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Preface

Royal Canadian Mounted Police incompetence reigns supreme: Clifford Olson Air India Robert Picton Etc. What the Royal Canadian Mounted Police can’t fabricate, they lie about: Staff Sgt. Ross Spenard Robert Dziekanski killing Etc. References courtesy of the Fair Use Act.

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Index Chapter 1 “IT’S ABOUT HOW THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE BUNGLED THE CASE OF THE NOTORIOUS SERIAL KILLER CLIFFORD OLSON” Chapter 2 THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE “DIDN’T LIKE BEING TOLD WHAT TO DO” Chapter 3 ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE “ARROGANCE IN BUNGLING PICTON CASE”

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Chapter 4 40 “AIR INDIA FAMILIES WAIT 25 YEARS FOR ANSWERS FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE” Chapter 5 44 WHAT IDIOT ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE OFFICER SLEEPS WITH A POTENTIAL WINESS IN THE SURREY SIX MASSACRE CASE? Chapter 6 60 RCMP STAFF SGT ROSS SPENARD THOUGHT HE HAD COVERED HIS TRACKS BY SHREDDING DOCUMENTS, HE WAS WRONG! Chapter 7 BEWARE POLISH IMMIGRANTS, IF THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE CAN’T KILL YOU OUTRIGHT AND GET AWAY WITH IT THEY WILL LIE ABOUT IT? Chapter 8 LET’S LIE ABOUT THE KILLING OF ROBERT DZIEKANSKI!!! 67

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Chapter 9 89 BRITISH COLUMBIA CHIEF JUDGE SAID ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE CONST DONOVAN TAIT’S STORY ISN’T CREDIBLE !! Chapter 10 96 ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE TOO BUSY HARASSING FEMALE OFFICERS TO CONCENTRATE ON NOTORIOUS CASES? Chapter 11 98 WHAT DID THE ROYAL CANADIAN RATS DO TO THIS OTHER LITTLE GUY, TERRY MALLENBY??? Chapter 12 117 ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE COMMISSIONER ROBERT PAULSON USE A RAT BY THE NAME OF SANFU CHEN TO UPLOAD THEIR 40 YEAR OLD LIES ABOUT TERRY MALLENBY BECAUSE HE SUCCESSFULLY SUED THEM!!!!

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Chapter 1 “IT’S ABOUT HOW THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE BUNGLED THE CASE OF THE NOTORIOUS SERIAL KILLER CLIFFORD OLSON” As cited, “Nick has the lead role in this Canadian TV movie, set to film in Calgary and air on CTV sometime during the 2001-2002 season. A British co-production based on the book Where Shadows Linger1, it's about how the RCMP bungled the case of notorious serial killer Clifford Olson” [see Appendix 5a to 5e, cited below]. As further cited, “RCMP Superintendent Bruce Northorp was the office in charge of the Olson hunt at the time of his arrest in 1981. His full review of the case clearly shows that the RCMP investigation of the Olson affair was plagued by its own internal problems and personalities.” As cited, “Clifford Robert Olson Jr. was born on January 1st, 1940 at St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, B.C. In his teenage years, he did crimes like B&E's, robberies, theft, etc.”2 “While in B.C. Pen in 1974, sexually attacked a 17-year-old fellow inmate. After being released he indecently assaulted a 7-year-old girl in Nova Scotia. This was the beginning of his sexually deviant and murderous criminal activity.”3 “During those seven years Olson’s prison style changed. To some he was known as ‘Bobo,’ a man who viciously ‘muscled’ or buggered young inmates. To others he became knows as ‘The Senator.’ This was because he honed his cell-room lawyer’s skills, by writing incessantly to both federal and provincial politicians with a barrage of complaints about prison conditions. He was also a `stoolie’, a person who would inform on anyone for any reason. This trait made him unpopular with both inmates and guards and he eventually needed protective custody.”4 Olson was moved to the Super Maximum Unit (SMU), commonly known as the Penthouse, the “rat and rapo” unit, where the most despised cons were housed. It was here that he met accused child-killer Gary Francis Marcoux.5 “A serial killer was on the loose and the people in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley region of British Columbia were gripped with fear. In
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the short time span, from November 1980 to July 1981, a number of children had gone missing, and were later found dead.”6 “Parents in suburban Vancouver complained that the police were not treating reports of the missing youths seriously enough.”7 The apparent rationale given, “the 200 Mounties [RCMP] in the Surrey detachment processed roughly 2000 missing-person cases and investigated some 18,000 criminal code offenses in those two years. Many of the juveniles turned out to be runaways, congregating on the Granville Street area downtown, while some stayed with friends or out partying past their curfew, without informing their parents. The police figured, ‘They’d turn up’ -- and for the most part they did.”8 The only problem with this RCMP explanation was that the missing children were mere toddlers? Incredibly, it took the disappearance of nine year old Simon Partington “that was the turning point in The Case of the Missing Lower Mainland Children. The RCMP could hardly list him as a runaway, given his young age and angelic-looking face. Police were sure that the slight, 4-foot-2inch, 80-pound boy had been abducted.”9 By the time Clifford Olson’s murderous spree was over, “Olson had killed 10 children in southern British Columbia and, by the time he was finished, 11 would be dead. It was not the largest body count in the occurrence of multiple murders in Canada --- the Olson murders caused the greatest terror and horror.”10 Footnotes 1. Based on the book, Where Shadows Linger by W. Leslie Holmes & Bruce Northrop, two Mounties involved in the original case, "The Investigation" is a co-production between Muse Entertainment Enterprises and Voice Pictures, produced by Bernard Zukerman, in association with CTV. 2 – 8. Clifford Olson - Murderer and Serial Killer http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:0VKWBNBQIUJ:www.allserialkillers.com/clifford_olson.htm+RCMP+bu ngle+clifford+olson+case&cd=12&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 9. Clifford Olson Victims - Victims of Clifford Olson

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http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:I81TJptFeqkJ:ww w.allserialkillers.com/clifford_olson_victims.htm+clifford+olson+victims &cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 10. Clifford Olson - Murderer and Serial Killer http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:0VKWBNBQIUJ:www.allserialkillers.com/clifford_olson.htm+RCMP+bu ngle+clifford+olson+case&cd=12&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

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Appendix 5a “It's about how the RCMP bungled the case of notorious serial killer Clifford Olson” Where Shadows Linger http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:5zQS45avAh0J: www.nicklea.com/investig.htm+RCMP+bungle+clifford+olson+case&cd =1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca Nick has the lead role in this Canadian TV movie, set to film in Calgary and air on CTV sometime during the 2001-2002 season. A British coproduction based on the book Where Shadows Linger, it's about how the RCMP bungled the case of notorious serial killer Clifford Olson. (The movie is about the investigation, not really about Olson; you don't even see Olson's face until the very end.) Nick plays Les Forsythe, a character based on Les Holmes, the exMountie who wrote a book revealing the tragic errors that let Olson kill several more victims before being arrested. The movie is likely to prove controversial, since it pulls some skeletons out of the RCMP closet. It will air sometime in 2002. Where Shadows Linger Press Release Les Holmes knew it would not be easy, but he was determined to bring closure to an event that had scarred so many. As this respected ex-Mountie dug into the records of Canada's most horrifying serial killer case to date, he found that shadows still lingered. The culmination of the author's research came when he interviewed an ex-RCMP member who had fingered Olson weeks before his arrest but whose discovery slipped between the cracks of jurisdiction. Five more teenagers died in the meantime. RCMP Superintendent Bruce Northorp was the office in charge of the Olson hunt at the time of his arrest in 1981. He kept quiet both during and after the horrific affair out of respect for the mourning parents and because of suspicions about the media's hidden agendas. He knew that one day he would have to set the record straight, and in this book he finally speaks out. His full review of the case clearly shows that the RCMP investigation of the Olson affair was plagued by its own internal problems and personalities.

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Appendix 5b “It's about how the RCMP bungled the case of notorious serial killer Clifford Olson” Also see: Jurisdictional mishmash hindering B.C. police forces By Lindsay Kines, Katie DeRosa and Jack Knox, Victoria Times Colonist September 22, 2010 http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:G9ZIaC4_3cQJ: www.theprovince.com/news/Jurisdictional%2Bmishmash%2Bhindering% 2Bpolice%2Bforces/3562093/story.html+rcmp+dispose+of+bodies&cd=5 &hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca VICTORIA — Thirty years ago, Clifford Olson began his killing frenzy of 11 children in British Columbia's Lower Mainland. Oblivious to police boundaries that criss-cross the Vancouver area, he roamed the region in search of young victims, raping, murdering and disposing of bodies from Agassiz to Whistler. Police, at times unaware of what their counterparts were doing in other detachments and departments, were slow to link the disappearances before eventually arresting him in 1981. The B.C. government resisted calls for a public inquiry and police and politicians vowed to do better in the future. Today, the policing map in the Lower Mainland and across B.C. looks much as it did during Olson's rampage. Multiple agencies still patrol metropolitan areas in the Vancouver and Victoria areas, jurisdictional barriers still thwart effective communication and the tragedies continue to mount. In September 2007, Peter Lee stabbed to death his six-year-old son Christian, his wife Sunny Park, and her parents Kum Lea Chun and Moon Kyu Park before taking his own life in the leafy Victoria enclave of Oak Bay. It was later revealed that in the weeks prior to the massacre, Park bounced among three police departments while trying to get help for spousal abuse. On the night of the murders, the grandmother's 911 call was handled by a maze of dispatchers, while dozens of police officers from Victoria, Saanich and Oak Bay responded to the call.

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Then, last month, the Vancouver Police Department released its Missing Women Investigation Review, which concluded that police likely could have caught serial killer Robert Pickton years earlier. In findings eerily reminiscent of the Olson case, Deputy Chief Doug LePard blamed jurisdictional barriers, poor management and shoddy analysis of information. One of the main problems was conflicting priorities. Vancouver police were under pressure to solve the case, but it was less of a priority for the Coquitlam RCMP, in whose jurisdiction Pickton resided. As a result, the detachment allowed the file to languish for months, LePard said. Now, growing numbers of current and retired police officers, criminologists and politicians say it's time for B.C. to put public safety ahead of politics and establish regional forces in major metropolitan areas. Former solicitor general Kash Heed, a former chief of the West Vancouver department, said it would be impossible "to find a more disturbing example anywhere in the world" than the investigative failures in the Pickton case. But he warned that similar problems will keep happening unless something gets done. "The RCMP have bosses that are beholden ... to Ottawa," he said. "You have municipal bosses that have their own little kingdoms. Albeit, I was one of them and you're only concerned about your area ... You only care, really, what happens within the boundaries of your jurisdiction." On the Lower Mainland alone, there are at least 15 RCMP and municipal police jurisdictions delivering service to two million people. In Greater Victoria, four municipal departments, three RCMP detachments and three 911 dispatch centres serve just 350,000 people. By contrast, Toronto's 2.6 million population is policed by a single force, as are all other major metropolitan areas in Canada. "It mystifies me," former Ottawa police chief Vince Bevan said of B.C.'s balkanized system. "It's beyond me how they can have these series of smaller departments, and think that they're meeting standards." The B.C. government and some police leaders counter that much has changed since the days of Olson, and even Pickton. They cite, in particular, the creation of integrated units that draw officers from different police agencies in a region to tackle a particular crime or problem, such as homicides, domestic abuse, traffic enforcement or gang violence.
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Clayton Pecknold, president of the B.C. Association of Police Chiefs, said the integrated units have "eliminated borders" between police departments. "It's now subject-matter based as opposed to based on a geographical area," said Pecknold, who is deputy chief of Central Saanich police. "That's why the border doesn't matter anymore." But critics say the integrated units only highlight the problems. With so many chiefs trying to find consensus on key crime-fighting issues, the units often take months to establish. They add more layers of bureaucracy, and attempt to blend the different RCMP and municipal cultures — sometimes with mixed results. Saanich police Chief Mike Chadwick, a 35-year veteran of the force and a staunch defender of the status quo, argues that individual municipalities have the right to "direct the level of service ... from their police department" and that municipal taxpayers should have a say on the type policing they want. "I'm not so sure if you had a regional department that would be the case," he said. "In Saanich, people pay for a service that we have provided for over 100 years now and they come to expect that. "Saanich taxpayers don't expect to pay for what goes on downtown." But Victoria police Chief Jamie Graham, a strong proponent of police regionalization, thought the jurisdictional confusion around the Oak Bay murder-suicide would be the impetus needed to force regionalization on the Lower Island. Graham, who also served as chief of the Vancouver police, said it simply makes sense to have a regional force chasing and apprehending criminals that don't respect political boundaries. "This isn't about cost," he said. "This is about the ability to deploy more effectively." He said Victoria police continue to be crushed under the weight of policing a downtown core which is the destination of club-hoppers, concert or festival goers and of course, criminals, many of whom live in the surrounding municipalities.

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The department's 241 officers have the highest case load among municipal police officers in the region and Graham said he would have to hire 60 officers to reach the provincial standard. Graham noted that, under a regional model, a single chief would have the ability to deploy resources where they are needed most. If there were a brawl downtown or a major crime in Oak Bay, police officers, including those with specialized training, would be able to flood the area and control the situation.

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Appendix 5c Clifford Olson - Murderer and Serial Killer Clifford Olson - Murderer and Serial Killer http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:0VKWBNBQIUJ:www.allserialkillers.com/clifford_olson.htm+RCMP+bu ngle+clifford+olson+case&cd=12&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca Clifford Olson Clifford Robert Olson Jr. was born on January 1st, 1940 at St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, B.C. In his teenage years, he did crimes like B&E's, robberies, theft, etc. While in B.C. Pen in 1974, sexually attacked a 17-year-old fellow inmate. After being released he indecently assaulted a 7-year-old girl in Nova Scotia. This was the beginning of his sexually deviant and murderous criminal activity. “During those seven years Olson’s prison style changed. To some he was known as ‘Bobo,’ a man who viciously ‘muscled’ or buggered young inmates. To others he became known as ‘The Senator.’ This was because he honed his cell-room lawyer’s skills, by writing incessantly to both federal and provincial politicians with a barrage of complaints about prison conditions. He was also a `stoolie’, a person who would inform on anyone for any reason. This trait made him unpopular with both inmates and guards and he eventually needed protective custody.” Olson was moved to the Super Maximum Unit (SMU), commonly known as the Penthouse, the “rat and rapo” unit, where the most despised cons were housed. It was here that he met accused child-killer Gary Francis Marcoux Olson was arrested for impaired driving and for contributing to juvenile delinquency. He crashed his car with his 16-year-old female passenger in Agassiz, a farming hamlet in the Valley about an hour from Vancouver. Olson had picked her up in the Cottonwood Avenue and North Road area of Coquitlam, Daryn Johnsrude and Olson’s neighborhood Although the young girl could not be convinced that Olson was a sex offender, she did tell the police that he had offered her a job, had bought her drinks and given her pills. She palmed one of the tiny emerald knockout pills, later giving it to the police. The laboratory identified it as chloral hydrate, commonly known as knock-out drops or a Mickey Finn
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A serial killer was on the loose and the people in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley region of British Columbia were gripped with fear. In the short time span, from November 1980 to July 1981, a number of children had gone missing, and were later found dead. Parents in suburban Vancouver complained that the police were not treating reports of the missing youths seriously enough. The 200 Mounties in the Surrey detachment processed roughly 2000 missing-person cases and investigated some 18,000 criminal code offenses in those two years. Many of the juveniles turned out to be runaways, congregating on the Granville Street area downtown, while some stayed with friends or out partying past their curfew, without informing their parents. The police figured, “They’d turn up” -- and for the most part they did. Under surveillance, Olson was not easy to follow. The “watchers” claimed that he would stop in the middle of the street, make sudden inexplicable U-turns, and go down one-way alleys, stop, and reverse. He also had a habit of continually changing rental cars: a Pinto, a Mustang, a Bobcat, a Lynx, a Honda, a panel truck, a Citation, an Escort, an Omega, and an Acadian. Olson drove incessantly. At one point, he traveled over 20,000 kilometers in three months in 14 different rental cars. In mid-July he drove an Escort 5,569 kilometers in just two weeks. Olson took the ferry over to the Vancouver Island and, after burglarizing two Victoria residences, made his way up north towards Nanaimo, an old coal-mining town. He pulled over to the side of the road to pick up two young women hitchhiking. Hitchhiking was a popular mode of travel for the young in 1981. Roughly three hours later, writes Ian Mulgrew in Final Payoff, the car was weaving across the highway on the other, sparsely populated side of the massive island. Occasionally, it hit the soft shoulder. At the bottom of Hydro Hill, just before the turn-off for Long Beach, the car slowed. It turned onto a dirt-logging road, kicking up a cloud of dust and gravel. Moments later, two local RCMP squad cars pulled to a stop across the entrance to the road, blocking the car’s retreat and disgorging the uniformed Mounties. They had been summoned by the helicopter crew. Two police officers followed the car’s path, picking their way through the Douglas fir and spruce that lined either side of the isolated track. In the distance, they could see three people standing outside the car passing a bottle, and they could hear Olson. They moved closer. He was telling one of the women to take a walk. He began to yell. The police decided it was time to move.
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Olson spotted the police emerging from the undergrowth and sprinted back to the car. He threw the vehicle into gear and roared back the way he had come, but he was arrested at the roadblock. The women were confused, but safe. Olson said they had only stopped so he could relieve himself. Police charged him with impaired and dangerous driving, impounded his car, and took him to local lock-up. The police searched his rented car and found a green address book with the name of the 14-year-old New Westminster girl—Judy Kozma. By now, Olson had killed 10 children in southern British Columbia and, by the time he was finished, 11 would be dead. It was not the largest body count in the occurrence of multiple murders in Canada --- in 1949, all 23 passengers aboard a Dakota were killed by Montreal jeweler Joseph Guay, for the sole purpose of killing his wife --- but the Olson murders caused the greatest terror and horror. “When he was arrested, only three bodies had been discovered and identified. The police did not yet know how many children had been murdered. August 6, 1981 “The 6th was a momentous day,” Northorp declared. “It was the beginning of the events that have probably taken Olson off the streets of Canada for the rest of his life.” It was also the beginning of several days of methodical police work. The surveillance team went into high gear. August 7 to 11, 1981 Solving a murder usually boils down to a lucky break. Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper, was arrested by two vice cops concerned about license plates. He was driving a car with stolen plates, was arrested, and later confessed to 13 murders --this after some 250 detectives had been deployed and almost $8 million dollars had been spent on the investigation. There was also evidence that Sutcliffe had been questioned nine times by the English police and was even arrested once with his hammer, his favorite weapon, but somehow happened to escape detection. The extensive national coverage of the missing children was likened by some members of the media to the Yorkshire Ripper case in Great Britain and the Atlanta child killings. U.S. Human Resources Minister Grace McCarthy claimed: “We have our own little Atlanta going on.
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“I feel the police, in total, did a tremendous job,” Northrop concluded. “All you have to do is compare the length of time it took the police in other jurisdictions to solve their serial killings. Twenty-nine blacks, twenty-seven male and two female, ranging in age from seven to twentyeight years, were murdered in Atlanta, Georgia, from July 1979 until May 1981. In 1981 only two of the cases were close to being cleared when Wayne Williams was indicted for the two latest murders, both of adults.” Also in both jurisdictions all of the victims’ bodies had been found. Not so in the Olson case, eliminating the chance of securing leads or even knowing if one person was responsible. “The fact that known and suspected victims were both male and female,” said Northorp, “was in itself most unusual and further complicated matters,” ignoring the fact that the Atlanta child murders also involved victims of both sexes and a wide range of ages, including young adults. “We didn’t interview Olson until his arrest on the 12th of August,” said Maile, “because we didn’t have anything.” August 12, 1981 “I had no idea this would be the day when the big break would come,” declared Northorp, “nor did Olson have any idea this would be his last day as a free man.” The decision was made to arrest Olson on Vancouver Island, then commence intensive interrogation. August 18, 1981 Olson was charged with the first-degree murder of Judy Kozma, which ultimately resulted in a full confession. August 21, 1981 Supt. Bruce Northorp had been heading the task force for three weeks with no real guidelines to follow. He had to assemble some 150 officers who were at that time working the case, digest all the information accumulated before he took the assignment, plan strategy, deal with the media, and a myriad of other details. He was shocked at the turn of events. “At 8:35 a.m. I got a real jolt,” said Northorp. “I learned for the first time of the $100,000 deal put forward by Olson.” The “Cash-for-bodies” Deal

