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Chapter 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Introduction

Meal time is a bonding moment for every Filipino family. Aside from the food served, it is important to consider a beautiful dining ware. Brightly colored ceramic mugs and plates will certainly liven up the table. It's hard to imagine that such attractive pieces of pottery could be dangerous to your health. This study about the level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares has a big relevance to the issue, since it would determine how well housewives are informed about the safeness of their kitchen wares and what toxic substance it might contain. Nowadays, we are now in the fast pace of technology age, and most of us are not aware of chemical contents of the things that we are using. We want things that are convenient to use and easy to carry. Especially housewives, they want convenience in using a certain product, but what they didn‘t know is if the

2 products they are using mostly at home are safe. News reports especially when holiday season came up, showing some dining wares that we are commonly use in our household have poisonous chemicals that may affect humans. The researchers, as a Marketing Major Students are interested in this issue because it would give them the idea on how housewives are knowledgeable about the products they purchase and in what way they can sell a safe product to the consumers. Also marketing students, want to know if the housewives of this modern period are still aware of the possibility that there are poisonous/toxic substances in the dining wares, which we commonly use in eating food and using at home.

Background of the Study

Toxicity is the degree of poison or toxic substance available that can harm human body. Toxic substances were already part of our daily living and we can‘t avoid it but we can prevent it. We should be aware about the toxicity of a certain product so we can prevent the disease or any illness. Many products especially dining wares may have contain toxic materials that can lead to any diseases for our family or love ones. Dining wares can easily contaminate a certain person because it is use for eating our foods that

3 housewives prepare at home. Now we should now if housewives are really aware in the toxicity of the dining wares that they are using at home.

Theoretical Framework This study aims to determine the level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares. The researchers gathered theories to meet the problems stated in the study. The theory of toxicity of Ejikeme Nwosu states that under normal conditions, organisms (human) are in a stable, neutral state. As toxic substances are introduced into the system they release unstable single, double and/or triple electrons into the system, which alters the maintained neutrality and stability. When this occurs, the released electrons react with some body cells, tissues, organs and thereby reducing it while the toxic substance is being oxidized. The organism falls sick and if not properly treated, might result to death. According to Dynamic Awareness Theory of Kai Riemer, Russel Haines, 2008,: 1.) "Awareness develops gradually over time, meaning different levels of awareness can exist." 2.) "Awareness requires active maintenance because it diminishes over time."

4 3. process. . output model." Conceptual Framework The study uses the input.) "Awareness is an individual and not a group-level or workspace-level construct.

1 Research Paradigm .5 Input  Aspects in awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares Brand name Contents of the label Information provided by media Poster announcements of retail outlet Process Output  Assessment of the level  Level of awareness of awareness assessed.  Presentation. and interpretation of data  Differences in the assessment of the respondents on their level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares when they are grouped according in their profile Feedback Fig. analysis.

Output consists of profile of respondents determined and level of awareness assessed. analysis and interpretation of data. contents of the label.6 Input consists of the following: Profile of the Respondents (the age. Specifically. highest educational attainment and exposure to media campaign on toxicity of dining wares). the study wants to answer the following sub-problems: 1. Aspects in Awareness of Housewives on the Toxicity of Dining Wares (brand name. Statement of the Problem The study intends to determine the level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares. information provided by media and poster announcements of retail outlets) and the Differences in the Assessment of the Respondents on their Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Toxicity of Dining Wares when they are grouped according in their profile. How do the respondents assess their level of awareness on the toxicity of dining wares in terms of the following aspects? . Process consists of determination of the profile of respondents. assessment of the level of awareness and presentation.

7 1. Is there a difference on the assessment of the respondents on their level of awareness on the toxicity of dining wares when they are grouped according to their profile? Hypothesis There is no difference in the assessment of the respondents on the level of awareness of the housewives when they are grouped according to their profile. newspaper.4 Posters/announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic materials. .1 Brand/brand name of dining wares are made of toxic material.2 Contents of label of the dining ware. 1. etc. 2. 1.3 Information on toxicity of the dining ware provided by media like television. 1.

Housewives from different areas of Metro Manila (Teresa St. any member of the family (father and their children) will not be liable to respond to this study. Significance of the Study The study is beneficial to the following individuals and organizational institutions. Manila. The survey was conducted by the researchers last February 11 (25 housewives) and 18 (25 housewives). and V. Clear description of the possible sickness from using dining wares with high toxicity is not given emphasis in the study. Luna. Quezon City) with different social statuses are used as respondents. This study is only prepared for housewives. Mesa.8 Scope and Limitations of the Study The study aims to discover the level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares. The researchers gathered information from housewives making the buying decision for their family. . 2013. Sta.

9 Housewives. This study will help them be aware about the toxic products that can be harmful to the consumers. This will make the housewives. the one that is responsible for every family‘s health. The study will make the housewives a keen buyer of products and they will be more responsible in buying products for their family. so that they can make precautionary measures about dining wares containing possible toxic materials. Government Health and Non-government Sectors. This study will serve as a stepping stone for other research that will be beneficial to the future. making them more aware about the products they will buy in the market. This study will help further studies of government and non-government health sectors making them alert. Marketing Student. They would also know about the possible effects of the products they will market to the customers. up to the extent of how aware Filipino housewives about the dining wares they use in their household. This study will help the academe and future researchers as a basis for a new research they will conduct in relation with the topic of toxicity on the products that are available in the market. . Academe and Future Researchers. As a future marketer they should be aware about the products they will sell in the market.

newspapers. both foreign and local. both foreign and local. a type of cell. the internet and some unpublished materials like some thesis and dissertation. the researchers consulted some conceptual literature from books. Through this review. ranging from immediate death to subtle changes not realized until months or years later. the research will have deeper insights about the study. These adverse effects may occur in many forms. . which stand directly to the study. In order to come up with some helpful information about the topic. a more descriptive definition of toxicology is "the study of the adverse effects of chemicals or physical agents on living organisms". or a specific biochemical. the traditional definition of toxicology is "the science of poisons. They may occur at various levels within the body. It is now known that various observable changes in anatomy or body functions actually result from previously unrecognized changes in specific biochemical in the body. Foreign Literature According to Xinru Wang. such as an organ. magazines. Knowledge of how toxic agents damage the body has progressed along with medical knowledge." As our understanding of how various agents can cause harm to humans and other organisms.10 Chapter 2 REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES This chapter presents the different related literature and studies used in the study.

dinnerware decorated with over-glazed designs can release toxic metals into food substances in amounts high enough to constitute . Jaesung Lee and Melvin A. a maximum of 3 log reduction in the virus were obtained. Escherichia coli K-12 and Listeria innocua. concerns about toxicity of plastics have gained a great deal of steam over the past few years. restaurants and food service establishments are required to achieve a minimum microbial reduction of 5 logs from these surfaces. the system responsible for regulating many bodily functions and aspects of development. During the study. Both of these chemicals act on the delicate endocrine system. Sheets. the survivability and response to the experimental conditions of the bacterial species was compared with that of MNV-1. Based on the study by Lizanel Feliciano. the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found traces of 212 environmental chemicals in humans. The results showed that current ware-washing protocols used to remove bacteria from tableware items were not sufficient to achieve a 5 log reduction in MNV-1 titer. After washing.11 According to Ryan Stanton. These were contaminated with cream cheese and reduced-fat milk inoculated with murine norovirus (MNV-1). It was concluded that MNV-1 appeared to be more resistant to both the washing process and the sanitizers when compared with E. The major concern is that the chemicals can leach out of these products into our food and beverages. Although the effects of these chemicals are not fully understood. This study evaluated the sanitization efficacies of ware-washing protocols (manual and mechanical) used in restaurants to clean tableware items. According to Ralph W. Two of the more commonly found chemicals in humans are bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. Pascall. drinking glasses and stainless steel forks were used as the food contact surfaces. In a recent study. the results of the survey raise questions about whether such chemicals contribute to a wide range of diseases and behavioral disorders. Ceramic plates. The sanitizing solutions tested were sodium hypochlorite (chlorine). Both of these chemicals are found in plastic products throughout our homes. cross-contamination of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods with pathogens on contaminated tableware and food preparation utensils is an important factor associated with food borne illnesses. Jianrong Li. To prevent this. innocua. quaternary ammonium (QAC) and tap water (control). coli K12 and L.

