CAMARGO‐KITSON   URBAN DESIGN CONSULTANTS 

 

BRISBANCE CITY CATALYST PROJECT  ROMA STREET TRANSFORMATION   
Presented by: Mr Alex Camargo and Mr Greg Kitson 

      
0   

Table of Contents 
Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................... 2  1.0 Vision .................................................................................................................................................. 3  2.0 Introduction to Roma Street ................................................................................................................ 4 
2.1 Project Brief – Roma Street Transformative Area ....................................................................................................  4  2.2 Urban Design Process and Methodology .................................................................................................................  5 

3.0 Urban Design Tasks ............................................................................................................................. 6 
3.1 Task One – Contextual Analysis ................................................................................................................................ 6  3.1.1 Brief Background – Roma Street ....................................................................................................................  6  3.1.2 Brief Background Information ‐ Brisbane Transit Centre ...............................................................................  8  3.1.3 Maps and Plans – Roma Street Area ..............................................................................................................  9  3.2 Task Two – Spatial Analysis .................................................................................................................................... 13  3.3 Task Three – Stakeholder Analysis .........................................................................................................................  25  3.4 Task Four – Concept Plan Development .................................................................................................................  27  3.5 Task Five – Urban Design Development Roma Street ‐ Recommendation ............................................................ 34 

4.0 Summary and Conclusion .................................................................................................................. 35  5.0 Reference List .................................................................................................................................... 36  6.0 Appendices  ........................................................................................................................................ 37 
 

List of Figures  
Figure 1 – Historical images of Roma Street ............................................................................................... 6  Figure 2 – Roma Street and Roma Street Railway Station .......................................................................... 7  Figure 3 – Brisbane Transit Centre ............................................................................................................. 8  Figure 4 ‐ Synthesised Contextual Analysis of Roma Street ...................................................................... 14  Figures 5 ‐ 8 ............................................................................................................................................. 17  Figures 9 ‐ 12 ........................................................................................................................................... 18 

  List of Tables 
  Table 1 ‐ Five Key Tasks for Submission ................................................................................................... 18 

1   

Executive Summary 
This  report  delivers  a  comprehensive  analysis  and  spatial  assessment  of  Roma  Street  in  Brisbane  City  and  delivers  a  design  option  for  the  transformation  of  the  area.   Firstly,  this  report  identifies  vital  background  information  to  ensure  the  area  is  correctly  defined.  Secondly,  the  vision  and  development  objectives,  prescribed  by  Brisbane  City  Council,  are  outlined  to  provide  a  sense  of  direction  for  the  design  option.   The  report  outlines  and  discusses  the  critical  steps  to  managing  a  successful  urban  design  project.   Lastly,  the  report  offers  options  for  the  redevelopment  of  Roma  Street as a Catalyst Project and aligns the optimal design with the desired outcomes referred to in  the City Master Plan for Brisbane.        The  investigations  and  analysis  of  Roma  Street  discovered  that  many  of  sites  current  planning  issues  can  be  resolved  and  the  solutions  offered  can  assist  to  transform  the  area  into  a  new  focal  point for the Central Business District and lead to a better City which residents are happy to live in.     The recommendations made by Camargo‐Kitson in this report include:     The  construction  of  a  traffic  tunnel  directly  underneath  Roma  Street  to  re‐direct  traffic  away from pedestrians and out of sight  Converting  the  reclaimed  roadway  to  ‘pedestrian  priority  green‐street’  and  a  landscaping  beautification of the surface area  Incorporating  green  transport  strategies  and  enhancing  connectivity  to  Brisbane’s  major  multi‐modal  public  transport  interchange,  Roma  Street  Station  and  the  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  Revitalising  the  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  with  a  modern  upgrade  to  the  external  street  face  and refurbishment of the internal layout  Connecting the new Roma Street to the planned Cross River Rail project; and  The longer‐term strategy to cover over Roma Street Railway Station, partially enclosing the  facility, and creating a new open green space for resident and visitors to the CBD  

  

  The  main  limitation  of  this  report  and  underlying  processes  is  that  although  community  surveys  were completed, this was only a very small sample of the population living in Brisbane and a short  time  frame  to  develop  plausible  solutions.    However,  Camargo‐Kitson  has  strictly  followed  the  objectives  outlined  in  the  project  brief  and  guidance  and  feedback  provided  by  the  Brisbane  City  Council. 
      2   

1.0  Vision 
The new Roma Street will be Brisbane’s premiere ‘pedestrian priority green‐street’  and amplify the symbolic importance of the City’s largest transport interchange.  A  welcoming sense of arrival to Australia’s most liveable city will indulge visitors and  residents in all directions.   
A purpose built traffic tunnel (cut and cover) under the existing roadway, with portals along Roma  Street  and  at  the  George  Street  intersection  with  Herschel  Street,  will  allow  the  activation  of  a  ‘green‐street’ along the surface of Roma Street.  The reclaimed area will support the new direction  of  green  infrastructure  options  across  the  city  and  afford  a  memorable  and  enjoyable  experience  to an onward journey.  A modern architectural makeover of the Brisbane Transit Centre will invite  the outdoors inside, providing a seamless visual connection for travellers.    The  dynamics  of  the  tree  lined  streetscape  with  modern  environmentally  friendly  built  form  and  redirected  traffic  will  reignite  Roma  Street  and  the  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  as  an  exciting  focal  point  of  the  western  fringe  and  newest  landmark  for  the  city.    An  exciting  destination,  the  new  Roma Street will support and reinforce the objectives of other city centre catalyst projects by:  revitalising buildings and creating new memorable outdoor areas  improving links and enhancing integration of the public transport network  freeing pedestrian and traffic interaction for seamless access and movement   supporting active transport options through the vital corridor and onwards; and  showcasing an inviting balance of private and public space    The longer‐term vision to build over Roma Street Railway station and create a new green area will  enhance  connectivity  between  Roma  Street  Parklands  and  Southbank,  via  the  Kurilpa  Bridge.   This  new  open  green  space  will  reflect  the  City’s  sub‐tropical  look  and  feel.   Interacting  with  the  Cross  River Rail Project and planned portals, this new green space will support the sense of arrival at the  gateway to the city centre.          

