Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 83, No. 2, pp. 397–410, 2011.

doi:10.1351/PAC-REP-10-06-02
© 2011 IUPAC, Publication date (Web): 14 January 2011

Isotopic compositions of the elements 2009
(IUPAC Technical Report)*
Michael Berglund1,‡ and Michael E. Wieser2
1European

Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials
and Measurements (IRMM), Belgium; 2Department of Physics and Astronomy,
University of Calgary, Canada
Abstract: The Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) of the
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) completed its last update of the
isotopic compositions of the elements as determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry in
2009. That update involved a critical evaluation of the published literature and forms the
basis of the table of the isotopic compositions of the elements (TICE) presented here. For
each element, TICE includes evaluated data from the “best measurement” of the isotope
abundances in a single sample, along with a set of representative isotope abundances and
uncertainties that accommodate known variations in normal terrestrial materials. The representative isotope abundances and uncertainties generally are consistent with the standard
atomic weight of the element Ar(E) and its uncertainty U[Ar(E)] recommended by CIAAW
in 2007.
Keywords: atomic weights; critical evaluation; elements; isotopic composition; isotope abundance; IUPAC Inorganic Chemistry Division; uncertainty.
INTRODUCTION
The Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (CIAAW) of the International Union of
Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has provided regular assessments of the standard atomic weights
and isotopic compositions of the elements [1]. CIAAW has evaluated the isotopic composition of each
element by examining carefully the most accurate and precise isotope-abundance measurements of the
element in selected samples through its Subcommittee for Isotopic Abundance Measurements (SIAM),
and by compiling evidence for known variations in the isotope abundances of the element in normal terrestrial materials, through its Subcommittee on Natural Isotopic Fractionation (SNIF). By “normal”,
CIAAW refers to terrestrial occurrences that satisfy the following criterion:
The material is a reasonably possible source for this element or its compounds in commerce, for industry or science; the material is not itself studied for some extraordinary
anomaly and its isotopic composition has not been modified significantly in a geologically
brief period. [2]
The results of these investigations are important for a number of reasons, including the evaluated
best measurements indicate the state of the metrology of isotope-abundance measurements, the best
measurements provide benchmark data for isotopic reference materials, and the combination of best

*Sponsoring body: IUPAC Inorganic Chemistry Division, Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights: see more
details on page 408.
‡Corresponding author

397

. m modified isotopic compositions may be found in commercially available material that has been subjected to an undisclosed or inadvertent isotope fractionation. As they are not reported in any uniform manner in the literature. giving an “absolute” result within the “uncertainty” stated in the original publication. 2. The table of the isotopic compositions of the elements was produced by CIAAW to accompany the 2007 table of standard atomic weights of the elements (TSAW) [3]. Entries in TSAW 2007 [3] are based on the atomic masses of the nuclides [4. or “3s” indicates l. Explanation of the annotations. 83. and “se” indicates standard error (standard deviation of the mean). r range in isotopic composition of normal terrestrial material prevents more precise values (for column 9) to be given. as follows: Column l: Column 2: Column 3: Column 4: Column 5: Column 6: The elements are tabulated in ascending order of atomic number (Z). 2. [1] and Coplen et al. which are indicated with a “g” in Column 5. Substantial deviations from the listed isotopic compositions can occur (refers to column 9). e. 397–410. Additional supporting data and background information can be found in de Laeter et al. Note that the annotations apply to all isotopes of a given element.. The symbols for the elements (E) are listed using the abbreviations recommended by IUPAC. g geologically exceptional specimens are known in which the element has an isotopic composition outside the reported range. The values are reproduced or calculated by CIAAW from the original literature. IUPAC Pure Appl. pp. The table consists of 9 columns. Vol. BERGLUND AND M. No. based on data evaluated by CIAAW published 2009. The limits given may not include those of certain exceptional samples. Coplen et al. [7. The tabulated values should be applicable to any normal material. or 3 standard deviations. “F” is appended when calibrated mixtures have been used to correct for isotope fractionation but the measurement fails to fulfill all of the requirements of a “C” measurement. WIESER 398 measurements and documented variations serve as the basis for the determination of the standard atomic weights of the elements.M. “P” indicates some other “uncertainty” as defined by the author.8]. “2s”. 2011 . The table of the isotopic compositions of the elements was produced by CIAAW to accompany the table of standard atomic weights of the elements [3]. “N” is appended when none of the above requirements are met. “C” is appended when calibrated mixtures have been used to correct the mass spectrometer for bias. “L” is appended when the linearity of the mass spectrometer has been established for the relevant abundance ratios by using synthetic mixtures of isotopes or certified reference materials. The previous table of the isotopic compositions of the elements was published in 2005 [6]. The uncertainties on the last digits are given in parentheses. The table is intended to include data for normal terrestrial materials and does not include published values for meteoritic or other extraterrestrial materials.g. The mass number (A) for each isotope that can be found in normal terrestrial material. [8]). E. Range of natural variations No data are given in this column unless a range has been reliably established (see.5]. “ls”. The best measurement from a single terrestrial source. following CIAAW deliberations in 2003. © 2011. This report presents an updated table of the isotopic compositions of the elements as evaluated by SIAM and SNIF in the period July 2005 to July 2009. Chem.