Chemi cals like bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates — key ingredients in modern plastics — may disrupt the delicate endocrine system. According to Bryan Walsh. "But there's an emerging understanding that kids are uniquely susceptible to environmental hazards.12 health hazards. zinc and cadmium released depend on the leaching agent used. High concentrations of lead. orange juice. attentiondeficit/hyperactivity disorder — could have chemical connections. When dishes made in the US before 1970 were filled with 4% acetic acid for 24 h. Repeated extractions with acetic acid show that even after 20 consecutive 24-h leachings many dishes still release lead in concentrations exceeding FDA limits. One-fourth of dishes tested for cadmium (26 of 98) exceeded the FDA limit of 0. cadmium and zinc were also released into 1% solutions of citric and lactic acids. they're discovering that even tiny quantities of toxins can have a potentially serious impact on our health — and the children's future. leading to developmental problems. pickle juice. as well as by commercial food substances including sauerkraut juice. director of the Children's Environmental Health Center at New York City's Mount Sinai Medical Center." . A host of modern ills that have been rising unchecked for a generation — obesity. Citric acid when leached contain higher lead: cadmium and zinc: cadmium (but lower lead: zinc) ratios than do acetic acid leaches from nominally identical dishes. as scientists get better at detecting the chemicals in our bodies. Philip Landrigan. Significant amounts of these metals were extracted by basic solutions of sodium citrate and sodium tripolyphosphate. lead concentrations of up to 610 μg/ml and cadmium concentrations of up to 15 μg/ml were measured." says Dr. diabetes. Relative concentrations of lead. autism.5 μg/ml. and low-lactose milk. "We don't give environmental exposure the attention it deserves. Acetic acid leaches from more than half the dishes tested for lead (78 of 149) contained levels exceeding the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allowable concentration of 3.0 μg/ml.

These data help toxicologists make predictions about the hazardous nature of materials tested and their potential impact on the environment and on human populations. and reproductive tests are the principal experiments conducted in a toxicology laboratory. creating a yuletide mood in your dining table through Christmas-inspired dinnerware may spell trouble for your health. The EcoWaste Coalition.pharmaceuticals such as cosmetics and household products. The EcoWaste Coalition presented this suggestion to gift givers after analyzing 35 samples of Christmas mugs for heavy metals such as antimony. Acute toxicity tests using animals have been criticized. a toxics watchdog. The skin and eye assays are examples of such tests.kids4research. cadmium. especially if they are used to evaluate non.org. (Published by kids4research) From related materials. a toxics watchdog has warned. or the dose of a substance that kills 50 percent of the animals tested. A toxicologist is an individual who is responsible for predicting the harmful nature of a substance by designing experiments that will supply the data necessary to assess the toxicity of materials. sub-chronic. Other acute studies are set up to assess the toxicity of products placed in contact with animal tissue to evaluate local tissue irritation. From EcoWaste Coalition. toxicology is the science of poisons and the harmful effects these substances have on living things. in the broadest sense. lead and mercury. The EcoWaste Coalition cautioned shoppers from buying ceramic yuletide decors that are not certified ―toxic-free‖ after it detected lead and other chemicals of concern in nine out of 12 samples. informing the public to watch out for leadglazed or lead-painted Christmas-themed ceramic ornaments. Another from EcoWaste Coalition. a single dose of a test substance is given to an animal. One measure of acute toxicity is the lethal dose 50 (LD50). made the precautionary warning after detecting lead and . chromium. In most acute (short-term). arsenic.13 Local Literature According to www. EcoWaste Coalition warned public to keep out cheap coffee mugs decorated with popular Christmas symbols in your yuletide gift list unless such items are confirmed safe from lead and other chemicals of concern.

Alano. from P29 to P199. here at home. crock pots containing lead was the subject of an investigation that started in Salt Lake City with KUTV‘s Bill Gephardt. After his investigation about lead in ceramic glazed plates. He found that 20 percent of the cookers were leaching out measurable amounts of lead into food. north of Manila. Greenpeace International. in one department store in Caloocan City. When ceramic ware is heated to just 80-degrees. According to Sun.14 other harmful chemicals in 20 imported plates and serving dishes sold at cut-rate prices. They have called on the government to order the immediate recall of baby feeding bottles containing the toxic ingredient Bisphenol A or BPA. it releases nearly 10- . the toxic impact of the lead waste trade goes beyond humans. These potent toxins should not be present in food contact materials. as evidenced by numerous reported cases of dogs. bowls and mugs and finding high a content of lead in them. FOREIGN STUDIES Written by Kathryn (a certain blogger). According to Von Hernandez. the EcoWaste Coalition and Save Babies Coalition have joined forces to add their voices to those of other countries taking precautionary action to protect babies from potential toxic contamination. Gephardt took several slow cookers to Data Chem lab in Salt Lake City to be tested. According to Ching M. birds. ―We are deeply concerned about the test results as there really is no safe amount of exposure for lead. cows and other animals dying after drinking water contaminated with the toxic runoff from piles of imported lead acid batteries dumped in open fields and quarry sites in several towns in Bulacan province. his focus turned to ceramic glazed crock pots after a viewer did a little research on her own. cadmium and other toxic elements.Star and EcoWaste Coalition.‖ said Aileen Lucero of the EcoWaste Coalition‘s Project Protect.

In the last 15 years the global annual production has doubled. and metals for the electronic product leachates.e. These belong to the polymer families of polyurethanes. The toxic leachates came mainly from products that were soft to semi-soft. and not from plastics components. and additives which have toxic properties. and from synthetic textiles made of various plastic fibres. PVC. properties and possible applications. which is based on five papers. reaching 245 million tons in 2008.15 times the amount of lead as a plate at room temperature. According to Delilah Lithner. was to study the environmental and health hazards of chemicals in plastic polymers and products. Leaching tests. but in plastic products there may be nonbound residual monomers. and styrenic . may be released during the life cycle of a plastic product. and discarded electronic products. The electronic product leachates that were acutely toxic came from mixed material and metal components. polyacrylonitriles. degradation products. plasticised PVC (11/13) and polyurethane (3/4). A hazard ranking model was developed and used to rank plastic polymers based on monomer composition and environmental and health hazard classifications. Plastics are extremely diverse in terms of chemical composition. The overall aim of this thesis. indicated that the major toxicants were hydrophobic organics for the plastic product and synthetic textile leachates. Crock pots can heat up to more than 250-degrees.. Several of the chemicals used to produce plastics are hazardous for human health and the environment. synthetic textiles. TIEs. The polymers ranked as most hazardous are made of monomers classified as mutagenic and/or carcinogenic (category 1A or 1B). toxicity tests and Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs) were made on plastic products. Substances causing acute toxicity to Daphnia magna (water flee) leached from one third of all 83 plastic products/textiles even during short term (1-3 d) leaching in deionised water. These. and are widely distributed in the society and the environment. performed on some leachates. polymerisation chemicals. epoxy resins. and from epoxy products (5/5). i. and their degradation products. Also other hazardous substances needed to produce each polymer were identified. The plastic polymers are not considered as toxic.

80 °C. 30 °C. food-borne exposures deserve further investigation. and this could be one of the important exposure sources in humans. Jr. it is prudent to cautiously select materials that contain foodstuffs. 31 out of 55. A considerable number of polymers... Occupational and environmental exposures (especially pica) appear to account for much of the identified human disease. whereas melamine cannot be detectable in all other material-made samples in the same condition. The test samples were filled with pre-warmed designated-temperature (from room temperature (∼20 °C. including food. 50 °C.V. simulant. usage of lead arsenate pesticides. are made of monomers that belong to the two highest of the ranking model‘s five hazard levels. throughout human history. Lead residues in food can result from: biological uptake from soils into plants consumed by food animals or man. The study aims to measure melamine migrated from different material-made tableware by the most sensitive technique of liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC– MS/MS). SAN and HIPS). Earlier estimates of average total dietary intake of lead by adults have been reported to range from above 500 μg/day downward with more recent estimates suggesting averages of 200 μg/day or lower. contact times. the higher the melamine migration levels. Kolbye. 40 °C. and have a large global production (1-37 million tons/year). et al. The migration of melamine amount is dependent on different temperatures. Estimates of total dietary exposure should reflect frequency distribution data on lead levels in specific food commodities in relation to the quantities actually ingested by various sample populations to distinguish degrees of risk associated with particular dietary habits. the cheaper the melamine-made tableware samples. inadvertent addition during food processing. ranging from 6. 70 °C. According to Elsevier B. Melamine is commonly used to manufacture tableware.16 copolymers (ABS. 60 °C. and by leaching them improperly glazed pottery used as food storage or dining utensils.03 μg/ml. exposures to lead have emanated from various sources. In addition. According to Albert C. Since tableware is used in daily life. however.97 to 19. and prices of tableware. to 90 °C) simulant (either distilled water or 3% acetic acid) up to 20 ml and immersed in a water bath at that designated temperature for 15 or 30 minutes (min). . can be measured from all melamine -made samples containing 20 ml 3% acetic acid in water bath of 90 °C for 30 min. High melamine migration levels.