3   

 perspectives.  2.jpg  files  to  enable  reuse  in  the  Master  Plan  document  or displayed on Council’s website.1  Project Brief – Roma Street Transformative Area  Shortly.   4     .2.  concluding  in  May.    At  present.   Design  professionals.  BCC  is  hosting  a  design  and  ideas  festival.    The  overall  objectives  for  this  project  are  as  follows:  (Brisbane City Council 2013)    to  humanize  the  arrival  experience  between  Roma  street  station  and  the  rest  of  the  city  by providing clear.0  Introduction to Roma Street  This section provides relevant information about the ‘Catalyst Project Brief’ from the Brisbane City  Council. concept plan.  brief  information  about  Roma  Street  and  the  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  (BTC).  and  a  brief  summary  of  the  urban  design  process  and  activities  undertaken  to  create  the  transformative  area  and new Roma Street.  BCC  approved  the  new  Vision  for  the  CCMP.  Outdoor:  Accessible:  Inviting:  Free”  (Brisbane  City  Council  2012). cross section etc)  ‐ Specifications of final deliverables to be provided as follows:  ‐ Posters should be legible at a distance of approximately 3 metres  ‐  A  high  resolution  (600dpi)  .  Brisbane  City  Council  (BCC)  will  release  a  new  City  Centre  Master  Plan  to  guide  development  and  renewal  of  the  Central  Business  District.  students  and  residents  are  invited  to  consider  new  innovative  ideas  and  propose concepts that will renew and improve 16 transformative sites in the City Centre. including  Roma  Street  (Brisbane  City  Council  2013).    In  October  2012. sage and attractive connections   to explore opportunities for architectural transformation of the transit centre   to  produce  concepts  that  inspire  and  capture  the  public  imagination  as  well  as  stimulating  discussion and debate about opportunities to transform City Centre   to  provide  an  overall  vision  and  direction  on  the  identified  transformative  areas  and  produce concepts for use in the City Centre Master Plan document   to  produce  high  quality  graphics  oriented  towards  a  general  audience  that  clearly  capture  the key ideas and city shaping opportunities of the scheme  (Brisbane City Council 2013)    Consultants are required to provide two outputs with their submission in the form of:   A1 size poster which that includes:  ‐ Design Vision/Rationale ‐ approximately 300 words  ‐ Concept Plan ‐ An overall plan (plan or aerial)  ‐ Before and after graphics/picture   ‐ Supporting graphics (sketches. before and after view depicting priority project outcomes  ‐  other  supporting  presentation  graphics  as  evidence  showing  the  achievement  of  the  set  criteria for the assessment and including a conclusion and recommendations.  “Our  Vision:  Open  City. media releases and other market collateral   A4 size Urban Design Project Folio that includes:  ‐  a  holistic  and  integrated  composition  of  the  collated  materials  from  the  five  tasks  described in Table 1  ‐ a design vision.

1)  and  all  tasks  were  carried  out  during  March  and  April  2013.  focus  group  to  elicit  views  and  opinions)  and  determine  how this may affect design schemes and options  based  on  the  results  of  the  various  analyses.   To  better  understand  the  BCC’s  desired  outcomes  for  Roma  Street  and  to  enhance  design  options  and  planning.  interview.  the  following  list  of documents were reviewed and consulted for guidance:           A Vision for our City: City Master Plan 2012  Graphics in the urban design process: Chapters 1 to 6  The Urban Design Guidance Manual  Creating Places for People: An Urban Design Protocol for Australian Cities  Brisbane City Centre Planning Strategy: Building a Liveable City Heart  Google Maps – specifically Roma Street and surrounds  Historical information in relation to land‐use at the site  Brisbane City Council Website    The  purpose  for  reviewing  these  documents  is  to  ensure  best  practice  during  the  design  process  and to:   align to existing development policies for Roma Street as prescribed by the BCC   review earlier decisions from consultation completed by the BCC in relation to the area   ensure  that  the  optimal  design  developing  Roma  Street  development  is  carried  out  in  accordance with Australian urban design guidelines   planning history of the area and existing features of the area   identification of development constraints (desktop audit)   local initiatives (Ideas Fiesta)   realise the importance of the area    5    .(Brisbane City Council 2013)  Table 1 – Five Key Tasks for Submission  Task   1  Description   identify the site   conduct  an  assessment  of  how  people  are  using  space  to  assist  in  raising  your  own  questions  and  hypotheses  about  the  issues  and  challenges  facing  a  specific  urban  area/space   document observations and perceptions about the physical environment   appraise the existing context.  develop  a  concept  plan  and  integral  theme for the urban design  develop the urban design proposal for the chosen site    (Brisbane City Council 2013)  2  3  4  5  2.e.  contextualise  the  urban  design  problem  present  various  parameters  of  the  project  project through maps and analysis  identify  various  stakeholders  and  elicit  their  issues  and  concerns  through  appropriate  methodology  (i.3  Urban Design Process and Methodology   The  urban  design  process  and  methodology  undertaken  by  Camargo‐Kitson  to  produce  the  concept  plan  for  Roma  Street  aligns  with  the  instructions  prescribed  by  the  BCC  (refer  to  section  2.

1.   Also. seen in Figure 1 (Queensland Government 2004).0  Urban Design Tasks  This  section  provides  a  brief  statement  in  relation  to  the  each  of  the  five  tasks  and  activities  undertaken to complete each task.  To the left.  produce  markets.1  Brief Background – Roma Street    The  very  early  history  of  Roma  Street  and  the  surrounding  is  documented  with  evidence  of  Aboriginal  populations  and  culture  and  early  European  settlers  witnessed  large  gatherings  of  various  Aboriginal  tribes  for  ceremonial  purposes.1  Task One – Contextual Analysis  Camargo‐Kitson  understands  contextual  analysis  to  be  a  desktop  site  location  identification  exercise  that  includes  a  brief  history  of  the  area.    To  identify  the  location  of  Roma  Street.    To  the  right.  Brisbane  Grammar  School  and  eventually  the  construction  of  the  Roma  Street  Railway  Station and Rail Yard in 1911.  although  it  is  boxed  in  by  the  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  and  new  Railway  Infrastructre.                                                      6    .   In  1825. the picture provides context  of the large parcel  of land.  the  original  Roma  Street  Railway  Station  remains  at  the  exisiting  site.    3.3.      (Bonzle 2013)  Figure  1  ‐  Roma  Street  Station  and  Rail  Yards  in  the  late  1800s.  a  series  of  maps  illustrating  the  local  and  strategic  context  of  the site were sourced and developed using Google maps.      3.  saleyards.  a  brief  history  of  the  Roma  Street  Area  and  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  is  summarised.  farming.  a  sequence  of  maps  and  plans  with  an  accompanying  short  appraisal  that  describes  the  area  and  includes  data  collected  from  early  observations.   The  area  was  eventually  subdivided  by  1840  and  over  time  was  used  for  various  purposes  including  an  orphanage.  land  use  was  dramatically  altered  by  the  establishment  of  the  Moreton  Bay  Penal  Colony. the very early stages of the railway yards.