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“I’ll give you eleven bodies for $100,000. The first one will be a freebie,” Olson offered the police. “I felt the intense pressure over the ensuing hours,” said Northorp. “We were so close [to breaking the case]. But could Olson really be so stupid as to enter into an agreement that would likely result in his spending the balance of his days in prison?” Still, there was no concrete evidence that the missing children and the murders were related. The bodies of Weller, Johnsrude, King, and Kozma had been recovered. Olson proposed a schedule to recover the missing bodies of the dead children, one at a time, in a specific order and then money would be placed in an account: Chartrand at Whistler Daignault at Surrey Carson at Chilliwack Four locations where evidence would be found Court at Agassiz Wolfsteiner at Chilliwack Partington at Richmond German girl at an unspecified location “You’ll get statements with the bodies,” said Olson. “I’ll give you all the evidence, the things only the killer would know.” As Olson led police to further bodies, Northop said in his co-authored book Where Shadows Linger, “I was convinced Olson’s admission to two more murders was merely a ploy, bearing in mind his many escapes from custody, tight security was laid on. Olson was to be taken in a car with three unarmed police officers, with one handcuffed to him. The car was to be escorted by two other cars, with two officers in each, armed with revolvers, rifles, and shotguns. District Two was alerted that Olson might be taken their way, and I arranged for the use of a police aircraft. If escape was on his mind, he would not succeed.” In the year 2000, in a Vancouver Sun article called “Ex-Mounties Deny Olson Case was Botched,” two retired RCMP officers, Fred Maile and Ed Drozda, among other disclaimers, said there is no truth to allegations in Where Shadows Linger: The Untold Story of the RCMP’s Olson Murders Investigation, that flaws in the investigation may have allowed Olson to claim seven more victims before he was finally caught. Drozda said, “Hindsight plays such a large part. It is so wonderful with all the information before you to say, `Oh wow, look at this.’ At the time you are putting together a puzzle and these pieces somewhere along the way have
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to fit. It’s not only surfacing someone who is a suspect but also in putting the evidence together to take it to court and get a conviction.” Maile’s boss, Staff Sergeant Arnie Nylund, commented in Where Shadows Linger, “Fred seemed to know what he was doing, and I had never seen anything to indicate otherwise. It is easy to view these things in hindsight and draw conclusions. We had other suspects that looked better than Olson. Don’t forget, it was not apparent a serial killer was on the loose. Up until then the guys were busy working on a number of other homicides not related to these cases at all. After Olson was in jail we had all kinds of second-guessers. We did the best we could with what we had. I have nothing but respect for the guys and how they did it. It was terrible, just terrible for those members who accompanied Olson when they were recovering those bodies. It was so bad I had to send one man home. He just couldn’t take it anymore.” “It’s not an investigation you like to talk about too much because of the nature of what he was doing. I mean he was killing children,” Maile told the Vancouver Sun. “To me, if there was ever an image of the devil, it was Clifford Olson.” The Deal Exposed The secret deal had been cut in 1981, but was exposed to the media a year later. “Olson Was Paid to Locate Bodies” was just one of the bold front-page headlines on January 14, 1982 in the Vancouver Sun. On January 15th the Sun headline read: “Olson Deal Greeted by Disgust.” The police had not disclosed the cash deal for fear of prejudicing Olson’s right to a fair trial. At some point the Attorney General of British Columbia, the federal Solicitor General, the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner of the RCMP in Ottawa, as well as the Prime Minister of Canada would be drawn into the controversy. Many thought it repugnant that Olson was profiting from his crimes. “I found it unthinkable he should be paid to provide evidence,” said Supt. Bruce Northorp, the head of the task force. “The proposition to pay Olson’s wife was simply splitting hairs. She was not separated from him, and Olson stood to gain even if monies were paid to his wife. The situation may have been different if she were separated and were supplying information as to past criminal activity. That was not the case.” Northorp had to admit though that he felt a tremendous sense of relief that the killings were solved and no more children would die. When asked
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what evidence had been found, Northorp replied, “I won’t go into detail. Essentially, they were items, which could be established as belonging to each of the four victims, whose bodies had been found without Olson’s assistance, thus establishing he was the killer. Only the killer would have knowledge of where these articles had been hidden.” The Attorney General of British Columbia, Allan Williams, also wondered how such an appalling deal had been made. Yet the good news was, in exchange for $100,000, the Attorney General could guarantee a firstdegree murder conviction, ease the anxiety of the parents of the missing children, subdue the terror in British Columbia, and end an expensive police investigation. There was no hard evidence and Olson, an experienced criminal, was unlikely to talk without it. The day before Clifford Olson was charged with the death of Judy Kozma, he had a twohour visit with his wife Joan and their infant son. “I could not stop crying during those two hours,” wrote Olson in a letter February 5th, 1982, to Genevieve Westcott, a CBC television reporter in Vancouver, as to why he pleaded guilty. “I told my wife that I was responsible for the deaths of the children and that I could not live with myself nor have any peace of mind until I confess to what I had done and give back the bodies to their families for a proper Christian burial. “My wife told me that if I told police (R.C.M.P.) what I did, they would lock me up in jail for the rest of my life and I would in all probability be killed in jail. She said what would she tell our son when he grew up and everyone was teasing him at school for what his father had done. I told her it will be up to me to tell my son what has happened. I knew in my heart that I must give up my wife and son for the rest of my life. . My son will have to [sic] father to call Daddy and he will grow up knowing his father for the sins he has done. And my wife will always bear my mistake for the rest of her life. She told me that I must do what is right and that she will always love me and that someday we would be n [sic] heaven together praising the Lord together.” Olson may have been trying to bolster his own image because he also was heard to say: “If I gave a shit about the parents I wouldn’t have killed the kid.” Thursday, July 30, 1981 Meanwhile Const. Fred Maile of the RCMP Serious Crimes Unit had a simple strategy. His idea was to surreptitiously tape a conversation with Olson insinuating some kind of a reward. The idea was, if Olson was the
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murderer, and he thought he could make some money from that fact, he might go back to the crime scenes in order to retrieve some physical evidence. If he was not the murderer or knew who the murderer was then maybe he would tell them. Olson met Detective Tarr at a White Spot Restaurant, and then was joined by RCMP’s Corporal Maile and Corporal Drozda. The hidden microphones transmitted the conversation to a Mountie in a car in the parking lot. Final Payoff describes this tense 30 minutes: “Quite a few homicides around here, right?” Maile began. “And we understand that you might be able to help us. We’re prepared to compensate you for whatever you’re able to tell us or help us. But we have to know if you are able to help us. “He stopped and blew on his coffee. All eyes were on Olson. For a while he said nothing. “Finally, Olson said he wanted to be hired at a salary of $3,000 a month. In exchange, he claimed he would provide information about the disappearances.” Olson’s eyes lit up at the idea that they were coming to him for information. He spent much of the time bragging about testifying in Marcoux’s conviction of “that Jeannie,” promising to get back to them if he found out anything. With a casual, “Well, I’ll get back to you if I find out anything,” the officers watched the killer leave the restaurant and amble out into the sunshine. No one followed the man suspected of murdering several children.

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Appendix 5d The RCMP could hardly list him as a runaway Clifford Olson Victims Victims of Clifford Olson http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:I81TJptFeqkJ:ww w.allserialkillers.com/clifford_olson_victims.htm+clifford+olson+victims &cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca Colleen Daignault Colleen Daignault wouldn’t talk to just anybody, shy as she was. A shade over 5 feet, the 13-year-old girl, with her lovely long brown hair and fresh face, smiled sweetly in her missing person’s photo. One of the Victims of Clifford Olson Daryn Johnsrude Wednesday, April 22, 1981 -- Daryn Todd Johnsrude He had been in Vancouver for only two days. Clifford Olson Victims like Daryn Johnsrude, should not have happen. Sandra Lynn Wolfsteiner Tuesday, May 19, 1981 -- Sandra Lynn Wolfsteiner Olson murdered 16-year-old Sandra Wolfsteiner just 4 days after his wedding. Her boyfriend’s mother saw her get into a car with a man. Olson took Sandy to the bush just off Chilliwack Lake Road. Olson attacked and killed her by striking her in the head. Ada Court 5th Sunday, June 21, 1981 – Ada Court Ada Court, victim Thirteen-year-old Ada Court of Burnaby babysitting at her brother and sister-in-law’s Coquitlam apartment, the same family apartment complex where the Olsons lived and where Olson Sr. and Leona worked as caretakers. Sunday morning, Ada caught a bus to meet her boyfriend. Then, she simply vanished. Fifty-two-year-old Jim Parranto, a White Rock resident, believed he saw Olson disposing of Ada’s body. Simon Partington 6th Thursday, July 2, 1981 – Simon Partington Simon Partington, victim It was the disappearance of a nine-year-old Surrey boy, Simon Partington that was the turning point in The Case of the Missing Lower Mainland Children. The police could hardly list him as a runaway, given his young age and angelic-looking face. Police were sure that the slight, 4-foot-2inch, 80-pound boy had been abducted.
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Appendix 5e “It's about how the RCMP bungled the case of notorious serial killer Clifford Olson” Also cited in: Clifford Olson http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Q4ILOtKCdgYJ: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford_Olson+clifford+olson+victims&cd=3&hl= en&ct=clnk&gl=ca Clifford Robert Olson, Jr (born January 1, 1940 in Vancouver, British Columbia) is a convicted Canadian serial killer who confessed to murdering two children and nine youths in the early 1980s.[1] Murders On November 17, 1980, 12-year-old Christine Weller of Surrey, British Columbia was abducted.[2] She was found on Christmas Day, after having been strangled with a belt and stabbed repeatedly. On April 16, 1981, Colleen Marian Daignault, 13, vanished. It was five months before her body was found. By then, Daryn Todd Johnsrude, 16, had also been abducted and killed; 16-year-old Sandra Wolfsteiner was murdered on May 19 and 13-year-old Ada Court in April. Six victims followed in quick succession in July 1981. Simon Partington, 9, was abducted, raped and strangled on the second day of the month. Judy Kozma, a 14-year old from New Westminster, was raped and strangled a week later. Her body was discovered on July 25 near Weaver Lake.[3] The next victims were: Raymond King Jr., 15, abducted on July 23, raped and bludgeoned to death; Sigrun Arnd, an 18-year old German tourist, raped and bludgeoned the following day; Terri Lyn Carson, 15, raped and strangled; Louise Chartrand, age 17, the last victim identified, died on July 30. Olson was an atypical serial killer in that he targeted both boys and girls. His victims were also of various ages. Arrest and plea bargain Olson, who had an extensive criminal history,[4] was arrested on August 12, 1981 on suspicion of attempts to abduct two girls.[2] By August 25, Olson had been charged with the murder of Judy Kozma.[3] He reached a
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controversial deal with authorities, agreeing to confess to the 11 murders and show police where the bodies of those not recovered were buried, in return for which he wanted $10,000 paid to his wife for each victim. His wife received $100,000 after Olson cooperated with police.[4] In January 1982, Olson pleaded guilty to 11 counts of murder and was given 11 concurrent life sentences to be served in Canada's super-maximum security Special Handling Unit in Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines, Quebec, which houses many of the country's most dangerous criminals.[1] Olson is a dangerous offender, meaning he is very unlikely to ever be released from prison. References 1. Parole hearing being planned for Clifford Olson June 21, 2006. Accessed September 2, 2007. http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20060621/olson_parole_hearing_06 0621/ 2. Section source. Kerr, Jan Bouchard. Clifford Olson: The Case of the Missing Lower Mainland Children Court TV. Accessed September 2, 2007. http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/serial_killers/predators/olson/1.html 3. "Probe of 3 slayings continues, police say". The Globe and Mail. The Canadian Press (Toronto). August 25, 1981. 4. Clifford Olson The Beast of British Columbia CBC Canada. July 19, 2006. Accessed September 2, 2007. http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/olson-clifford/

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Chapter 2 THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE “DIDN’T LIKE BEING TOLD WHAT TO DO” As reported, the RCMP “didn’t like being told what to do. They were Canada’s national force and they considered themselves the cream of the cream. They figured they were the best of the best.”1 As this book exemplifies, they have turned out to possibly be one of the worst lending credence to the statement: “the RCMP is still, alas, horribly broken.”2 As further cited, author Paul Palango in his book “Dispersing the Fog: Inside the Secret World of Ottawa and the RCMP” says “the public record shows that the RCMP’s collective reputation is undeserved. For more than 35 years the force has found itself mired in a seemingly unending litany of organizational, legal and political controversies.”3 As the former solicitor-general, and a former municipal chief of police, Mr. Heed said B.C. must assert more control over its police. He said he has heard too many times the RCMP promise to do better following controversy. “Somehow, mistakes continue to be made,” he said in an interview this week.4 “The Vancouver Police Department’s internal report on the Pickton case, released last month, painted an unflattering picture of competing priorities and jurisdictional squabbles that hampered the investigation into scores of missing women.”5 “It capped off a summer of bad press for the Mounties. In June, the force’s conduct in the Air India case, Canada’s worst mass murder, was condemned in an inquiry that uncovered errors, incompetence and jurisdictional bickering.”6 “Next, the commission looking into the death of Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski, tasered at the Vancouver International Airport, concluded with a harsh denunciation of the behavior of four Mounties.”7 “One of the few communities that have elected to abandon the RCMP is, ironically, Mr. de Jong’s own hometown of Abbotsford. In 1995, when the communities of Abbotsford and Matsqui amalgamated, the Abbotsford RCMP was dumped in favour of Matsqui’s community police force.”8 Abbotsford Mayor George Peary, who was involved with the transfer, is a
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staunch supporter of his homegrown force. “We are not subject to the whims of a national police force,” he said proudly. Nearly all 209 members of the Abbotsford police live in the community, and he said that naturally means better policing. “They coach teams and go to parentteacher meetings, they attend churches, whatever it might be – they are part of the fabric of our community.”9 Footnotes 1. RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case: Reluctance to cooperate with other police forces played a role in allowing pig farmer to go on killing, critics say Dirk Meissner, Victoria — The Canadian Press Published on Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010 Last updated on Monday, Aug. 23, 2010 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/rcmparrogance-cited-in-bungling-of-pickton-case/article1681717/ 2. Globe Editorial: The RCMP is still broken From Thursday's Globe and Mail Published on Wednesday, Jul. 28, 2010 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/the-rcmp-isstill-broken/article1655180/ 3. Dispersing the Fog: Inside the Secret World of Ottawa and the RCMP By Paul Palango Press Release: October 16, 2008 http://www.dispersingthefog.com/ 4 - 9. Pressure to end B.C.’s 60-year ride with the Mounties is growing Justine Hunter and Robert Matas Victoria and Vancouver — From Saturday's Globe and Mail Published on Friday, Sep. 10, 2010 Last updated on Saturday, Sep. 11, 2010 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/britishcolumbia/pressure-to-end-bcs-60-year-ride-with-the-mounties-isgrowing/article1703538/

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Chapter 3 ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE “ARROGANCE IN BUNGLING PICTON CASE” Perhaps the greatest incompetence the RCMP could have made was their “arrogance in bungling of Pickton case” where their “reluctance to cooperate with other police forces played a role in allowing pig farmer to go on killing”1 [see Appendix 6a – 6d, cited below]. As emphasized by Rob Gordon of Simon Fraser University. “The RCMP know all, cannot be told anything.”2 “The RCMP is facing criticism in the wake of a scathing Vancouver Police Department report detailing investigative missteps on the hunt for serial killer Robert Pickton.”3 “There’s ample evidence to indicate that the RCMP does not play well with others and most certainly was not playing well with others in relation to the Pickton matter,” Prof. Gordon said.4 “Thirteen women disappeared from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside after the city’s police force first forwarded information about Mr. Pickton to the RCMP, according to the police review.”5 The 400-page document said mistakes prevented police from arresting Mr. Pickton until 2002 – years after officers first started looking at him as they investigated reports of missing sex workers – and that he could have been caught earlier.6 Mr. MacKay-Dunn, now a councillor in the District of North Vancouver, said he was one of the first officers to believe a serial killer could be responsible for the disappearances of dozens of women from the Downtown Eastside.7 He said he consistently encountered resistance from RCMP brass throughout his career, but rank-and-file officers from all forces seemed to get along.8 But Mr. MacKay-Dunn and Prof. Gordon both agree that the RCMP should not have its current 20-year service contract in British Columbia renewed. The current RCMP contract in British Columbia expires in 2012. “Absolutely, don’t do it,” Mr. MacKay-Dunn said.9 As further reported, “two years after B.C. prosecutors dropped attempted
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murder charges against Robert Pickton, Leah Best warned that the Port Coquitlam man was a killer – but her warning was not heeded,” saying the RCMP “didn’t seem like they cared.”10 “I did feel angry about it,” Ms. Best told CTV. “It didn’t seem like they cared.” Eleven years later, she is convinced that 13 women’s lives could have been saved if police had acted more aggressively on her information.11 Ms. Best, now a grandmother in her 50s living in the Fraser Valley, says she was introduced to Mr. Pickton through a friend, Lynn Ellingsen, who was getting money from him for drugs.12 “Lynn said he was a millionaire,” she said. “I said, ‘Oh, some millionaire, with gumboots and a tattered jacket.’”13 Mr. Pickton looked dirty, but didn’t appear “creepy,” she said. It wasn’t until she ran into Ms. Ellingsen at a friend’s house that a truly horrifying story came out.14 “She was staying at Willie’s the night before,” Ms. Best said. “She was out wandering and came upon Willie in the barn. She said he was gutting a woman.”15 “Ms. Best was surprised – but thought the story had a ring of truth. Ms. Best said she thought Ms. Ellingsen would go to the police with the information. A month later, Ms. Best went to the Burnaby RCMP detachment herself.”16 “She was one of three informants in 1999 who related the same story: that Ms. Ellingsen had seen a woman being butchered at the farm.”17 “I thought that they would have got a search warrant or something right away, and looked in the freezers at least,” she said.18 RCMP Deputy Commissioner Gary Bass said "the RCMP deeply regrets that we weren't able to gather the evidence necessary to lay a charge sooner.”19 As further reported, “twenty outstanding murder charges against convicted serial killer Robert Pickton have been stayed by the Crown, ending the prospect of any more trials.”20 “Pickton, a former Port Coquitlam pig farmer now serving a life sentence in prison, was found guilty on six counts of second-degree murder in
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December 2007 in the deaths of women from Vancouver's Downtown Eastside neighbourhood.”21 “He was originally charged with killing 26 women, but the Crown decided first to pursue the six cases most likely to result in convictions.”22 “The victims disappeared from the troubled Vancouver neighbourhood between 1978 and 2001, and traces of their remains were found on Pickton's farm, about 25 kilometres east of the city.”23 “He was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for at least 25 years. Pickton appealed the convictions to the Supreme Court of Canada, which ruled unanimously in a decision released last week that he would not a get new trial.”24 Footnotes 1 - 9. RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case: Reluctance to co-operate with other police forces played a role in allowing pig farmer to go on killing, critics say Dirk Meissner, Victoria — The Canadian Press Published on Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010 Last updated on Monday, Aug. 23, 2010 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/rcmparrogance-cited-in-bungling-of-pickton-case/article1681717/ 10 - 18. Women's lives could have been saved, Pickton informant says Jon Woodward, Vancouver — From Tuesday's Globe and Mail Published on Monday, Aug. 23, 2010 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/britishcolumbia/pickton/womens-lives-could-have-been-saved-picktoninformant-says/article1682799/ 19. Pickton investigation to be reviewed by B.C. Last Updated: Friday, August 20, 2010 http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2010/08/20/bc-picktonreport-released.html 20 – 24. Twenty Pickton murder charges not to be tried Last Updated: Wednesday, August 4, 2010 CBC News http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2010/08/04/bc-picktoncharges.html

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Appendix 6a RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case Deadly blunders sully police reputations Robert Matas and Justine Hunter Vancouver and Victoria— From Saturday's Globe and Mail Published Friday, Sep. 10, 2010 8:18PM EDT Last updated Friday, Sep. 10, 2010 8:20PM EDT When forces collide: Different codes of conduct, different masters and sometimes just different police channels can result in deadly blunders. An extensive review of the Vancouver Police Department’s investigation into the city’s missing women concluded that a regional police force might have led to the arrest of serial killer Robert (Willie) Pickton much earlier. Crime Stoppers received the first tip in the case on July 27, 1998. The caller described a man known as “Willie” who picked up prostitutes and reported that a recent visitor to his trailer saw at least 10 purses and women’s identification. The caller also said Willie told others he could easily dispose of bodies by putting them through a grinder which he uses to prepare food to feed his hogs. The tipster called back less than two weeks later, identifying the man as Willie Pickton and advised that Mr. Pickton killed Sarah (de Vries) and possibly all the missing women. By early 1999, some VPD officers strongly believed that further investigation of Mr. Pickton was warranted. However, VPD had to rely on the RCMP to pursue the investigation because the alleged crime scene was in Port Coquitlam and the RCMP were responsible for policing there. The investigation stalled at that point. Port Coquitlam RCMP turned to the Provincial Unsolved Homicide Unit, an integrated team of RCMP and municipal officers. The integrated unit had no vested interest in the investigation and did not agree to pursue the information that was available, Deputy Chief Doug LePard says. Vancouver police made several attempts to bring the RCMP and the homicide unit into the missing women investigation. In one instance, VPD Detective Lori Shenher in May, 1999, asked the RCMP for copies of files regarding homicides of six women that could possibly be linked to Mr. Pickton. It took nine months for the RCMP to respond to her.

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The Missing Women Task Force first met in January, 2001. Mr. Pickton was finally arrested after a rookie cop obtained a search warrant to investigate a report of an unrelated crime. Appendix 6b RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case Also Referenced: RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case Dirk Meissner, Victoria— The Canadian Press Published Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010 9:53PM EDT Last updated Thursday, Sep. 09, 2010 6:50PM EDT http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/britishcolumbia/pickton/rcmp-arrogance-cited-in-bungling-of-picktoncase/article1681717/ The RCMP is facing criticism in the wake of a scathing Vancouver Police Department report detailing investigative missteps on the hunt for serial killer Robert Pickton. A British Columbia criminologist said Mounties are trained to believe they are Canada’s top cops, while considering provincial and municipal officers below standard. “There’s long been tensions between the RCMP and municipal police services,” said Rob Gordon of Simon Fraser University. “The RCMP know all, cannot be told anything, and they’re the ones who alone stand between chaos and civilized society.” He pointed to deep-rooted RCMP arrogance on the Pickton investigation, where Mounties and Vancouver police officers withheld information from each other about women who’d been reported missing from the Downtown Eastside beginning in the mid-1990s. Mr. Pickton’s crimes came to light only when a rookie Mountie showed up looking for weapons on the former pig farmer’s sprawling property in suburban Port Coquitlam in 2002. “There’s ample evidence to indicate that the RCMP does not play well with others and most certainly was not playing well with others in relation to the Pickton matter,” Prof. Gordon said. The Vancouver police report, authored by Deputy Chief Constable Doug LePard, said both its own department and the RCMP are to blame for errors made during the investigation.
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Thirteen women disappeared from Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside after the city’s police force first forwarded information about Mr. Pickton to the RCMP, according to the police review. The 400-page document said mistakes prevented police from arresting Mr. Pickton until 2002 – years after officers first started looking at him as they investigated reports of missing sex workers – and that he could have been caught earlier. RCMP haven’t commented on the LePard report, saying they need to read it first, but have already stated they disagree with some of its conclusions. Prof. Gordon noted other examples of RCMP problems were highlighted in the report of the Air India inquiry, which criticized the Mounties for fighting turf wars with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service during the investigation into twin Air India bombings in 1985 that killed a total of 331 people. Prof. Gordon said the Mounties have also caused problems with the various Vancouver-area combined police teams fighting gang violence. He said a Vancouver police biker gang expert was drummed out of his post in a combined RCMP-municipal team by the Mounties. “He was a sergeant with the VPD, been a project leader, and ran into all kinds of difficulty,” he said. “The guy was an expert, but was treated very poorly by his RCMP colleagues.” Former Vancouver police officer Doug MacKay-Dunn, who served in the Downtown Eastside and retired in 2001 after 31 years of service, said he encountered difficulties working with Mounties. “At that point, the RCMP didn’t necessarily get along that well with other organizations,” he said. “They didn’t like being told what to do. They were Canada’s national force and they considered themselves the cream of the cream. They figured they were the best of the best.” Mr. MacKay-Dunn, now a councillor in the District of North Vancouver, said he was one of the first officers to believe a serial killer could be responsible for the disappearances of dozens of women from the Downtown Eastside.