up to 50% is absorbed. . Children are in danger from the lead and cadmium contained in imported toys. lunch bags. This same ceramic ware is used to produce foodstuffs that are sent to families across the globe as gifts from home and appears to be the greatest source of lead toxicity among Mexican migrant communities in California. of the amount you have in your body now. and baby bibs. the Mexican State has known for decades that its rural ceramic producing communities have had to increase the lead content of their glaze in response to lower grade fuel supplies for their adobe kilns. The half-life for lead is about 20 years. and James Grieshop. Even mother‘s handbag has been in the news. Margaret A.17 According to Ramona L. half of it will still be in your body 20 years from now. toys. This research reviews an interdisciplinary applied anthropology project that integrated the three communities who formed the triadic sphere of ceramic production. bibs and washcloths in their handbag. The close correlation has allowed lead toxicity to be obscured and the state to defer or minimize its role in prevention and treatment. This has resulted in increased Blood Lead Levels (BLLs) among their poorer populations who not only produce the ceramic but also depend on it as their primary source of cookware. and children absorb between 30 to 75%. Pérez. Handley. the list goes on and on and it‘s been all over the news. candy. When lead is inhaled. p acifier. ceramic use. Local Studies According to the FDA. jewelry. In other words. and food consumption across two nations to address the problem of lead in their lives from a local level. Lead is a subtle crippler that produces many health maladies that mimic those resulting from poverty. imported handbags are full of lead and moms sometimes carry their baby‘s bottle. adults absorb 11% of the lead that reaches their digestive tract.

Dining wares containing these toxic materials can harm an individual‘s body. .18 Synthesis of the Reviewed Literature and Studies Both foreign and local literatures are related to the study that there are high level content of toxic chemicals in plastic and ceramic dining wares. mainly the endocrine system which is responsible for an individual growth and development.

Descriptive method encompasses all the data gathered useful in adjusting or meeting the existing standard. In this research. Method of Research This study entitled ―Level of Awareness of Housewives on Toxicity of Dining Wares‖. Luna. Manila. instruments used. Survey study was employed to measure the existing event without inquiring into why it exists. 2013 at around 10:00 to 11:00 am. Mesa. V. Sta. This method enables the researchers to interpret and comprehend the theoretical meaning of the findings and hypothesis development for further studies. Quezon City) with different social statuses are used as respondents. It presents the following sections: Research method used. Population Housewives from different area of Metro Manila (Teresa St. respondents of the study. make used of descriptive method research which is primarily for the researchers to gather information about the prevalent issues and conditions at a chosen field of study. The survey was conducted last February 11 (25 housewives) and 18 (25 housewives). this method involved determined information about variables rather than the individuals. validation of the instruments. . data gathering procedures and statistical treatment of data. The population of the study consisted of fifty (50) housewives.19 Chapter 3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY This chapter encompasses the design and procedures undertaken by the researchers in the course of the study.

4 – aware. Highest Educational Attainment and Exposure to Media and were asked to evaluate their level of awareness on toxicity of dining wares according to their profile. Information provided by media. 1 – unaware. . Highest Educational Attainment and Exposure to Media. the researcher chooses subjects because of convenience. The questionnaire is composed of two parts. The options are divided into: 5 – fully aware. Each respondent are characterized in terms of their Age. As the name describes. Likert scale was used to signify the answer and response of the respondents considering five options with corresponding scales. Research Instrument In this study. where the respondents are opted to check their chosen option. 3 – somewhat aware. It was tested to five (5) respondents and revised subsequently after the testing. Contents of the label. and Posters and announcements of retail outlets.20 The numbers of respondents were obtained using Convenience sampling Method. Part 1 is the Profile of the Respondents including Age. Convenience Sampling is gathering data to those whoever came within that particular place at a particular time will be consider as respondents. Part 2 is the level of awareness of housewives on toxicity of dining wares through the following aspects: Brand name. Convenience sampling was used to get the respondents assessment on their level of awareness on toxicity of dining wares as they grouped according to their profile. Description of the Respondents The respondents of the study are housewives. It was then validated by an expert professor in Marketing Research. the instruments used were Questionnaires which are required in a descriptive type of research. 2 – less aware.

2. The results will be tallied and tabulated according to the frequency of the items checked by the participants.21 Data Gathering Procedure The researchers have spent great time in creating the questionnaires. The data will be coded. After the data tabulation. The formula to be used in the application of this technique is: . Frequency Distribution It is used to classify the respondents according to their profile. results will be interpreted using various statistical tools. They carefully assembled all the components of the questionnaire in order for it to serve its purpose. Statistical Treatment of Data The data that will be collected in this study will be organized and classified based from the research design and the problems formulated. tallied and tabulated to facilitate the presentation and interpretation of results using the following statistical tool: 1. Frequency will present the actual response of the respondents to a specific question or item in the questionnaires. The results of the technique used in the data gathering help the researchers to arrive at the interpretation of the study. Percentage Distribution The percentage of the item is to be computed by dividing it with the sample‘s total number of respondents who will participate in the survey.

Profile of the Respondents 1. This also includes the statistical results and their corresponding interpretation. 1. nineteen (38%) out of fifty respondents are 18-32 years old. fifteen (30%) are 33-46 years old. ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA This chapter presents the data that were utilized in the study.1 Age TABLE 1 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of Respondents According to Age Age 18 – 32 years old 33 – 46 years old 47 – 60 years old 61 – 74 years old 75 years old and above Total Frequency 19 15 11 5 0 50 Percentage 38% 30% 22% 10% 0% 100% As shown in Table 1.22 Chapter 4 PRESENTATION. five (10%) are . eleven (22%) are 47-60 years old.

Majority of the respondents are according to age are 18 to 32 years old.23 61-74 years old and none of them are 75 years old and above. Majority of the respondents according to highest educational attainment are college graduates. four (8%) are elementary graduate. four (8%) are vocational graduate and only one (2%) have graduated with a master‘s degree. seventeen (34%) are high school graduate.2 Highest Educational Attainment TABLE 2 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of Respondents According to Highest Educational Attainment Highest Educational Attainment Elementary Graduate High School Graduate Vocational Graduate College Graduate With Master‘s Degree Total Frequency 4 17 4 24 1 50 Percentage 8% 34% 8% 48% 2% 100% Table 2 depicts that there are twenty-four (48%) out of fifty respondents have graduated from college. 1. .

24 1. 2. four (8%) acquire information from posters and tarpaulin and four (8%) of the respondents acquire data from the internet or social media. Majority of the respondents according to exposure to media obtain their information through television. Level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares 2.1 Brand Name of the Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material TABLE 4 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of Respondents Assessment on Brand Name of the Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material Level of Assessment Fully Aware Frequency 6 Percentage 12% . five (10%) obtain knowledge from radio.3 Exposure to Media TABLE 3 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of Respondents According to Exposure to Media Exposure to Media Magazine/Newspaper Posters/Tarpaulin Radio Television Internet/Social Media Total Frequency 18 4 5 19 4 50 Percentage 36% 8% 10% 38% 8% 100% Table 3 shows that nineteen (38%) out of fifty respondents acquire their knowledge about toxicity through television. eighteen (36%) gain information from magazine and newspaper.

six (12%) are fully aware and only two (4%) of the respondents are less aware. Majority of the respondents are unaware of brand name of the dining wares made of toxic material. ten (20%) are somewhat aware and only six (12%) are fully aware. ten (20%) are aware. ten (20%) are aware. 2. .25 Aware Somewhat Aware Less Aware Unaware Total 10 10 11 13 50 20% 20% 22% 26% 100% Table 4 presents that thirteen (26%) out of the fifty respondents assess that they are unaware of the brand name of the dining wares containing toxic material. eleven (22%) are less aware. Majority of the respondents are unaware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares.2 Contents of the Label of Dining Wares TABLE 5 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of Respondents Assessment on Contents of the Label of Dining Wares Level of Assessment Fully Aware Aware Somewhat Aware Less Aware Unaware Total Frequency 6 10 7 2 25 50 Percentage 12% 20% 14% 4% 50% 100% Table 5 shows that twenty-five (50%) out of fifty respondents assess that they are unaware of the contents of the label of dining wares. seven (14%) are somewhat aware.

six (12%) are unaware and only three (6%) of the respondents are less aware. seventeen (34%) are somewhat aware. Majority of the respondents are aware of the information of toxicity of dining wares provided by media. six (12%) are fully aware. 2.4 Poster Announcements of Retail Outlets on Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material TABLE 7 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of Respondents Assessment on Poster Announcements of Retail Outlets on Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material Level of Assessment Fully Aware Aware Frequency 4 14 Percentage 8% 28% .3 Information on toxicity of the dining ware provided by media TABLE 6 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of Respondents Assessment on Toxicity of Dining Ware Provided by Media Level of Assessment Fully Aware Aware Somewhat Aware Less Aware Unaware Total Frequency 6 18 17 3 6 50 Percentage 12% 36% 34% 6% 12% 100% As shown in table 6. eighteen (36%) out of fifty respondents assess that they are aware of the information about toxicity of dining ware provided by media.26 2.

