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HammerHard MEDIAWORKS

The art of communication: strategic planning, public relations and organizing for labor unions, non-profits, progressive advocacy organizations and grassroots groups.

Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it.
- Bertold Brechtk

online streets
and in the

BUILDING LABOR :

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Labor has a problem Building your base Making analysis accessible and effective Communicating to win Mission driven messaging Social networks are viral storytellers Successful communications: a snapshot HammerHard mediaworks: problem solvers Appendix 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 14

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building labor online & in the streets

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LABOR HAS A PROBLEM.
we all know the headlines:
The labor movement is shrinking. ‘Right-to-work’ and other laws are undermining the financial base of labor. Working people often think unions are going to gouge them. Important labor issues fail to ignite and maintain the public’s attention. Politicians would rather subsidize profitable corporations than pay pensions.

In times like these, labor’s first instinct has
been to circle the wagons and – like playing whack-a-mole – fight back against these external threats and the economically and politically potent big business interests that bankroll them.

These threats have power and resonance with the forces that labor needs most – rank and file members and the broader public – because organized labor has lagged in effectively organizing, communicating and engaging with these core partners. Labor has within its reach the capacity to knock over all of the bowling pins at once and strike back against these potent special interests, by marshaling a groundswell of informed, committed, organized support from its members and the larger public. Union locals typically face the most difficult challenges in marshaling strong engagement strategies with these constituencies. These locals typically focus their small budgets and modest staffing levels on the imperatives of daily operations, relegating engagement with their grassroots base to the back burner.

And in this era of hyper-connectivity, union locals often have a lack of detailed knowledge about who their members are – where they live, what local economic and social challenges their communities and families confront, who or what they rely on for information and what core issues capture their attention. Locals often know little about how to measure the effectiveness of their organizers, volunteers and actions. Their web presence is awful, and they struggle to deliver information to the right people efficiently – and to turn that information into effective, sustained engagement and successful outcomes. Many locals look bumbling and incompetent. They have access to online tools like Salsa that they don’t use. They use 19th century strategies to wage 21st century battles – and they are afraid to change the resources and approaches in their organizing toolkit, while their opposition has aggressively embraced these potent new outreach and organizing tools.

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building labor online & in the streets

Joe Trippi, Howard Dean’s 2004 campaign

manager, was terrified of flying as a kid. So he became obsessed with learning about flight. “The only effective way to deal with an irrational fear like that is to put your mind to work on the problem, to turn the fear of flying into an understanding of it, a sense of wonder at the miracle of human flight,” says Trippi. “It’s natural to fear things we don’t understand … fear of change is a terminal condition.”

over 95% of 18-29 year olds use the internet, and 89% of 30-49 year olds use it.2 Yet the web is no panacea for labor’s problems. Many locals make a static website and a Facebook page, never update them, never take insights from them, and never use them to their full potential to guide the strategic decisions they make. That is, as they say online, #notdoingitright.

Unions need to embrace communications tactics and strategies that build engaged support for winnable struggles.

The lightning rod for this fear of change often focuses on internet-based tools. “I’ve got news for you politicians and business people and anyone else who has let your fear of technology keep you from understanding and embracing the Internet,” says Trippi. “This is the dominant technology – not of some distant future – but of tomorrow, of next week, now. And you’re almost out of time.”1 According to a Pew Research Center study,

If union locals are going to #startdoingitright, they need to integrate 21st century communications and training techniques into their day-to-day operations, synergize communications and analysis with organizing, and energize and engage their base and the public.