    Figure  2  clearly  shows  the  dominant  land  uses  for  the  Roma  Street  area.  The  view  of  Roma  Street  is  very  plain  and  dominated  by  concrete  structures  and  bitumen.  Roma  Street  Railway  Station.      Roma  Street  Railway  station  is  the  major  terminus  for  Brisbane’s  metropolitan  and  Queensland’s  long‐distance  rail  network.    This  area  is  well  hidden  at  street  view  from  Roma  Street  by  the  BTC.   The  street  can  only  be  described  as  bare  and  baron  and  hardly  worth  visiting.   The  land  parcel  for  Rail  Infrastructure  is  large  and  un‐inviting. as seen in figure 2 (Queensland Government 2004).    Hardly  the  desired  welcome  to  the    Figure 2 ‐ Roma Street and Roma Street Railway Station            7    .    Today.  unless  you  are  in  transit.    The  contrast  between  the  two  land  uses  is  stark  and  inconsistent.    However.  the  site  was  characterised  by very steep slopes.  Roma  Street  Parklands.    Although.  the  view  shown  is  from  Albert  Street  to  the  North  which  connects  to  the  Roma  Street  parklands.  The artificial escarpment from the early excavation is visible at the boundary  of  the  rail  yards  with  Albert  Park.  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  and  the  Queensland  Police Head Headquarters.Prior  to  an  extensive  exaction  to  flatten  the  area  for  rail  infrastructure.  the  station  infrastructure  covers  only  the  south  east  corner  of  this  very  large  parcel  of  crown  land  (Queensland  Government  2004).  the  dominant  land  uses  at  the  site  are  Roma  Street.

  car  park  and  a  coach  terminal  that  partially  covers  the  railway  station.1.    Construction  in  1986.    The  early  construction  indicates  the imposing height and length  of  the  building  and  its  rise  as  a  focal point of the area.  the  structure  is    considered  dull  and  cheap  in     Figure 3 ‐ Brisbane Transit Centre 2013                 (Brisbane Transit Centre 2013)        8    .  retail  shops.  the  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  (BTC)  is  a  purpose  built  multi‐modal  transport  hub  located  on  Roma  Street  and  is  the  gateway  to  Roma  Street  Railway  station  and  Roma  Street  Busway  Station.    The  top  floors  are  tinted  glass  and  steel.    Figure  4  illustrates  the  BTC’s  domination of the Roma Street  area  and  Streetscape.  the  building  hosts  the  original  internal  décor  and  external  facia.  eatery.   In  2008.    However.    Today.   The  building  aligns  with  Roma  Street  and  creates  the  northern  frame  for  the  streetscape.  then.  The  Brisbane  City  Council  approved the site for redevelopment and for the construction of twin towers up to 33 storeys and  refurbishment to the internal facilities (Brisbane Transit Centre 2013).2  Brief Background Information ‐ Brisbane Transit Centre  Opened  in  1986.  the  structure  is  no  26  years  of  age  minimal  upgrading  has  occurred.      The  building  surface  is  comprised  of  concrete  in  the  bottom  floors  and  coated  with  a  rough  ‘exposed  aggregate  concrete’  texture.3.  and  heralded  as  a  turning  point  in  the  history  of  the  site  and  residents  welcomed  the  completion  of  a.  modern  facility  to  welcome  visitors  to  the  growing  Brisbane’s  growing  City  Centre  (Queensland  Government  2004).  The  BTC  incorporates two  commercial  office  towers.   Overall.

 Basic Plan    Map  one  illustrates  the  location  of  Roma  Street  from  a  birds‐eye  view  and  the  shows  the  sites  relationship  and  connectivity  to  other  major  sites  in  Brisbane  City.    The  area  is  located  at  western  fringe  of  the  CBD.                  9    .  adjacent  to  the  Brisbane  River  before  it  straightens and meanders away toward the inner Western suburbs.  it  is  made  clear  that.  Roma  Street  Parklands.  Roma  Street  is  considered  as  a  major  starting  point  to  several  other  key  destinations  within  the  City  Centre. Central Station and the inner CBD.3    Maps and Plans – Roma Street Area  Roma Street.1.    Illustrated  in  red.  City  Botanical Gardens.3.  as  a  central  site.  including  Suncorp  Stadium.

   The  facilities  offered  at  the  site  (described  earlier)  and  the  central  location  reinforces  the  importance  of  the  area  and  ongoing  role  as  a  major  destination  from  all  directions  of  the  sprawling  metropolitan  areas  of  Brisbane.    There  is  almost  nil  opportunity  for  residents  to  stay  on  site  for  extended  periods  and  an  un‐pleasant  arrival  for  commuters  and  visitors and certainly not one to advertise the CBD as a modern.  Tiesdell 2007). Strategic Context    (Google Maps)    Map  two  identifies  the  location  of  Roma  Street  in  a  strategic  context  to  the  surrounding  city. sub‐tropical liveable City Centre.  The main issue identified in the contextual analysis is.      10    .    However.  Also.        Recognising  the  areas  importance  is  a  strong  factor  to  influencing  the  urban  re‐design  of  the  site  and  its  many  features.  the  centrality  of  the  area  should  not  become  the  dominant  factor  in  the  identity  of  the  new  Roma  Street. the area and site  are  used  only  as  a  point  of  re‐distribution  of  travellers.    Relph  (1976)  argues  that  places  should  be  interesting in their own right and not for their location.   The  large  yellow  circle  indicates  a  ten  kilometre  radius  from  the  City  Centre  and  the  red  dot  indicates  that  Roma  Street  is  in  fact  in  the  Central  Heart  of  metropolitan  Brisbane. at present. that improved knowledge of a place.Roma Street.  area  and  site  will  assist  to  manipulate  it  to  a  re‐created  expression  of  its  inhabitants  (Carmona.

