BY ALBERT AMATEAU

AND LINCOLN ANDERSON
The chain-link fences came down
without any fanfare and with minimal
public notice around 6 a.m. Tuesday.
But it did not take long for Villagers
and visitors to find their way into the
new, redesigned northwest quadrant of
Washington Square Park.
By 10 a.m. the relocated fountain
was jetting water as it should and
George Vellonakis, the designer of the
park’s renovations, was on hand to see
that all was well. He declined to com-
ment and referred all inquiries to the
Department of Parks and Recreation
press office.
Early-morning visitors had divided
opinions about the new design, which
provoked a seemingly endless and bit-
ter controversy for the past several
years and survived a court attack by
dissenters.
“I liked it better the way it was
before,” said Ognjen Simic, who works
at New York University. “I don’t see the
need to change it.”
“It looks great,” said Vigdis Burke,
a Village neighbor for 15 years who
came with her daughter, Annika, 2½
years old, and her son, Christian, not
quite 1 year old. Annika found her way
to the water in the fountain and wet
her fingers and the bottom of her shoes
before mom said, “No.”
What did David Langdon, in the
park with his wife and three children,
think of the new landscaping with a
wide central path leading to the plaza
and the fountain? Langdon shrugged.
“It’s pretty,” he said. “But they took
down a lot of trees. The fountain seems
strange here in the center. I don’t think
it was worth closing the park for two
years.”
Robin Nagle, an anthropology pro-
fessor at N.Y.U. and anthropologist-in-
residence of the city’s Department of
Sanitation, said, “It’s beautiful, but I’m
concerned about maintenance. That
will be the make or break of the park.”
Nagle said she did not miss the sunken
BY PATRICK HEDLUND
A decade-long local effort
to transform a derelict former
West Side railway into a pub-
lic park-in-the-sky will finally
be realized next month with
the debut of the High Line’s
first section in Chelsea.
“To me the most reward-
ing thing is bringing some-
body up there to show it to
them for the first time,” said
Joshua David, who conceived
of the idea with fellow park
The High Line park
is steaming quickly
toward grand debut
Fountain flowing, flowers blooming,
restored square bursts back to life
Villager photo by Jefferson Siegel
On Tuesday afternoon a youngster waded in the renovated Washington Square Park fountain amid the spray of its
new, more powerful water jets.
BY ALBERT AMATEAU
The Department of Edu-
cation was negotiating with
Greenwich House last week
for space that could tempo-
rarily relieve the overcrowd-
ing that has resulted in a
waiting list for kindergarten
seats in Greenwich Village’s
two public elementary
schools in September.
Council Speaker Chris
Quinn and an Education
official spoke about the
option at the Thurs., May
14, meeting of the District
2 Community Education
Council, at which more
than 300 parents from the
Village, the Upper East Side
and Chelsea were hoping for
good news.
Quinn also said she
welcomed New York
University’s offer last week
of space for four pre-kinder-
garten classes in Washington
Square Village, but she said
the space needed a lot of
work and could not be ready
for children in September.
“It’s been a whirlwind
week,” said Rebecca Daniels,
president of the District 2
C.E.C., who presided at the
May 14 meeting.
The waiting list for
incoming kindergarteners
at P.S. 41 on W. 11th St.
and P.S. 3 on Hudson St.
stood at 79 at the end of
last week, even after a task
force of elected officials and
D.O.E. staff members had
been searching for weeks
for more classroom space.
The task force looked every-
where, from the McBurney
Pre-K kids might
go to Barrow St.,
not to Balducci’s
Continued on page 16
145 SI XTH AVENUE • NYC 10013 • COPYRI GHT © 2009 COMMUNI TY MEDI A, LLC
Continued on page 11
Continued on page 30
EDITORIAL,
LETTERS
PAGE 18
‘FRASIER’ CO-STAR
IN CLASSIC
COMEDY
PAGE 24
Volume 78, Number 50 $1.00 West and East Village, Chelsea, Soho, Noho, Little Italy, Chinatown and Lower East Side, Since 1933 May 20 - 26, 2009
Golden Girls
beach party,
p. 25
2 May 20 - 26, 2009
SIDEWALK ‘ROAD WARRIOR’: “I want you to get this
right — because this is going to be all over Streetsblog,”
Sean Sweeney said, as he explained to us on Sunday how he
got the whopping shiner under his left eye. The Soho activist
said he was walking on Greene St. when a young cyclist came
barreling down the sidewalk toward him. At a point where
the pavement narrowed, the two came face to face, with the
rider still racing at a rapid rate. Sweeney abruptly grabbed
the bike’s handlebars, to which the cyclist responded, “Are
you looking for trouble?” Sweeney answered, “Yeah!”
though, he said, on second thought maybe he shouldn’t have.