NOTES • 1 The Revolution Will Not be Televised, by Joe Trippi. Regan Books, 2004 • 2 Essential Guide to Online Advocacy for Nonprofits, by Kristin DeMint and Jeanette Russell. John Wiley & Sons, 2013

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UNDERSTAND YOUR BASE TO BUILD YOUR POWER

“What can we do to become a stronger
organization?” is a question union locals need to ask. It’s better to start from a position of strength in any campaign. But to get to that baseline of solid organizing strength, union locals should be asking themselves two key questions: What are we doing to encourage people to get involved? What convinces people to care more about our organization or cause? Union locals can start to answer these questions by laying out their ladder of engagement -- the steps they take to identify and cultivate supporters and move them to take on increasingly meaningful and engaged actions. The first rung might be attending a monthly meeting, while the top rung could be leading a local campaign that successfully pressures a legislator to change his position on a bill. ‘You can’t fire volunteers’ goes the old saying. But you CAN use smart communications strategies to motivate volunteers, help them work more effectively and stay engaged. Smart communications can help volunteers reconnect with previous commitments and fulfill those commitments more effectively. Smart communications can offer volunteers and activists ways to build their capacities by offering feedback to those who did not honor their commitments, celebrating those who do, and collaboratively coaching to help everyone learn best practices. Most importantly, smart communications gives people a way to plug in initially at their comfort level -- and motivate volunteers and supporters to step up their

level of engagement to support campaigns that can win real gains on the ground. Unions need to create engaged involvement and structure by mapping social networks for their locals – members, job shops, families, supporters. Effective outreach programs create a distributed sense of ownership throughout the structure, so that organizers can set effective objectives and track results, while activists can step forward, take responsibility for their organizing goals, win credit for their successes, and embrace accountability in their work going forward. Unions can’t allow the perfect to be the enemy of the good. No software package is perfect, but products like Salsa can be extremely effective tools to understand your base, gauge buy-in, measure outcomes and boost effectiveness over the long term. That said, no software package is useful if organizers and staff don’t use its capacities – or use them wrong – but proper training can help labor marshal the power of the resources they already have.

“What can Labor do for itself? The answer is not difficult. Labor can organize, it can unify; it can consolidate its forces. This done, it can demand and command.”
- Eugene V. Debs
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building labor online & in the streets

MAKING ANALYSIS ACCESSIBLE + EFFECTIVE Many unions don’t realize that they have
data that can be analyzed. Consider event sign-in sheets, email lists, job shop lists, and even voter lists. It’s important to put these to use with the implementation of a ‘constituent relationship manager’ (CRM) program like Salsa, and gain a better understanding of what this data tells us about a client’s progress. At the same time, it’s necessary to create a culture of data and analytics in the local. It’s not enough to list numbers – organizers and staff need to be thinking about ways that they can track member involvement, and they need to consistently and comprehensively gather data. Idealware and NTEN looked at April 2012 survey data for nearly 400 nonprofit organizations to see how they manage and use data. Their report found that nonprofits are either doing a lot with their metrics or not much at all. Unions need to do a lot more with their metrics. 3 The Obama campaign poured unprecedented support into data and analytics – it drove their decision-making in the field, in communications and in fundraising. They could send the right message about a specific issue to a voter – and track that voter’s response. One Obama campaign official put it this way: “It’s about turning over control to some nerds. And more than any other year, campaign leadership really took that leap of faith.”4 Obama’s success with data-driven decision-making has led some to think that the GOP can never catch up – which is ridiculous, particularly when you consider how corporate marketers have been using this sort of data-driven approach for years, and are light-years beyond what any political campaign is doing. IBM runs server farms for bank ATMs and can make predictive models about where, when and how much money you will withdraw from a machine. Inevitably, corporate behemoths will double down on their investments and get their candidates up to speed on this technology. If organized labor is going to survive, it needs to get in the game with big data – not just for elections, but for organizing drives, contract negotiations, grievance processing and all union work. Union locals are as grassroots as you can get, but most are not surveying their data for micro-targeting properly. Few let data inform their decisions and offer them actionable insights. A rare number are making models for their goals and their likelihood of hitting them – and using data to sharpen their reach on the ground and in the halls of government. Using data to make decisions may seem strange to unions. The Wall Street Journal mocked the Obama campaign for hiring specialists in predictive modeling and data mining, calling it “politics as done by Martians.” In response, the Obama campaign put a picture of the Martian surface on their analytics department wall – and won the election.5 Labor doesn’t want to be left behind. Data and analytics help answer the ‘how’ question – how to use resources efficiently, detect opportunities, compare costs, and so on. Data provides feedback on how others perceive you and what you can do to enhance their perceptions of your union. Data can help unions figure out if they are using members’ dues money effectively and find supporters ‘behind enemy lines.’ Unions can make themselves data masters, with the ability to make sense of raw information and organize the information that they have in front of them. With a CRM, they won’t have to shift through twenty different spreadsheets – they can have all the information they need at their fingertips, in easy-to-understand formats that help users translate that raw data into effective organizing and positive outcomes.