1 Age TABLE 8 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Brand Name of the Dining Ware Made of Toxic Material as to Age Age Level of Awareness Grand Total Unaware Fully Aware F 18-32 5 P 10% F 2 Aware Somewhat Aware F 4 P 8% F 6 Less Aware P 12% P 4% F 2 P 4% F 19 P 38% . four (8%) are fully aware and only one (2%) are less aware. Majority of the respondents assess that they are unaware of the poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic materials. Difference on the assessment of the respondents on their level of awareness on the toxicity of dining wares when they are grouped according to their profile 3. fourteen (28%) are aware.1 In terms of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic material 3.1. nine (18%) are somewhat aware. 3.27 Somewhat Aware Less Aware Unaware Total 9 1 22 50 18% 2% 44% 100% Table 7 illustrates that twenty-two (44%) out of fifty respondents are unaware of the poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material.

Three (6%) of the respondents asses that they are aware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. The same table also shows that eleven (22%) of the respondents are from 47-60 years old. eleven (22%) are aware. ten (20%) are somewhat aware and five (10%) are fully aware. four (8%) are somewhat aware. Six (12%) of respondents from 18-32 years old are unaware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials.28 33-46 47-60 61-74 75 & above Total 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0% 0% 4 3 2 0 8% 6% 4% 0% 4 2 0 0 8% 4% 0% 0% 2 3 0 0 4% 6% 0% 0% 5 3 3 0 10% 6% 6% 0% 15 11 5 0 30% 22% 10% 0% 5 10% 11 22% 10 20% 11 22% 13 26% 50 100% Table 8 shows that nineteen (38%) of the respondents are 18-32 years old. In the same table. Five (10%) of the respondents assess that they are unaware in terms of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. two (4%) are somewhat aware and none of them are fully aware. four (8%) are somewhat aware. two (4%) are less aware and none of them are fully aware. two (4%) are aware. three (6%) are unaware. Table 8 also illustrates that five (10%) of the respondents are from 61-74 years old. Table shows that there is no respondent that age seventy-five and above. eleven (22%) are less aware. All in all. four (8%) are aware. five (10%) are fully aware. none are fully aware. thirteen (26%) of the respondents according to age are unaware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. two (4%) are aware and two (4%) are unaware. Three (6%) of respondents assess that they are unaware in terms of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. three (6%) are less aware. none are somewhat aware and none of them are less aware. . fifteen (30%) out of fifty respondents are from 33-46 years old.

. three (6%) are somewhat aware. six (12%) are unaware.1. Six (12%) of the respondents assess that they are unaware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. four (8%) are somewhat aware and four (8%) are less aware. The table above also shows that seventeen (34%) of the respondents are high school graduate. two (4%) are aware and none of them are fully aware.29 3. five (10%) are aware. five (10%) are fully aware. Six (12%) of the respondents assess that they are less aware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials.2 Highest Educational Attainment TABLE 9 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Brand Name of the Dining Ware Made of Toxic Material as to Highest Educational Attainment Highest Educational Attainment Level of Awareness Fully Aware F Elementary Graduate High school Graduate Vocational Graduate College Graduate With Master’s Degree Total 5 10% 5 10% 4 8% 4 8% 6 12% 0 P 0% Aware Somewhat Aware F 2 P 4% Less Aware F 0 P 0% Unaware Grand Total F 2 P 4% F 0 P 0% F 4 P 8% 0 0% 2 4% 3 6% 6 12% 6 12% 17 34% 1 2% 1 2% 1 2% 1 2% 0 0% 4 8% 24 48% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 1 2% 1 2% 6 12% 10 20% 10 20% 11 22% 13 26% 50 100% Table 9 depicts that twenty-four (48%) of the respondents are college graduate.

Two (4%) of the respondents assess that they are aware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. one (2%) is somewhat aware. one (2%) is aware. ten (20%) are somewhat aware and six (12%) assess that they are fully aware. In total. four (8%) of the respondents are vocational graduate. 3. And she reacted to unaware in terms of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. And the remaining one (2%) respondent is with master‘s degree.3 Exposure to Media TABLE 10 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Brand Name of the Dining Ware Made of Toxic Material as to Exposure to Media Exposure to Media Fully Aware F Magazine/ 2 P 4% Level of Awareness Grand Total Unaware Aware Somewhat Aware F 3 P 6% Less Aware F 6 P 12% F 3 P 6% F 4 P 8% F 18 P 36% . One (2%) of the respondents is fully aware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. thirteen (26%) of the respondents according to highest educational attainment are unaware of the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. none (0%) less aware and none (0%) are unaware In the same table.1. two (4%) are somewhat aware.30 The table also presents that four (8%) of the respondents are elementary graduate. eleven (22%) are less aware. one (2%) is less aware and none (0%) of them are unaware. none (0%) are fully aware. ten (20%) are aware.

one (2%) is somewhat aware. one (2%) are fully aware. In the same table. . Six (12%) of the respondents are somewhat aware of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. three (6%) assess that they are aware. one (2%) is less aware. one (2%) is aware. eighteen (36%) of the respondents base their exposure to media through magazine/newspaper. Six (12%) of the respondents are less aware in terms of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials as to exposure to media through magazine or newspaper. Three (6%) of the respondents are less aware of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials through posters and tarpaulin. one (2%) are somewhat aware.31 Newspaper Posters/Tarpaulin 0 Radio Television Internet/ Social Media Total 0 3 1 0% 0% 6% 2% 0 1 3 2 0% 2% 6% 4% 1 0 6 1 2% 0% 12% 2% 3 1 2 0 6% 2% 4% 0% 0 3 5 0 0% 6% 4 5 8% 10% 38% 8% 10% 19 0% 4 6 12% 9 18% 11 22% 12 24% 12 24% 50 100% Table 10 shows that nineteen (38%) of the respondents base their exposure to media in television. Two (4%) of the respondents are aware of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. three (6%) are fully aware. three (6%) are aware and only two (4%) are less aware. none are aware and none are unaware. five (10%) are unaware. none are less aware. It also depicts that four (8%) of the respondents base their exposure to media through posters/tarpaulin. and none are unaware. four (8%) assess that they are unaware. none are fully aware. The table also presents that four (8%) of the respondents base their exposure to media through internet and social media. none (0%) are fully aware and none are somewhat aware. Three (6%) of the respondents are unaware of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. three (6%) assess that they are somewhat aware and only two (4%) are fully aware. The table also shows that five (10%) of the respondents base their exposure to media through radio.

Ten (20%) of them responded that they are unaware on the contents of the label of dining wares. nineteen (38%) are from ages eighteen to thirty-two. Seven (14%) answered unaware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares. Fifteen (30%) of the respondents are from thirty to forty-six years old.2.1 Age TABLE 11 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Contents of the Label of Dining Wares as to Age Age Level of Awareness Grand Total Unaware Fully Aware F 18-32 33-46 47-60 61-74 75 & above Total 3 1 1 0 0 P 6% 2% 2% 0% 0% Aware Somewhat Aware F 2 3 2 0 0 P 4% 6% 4% 0% 0% Less Aware F 1 0 1 0 0 P 2% 0% 2% 0% 0% F 3 4 2 2 0 P 6% 8% 4% 4% 0% F 10 7 5 3 0 P 20% 14% 10% 6% 0% F 19 15 11 5 0 P 38% 30% 22% 10% 0% 5 10% 11 22% 7 14% 2 4% 25 50% 50 100% Table 11 presents that out of fifty respondents. twelve (24%) of the respondents according to their exposure to media are less aware of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. 3. four (8%) . three (6%) also assessed to aware. nine (18%) are aware and only six (12%) are fully aware. three (6%) said that they are fully aware.32 In total.2 In terms of contents of the label of dining wares 3. twelve (24%) are unaware. eleven (22%) are somewhat aware. two (4%) in somewhat aware and only one (2%) in less aware.