 Local Context B        11    . Local Context A  (Google Maps)  Roma Street.Roma Street.

  adjacent  buildings.  four  and  five  identify  the  location  of  Roma  Street  in  context  the  Brisbane  Central  Business  District  (CBD).   Each  illustrate  main  roads.  traffic  intersections and disconnected open space immediately at the site or nearby.  The data  collected  and  during  the  site  visits  and  the  location  appraisals  has  allowed  identification  of  a  number  of  preliminary  issues  for  consideration  of  the  optimal  design  for  transforming  the  area. Local Context C    Again.Roma Street.  they include:         Pedestrian movement and numbers (high frequency)  Traffic issues and Parking capacity  Lack of safe bicycle route along Roma Street  Capital for redevelopment  Restricted development as prescribed in the current Brisbane City Master Plan  Maintaining the site as a mixed‐use zone  Lack of open space (green areas) and social amenities    12    .  green  space.  maps  three.  Map five the clearly  identifies the areas of opportunity that exist along Roma Street and adjacent to the site.

  outdoor  seating.    Figure  five  represents  the  dominant  land  uses  along  Roma  Street  movement  of  pedestrians  along  and  across  the  roadway  and  footpaths. using appropriate skills .  public  amenities  and  landmarks  that  memorable  landmarks.   Camargo‐Kitson  developed  a  field  Observation  Plan  (refer  to  Appendix  1)  and  Observation  Template.    A  major  criticism  of  the  current  streetscape  is  the  lack  of  landscaping.    Also.2  Task Two – Spatial Analysis  Camargo‐Kitson  understands  spatial  analysis  to  be  an  extension  to  the  contextual  analysis  and  a  more focussed assessment of the quality of the space and area to assist in developing appropriate  strategies to deliver changes and enhancements.  During March and April.    Pedestrians  and  traffic  can  be  seen  interacting  and  groups  of  people  congregating  on  the  footpath. a series of 12 maps/illustrations were completed identify the areas:           green spaces  open spaces  pedestrian links  footpaths and bicycle access  opportunities and constraints       key areas for redevelopment  strategic transport links  roads layout   land uses  built form      capture  evidence  for  future  planning  potential  consider development potential   engage with the community  immersion  13    .  photographs  and  observation  details  were  synthesised  into  a  single  diagram  at  figure  five  on  the  following  page.   Photographs  on  pages  17  and  18  visually  identify  and  provide  comments  on  the  many  issues  identified  at  Roma  Street.  Camargo‐Kitson  conducted  field  visits  to  Roma  Street  to  collect  data  through  observation  and  document  the  physical  environment  using  a  series  of  maps  and  synthesised  observations  that:      define the area boundaries   identify issues  understand the place  define local character (old and new)  identify needs    (Placecheck 2013)    To  maximise  the  objectives  of  the  field  visits  and  to  capture  all  relevant  information.   Coupled  with  the  observation  syntheses.  The template captures information in relation to:      Traffic   land use   roads   built form   noise/sensory      public transport   pedestrian behavior   location aesthetics   amenities and  landmark  footpath access   footpath access      Relevant  maps.3.  Camargo‐Kitson  synthesised  the  results  of  the  field  observations  into  a  single  document.

    Figure 4 – Synthesised Contextual Analysis of Roma Street    14    .

 A large car park space sitting. Opposite Main Entry to BTC TRAFFIC BUILT FORM PEDESTRIANS …. driving and working  Mixed very young to very old. …low/med/high levels. boring and wasted space. where are  Built form largely consists of concrete. farewelling.High/Medium/Low traffic volumes. pollution. unused space meeting. where are they going to?  Steady flow of traffic. crossing the road. The railway station entry is more modern looking than the BTC. in groups glass and steel materials Estimate the numbers  Cars. 15    . the BTC has vast areas of  Travelling home. dated. loitering.  Traffic – high noise level listed above residential. 100 years and the most modern under teenagers. backpackers. age. to work. playing. what are they doing. most people in 20-50 age group LAND USES NOISE/ SENSORY  Brief shower caused people to group …. smoking. un  There is a lack of outdoor seating inspiring. school students.describe the noise levels and types. Western and Easter Ends of Roma Street. office  Pedestrian – medium noise level  People were observed talking in groups. transport corridors. condition …are there workers (type). feel of under shelter on BTC side of Roma St adjacent sites the site…is it saw  In the time spent at the site at least 200 people were observed doing the activities  Mixed-use zones incorporating retail.what are the land uses of the site and …. and commercial and green  Construction – low noise level standing in silence and sitting in silence space/recreational on the stairs to the BTC The site is generally unwelcoming. The internal fit out of the BTC is like walking into a time warp and is dull. vehicle type. eating. noise. coming from. students. police. university construction) students  Internally. buses and delivery trucks and  Paved walkways and access points vans  A mix of low-medium-high buildings and  Office workers.    SYNTHESISED FIELD OBSERVATION WORKSHEET GROUP: Alex Camargo and Greg Kitson SITE: Brisbane Transit Centre/Roma Street (including Roma St Rail & Bus stations) DATE: March 2013 – Various Times WEATHER: Sunny/Cloudy/Rain Showers OBSERVATION POINT: Main Entry to BTC on Roma Street. general public. bicycles children. The landscaping is limited. also a mix of ages (estimate the oldest is tradespeople.