NOTES • 3 Nonprofits Collect Data, But Don’t Use It! Beth Kanter, November 19, 2012 • 4, 5 Obama Campaign’s Investment in Data Crunching Paid Off. Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey, Los Angeles Times, November 13, 2012

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COMMUNICATING TO WIN

Corporations invest billions of dollars a

year in marketing. Sometimes as part of their marketing, they try to brand their company as a sort of community. Like management’s claims of being a ‘family’ with its employees, ultimately their focus is actually on trying to make a profit at the expense of workers and consumers. Unions spend a fraction of that to promote their critical social and economic value. Yet they have the tools at hand to build support effectively and affordably through grassroots communications. And they have a built-in strength in making their case to their members and the public – because they aren’t using a fake ‘community’ to make a CEO richer, but trying to empower workers to improve their lives. Effective communication empowers people to tell their stories with power and passion in words and visuals. Often unions attempt to convince the public of their merits and value to the larger society by citing facts – including the ways in which unions help their members gain better pay, better benefits and dignity on the job. They counter right-wing lies with evidence and logic.

Successful communications goes beyond facts and statistics – it’s embedded in narrative and personal stories that people can relate to.6 Unions need to explain their ‘why’ – why they matter, why people care, why the public should embrace union solidarity and reject the corporate spin that paints unions as ‘greedy’ while advancing corporate greed. By creating a narrative, unions can lever empathetic identification to garner support from and motivate our grassroots supporters to step up the pressure on people in power.

“It does not matter what you know about anything if you cannot communicate to your people. In that event you are not even a failure. You’re just not there.”
- Saul Alinsky
NOTES • 6 It Is in Our Nature to Need Stories. Jag Bhalla, Scientific American, May 8, 2013

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HammerHard MEDIAWORKS

building labor online & in the streets

MISSION-DRIVEN MESSAGING
Creating a mission-driven approach that
unites and gives purpose to your union’s actions and to your solidarity work is crucial to communicating your core messages. Unions need to train and guide union members on how to tell their stories effectively. The New Organizing Institute sums this up succinctly: “Stories teach how to manage emotions, so we can act with agency to face our own challenges.” That’s why messaging that’s grounded in narrative and story must sit side by side with fact-based presentations if we’re going to amplify the effectiveness of our communications and organizing. Unions are the most democratic of our society’s institutions and they have a responsibility to give a public account of their story. If unions don’t author their stories, their opponents will. Too often unions are portrayed negatively or end up as part of ‘the story of the battle’ about the competing interests of labor and corporations. Unions need to create a new paradigm and focus on winning ‘the battle of the story’ by framing themselves as the good guys. Part of this strategy has to involve democratizing communications. Many unions are tightly structured and secretive. Only the media officer speaks to the media and only organizers speak to members. But in this age of social media, everyone has the capacity to talk to everyone else – and that’s a powerful matrix for maximizing your messaging. Unions are perfectly suited to apply this strategy. Members can engage their social networks about what the union means to them – the kind of person-to-person storytelling that can act as a potent tool for organizing and outreach and as a powerful antidote to corporate spin and right-wing disinformation. A grassroots corps of communicators doesn’t have to be law or policy experts – they simply need to be empowered with mission-critical facts and share their own experiences and motivations.