924 11(24) [11] IRMM-016* IAEA NIST IRMM 1 [12] [0. pp.000 001 34(3) 0. such as assessment of isotope-dependent properties.927 86 4 Be 9 Annotations Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 5 g. Representative isotopic composition. samples with precisely known isotopic compositions (such as those listed in column 8) should be used or suitable isotopic analyses should be made.000 184 2 He 3 4 4.000 041 0. in the opinion of CIAAW.999 959–1 3 Li 6 7 0. the sum of the isotope mole fractions may not equal l. represent the isotopic composition of chemicals and/or natural materials that are likely to be encountered in the laboratory.. No. Reference for the best measurement in column 6. the best measurement was made on a substance that was not a recognized reference material. the sample used for the “best measurement” may represent any part of the range. but those values may not represent the most abundant materials and it is possible that no real sample exists having the exact values listed. they may not necessarily correspond to the best measurements.000 115(70)b 0. it is just the best measurement available.000 026–0. IUPAC Pure Appl.m. Column 7: Column 8: Column 9: Table 1 Isotopic compositions of the elements 2009.000 001 343(13) 1s C 0. c) Because the data are reproduced from the literature. 83. 2.999 844 26(5) 2s C 0. 397–410. nor is it necessarily calibrated.999 816–0.999 998 66(3) (in air) 0.999 998 657(13) [10] Air* 0.077 14 0. Vol. Users should be aware of the following: a) Values in column 9 can be used to determine the average properties of the element in materials of unspecified natural terrestrial origin. Available reference materialsa 7 8 Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 0. The expanded uncertainties listed in parentheses include the range of probable isotope-abundance variations among different materials as well as measurement uncertainties. Z E Mass number Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 1 2 3 1 H 1 2 0. In this column are listed the isotopic reference materials that were used for the best measurements given in column 6 (with asterisk) and agencies that distribute additional isotopic reference materials (see Section “Sources of isotopic reference materials”).075 89(24) 2s C 0. b) When precise work is to be undertaken.r Ref. for elements with known isotope-abundance variations.0759(4)]c [0.000 155 74(5) [9] VSMOW* IAEA NIST 0.922 75–0. however. b) If a range of isotope-abundance ratios has been established for an element.6 × 10–10–0.Isotopic compositions of the elements 2009 399 Users should be aware of the following: a) A “best measurement” is not necessarily free of systematic errors.9241(4)] 1 (continues on next page) © 2011. 2011 .999 885(70) 0. In this column are listed the values that.r g.999 974 0.m. These values generally are consistent with the standard atomic weights [3].r g. If no asterisk is given. Chem.072 25–0.