Before Sweeney knew it, the cyclist — whom he said was
“clean cut, like a yuppie” — had sucker punched him in the
face. Some bystanders — “young citizens, his age,” Sweeney
noted with some satisfaction — grabbed the bike rider and
held him. “They said, ‘What are you punching the old guy
for?’” a remark Sweeney said actually hurt more than the
physical blow. The cyclist protested that Sweeney “started
it,” but the activist retorted, “No, you were on the sidewalk.”
In the end, since he was late for a Downtown Independent
Democrats meeting, Sweeney decided not to call the police
or press charges, and they let the man go. It’s not Sweeney’s
first run in with bikes. He’s been a vocal critic of the new
Grand St. bike lane, which — along with his opposition to a
proposed Prince St. pedestrian mall — led Streetsblog, not
long ago, to dub him NIMBY of the Year.
HERE COMES THE JUDGE: Downtown Independent
Democrats’ fundraiser last Sunday, at D.I.D. President
Sweeney’s Soho loft (which is where he was telling us
about his black eye), drew quite a crowd, with the likes of
Congressmembers Jerrold Nadler and Carolyn Maloney,
Council Speaker Christine Quinn and state Senator Daniel
Squadron, among others. Civil Court Judge Kathryn Freed
was there — and pointed out she had every right to be. Rules
bar judges from attending such political events — but not if
they are candidates running for office, and Freed told us she
has her eye on state Supreme Court. But she said, though
it’s possible she might be on the ballot this year, there are a
bunch of candidates already approved by the judicial screen-
ing panel who were “ahead” of her in line, so to speak, so
she might have to run next year. Supreme Court would mean
$10,000 more a year, plus “more interesting cases,” Freed
said. She stated she won’t run for her old First District City
Council seat again because, as she put it, “I can’t afford it,”
noting she’s still paying off the mortgage on her Grand St.
Co-ops apartment.
GET INTA DODGE: Also at the D.I.D. fundraiser, we
learned a bit more about Dodge Landesman and his ground-
breaking campaign (he’s only 18) for City Council. A junior at
York High School who lives on E. 21st St. in Gramercy, he’s run-
ning against incumbent Rosie Mendez in the Second District.
A former special-education student who overcame difficulties
with “sequencing,” such as reading the correct time on a clock
face, Landesman previously attended the Gateway School on
Second Ave. near 14th St. We did not know that Gil Horowitz,
who is a psychologist when not a Washington Square-area
activist, was Landesman’s pro bono “life coach.” Horowitz said
the biggest thing he has tried to impart to the young wannabe
pol so far is: “Think Big. Think Win.” Landesman said Mendez
has been good on public-housing and L.G.B.T. issues, but that
he would be more active on education. Speaking of education,
Horowitz said he’s advising Landesman that, if elected, he
should go to school locally and attend Baruch College while
in office. Continuing a sartorial style set by one of his primary
campaign predecessors, Jay Wilson, Landesman favors both
saddle shoes and natty, vintage-style suits. ... Oh, by the way,
Dodge’s dad, Rocco Landesman, was just tapped by President
Obama to be chairperson of the National Endowment for the
Arts, though still needs to be confirmed.
ONE MORE D.I.D.: Horowitz noted he’s also helping out
Pete Gleason — who unlike Freed, is running for the First
Council District seat — as Gleason’s campaign “behavioral
IN THE HEART OF GREENWICH VILLAGE
— Recommended by Gourmet Magazine, Zagat, Crain’s NY, Playbill & The Villager —
“Gold Medal Chef of the Year”. — Chefs de Cuisine Association
.ORTHERNITALIAN#UISINEs#ELEBRATING/VER9EARS
69 MacDougal St. (Bet. Bleeker & Houston St.) 212-673-0390 · 212-674-0320
Open Mon. - Sat. 12-11pm · www.villamosconi.com
St eaks - Lobst ers - Seaf ood
146 Tenth Ave. at 19th St. 212-627-3030
Seating everyday noon to midnight
Private parties for 10 to 400 - Reservations Suggested
“Old-fashioned in every way”,
this Chelsea “trip back in time”
purveys “hearty” Americana
in a “Waterford-and-wood-
buring-fireplace” setting; add in
“accommodating” staffers who
“pour a great Guinness” and the
“whole is definitely equal to
more than the sum of its parts.”
- ZAGAT 2008
OCEANFRONT AMAGANSETT, NY
Nestled in the dunes of Napeague and just steps to the Atlantic
Ocean, The Ocean Vista Resort offers the ideal location for the
perfect Hamptons vacation, weekend getaway or family reunion.