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He said he consistently encountered resistance from RCMP brass throughout his career, but rank-and-file officers from all forces seemed to get along. But Mr. MacKay-Dunn and Prof. Gordon both agree that the RCMP should not have its current 20-year service contract in British Columbia renewed. The current RCMP contract in British Columbia expires in 2012. “Absolutely, don’t do it,” Mr. MacKay-Dunn said. Prof. Gordon called the RCMP a broken organization, and said trying to change the Mounties would be like “bending granite.” He warned the current Liberal government against signing any new contract with the Mounties. “If they are going for another 20 years and the province signs off on it, the current government deserves to fall,” Prof. Gordon said. The RCMP launched a massive search on Mr, Pickton’s farm in 2002, uncovering the remains or DNA of 33 women. He was charged with 27 counts of murder and eventually convicted in the murders of six women.

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Appendix 6c RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case Also see: RCMP seeking serial killer for 1995 deaths in B.C. By Petti Fong, Western Bureau Published On Wed Nov 3 2010 http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/884948--another-serial-killerin-b-c VANCOUVER—A serial killer who disposed of the bodies of three women in remote areas east of Vancouver may be dead or already in jail. The RCMP confirmed this week that they are looking for a serial killer after finding similarities in the cases of three victims whose bodies were discovered within two months of each other near the same area in 1995. Staff Sergeant John Cater with the RCMP said investigators have ruled out Robert Pickton as the women’s killer but said whoever is responsible may have been convicted of other crimes. Pickton is Canada’s most prolific convicted serial killer. He was charged with killing 26 women and convicted of second degree murder in six of those charges in 2007. The Supreme Court of Canada earlier this year rejected his bid for a new trial. Pickton is serving a sentence of 25 years without possibility of parole. The three victims were all living and working in the same area as Pickton’s victims — in Vancouver’s working class Downtown Eastside. Pickton was linked to dozens of women who went missing from the area starting in the 1980s. The disappearances continued until shortly before Pickton was arrested in 2002. “Pickton has been excluded of being responsible for these murders,” said Cater Tuesday. “There is no connection whatsoever.” Cater said the three victims were killed shortly before their bodies were discovered in the fall of 1995 and police have made appeals before for information.

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The RCMP released photos of some of the forensic evidence they have found at the crime scene along with more details to try and get more tips coming in. It appears to be working. Cater said Tuesday that police have been getting tips since making a public appeal Monday. “We have been successful in tracking down all sorts of people who could be responsible. The suspect could be deceased, in jail doing long-term crime or could have left the area,” Cater said. “We’re hopeful now on the 15th anniversary that someone will come forward with information.” Tracy Fadola Olajide was the first victim to be found. The 30-year-old Olajide was working in the Downtown Eastside as a sex trade worker and was addicted to crack cocaine and the mother of one child. Her body was discovered on a logging road on Aug. 12. Two weeks later, the body of Tammy Lee Pipe, a 24-year-old who was known to give money and clothing to the poor and supported her cocaine habit by working as a sex trade worker in the Downtown Eastside, was found in a remote wooded area in the same area. One month later, the body of Victoria Lynn Younker, 35, who was also a sex trade worker and drug addict, was found laying in the embankment at the dead end of a logging road in the same area. Simon Fraser University criminologist Rob Gordon said Tuesday that since Pickton was arrested there were theories that the former pig farmer from Port Coquitlam did not commit the murders by himself. The bodies of the three victims were left out in the open likely to decompose, said Gordon. That difference with Pickton’s victims, whose bodies had been disposed of in a rendering plant on the farm, is the strongest indication that police are looking at another serial killer. Gordon said Tuesday that the RCMP are dealing with a very tough investigation. Pickton continued his killing spree until just before he was caught. With this serial killer, Gordon said police have three victims killed 15 years ago and nothing since. “The chances of the police being able to identify the person responsible is frankly zero,” said Gordon. “The trail is obviously stone cold.”

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Appendix 6d RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case Also see: DNA clears key suspect in murders Lindsay Kines, Kim Bolan and Lori Culbert Crime: Special Report The Vancouver Sun Friday, November 23, 2001 http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:UIOqDD6ygRgJ: www.missingpeople.net/dnaclearssuspectinmurders.htm+rcmp+dispose+o f+bodies&cd=6&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca DNA testing has cleared the prime suspect in the murders of three women from Vancouver's Downtown Eastside whose bodies were discovered in the Fraser Valley in 1995, The Vancouver Sun has learned. The DNA results mean the real serial killer has gone undetected for six years and police say he could be responsible for some of Vancouver's missing women cases. "He could still be doing it and disposing of the bodies efficiently," RCMP Constable Paul McCarl confirmed in a recent interview. Police said in 1995 that they believed the same man killed Tracy Olajide, Tammy Lee Pipe and Victoria Younker, whose bodies were found that year near Agassiz and Mission. The three women -- like those who have disappeared since -- were all involved in drugs and the sex trade. During the investigation, police developed a long list of possible suspects by reviewing serious sex assaults of women, especially prostitutes. The review led them to one particular suspect, who was identified in 1995 as Ronald Richard McCauley, a roofer from Mission. One of the things that caught investigators' attention was that McCauley picked up a prostitute at Vancouver's Astoria Hotel in July of that year and drove her to Hemlock Valley, where she was beaten, raped and dumped from his truck -- just a few kilometres from where Olajide's body was later found. The woman reported the incident to police and McCauley, who had a record of similar violent offences, was arrested in September 1995, convicted of rape in 1996, declared a dangerous offender, and jailed indefinitely.
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"He surfaced pretty quick and he looked really, really good," said McCarl, who is the lead investigator on the Olajide and Pipe homicides. The things McCauley had done to the victim in the rape case, were similar to what had been done to the murder victims, McCarl said. He also lived in the area, had a vehicle consistent with the suspect's, and he was known to frequent the Downtown Eastside and hire prostitutes. In addition, McCauley once told a parole hearing that had he not been arrested for two rapes and attempted murders in the early 1980s, he "would have become a serial killer such as Clifford Olson." "I thought we had the guy," McCarl said. But despite the circumstantial evidence, police never had enough to lay murder charges against McCauley. The semen recovered at the crime scenes in 1995 had been degraded by bacteria and police were initially unable to test it, McCarl said. As the years passed and technology improved, however, the laboratory eventually used new techniques to re-test the samples and provide police with a DNA analysis. The results confirmed that one person was "associated" to at least two of the women prior to their deaths. The findings also raised the possibility that two men might have been involved in the murders. But, unfortunately for police, the results also confirmed that investigators had the wrong name at the top of their suspect list; Ronald Richard McCauley wasn't their man, after all. "He looked the best, so we pursued him," McCarl said. "And when we found out it wasn't going to be him, we were all disappointed." In fact, it was such a surprise to police, that investigators tried for a time to figure out whether McCauley might still have been involved, so convincing was the circumstantial evidence against him. "But realistically, we decided it's not him, it's somebody else," McCarl said. McCauley did not respond to requests for an interview, but his former lawyer, Susan Ludford, said she wasn't surprised by the RCMP's findings.
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"He volunteered that DNA sample to clear himself," Ludford said. The RCMP didn't use a warrant to get it. "So I'm glad he's cleared; I didn't think he was guilty of that in the first place." The DNA results were a significant turn of events for the RCMP, because investigators considered McCauley a suspect not only in the Olajide, Pipe and Younker homicides, but in the disappearances or murders of four other women as well. Mary Lidguerre, Catherine Gonzalez, Catherine Knight and Dorothy Spence all vanished from the Downtown Eastside the same year as the Valley murders. Lidguerre's remains were found two years later in North Vancouver, but the bodies of Gonzalez, Knight and Spence have never been found, and their names are currently on the list of up to 45 women who have vanished from city streets over the past two decades. The RCMP did not consider McCauley a suspect in the disappearances of women who vanished after September, 1995, because he was in custody from that point onward. But now he has been cleared, it means the real killer could be responsible for the three Valley murders, Lidguerre's death and any number of the missing women cases as well. "If you just look at some of them, you see there's some consistencies," McCarl said. "Where were they missing from? What were they doing prior to when they went missing? Who were their associates? "There's got to be a couple more ... that the same person's responsible for. "And my personal belief is that Vancouver isn't the only hunting ground. The person's probably hunting over on the Island, up in the Interior, and across the border." Given that possibility, senior investigators met in Kelowna last year to discuss cases of murdered and missing sex trade workers from around the province. The Valley murders, Vancouver's missing women, and the murders of women on Vancouver Island and in the Interior were all part of the agenda. In the end, McCarl said investigators agreed on the need for a joint forces team assigned exclusively to those files. The feeling, he says, was that "they shouldn't work on anything else and that way they can stay focused and pursue it until they conclude it."
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Earlier this year, the RCMP and Vancouver city police moved to set up just such a team, which now has 16 people doing a review of missing and murdered sex trade worker files from around the province. Interestingly, the person selected for the file coordinator's job on the task force, also has a direct link to the Valley murders; Sergeant Wayne Clary attended the scene where Younker's body was discovered in 1995 and he also attended the autopsy. Clary acknowledges the possible link between the missing women cases and the Valley murders, but said it's strictly a coincidence that he has worked both files. His involvement in the Valley murders was limited to attending the crime scene and the autopsy on the Younker case, he said. Still, McCarl said it will work to the Crown's favor if both he and Clary are still involved in the cases when they go to court. "Those are our gold cards when it comes to a prosecution." It's also helpful for the families, he said. "It's nice to have some continuity with the cop that was at the scene and found their daughters or sisters." The Sun contacted the families of Pipe and Olajide for this article, but they chose not to comment. McCarl said he continues to stay in contact with family members. "We call them, they don't call us. That makes me think that they must be satisfied in knowing that we haven't rolled over -- we never give up." After the RCMP realized McCauley wasn't their man, investigators on the Olajide, Pipe and Younker files began compiling long lists of other possible suspects, McCarl said. One of the theories is that the killer had either lived in the area, was a logger, fisherman or hunter familiar with the region, or perhaps had been incarcerated at one of the correctional facilities in the Fraser Valley and became familiar with the area while on a work-release program. McCarl said investigators hope to find a way to use computers to combine police, prison and parole records with lists of voters, hunters, fishermen and loggers in the region. "Anything electronic that we could get was going to get pulled and sorted. And then we would try and give it parameters and see whose name comes
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up the most frequently ... whoever comes up the most frequently gets targeted first. "And that's what we're looking at now, is basically creating a list of the best people to look at and going and finding them and trying to follow up with them." The problem is that a computer program has yet to be developed that could handle such massive amounts of information. RCMP Inspector Keith Davidson, a psychological profiler who helped develop the RCMP's computer system for tracking serial offenders, confirmed he is currently trying to find a way to use computers to assist in the investigations of the Valley murders and the missing women. McCarl also said the RCMP recently brought profilers from Ottawa and Winnipeg, to visit the Mission and Agassiz crime scenes. This was done to "give a better idea of what type of person we should be looking for and make sure that we have covered off all the lists of possible suspects." McCarl said he's in regular contact with the missing women task force, which has been reviewing all sexual assaults, attempted murders and murders of women in the sex trade around the province. So far, the review has turned up a list of more than 600 potential suspects. "They're doing the complete review and then they'll see who they want to target," McCarl said. "And then they'll go out and find these people or then try and eliminate them or see whose name shows up most frequently. "It's a very methodical, well-considered plan to follow up on these investigations. I think it's going to work. But it's not a quick fix and it will take lots of time and they'll have to keep those people working on that file. "They're looking at two years and, in all likelihood it probably could be more like four. Once a potential suspect is identified, then that will be the focus of the investigation." McCarl rejected criticism that has been levelled at police -- particularly in Vancouver -- that they don't care about the murders and disappearances because the victims are marginalized women involved in drugs and the sex trade. "The cops cared on this file, and the guys that really care are the ones that are on this task force right now," he said. "There's not one person down there that I don't have 100 per cent respect for ... they are generally the best in their field and that's what you need."
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McCarl said police recently thought they had a good suspect in the Valley murders, and the force pulled out all the stops to find the best people to handle wiretap and undercover operations. "The best people for the jobs were all identified and contacted and willing to participate and I see that happening with the group of people they've got [on the task force]. Anything that they identify, it'll come to pass ... they're not going to roll over until they know who is responsible." Nor, he says, will he. "Six years down the road, we're still spinning wheels, saying, 'Whodunit?' he said. "But I feel confident that, eventually, it will be successfully concluded -- that we will find out who it was."

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Chapter 4 “AIR INDIA FAMILIES WAIT 25 YEARS FOR ANSWERS FROM THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE” Prof. Gordon noted other examples of RCMP problems were highlighted in the report of the Air India inquiry, which criticized the Mounties for fighting turf wars with the Canadian Security Intelligence Service [CSIS] during the investigation into twin Air India bombings in 1985 that killed a total of 331 people.1 As cited, “dozens of family members of the victims of the Air India bombing will soon mark the 25th anniversary of the explosion. A week before that day, a long-anticipated inquiry reports its findings.”2 What? Twenty-five years for an investigation? Can anyone spell “i-n-c-o-m-p-e-t-e-n-c-e”? Has the RCMP waited 25 years so that the ‘incompetent’ players have all retired with full pensions? Was that their game? While the families of the victims waited? And waited? Ane waited? “All 329 passengers and crew on the Montreal-to-Delhi flight were killed. Fifteen years after the bombing, two men, Ripudaman Singh Malik and Bagri, were charged with 329 counts of first-degree murder.”3 “In 2005, a B.C. Supreme Court judge found Malik, a Vancouver businessman and Bagri, a Kamloops, B.C., mill worker, not guilty of firstdegree murder.”4 “John Major, a former Supreme Court justice, was appointed in May 2006 to investigate the bombing of Flight 182, which went down off the coast of Ireland.”5
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“Major was appointed after family members of the Air India victims pressed for an inquiry into the failures before and after the explosion.”6 “The final report comprises more than 4,000 pages. More than 200 witnesses testified during the four-year-long inquiry.”7 “The only person successfully convicted in the Air India bombing was Inderjit Singh Reyat, who pleaded guilty in 2003 to manslaughter after admitting to making the bombs.”8 “Bal Gupta, whose wife Ramurthy was killed in the Air India bombing, said families of the victims have been waiting for answers for far too long.”9 “During the investigation, we were told to let the investigation proceed and we kept quiet during the trial, but after the acquittal of the two accused there was no reason not to have an inquiry. But we had a difficult time and had to push the government,” said Gupta, an engineer from Toronto, who was the first to testify at the inquiry.”10 As further noted, “one of the most widely held assumptions about the bombing of Air India Flight 182 that departed Toronto on June 22, 1985 is that there was no specific advance warning of this threat of such an attack”11 [see Appendix 51]. However, according to James Bartleman: "I can only tell you my experience. It will be of June 18, the week of the bombings which took place on the 23rd. I was going through the daily intercept package ... and I saw in there a document which indicated that Air India was being targeted that weekend. That would be the weekend of the 22nd and 23rd.”12 "I knew that there was a meeting going on in the operations centre ... and so I took the document and I put it in a secure folder and I walked down to the meeting and I asked the senior RCMP officer present if I could speak to him privately . .. . I pulled out the document and I asked him if he had seen it and if he was taking action.”13 "His reaction startled me. He flushed and told me that of course he had seen it and that he didn't need me to tell him how to do his job.”14 Another arrogant RCMP ‘freak out’? As James Bartleman continued: “I then took it back and that was that. The next thing in my memory is the downing of the aircraft."15
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Bartleman said “it is seared into his memory.”16 Who was this senior RCMP? Was he the weak link in preventing the Air India bombing tragedy? As noted, “Bartleman's story yesterday was also shocking for the families who have conducted a long and often solitary vigil to unearth what they believe is the hidden truth behind the botched Air India investigations.”17 It appears again that the RCMP apparently kept the truth of their ‘incompetence’ under wraps? "We want(ed) to know the truth and now it more or less proves that this tragedy could have been prevented.”18 "This was the largest mass murder in Canadian history," Mr Major said, delivering the investigation's final report.”19 "A cascading series of errors contributed to the failure of our police and our security forces to prevent this atrocity... various institutions and organizations did not fulfill their responsibilities."20 “He highlighted what he said were the poor relations between the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) ... error, incompetence, and inattention occurred”21 Great, the Air India tragedy apparently occurred because of ‘idiotic’ infighting between the RCMP and CSIS? Finally, “the report also criticizes the Canadian government for claiming it has since fixed the security lapses.”22 "The commission rejects that position," Mr Major said.23 Just great, nothing has been learned? Is everyone who flies still at risk of terrorist threats because of in-fighting between the RCMP and CSIS? What a bunch of crap! Get your act together, idiots? Footnotes
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1. RCMP arrogance cited in bungling of Pickton case: Reluctance to cooperate with other police forces played a role in allowing pig farmer to go on killing, critics say Dirk Meissner, Victoria — The Canadian Press Published on Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/british-columbia/rcmparrogance-cited-in-bungling-of-pickton-case/article1681717/ 2 – 10. Air India families wait for answers 25 years later By Petti Fong, Western Bureau Published On Tue Jun 15 2010 http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/824113--air-india-familieswait-for-answers-25-years-later 11 – 18. RCMP warned on Air India Allan Woods Ottawa Bureau Published On Fri May 4 2007 http://www.thestar.com/article/210386 19 – 23. Canada's Air India probe highlights 'series of errors' 17 June 2010 http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:HVnWwSIwt6kJ: www.bbc.co.uk/news/10344125+rcmp+botch+air+india+investigation&cd =9&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

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Chapter 5 WHAT IDIOT ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE OFFICER SLEEPS WITH A POTENTIAL WINESS IN THE SURREY SIX MASSACRE CASE? As the title emphasized, it was “the worst gangland slaying in B.C. history”.1 It’s an important story, and is cited ver batim: 2 It wasn’t until 9 p.m. last October 19 that Lois Schellenberg really began to wonder where her husband Ed was. A gasfitter with a successful repair business, he often worked late as calls came in. She had made pizza for dinner. Her teenage son, Kevin, was trying to reach his dad on cell, puzzled the 55-year-old Abbotsford man wasn’t answering. “You know, he’s busy or he’s driving. He doesn’t always pick up if he’s with a customer,” she reassured him. Lois had heard the news that night about a suspected gas leak in the vicinity of the Balmoral Tower highrise in Surrey, where Ed had been working all week. But it didn’t alarm her. Instead, she called her sister in Richmond to ask what was going on there after the bizarre news that a small plane had flown into an apartment building. The Surrey emergency, whatever it was, came up in their conversation. “My sister said, ‘Haven’t you heard? It’s been upgraded. It’s a murder or a police incident,’ ” Lois Schellenberg recalled this week. Her heart sank. She immediately called her brother-in-law, Steve Brown, who worked with Ed and his nephew in the family business and who had been in contact with both earlier that day. Lois also phoned her two children and told them they’d better come home. Brown contacted Schellenberg’s nephew, who hours earlier had finished cleaning the gas fireplaces on the Balmoral’s top floor. He left “Uncle Ed” to do the final suite: 1505.
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Minutes after Brown’s panicked call, the young man — just 21 and in his first week on the job — was called by residents of the 15th floor. “They were saying stuff like, ‘Are you all right? Are you all right?’ ” said Brown. “They said, ‘Something terrible has happened on the 15th floor and your guy’s van is still down in the parking lot and his tools are still out in the hallway.’ “They said, ‘Something horrible has happened in 1505.’ ” Startling new details It was more than horrible. Some time between 3 and 4:30 p.m. that day, members of a criminal gang executed six people with gunshots to their heads. Four were young men with established links to the drug trade, but two of them — Schellenberg and 22-year-old Christopher Mohan — were uninvolved victims of the worst gangland slaying in B.C. history. A rally is being held at 3 p.m. today at Surrey’s Valley View Memorial Gardens on what would have been Mohan’s 23rd birthday to demand tougher government action against rampant gang violence. Seven months after the killings, a Vancouver Sun investigation has revealed startling new details about the case, including who is likely behind it, the state of the police investigation, how dangerously close others came to getting caught in the slaughter, and the fact that at least one murdered gangster left behind a substantial amount of cash. The massive police probe into the bloodshed is still extremely active, RCMP Supt. Wayne Rideout, who heads the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team, told The Sun this week. About 50 officers, including specialists pulled from the Integrated Gang Task Force and the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, continue to work on the file. “We’re not going to pull that team off. We’re going to stay on it,” said Rideout, who is hopeful charges will be laid. The Sun has learned that a sophisticated criminal gang called the Red Scorpions is believed to be responsible for the killings. One of the dead gangsters, Eddie Narong, had gone to jail for manslaughter in 2000 with other associates who later formed the Red Scorpions.
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The Sun has also learned that the same persons of interest in the Surrey six slayings are suspects in “multiple” other unsolved Metro Vancouver murders. Insp. Bill Fordy, who is leading the investigation, would “neither confirm nor deny” the Sun’s information about the involvement of the Red Scorpions, a gang known for running dial-a-dope crack cocaine rings. “The police have identified the criminal organization we feel is responsible for this offence, and that organization knows we feel they are responsible, and they are making efforts to avoid prosecution,” Fordy said. “I would say this particular criminal organization continues to operate in the Lower Mainland, in spite of a significant police presence.” ‘My life fell apart’ Eileen Mohan had no inkling there was someone with gang links living in apartment 1505 when the family decided to move from the 14th floor to unit 1504 a month earlier. “If they had told me the person living beside me was a drug dealer, do you think I would have stayed there?” she asked. “There was no traffic in and out of the suite. The only guy I saw was the tenant. He looked like a normal guy. He was dressed nicely — no tattoos, no bling-bling, nothing alarming.” She shared the apartment with her husband and Christopher. The family was hoping to buy their dream home within a few months. Chris was already designing the layout of his basement suite and Mohan wanted a studio where she could pursue her passion — fashion design. “Our house used to be so full of love and laughter. And then October 19, 2007 came. My life fell apart. My family fell apart.” Nothing about the day seemed extraordinary. She left for her job in downtown Vancouver about 8 a.m., catching the SkyTrain at the station across the street from Balmoral Tower, at 9830 East Whalley Ring Road. Chris had a day off work and planned to go to the gym before heading to Burnaby for a 5:30 p.m. basketball game. He loved basketball and never missed a game. He planned to arrive early to work on his shot.
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The gas fireplaces in the entire building were being serviced that week. The seven suites on the 15th floor were last on the checklist. Chris had agreed to wait for the servicemen before leaving for his game. “I spoke to Chris at quarter to two that afternoon. While I was speaking to him, the building manager and the fireplace people had just walked into the apartment,” Mohan said, tears welling up. “He said ‘Mom, I’ve got to go — love you,’ and I said, ‘Love you,’ and put the phone down. “That was the last time I spoke to him.” The Sun has learned that Ed Schellenberg’s nephew, the 21-year-old rookie gasfitter, was scheduled to do suite 1505, but the building managers decided Schellenberg, the veteran, should enter the suite instead — maybe because Narong, Lal, his brother Michael, and Ryan Bartolomeo were all inside the one-bedroom apartment. That left Schellenberg’s nephew to clean the Mohans’ fireplace. He chatted with Chris before leaving the Mohans’ place about 3 p.m. Schellenberg ticked off 1504 on the work order. The checklist showed every suite in the building had been completed — except 1505. The Sun has decided for security reasons not to name people in this story who could become witnesses in an eventual prosecution, including the nephew, the building managers and the tenant in 1505 — all of whom likely escaped death by minutes. The Sun has learned that the tenant in the death suite was facing criminal charges last October, and in November was arrested with two guns and ammunition after his vehicle was pulled over by police. Steve Brown, who had worked at Balmoral Towers every day that week but Friday, wonders if his brother-in-law knew something was amiss. “Ed had permission from the owner to go in. He was let in by the renter,” Brown said. “The fact that some of his tools were left out in the hallway leads me to believe that maybe he was being cautious.”