Z E Mass number 1 2 3 Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 Annotations Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 5 5 B 10 11 0.242 29(45) [24] NISTSRM975* IRMM 0.801(7) g. No.003 64(20) 0.9051 0.7576(10) 0.789 58–0.0107(8) 0.030 82–0.810 71 g.002 0004(5)e [16.046 92 0.0171 0. IUPAC Pure Appl.r 0.000 40 0.0920–0.M.000 629(7) 0.007 93 0. BERGLUND AND M.995 79–0.011 47 7 N 14 15 8 O 16 17 18 9 F 19 10 Ne 20 21 22 11 Na 23 12 Mg 24 25 26 13 Al 27 14 Si 28 29 30 15 P 31 16 S 32 33 34 36 0. pp. E.m 0.189 29–0.996 36(20) 0.000 6289(12) 0.000 37–0. 2.0027(1) 0.099 96–0.756 44–0.100 03(9) 0.030 8716(32) [22] 1 [12] 0.790 17 0.031 02 r g.r 1 Air* 0.004 21 g.996 337(4)d P C 0.110 30 0.002 05(14) 1 [18] 0.996 54 0.r 17 Cl 35 37 0.0996 g.922 41 0.067 3022(292) [26] NISTSRM985* 0.0001(1) 0.8847–0.1101(3) 1 IAEA IRMM NIST 0.002 22 g.000 145 79(89) [23] IAEA-S1* IAEA NIST IRMM 0.997 57(16) 0.922 23(19) 0.240 77–0.990 37 0.203 86 0.001 88–0.932 5811(292) 2s C 0.243 56 g. WIESER 400 Table 1 (Continued). 397–410.0075(2) 0.100 12 0.r 0.997 6206(5)e 1s N 0.997 38–0.0925(3) (in air) 1 NISTSRM980* IRMM 0.1982(2) 2s C 0. 83.000 38(1) 0.003 336(21) 0.997 76 0.092 465(90) [19] 1 [20] 0.011 078(28) [14] NBS 19* IAEA NIST 0.1000(1) 0.110 05(19) [21] 1 [20] 0.109 87–0.046 8316(32) 0.759 23 0.944 54–0.000 117(1) 0. Chem.007 4869(60) 0.9893(8) 0.009 63–0.9048(3) 0.047 34 0..030 92(11) 1 (continues on next page) © 2011.996 0350(42) [25] Air* 0.000 3790(9)e 0.2424(10) 0.8018(2) [13] IRMM-011* NIST IRMM BAM 0.904 838(90) 1s C 0.003 663(4)d [15] Air* IAEA NIST 0.r 6 C 12 13 0.932 581(44) 0.046 85(8) 0.m.067 302(44) 0. Available reference materialsa 7 8 Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 0.9499(26) 0.002 696(5) 0.199(7) 0.r 18 Ar 36 38 40 19 K 39 40 41 Ref.796 14–0.7899(4) 0.007 30–0.789 92(25) 2s C 0.0027–0. 2011 .000 13–0.r 0.041 9599(66) 0.003 46–0.m.988 922(28) P C 0.757 71(45) 2s C 0.046 78–0. Vol.996 035(25)h (in air) 0.988 53–0.922 05–0.000 116 72(41) 0.950 4074(88) 2s C 0.0425(24) 0.952 81 0.003 3361(35) 1s F 0.000 19 g.039 76–0.922 2968(44) 2s C 0.17] VSMOW* IAEA NIST 0.