Newly renovated rooms | Great location | Kitchenettes
Oversized heated indoor pool and sauna | Tennis | Private ocean beach
Midweek & Weekend Specials also available
OPENING WEEKEND SPECIAL
5/15/09 thru 5/21/09
$80. per night (also available during week of 5/26 thru 5/28/09)
MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND SPECIAL
$150. - $210. per night,
and enjoy 1 night free when staying 3 nights
* not to be combined with any other offer or coupon
800-272-2956 631-267-3448
www.oceanvistaresort.com
PEP REAL ESTATE
Soho, Noho, Greenwich Village,
Nolita, Tribeca, and Hudson Sq.
Member: REBNY, GVCC, and SOHOPRTSP
John & Ronald Pasquale
www.peprealestate.com
212-925-3280
Commercial Sales and Leasing for
Retail Office and Lofts
We Offer Building Management Service and
Mortgages-Acquisition/Refinance
SCOOPY’S
NOTEBOOK
BROADWAY PANHANDLER
A COOK’S BEST RESOURCE
www.broadwaypanhandler.com
65 East 8th St. (off B’way) • 212-966-3434
Mon-Sat 11-7 • Thurs ’ti l 8pm • Sun 11-6
40oz Glass Carafe
$69.95
Sugg. Retail $100
Blender
Homemade Pasta Demo
Join us Sunday, May 25th from 2 to 5pm
and learn how to make pasta using
the Imperia Pasta Machine.
Continued on page 9
Photo courtesy Sean Sweeney
Sean Sweeney sporting the black eye he said a cyclist
gave him.
May 20 - 26, 2009 3
4 May 20 - 26, 2009
BY ALBERT AMATEAU
The Landmarks Preservation Commission
on May 12 looked at the residential side of
the St. Vincent’s Hospital redevelopment
project and found it better than it was a
year ago. But commissioners still said the
proposed Seventh Ave. apartment tower
was too tall.
At the end of the May 12 hearing, Robert
Tierney, commission chairperson, said the
Rudin residential plan that is intended to
replace the current hospital complex on the
east side of Seventh Ave. was vastly better
than the original plan.
“I’m close to finding the project to
be totally appropriate for the Greenwich
Village Historic District, and I look forward
to another meeting with St. Vincent’s in the
near future,” Tierney said.
But he did not specify a date for the next
hearing on the project that has been before
the commission for a year.
The Rudin Organization, the hospital’s
development partner, originally planned to
demolish all eight hospital buildings on the
east side of the avenue and replace them with
new development, including a 265-foot-tall
apartment tower extending between 11th
and 12th Sts. The residential development
is intended to pay for a new 21st-century,
299-foot-tall hospital to replace the O’Toole
building on the west side of the avenue.
After a cool reception by the L.P.C. last
year, the design was changed to preserve
and adapt four of the eight buildings — the
Nurses Residence and the Smith and Raskob
buildings on 12th St. and the Spellman
building on 11th St. The proposed apart-
ment tower was reduced in height to 233
feet and in width from 265 feet to 142 feet.
Although the commission did not vote
on the project on May 12, commissioners
made statements. All wanted a shorter
apartment tower. Several commission-
ers said the four buildings proposed for
adaptive residential use should have fewer
changes than the architect, Dan Kaplan of
F.X. Fowle, has proposed. Commissioners
said the original bronze door on the Nurses
Residence, which the architect said was
“too monumental” for an apartment build-
ing, was worth preserving.
Some commissioners were not happy with
the plans for five townhouses proposed for
11th St. Instead of lining up with each other,
the five-story buildings step back at an angle
from each other, which allows each to have
corner windows. But several commissioners
said they couldn’t make sense of the design.
The commission also gave its final
approval on May 12 for the demolition
of the O’Toole building — designed by
Albert Ledner and built in 1964 for the
National Maritime Union and acquired by
St. Vincent’s 10 years later.
In October, the commission had voted 6
to 4 to approve St. Vincent’s application for
a hardship waiver of historic district rules
to demolish the quirky building. The mat-
ter was revisited on May 12 to confirm that
alternatives to the O’Toole demolition had
been adequately examined. The board voted
8 to 3 that alternative sites were adequately
considered and found unsuitable.
The dissenters, Roberta Brandes Gratz,
Stephen Byrns and Margery Perlmutter,
insisted that other options, including pos-
sible eminent domain acquisition of other
property, were ignored.
“The Landmarks Law and the commis-
sion have been snookered,” said Byrns,
regarding the hardship application.
However, despite the May 12 vote, the
issue is not yet resolved. In March, a group
of preservation advocates, Protect the Village
Historic District, filed a lawsuit challenging
the L.P.C. action granting the hospital’s
hardship application.
Tierney took issue with the “snookered”
remark.