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building labor online & in the streets

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SOCIAL NETWORKS AS VIRAL STORY-TELLERS

The Wobbly songwriter Joe Hill once

perfectly summed up how to make an idea ‘go viral’: “A pamphlet, no matter how good, is never read more than once, but a song is learned by heart and repeated over and over.” Joe was essentially describing a meme, a unit of self-replicating cultural transmission that allows a grassroots movement to spread ideas through social networks. These networks can be online or offline, but the principles remain the same: personal conversations build relationships with people, and unions need to subvert ‘old media’ approaches and instead communicate directly with supporters and the public. These conversations can’t be an afterthought, and you can’t expect the fish and loaves to multiply on their own. It takes work to gain followers. It is important to embrace KISS – ‘Keep It Short and Simple’ – while calling upon supporters to action. Crucially, unions need to follow up with reminder messages and conversations

that engage people’s interests, and to employ storytelling narratives that dovetail with powerful visual images – because we’re hardwired as humans to assess and respond to our environment visually. Effective communication is not about spinning and distorting the facts about your union. It’s about capturing the essence of your union and communicating that to your base by meeting people where they’re at, reaching out to them based on their needs, interests and aspirations, and helping them understand how your union works to fulfill those aspirations. By using data-driven strategies like micro-targeting and segmenting, unions can mobilize new technologies and old-fashioned people-to-people outreach to communicate with multiple constituencies, sharpen their message, and rebuild the fighting union movement our nation so desperately needs.

SEIZE THE STORY, SEIZE THE DAY

Union members are using social networks

today both person-to-person and electronically. They should want to marshal those networks to support union locals’ struggles and more broadly to re-build a strong national labor movement. Corporations are using those same social networks of members every day – in endeavors that range from selling them products to convincing them to vote against their interests. And they’re often doing this by bypassing the media altogether and taking their messaging straight to consumers.

Union locals can do more to work to energize an engaged, committed, informed base that empowers our unions and gets the goods – whether that’s a better contract, an end to unsafe workplace practices or a bigger piece of the economic pie for workers’ neighborhoods and communities.

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HammerHard MEDIAWORKS

building labor online & in the streets

SUCCESSFUL COMMUNICATIONS: A SNAPSHOT
Imagine a union that sets the terms of the debate at the negotiating table, in the media and on the streets. With the right communications strategy, wedded to readily available technology and the ability to assemble and use good data, local unions would be able to:

Use Facebook, Twitter and other social networking tools to break news, influence mainstream media, pressure the opposition and jumpstart pro-union conversations among members. Get members to fire off instant feedback that supports union organizing goals and perspectives and gets news about those pro-union sentiments covered by the print and electronic media. Build better public awareness and sympathy. How? By finding and utilizing supporters, getting out calls to action, engaging and building your base of supporters by inviting personal stories from users of your social media sites, and taking those supporters to the streets. Use multi-channel messaging including phone, SMS, email, person-to-person, print, video and social media to disseminate direct, member-to-member communication that builds a sense of connection between rank and file and union leadership, bypasses corporate media spin, adds emotional heft to campaigns, puts critical facts directly in the hands of membership, and humanizes the face of union leadership. Incite members and their extended families and networks to join petition drives that pressure local legislators, civic leaders and institutional players to support the union. This has powerful upsides, including strengthened member engagement, instant feedback, amplified influence and more effective messaging. Motivate more members to attend meetings and events regularly and better track their involvement in union activities. Develop more effective uses of member’s dues - and prove it with measurable facts. Raise funds – from dues to donations – to support organizing and other goals. Hold regular trainings on a range of topics for members, supporters, staffers and organizers. Discover and recruit more potential union members at shops that do not yet have a union.

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Effective communication strategies give people the tools to tell their stories with power and passion in words and visuals.

Unions and non-profits are using these kinds of strategies today. In 2010, NNU affiliate MNU

staged one of the largest one-day walkouts in recent history. The Minnesota nurses’ walk-out dovetailed with a savvy social networking campaign built on hard data, solid strategy and a fired-up and growing rapid response network that brought almost 100,000 viewers to their YouTube channel, more than 340,000 views and thousands of comments on the MNA blog, almost half a million page views of the nurses’ Facebook page, and an inspired, engaged workforce and extended family of supporters. In Chicago, the CTU has marshaled a formidable social networking apparatus built on hard data and methodical messaging to build enormous public opposition to the mayor’s and the school board’s attempts to privatize public education. Nationally, MoveOn has developed a massive e-mail list with incredible data analysis and social networking strategies that it uses to raise millions of dollars for progressive candidates and causes. The toolkit is vast and surprisingly accessible – with the right strategic approach and the expertise to use those tools effectively.