006 106(11) [35] IRMM3702* IRMM 0.001 35(10) 0.680 769(59) 2s C 0.020 86(4) 0.054 09(10) 0.006 46–0.000 04(3) 0.002 82 0.601 08(9) 0.001 35(2) 0.006 48 0.023 91 0.002 819(27) [32] 27 Co 59 1 [12] 28 Ni 58 60 61 62 64 r 0.021 16–0.023 65–0. No.001 35–0.043 45 0.011 399(13) 0.058 37–0.002 81–0.997 503(6) [30] 0.023 65(7) 1 IRMM-014* IRMM 0.691 74(20) 2s C 0.398 921(62) [36] NISTSRM994* 0.837 89(18) 0.277 31(11) 0.095 006(110) 0.308 26(20) [34] NISTSRM976* IRMM 0.002 50(4) 0.001 87(1) [27] 45 1 [28] 1 Ti 46 47 48 49 50 0.023 647(48) [31] 25 Mn 55 1 [12] 26 Fe 54 56 57 58 0.969 47 0.021 21 0.001 87(21) 0.002 497(6) 1s F 0. IUPAC Pure Appl.000 04 0.036 345(11) 0.7372(3) 0.009 255(19) 29 Cu 63 65 r 0. Z E Mass number 1 2 3 20 Ca 40 42 43 44 46 48 21 Sc 22 Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 0.058 45(23) 2s C 0. 83.020 86(110) 0.2773(98) 0.001 35 0.043 452(85) 2s C 0.002 502 0.021 191(65) 0.601 079(62) 2s C 0.262 23(15) 0. 2.000 04–0.680 77(19) 0.095 53 0.040 401(18) 0.969 41(156)h 0. 2011 .074 37(14) 0.693 38 0.837 90 0.917 42–0. Vol.917 54(36) 0.1845(63) 0.002 487–0.011 399(4) 0.689 83–0.036 346(40) 0.009 256(6) [33] NISTSRM986* 0. Available reference materialsa 7 8 0.262 231(51) 0.997 498–0.0541(2) 0.491 704(83) 2s C 0.002 82(4) 1 (continues on next page) © 2011.917 54(24) 0.001 86–0.4917(75) 0..043 45(13) 0.0061(10) 31 Ga 69 71 0.000 04(1) 0.6915(15) 0.737 20(22) 0.Isotopic compositions of the elements 2009 401 Table 1 (Continued).021 19(10) 0.997 513 0.058 61 0.997 50(4) 24 Cr 50 52 53 54 0.969 41(6) 2s N 0.969 33–0.001 88 Annotations Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 5 g Ref.398 92(9) 0.095 01(17) 0.020 92 0. 397–410. pp.310 17 NISTSRM915* Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 NISTSRM979* IRMM 0.0825(3) 0.184 483(69) 0.306 62–0.006 47(3) 0.837 895(117) 0. Chem.0404(16) 0.082 49(21) 2s C 0.051 85(13) [29] 0.3085(15) 30 Zn 64 66 67 68 70 r 0.006 47(23) 0.917 60 0.0518(2) 23 V 50 51 0.042 94–0.837 62–0.095 01–0.058 45(35) 0.0744(2) 0.020 82–0.