Four with signalled pedestrian access and one with signalled cycle access 2 side Streets (Makerston and Garrick) Roma Street is a major gateway to the CBD and connects to roads leading to cross river locations and the internal CBD grid PUBLIC TRANSPORT …. ugly and is in danger of being an eye sore amongst the new styles of construction that are next to the site  The site enjoys high visibility on along Roma St and side streets  Internal aesthetics are reasonable.  The site lacks balance with built and natural environment/interaction FOOTPATHS/ACCESS …describe the available space for pedestrian movement and access  Footpaths are narrow at the immediate entry to the BTC. Phones. lines of visibility. what type?  BTC is a Major Transport Node (Translink. what are they?  Limited landscaping in and around the BTC  Large trees line Roma Street at the CBD end. NATURAL ENVIRONMENT …. private coach.  The location is fantastic. close to all amenities of the CBD  The BTC is dated. separated by a concreted median strip (3 lanes left and right) Five sets of traffic signals. Footpaths on the BTC side of Roma St widen at allocated City Council Bus Stop area and parallel to the BTC Car Park. but again are very dated.is there public transport. Footpaths are standard along Emily Miller Place and alongside the QEII Court Buildings  Four Street Level Signalled Pedestrian Crossings exists along Roma Street  An elevated pedestrian crossing passes over Roma St connecting the Level 2 Eastern Access Point to the BTC and to Street Level on George St (where in intersects with Herschel Street).are there any natural features. Footpaths widen in front of QLD Police HQ and Magistrates Courts. planned well. are there any landmarks?  Food Court (eatery – fast food)  BTC is a landmark  Roma St Station is a Landmark (houses a heritage listed building  Retail  Traders Hotel (Landmark)  QLD Police HQ (Landmark)  Public – Toilets. Makerston St and Garrick St  Emily Miller Place and Roma Street Parklands are close to the BTC (within walking distance.    LOCATION AESTHETICS/VIEWS …is the site tidy. clean. Limited landscaping along Roma St. orderly. cycle and foot)  Roma Street Rail Station  Inner Northern Busway  Private Coaches (intrastate and national)  Taxis  Cycles (private and city cycle)  Foot Traffic  The Site serves as a major transfer site to onward journeys   16    . Lockers. Bike Racks  Office ROADS …describe roads and access points…     Sealed bitumen at 6 lanes.  Adequate signage exists in and around Roma St AMENITIES & LANDMARKS …what amenities exist at the site. Rubbish Bins.

  Although.  The area is un‐inviting to  pedestrians    Figure 7 – Again.  Although footpath access is reasonable at this end of Roma Street.   Cross  River  Rail  is  planned  for  construction  under  this  area. car parking  space. the footpath  narrows significantly directly outside of the BC. the building  frontage is inactive and traffic noise and pollution makes the area unsightly. one of the main congregation points.  Buildings frame the roadway with q bare minimum of  landscaping.    Photographs – Roma Street March – April       Figure 5 ‐ facing east toward CBD.  Vehicle access dominates the landscape.        Figure  8  ‐  Roma  Street  Railway  Station  is  the  dominant  adjacent  land  use  to  Roma  Street.      Figure 6 – the western gateway to Roma Street is dominated by roadway.  Opportunity  exists  to build over the station and partially cover the area with new green space  17    . concrete dominates the streetscape at pedestrian level. landscaping is non‐existent.  ease of movement for pedestrians is achieved.

  The transition from Rail Station concourse to street is obstructed by a  concrete wall.      Figure 4 ‐ view across Roma Street from main entry to BTC.    Figure 6 ‐ the eastern end of Roma Street achieves a balance between natural  environment and built form.  The area is small and not protected from rain and wind.  Pedestrian access and bicycle movement is improved  dramatically     18    .  Limited activity  occurs on the baron streetscape.  Figure 5 ‐ the internal decor and fit out of the BTC reflects the 1980s construction.    Photographs – Roma Street March – April     Figure 3 ‐ The BTC main entry from Roma Street is generally dated.  The  building spaces are under‐utilised and almost deserted at day and night. bleak and dominated  by concrete. the area lacks opportunity for social interaction.  A six lane roadway cuts the  mix of buildings and is the location of the major pedestrian crossing.

 Plaza ‐ Brisbane Courts)          19    .                      Public Space (Footpaths.    Green Space ‐ Roma Street  The  Green  Space  analysis  clearly  indicates  the  minimal  land  use  provided  in  the  vicinity  of  Roma  Street.  Emma  Miller  Place  has  public  seating  and  shade. Park.  the  smaller  parcel  of  green  space  is  more  a  public  garden  for  viewing  and  not  recommended  for  recreation  due  to  its  size  and  location  next  to  a  major  hotel.   The  open  space  at  the  eastern  end  of  Roma  Street  appears  to  be  well  connected.  accessible  and walkable.                     Green Space ‐ Emma Miller Place  Public Space ‐ Roma Street  The  existing  amount  of  open  public  space  indicates  a  small  percentage  level  in  comparison  to  the  overall  Roma  Street  area.    Although.    The  very  thin  ribbon  of  public  space  immediately  at  the front of the BTC is  inadequate  for  the  amount  of  pedestrian  movement  observed  at  the  site.

 Kurilpa Bridge)  Key Opportunities and Constraints – Roma Street  Key  opportunities  are:     widen footpaths   landscaping   revitalise BTC   develop  over  rail  station   more mixed‐uses   creation  of  open  public space    Key constraints are:     traffic volumes   private  ownership  of  BTC   rail infrastructure   government funding   objection from  motorists          Footpaths and landscaping    Roma Street Railway Station      20      Brisbane Transit Centre  . Queen St. The impact on  traffic  leads  to  traffic  congestion  during  peak  times.  to  the  Kuripla  Bridge.  George  street  and  Tanks  Street. King George Square.    The  key  factor  to  learn  from  this  analysis  is  to  maintain  the  current  level and improve the  walkability  options  of  at  the  BTC  and  surrounding area.           Strategic Pedestrian Links (e.  Strategic Pedestrian Links to Urban Area and Open Spaces – Roma Street  The  analysis  of  strategic  pedestrian  links    indicates  that  a  very  high  level  of  pedestrian  movement  along  Roma  Street.g.

   However.  the  cycle  path  is  removed  at  the  intersection  Roma  Street  with  and  Herschel Street.    The  footpaths  are  considered  to  be  too  narrow.                     21  .  Areas for potential development – Roma Street  Based  on  the  analysis  undertaken  and  the  already  to  objectives  transform  the  area.  Roma  Street  Station  Infrastructure   Railway  and    Footpaths and Cycle Paths – Roma Street  Footpaths  are  located  on  both  sides  of  Roma  Street  and  are  heavily  utilised  by  pedestrians  leaving  the  BTC.  the  potential  areas  for  development  are  Roma  Street.      A  dedicated  cycle  path  is  located  along  George  Street.