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Brown later learned that one of the building managers saw Schellenberg’s van still in the parking lot an hour or so later and went up to investigate. On entering 1505, the manager spotted the bodies. He assumed it was a gas leak and called 911. Firefighters quickly realized they had a massive crime scene on their hands and called police. Rideout, the veteran homicide detective, had already left work for the weekend. The RCMP was stretched because of the Richmond plane crash. “I got the call from the plainclothes commander at the Surrey detachment. They were suspecting now that it was a multiple homicide. We called out multiple teams.” He went immediately to the Balmoral, though not into the blood-soaked suite. “I knew this was going to change IHIT forever,” he said. “We had never had anything like this.” The magnitude of a mass murder probe linked to organized crime with suspects on the loose hit everyone. In the aftermath, there were 100 investigators at work on the case. “It doesn’t just impact that investigation. It impacts all investigations,” he said. “It has really drained resources.” Since the massacre in 1505, IHIT has been called to 39 other murder scenes. Rideout said the motives in the Surrey six slayings - just like other gangland hits since - are drugs, money, guns, alliances and allegiances. “It is about failed deals, new deals, ripoffs and failed ripoffs.” Fordy said the violence is “born out of greed and, to a degree, the need to establish their credibility in the criminal world.” The building’s one-bedroom penthouse suite was rented just months before the mass murder by a 20-year-old man then facing charges for break and enter, according to court files. He was arrested again Nov. 13 in a vehicle with a friend. Police found a 9-mm Glock and a Walther p22c semi-automatic. Both were loaded. The tenant was charged with eight firearms counts. A judge released him two days later on $15,000 bail.
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Rideout said the suite was being used as a “staging area for criminal activity in general,” including the distribution of drugs. All four of the slain gangsters had been crashing there on and off, along with the official tenant. Narong, just 22, had the most serious criminal history with more than 30 charges laid against him between 2003 and 2007, though the majority of them were stayed. At the time of his murder, he was on probation for resisting a police officer in May 2007. He had also faced drug trafficking charges. Bartolomeo, at 19, was still before the courts with a Dec. 2006 charge of possession for the purpose of trafficking. Michael Lal, 26, was a well-known drug dealer. He got a 17-month conditional sentence in 2006 for possession for the purpose of trafficking. His younger brother, 22-year-old Corey Lal, had also faced drug trafficking charges. The Lal brothers had been previously connected to some members of the Independent Soldiers, a powerful drug gang from South Vancouver. But more recently, they were freelancers in B.C.’s volatile criminal underworld. The Sun obtained probate documents filed in the Supreme Court of B.C. by the brothers’ parents, Cheryl and Michael Lal Sr. and sister Jourdane, an RBC account manager, to get access to $49,700 in cash in two Vancity safety deposit boxes rented by Corey. In the documents, Corey is described by his family as a “businessman” living at his mother’s Langley home, though his business isn’t specified. He has no other assets or accounts, the documents say, and owed several thousand dollars on two credit cards. A portion of the safety deposit box cash was released to the family by a judge in January. Jourdane Lal did not return phone calls. Eileen Mohan and Lois Schellenberg want to know why no warnings went out about the criminal activities alleged to have been occurring in apartment 1505. Why weren’t other tenants notified? Why weren’t workers and service people like Schellenberg protected?
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“He was sent up there to do this job, the last one of the entire building,” said Lois, “and if the property managers knew there was stuff going on there, why would they let him go? Why didn’t they go with him?” Suite 1505 is owned by real estate agent Ceasar Tiojanco and his wife, Myrna. They bought the apartment in 2003 for $82,000. Land title records show the couple own six other properties across Metro Vancouver with an assessed 2008 value of almost $2.8 million. There had been no complaints made about suspicious activity in 1505, according to Janice Abbott, head of the Atira Property Management, which has run the building since December 2006. In fact, she said the strata council has insisted since December 2006 that unit owners inspect their rental suits every six months for evidence of illegal activity, including drug trafficking. “They must fill out a form that asks questions like: Is there any evidence of illegal drug making? Is there any evidence of illegal activity in the unit?” Abbott said. “Ceasar submitted a confirmation of inspection form that answered those questions to the strata council on October 13, 2007.” Just six days before the drug-related slaughter in his suite Tiojanco reported everything was fine. “I don’t know what he would have seen,” Abbott said. “Ceasar owns three units in the building.” She said neither Atira, nor the strata council, knew people facing criminal charges lived in 1505. Nor did they know that it was a hub of illegal activity, she said. The new inspection policy proved the strata members “were concerned about making sure that there was no illegal activity,” Abbott said. Tiojanco is out of the country and unavailable for comment this week. Myrna refused to answer questions about the apartment and hung up on a Sun reporter three times. Abbott’s management company is linked to a Surrey group providing services for battered women. The company’s website notes that all “profits are donated to Atira Women’s Resource Society, an organization dedicated to the elimination of all forms of violence.”

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One of the board members is activist Miriam Sobrino, who is married to Surrey NDP MLA Bruce Ralston, a vocal supporter of Eileen Mohan’s who has addressed her public rallies against gang violence and is scheduled to speak again today. Ralston said this week that he had no idea Atira managed the Balmoral. He he said he doesn’t know how anyone could have anticipated something as horrific as the slaughter. Asked if tenants in apartment buildings should be warned if gang activity is suspected to be going on, Ralston said: “I don’t know the answer to that.” What he does know is that there doesn’t seem to be any sense of urgency in the provincial government about dealing with gang violence. “Eileen is raising concerns about what I would call a crisis of gun violence in the Lower Mainland. It is profoundly disturbing that there are many, many families out there who are experiencing the same thing,” he said. “There doesn’t appear to be any solid action by the attorney general. The bodies roll out and the investigations go on.” Attorney-General Wally Oppal does not think anyone should be politicizing gang violence. “Gang violence has always been difficult to resolve. It has to be a concerted effort by everyone involved, including members of the public who have to give the information to the police,” Oppal said. “The government is firmly committed in assisting the police to make the streets safer and to address the horrible issue of gang violence.” Waiting by the phone The Mohans and the Schellenbergs are religious families. In the hours after the murders and before they had police confirmation that their loved ones were gone, their faith kept them hanging on to hope. Steve Brown told his sister-in-law he would go to Balmoral Towers to find out what had happened. “It was rainy, cold and miserable, and I immediately got out and walked up to the police officer. I said, ‘That’s my brother-in-law’s van sitting in the parking lot.’
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“I wondered what the hell was going on. Obviously, something had happened to Ed, and at that point they would have known, but they didn’t say anything to me.” He called Lois, who by then was surrounded by family and friends, and went home. He sat up in bed all night, staring at his BlackBerry. “I was thinking. ‘I’m going to get a call. I’m going to have to go down and identify his body.’ ” Lois wasn’t giving up hope. She and her children listened to every breaking news report. “We tried to imagine [that] if something had happened and Ed saw something, police would have whisked him away and he was at the jail or somewhere in protective custody, or something. “I watch too much CSI,” she said, “but they would have let him at least call. You have to call your family and say you’re okay.” On Saturday morning, she got up and baked pies. “I figured he would be hungry when he got home. Whatever time, he was always up for pie,” she said, her voice breaking. The RCMP came around noon, looking for a photo of him. Feelings of angst Eileen Mohan had to wait even longer for official word that her son was dead. She had worked until 7:30 p.m. on Friday and only learned of the “gas leak” when she got to the SkyTrain and found it running at a snail’s pace. She assumed Chris was at his basketball game. When she got to Surrey, she walked over to see if she could get close, looking up at the 15th floor from the street. “I was looking to the very side of the building where my son lay dead. I had no idea. There was no fear in me,” she said. She went to a relative’s to wait for the Balmoral to reopen. As she walked through the rain, feelings of angst washed over her.
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“I thought, ‘Why am I feeling this way?’ ” About 12:30 a.m., she went back home, hoping to get inside and find her son waiting. But police told her the 15th floor remained closed. “It began to register on me. My son hadn’t called. It was 1 o’clock. “He always called to let me know where he was.” She shared a cellphone with her son — she would use it on weekdays and he would have it on weekends — so she couldn’t even call him. Instead, she began calling his friends. She learned that he hadn’t made it to basketball. Her family turned on the TV news. Reports started coming in that there had been a murder in the building. “It was then that my heart sank. I went limp.” In the morning, she called the building managers. She tried to trace Chris’s last known steps. He had been scheduled to go to a close friend’s funeral at 10 a.m. When he didn’t show up there, his friends began calling her. About 4 p.m. Saturday, she raced to the Balmoral, determined to get answers from the RCMP. “I said, ‘I know six murders have happened. When my son left, he was going to a basketball game. He hasn’t called me. It’s four in the afternoon.’ ” She could see concern on the faces of the RCMP officers. “It’s then that they said, ‘Do you have a picture of your son?’ ” She didn’t get formal confirmation for another 24 hours that Chris had been shot point-blank in the back of his head. “What kills me most is how frightened he must have been. This was probably the first time in his life that he had seen a gun. “I think about the last second before he died, what a horrible death he would have had. Why didn’t they just let him go? Why didn’t they just let Ed and Chris go?”

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She doesn’t know if he was dragged into 1505 and shot or led in at gunpoint. It is impossible to know. “I’m the most vigilant person. I see a person’s activities. I monitor things,” she said. “I didn’t see this coming. My problem is that no one told me.” An amazing funeral The first week after the murders was a blur. “So many people came, and flowers — it was like a floral shop around here,” Lois Schellenberg said. “Just so many people who came and cared, it was amazing. Our church — they have been unbelievable with the things they have done for us. The generosity, the kindness, the thoughtfulness — it goes on and on, still now.” Eileen Mohan decided to give Christopher an amazing funeral, one that would encapsulate the spirit of the wedding he would never have, the university graduation she wouldn’t celebrate, the births of grandchildren she wouldn’t know. Then she decided she was going to publicly challenge gangsters like those who had killed her only son. She gave interviews. She spoke to politicians. She demanded changes to laws she believes contribute to lawlessness. “Christopher was a son every parent would love to have,” she said this week. “He didn’t deserve what happened to him. Her most contentious proposal — to post photographs of known gangsters online so the public can be warned — has drawn fire from groups like the B.C. Civil Liberties Association. But she maintains that “we need to curb the freedom of gangsters.” Steve Brown has also become an activist. He said, “When I heard some of these police officials and politicians beaking off in the press, it just made me very angry.” Comments like “We have control of the violence” and “The streets are safe” irked him most.
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“I’m thinking to myself, ‘What planet are you living on?’ I contacted Eileen, and I realized that for what they did to her son, she was prepared to storm the gates of hell all by herself. I just thought, ‘I can’t let her do that alone.’ ” Lois Schellenberg hasn’t been as public in her quest for justice for Ed but is just as passionate about what she wants. “I want the guys who did this to be brought to justice,” she said. “You can’t just do something like this and walk away. There has got to be something that happens …. There has to be a consequence.”3 This was a major investigative case. However, what does one senior RCMP officer do? The idiot sleeps with one of the major witnesses? What? As cited: In one more sex scandal involving RCMP, this time a sergeant. As reported, “the police investigation into the massacre of six men in a Surrey high-rise in 2007 — two of them innocent bystanders — suffered another embarrassment Tuesday. The RCMP announced a second officer working on the Surrey Six case has been suspended.”4 In February, the RCMP called in the Ontario Provincial Police to investigate a veteran sergeant working on the case for allegedly having an “inapproprivate relationship” with a potential witness in the case.5 “While the RCMP would not name the sergeant, it has been widely reported he is Sgt. Derek Brassington, a 14-year veteran of the RCMP. It also has been reported that Brassington is married to a police officer and the relationship he carried on was with the girlfriend of Dennis Karbovanec, a member of the Red Scorpions gang who was one of six people charged in the massacre at Balmoral Towers on October 2007.”6 Does anyone else feel this guy was a “jack-ass”, putting a massacre trial in jeopardy? Incredibly, this Brassington “helped investigate the death of Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski at the Vancouver airport in October 2007.”7 What kind of white-wash would this “jack-ass” do for his fellow RCMP in
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the tragic death of Robert Dziekanski? What does another RCMP officer do? He pads his expense account? What a “slug”? As cited, “RCMP homicide investigator who submitted a bogus claim for $700 in overtime while working on the Surrey Six murder case has dodged a criminal record.” 8 “Steve Perreault, who had been with the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team and worked with the RCMP for four years, pleaded guilty to attempting to defraud the RCMP of monies under $5,000.”9 “He made the false overtime claim in August 2009 while investigating the October 2007 multiple slayings, where six men were shot dead in a penthouse suite in Whalley's Balmoral Tower.”10 “The judge noted that the Mountie said he did it because money was tight.”11 What? Oh, ‘boo, hoo’! Apparently, the starting salary for an RCMP constable is $46,003 and within three years of service, that begins to increase incrementally to $74,539 annually? This guy worked for the RCMP for 4 years? He was making a good chunk of change! The judge noted Perreault underwent counseling "in an effort to understand why" he filed the bogus overtime claim.12 Maybe the judge should have asked if the guy had been ‘psychologically’ assessed before being hired by the RCMP?13 “The Crown had sought a two-month jail term followed by a year's probation, arguing that as a police officer, Perreault should be held to a higher standard than regular people.”14
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The Crown argued the officer had committed a breach of trust against taxpayers and against his duty as a police officer to uphold the law and noted the crime was "not spontaneous."15 The defence argued for a conditional discharge, which the Crown opposed as being "contrary to the public interest."16 What did Judge Bastin decide? Given the "unsophisticated and senseless nature" of the offence, he concluded it is "not contrary to the public interest" to order a discharge.17 Eileen Mohan, whose son Chris was one of the six murder victims, said she was "very disappointed" by what Perreault did. "It was very selfserving," she said.18 You bet it was? Footnotes 1 – 3. Shocking story behind six murders in a Surrey tower ‘Something horrible has happened in 1505’: The worst gangland slaying in B.C. history happened last October in Surrey. Two of the six victims were bystanders. By Vancouver Sun, June 22, 2008 http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/story.html?id=f67e8e35fe20-4b4c-b515-d6829c5c3461 4 – 7. Surrey Six RCMP sergeant accused of inapproprivate relationship with potential witness. By Andy Ivens, The Province June 23, 2010. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:6kNJfnl09XgJ:w ww.theprovince.com/news/Surrey%2BRCMP%2Bsergeant%2Baccused% 2Binapproprivate%2Brelationship%2Bwith%2Bpotential%2Bwitness/318 6852/story.html+Sgt.+Derek+Brassington,+accused+of+having+an+affair +with+a+witness&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 8 – 12. Former Surrey Six officer gets conditional discharge for false overtime claim By Tom Zytaruk, Surrey Now October 29, 2010 http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Former+Surrey+officer+gets+conditi onal+discharge+false+overtime+claim/3748688/story.html 13. Reference to ‘psychological’ assessment by the RCMP can be found in: If You Like “To Catch Bad Guys” This Police Force Doesn’t Want
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You? What kind of “wacky” police force is that? http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=searchalias%3Daps&field-keywords=mallenby# 14 – 18. Former Surrey Six officer gets conditional discharge for false overtime claim By Tom Zytaruk, Surrey Now October 29, 2010 http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Former+Surrey+officer+gets+conditi onal+discharge+false+overtime+claim/3748688/story.html

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WHAT THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE CAN’T FABRICATE, THEY WILL LIE ABOUT!!

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Chapter 6 RCMP STAFF SGT ROSS SPENARD THOUGHT HE HAD COVERED HIS TRACKS BY SHREDDING DOCUMENTS, HE WAS WRONG! Incredibly, in another high profile case, another senior RCMP officer fabricated, fabricated and fabricated!!! The so-called RCMP expert witness, classed an expert witness on bloodpattern analyses, was “accused of perjury and exposed in B.C. Supreme Court as the author of a flawed forensic report that got basic biology wrong.”1 Who was this RCMP Officer? “Staff Sgt. Ross Spenard’s credibility was shredded during the recent second-degree murder trial of Charlie Rae Lincoln, an aboriginal woman convicted of stabbing to death her own two-year-old. He acknowledged misleading the court and failing to send a letter to the Crown in the case revealing the concerns about the report and his errors.”2 RCMP Spenard thought he covered his tracks by shredding documents [see Appendix 14, cited below]. He was wrong. As noted, “armed with a copy of documents that Spenard thought were destroyed, defense lawyer Matthew Nathanson forced him to make a series of devastating admissions.”3 The document was riddled with so many DNA misinterpretations and errors that the top experts in the field were flown in from Edmonton and Halifax to correct it. Some conclusions were “not scientifically sound,” they said.4 “You were not being truthful, right?” the lawyer said, confronting the Mountie with a transcript of his earlier testimony.5 “Yes, I agree” Spenard admitted.6 As emphasized, “the performance was as bad as any at the Braidwood inquiry into the death of Robert Dziekanski, which has also featured RCMP officers seemingly uncomfortable with the truth.”7
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“You will recall the Staff Sgt. Spenard gave some evidence of blood found in... [a] house at different places,” the justice said before sending the jurors to deliberate. “You have heard the Crown totally ignore his evidence, and I suggest to you that you do ignore his evidence completely.8 “Staff. Sgt. Spenard is the perfect example of a person who clearly lied under oath, and violated his oath to tell the truth, and he even agreed to this. That conclusion is so clear and convincing, and so serious, that I suggest you should consider his evidence to be completely tainted, and without any value whatsoever.”9 As further cited in Retired B.C. Mountie charged with perjury, “a retired RCMP officer has been charged with one count of perjury for his testimony at the 2009 trial of a B.C. woman convicted of killing her own child.”10 What a “scum bucket”? Only one charge? Pretty lenient, wouldn’t you say? “Former staff sergeant Ross Spenard, a 32-year veteran of the RCMP, is accused of lying while testifying in B.C. Supreme Court in May 2009. He was testifying as an expert witness in bloodstain pattern analysis during the second-degree murder trial of Charlie Rae Lincoln.”11 “During cross-examination by defence council at the 2009 trial, Spenard admitted he did not tell the whole truth in his earlier testimony.”12 “Justice John Truscott then advised the jury to ignore Spenard's evidence.”13 "Staff Sgt. Spenard is the perfect example of a person who clearly lied under oath and violated his oath to tell the truth and he even agreed to this," Trustcott said. "That conclusion is so clear and convincing, and so serious, that I suggest you should consider his evidence to be completely tainted, and without any value whatsoever."14 Is this “scum bucket” getting a full pension at taxpayers’ expense?