Let us know how HammerHard can help you learn – and do – more.

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building labor online & in the streets

HAMMERHARD MEDIAWORKS: PROBLEM SOLVERS HammerHard MediaWorks helps local unions build a ladder of engagement with a focus on
organizing – among current members, prospective members, their families, neighborhoods and the larger public – through training, analysis and communications strategies. We have over 30 years of cumulative, in-depth experience in dynamic, effective and forward-thinking communications, outreach, organizing, strategic planning, and branding on behalf of a broad array of labor unions, government agencies, non-profits, political campaigns and progressive grassroots groups. We collaborate with our clients to fill the training gap and build capacity and operations in communications, outreach and organizing using real-world and online tools.

ORGANIZERS FIRST
Everything we do is grounded in helping groups build effective organizations of committed members who can mobilize for civic power and public reach. We help our clients focus on appealing to current members, helping to recruit new members and community supporters – and then utilizing that growing base to change policy and improve conditions on the ground. That includes helping our clients sharpen the person-to-person relationships that make effective organizing possible, and supporting that organizing with both new technologies and tried and true personal engagement strategies. and we show clients how to communicate outcomes, opportunities, successes and ongoing struggles to union members and Internationals that bump up positive visibility among members and the public. We bring extensive expertise in press outreach, crisis communications and design skills for public relations to tools that range from print flyers to electronic newsletters.

21ST CENTURY TACTICS
Technology doesn’t win campaigns, but it certainly is a weapon – a formidable force multiplier in any ground game or civic engagement strategy. HammerHard brings strong capacities in a variety of CRM platforms, multi-tiered electronic communications expertise and a deep background in integrating evolving electronic tools with data-driven techniques to sharpen organizing and outreach efforts through new media and electronic outreach tools.

COMMUNICATORS
Communications is no substitute for effective organizing – but done correctly, good communications work supports and informs organizing and relationship-building. We set standards for employing new media and outreach tools that locals can embrace –

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COHESIVE
We create training protocols for effective communications and constituency-building that empower clients and give them the skill-sets they need to seize opportunities and build their organizations, brand identities and grassroots support. We connect all the various aspects of a multi-channel campaign into a comprehensive whole. We show field organizers how to consistently connect with online ‘fans’, and we show staff how to broadcast grassroots stories to the press and public. We deliver value-added services that incorporate our clients into larger networks of like-minded groups and organizations, and utilize and embrace cutting-edge tools for networking, communications and outreach.

COST-EFFECTIVE, MISSION-DRIVEN
We know how to work rapidly, efficiently and flexibly to meet evolving demands. We have the expertise, networks and skillset to ease our clients’ workloads. We provide clients with a cost-effective package that allows us to work for organizations at a fraction of the cost of hiring into multiple full-time positions for communications, analytics, research, data mining, statistical modeling and graphic design. Most importantly, we’re mission-driven and focused on our clients’ success over the long term. We care deeply about the future of unions and their memberships, extended families, neighborhoods and larger communities. And we’re committed to helping our clients ensure living wages and decent working conditions for their constituencies within a framework that supports a strong national union movement and economic and social justice for all Americans.