087 31(10) [38] 0.237 72(20) 0.076 35(10) 0.0937(29) 0.5069(7) 0.091 514(74) 0.077 31(40) [37] 0.2783(2) 38 Sr 84 86 87 88 g.1453(30) 0.022 8560(96) 0. Z E Mass number 1 2 3 32 Ge 70 72 73 74 76 0.0873(22) 35 Br 79 81 0.7217(2) 0.m 0. IUPAC Pure Appl. pp. 2.145 25(15)o 0.0763(16) 0.166 72(19) 0.093 66(18) 0.514 52(9) 2s N 0.2439(37) 0.0694–0.1715(8) 0.0055–0.0280(9) 41 Nb 93 1 [20] 1 [45] 0.2745(11) 0.172 790(32) [40] 37 Rb 85 87 g 0.569 877(58) 0..278 346(132) [41] NISTSRM984* IRMM 0.172 79(41) (in air) – (continues on next page) © 2011.1584(11) 0.115 93(31) 0.077 50(40) 0.8229–0.0775(12) 0.4961(41) 0.098 24(50) – 1s F Ref.365 03(67) 0.022 86(10) 0.5145(40) 0. WIESER 402 Table 1 (Continued).8275 92 94 95 96 97 98 100 Tc Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 g g 0.1122(5) 0.003 55(3) 0. 2011 .493 14(26) [39] 36 Kr 78 80 82 83 84 86 g.496 07(17) 0.0975–0.158 375(98) 0.506 86(26) 2s C 0.115 930(62) 0.114 996(58) 0.0982(31) 42 43 Mo Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 Annotations 5 r 0.r 0.8258(1) 39 Y 89 1 [43] 1 40 Zr 90 91 92 94 96 0. 397–410.1738(28) 0.0986(1) 0.2057(27) 0.2745(32) 0.003 5518(32) 2s C 0. Chem.2377(28) 0.3650(20) 0.0960(14) 0. E.0058 0.095 991(73) 0.721 654(132) 2s C 0.M.112 23(12) 0.1667(15) 0.005 574(16) 2s C 0. No.825 845(66) [42] NISTSRM987* NIST IRMM 0.0700(1)h 0.070 015(26) 0. Vol.115 00(19) 0.027 99(5) [44] 0.243 91(18) 0.205 69(90) 1s C 0.0773(12) 33 As 75 1 [12] 1 34 Se 74 76 77 78 80 82 0.171 46(7) 0.0999 0. Available reference materialsa 7 8 NISTSRM977* Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 0.569 87(15) 0.0056(1) 0. 83.098 566(34) 0. BERGLUND AND M.0714 0.008 89(3) 1s N 0.0089(4) 0.1738(12) 0.4931(7) 0.0915(9) 0.

52] 0.0097(1) 0.0474(14) 0.1276(14) 0.01020(8) 2s C 0.000 96(1)i 2se N 0.057 89(17) [51.009 08(1)i 0.170 600(10) 0.325 93(20) 0. No.046 29(9) 0.2233(5) 0.1454(9) 0.2422(9) 0.1884(25) 0.3155(14) 0.085 85(13) 0.4279(5) 52 Te 120 122 123 124 125 126 128 130 g 0. 2.337 99(3)i [54] 0.3408(62) (continues on next page) © 2011. Available reference materialsa 7 8 Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 0.0429(5) 0.1172(6) [47] 0.009 73(3) 1s C 0.127 579(6) 0.2733(3) 0.0125(6) 0.2413(7) 0.2413(21) 0. Vol. 397–410. Z E Mass number 1 2 3 44 Ru 96 98 99 100 101 102 104 45 Rh 103 46 Pd 102 104 105 106 108 110 47 Ag 48 Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 Annotations Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 5 g Ref.055 420(1) 1s N 0.2646(6) 0.1172(9) 107 109 g 0.0102(1) 0.518 392(51) 2s C 0.1280(4) 0.518 39(8) 0.186 210(11) [46] 0.1862(27) 1 [12] 1 g 0.3258(9) 0.048 16(2)i 0. Chem.018 688(2) 0.071 39(2)i 0.0009(1) 0.0089(3) 0.0463(3) 0.042 88(5) 2s N 0.242 23(30) 0.1249(6) 0.125 985(4) 0. 2011 .2233(8) 0.1260(7) 0.316 87(4)i 0.003 39(3)f 0.1222(12) 0.0749(18) 49 In 113 115 0..2873(42) 0.1222(4) 0.0125(2) 2s F 0.0768(7) 0.0749(6) [49] IRMM BAM 0.315 519(11) 0.1114(5) 0.189 52(4)i 0.2873(14) 0.0034(1) 0.1706(2) 0.0859(4) 0.957 12(5) [50] 0.481 608(51) [48] NISTSRM978* 0.5721(5) 0.076 76(22) 0.0066(1) 0.0089(3) 0.0089(1) 0.1280(12) 0.0187(3) 0.Isotopic compositions of the elements 2009 403 Table 1 (Continued).3174(8) 0. 83.145 36(31) 0.0707(15) 0. IUPAC Pure Appl.026 03(1)i 0.427 87(32) [53] 0.9571(5) 50 Sn 112 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 122 124 g 0.572 13(32) 2s C 0.2646(9) 0. pp.2733(2) 0.481 61(8) Cd 106 108 110 111 112 113 114 116 g 0.1249(18) 0.0554(14) 0.006 59(3)f 0.1114(8) 0.0579(5) 51 Sb 121 123 g 0.0255(12) 0.