Footnotes
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1 - 9. Caught in a web of documents he thought had been destroyed: Blood-splatter expert admits to misleading court and failing to send a letter to the Crown revealing concerns about the forensic report. Ian Mulgrew, Vancouver Sun, June 29, 2009. http://www.bcpolicecomplaints.org/ross_spenard.html 10 - 14. Retired B.C. Mountie charged with perjury Last Updated: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 | 1:24 PM PT Comments63Recommend34. CBC News http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2011/01/11/bc-mountieperjury.html

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Appendix 14 RCMP Staff Sgt. Ross Spenard caught in a web of documents he thought had been destroyed Caught in a web of documents he thought had been destroyed Blood-splatter expert admits to misleading court and failing to send a letter to the Crown revealing concerns about the forensic report Ian Mulgrew, Vancouver Sun, June 29, 2009 http://www.bcpolicecomplaints.org/ross_spenard.html An RCMP blood-spatter expert has been accused of perjury and exposed in B.C. Supreme Court as the author of a flawed forensic report that got basic biology wrong. Staff Sgt. Ross Spenard’s credibility was shredded during the recent second-degree murder trial of Charlie Rae Lincoln, an aboriginal woman convicted of stabbing to death her own two-year-old. He acknowledged misleading the court and failing to send a letter to the Crown in the case revealing the concerns about the report and his errors. Until now, Spenard testified, no one outside of the RCMP had been told about the doubt cast upon other cases, some of which have been reviewed by other specialists. The officer has been a blood-pattern analyst for five years and giving evidence on the basis of his work as a recognized expert witness. In this case, he claimed to have “peer-reviewed” a report he actually helped author that was based on the mistaken assumption that if someone was a possible contributor of a DNA profile, or if a person couldn’t be excluded as contributing to a DNA profile, then you could say the blood came from that person. What’s wrong with that logic is obvious: Anyone with a white car may be in the pool of suspects for a hit-and-run, but being potentially responsible is not the same as being culpable. Armed with a copy of documents that Spenard thought were destroyed, defence lawyer Matthew Nathanson forced him to make a series of devastating admissions, none thankfully that affected the outcome of the trial.
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The officer was at pains to try and mask the rewriting and review process that led to the creation of the impugned forensic report on blood spatter and DNA evidence in the brutal child-killing. The document was riddled with so many DNA misinterpretations and errors that the top experts in the field were flown in from Edmonton and Halifax to correct it. Some conclusions were “not scientifically sound,” they said. Spenard was ordered to submit future reports for review and told to send an explanatory letter to the Crown. But he hid that from the judge until he withered under Nathanson’s crossexamination. “You were not being truthful, right?” the lawyer said, confronting the Mountie with a transcript of his earlier testimony. “I was splitting hairs,” the staff sergeant conceded. “Officer,” Nathanson pressed brandishing the transcript, “do you agree that by splitting hairs, you were not being completely truthful?” “Yes, I agree.” Spenard admitted he wrote the report supposedly authored by Sgt. James Gallant. “That was an untrue answer that you gave to this jury in this case, right?” Nathanson said. “Not correct,” the Mountie replied. “No, it was not.” “Untrue, right?” Nathanson continued. “You said that he authored the report, right? You told the jury last week that [Sgt. Gallant] authored the report, right?” “And I was in error.” “That was untrue, was it not?” Nathanson insisted. “No, it was not untrue,” the officer dissembled. “I was in error. I was mistaken.” “You were confused about who had written the report?” the lawyer
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scoffed. “The circumstances, yes,” said the Mountie. “I realized I had written the report.” The performance was as bad as any at the Braidwood inquiry into the death of Robert Dziekanski, which has also featured RCMP officers seemingly uncomfortable with the truth. The force has conducted a review of other cases coming before the court in which Gallant was involved. But no review of completed cases in which he gave evidence has been done. Spenard also misled the court during earlier proceedings into believing Gallant was no longer doing blood-spatter work because he was seconded to an RCMP Olympic unit. He is not doing any policing at the moment. The Mountie said he lied under oath to protect his colleague’s “privacy.” Justice John Truscott has not specifically addressed Spenard’s misconduct, but he was savage in his charge to the jury. “You will recall the Staff Sgt. Spenard gave some evidence of blood found in... [a] house at different places,” the justice said before sending the jurors to deliberate. “You have heard the Crown totally ignore his evidence, and I suggest to you that you do ignore his evidence completely. “Staff. Sgt. Spenard is the perfect example of a person who clearly lied under oath, and violated his oath to tell the truth, and he even agreed to this. That conclusion is so clear and convincing, and so serious, that I suggest you should consider his evidence to be completely tainted, and without any value whatsoever.” After two days of deliberation, on June 17, the jury found the 23-year-old mom guilty of second-degree murder in the slaying of her toddler in July 2006 in the remote coastal town of Bella Bella. Nathanson had argued for a verdict of manslaughter because Lincoln suffers from the effects of fetal-alcohol syndrome and associated psychiatric problems.

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Chapter 7 BEWARE POLISH IMMIGRANTS, IF THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE CAN’T KILL YOU OUTRIGHT AND GET AWAY WITH IT THEY WILL LIE ABOUT IT? Let’s change direction and see why the Royal Canadian Police do not apparently have a dedicated web site to all the missing and unsolved murders in British Columbia, Canada? Remember readers that Canada is made up of 10 provinces and three territories. British Columbia is only one of those ten provinces? If the above noted chapters list page after page of missing and / or murdered individuals just in BritishColumbia, why doesn’t the Royal Canadian Police have a dedicated web site to all the missing and unsolved murders in Canada? Is it because they are just too busy defending their stupid and very often deadly actions? Let’s look at this tragic case: Did the RCMP get away with murder? Some appear to think yes! "Nothing will happen to them, still they are on the job, the four RCMP officers who caused Robert's death by what they did, and then they lie," said Cisowski [see Appendix 7, cited below].1 The case involved the vicious tasering to death of 40-year-old Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski. The RCMP lies start immediately. Richmond RCMP Sgt. Pierre Lemaitre said officers struggled to subdue the man: 'Even though he had received what they call pulses, two pulses from Taser, he was still out of control.'2 The man actually died after 4 Taser jolts, witness alleges.3 In fact, one witness said she offered to tell the RCMP officers what she witnessed, and that one officer said, "'I'll be with you in a few minutes.'" But the officers did not take a statement from her, she alleges.4
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As reported, “within seconds, he had been Tasered. Dziekanski, even after falling to the ground, shrieking in pain, was Tasered repeatedly.”5 The cover-up begins! “After the event, the Mounties all gave similar statements about how Dziekanski had come at them, yelling and wildly swinging the stapler, and how several officers had to wrestle the man to the ground.”6 However, a video proves the RCMP officers outright lied! A witness’s video of the event showed none of that happened ... if not for the video, might have got away with whitewashing what the judge called the force’s "shameful" conduct in the events that led to an innocent man’s death.7 As further reported, “I saw more RCMP officers lie to cover up this cowardly crime.”8 Incredibly, “on Dec. 12, 2008, B.C. Criminal Justice branch spokesman Stan Lowe "cleared" the four officers of any wrongdoing and portrayed Dziekanski as a violent and agitated alcoholic whose irrational behavior contributed to his own death.”9 However, even this Stan Lowe was put in his place when Cisowski had the satisfaction of hearing Thomas Braidwood call the four Mounties "inapproprivately aggressive" and "patently unbelievable," while emphasizing Dziekanski did nothing wrong nor in any way caused his own death.10 Caught in their lies thanks to videotape of the “cowardly” crime, as it has been described. Braidwood called the bystander video by Paul Pritchard of Dziekanski's Tasering death "invaluable" evidence that "couldn't be cross-examined."11 “Onlookers were incredulous when RCMP Commissioner William Elliott said Friday he wouldn't be announcing any disciplinary measures for any of the four Mounties for their role in Dziekanski's death.”12 Get away with murder and no consequences? Even the apology to Robert Dziekanski’s mother was a bunch of RCMP bunk?
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“A raft of internal RCMP emails was released through an Access to Information Act request showing that the April 1 apology was a carefullycrafted script designed not to blame any RCMP member.”13 “On the day before the staging of the apology, RCMP Deputy Commissioner Gary Bass reassured RCMP staff relations supervisor Brian Roach that their "apology" to Cisowski did not mean they were apologizing for anything specific that any of their officers had done.”14 "Essentially, even though the word ‘apology’ worries some, we are not apologizing for the actions of specific members or saying anything about specific actions.”15 Cisowski said yesterday "this just shows that the RCMP even when they apologize to me, they coverup.”16 Actually tasered five times! “The e-mail, sent by RCMP Chief Supt. Dick Bent to Assistant Commissioner Al Macintyre suggested for the first time that the four Mounties who responded to a call at Vancouver's airport planned to use a Taser on Robert Dziekanski, who died at the airport on Oct. 14, 2007, after he was Tasered five times.”17 Finally: “why do provinces put up with this police force, it would be less disastrous and more economically feasible to have their own provincial police forces -- more control?” Footnotes 1. Still they get no consequences. By Suzanne Fournier, The Province, June 20, 2010. http://www.theprovince.com/news/Still+they+consequences/3178031/stor y.html 2 - 3. RCMP say deceased man was 40-year-old Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski. Last Updated: Tuesday, October 16, 2007. CBC News. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2007/10/15/taserdeath.html 4. One witness said she offered to tell the RCMP officers what she witnessed. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:IF56ES6gNEJ:vancouveraiportpolicekillpolishman.blogspot.com/+RCMP+KILL+
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POLISH+AT+AIRPORT&cd=4&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 5 - 7. Inquiry deservedly hammers RCMP in Dziekanski death. By Paul Schneiderit, The Chronicle Herald, Tue. Jun 22. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:TeQCCRcGIYJ:thechronicleherald.ca/Columnists/1188456.html+rcmp+lie+at+ Robert+Dziekanski+inquiry&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 8. I saw more RCMP officers lie to cover up this cowardly crime. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:O1wmRBqPAN UJ:www.thepetitionsite.com/95/justice-for-mother-of-late-robertdziekanski+rcmp+lie+Robert+Dziekanski&cd=7&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 9 - 12. Still they get no consequences. By Suzanne Fournier, The Province, June 20, 2010. http://www.theprovince.com/news/Still+they+consequences/3178031/stor y.html 13 - 16. RCMP's apology grudging, evasive. By Suzanne Fournier, The Province, June 17, 2010. http://www.theprovince.com/news/RCMP+apology+grudging+evasive/31 64920/story.html 17. E-mail Suggests Four RCMP Officers Committed Perjury While Senior Officers Sat Silent. Contributed on Sun, 2009/06/21 - 2:30pm. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_ while_senior_officers_sat_silent+assaults+committed+by+rcmp&cd=18& hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca Also see: Startling New Email Halts Inquiry. By Neal Hall and Lori Culbert; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www2.canada.com/topics/news/story.html?id=1716658 Also see: Damning e-mail suggests the four officers committed perjury and that senior officers sat silent while they did. By Ian Mulgrew; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Column+Mounties+Tasering+sh... http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_ while_senior_officers_sat_silent+assaults+committed+by+rcmp&cd=18& hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

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Appendix 7 'Still they get no consequences' 'Still they get no consequences' Four Mounties involved should not get off scot-free, says Dziekanski's mother By Suzanne Fournier, The Province June 20, 2010 http://www.theprovince.com/news/Still+they+consequences/3178031/stor y.html Zofia Cisowski's "darkest hour" after learning that her son Robert Dziekanski was dead came when B.C. criminal justice officials declared that the RCMP had done nothing wrong -- and that it was her son's own fault that he died. Now that she has been vindicated by the Braidwood Inquiry report castigating the officers and ruling her son did nothing wrong, Cisowski still carries with her a news clipping containing the earlier blaming, hurtful words. On Dec. 12, 2008, B.C. Criminal Justice branch spokesman Stan Lowe "cleared" the four officers of any wrongdoing and portrayed Dziekanski as a violent and agitated alcoholic whose irrational behaviour contributed to his own death. Last week, Walter Kosteckyj, Cisowski's lawyer, said "that was Zofia's darkest hour, after losing her son, and that's why she still carries that news clipping with her." So far, Cisowski notes, none of the four Mounties "has ever got any consequences." On Friday, Cisowski had the satisfaction of hearing Thomas Braidwood call the four Mounties "inapproprivately aggressive" and "patently unbelievable," while emphasizing Dziekanski did nothing wrong nor in any way caused his own death. "This tragic case is at its heart the story of shameful conduct by a few officers," Braidwood said. "It ought not to reflect unfairly on the many thousands of RCMP and other police officers who have protected our communities and earned a welldeserved reputation in doing so."
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Cisowski heard B.C. Attorney-General Mike de Jong promise to appoint a special prosecutor and commit to a citizen-led Independent Investigation Office to conduct criminal investigations into RCMP or municipal police incidents causing death or harm. Friday was an exhausting day after a night in which Cisowski slept little, coming at the end of years of hearings in which a video of her son's death was screened repeatedly -- although it helped a kind and patient former judge get to the truth. Braidwood called the bystandervideo by Paul Pritchard of Dziekanski's Tasering death "invaluable" evidence that "couldn't be cross-examined." Cisowski received an apology Friday from the RCMP's top cop, Commissioner William Elliott. Yet as a mother, Cisowski did not hear from Elliott -- the first lawyer and non-cop to head the national RCMP -- the words she has waited so long to hear, she said. "Nothing will happen to them, still they are on the job, the four policemen who caused Robert's death by what they did, and then they lie," said Cisowski. Listening to Elliott say the RCMP has reformed its training and Taser policies, Cisowski whispered: "Still they get no consequences for causing my son's death." Braidwood's 460-page report, entitled simply Why? The Robert Dziekanski Tragedy, is a blistering denunciation of the four Mounties who Tasered and restrained Dziekanski face down, then left him unattended until he died. Onlookers were incredulous when Elliott said Friday he wouldn't be announcing any disciplinary measures for any of the four Mounties for their role in Dziekanski's death. He said he would await the special prosecutor's report. Elliott acknowledged that Cpl. Benjamin Monty Robinson is suspended with pay, but only in connection with the unrelated traffic death of a motorcyclist. That matter doesn't go to trial until April 2011. The other three -- Const. Gerry Rundel, Const. Bill Bentley and Const. Kwesi Millington -- are "on the job but not in front-line policing," said
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Elliott, who couldn't explain why the four officers could be criticized about an unjustified death and yet remain on the RCMP payroll. Elliott hinted it might even be too late to mete out internal punishment, but admitted: "We recognize there needs to be fairly fundamental changes in our discipline system." Braidwood said the four Mounties behaved as if they were responding to a "barroom brawl," and senior officer Robinson "intervened in an inapproprivately aggressive manner." "I found that Mr. Dziekanski had been compliant, was not defiant or resistant, did not brandish the stapler and did not move toward any of the officers," Braidwood said. "I concluded the constable [Millington] was not justified in deploying the weapon and neither the constable nor the corporal honestly perceived that Mr. Dziekanski was intending to attack any of the officers." Braidwood said the other two officers also "offered patently unbelievable after-the-fact rationalizations of their police notes and statements to [the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team]." As for Robinson's claim that the Mounties made a point to check if Dziekanski was alive, Braidwood was dismissive. "I can place little reliance on the testimony of Cpl. Robinson that he constantly monitored Mr. Dziekanski's breathing until the firefighters arrived. Similarly, I find unpersuasive the testimony of Const. Rundel that . . . he knelt down near Mr. Dziekanski and heard him breathing and snoring. "I am satisfied that Mr. Dziekanski went into cardiac arrest first, then went unconscious, and finally showed signs of cyanosis, all within 75 seconds of being handcuffed." De Jong was prompt to appoint special prosecutor Richard Peck to look into possible criminal charges against the four Mounties. "There was misconduct here and that reflects badly [on the RCMP]," said de Jong. "The human dimension in this is staggering, that someone would be lost within an airport for hours, separated by a glass door forever from one of his loved ones."
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The stark images on the Pritchard film, of the police behaviour and a man's death, had enormous impact, said De Jong. "Many people [not just in B.C.] remember where they were at the time the film was shown," he said. "We are welcoming and one of the friendliest countries in the world -- we didn't display it that day."

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Chapter 8 LET’S LIE ABOUT THE KILLING OF ROBERT DZIEKANSKI!!! The case involving the vicious tasering to death of 40-year-old Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski warrants an additional chapter to see the extent of the lies by the RCMP to cover-up. As noted, “we have seen often-quoted Mountie mouthpiece Cpl. Dale Carr tell the Braidwood inquiry that top RCMP brass made a deliberate decision not to correct misinformation RCMP had given to the media about Dziekanski’s death.”1 In fact, “e-mail suggests four RCMP Officers committed perjury while senior officers sat silent,”2 specifically suggests Mounties planned to deploy Taser before they arrived at YVR, contrary to their testimony.3 As reported, “after months of outrage about the conduct of the four Mounties who responded to Vancouver Airport Oct. 14, 2007, who can believe that at the last minute, a federal lawyer would produce what many would consider a smoking gun -- an e-mail saying the officers decided to use the Taser before confronting the Polish immigrant?”4 “If true, the Nov. 5, 2007, e-mail titled "Media strategy -- release of the YVR video," from RCMP Chief Supt. Dick Bent to assistant commissioner Al McIntyre, establishes the four have been lying through their teeth. This critical document suggests the four officers committed perjury and that senior officers sat silent while they did so.”5 "The documents that have just come to our attention include a critical email from very high up in the RCMP chain of command, disclosing that the officers decided in a premeditated way, en route to the scene.”6 Even the RCMP lawyers apparently lie? “Lawyer Helen Roberts, who represents the RCMP at the inquiry, offered a tearful apology to inquiry commissioner Thomas Braidwood, a retired judge, for not disclosing the e-mail sooner.”7 “Helen Roberts had every reason to be in tears Friday as she apologized to the public inquiry into Dziekanski's death for failing to disclose what appears to be not just germane but also startlingly important evidence.”8 Robert’s crocodile tears don’t wash!
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“If Roberts had cried over Dziekanski mother's pain, I would be moved -but a veteran lawyer wet-eyed over another screw-up in this case? I think they were crocodile tears.”9 "I find this delay in disclosing it to the commission appalling," Braidwood said. "The contents of this e-mail goes to the heart of this inquiry's work."10 "It should have been disclosed much, much sooner ... months and months ago."11 "It's a stunning turn of events," Don Rosenbloom, the lawyer representing the government of Poland at the inquiry.12 Rosenbloom said the 11th-hour disclosure "is totally inconsistent with testimony given under oath" and goes to the heart of the issue of police fabrication. During the hearing, he said, "we were alleging [the four Mounties] were fabricating their story."13 The RCMP fabrication was, in fact, true! Dziekanski's mother told reporters she was surprised and angry about the e-mail being released so late. She suggested there had been a "coverup."14 "This is the kind of evidence someone should have known would have important consequences," said Walter Kosteckyj, the lawyer representing Dziekanski's mother at the inquiry.15 He said he had spent the last two weeks preparing his final arguments for the inquiry, only to find not all the evidence has been heard.16 The RCMP lawyer tries to white-wash the facts? David Butcher, the lawyer representing Const. Bill Bentley, one of the four Mounties involved in the in-custody death, said Bent's e-mail was hearsay and not credible evidence.17 B.C. Attorney-General Mike de Jong said he was concerned about the new development, "the possibility that new evidence may be emerging at this late date is troubling, and I'm sure very troubling for the commission itself," he said.18 "Commissions of this sort, and really our system of justice, rely on all witnesses who give evidence under oath to provide truthful and honest answers."19
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Incredibly, Commissioner William Elliott's carefully parsed press release was equally unbelievable: "This was simply an oversight. Unfortunately in an exercise of this magnitude, such an oversight can occur."20 Elliott a moron, as cited, “no one but a moron overlooks the import of an e-mail like this” [see Appendix 8a – 8c, cited below].21 That was not an "oversight." It was professional incompetence or a coverup.22 Paul Kennedy, the chairman of the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP, using a news conference in Vancouver, took some well-aimed verbal shots at stagnant RCMP culture, especially its notorious, self-destructive resistance to change. It is a “massively inert” organization, he said, and that must not stand.23 Footnotes 1. RCMP admissions in Dziekanski Taser death are troubling. By Damian Inwood, Wed, Apr 22 2009. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:cIe04eO43_QJ:co mmunities.canada.com/theprovince/blogs/lordoftherings/archive/2009/04/ 22/rcmp-admissions-in-dziekanski-taser-death-are-troubling-forvancouver-2010-security-watchers.aspx+Now,+we+have+seen+oftenquoted+Mountie+mouthpiece+Cpl.+Dale+Carr+tell+the+Braidwood+inqu iry&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 2. E-mail Suggests Four RCMP Officers Committed Perjury While Senior Officers Sat Silent. Contributed on Sun, 2009/06/21 - 2:30pm. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_ while_senior_officers_sat_silent+assaults+committed+by+rcmp&cd=18& hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 3. Startling New Email Halts Inquiry. By Neal Hall and Lori Culbert; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www2.canada.com/topics/news/story.html?id=1716658 4 - 5. Damning e-mail suggests the four officers committed perjury and that senior officers sat silent while they did. By Ian Mulgrew; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Column+Mounties+Tasering+sh... http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_
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while_senior_officers_sat_silent+assaults+committed+by+rcmp&cd=18& hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 6 - 7. Startling New Email Halts Inquiry. By Neal Hall and Lori Culbert; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www2.canada.com/topics/news/story.html?id=1716658 8 - 9. Damning e-mail suggests the four officers committed perjury and that senior officers sat silent while they did. By Ian Mulgrew; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Column+Mounties+Tasering+sh... http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_ while_senior_officers_sat_silent+assaults+committed+by+rcmp&cd=18& hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 10 - 19. Startling New Email Halts Inquiry. By Neal Hall and Lori Culbert; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www2.canada.com/topics/news/story.html?id=1716658 20 - 22. Damning e-mail suggests the four officers committed perjury and that senior officers sat silent while they did. By Ian Mulgrew; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun. http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Column+Mounties+Tasering+sh... http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_ while_senior_officers_sat_silent+assaults+committed+by+rcmp&cd=18& hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca Also see Appendix 10a – 10c about RCMP Commissioner William Elliott being called a ‘moron’. 23. RCMP watchdog goes out firing with Dziekanski report. Posted: December 08, 2009, 6:35 PM by Ron Nurwisah. By Brian Hutchinson, National Post. http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fullcomment/archive/2009/12/08 /rcmp-watchdog-goes-out-firing-with-dziekanski-report.aspx

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Appendix 8a Damning e-mail suggests the four RCMP officers committed perjury and that senior RCMP officers sat silent while they did Column: Mounties in Tasering should face prosecution: Damning e-mail suggests the four RCMP officers committed perjury and that senior RCMP officers sat silent while they did By Ian Mulgrew; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Column+Mounties+Tasering+sh... Cited here: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_ while_senior_officers_sat_silent+Ian+Mulgrew+%22Damning+email+suggests+the+four+officers+committed+perjury%22&cd=1&hl=en &ct=clnk&gl=ca The Braidwood Inquiry into the Taser-related death of Robert Dziekanski has been blown up and left in ruins by the revelation a key RCMP e-mail was withheld from the commission. After months of outrage about the conduct of the four Mounties who responded to Vancouver Airport Oct. 14, 2007, who can believe that at the last minute, a federal lawyer would produce what many would consider a smoking gun -- an e-mail saying the officers decided to use the Taser before confronting the Polish immigrant? If true, the Nov. 5, 2007, e-mail titled "Media strategy -- release of the YVR video," from RCMP Chief Supt. Dick Bent to assistant commissioner Al McIntyre, establishes the four have been lying through their teeth. This critical document suggests the four officers committed perjury and that senior officers sat silent while they did so. Worse, it seems there are many other documents that have not been turned over that may be relevant. This e-mail was one of 260 documents on a CD sent by the RCMP to the justice department last April, yet the federal lawyers didn't open the CD until last week. Last week? Evidence delivered in April didn't get opened until last week?
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What? Helen Roberts had every reason to be in tears Friday as she apologized to the public inquiry into Dziekanski's death for failing to disclose what appears to be not just germane but also startlingly important evidence. If Roberts had cried over Dziekanski mother's pain, I would be moved -but a veteran lawyer wet-eyed over another screw-up in this case? I think they were crocodile tears. Commissioner William Elliott's carefully parsed press release was equally unbelievable: "This was simply an oversight. Unfortunately in an exercise of this magnitude, such an oversight can occur." Bollocks. No one but a moron overlooks the import of an e-mail like this. The officers deny the explosive content is true and Roberts says Bent was wrong in what he said. But their protestations ring hollow after almost 18 months of bluster and denial. So does Elliott's threadbare these-thingshappen excuse. The situation is as bad as the most virulent critics of the Mounties feared. This is no longer about four officers who made mistakes in judgment: It's about an organization that thinks it is above the law. "I find this delay in disclosing it to the commission appalling," an upset Braidwood said. "The contents of this e-mail goes to the heart of this inquiry's work." Exactly. Braidwood says his inquiry will resume on Sept. 22 after commission lawyers have time to review the e-mail, conduct an investigation and perhaps call the senior Mounties to testify about the document. I think not. There was a time when I thought Oct. 14, 2007 was the day that would live in the annals of RCMP infamy, but June 19, 2009 has eclipsed the tragedy of Dziekanski's death. On Friday, a country's faith in a once proud, once revered institution died.