two (4%) also in somewhat aware. eleven (22%) are aware. out of fifty respondents. 3. Eleven (22%) respondents age between forty-seven to sixty. five (10%) are fully aware. two (4%) in aware. three (6%) in somewhat aware. And three (6%) of them said that they are unaware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares. Five (10%) of the respondents.2. twenty-five (50%) assessed to be unaware of the contents of the label of dining wares according to age. one (2%) in fully aware and also one (2%) in less aware.33 in aware.2 Highest Educational Attainment TABLE 12 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Contents of the Label of Dining Wares as to Highest Educational Attainment Highest Educational Attainment Fully Aware F Elementary Graduate High school 0 P 0% Level of Awareness Grand Total Aware Somewhat Aware F 0 P 0% Less Aware F 0 P 0% Unaware F 1 P 2% F 3 P 6% F 4 P 8% 0 0% 1 2% 2 4% 1 2% 13 26% 17 34% . Table shows that there is no respondent that age seventy-five and above. two (4%) said that they are aware and no one said that they are fully aware. and two (4%) are less aware. somewhat aware or less aware. To conclude. one (2%) in fully aware and none (0%) in less aware. seven (14%) are somewhat aware. Five (10%) reacted to unaware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares. are from sixty-one to seventy-four.

and no one assess to fully aware and in less aware. one (2%) said she is unaware. six (12%) of them answered that they are fully aware. Seventeen (34%) respondents are high school graduates. six (12%) . Seven (14%) of them answered that they are unaware on the contents of the label of dining wares. and only one (2%) said that they are less aware. Another four (8%) of the respondents are vocational graduates. And the remaining one (2%) respondent is with master‘s degree. ten (20%) are aware. and no one says that she is fully aware. two (4%) in somewhat aware. twenty-five (50%) of them are unaware. And thirteen (26%) reacted to unaware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares. another one (2%) in less aware and none in fully aware. Three (6%) of them said that they are aware of the contents of the label of dining wares. one (2%) in aware. And she reacted to unaware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares. five (10%) also said that they are somewhat aware.34 Graduate Vocational Graduate College Graduate With Master’s Degree Total 0 0% 3 6% 0 0% 0 0% 1 2% 4 8% 6 12% 5 10% 5 10% 1 2% 7 14% 24 48% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 1 2% 1 2% 6 12% 10 20% 7 14% 2 4% 25 50% 50 100% Table 12 indicate that twenty-four (48%) out of fifty housewives respondents are college graduates. Three (6%) assessed to be unaware of the contents of the label of dining wares. seven (14%) are somewhat aware. As a result. Table 12 presents that out of fifty respondents. somewhat aware or less aware. five (10%) said that they are aware. one (2%) in aware. Four (8%) of the respondents are from elementary graduates.

four (8%) in aware. 3. Eight (16%) of them said that they are unaware on the contents of the label of dining wares. four (8%) said that they are fully aware.35 are fully aware. Nine (18%) reacted to unaware of the contents of the label of dining wares. two (4%) are somewhat aware. three (6%) said that they are aware. . another four (8%) in somewhat aware.2. Eighteen (36%) respondents based their exposure to media through magazines/newspapers. and only two (4%) said that they are less aware.3 Exposure to Media TABLE 13 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Contents of the Label of Dining Wares as to Exposure to Media Exposure to Media Fully Aware F Magazine/ Newspaper/ 0 P 0% Level of Awareness Grand Total Aware Somewhat Less Unaware Aware Aware F 4 P 8% F P F 9 P F P 36% F 4 P 8% 1 2% 18% 18 Posters/Tarpaulin 0 Radio Television Internet/ social media Total 0 4 2 0% 0% 8% 4% 1 1 3 1 2% 2% 6% 2% 0 1 2 0 0% 2% 4% 0% 0 0% 0 0% 2 4% 0 0% 3 3 8 1 6% 6% 4 5 8% 10% 38% 8% 16% 19 2% 4 6 12% 10 20% 7 14% 3 6% 24 48% 50 100% Table 13 displays that out of fifty respondents. nineteen (38%) of them based their exposure to media through television. one (2%) in less aware and none in full aware. and two (4%) are less aware about the contents of the label of dining wares as to highest educational attainment.

no one says their fully aware. and on the contents of the label of dining wares as to their exposure to media. one (2%) is aware. one (2%) is aware. The last four (8%) respondents based their awareness through posters/tarpaulin. six (12%) are fully aware. also one (2%) to somewhat aware and none to fully aware and less aware. three (6%) are less aware. table 13 shows that out of fifty respondents twenty-four (48%) respondents are unaware. 3.3 In terms of information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media 3. Three (6%) of them are unaware of the contents of the label of dining wares. Three (6%) of them assessed their self as to unaware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares. seven (14%) are somewhat aware. ten (20%) are aware. and the other one (2%) is unaware.3. Four (8%) respondents based their awareness through internet/social media. one (2%) to aware.36 Radio is the basis of exposure to media by five (10%) respondents.1 Age TABLE 14 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Information on Toxicity of Dining Wares Provided by Media as to Age Age Level of Awareness Grand Total Unaware Fully Aware F 18-32 33-46 47-60 2 1 1 P 4% 2% 2% Aware Somewhat Aware F 5 8 4 P 10% 16% 8% Less Aware F 0 0 2 P 0% 0% 4% F 8 5 4 P 16% 10% 8% F 4 1 0 P 8% 2% 0% F 19 15 11 P 38% 30% 22 % . All in all. None of them says that they are somewhat aware or less aware. no one is somewhat aware or less aware. Two (4%) of them are fully aware in terms of the contents of the label of dining wares.

one (2%) is fully aware and one(2%) is unaware. four (8%) are unaware and only two (4%) fully aware. two (4%) are less aware and only one (2%) are fully aware. six (12%) are unaware. table 14 shows that twenty (40%) are aware. one (2%) is fully aware. seventeen (34%) are somewhat aware. Eight (16%) claims that they are somewhat aware on the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. Three(6%) are aware on the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. and no one is less aware. . five (10%) of the respondents are fully aware. four (8%) are somewhat aware. Four (8%) are aware on the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. None of them says that they are unaware. No one claims that they are somewhat or less aware. five (10%) are aware. Five (10%) respondents are from ages 61-74. Eleven (22%) respondents are from ages 47-60. nineteen (38%) of them are from ages 18-32. and only two (4%) are less aware on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media as to their age. No one said that they are less aware. All in all. there are fifteen (30%) respondents. five (10%) are somewhat aware. From ages 33-46.37 61-74 75 & above Total 1 0 2% 0% 3 0 6% 0% 0 0 0% 0% 0 0 0% 0% 1 0 2% 0% 5 0 10% 0% 5 10% 20 40% 17 34% 2 4% 6 12% 50 100% Table 14 shows that out of fifty respondents. Eight (16%) of them are aware on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media. one (2%) is unaware.

3. six (12%) are somewhat aware.2 Highest Educational Attainment TABLE 15 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Information on Toxicity of Dining Wares Provided by Media as to Highest Educational Attainment Highest Educational Attainment Fully Aware F Elementary Graduate High school Graduate Vocational Graduate College Graduate With Master’s Degree Total 0 P 0% Level of Awareness Aware Somewhat Aware F 2 P 4% Less Aware F 0 P 0% Unaware Grand Total F 2 P 4% F 0 P 0% F 4 P 8% 0 0% 3 6% 8 16% 3 6% 3 6% 17 34% 0 0% 3 6% 1 2% 0 0% 0 0% 4 8% 5 10% 10 20% 6 12% 0 0% 3 6% 24 48% 1 2% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 1 2% 6 12% 18 36% 17 34% 3 6% 6 12% 50 100% Table 15 shows the level of awareness of housewives on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media as to highest educational attainment. From seventeen (34%) high school graduate.38 3. eight (16%) are somewhat aware on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media. Where twenty-four (48%) of the respondents are college graduate. No one said that they are less aware. From these respondents ten (20%) are aware on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media. and only three (6%) is unaware. five (10%) are fully aware. three (6%) of the .

and six (12%) are unaware on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media as to their highest educational attainment. three (6%) are less aware. No one claims that they are fully aware. and one (2%) is somewhat aware. less aware. or unaware. Three (6%) are aware of the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media. three (6%) are less aware. less aware. The next four (8%) of the respondents are from vocational graduates. None claims that they are fully aware. One (2%) who has a master‘s degree is fully aware of the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media. there are six (12%) respondents who are fully aware. None of them claims that they are fully aware. eighteen (36%) are aware. or unaware. Four (8%) of the respondents are elementary graduate. and the other two (4%) says that they are somewhat aware. Where two (4%) of them are aware of the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media.39 respondents are aware.3 Exposure to Media TABLE 16 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Information on Toxicity of Dining Wares Provided by Media as to Exposure to Media Exposure to Media Fully Aware F Magazine /Newspaper 0 P 0% Level of Awareness Grand Total Aware Somewhat Less Unaware Aware Aware F 6 P 12% F P F 2 P 4% F 18 P 36% F P 10 20% 0 0% . seventeen (34%) are somewhat aware. and the other three (6%) of the respondents are unaware. All in all.3. 3.