002 51–0. WIESER 404 Table 1 (Continued).088 573(44) [56] 0.716 99(7) [57] 0.111 14(51) 59 Pr 141 1 [43] 1 60 Nd 142 143 144 145 146 148 150 0.478 10(42) 2se C 0. Z E Mass number 1 2 3 53 I 127 54 Xe 124 126 128 129 130 131 132 134 136 55 Cs 56 Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 Annotations Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 5 Ref.0307(7) 0.082 93(12) 0.227 520(68) [61] 0.001 86 0.065 92(12) 0. 83.884 49 0.104 357(21) 0.M.264 006(82) 0.121 74(26)h 0.1124(10) 0.019 102(8) 0.884 46–0.237 98(19) 0. 2.019 102(8) 0.111 14–0.111 14 g – – (continues on next page) © 2011.212 324(30) 0.999 1119(71) 58 Ce 136 138 140 142 g 0.024 17(18) 0.001 85(2) 0.5219(6) g.0738(1) 0.001 85–0. IUPAC Pure Appl.m 0.000 952(3) 0.521 90(42) [62] 0. No.716 98(42) 57 La 138 139 g 0.024 17(3) 0.104 357(21) 0. 397–410. Vol.4781(6) 0.057 56(21) 0.2675(16) 0.. Chem.001 01(1) 0.121 73(18) 0.078 54(24) 0.112 32(4) 0.078 53(4) 0.171 89(17) 0.884 49(34) 0.040 710(13) 0.269 086(33) 0.000 952(3) 3s C 0.002 51(1) 0.030 734(9) 2s F 0.1499(18) 0.2275(29) 63 Eu 151 153 g 0.056 38(28) 61 Pm 62 Sm 144 147 148 149 150 152 154 g 0.001 058(2) 3se F 0.001 86(1) 2s C 0.111 14(34) [59] 0.000 890(2) 0.138 189(18) 0.212 324(30) 0.001 012(2) 0.002 51(2)h 0.000 8881(71) 0.267 421(66) 0.082 93(7) 0.056 38(9) [60] 0. 2011 .000 8881(24) 2s N 0.112 32(24) 0.065 92(2) 0.149 934(18) 0.040 710(13) 0.1382(7) 0. E.264 006(82) 0.000 890(2) 0. pp. BERGLUND AND M.112 406(15) 0.271 53(19) 2s C 0.237 98(12) 0.171 89(32) 0.001 06(1) 0.002 54 0.884 50(51) 0.271 52(40) 0. Available reference materialsa 7 8 Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 1 [55] 1 0.999 1119(24) [58] 0.088 573(44) (in air) 133 1 [20] 1 Ba 130 132 134 135 136 137 138 0.057 56(8) 0.269 086(33) 0.073 796(14) 0.