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We have left the realm of how to regulate Taser use and the circumstances of Dziekanski's death and entered the world of criminal conduct -- which is beyond Braidwood's provincially rooted authority to investigate. If we needed any prod to reopen the decision not to prosecute these officers, we now have been given it. It is time to thank commissioner Braidwood for his excellent work in bringing these unsettling facts to light and it's time to appoint a special prosecutor. The B.C. Law Society should also begin an investigation into the conduct of Roberts and any other federal lawyer involved in this staggering lack of disclosure. That was not an "oversight." It was professional incompetence or a coverup.

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Appendix 8b E-mail Suggests Four RCMP Officers Committed Perjury E-mail Suggests Four RCMP Officers Committed Perjury While Senior Officers Sat Silent By Neal Hall and Lori Culbert; June 20, 2009 - Vancouver Sun Contributed by blackandred on Sun, 2009/06/21 - 2:30pm. In sections: British Columbia Canada Accountability Rights Security apparatus Startling New Email Halts Inquiry Cited here: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Ae1cCKW4u6cJ: mostlywater.org/email_suggests_four_rcmp_officers_committed_perjury_ while_senior_officers_sat_silent+Ian+Mulgrew+%22Damning+email+suggests+the+four+officers+committed+perjury%22&cd=1&hl=en &ct=clnk&gl=ca Suggests Mounties planned to deploy Taser before they arrived at YVR, contrary to their testimony A shocking e-mail found last week brought the Braidwood inquiry to a sudden halt Friday and may result in the most senior RCMP officers in B.C. being required to testify. The e-mail, sent by RCMP Chief Supt. Dick Bent to Assistant Commissioner Al Macintyre suggested for the first time that the four Mounties who responded to a call at Vancouver's airport planned to use a Taser on Robert Dziekanski, who died at the airport on Oct. 14, 2007, after he was Tasered five times. Under the subject line "Media Strategy - Release of YVR video," the email, dated Nov. 5, 2007, said: "Finally spoke to [Supt.] Wayne [Rideout] and he indicated that the members did not articulate that they saw the symptoms of excited delirium, but instead had discussed the response en route and decided that if he did not comply that they would go to CEW [conducted energy weapon]." Lawyers for the four RCMP officers involved in the fatal incident said Friday their clients deny they formulated a plan to use a Taser on Dziekanski. The officers testified at the inquiry they arrived in separate police cars and had no discussion beforehand.
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Alex Pringle, a lawyer representing Rideout, who was in charge of investigating Dziekanski's death, appeared at the inquiry Friday and read a statement from his client, which said Bent's e-mail was in error. Pringle said it was a "misunderstanding of a conversation I had with him." Lawyer Helen Roberts, who represents the RCMP at the inquiry, offered a tearful apology to inquiry commissioner Thomas Braidwood, a retired judge, for not disclosing the e-mail sooner. She also said Bent was mistaken in his e-mail and that the officers did not plan to use the Taser. She offered to have senior Mounties testify. "I find this delay in disclosing it to the commission appalling," Braidwood said. "The contents of this e-mail goes to the heart of this inquiry's work." The e-mail will have to be investigated and further hearings may be required, the commissioner said. He ordered the inquiry adjourned until Sept. 22. The delay was due to summer plans already made by many of the lawyers involved in the inquiry, he added. Friday was supposed to be the start of final submissions by lawyers representing various parties, including the four Mounties involved in the in-custody death. Commission counsel Art Vertlieb told the inquiry that the new e-mail was disclosed Tuesday by lawyers for the federal justice department, which represents the RCMP. "It should have been disclosed much, much sooner ... months and months ago," Vertlieb later told reporters, adding he was "upset and frustrated" by the last-minute disclosure. He said he didn't know whether the RCMP disclosed the e-mail to Crown counsel before a decision was made that no criminal charges were warranted against the four officers. Vertlieb told the inquiry that the Bent e-mail was among 260 documents on a CD sent by the RCMP to the justice department in April, just before RCMP media relations officers testified at the inquiry about the botched handling of information released to the media in the days after Dziekanski's death.
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He said the federal lawyers didn't open the CD until last week, discovering the Bent e-mail and other documents. "It's a stunning turn of events," Don Rosenbloom, the lawyer representing the government of Poland at the inquiry, told reporters after the commissioner ordered the three-month adjournment. "The documents that have just come to our attention include a critical email from very high up in the RCMP chain of command, disclosing that the officers decided in a premeditated way, en route to the scene, to use the Taser if Mr. Dziekanski did not comply." Rosenbloom said the 11th-hour disclosure "is totally inconsistent with testimony given under oath" and goes to the heart of the issue of police fabrication. During the hearing, he said, "we were alleging [the four Mounties] were fabricating their story." Dziekanski's mother told reporters she was surprised and angry about the e-mail being released so late. She suggested there had been a "coverup." "This is the kind of evidence someone should have known would have important consequences," said Walter Kosteckyj, the lawyer representing Dziekanski's mother at the inquiry. He said he had spent the last two weeks preparing his final arguments for the inquiry, only to find not all the evidence has been heard. David Butcher, the lawyer representing Const. Bill Bentley, one of the four Mounties involved in the in-custody death, said Bent's e-mail was hearsay and not credible evidence. "The chief superintendent is simply wrong," he said. The late disclosure of the e-mail was the result of an oversight, RCMP Commissioner William Elliott said in a statement issued Friday. "We have produced thousands of documents to our legal counsel for their review and for them to transmit all relevant material to the commission," Elliott said, pointing out that it was the RCMP that brought the Bent email to the attention of the inquiry commissioner on Friday.

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"Commissioner Braidwood was informed that a specific document was not provided and he himself accepted the government of Canada's sincere apologies for this oversight," Elliott's statement said. "The RCMP wants all of the facts surrounding this tragic event to be known so that we can learn as much as possible and make any further required changes to the RCMP's policies and practices." B.C. Attorney-General Mike de Jong said he was concerned about the new development. "The possibility that new evidence may be emerging at this late date is troubling, and I'm sure very troubling for the commission itself," he said. "Commissions of this sort, and really our system of justice, rely on all witnesses who give evidence under oath to provide truthful and honest answers." Whether the testimony in the Dziekanski inquiry has been truthful will be up to Braidwood to decide, de Jong said. It will be up to Braidwood to assess the new evidence and determine its relevance before making his findings, he said, adding that it was too early to comment on the possible fallout from Friday's events. The attorney-general said it would be premature to comment on whether criminal charges against the four officers should be reconsidered. "I'm not going to rule anything in or out. I am going to wait with keen interest for Mr. Braidwood's report." Dziekanski, who spoke no English, had travelled for 24 hours from Poland and spent about 10 hours at the airport, unable to find his mother, who went home to Kamloops after being told by officials that her son couldn't be found. The 40-year-old man eventually started throwing around furniture, prompting a bystander to call 911. Seconds after four Mounties arrived, Dziekanski was Tasered. He died at the scene.

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Appendix 8c The RCMP had decided to electrocute him before they even saw him They had decided to electrocute him before they even saw him 19.06.09.18:24:00 Rusty Idols,New Democrats Online http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:7K66KZTx4z8J: newdemocratsonline.ca/node/20701+%E2%80%9Cno+one+but+a+moron +overlooks+the+import+of+an+email+like+this%E2%80%9D&cd=8&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca In the car on the way to the airport as revealed in an email the government finally revealed on what was supposed to be the last day of the Braidwood Commission. And you thought the RCMP's behavior couldn't look any worse. This e-mail was one of 260 documents on a CD sent by the RCMP to the justice department last April, yet the federal lawyers didn’t open the CD until last week. Last week? Evidence delivered in April didn’t get opened until last week? What? Helen Roberts had every reason to be in tears Friday as she apologized to the public inquiry into Dziekanski’s death for failing to disclose what appears to be not just germane but also startlingly important evidence. If Roberts had cried over Dziekanski mother’s pain, I would be moved — but a veteran lawyer wet-eyed over another screw-up in this case? I think they were crocodile tears. Commissioner William Elliott’s carefully parsed press release was equally unbelievable: “This was simply an oversight. Unfortunately in an exercise of this magnitude, such an oversight can occur.” Bollocks. No one but a moron overlooks the import of an e-mail like this. The officers deny the explosive content is true and Roberts says Bent was wrong in what he said. But their protestations ring hollow after almost 18 months of bluster and denial. So does Elliott’s threadbare these-thingshappen excuse.
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The situation is as bad as the most virulent critics of the Mounties feared. This is no longer about four officers who made mistakes in judgment: It’s about an organization that thinks it is above the law.

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Chapter 9 BRITISH COLUMBIA CHIEF JUDGE SAID ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE CONST DONOVAN TAIT’S STORY ISN’T CREDIBLE!! These revelations about the RCMP leads one to wonder what other behaviors they are capable.1 Maybe these cases can reveal that. In one case, “an RCMP constable who broke a man's jaw on both sides with punches has been found guilty of assault causing bodily, a provincial court judge ruled.”2 “Evidence at the trial that ended last month indicated that Const. Donovan Tait and his partner were investigating a theft complaint in May 2003 when they confronted Asmeron Yohannes at his North Vancouver home. Tait's defense was that the degree of force used was approprivate because Yohannes spit in the officer's face.”3 Another RCMP fabrication? In her ruling, however, released Tuesday, provincial court Chief Judge Carol Baird Ellan said Tait's story isn't credible and that he arrested Yohannes out of frustration.4 The accused partner, Const. Simon Scott, testified that Yohannes spit in Tait's face.5 The judge said his testimony "was so rife with discrepancies and contradictions that it would be unreliable.”6 Const. Tait “has an issue with temperament,” concluded Judge Carol Baird Ellan, noting he was the subject of four previous complaints related to use of force and proper arrest. Const. Tait was transferred to Sooke, near Victoria. He now works from an RCMP detachment in Campbell River.7 In another case, “a Yellowknife man whose leg was broken during an arrest outside a bar has been found not guilty of assaulting a police officer and obstructing justice.”8 Another RCMP fabrication? In fact, Chief Judge Brian Bruser, in his decision released last month, said
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RCMP Const. Scot Newberry attacked Devon Herback, not the other way around.9 "There is no doubt that what occurred was excessive force in the course of an unlawful arrest," Bruser wrote.10 “Newberry said Herback resisted arrest and tried to kick him, but Bruser found Newberry was the aggressor.”11 “The judge said in his ruling he did not believe Newberry's version of events that night. "His evidence was frequently vague, evasive, implausible or simply unbelievable or unreliable."12 In yet another case, a Newfoundland man who claimed RCMP Sgt. Gary Tidsbury was behind a beating meant to extract a murder confession has settled his civil lawsuit out of court.13 In 1995, Murrin was beaten so badly he spent 11 days in hospital.14 RCMP Spokesman Sgt. Rob Vermeulen confirmed the lawsuit has been resolved and there would be no comment on the case.15 Reached at his home near St. John's, Murrin, 59, said a settlement had been reached, although he said he couldn't talk about it.16 This is one of the problems with settled cases with the RCMP, one isn’t supposed to talk about the settlement.17 Another RCMP fabrication? “Tidsbury denied instigating the attack. Murrin's lawyer, Peter Wilson, told the trial the RCMP investigation was biased and incompetent and Tidsbury, as the lead investigator, lied under oath about his role.”18 In another incident, “RCMP Corporal John Graham, alleged in a B.C. court to have a “propensity for violence,” pleaded guilty to assault in 2002 after kicking a Prince George man described as resisting arrest.”19 The man suffered “broken bones in his face and was missing teeth,” reads a court judgment.20 Yet he remains on active duty in Prince George, where he is alleged to have once deployed a Taser at least 21 times on another person under arrest.21
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News that Cpl. Graham remains on active duty leaves some people shaking their heads.22 “All of this brings me to the conclusion that things are completely out of control.”23 Here’s yet another incident, “a Vancouver constable named Kenrick Whitney became angry when a civilian took a parking spot he wanted. “I lost my cool for that short moment,” he admitted in B.C. provincial court.”24 Const. Whitney’s assault victim, however, “told a more chilling story. “He told me, ‘You’re f---ing dead,’ ” he testified in 2003. Const. Whitney chased after the man on foot and knocked him to the ground. “The next thing I knew, I was hit in the face,” the victim testified.”25 Last year, he was the subject of a Code of Conduct review for another road-rage incident. Const. Whitney had confronted a driver in what the RCMP described as “an unprofessional manner.” He swore at the driver and spit on him. He remains on active duty in B.C.’s Lower Mainland.26 Whitney got off easy both times.27 Crown prosecutors declined to press charges over his most recently known assault, while a provincial court judge treated him leniently for an earlier assault.28 He remains on active duty in B.C.’s Lower Mainland.29 In yet another incident, an RCMP police officer was guilty of assaults against prisoners, “Const. Kipanik Eegeesiak was given a suspended sentence on each count of assault and will be under probation for the next year, said Justice Ronald Veale at Eegeesiak's sentencing on June 24 at the Nunavut Court of Justice.”30 In the first instance, “Eegeesiak choked the prisoner before he fell to the floor” and in the second "never bug my cousin again, or I will knock you out, Eegeesiak threatened. Eegeesiak threw the prisoner against the door of the cell, pinned him to the ground and kneed him in the face five or six times. Eegeesiak then proceeded to stand with one foot on the man's upper back and the other on his head while the prisoner had one hand handcuffed.”31 In another situation, “two RCMP officers in Kamloops, B.C., face assault charges stemming from separate incidents early this year. Const. Kevin
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Roy has been suspended with pay over charges he used excessive force during the separate arrests of two people in January. Const. Ryan Sheremetta has been assigned to desk duties after a fellow officer complained about an off-duty altercation in which Sheremetta is alleged to have punched a man … Sheremetta is the officer who shot and killed a Vanderhoof, B.C., man during a confrontation … He was never charged.”32 In one more situation, RCMP Cpl. Andre Turcotte was found guilty of the assault on Scott Campbell in Penticton.33 The beating left the man unconscious on the side of Highway 97 in Summerland near the Sumac Ridge turnoff on Nov. 29, 2007.34 Judge Dev Dley said Turcotte punched Campbell and eventually landed "at least three kicks," to Campbell before an oncoming car stopped.35 What did RCMP Turcotte do? He left the scene? “It was then Turcotte jumped into his vehicle and left the unconscious man and the witnesses.”36 "What he did was intentional and inexcusable ... the nature of the assault can only be described as brutal," said Dley adding Turcotte breached his trust with the public.37 “Dley found that Turcotte intentionally hid that he had been involved in the incident from a fellow officer when asked about it the following day.”38 He also called Turcotte's eventual statement to RCMP "misleading," and other inconsistencies led the judge to take the victims word over Turcotte's.39 Again, in September 2005, RCMP Constable Michael Dudas entered a McDonald’s restaurant drive-through lane and instigated an angry verbal exchange with three young pedestrians placing an order in front of him.40 In “a sudden and violent attack,” RCMP Const. Dudas left his truck, grabbed one of the young women and punched her in the face.41 She fell to the ground where she lay “bleeding profusely.” Four of her teeth were fractured as a result of the attack.42
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What did RCMP Const. Dudas do? What else, he left the scene! “The constable returned to his truck and left the scene without offering any assistance to his victim.”43 What did the RCMP do, they “docked him 10 days pay.”44 RCMP Const. Dudas remains on active duty in the National Capital Region.45 In another assault case, incredibly “a Surrey Mountie already awaiting trial on two counts of assault has been charged again -- this time for another alleged on-duty incident. Const. Imran Saeed has been charged with one count of assault stemming from a February 2009 incident involving a female driver.”46 “In the latest probe into Saeed's on-duty conduct, the female motorist alleges Saeed assaulted her during a routine traffic stop. The 30-year-old officer is already awaiting trial for two other counts of assault relating to an alleged on-duty incident.”47 Similarly, “Const. Joseph Kane, who was not present at the Surrey Provincial court hearing, is charged with assault causing bodily harm in relation to an alleged incident from April 2008.” As well, “Kane is also accused, in a separate incident, of assaulting a man during a vehicle stop in January 2008.”48 In another assault incident, “on February 15, 2010 an individual alleged he had been assaulted by a police officer the previous evening around bar closing time near a nightclub on Leon Avenue in Kelowna. A Criminal Code and RCMP internal Code of Conduct investigation were initiated. The results of the criminal investigation were forwarded to Crown Counsel resulting in one charge of assault being laid against Cst Christopher Brinnen. Cst Brinnen remains on duty.”49 Footnotes 1. RCMP thug broke man’s jaw found guilty. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:P4XJxz4LNhwJ: www.bcrevolution.ca/rcmp_covering_up_child_abuse.htm+sexual+assault s+committed+by+rcmp&cd=11&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca
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2 - 6. RCMP "officer" guilty in North Vancouver assault. Canadian Press. Tuesday, February 15, 2005. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:P4XJxz4LNhwJ: www.bcrevolution.ca/rcmp_covering_up_child_abuse.htm+sexual+assault s+committed+by+rcmp&cd=11&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 7. Brian Hutchinson: What constitutes ‘gross misconduct’ for RCMP officers questioned. Posted: National Post, December 05, 2009 by Daniel Kaszor. http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fullcomment/archive/2009/12/05 /brian-hutchinson-what-constitutes-gross-misconduct-for-rcmp-officersquestioned.aspx 8 - 12. RCMP Officer criticized for arrest. Canadian Press. Tuesday, February 15, 2005. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:P4XJxz4LNhwJ: www.bcrevolution.ca/rcmp_covering_up_child_abuse.htm+sexual+assault s+committed+by+rcmp&cd=11&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 13 - 16. Case closed: Shannon Murrin. Published on December 31st, 2009, Published on July 1st, 2010. http://www.thetelegram.com/Justice/2009-12-31/article-1455540/Caseclosed/1 17. Others ignore that requirement and publish the crap the RCMP pull, “$275,000 of taxpayer's money wasn't enough!”, Amicus No. 23489520, National Library of Canada. The author believes that, to make it a better world, more people should publish their stories to let the next ‘guy’ know what has gone before so they can protect themselves from such behavior. 18. Case closed: Shannon Murrin. Published on December 31st, 2009, Published on July 1st, 2010. http://www.thetelegram.com/Justice/2009-12-31/article-1455540/Caseclosed/1 19 - 26. Brian Hutchinson: What constitutes ‘gross misconduct’ for RCMP officers questioned. Posted: National Post, December 05, 2009 by Daniel Kaszor. http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fullcomment/archive/2009/12/05 /brian-hutchinson-what-constitutes-gross-misconduct-for-rcmp-officersquestioned.aspx 27 - 28. Kenrick ‘Ken’ Whitney: From offensive tackle to offensive cop.
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http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:dZ942uwbbJgJ:w ww.bcpolicecomplaints.org/ken_whitney.html+assaults+committed+by+rc mp&cd=9&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 29. Brian Hutchinson: What constitutes ‘gross misconduct’ for RCMP officers questioned. Posted: National Post, December 05, 2009 by Daniel Kaszor. http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fullcomment/archive/2009/12/05 /brian-hutchinson-what-constitutes-gross-misconduct-for-rcmp-officersquestioned.aspx 30 - 31. Police officer guilty of assaults against prisoners. Emily Ridlington, Northern News Services. Published Monday, June 28, 2010. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:LNxfqVkMhL4J: www.nnsl.com/frames/newspapers/201006/jun28_10crt.html+assaults+committed+by+rcmp&cd=20&hl=en&ct=c lnk&gl=ca 32. Two Kamloops RCMP face assault charges. Last Updated: Friday, July 9, 2010. The Canadian Press. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2010/07/09/bckamloops-rcmp-assault-charge.html 33 - 39. RCMP officer sentenced for assault. By Kristi Patton - Penticton Western News. Published: June 01, 2010, Updated: June 01, 2010. http://www.bclocalnews.com/okanagan_similkameen/pentictonwesternne ws/news/95369939.html 40 - 45. Best of the worst of Mountie misconduct. Posted: December 12, 2009 by Daniel Kaszor. National Post. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:XErUwmcdhEAJ :network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/posted/archive/2009/12/12/best-ofthe-worst-of-mountiemisconduct.aspx+rcmp+disgraceful+behaviour+2010+Winter+Games&cd =6&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 46 - 47. Surrey Mountie charged with assault once more. By Katie Mercer And Jennifer Saltman, The Province. May 20, 2010. http://www.theprovince.com/news/Surrey+Mountie+charged+with+assaul t+once+more/3050445/story.html 48. More assault charges against Surrey Mounties.
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By Jennifer Saltman and Katie Mercer, The Province May 20, 2010. http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:26Dfhn5qg3AJ:w ww.theprovince.com/opinion/Tiger%2Bpenises%2Bnext/2736256/More% 2Bassault%2Bcharges%2Bagainst%2BSurrey%2BMounties/3049113/stor y.html+Const.+Joseph+Kane+assault&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca 49. Kelowna RCMP Member Charged with Assault File # 2010-27719. 2010-08-16. http://bc.rcmp.ca/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=50&languageId=1&conten tId=16095