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APPENDIX
Trevor Griffey, “Design to Win: Labor Unions Need to Improve Their Web Sites,” blog.seattlepi.com, October 10, 2010, http://blog.seattlepi.com/trevorgriffey/2010/10/10/design-to-win-labor-unions-need-toimprove-their-web-sites Benjamin Simon and Jim Pugh, “Why You Should Test (Almost) Everything,” Tech President.com, May 6 2013, http://techpresident.com/news/23843/backchannel-whyyou-should-test-almost-everything Jason Mann, “How unions can make union organizing lists using Facebook,” Strategic Organizing.com, April 29, 2013, http://www3.strategic-organizing.com/plantoreachwalmartusingfacebook “Organizers Toolbox”, New Organizing.com, http://neworganizing.com/toolbox Grow Your Base.org, https://growyourbase.org/selfpaced-classes Gloria Fong, “5 Tips to Remember for your Ladder of Engagement,” Mobile Commons.com, November 18, 2011, http://www.mobilecommons.com/blog/2011/11/5-tipsto-remember-for-your-ladder-of-engagement/ George Weiner et al, “Panel: How Many Rungs?: Social Change & the Engagement Ladder,” sxsw.com, March 12, 2011, schedule.sxsw.com/2011/events/event_ IAP7201 Gideon Rosenblatt, “The Engagement Pyramid: Six Levels of Connecting People and Social Change,” Idealware.org, November 2010, http://www.idealware.org/articles/engagement-pyramid-six-levels-connecting-people-and-social-change Charles Lenchner, “Three Complaints About OWS,” Technology Operations Group, January, 5, 2012, http://tech. nycga.net/2012/01/05/three-complaints-about-ows Jason Mann, “Avoid Buttonitis”, Strategic Organizing, May 5, 2013, http://www.websitesforunions.com/avoid-buttonitis/ “How to Build an Engagement Pyramid,” Mixtape Communications, October, 2010, http://www.mixtapecommunications.com/2012/10/engagement-pyramid/ Beth Kanter, “Nonprofits Collect Lots of Data, But Most Don’t Use It Says NTEN/Idealware Report!” Beth Kanter. org, November 19, 2012, http://www.bethkanter.org/ nonprofit-data/ Alexis C. Madrigal, “When the Nerds Go Marching In,” The Atlantic, November 16, 2012, http://www.theatlantic. com/technology/archive/2012/11/when-the-nerds-gomarching-in/265325/ Benedict Carey, “Academic ‘Dream Team’ Helped Obama’s Effort,” New York Times, November 12, 2012, http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/13/ health/dream-team-of-behavioral-scientists-advised-obama-campaign.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 Alexis Madrigal, “Is the Democrats Tech Advantage Durable?” Linkedin.com, November 16, 2012, http:// www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20121116164611 -870338-is-the-democrats-tech-advantage-durable?goback=.gde_4719719_member_186672912 Steve Lohr, “The Obama Campaign’s Technology Is a Force Multiplier,” New York Times, November 8, 2012, http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/08/ the-obama-campaigns-technology-the-force-multiplier/ Christi Parsons and Kathleen Hennessey, “Obama Campaign’s Investment in Data Crunching Paid Off,” Los Angeles Times, November 13, 2012, http://articles. latimes.com/2012/nov/13/nation/la-na-obama-analytics-20121113 Tim Murphy, “Republicans Get Religion on Campaign Data,” Mother Jones, December 4, 2012, http:// www.motherjones.com/mojo/2012/11/republican-walks-roots-camp Steve Friess, “GOP Digital Divide May Take Years to Bridge,” Politico, January 27, 2013, http://www.politico. com/story/2013/01/gop-digital-divide-may-take-years-tobridge-86761.html Ryan Holmes, “3 Reasons Why Your Company Should Pay Employees to Use Social Media,” Hootsuite, May 17, 2013, http://blog.hootsuite.com/pay-employees-to-usesocial/ Tim Murphy and Mark Matcho, “Stalk the Vote: How Obama for America gets to know Jane Q. Voter,” Mother Jones, September/October 2012, http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2012/10/obama-campaign-microtargeting-technology Tim Murphy, “Inside the Obama Campaign’s Hard Drive,” Mother Jones, October 2, 2012, http://www.motherjones. com/politics/2012/10/harper-reed-obama-campaign-microtargeting