eighteen (36%) claims that they are somewhat aware. and two (4%) are unaware. other one (2%) is less aware and none says that they are fully aware or unaware. Four (8%) says that posters/tarpaulins are the basis of their awareness. Five (10%) of the respondents based their awareness through listening to the radio. five (10%) . Two (4%) of them assess that they are somewhat aware of the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. two (4%) are less aware. As a result. Where ten (20%) of them are aware of the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. Two (4%) answer that they are aware of the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. Where nine (18%) of them are somewhat aware of the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. Another four (8%) is through internet/social media.40 Posters/Tarpaulin 0 Radio Television Internet/Social Media Total 0 4 1 0% 0% 8% 2% 1 2 2 2 2% 4% 4% 4% 2 1 9 0 4% 2% 18% 0% 1 2% 0 0% 2 4% 0 0% 0 2 2 1 0% 4% 4% 2% 4 5 19 4 8% 10% 38% 8% 5 10% 17 34% 18 36% 3 6% 7 14% 50 100% Table 16 shows that nineteen (38%) of the respondents based their awareness through television. seven (14%) are unaware. and the other two (4%) are unaware. four (8%) of them are fully aware. None of them claims that they are fully aware or less aware. one (2%) is aware. two (4%) are aware. seventeen (34%) are aware. six (12%) are somewhat aware. No one reacted to somewhat aware and less aware. two (4%) are unaware and only one (2%) is somewhat aware. Two (4%) are aware of the information on toxicity of dining ware provided by media. No one says that they are fully aware or less aware. Eighteen (36%) of the respondents based their awareness by reading magazines/newspaper. one (2%) is fully aware and the other one (2%) says that she is unaware. out of fifty respondents.

two (4%) are fully aware and the remaining two (4%) are somewhat aware. Fifteen (30%) respondents are from age thirty-three to forty-six.4 In terms of posters announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material 3. Five (10%) says that they are unaware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares .4. are from ages eighteen to thirty-two. majority of them.41 are fully aware and three (6%) are less aware on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media as to their exposure to media. four (8%) are aware. nineteen (18%).1 Age TABLE 17 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on Posters Announcements of Retail Outlets on Dining Wares Made of Toxic Materials as to Age Age Level of Awareness Grand Total Unaware Fully Aware F 18-32 33-46 47-60 61-74 75 & above Total 2 1 0 0 0 P 4% 2% 0% 0% 0% Aware Somewhat Aware F 2 4 2 1 0 P 4% 8% 4% 2% 0% Less Aware F 0 1 0 0 0 P 0% 2% 0% 0% 0% F 4 4 4 3 0 P 8% 8% 8% 6% 0% F 11 5 5 1 0 P 22% 10% 10% 2% 0% F 19 15 11 5 0 P 38% 30% 22% 10% 0% 3 6% 15 30% 9 18% 1 2% 22 44% 50 100% Table 17 presents that out of fifty respondents. None is less aware. 3. whereas eleven (22%) of them answer that they are unaware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material.

this table depicts that twenty-two (44%) of the respondents are unaware. one (2%) is somewhat aware and the other one (2%) is unaware. Five (10%) claim that they are unaware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. other four (8%) is somewhat aware. one (2%) is fully aware and last one (2%) says that he/she is less aware. four (8%) are aware and two (4%) are somewhat aware. four (8%) are aware. To conclude. No one claim that she is fully aware or less aware. 3. one (2%) is less aware on the poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material as to their age. The remaining five (10%) respondents are from sixty-one to seventy-four years of age. Three of them (6%) are aware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material.42 made of toxic material. fifteen (30%) are aware. Eleven (22%) of the respondents are forty-seven to sixty years old.4.2 Highest Educational Attainment TABLE 18 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on Posters Announcements of Retail Outlets on Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material as to Highest Educational Attainment Highest Educational Attainment Fully Aware F Elementary Graduate High school 0 P 0% Level of Awareness Aware Somewhat Aware F 0 P 0% Less Aware F 1 P 2% Unaware Grand Total F 2 P 4% F 1 P 2% F 4 P 8% 0 0% 2 4% 6 12% 0 0% 9 18% 17 34% . three (6%) are full aware and lastly. nine (18%) are somewhat aware. None is fully aware or less aware.

Vocational graduate respondents are four (8%). two (4%) are aware. seven (14%) answers aware. where nine (18%) claim that they are unaware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. Two (4%) of them are aware v of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. two (4%) in somewhat aware. and none in less aware. Two (4%) assess themselves as aware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. four (8%) in fully aware. One (2%) respondent with master‘s degree says that she is aware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. six (12%) are somewhat aware. one (2%) is less aware and only one (2%) is unaware. None is fully or somewhat aware. the other one (2%) is unaware and no one is fully aware or less aware. Eleven (22%) answer that they are unaware on poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic materials. twenty-two (44%) of the respondents are unaware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. In total. fourteen (28%) . The other four (8%) respondents are elementary graduate. Seventeen (14%) respondents are high school graduate.43 Graduate Vocational Graduate College Graduate With Master’s Degree Total 0 0% 2 4% 1 2% 0 0% 1 2% 4 8% 4 8% 7 14% 2 4% 0 0% 11 22% 24 48% 0 0% 1 2% 0 0% 0 0% 0 0% 1 2% 4 8% 14 28% 9 18% 1 2% 22 44% 50 100% Table 18 indicates that there are twenty-four (48%) respondents who are college graduates out of fifty respondents. one (2%) is somewhat aware. and no one is fully aware or less aware.

.4. two (4%) are aware and only one (2%) is less aware. Where seven (14%) says that they are unaware of the posters announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. four (8%) is fully aware. six (12%) are aware. four (8%) are fully aware and the last one (2%) is less aware. Other five (10%) claims that they are somewhat aware. 3.3 Exposure to Media TABLE 19 Frequency and Percentage Distribution on the Level of Awareness of Housewives on Posters Announcements of Retail Outlets on Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material as to Exposure to Media Exposure to Media Fully Aware F Magazine/ Newspaper P Level of Awareness Grand Total Aware Somewhat Less Unaware Aware Aware F 2 P 4% F P F P F P 36% F 6 P 12% 0 0% 0 0% 10 20% 18 Posters/Tarpaulin 0 0% 1 Radio Television Internet/ Social media Total 0 0% 4 8% 0 0% 2 2 2 2% 4% 4% 4% 2 0 5 0 4% 0% 10% 0% 1 2% 0 0% 1 2% 0 0% 0 3 7 2 0% 6% 4 5 8% 10% 38% 8% 14% 19 4% 4 4 8% 13 26% 9 18% 2 4% 22 44% 50 100% Table 19 shows that nineteen (36%) out of fifty respondents based their level of awareness in television.44 are aware. Ten (20%) of them are unaware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. Magazines/newspapers are the basis of eighteen (36%) respondents. two (4%) are somewhat aware and no one is fully or less aware. nine (18%) are somewhat aware.

The remaining four (8%) respondents get their awareness through internet/social media. No one claims that he/she is fully. majority of the respondents. To conclude. nine (18%) are somewhat aware. Two (4%) are somewhat aware. three (6%) are unaware and two (4%) are aware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. Posters/tarpaulin are the source of awareness for four (8%) respondents. four (8%) are fully aware. No one answers fully. somewhat or less aware. are unaware. one (2%) is aware and the other one (2%) is less aware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. somewhat or less aware. .45 Five (10%) says that their basis is listening to radio. Two (4%) are unaware and the other two (4%) are aware of the posters announcement of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. Among these respondents. twenty-two (44%). thirteen (26%) are aware. None is fully aware. while the remaining two (4%) are less aware on posters announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material as to their exposure to media.

The survey questionnaires were the fundamental instruments utilized in collecting data. Specifically.1 Age 1. tabulating and interpreting of data. conclusions arrived.2 Educational attainment . the researchers used the frequency and percentage distribution as the statistical tool of the study. To ensure impartiality on presentation. FINDINGS. and the recommendations made about the study. Participating respondents of the study were Housewives. Descriptive method was used because of its simplicity in gathering. CONCLUSIONS. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of the following variables? 1. Statement of the Problem The study aims to determine the level of awareness of housewives on toxicity of dining wares.46 Chapter 5 SUMMARY. analyzing. AND RECOMMENDATIONS This chapter discusses the summary of findings. The study was conducted during the second semester of the school year 20122013. this study wants to answer the following sub problems: 1. analysis and interpretation of data.