             22    .   Pedestrian  movement  is  obstructed  due  to  the  single  crossing  point  to  the  BTC  on  Roma  Street.   Pedestrian  movement  is  also  constrained  by  traffic  flows  from  George Street.  The  point  where  George  Street  intersects  with  Roma  Street  creates  a  triangle  of  un‐used  space.      Pedestrian movement – Roma Street  Pedestrian  movement  along  Roma  Street  toward  the  BTC  is  heavy  during  peak  times  and  a  steady  constant  outside  of  peak  times.    The  convergence  of  the  two  roads  often  causes  traffic  issues  during peak times.  Road infrastructure – Roma Street  The  analysis  of  road  infrastructure  indicated  a  six  lane  roadway  for  Roma  Street  and  a  four  lane  roadway  for  George  Street.

  airport  inner  dedicated  connections.  Public Transport options – Roma Street  Public  transport  options  are  abundant  at  Roma  Street.  northern  busway.   Commuters  can  travel  by  rail.  city  and  suburban  cycle  paths  and  city  footpath  are  all  network    options  available  to  residents and visitors.    The  metropolitan.      Some  land  use  was  not  clearly  evidenced.           23    .  city  cycle  and  on  foot.  Land  use  in  the  area  is  dominated  commercial  There  are  by  activity.    Two  main  land  uses  were  identified.  bus.   few  Land use types – Roma Street  residential  land  use  options.  and  interstate  state  rail  inner  networks.  us  network.

          24    .  timber  and  bitumen    Potential solutions for redevelopment – Roma Street  A  number  of  potential  solutions  were  identified    during  including:   developing  the  facia  and  gateway to the BTC     installing  a  dedicated  cycle  path  along  Roma  Street     Incorporation  of  more  green  space  along  Roma  Street     Separating  vehicle  and  pedestrian  interaction  along Roma Street     this  analysis.  Built Form – Roma Street  Built  form  at  Roma  Street  and  the  surrounds  consists  of  road  rail  high  infrastructure.  infrastructure.  steel.  rise  building  (above  3  floors)  and  multi‐story  buildings  (3  floors  maximum).   The  built  form  materials are concrete.

  all  persons  interviewed  liked  the  idea  of  a  renewal  plan  for  Roma  Street. Train (5).  A general matrix of stakeholders was completed was developed and  considered during the design process (refer to Appendix 3). One person had worked in the area for eight years and commented “a new lease on life  is required in this area”.  The key stakeholders identified during  the design process include:                 Ten  members  of  the  public  were  interviewed  for  their  personal  views. Ten interviews were completed with persons of the following details:    • Five Male  • Five Female  • Aged 17 – 52  • Occupation ‐ Unemployed (1). Student (2) Railway worker (1)  • Mode of transport ‐ Bus (3).  comments  and  ideas  in  relation  to  the  Roma  Street  Transit  Centre  as  a  transformative  area  within  the  Brisbane  Central  Business District. Policeman (1).3  Task Three – Stakeholder Analysis  Camargo‐Kitson  acknowledges  that  the  structured  involvement  of  all  stakeholders  at  selected  times  throughout  planning  process  is  a  vital  element  to  a  successful  urban  design  output  (Australian Government 2011).  Two  persons  interviewed  commented  that  “it  is  about  time”. Car (1) and Bicycle (1)    In  relation  to  questions  one.  that  this  end  of  the  City  was  renewed.          25    building owners  commuters  nature and environment  financiers/banks  Queensland Government  Brisbane City Council  local residents  visitors  pedestrians  planning professionals  community interest groups              cyclists  motorists  interest groups  Queensland police  Queensland Rail  Retail Businesses  The Transcontinental Hotel  Legal Aid QLD  Traders Hotel  Telstra  .      A stakeholder analysis brief questionnaire was completed (Appendix 3) and used during interviews  with interested stakeholders. Office Workers (5).  3.

  few  persons  were  excited  to  hear  that  the  Brisbane  City  Council  is  interested  in  redeveloping  the  area.    Three  persons  believed  that  any  green  projects  for  the  area  should  be  sub‐tropical  to  reflect  the  nearby  Roma  Street  Parklands.  All  interviewees  agreed  that  more  greenery  is  required  along  Roma  Street.  when  indication  was  given  that  this  could  improve  more  green  space  in  the  area  for  beautification.    Finally.  Also.  Two  persons  did  not  agree  with  the  widening  of  sidewalks.        26    .  shopping  and  car  parking.  One  person  made  the  distinction  of  nearby  parks  to  the  dull  look  of  the  Transit  Centre  and  Roma  Street. Three interviewees cited the Roma Street Rail yards.  Six  persons  thought that the entire area was not being used to its full potential.  making  it  more  inviting  to  visit  and  to  not  neglect.  As  a  suggestion.  The  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  and  Roma  Street  road  corridor  were  the  two  main  features  interviewees would like to see redeveloped.  those  opposed  changed  their  views to support such a strategy.  Six  persons  were  not  satisfied  with  pedestrian  access  immediately  at  the  front  of  the  Transit  Centre.  However.     One  person  said  “to  demolish  the  transit  centre  and  start  again”.    In  relation  to  the  third  question.  the  majority  of  persons  interviewed  were  of  the  opinion  that  to  narrow  the  roadway  to  allow  improved  pedestrian  access  was  a  positive  idea. garden beds and trees along footpaths and even across the overhead footbridge.  All  believed  that  more  trees  and  green  space  would  transform  the  area.  support  was  given  for  a  mix  of  newer  buildings  that  allowed  for  residential. commenting “this could allow pedestrians and traffic to move freely and safely”. one person suggested an underground mall similar to that at Post Office Square in the  CBD heart.  Suggestions  include:  plants  and  trees  in  the median strip.