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Sasha Issenberg, Victory Lab, (Crown Publishers, 2012) Thomas Harding, The Video Activist, (Pluto Press, 1997) Capulet Movement Marketing, “The Noble Arsonist: Stoking Fires and Igniting Movements for NGOs (and Companies that Care)” Echo Justice Communications Collaborative, “Echoing Justice: Communications Strategies for Community Organizing in the 21st Century” Matt Price and Jon Stahl, “Engagement Organizing: the Culture and Technology of Building Power,” Fall 2012 Kristin DeMint and Jeanette Russell, Essential Guide to Online Advocacy for Nonprofits, (John Wiley & Sons, 2013) Hubert M. Blalock, Social Statistics, (Mcgraw-Hill, 1960) Christian A. Schwarz and Christoph Schalk, Natural Church Development Implementation Guide, (Church Smart Resources, 1998) Joseph Murray and Brian P. Shaughnessy, Using Civicrm, (Packt Publishing, 2011) Smartmeme, “Smartmeme: Tools and Strategies for Building Movements,” Febuary 2003 Marshall Ganz, The Practice of Leadership: Leading Change, (Harvard Business Press) New Organizing Institute, “Engagement Organizing” New Organizing Institute, “Introduction to Strategizing”

Alex White, “Tips to Help You Choose the Right Activist & Delegate Database,” alexwhite.org, April 22, 2013, http:// alexwhite.org/2013/04/tips-to-help-you-choose-the-rightactivist-delegate-database/#sthash.BLtVFl15.dpuf Alex White, “A Sample Social Media Policy for Your Union,” alexwhite.org, July 7, 2012, http://alexwhite. org/2012/07/a-sample-social-media-policy-for-yourunion/#sthash.lm6V39tt.dpuf Alex White, “Case Study: Using Data to Identify and Develop Activists,” alexwhite.org, May 8, 2012, http:// alexwhite.org/2013/05/case-study-using-data-to-identify-and-develop-activists/#sthash.MfFjonjn.dpuf Jim Britell, Organize to Win - A Grassroots Activist’s Handbook, August 15, 2010, Version 2.3 IBM Business Analytics Summit, “Presentation: Weaving Analytics into the Fabric of Your Business,” 2013 Salsalabs, “’I Do!’ Engaging in a Committed Online Relationship” Akash Jayprakash, “Streaming Emails, Autotriggers and Groups: Ongoing Engagement, Welcome Messages, and Instant Thank You’s” Akash Jayprakash, “Ur Doing it Wrong: Email Templates and Blasts” Salsalabs, “Advocacy Rising” Amy Ward and Jeanette Russell, “Crowdsourcing vs Community-Sourcing” Cunning Minx, “Content Strategy for the Online Activist”

Alex White, “Social Media for Unions,” alexwhite.org Alex White, “Introduction to Email Campaigning for Unions” alexwhite.org Norman Shawchuck et al, Marketing for Congregations: Choosing to Serve People More Effectively, (Abingdon Press, 1992) Alex White, “Facebook ‘likes’ and the Commitment and Consistency Principle,” alexwhite.org, March 20, 2011, http://alexwhite.org/2011/03/facebook-likes-and-the-commitment-and-consistency-principle/#sthash.cnTmbVFI.dpuf Alex White, “Top Five Web Design Mistakes Unions Make,” alexwhite.org, April 18, 2012, http://alexwhite. org/2012/04/top-five-web-design-mistakes-unionsmake/#sthash.3M5bMndc.dpuf Alex White, “Nine Ways to Promote Your Union’s Website,” alexwhite.org, April 12, 2012, http://alexwhite.org/2012/04/nine-ways-to-promote-yourunions-website/#sthash.bbSSJDE5.dpuf Salsalabs, “Email Stats: What are These Numbers All About Anyway?” Salsalabs and Leftaction, “Charity Dynamics,” May 22, 2012 Salsalabs, “A Complete Campaign in Salsa” Salsalabs and Firefly Partners, “Maximize Your Nonprofit’s Online Presence with Savvy Testing,” Jason Zanon, “Salsa Scoring” Salsalabs et al, “Video-Driven Campaigns” Sam Freund et al, “Salsa Database Structure” Salsalabs, “Build Your Base of Support: List Growth Strategies for Nonprofits”

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HammerHard MEDIAWORKS
www.hammerhard.org hammerhard@hammerhard.org 847-989-6104

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building labor online & in the streets

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