As to Information on toxicity of the dining ware provided by media. Concerning about the Contents of the Label of Dining Wares. 1. Level of awareness of housewives on toxicity of dining wares With regards to Brand Name of the Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material. 2. thirteen (26%) of the respondents assess that they are unaware.47 1.3 Exposure to media 2.2 Contents of the label 2. When it comes to Poster Announcements of Retail Outlets on Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material twenty-two (44%) out of 50 respondents are unaware. . eighteen (36%) of the total respondents assess that they are aware. twenty-five (50%) out of 50 respondents are unaware. summary of findings were stated. there are twenty-four (48%) out of 50 respondents are college graduates. nineteen (38%) out of 50 respondents are 18-32 years old. With regards on the exposure to media.4 Poster announcements of retail outlet 3. Is there a differences in the assessment of the respondents on their level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares when they are grouped according in their profile? Findings In accordance with the data analyzed by the researchers. When it comes to highest educational attainment. nineteen (38%) out of 50 respondents acquire their knowledge about toxicity through television. How do the respondents assess their level of awareness on their dining wares in terms of the following aspects? 2. Profile of the respondents As to age.3 Information provided by media 2.1 Brand name 2.

48 3. Differences in the assessment of the respondents on their level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares when they are grouped according in their profile As to age, thirteen (26%) are unaware, eleven (22%) are aware, eleven (22%) are less aware, ten (20%) are somewhat aware and five (10%) are fully aware about the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. Moreover, out of fifty (100%) respondents, 25 (50%) assessed to unaware, eleven (22%) in aware, seven (14%) in somewhat aware, five (10%) in fully aware, and two (4%) in less aware about the contents of the label of dining wares. In terms of information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media, five (10%) of the respondents are fully aware, twenty (40%) are aware, seventeen (34%) are somewhat aware, two (4%) are less aware, and six (12%) of them are unaware. Furthermore, twenty-two (44%) of the respondents are unaware, fifteen (30%) are aware, nine (18%) are somewhat aware, three (6%) are fully aware and lastly, one (2%) is less aware on the poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. As to Highest educational attainment, thirteen (26%) of the respondents are unaware, eleven (22%) are less aware, ten (20%) are aware, ten (20%) are somewhat aware and six (12%) assess that they are fully aware about the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. In terms of contents of the label of dining wares, out of fifty (100%) respondents, 25 (50%) of them are unaware, ten (20%) are aware, seven (14%) are somewhat aware, six (12%) are fully aware, and two (4%) are less aware about the contents of the label of dining wares. Moreover, there are six (12%) respondents who are fully aware, eighteen (36%) are aware, seventeen (34%) are somewhat aware, three (6%) are less aware, and six (12%) are unaware on the information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media. Furthermore, In terms of posters announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material there are twenty-two (44%) of the respondents are unaware, fourteen (28%) are aware, nine (18%) are somewhat aware, four (8%) are fully aware and the last one (2%) is less aware.

49 As to exposure to media in terms of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials, twelve (24%) of the respondents are less aware, twelve (24%) are unaware, eleven (22%) are somewhat aware, nine (18%) are aware and only six (12%) are fully aware. In terms of contents of the label of dining wares, out of 50 respondents six (12%) are fully aware, ten (20%) are aware, seven (14%) are somewhat aware, three (6%) are less aware, and twenty-four (48%) respondents are unaware. In addition to, in terms of information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media , fifty (100%) respondents, 18 (36%) claims that they are somewhat aware, 17 (34%) are aware, 7 (14%) are unaware, 5 (10%) are fully aware and three (6%) are less aware. Lastly, In terms of posters announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material, twenty-two (44%), are unaware, thirteen (26%) are aware, nine (18%) are somewhat

aware, four (8%) are fully aware, while the remaining two (4%) is less aware.

Conclusions Based on the summary of findings, the following conclusions are made. 1. Profile of the Respondents The study shows that majority of the respondents ranging from eighteen to thirty-two years of age mostly hold a bachelors degree acquire their knowledge about toxicity through television. 2. Level of awareness of housewives on toxicity of dining wares Majority of the respondents assessed that they are unaware about the brand name of the dining wares containing toxic material. When it comes to Contents of the Label of Dining Wares, majority of the respondents are unaware. Furthermore, majority of the respondents assessed that they are aware of the information about toxicity of dining ware provided by media. Lastly, majority of the respondents are unaware when it comes to Poster Announcements of Retail Outlets on Dining Wares Made of Toxic Material.

50 3. Differences in the assessment of the respondents on their level of awareness of housewives on the toxicity of dining wares when they are grouped according in their profile As to age, majority of the respondents are unaware about the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. With regards to the contents of the label of dining wares, majority of the respondents are also unaware. In terms of information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media, majority of the respondents are aware. When it comes to poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material, majority of the respondents are unaware. As to Highest educational attainment in terms of brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials, majority of the respondents are unaware. In terms of contents of the label of dining wares, majority of the respondents are unaware. Moreover, in terms of information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media the majority of respondents are aware. Lastly, majority of the respondents are unaware about poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material. As to exposure to media, majority of the respondents are equally less aware and unaware about the brand name of the dining ware made of toxic materials. When it comes to contents of the label of dining wares, majority of the respondents are unaware. In terms of information on toxicity of dining wares provided by media, the majority of respondents are somewhat aware. Lastly, majority of respondents are unaware with regards to poster announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made of toxic material.

Recommendations After conducting the study, the researchers organize their recommendations for many tentative users of this study. 1. To the housewives, they should be the ones who are mostly aware about the topic to ensure the safeness of their family.

related to this topic. 3. For the future researchers. To organizations who are assigned with these kinds of problems. when most of this cases occur.51 2. they should always provide consumers with enough information. and family. especially to the society. researchers will find more concrete research data and research materials. friends. We hope that this study will help those who will soon be researching the same topic. . we recommend that if they will do a research. Improve and expand the information about the toxicity in dining ware and its implication to ourselves. not only during holiday seasons. Add some respondents that can also help to answer the research problem. they should always monitor stores and provide warnings for the sake of their consumer‘s health.

We are requesting for your cooperation by answering the questions below regarding this topic. 1.3 Information on toxicity of the dining wares provided by media like television. We.2 Highest Educational Attainment __Elementary Graduate __High School Graduate __College Graduate __With Master‘s Degree __With Doctor‘s Degree 1. the students from College of Business of Polytechnic University of the Philippines. ASPECTS ON THE TOXICITY OF DINING WARES 2.2 Contents of the label of the dining wares 2. 2. Please do not leave any item unanswered. Thank you! The Researchers Part I: Profile of the Respondents Instructions: Please provide the needed information by putting a check mark () on the space provided for. We promise to keep all your answers confidentially.1Brand/ brand name of the dining wares made of toxic materials 2.4 Posters/ announcements of retail outlets on dining wares made on toxic materials LEVEL OF AWARENESS 5 4 3 2 1 FA A SA LA U 1. newspaper etc. old Part II: Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Toxicity of the Dining Wares Instructions: Please tell us your level of awareness on the toxicity of dining wares using the following scale: 5 – Fully Aware (FA) 4 – Aware (A) 3 – Somewhat Aware (SA) 2 – Less Aware (LA) 1 – Unaware (U) Put a check mark () on the space provided.52 Republic of the Philippines Polytechnic University of the Philippines College of Business Dear Respondents. are conducting a research study entitled ‗Level of Awareness of Housewives on the Toxicity of Dining Wares‘.1 Age __18-32 years old __33-46 years old __47-60 years old __61-74 years old __75 and above yrs.3 Exposure to Media (You may check as many as want) __Magazine/newspaper __Posters/tarpaulin __Radio __Television __Internet/social media .

Mesa. : Marilez A. Mesa March 3. 2013  Marketing Greenaid: Blast to the new color of Business trends Bulwagang Balagtas. Mesa Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2009-Present High School Pinagbuhatan High School Pinagbuhatan. CONTACT NUMBER: 09263211981 EMAIL ADDRESS: rizel_abrasia@yahoo. PUP Sta. 1993 : Pasig City : Baptist : Nadir C. Pasig City 2005-2009 Elementary Pinagbuhatan Elementary School Pinagbuhatan.53 ABRASIA. Cinema 9  . 2013 HashTag: Trending Marketing Opportunities March 1. 2013 SM Sta. Pasig City 1999.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Female : July 19. RIZEL A.Mesa. Abrasia EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. Manila March 2.2005 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: On-The-Job Training: Philippine Seven Corporation (August – October 2012) SEMINARS ATTENDED:  Hashtag: Trending Marketing Opportunities Cinema 9. SM City Sta. Abrasia Jr.