   The  main  contributing  factors  for  the  options  presented  below  are  to  separate  the  interaction  between  vehicles  and  pedestrians  and  to  maximise  the  opportunity for more open green space along Roma Street and the surrounding area.    Each  of  the  stakeholders  listed  and  interviewed  in  section  four  have  each  provided  valuable  insights  to  the  concept  plan.    On  the  surface.  The options  were refined during meetings with the BCC during April 2013.    3.    Three  Transformative  Areas  are  identified and  the  following  opportunities  could  be  realised  (preliminary  designs and sketches are available on pages 28 – 30):  Transformative Area A (Short Term Strategy and Solutions)         widening of footpaths  narrowing of roadway to two lanes each way  at the Western Gateway the introduction of a landmark feature (Public Art etc.  Emma  Miller Place.   Connections  to  the  BTC  and  portals  along  Roma  Street  and  George  Street  would  allow  for  the  seamless  movement  of  pedestrians  to  and  from  the  BTC  and  to  onward  journeys. green space and attractive        27    .) to improve  the sense of arrival to the CBD  intensification  of  landscaping  (tree  planting  in  median  strip.     Option 1 ‐ Underground pedestrian mall and tunnels  This  proposal  is  for  the  construction  of  a  purpose  built  pedestrian  facility  directly  under  the  Roma  Street  roadway.    The  narrowing  of  the  roadway  would  also  allow  for  increased  landscaping  and  improved  pedestrian  access  and  movement. E McCormick Place etc.   The underground facility would host retail opportunities and services for the general public.4  Task Four – Concept Plan Development  Camargo‐Kitson  recognises  that  effective  urban  design  guidance  brings  together  the  perspectives  of  people  who  may  have  a  range  of  conflicting  interests.  garden  beds  and  trees  along  widened footpaths  Dedicated Bicycle Lanes (City Council Standard Green Path) along Roma Street on both  Sides  to  connect  with  dedicated  bicycle  lanes  on  George  Street  and  Upper  Roma  Street ‐  Greenery  will  improve  ‘Green  Path’  surface  connectivity  to  Roma  Street  Parklands.  the  Roma  Street  roadway  would  be  narrowed  to  allow  for  the  widening  of  footpaths  and  installation  of  a  dedicated  cycle  path.   Combining  the  contextual  and  spatial  analysis  with  the  desires  of  the  BCC’s  design  brief  guided   Camargo‐Kitson  to  two  realistic  options.  All actions address issues with poor pedestrian access.

  Transformative Area B (Short to Medium Term Strategy and solutions)  Apart  from  the  ground  floor. including:          Transformative Area C (Long Term Strategy)      enclose Roma Street Railway Station and cover it with a new park and garden facility  Lawns and exercise areas.  the  upper  floors  of  the  Transit  Centre  are  not  utilised  well  and  the  BCC could work with the owners on joint projects to improve use.  This will improve surface access to Roma Street Parklands and create a new open space for  the Roma Street Precinct of the CBD  The  BTC  would  receive  an  internal  refurbishment  and  upgrade  to  the  facia  of  the  building  with  glass  so  that  views  are  continuous  from  the  inside  and  with  limited  obstruction  from  the outside.    Short‐term accommodation and amenities for people in transit (interstate/intrastate)  A supermarket to support new residential projects at Roma Street  Dedicated bicycle centre (similar to RBWH and King George Square) to  Encourage different transport options to and from the CBD  Office Space  Smaller area for interstate coach travel passengers                   28    .

  Option 1 ‐ Underground pedestrian mall and tunnels designs (street view)        29  .

  Option 1 ‐ Underground pedestrian mall and tunnels designs (pan view)  30    .

  Option 1 ‐ Underground pedestrian mall and tunnels designs (plan view)              31    .

  All actions address issues with poor pedestrian access. E McCormick Place etc. green space and attractive     Brisbane Transit Centre   Short‐term accommodation and amenities for people in transit (interstate/intrastate)   A supermarket to support new residential projects at Roma Street   Dedicated bicycle centre (similar to RBWH and King George Square) to   Encourage different transport options to and from the CBD   Office Space   Smaller area for interstate coach travel passengers     Roma Street Railway Station     enclose Roma Street Railway Station and cover it with a new park and garden facility   Lawns and exercise areas.  garden  beds  and  trees along widened footpaths  Dedicated Bicycle Lanes (City Council Standard Green Path) along Roma Street on both  Sides  to  connect  with  dedicated  bicycle  lanes  on  George  Street  and  Upper  Roma  Street ‐  Greenery  will  improve  ‘Green  Path’  surface  connectivity  to  Roma  Street  Parklands.  Option 2 – Traffic tunnel and creation of ‘Green Street’  The  second  and  preferred  option  is  to  construct  a  vehicle  tunnel  (cut  and  cover  method)  directly  under  the  existing  Roma  Street  Roadway  with  tunnel  portals  at  the  eastern  and  western  ends  of  Roma  Street  and  at  the  intersection  of  George  Street  and  Hershel  Street.) to improve  the sense of arrival to the CBD  intensification  of  landscaping  (tree  planting  along  the  reclaimed  area.   This will improve surface access to Roma Street Parklands and create a new open space for  the Roma Street Precinct of the CBD   The  BTC  would  receive  an  internal  refurbishment  and  upgrade  to  the  facia  of  the  building  with  glass  so  that  views  are  continuous  from  the  inside  and  with  limited  obstruction  from  the outside.      32    .    The  following  opportunities could be realised through this option (the final design is available on page 33):    Roma Street Surface Area     at the Western Gateway the introduction of a landmark feature (Public Art etc.    The  separation  of  vehicles  and  pedestrians  will  allow  un‐obstructed  movement  of  vehicles  along  Roma  Street  and  safe  and  seamless  movement  of  pedestrians  along  the  surface  of  Roma  Street.  Emma  Miller Place.

  33    .