Vol.335 03(36) 0. Available reference materialsa 7 8 Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 0.269 852(120) 0.228 69(9) 0.029 82(39) 0.0218(3) 0.000 1201(32) 0.029 82(6) 0.216 86(19) 0.999 8799(8) [69] 0.136 19–0. IUPAC Pure Appl. Z E Mass number 1 2 3 64 Gd 152 154 155 156 157 158 160 65 Tb 159 66 Dy 156 158 160 161 162 163 164 67 Ho 165 68 Er 162 164 166 167 168 170 69 Tm 169 70 Yb 168 170 171 172 173 174 176 71 Lu 175 176 72 Hf 174 176 177 178 179 180 73 Ta 74 W Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 Annotations Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 5 g Ref.001 620(9) 2se N 0.001 391(30) 2s C 0.0016(1) 0.248 347(16) 0.3508(16) 180 181 0.1362(2) 0.001 232(4) 2s F 0.3064(2) 0.Isotopic compositions of the elements 2009 405 Table 1 (Continued).1363 0.974 01(13) 0.025 99(13) 0.000 56(3) 0.204 664(6) 0.186 06 0.2484(7) 0.320 25(12) 0.129 96(83) g 0.306 422(13) 0. pp.185 953(12) 0.264 985(49) 0.136 210(9) 0.350 76–0.156 518(9) 0.052 71 0.1480(12) 0.1860(9) 0. 2.025 987(12) [67] 0.000 95(2) 0.000 95(3) 0. 2011 .272 811(22) 0.254 75(36) 0.0526(7)h 0.272 78–0.254 75(24) 0.974 013(12) 2s N 0.248 96(28) 0.351 (continues on next page) © 2011.248 96(42) 0.001 39(5) 0.023 29(18) 0.185 93–0.023 29(12) 0.161 03(63) 0.272 97 0..140 9(14) 0.0012(1) 0.161 03(9) 0.1565(2) 0.218 635(7) [63] 0.2826(36) [64] 0.147 998(17) 0.2843(19) g g 0.140 86(20) 0.052 06–0.216 8(13) 0.129 95(13) [66] 0.001 198(2) 1s N 0.284 259(62) [70] 0.021 809(4) 0.016 01(3) 0.001 619–0.188 89(28) 0.149 013(240) [65] 0.2728(7) 0.002 029(4) 2se N 0. No.052 604(56) 0.2047(9) 0.269 78(18) 0. Chem.282 60(54) 1 [43] 1 0.001 621 0.228 724(60) 0.149 10(36) 1 [43] 1 g 0.999 8799(32) 180 182 183 184 186 0.1431(4) 0.2650(16) 0.350 802(26) [68] 0.143 136(6) 0.2186(19) 1 [43] 1 0. 83. 397–410.000 1201(8) 2s L 0.188 89(42) 0.001 23(3) 0.320 26(80) 0.016 006(20) 0.000 56(2) 2s C 0.335 014(240) 0.0020(1) 0.

019 644(12) 0.241(1)h 0.294 94–0..1762–0.627(2) Pt 190 192 194 195 196 198 0.0196(2)h 0. 397–410.0687(15) 81 Tl 203 205 0.007 818(80) 0.524(1)h 83 Bi 209 1 [12] 84 Po 85 At 86 Rn 87 Fr 88 Ra 89 Ac 90 Th 232 1 [78] 91 Pa 231 1 [79] g g.000 12(2) 0.M.373(2) 0. Available reference materialsa 7 8 0.099 68(13) 0.0997(20) 0.014(1) 0.7048(1) 82 Pb 204 206 207 208 0.000 197(5) 1s N 0.0165 0.2084–0. pp.372 72(15) 1s N 0. BERGLUND AND M.2365 0.704 72–0.5128–0.373 98(16) 2s C 0. WIESER 406 Table 1 (Continued).705 06 0.298 63(33) 0.2986(26) 0.2310(19) 0.328 6(14) 0.626 02(16) [71] 0.328 6(40) 0.252 1(34) 0.523 481(86) [77] NISTSRM981* NIST 0.704 76(9) [76] NISTSRM997* IRMM 0.627 28(15) [73] 0.241 447(57) 0.073 56(43) [74] 79 Au 197 1 [12] 80 Hg 196 198 199 200 201 202 204 0.221(1)h 0.295 28 0.5621 0.131 81(13) 0.2748 0. Vol.000 1172(58) 1s F 0.014 245(12) 2s C 0.007 82(24) 0.3740(2) 0. 2.6260(2) 0.1324(8) 0.r g NISTSRM989* Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 IRMM-010* 0.132 434(19) 0.262 584(14) 0.0159(3) 0.4078(19) 191 193 0.073 56(130) 1 1 IRMM 1 1 (continues on next page) © 2011.337 8(24) 0.1318(9) 0. E.1615(5) 0.407 815(22) [72] 0.168 73(17) 0. 2011 .2952(1) 0.252 10(11) 0.0015(1) 0.015 859(44) 0.0002(1) 0. No. 83.0104–0.2626(2) 0.337 75(79) 0.001 5344(19) 1s N 0. Chem.295 24(9) 2s C 0.068 65(7) [75] IRMM NRC-CNRC 0.230 96(26) 0.1687(22) 0. IUPAC Pure Appl. Z E Mass number 1 2 3 75 Re 185 187 76 Os 184 186 187 188 189 190 192 77 Ir 78 Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 Annotations Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 5 Ref.220 827(27) 0.161 466(16) 0.