2006 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: On-The-Job Training: Classic Savory ( July – October 2012) SEMINARS ATTENDED:  Hashtag: Trending Marketing Opportunities Cinema 9.Mesa. Manila March 2. Cruz Elementary School Olallia Rd. PUP Sta. 2013 SM Sta. Brgy. Cinema 9 . 2013  Marketing Greenaid: Blast to the new color of Business trends Bulwagang Balagtas. SM City Sta. NELSON R. 2013  HashTag: Trending Marketing Opportunities March 1. Mesa. Cruz.54 ACEBUCHE JR. Sta. Antipolo City 2000.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Male : Nov. Mesa Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2010-Present High School Antipolo National High School Olallia Rd. 1992 : Antipolo City : Roman Catholic : Nelson P. Acebuche : Rita R. Cruz.1. Antipolo City 2006-2010 Elementary Sta. Brgy. Mesa March 3. Sta. Acebuche EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. CONTACT NUMBER: 09217588022 EMAIL ADDRESS: nelton_rod@yahoo.

2006 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: On-The-Job Training: Golden Arches Development Corporation (March – June 2012) SEMINARS ATTENDED:  ―Blackout: Putting Light to Society – Marketing with a Conscience‖ February 27. PUP Sta. 2012 SM City Sta. 2013 SM Sta. Mesa   . VERLYN DS. Mesa Cinema 6 HashTag: Trending Marketing Opportunities March 1. Mesa Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2010-Present High School Ramon Magsaysay (Cubao) High School Ermin Garcia St. 2013 Bulwagang Balagtas. Cinema 9 ―Marketing Greenaid – Blast to the New Color of Business Trends‖ March 2.55 AGUSTIN.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Female : September 18. Cubao 2006-2010 Elementary Bonifacio Memorial Elementary School Bgy. 1994 : Manila : Christian : Oliver Agustin : Jocelyn Agustin EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta.Mesa. Quezon City 2000. corner EDSA. NALLRC. CONTACT NUMBER: 09309996612 EMAIL ADDRESS: verlyn_agustin@yahoo. Balintawak. Unang Sigaw.

Valenzuela City 2000.anoc@yahoo. Mesa.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Female : September 25. Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2011-Present Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. JEROSELLE M. Valenzuela City 2006-2010 Elementary Maysan Elementary School Maysan. Mesa. 1993 : Valenzuela City : Roman Catholic : Arnulfo Anoc : Evelinda Anoc EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta.56 Name: ANOC. Manila Bachelor of Science in Accountancy 2010-2011 High School Maysan National High School Maysan. CONTACT NUMBER: 09059025115 EMAIL ADDRESS: jeroselle.2006 .

Arriola EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. JUSTINE B.57 SEMINARS ATTENDED:    ―Blackout: Putting Light to Society – Marketing with a Conscience‖ February 27. Mesa Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2009-Present High School Lakan Dula High School Tondo. 1993 : Caloocan City : Roman Catholic : Justo R. Arriola : Lordita B. 2013 Bulwagang Balagtas. 2013 SM Sta.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Male : July 3. PUP Sta. Cinema 9 ―Marketing Greenaid – Blast to the New Color of Business Trends‖ March 2.Mesa. 2012 SM City Sta. Manila . Mesa Name: ARRIOLA. CONTACT NUMBER: 09059478720 EMAIL ADDRESS: melovesairen@facebook. Mesa Cinema 6 HashTag: Trending Marketing Opportunities March 1. NALLRC.

navigating Juan‘s Market February 3. Cinema 9  Name: BAUTISTA.Mesa.Central Caloocan City 1999. 1994 : Bulacan : Roman Catholic : Ricardo C. CONTACT NUMBER: 09268082438 EMAIL ADDRESS: sarahjanebautista46@yahoo. 2012 SM Sta. The Core of Modern Strategic Marketing ― February 16. Position.Mesa. Bautista . Cinema 6 HashTag: Trending Marketing Opportunities March 1. Bautista : Marilou A. A ride with the Global Brands. 2013 SM Sta.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Female : June 8. SARAH JANE A.58 2005-2009 Elementary Caloocan Elementary School . Target.2005 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: On-The-Job Training: Kia New Manila (January – March 2013) Civil Service Eligible: Professional SEMINARS ATTENDED:   ―DIVERSITY MARKETING: Segment. 2012 Fasten your Seatbelt.

Obando. navigating Juan‘s Market February 3.Mesa. Polytechnic University of the Philippines  Fasten your Seatbelt. Mesa Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2010-Present High School Polo National High School Palasan. Bulacan 2000. 2012 Bulwagang Balagtas. Cinema 9 . Cinema 6  HashTag: Trending Marketing Opportunities March 1.Mesa. Position. Valenzuela City 2006-2010 Elementary Paco Elementary School Paco. 2013 SM Sta. 2012 SM Sta.2006 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: On-The-Job Training: Classic Savory (July – August 2012) SEMINARS ATTENDED:  ―DIVERSITY MARKETING: Segment. The Core of Modern Strategic Marketing ― February 16. Target.59 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. A ride with the Global Brands.

Mesa Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2010-Present High School Jose Abad Santos High School Binondo. Budiit EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. (July – September 2012) SEMINARS ATTENDED:  Marketing Grenaid BLAST TO THE NEW COLOR OF BUSINESS TRENDS March 2. CONTACT NUMBER: 09303385368 EMAIL ADDRESS: melbudiit@yahoo.60 Name: BUDIIT. 1992 : Albay : Roman Catholic : Vicente S. Albay 1999-2005 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: On-The-Job Training: Goldilocks Bakeshop Inc. Budiit : Sonia P.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Female : September 21. Manila 2006-2010 Elementary Bulusan Elementary School Libon. 2013 . MELBA P.

Mesa. Mesa. Quezon City . 1993 : Quezon City : Roman Catholic : Larry Casado : Felicitas Cachola EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2011-Present Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. Polytechnic University of the Philippines  WARFARE! ―RAID THE JUNGLE. HANS JUSTINE C. PREPARE FOR THE BATTLE‖ A CLOSE GUERILLA MARKETING ENCOUNTER February 17. 2012 Bulwagang Balagtas.61 Bulwagang Balagtas. Cinema 9 Goliath meets Juan ―The Giants firms‘ Promotional Approach to Filipinos‖ January 20. CONTACT NUMBER: 0916-542-9885 EMAIL ADDRESS: justine_cachola03@yahoo. Polytechnic University of the Philippines  Name: CACHOLA.Mesa.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Male : November 3. Manila Bachelor of Science in Accountancy 2010-2011 High School Quezon City Academy 1144 EDSA. 2012 SM Sta.

2013 Bulwagang Balagtas.Present) On-The-Job Training: Filtrepreneur Franchise Inc. 2012 SM City Sta.com PERSONAL INFORMATION: Sex Date of Birth Place of Birth Religion Father‘s Name Mother‘s Name : Female : November 4. 1993 : Gumaca. NALLRC. Andal EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: . PUP Sta. 2012 Bulwagang Balagtas.2006 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: Multi-Level Marketer: The Filipino Dream/ iDream Network International (February 2012. (August – October 2012) SEMINARS ATTENDED:  ―Fusion of Green Minds – A Discovery of the Shades of Green Marketing‖ February 22. Mesa   ―Blackout: Putting Light to Society – Marketing with a Conscience‖ February 27. CONTACT NUMBER: 09176690177 / 09079825381 EMAIL ADDRESS: sarahkaeyandal@rocketmail. Quezon : Roman Cataholic : Jimmy B. John of Beverley Novaliches. Mesa Cinema 6 ―Marketing Greenaid – Blast to the New Color of Business Trends‖ March 2. Andal : Victoria Wally C. Mesa ANDAL. Quezon City 2000. PUP Sta. SARAH KAEY C.62 2006-2010 Elementary St. NALLRC.

Mesa. SM City Sta. 2013 SM Sta. Manila March 2. Antipolo City 2006-2010 Elementary Juan Sumulong Elementary School Brgy. Mesa. Mesa March 3. Cinema 9  . 2013 HashTag: Trending Marketing Opportunities March 1. (August – October 2012) SEMINARS ATTENDED:  Hashtag: Trending Marketing Opportunities Cinema 9. 2013  Marketing Greenaid: Blast to the new color of Business trends Bulwagang Balagtas. Mesa Manila Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Major In Marketing Management 2010-Present High School Sumulong Memorial High School Brgy. San Roque.63 Tertiary Polytechnic University of the Philippines Sta. Antipolo City 2000-2006 PROFESSIONAL ATTAINMENT: On-The-Job Training: Lyric Piano Corp. PUP Sta. San Roque.