   It  is  thought  that  option  two  is  better  equipped  to  provide  a  more  attractive  solution  and  responds  better  to  the  objectives  of  the  design  brief.  At  the  economic  level.   Architectural  transformation  is  still  made  possible  with  option  and  provides  a  unique  opportunity  for  a  new  architectural  landscape feature for the City Centre.   It  was  decided  that  Option  2  is  the  recommended  design  for  the  Transformation  of  Roma  Street.  Potential  exists  to  revitalise  the  neighbourhood  with  new  residents.  with  features  of  historical  and  contemporary built form and one of sustainable living.  Roma  Street’s  strategic  position  allows  it  to  capitalise  on  the  economic  opportunities  offered  by  Brisbane’s  CBD.  convenience  shops  and  services  within  easy  walking  distance.    Again.5   TASK   F IVE   U RBAN   D ESIGN   D EVELOPMENT   R OMA   S TREET   ‐   R ECOMMENDATION Camargo‐Kitson  considered  both  of  the  design  option  at  length.  and  has  the  potential  to  offer  an  improved  variety  of  business  and  employment  opportunities  that  will  stimulate  the  areas  ongoing  prosperity  for  local  residents  and  workers. including  those  within  the  CBD.    34    .  connective  potential  to  open  space  and  opportunity  for  redevelopment  of  public  land.  New  development  is  immediately  supported  by  already  existing  transport  infrastructure  and  commercial land use.  Improving  connectivity  to  key  nearby  destinations.    Pedestrians  and  cyclists  will  be  provided  with  convenient access points throughout the area and to open space and community facilities that are  walkable  to  and  safe.  attractions  and  services  within  the  CBD  and  focussing  on  sustainable  transport  options  and  pedestrian  access  will  complement  the  existing  network  available  from  the  Roma  Street  hub.  3.    An  important  element  in  the  decision  is  the  fact  that  Brisbane  is  not  yet  a  24  hour  city  and  pedestrian  movement  is  almost   non‐existent  at  night.  Roma  Street  is  a  key  location  in  the  City  Centre  hierarchy  of  places.  Roma  Street  has  the  potential  to  be  landmark  location  that  can  benefit  from  its  high  level  of  accessibility.  The  Brisbane  Transit  Centre  offers  access  to  Brisbane’s  Domestic and International Airports and to many of South East Queensland’s attractions.  regional. national and international destinations.  The  railway  and  bus  stations  ensure  that  all  visitors  can  connect  to  local.   Any  nearby  future  construction  of  residential  projects  can  support  the  area  to  evolve  into  a  true  mixed‐use  neighbourhood.    It  was  decided  that  to  move  pedestrians  underground  would  create  possible  safety  issues  and  de‐humanise  the  arrival  experience  between  Roma  street  station  and  the  rest  of  the  city.

      Two  preliminary  ideas  were  selected  for  design application after careful consideration of the contextual.  Camargo‐Kitson  discovered  that  that  many  of  the  required  solutions  to  align  with  the  broader  plans  of  BCC  could  be  achieved  through  separation  of  pedestrian  and  vehicle  interaction.  economic  and  cultural  activities  in  the  City  Centre.  An attractive renewal of Roma Street into a boulevard that features subtropical gardens and trees  that  interact  with  high‐quality  building  redevelopment  and  upgrades.   Throughout  the  process.   The  proposed  design  will  increases  the  general  walkability  of  the  neighbourhood.  This  project  has  attempted  to  improve  the  area  through  a  rigorous  assessment  and  design  process.      4. but also to make this space a valued more asset in the community.  Footpaths  along  Roma  Street  and  nearby  side  streets  will  become  attractive  and  functional  and  fulfil  the  need  for  pedestrians to move freely and safely in the newly created green space.    The  analysis  identified  goals  for  urban  design  related  to  safe  pedestrian  movement.  is  an  important  site  for  social.  like  many  public  spaces.    Extra  green  space  creates  a  more  comfortable  and  natural  experience  in  a  world dominated by concrete and steel.  a  large  scale  multi‐modal  transport  hub  transit  and  increases  in  public  green  spaces  for  the  enjoyment  of  the  community.    Improved  bicycle  infrastructure  builds  on  the  multi‐modal  and  connectivity  assets  already  present  at  Roma  Street  and  also  adds  to  the  cycling  infrastructure  of  the  Brisbane.0  Summary and Conclusion  Roma  Street.  All  the  improvements  displayed  in  this  project  aimed  to  not  only  make  the  experience  more  comfortable  for  residents  and  visitors  to Roma Street. spatial and stakeholder analyses.    35    .

esmartdesign.brisbanetransitcentre. A Vision for our City: City Centre Master Plan 2012. viewed 24 April 2013. viewed 24 April 2013  http://www. Urban Design Guidance: Checklist for preparing urban design guidance..pdf    Placecheck 2013.  London     Queensland Government 2004. Thomas  Telford Publishing.0  Reference List Australian Government 2011.com/notebook/339/notebook. Australia 2600    Bonzle 2013.aila.info    Roma Street Redevelopment. pp.placecheck. 5‐7    Brisbane Transit Centre 2013. Brisbane.M. viewed 20 April 2013. Brisbane City  Council. 2002. Canberra. United Kingdom    Cowan.R. 2007. Oxford. Thomas Telford Publishing. Urban Design Guidance: Introduction. 2002.  5. http://www. Tiesdell.bonzle.R. Department of Infrastructure and Transport. Urban Design Reader.  http://www.S. Creating Places for People: An urban design protocol for Australian  Cities.  viewed 24 April 2013. http://www. 1 Heron Quay. Historical overview: Roma Street Parkland precinct.rawsonplace. Roma Street Railway Station 1888.htm    36    . London     Cowan. Urban Design Skills. viewed 24 April 2013.au      Carmona.com/c/a?a=pic&fn=ysiz2rzy&s=2     Brisbane City Council 2012.org. http://www. City Centre Transformative Areas and priority elements: Student  Information Brief City Centre Master Plan. Architectural Press. 1 Heron Quay.. Brisbane.com.. Brisbane City Council. Brisbane 4001    Brisbane City Council 2013.au/projects/qld/roma/docs/HistoryEBrochure.

42570576 Gregory Kitson . Hi-Vis Safety Vests (UQ/GPEM). At least twice a week. listed Buildings. Sketch Diagrams: Alejandro & Greg 37    . Observations to be recorded: Alejandro & Greg Mix people. historic evolution Pay particular attention to anything that seems to you unusual or odd. Pencils.42487535 Materials: Observation Template (includes Sketching space).  Appendices  Appendix One  Roma St (Brisbane Transit Centre) observation plan Students: Ismael Alejandro Munoz Camargo . Cameras (Smartphones). Appropriate footwear Video camera: Alejandro & Greg Site visits: Alejandro & Greg Morning. designated areas. Information recorded and observed from multiple locations at the transformative site (TBA). midday and evening (peak and off peak) between March-April including weekends. What do you see? What are they doing? Why they are there? What activities are they doing? Do they look comfortable? Try to be selective *Footpaths and cycle ways and Pedestrian movement • Road/Street types • Public transport networks • Land use • Building height and types • Active frontage • Density • Nodes • Landmarks and monuments • Views • Open Spaces • Other aspects: character areas.

  Appendix 2         38    .

          39    .

      27    .