145 246(15). Available reference materialsa 7 8 Representative isotopic composition (mole fraction) 9 IRMM-184* IRMM NBL [0. In the case of Li. far removed from the natural value. iAn electron multiplier was used for the Te measurements and the measured abundances were adjusted by using a “square root of the masses” correction factor.992 745(10) Ref.nbl. USA <http://www. dCIAAW recommends that a value of 272 be employed for N(14N)/N(15N) of N in air where N is the number fraction.nist. bTank hydrogen has reported 2H mole fractions as low as 0.000 032. Austria <http://www. Vienna. eThe best measurement was derived by combining independent analyses of the N(18O/16O) and N(17O/16O) ratios in VSMOW.Isotopic compositions of the elements 2009 407 Table 1 (Continued). cMaterials depleted in 6Li and 235U are commercial sources of laboratory shelf reagents.doe. for the 2 calculation of the mole fraction of 15N from measured (15N) values. it should be 0. Z E Mass number 1 2 3 92 U 234 235 238 Observed range of natural variations (mole fraction) 4 0.eu/html/reference_materials_catalogue> U. Stop 2300 Gaithersburg. 83.007 198–0.O. IUPAC Isotope Hydrology Laboratory International Atomic Energy Agency Room No. Box 100 A-1400.org/programmes/aqcs/> Standard Reference Materials® Program NIST 100 Bureau Drive. 397–410. SOURCES OF ISOTOPIC REFERENCE MATERIALS IAEA NIST IRMM NBL © 2011.. Chem.145 25(15). pp. 2. such samples are known to have 6Li mole fractions in the range of 0.000 054(5)] [0.020 07 to 0. Vol. IL 60439. MD 20899-2300. SIAM found that the best measurement of the isotope-amount abundance of 92Mo published in [44] is incorrect. USA <http://ts.gov/measurementservices/referencematerials> European Commission Joint Research Centre Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements Reference Materials Unit ATTN: Reference Materials Sales Retieseweg 111 B-2440 Geel.007 204(6)]c [0.992 752 Annotations 5 g.000 059 0. the 235U mole fractions are reported to range from 0.007 207. but based on data that appears in the paper. Department of Energy New Brunswick Laboratory.000 050–0.ec.htm> Pure Appl.iaea. G-162 P. hThe abundance of this radiogenic isotope may vary substantially. No. IRMM materials previously were labeled CBNM.gov/htm/certified_reference_materials. fThe original data for Sn were adjusted to account for possible errors due to 115In contamination.S. 350 ATTN: Reference Materials Sales 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne.jrc.007 200(1) 0. It appears as 0.europa. Bldg.076 72. In the case of U.m Best measurement from a single terrestrial source (mole fraction) 6 0.992 739–0. and an error in the 114Sn abundance. An asterisk (*) indicates the reference material used for the best measurement (column 6). oDuring its biennial evaluation in 2007. Belgium <http://irmm. 2011 .000 054 20(42) 2s C 0.0021 to 0. with natural materials at the higher end of this range.007 207 0.992 742(10)] [80] aNIST materials previously were labeled NBS.

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