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Chapter 10 ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE TOO BUSY HARASSING FEMALE OFFICERS TO CONCENTRATE ON NOTORIOUS CASES? As cited in “Female Mountie alleges sexual harassment, calls for union or support group”1: “A female British Columbia Mountie who was the force's public face for some of its most high-profile cases says the RCMP is accountable to no one for the treatment of its employees and a union or similar organization is needed to protect them from a culture that is badly broken.”2 “Cpl. Catherine Galliford, who was the spokeswoman on the Air India and Robert Pickton investigations, has come forward in recent days to detail shocking allegations of persistent sexual harassment during her 20 years on the force.”3 “Galliford says in an interview that she experienced six to 10 incidents of harassment or sexual harassment, including one occasion in which a superior showed her his genitals.”4 "You've reached your breaking point. You're being harassed to death. There has to be a group, a body to go to," Galliford said in a telephone interview.5 “Galliford has spent four years off the force, battling demons that have included posttraumatic stress disorder and for a while, a drinking problem. She has now filed a 115-page internal complaint.”6 “She said the harassment started almost from the beginning, when she was training at the RCMP depot in Regina and escalated to an incident when a superior showed her his penis to show her a mole. She said the pair were in a car and had pulled off of Highway 99.”7 “Galliford said a supervisor on one case she worked on would take her on road trips that included efforts to get her to have sex with him.”8 “Galliford said she wouldn't recommend any woman opt for a career in the RCMP.”9 "Don't even think about it. No. Run like your hair is on fire. There are other police departments out there. You can join Calgary. You can join Edmonton. You can join Toronto. You can join Port Moody. But do not join the RCMP."10

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With so many apparently sexually twisted individuals in the RCMP, abusing female officers, showing them their “winkies”, just how many missing women or murdered woman can possibly be attributed to members of this police force, if any? After all, just like those in Canada’s military, the RCMP are shipped all over Canada and sometimes in other parts of the world? And, if there are any armchair detectives out there, there is page after page of missing and murdered victims cited in this book and each and everyone deserves better than the RCMP have given them or their grieving loved ones! Footnotes 1 - 10. Female Mountie alleges sexual harassment, calls for union or support group By: Terri Theodore and Keven Drews, The Canadian Press Breaking News The Canadian Press - ONLINE EDITION Posted: 11/10/2011 3:01 AM http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/canada/breakingnews/female-mountie-allegessexual-harassment-calls-for-union-or-support-group133596853.html?viewAllComments=y

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Chapter 11 WHAT DID THE ROYAL CANADIAN RATS DO TO THIS OTHER LITTLE GUY, TERRY MALLENBY??? This is what the Royal Canadian Mounted Police did to this “little guy”, Terry Mallenby!! The thing is they have been doing the same to all “little guys and gals” for decades now!! Let’s put this true story into perspective as a very apparent RCMP [Royal Canadian Mounted Police] and Canadian Government Conspiracy: 1976 Coroner’s Inquest held in Squamish, British Columbia, Canada ruled the homicide was by Person or Persons Unknown RCMP S/Sgt John Thomas Randle writes a letter saying that this “little guy” was a murderer1 RCMP S/Sgt John Thomas Randle writes a letter saying that this “little guy” was a murderer is given to John Gomery2a M.J. Hauser of the Correctional Service of Canada in memo(s) says that this “little guy” was a murderer3 Nicole Bomberg of the Canadian Human Rights Commission in memo(s) says that this “little guy” was a murderer4 Lorisa Stein of the Canadian Human Rights Commission in memo(s) says that this “little guy” was a murderer5 The “little guy” being unemployed seeks relief from his Canada Student Loans, however, the Judge turns out to be John Gomery and his request is denied2b The “little guy” being unemployed seeks a disability pension [Canada Pension Plan] using RCMP S/Sgt John Thomas Randle, M.J. Hauser of the Correctional Service of Canada memo(s), Nicole Bomberg of the Canadian Human Rights Commission memo(s) and Lorisa Stein of the Canadian Human Rights Commission memo(s) – his request for disability pension approved The “little guy” being unemployed again seeks relief from his
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Canada Student Loans, the Judge not being John Gomery, and his request is approved 1981 The RCMP fabricate more “bull shit” about the “little guy” to railroad him into jail After 14 years of accumulating evidence, the “little guy” successfully sues the RCMP [see Appendix 1, cited below] The “little guy” blew the whistle on Newfoundland Social Service Minister Kay Young’s Whitbourne Centre [see Appendix 2, cited below] The “little guy” went back on his Canada Pension Plan disability pension with a psychiatrist diagnosis that the “little guy” suffered with Post Traumatic Stress – Chronic Type, Social Phobia, etc [see Appendix 3, cited below] As part of dealing with his Post Traumatic Stress – Chronic Type he took to writing about the RCMP false statements, harassment, illegal, acts: Human rights violations in Canada: Individual being denied employment with the Federal Government of Canada due to false "murder charge" statements made by M.J. Hauser of the Correctional Service of Canada continuing case study from Cour sup rieure en mati re de faillite, Palais de justice, Montr al, File 500-11002290-894)OCLC Number: 29205400 – 1990 Human rights violations in Canada: Individual being denied employment with the Federal Government of Canada due to false murder charge statements made by Nicole Bomberg of the Public Service Commission of Canada continuing case study from Cour sup rieure en mati re de faillite, Palais de justice, Montr al, File #500-11-002290-894)OCLC Number: 29205400 – 1990 1996 As part of dealing with his Post Traumatic Stress – Chronic Type he took to writing about the RCMP false statements, harassment, illegal, acts: R.C.M.P. Sgt. John ("Jack") Thomas Randle's legacy to Canada. ISBN: 0969594429 9780969594420 OCLC Number: 46531882 - 1996
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R.C.M.P. Sgt. John ("Jack") Thomas Randle's legacy to Canada. ISBN: 0969594429 9780969594420 OCLC Number: 46531882 - 1996 1997 As part of dealing with his Post Traumatic Stress – Chronic Type he took to writing about the RCMP false statements, harassment, illegal, acts: Human rights violations in Canada by federal agents of the Canadian Human Rights Anti-Discrimination Agency of the Public Service Commission of Canada. ISBN: 0969594453 9780969594451 OCLC Number: 46528081 - 1997 Is he Canada's example of another Mark Furman : R.C.M.P. Sgt. John ("Jack") Thomas Randle purposefully committed lies, fabricated evidence, made false statements & committed illegal acts! ISBN: 0969594437 9780969594437 OCLC Number: 43152171 - 1997 Complete discharge from bankruptcy including preferred student loans due to Royal Canadian Mounted Police harassment: a most unusual case of bankruptcy. ISBN: 0968290469 9780968290460 OCLC Number: 46563182 – 1997 1998 As part of dealing with his Post Traumatic Stress – Chronic Type he took to writing about the RCMP false statements, harassment, illegal, acts: Canadian anti-discriminate [sic] directorate and Canadian public service staff Nicole Bomberg's legacy to Canada. ISBN: 0968290469 9780968290460 OCLC Number: 46563169 - 1998 Canadian anti-discrimination directorate and Canadian public service staff Lorisa Stein's legacy to Canada. N: 096959447X 9780969594475 OCLC Number: 46563137 - 1998 Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers Sgt. John ("Jack") Thomas Randle's & Cpl. Jackett's legacy to Canada. ISBN: 0968290442 9780968290446 OCLC Number: 46563215 - 1998
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Judge John Gomery's inapproprivate comments based on lies, false statements, fabricated statements & illegal acts by R.C.M.P. Sgt. John Thomas Randle. ISBN: 0968290477 9780968290477 OCLC Number: 46563154 – 1998 Can police harassment involving illegal acts, false statements and fabricated evidence lead to a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder sufficient to approve permanent disability pension? ISBN: 0969594488 9780969594482 OCLC Number: 46563102 - 1998 1998 The United Nations wasn’t interested in “the little guy”: Kofi Annan, Secretary General of the United Nations and Mary Robinson, the Human Rights Commissioner: their legacy to the world. OCLC Number: 49268248 1998 To shut the “little guy” up, the RCMP fabricate more “bull shit” about the “little guy” to railroad him into jail The Canadian Investigative Program wasn’t interested in “the little guy”: Story 'too hot' for the investigative program "The Fifth Estate"!! OCLC Number: 48670944 2005 Did apparent RCMP stooge professor Helen Brown purposefully fabricate a statement about the “little guy’s” son to interfere with his university program6 This RCMP stooge professor Helen Brown also tried the same with the “little guy’s” daughter 2006 Did the RCMP have the Canadian Military purposefully issue the “little guy’s” daughter clown sized boots so she would not make BMQ and eliminate her from a career with the Canadian military 7 Did the RCMP have the Canadian Military apparently “poison” the “little guy’s” son so he would not make BMQ and eliminate him from a career with the Canadian military8 The RCMP had some ruffians harass the “little guy’s” wife, daughter and son9
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Did the RCMP have a private security employer deny the “little guy’s” son essential emails10 Did RCMP stooge Canadian Minister Diane Finley purposefully accept lies of a private security employer about the “little guy’s” son and daughter to eliminate a career in private security11 The RCMP made up some cock-and-bull reason not to accept the “little guy’s” son as a recruit thus eliminating his potential career with the RCMP12 Did RCMP stooge Manitoba Health Minister Theresa Oswald purposefully accept lies from the “cool kids gang” to harass, isolate and discriminate against the “little guy’s” daughter13 Did RCMP stooge Manitoba Health Minister Theresa Oswald’s “cool kids gang” also try to harass and isolate the “little guy’s” son

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The Canadian Government and RCMP are censoring this current author’s attempts to bring this conspiracy to light, where the Canadian Government and the RCMP are obviously censoring what appears on Amazon.com14

Footnotes 1. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago that there were “lying bastards” in the RCMP [interspersed amongst the many fine RCMP officers protecting our citizens and country] and has waited over 30 years before the rest of the country and world could read about the “lying bastards”, as cited in the current author’s recent books highlighting accounts in the media and on the web: Canada’s Police Force: Lies, fabrication, perjury ... and much worse? “Before his death he was able to tell a nurse at the hospital that an RCMP officer jumped up and down on him” http://www.amazon.com/CANADAs-POLICE-FORCE-fabricationperjury/dp/1461102812/ref=sr_1_18?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311552272&sr=1-18 Cry Babies! A pile of “dirty tricks” and when they are revealed – boy do they cry? http://www.amazon.com/Cry-Babies-dirty-tricksrevealed/dp/1466423188/ref=sr_1_21?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318962646&sr=121
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Were these RCMP officers just being "BOYS"? Or was it very close to "RAPE"? http://www.amazon.com/Were-these-RCMP-officersbeing/dp/1468089110/ref=sr_1_45?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1324291319&sr=1-45 The New RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson: Closes door on "sexual perverts" already in the RCMP? http://www.amazon.com/New-RCMP-Commissioner-BobPaulson/dp/1468092308/ref=sr_1_46?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1324291389&sr=146 Let's "brow-beat" this witness and, if that doesn't work, we'll fabricate? RCMP investigative techniques? http://www.amazon.com/Lets-brow-beat-witness-doesntfabricate/dp/1467982245/ref=sr_1_39?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323852499&sr=139 Why isn't Public Safety Minister Vic Toews doing more? Or, is it all just more political "hot air"? http://www.amazon.com/Public-Safety-Minister-Toewsdoing/dp/1468123238/ref=sr_1_51?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1325503167&sr=1-51 2a & 2b. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what a “miserable bastard” John Gomery was and has waited over 30 years before the rest of the country and world would find out, as cited in the current author’s recent book highlighting accounts in the media and on the web: A Federal Court ruling has blasted the biased musings of Judge John Gomery http://www.amazon.com/Federal-ruling-blasted-biasedmusings/dp/1456331027/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1318524151&sr=8-4 3 - 5. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and has waited over 30 years before the rest of the country and world would find out, as cited in the current author’s recent book: There's No Such Thing as Human Rights in Canada! http://www.amazon.com/Theres-Thing-Human-RightsCanada/dp/1463626622/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311552066&sr=1-2 6. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about the “lying professor” as an apparent RCMP stooge who tried to interfere with the “little guy” son’s education, as cited in the
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current author’s recent book: The lying professor? And, the lying V.P.? http://www.amazon.com/lying-professor-VP/dp/1466453400/ref=sr_1_30?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1319498208&sr=1-30 7. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about the “lying doctor” as an apparent RCMP stooge who tried to interfere with the “little guy” daughter’s potential military career, as cited in the current author’s recent book: The lying doctor? And, the lying general? http://www.amazon.com/lying-doctorgeneral/dp/1466449020/ref=sr_1_25?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=13194979 52&sr=1-25 8. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about the apparent attempted “poisoning” of the “little guy” son’s thus eliminating his potential military career, as cited in the current author’s recent books: Canadian Government Conspiracy: Was this ‘kid’ poisoned? http://www.amazon.com/Canadian-Government-Conspiracy-thispoisoned/dp/146646254X/ref=sr_1_29?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1320314209&sr=129 David Langtry's Legacy to Canada?: Accepting lie, after lie, after lie? http://www.amazon.com/David-Langtrys-Legacy-CanadaAccepting/dp/1468160478/ref=sr_1_55?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326213768&sr=1 -55 Canada Government: Why so many liars? http://www.amazon.com/Canada-Government-Why-manyliars/dp/1468176978/ref=sr_1_56?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1326213811&sr=1-56 9. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about the harassment of the “little guy’s” wife and daughter and son by RCMP stooges, as cited in the current author’s recent book: Canada’s Police Force: Lies, fabrication, perjury ... and much worse? “Before his death he was able to tell a nurse at the hospital that an RCMP officer
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jumped up and down on him” http://www.amazon.com/CANADAs-POLICE-FORCE-fabricationperjury/dp/1461102812/ref=sr_1_18?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311552272&sr=1-18 10. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about a vindictive employer as an apparent RCMP stooge who tried to interfere with the “little guy” son’s safety, as cited in the current author’s recent books: Canada’s Very Own “Three Blind Mice”! Who concluded that antibiotics are for stress? http://www.amazon.com/Canadas-Very-Three-BlindMice/dp/1466431334/ref=sr_1_23?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318962853 &sr=1-23 Vindictive Employers: Nothing but poison! http://www.amazon.com/Vindictive-Employers-Nothing-butpoison/dp/1468057758/ref=sr_1_42?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323852377&sr=1-42 CANADIAN JUSTICE DEPARTMENT Umpire J.M. Bordeleau: Ignores medical certificates and antibiotic prescriptions? http://www.amazon.com/CANADIAN-JUSTICE-DEPARTMENT-UmpireBordeleau/dp/1468053833/ref=sr_1_41?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323852587&sr=1 -41 Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire! J.M. Bordeleau's Legacy to Canada? http://www.amazon.com/Liar-Pants-Fire-BordeleausLegacy/dp/1468068504/ref=sr_1_43?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323852192&sr=1-43 11. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about a vindictive employer as an apparent RCMP stooge who tried to interfere with the “little guy” daughter’s employment, as cited in the current author’s recent books: Canada’s Very Own “Three Blind Mice”! Who concluded that antibiotics are for stress? http://www.amazon.com/Canadas-Very-Three-BlindMice/dp/1466431334/ref=sr_1_23?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318962853 &sr=1-23 Vindictive Employers: Nothing but poison! http://www.amazon.com/Vindictive-Employers-Nothing-butpoison/dp/1468057758/ref=sr_1_42?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323852377&sr=1-42
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CANADIAN JUSTICE DEPARTMENT Umpire J.M. Bordeleau: Ignores medical certificates and antibiotic prescriptions? http://www.amazon.com/CANADIAN-JUSTICE-DEPARTMENT-UmpireBordeleau/dp/1468053833/ref=sr_1_41?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323852587&sr=1 -41 Liar, Liar, Pants on Fire! J.M. Bordeleau's Legacy to Canada? http://www.amazon.com/Liar-Pants-Fire-BordeleausLegacy/dp/1468068504/ref=sr_1_43?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323852192&sr=1-43 12. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about the RCMP making up some cock-and-bull nonsense so they would not have to accept the “little guy’s” son as an RCMP recruit, as cited in the current author’s recent book: If You Like To Catch Bad Guys This Police Force Doesn’t Want You? http://www.amazon.com/Like-Catch-Police-ForceDoesnt/dp/1456352059/ref=sr_1_18?ie=UTF8&qid=1318523694&sr=8-18 If You Live at Home This Police Force Doesn't Want You? What kind of "wacky" police force is that? http://www.amazon.com/Police-Force-Doesnt-wackypolice/dp/1456327305/ref=sr_1_11?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311552066&sr=1-11 RCMP 'Psychologist' Neil Anderson's Legacy to 'Honesty': Don't tell the applicant our secret? http://www.amazon.com/RCMP-Psychologist-Andersons-LegacyHonesty/dp/1467953040/ref=sr_1_37?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=13228491 66&sr=1-37 13. The “little guy” knew full-well long, long ago what “lying bastards” were employed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and here is the story about the RCMP using a provincial government department to sex-discriminate, harass, and isolate the “little guy’s” daughter, as cited in the current author’s recent book: Is slavery alive and well in Canada? There is absolutely no protection for female employees against vindictive employers! http://www.amazon.com/slavery-alive-wellCanada/dp/146623802X/ref=sr_1_21?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=13194982 63&sr=1-21 14. The Canadian Government and RCMP are censoring this current
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author’s attempts to bring this conspiracy against this “little guy” and his family to light, where the Canadian Government and the RCMP are obviously censoring what appears on Amazon.com, as cited in the current author’s recent books:14 Is Canada's Police Force Filtering What the World Reads about Them? The "Crazy Canuck" apparently wrote a bogus review to help out? http://www.amazon.com/Canadas-Police-Force-FilteringWorld/dp/1463601832/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311552066&sr=1-4 Has the “WetCoaster” made another fabricated statement because the author has written about the Lies, Fabrications, Perjury and much worse by Canada’s Police Force? Is the “WetCoaster” and the “Crazy Canuck” the same person? http://www.amazon.com/WetCoaster-another-fabricated-statementFabrications/dp/1466410795/ref=sr_1_21?ie=UTF8&qid=1318523153&sr=8-21 Does Canada censor what is on Amazon.com? Especially books about Canada? http://www.amazon.com/Does-Canada-censor-what-Amazoncom/dp/1466476648/ref=sr_1_31?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1320314149&sr=1-31

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Appendix 1a The “little guy” sued for lost wages of 1.3 million dollars [with actuarial evidence] and the first out-of-court settlement that the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP offered him was $150,000? The “little guy” told the lawyer that wasn’t enough, and the second out-ofcourt settlement that the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP offered him was $275,000? The “little guy” said that represented a moral victory over “the bastards” and said accept it! As far as the “little guy” is concerned, the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP still owe him the remaining 1 million dollars, together with a sizeable amount for his wife and children who have themselves been harassed by the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP! As for the current author can tell, all he can say is that there are apparently many “lying shit-heads” working for the Federal Government of Canada and the RCMP and that there is enough material out there in the press, in the media and via Google search he can write many, many books about them for years and years to come?

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Appendix 1b The “little guy” successfully sued RCMP!

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Appendix 1c The “little guy” successfully sued RCMP!

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Appendix 1d The “little guy” successfully sued RCMP!

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Appendix 2 The “little guy” went off his Canada Pension Plan disability pension first approved in 1979, thinking the RCMP harassment may have finished? However, he was unable to cover-up for an apparent “sleeze ball”, as cited in the current author’s new book: Whistleblower! And darn proud of it! http://www.amazon.com/Whistleblower-darn-proud-TerryMallenby/dp/1466427574/ref=sr_1_22?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318962 745&sr=1-22 As cited, this ‘little guy’ who lost a job after blowing the whistle on the Whitbourne Centre to Premier Clyde Wells and Social Services Minister Kay Young, had warned these two “idiot” politicians of the dangers at the Whitbourne Centre!1 However, they wouldn’t listen [just like all the Whistelblowers cited in this book and elsewhere2] and got rid of their own whistleblower only to find out a year later that a tragedy did occur at the Whitbourne Centre! With the Newfoundland there was a Whistleblower who wrote to Newfoundland Premier Clyde Wells and to Newfoundland Social Services Minister Kay Young telling them that the security at the maximum security youth centre, the Whitbourne Centre, was lax and should be improved.3 What did Newfoundland Premier Clyde Wells and Newfoundland Social Services Minister Kay Young do? They didn’t listen to the Whistleblower; instead they fabricated some cock-and-bull excuse and got rid of him, just like all the government ministers and managers cited in this book and elsewhere.4 And what did that “sleaze-ball” Social Services Minister Kay Young do; she even violated the violation of the Freedom of Information Act and the Privacy Act to make sure this whistleblowers was good-and-gone! Can’t have anyone blowing the whistle on political / government incompetence can we: November 16, 1994 HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY PROCEEDINGS
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Vol. XLII No. 62 http://www.assembly.nl.ca/business/hansard/ga42session2/94-11-16.htm MR. FITZGERALD: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is to the Minister of Social Services. I want to ask the Minister of Social Services why she released information on the employment history of a Mr. xx, the former operations manager at the Newfoundland and Labrador Youth Centre, in clear violation of the Freedom of Information Act and in violation I believe of the Privacy Act? MR. FITZGERALD: Mr. Speaker, not only did the minister violate the Freedom of Information and Privacy Act but she also gave false information, Mr. Speaker, about Mr. xx's employment history. The minister said that Mr. xx had been fired for reasons related to job performance. The official record of employment the department gave to Mr. xx and to Employment Canada says he was dismissed for breach of trust and loss of confidence. Now I ask the minister, did the minister know, Mr. Speaker, that she was giving false information in her press release? Will she now admit Mr. xx was fired because he blew the whistle and disclosed the information as to what was actually happening out at the Newfoundland and Labrador Youth Centre? Now comes that “sleaze-ball” Newfoundland Premier Clyde Wells: November 17, 1994 HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY PROCEEDINGS Vol. XLII No. 63 http://www.assembly.nl.ca/business/hansard/ga42session2/94-11-17.htm MR. W. MATTHEWS: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I have a question for the Premier, following up on the line of questioning by the member for Bonavista South yesterday dealing with the Minister of Social Services Kay Young. Now, on November 8, 1994 the Minister of Social Services Kay Young issued a public statement, a written press release, where she referred to the dismissal of one Mr. xx at the Newfoundland and Labrador Youth Center at Whitbourne. In that she talked about the reasons for dismissal, job performance and work history. I want to ask the Premier, in light of the minister's public statement that is clearly a violation of the Freedom of Information Act and the Privacy Act, but particularly the Freedom Information Act, section 10 (1) (b): Does the Premier consider this conduct and behavior of the Minister of Social Services Kay Young to be acceptable?
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MR. W. MATTHEWS: - and in that written, deliberate statement pertaining to the situation, she said: Mr. xx was dismissed for work related problems, job performance. Now the record of employment belonging to Mr. xx states that he was dismissed for breach of trust and loss of confidence, so in essence, the minister in her statement, issued a false statement. The reason was inaccurate and incorrect, so I want to ask the Premier: does he feel that the conduct of the Minister of Social Services Kay Young, in issuing a false, public statement is behaviour and conduct acceptable for a minister of his Administration or, is he going to allow the standards and behaviour and conduct of the ministers to sink to an all-time low in this Province, where, individual privacy will no longer be protected? What happened a year later, due to the lax security, one of the youth committed suicide and a stink was raised about Newfoundland Premier Clyde Wells and Newfoundland Social Services Minister Kay Young ignoring these Whistleblower warnings! Footnotes 1. The Newfoundland Department of Social Services is the worst department this author has ever read about, AMICUS No. 16972196, National Library of Canada. 2. Some Canadian Whistleblowers Topics: Whistleblowers http://fairwhistleblower.ca/wbers/canadian_wbs.html 3. The Newfoundland Department of Social Services is the worst department this author has ever read about, AMICUS No. 16972196, National Library of Canada. 4. Some Canadian Whistleblowers Topics: Whistleblowers http://fairwhistleblower.ca/wbers/canadian_wbs.html

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Appendix 3a The “little guy” was diagnosed with a multitude of disorders as a consequence of RCMP and Federal Government illegal acts, harassment and other abuse. Author’s note: Anyone who has to identify a loved-one in the morgue can appreciate the horror, grief, anger one experiences?

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Appendix 3b Author’s note: Anyone who has to identify a loved-one in the morgue can appreciate the horror, grief, anger one experiences?

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Appendix 3c

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Chapter 12 ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE COMMISSIONER ROBERT PAULSON USE A RAT BY THE NAME OF SANFU CHEN TO UPLOAD THEIR 40 YEAR OLD LIES ABOUT TERRY MALLENBY BECAUSE HE SUCCESSFULLY SUED THEM!!!! Why would an Alberta University graduate travel all the way to Squamish to upload these 40 year old RCMP lies? Ah, doesn’t Prime Minister Stephen Harper come from Alberta: “Stephen Harper was born in Toronto, Ontario in 1959, and grew up in the suburbs of Leaside and Etobicoke. Following graduation from high school, he moved to Alberta to work briefly in the oil industry, and then entered post-secondary studies.” What kind of graduates does Alberta have? “Darby Love and Sanfu Chen both happen to be graduates of the library studies program at the University of Alberta.” Why would a University of Alberta graduate travel all the way to Squamish British Columbia, Canada? A distance of 1,223 km – around 1,000 miles? Why would a University of Alberta graduate travel all the way to Squamish British Columbia, Canada to upload one article from a non-existent newspaper to the internet? “The company that owned the paper doesn't exist anymore so while the library has verbal permission to use the archives of the Squamish Times there is no formal document making it clear so an application is in front of the copyright board seeking formal acknowledgement that the library can publish the newspaper archive online, says Sanfu Chen.” What was Sanfu Chen‘s purpose? Apparently - Squamish, British Columbia, Canada is the home of Liars! These people published their 40 year old lies anyway at the insistence of Prime Minister Stephen Harper and RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson!! Squamish Public Librarian Sanfu Chen & Darby Love!
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With the help of the Squamish Chief newspaper Laila Michell, David Burke, Rebecca Aldous?

Graduate student Sanfu Chen shifts through the Squamish Library’s archives Photo by Rebecca Aldous, The Chief Newspaper, Squamish, British Columbia Canada What was that article from a defunct newspaper that Sanfu Chen uploaded for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson: Husband reluctant witness .at Mallenby inquest - digitalcollections.ca www.digitalcollections.ca/.../r/.../19760401_Squamish_Times.pdf This article appeared in 1976 and, as cited above, was based on RCMP lies from 1976 made to the Coroner’s Inquest in an effort to railroad Terry Mallenby into jail! Was Rebecca Aldous behind this charade? After all she is part of the Editorial staff, responsible for publishing the false unwilling witness” story?

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Why didn’t Rebecca Aldous and Sanfu Chen concentrate on the apparent Squamish connection with Canada’s missing and murdered persons in Canada? The author became aware of it when starting to write about such things!! SQUAMISH # 1 Oct. 29, '85: Rachel Turley, 20 Turley's body was found in a wooded area near Squamish. She had been sexually assaulted, beaten and strangled. Police say she was known to them as a Granville Mall "street person" who once worked as a prostitute. A 2001 Vancouver Sun article listing the missing http://www.highwayoftears.ca/missingbclist.htm

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SQUAMISH # 2 Topic: 1970's Squamish, BC - possible connection between 3 murders? « Reply #20 on: August 02, 2011, 04:19:55 PM » I'm sorry about your friend. Sadly there were so many serial killers in this area during that era, it hard to know for sure. Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada http://www.unsolvedcanada.ca/index.php?topic=3091.15

SQUAMISH # 3 Re: Jodi Henrickson~17~missing~Bowen Island/Squamish~June 20,2009 « Reply #61 on: May 23, 2012, 11:55:54 AM » Body found on Bowen Island By Jane Seyd, North Shore News May 23, 2012 6:34 AM POLICE investigating the discovery of a body in a bushy area of Bowen Island say the remains are likely not those of missing Squamish teen Jodi Henrickson. "We don't feel it's connected to that case," said Sgt. Jennifer Pound, spokeswoman for the RCMP's Integrated Homicide Investigation Team. Pound said investigators ruled out that the body was Henrickson early on, although she declined to say how police did that. Bowen Island RCMP were called out Friday at around 2 p.m. by a local resident who had discovered the body on his land, a wooded property in the 1,000 block of Harding Road. An autopsy is to be performed Tuesday to try to identify the victim and the likely cause of death. Suicide remains a possibility, as does the chance that the body was dumped there. "There are no obvious signs of injury," said Pound. So far investigators have not confirmed whether the body - which was badly decomposed - is male or female. "We believe the body was there for quite some time," said Pound. Lloyd Harding, who lives on Harding Road, said he was walking down to his mailbox with his son's dog at the end of last week when the Jack Russell terrier tried to drag him into the bush.
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Harding said he noticed a bad smell in the area. "I thought someone had hit a deer he said." Harding said he's walked right by the area where the body was found before but didn't see anything or notice any smell in the area before last week's spell of hot weather. Police are currently checking missing persons reports to see if they can help identify the remains. Henrickson, then 17, disappeared three years ago on June 20, 2009 after leaving a house party on Bowen Island with her ex-boyfriend Gavin Arnott. Neither Henrickson nor any signs of her have shown up since then, despite several searches by both police and volunteers. Police have repeatedly said they think Henrickson met with foul play and never left the island. Harding said the quiet community is "shocked and very concerned" by Friday's discovery. jseyd@nsnews.com http://www.nsnews.com/news/Body+found+Bowen+Island/6663655/story.html Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada http://www.unsolvedcanada.ca/index.php?topic=2890.60

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SQUAMISH # 4 Christopher Leo Turgeon | 3 | Missing Squamish BC | December 18, 1999 « on: July 17, 2011, 10:39:27 PM » Case Number: 0000110 Missing Since: 18 December 1999 Missing From: Squamish, British Columbia, CANADA Details: Christopher was abducted by his non-custodial mother, Lilia VAZQUEZ. Missing Child: Christopher Leo TURGEON Date of Birth: 14 March 1996 Sex: Male Hair: Brown Eye: Brown Height: 91 cm (36 feet, inches) Weight: 19 kg (42 lb) Additional Information: He has a mole on his lower lip on the right side. He speaks English and Spanish. Christopher's photo is age-progressed to 7 years old. Alias(es): May be in the company of: Lilia Martinez VAZQUEZ Date of Birth: 23 March 1974 Sex: Female Hair: Brown Eye: Brown Height: 173 cm (68 feet, inches) Weight: 50 kg (110 lb) Additional Information: The abductor was born in Mexico. She speaks Spanish and English. Alias(es): Lilia MARTINEZ, Lilia MARTINEZ VAZQUEZ, Lilia VASQUEZ Relationship: Mother http://www.ourmissingchildren.gc.ca/cgi-bin/case.pl?id=181&lang=eng Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada http://www.unsolvedcanada.ca/index.php?topic=5195.0
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SQUAMISH # 5 Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada « Reply #45 on: April 11, 2010, 06:18:24 PM » Furry Creek, BC Okay, I am going to post some more of my findings, unfortunately, not much to find. I will post the info over a few posts. This first lot is not in the date sequence as originally listed. I may have found a common thread in these ones. Although they are listed as Squamish/Vancouver cases, when I looked at the death registration information on Ancestry.ca I found all of their locations of death were within 18km of a place called Furry Creek, BC. I have included one that was listed as Squamish as it seems to be in the same area. I am not sure if these young ladies actually died/were found near Furry Creek or if they were perhaps, from there, and therefore, their deaths were listed for that location. I have to break this one into two posts as the computer is fussing 1. 12 April 73 Helen Hopcroft, age 17, Vancouver Her death was registered as 13 May 73, Furry Creek, BC There was an obituary for her in the Winnipeg Free Press 7 June 73 2. 17 Feb 75 Gayle Rogers, Vancouver, BC If it is the same young lady, found "Gail Sandra Rogers" Date of registered death, 7 Mar 75, she was born in 1949 so she was 26, her death is registered as "Squamish, BC" Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada http://www.unsolvedcanada.ca/index.php?topic=416.45

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SQUAMISH # 6 Fraser Member Posts: 120 « Reply #46 on: April 11, 2010, 06:27:30 PM » Furry Creek cont'd 3. 25 Jan 75 Margie Melinda Blackwell, 21 Death registration: 25 Jan 75, place of death, Furry Creek, BC 4. 26 Feb 76 Ruth Gwendolyn Mallenby, 26, Squamish Death Registration: "Ruth Gwendelyne Mallenby", 7 Mar 76 Lion's Bay, (18 km from Furry Creek, BC) For everyone's consideration. If I find anymore with this link I will add them to this post. Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada http://www.unsolvedcanada.ca/index.php?topic=416.45

SQUAMISH # 7 Sunday afternoon a group of hikers found a dead body near a hiking trail on the side of Mamquam Road in Squamish. "It appears the man was met with foul play," said spokeswoman Sgt. Jennifer Pound. "It does appear to be a homicide." Pound also refused to comment on media reports that the man's body was found beaten and duct-taped. Kim Bolan has reported the identity of the body is that of William Woo from Surrey who was an associate of the East Vancouver hells angels but more recently went over to the other side. Now he's in a body bag. I wonder who the prime suspects are? If the East Vancouver chapter of the Hells angels contract a murder, that makes them a criminal organization guilty of murder. I don't know about the Duhre Daiquiris but Lotus, now there is some old school credibility right there. They are more than capable of professional payback. Beaten and duck taped. Yeah that would imply foul play. It reminds me of two other cases in Squamish. One was a guy named Alex Larsen who was run over by a truck because he was lying in the middle of the road. It's so strange and tragic. Yes it's possible he got drunk or high and passed out. Yet we've never heard a word either way. We don't know if he was beaten and dumped there or if he was walking on the side of the road and a car hit him which was why he was lying in the middle of the road before the bus ran him over. The case comes to mind and I wish there was more pieces to that puzzle. They say he had made a decision to turn his life around. Just like Britney Irving. Tragic indeed.
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Of course there's that other bizarre case in Squamish, the murder of Javan Luke Dowling. Three drug dealers were driving in a car in Vancouver. One of the drug dealers, shot one of the other drug dealers in the head and the third drug dealer watched the shooter cut off Dowling's head and dismembered his body. The two surviving drug dealers buried the body in two separate locations in Squamish. Mihaly Illes was alleged to be the shooter while Derrick Madinski helped him bury the body. Derrick Madinski went with Joe Brallic to LA where Joe was ripped off and murdered. Meanwhile in that same original article about a new dead body being found in Squamish it later stated there was another shooting in Surrey near the corner of 111A Avenue and 146th Street at about 2: 40 a.m. on Sunday. It didn't even make it's own head line. Kinda sad. The point is violent crime is continuing and as the papers also report the court system is currently in crisis. That was before Harper's disproportionate crime bill sent the fragile system into chaos. Gangsters Out Blog http://gangstersout.blogspot.ca/2011/10/body-dumped-in-squamish.html Why didn’t Rebecca Aldous and Sanfu Chen concentrate on the apparent Squamish connection with Canada’s missing and murdered persons in Canada? Simply because Rebecca Aldous and Sanfu Chen are RCMP stooges not interested in solving some of the hundreds, upon hundreds of missing and unsolved murders in Canada – only interested in helping the RCMP spread other crap about Terry Mallenby!! SIMPLY PAYBACK!! SOLVE SOME OF THESE MURDERS AND MISSING – YOU RCMP ARSE HOLES!! PEOPLE DESERVE A LOT BETTER FROM YOU ARSE HOLES!! So who is Sanfu Chen? Here she is again:

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Historical Squamish photos and documents go online Project awaiting word on next round of funding to carry on by John French As cited: “Getting the materials published online is librarian Sanfu Chen's task. She started full-time with the library in Squamish in June armed with a Library and Information studies degree along with undergraduate studies in art history.” Hmmm! Sanfu Chen starts in June and shortly thereafter she puts out on the internet this article about Terry Mallenby being a supposed unwilling witness?? Husband reluctant witness .at Mallenby inquest - digitalcollections.ca www.digitalcollections.ca/.../r/.../19760401_Squamish_Times.pdf Who would want this out there so fast – why the RCMP that’s who!! Surely Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper would want to do his fair share to help the RCMP out – why not have two people from the University of Alberta pretend they are doing an internet project, and guess what the first article they put out on the internet is some “bogus shit” about the little guy!! With people like RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson at the helm, and that other “jack-ass” Stephen Harper running the country – there’s no hope in hell of improving anything – let alone tell the truth!!
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Is that why the current prime minister is portrayed wearing a “Gestapo” uniform?? [see picture of Stephen Harper in gestapo clothes] http://fredericks-artworks.blogspot.ca/2012_06_01_archive.html

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Other Work by Terry Mallenby former federal peace officer old age pensioner & PTSD disability pensioner Cognitive development: the functional aspect of symbolization and language, by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 1206866 Publisher: Winnipeg, S. Evans, ©1973. A bibliography of research on spatial and social behaviour by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 1188853 Publisher: Winnipeg : Thomas Todd Press, 1973. A bibliography of research on spatial behaviour. by Terry W Mallenby; Ruth G Roberts OCLC Number: 123780236 Publisher: Winnipeg : Thomas Todd Press, ©1973. A note on perceived self-acceptance of institutionalized mentally retarded (IMR) children. by TW Mallenby ISSN: 0022-1325 OCLC Number: 105523657 Article Language: English Publication: The Journal of genetic psychology, 1973 Sep; 123(1st Half): 171-2 Database: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Personal space : direct measurement techniques with hard-of-hearing children by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 8686052 From: Environment and behavior ; v. 6, no. 1 (March 1974). Publisher: [Beverly Hills, CA] : Sage Publications, 1974. Effect of discussion on reduction of magnitude of Poggendorff illusion. by TW Mallenby ISSN: 0031-5125 OCLC Number: 107527338 Publication: Perceptual and motor skills, 1974 Oct; 39(2): 787-91 Database: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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Personal space: projective and direct measures with institutionalized mentally retarded children. by TW Mallenby ISSN: 0022-3891 OCLC Number: 105929976 Publication: Journal of personality assessment, 1974 Feb; 38(1): 28-31 Database: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Personal Space: Projective and Direct Measures with Institutionalized Mentally Retarded Children by Terry Mallenby ISSN: 0022-3891 OCLC Number: 4631503689 Publication: Journal of Personality Assessment, v38 n1 (19740201): 28-31 Database: ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education. Personal Space: Direct Measurement Techniques with Hard-of-Hearing Children by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 424960945 Accession No: EJ098610 Publication: Environment and Behavior, 6, 1, 117-122, Mar 74 Database: ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education. MALLENBY, TERRY W., Personal Space: Direct Measurement Techniques with Hardof-Hearing Children: Environment and Behavior 6(1) p. 117 N: 0013-9165 OCLC Number: 4647243973 Publication: Environment and Behavior, v6 n1 (19740301): 127-127 Database: ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education. The effect of extended contact with "normals" on the social behavior of hard-of-hearing children. by TW Mallenby ISSN: 0022-4545 OCLC Number: 107863896 Publication: The Journal of social psychology, 1975 Feb; 95(First Half): 137-8 Database: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

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The personal space of hard-of-hearing children after extended contact with 'normals'. by TW Mallenby; RG Mallenby ISSN: 0007-1293 OCLC Number: 113775903 Publication: The British journal of social and clinical psychology, 1975 Sep; 14(3): 253-7 Database: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. The Effect of Extended Contact with "Normals" on the Social Behavior of Hard-ofHearing Children by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 427052930 Accession No: EJ118344 Publication: Journal of Social Psychology, 95, 137-8, Feb 75 Database: ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education. The personal space of hard-of-hearing children after extended contact with "normals" by Terry W Mallenby; Ruth G Mallenby OCLC Number: 14151807 Notes: Caption title. From: British journal of social and clinical psychology ; v. 14, no. 3 (Sept. 1975) Description: p. 253-257. Publisher: [Great Britain : s.n., 1975] The missing person in measurement techniques of interpersonal distance. by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 678920246 Thesis/dissertation : Document : eBook Computer File Publisher: [Burnaby, B.C.] : [s.n.], ©1975. The Effect of Extended Contact with “Normals” on the Social Behavior of Hard-ofHearing Children by Terry Mallenby ISSN: 0022-4545 OCLC Number: 4653399646 Publication: The Journal of Social Psychology, v95 n1 (19750201): 137-138 Database: ERIC The ERIC database is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education. Facilitating the disappearance of perceptual error to the Poggendorff illusion. by TW Mallenby ISSN: 0023-8309 OCLC Number: 112913792 Publication: Language and speech, 1976 Apr-Jun; 19(2): 193-9
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Database: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Incidents of physical assault against child-abuse investigation workers : the nature of child-abuse protection legislation as possible reason for such incidents : some Canadian provincial examples of internal policies attempting to deal with such incidents : placing the trend of such incidents into a theoretical perspective by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 44178037 Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript Archival Material Publisher: 1994. Teach your child to read : a simple method for parents and educators by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 61554932 - 1984 The relative effectiveness of whole- and part-task simulators OCLC Number: 222728551 – 1984 Quality assurance in medical/health care utilizing and incorporating three methods of evaluation: process, setting and outcome : an introduction to assessing medical/health care by means of a conceptual "process matrix" : with special reference to acute care and chronic care hospitals by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 184866019 - 1986. When the "baby-boom" cohort reaches 65 : will it be social chaos or a carefully planned transition? : an introductory research proposal by Terry W Mallenby OCLC Number: 184861481 - 1986. Child abuse : a beginning social worker's understanding and use of the DSM-III-R and three reactive mental disorders following child abuse : reactive attachment disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and adjustment disorder by Terry Wallice Mallenby; Institute of Psychometric Assessment (Bay Roberts, Newfoundland) OCLC Number: 40533667 - 1994 Dealing with a violent work environment : internal policies and legislation dealing with physical assault and other threats against child protective social workers by Terry W Mallenby; Institute of Psychometric Assessment, Applied Studies & Investigative Research. ISBN: 0969594402 9780969594406 OCLC Number: 35875995 - 1994 Notes: Revision of author's thesis.
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Description: vii, 473 leaves; 29 cm. Series Title: Employee assistance program series. How to make staff safe: how to reduce labour-management conflict: how to reduce staff grievances by Terry W Mallenby ISBN: 0969594402 9780969594406 OCLC Number: 62920434 - 1997 Other Titles: How to reduce labor-management conflict, How to reduce staff grievances

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