“The last 11 months have not been
snookering,” he said, referring to the series
of hearings and votes on St. Vincent’s. “In
any case, we’ll be in court. I believe our case
is strong and we’ll win,” Tierney said regard-
ing the pending lawsuit.
Diverse opportunities
for diverse companies.
At The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey we want our partnerships
to reflect the diversity of our business activities and our region.
Each year we award millions of dollars in contracts to minority, women-owned
and small businesses (M/W/SBEs) — over $575 million in 2008 alone. Hundreds
of M/W/SBEs play a major role, delivering critical services and products that fuel
one of the largest transportation systems in the nation.
If you’re an M/W/SBE we’re here to connect you to our contractors, tenants
and internal business units. To find out more about our supplier diversity program
and contract opportunities at the Port Authority visit us at objonynj.info.
For information specific to opportunities at the World Trade Center, call our
Business Resource Center at 212-435-7843.
Let us get your company connected.
Landmarks to Rudin: Lower too-tall 7th Ave. tower
‘I’m close to finding
the project to be totally
appropriate for the
Greenwich Village
Historic District.’
Robert Tierney,
L.P.C. chairperson
Villager photo by Tequila Minsky
Climb trees? (K)not a problem
Solima, a student at P.S. 3, deftly navigated her way down a notably knotty tree in
Washington Square Park’s northeast section a few weekends ago. One never sees
kids climbing trees in New York City, an observer told her dad. He replied that
Solima and her brother learned to tree climb in Normandy.
May 20 - 26, 2009 5
BY LINCOLN ANDERSON
After a landlord-tenant dispute that turned
ugly, Matt Metzgar and Victoria Linchong were
in dire need of financial assistance. Showing
what friends are for, their neighbors, fellow
activists, musicians, “a couple of librarians”
and Linchong’s teenage son’s friends came
through in the clutch, at a rent party, helping
the couple raise $1,500.
In return for their $20 contributions —
some gave more — they got to sing “rock and
roll karaoke” with Metzgar’s band.
The cash from the May 9 bash at the E.
Sixth St. Center ended a tenuous situation that
saw the two and Linchong’s son, Miles, 15,
locked out of their apartment, and Metzgar
— a former squatter and the drummer for
Hooverville — jailed for 21 hours. The couple
slammed it as an “illegal lockout.”
The dispute started October 2007 when
Metzgar and Linchong, who live at 647 E. 11th
St., demanded their landlord fix four windows
in bad disrepair. They said the landlord, David
Jacobson, had offered everyone buyouts upon
taking over the building five years ago, but
that they’re among the few holdouts. Jacobson
owns seven East Village buildings.
Until the window problem was rectified,
they resolved, they would withhold their
$955-a-month rent. As Metzgar and Linchong
tell it, they got a court-ordered agreement in
December under which the landlord would fix
the windows, and they would pay $1,000 on
good faith, and pay the balance in January.
However, at the end of February, the land-
lord contacted a city marshal, who took control
of the apartment unbeknownst to the pair,
since no notice had been posted on the door.
So on Mon., May 4, when Metzgar returned to
find the locks had been changed, Linchong and
friends went down to Housing Court.
Meanwhile, Metzgar had let himself into the
apartment through the fire escape and changed
the locks again. He tried to file a police report at
the Ninth Precinct, but said officers told him he
couldn’t do it. When he returned home, he said
he found the landlord’s brother drilling into his
front door and changing the locks yet again.
But the judge sympathized with the tenants
based on several factors: Linchong — who
grew up in the neighborhood — has resided
in the apartment 15 years; her son lives with
them; and the apartment is rent-stabilized.
The judge ordered a settlement under which
Metzgar and Linchong would pay their roughly
$8,000 in back rent and be allowed to return
to their apartment.
The two took out loans of $6,100, and
Linchong got a generous $1,000 advance from
the Downtown art-house movie theater where
she works, but they were still short of their
goal. The rent party raised more than $1,900
— $400 of which went to the E. Sixth St.
Center for the donation of the space — leav-
ing Metzgar and Linchong with $1,500, which
was just enough to reach the needed amount
of $8,237.26. On May 11, they were able to
re-enter their two-bedroom home.
Although Metzgar said they have solid
grounds for a tenant-harassment lawsuit,
“We’re not seriously considering it. We just
got our apartment back.” However, he did add,
“We do want to spin it off to include the pos-
sibility for rent parties for others in trouble like
we were. We would like the rent party to be an
ongoing thing.”
Linchong said the show of support was
inspiring.
“It’s so good to know that there is still a
community like that in the East Village going
full force,” she said. “We’re still here, we’re still
strong, we’re together.”
The Villager was unable to reach Jacobson
or a representative of his company, East Village
Property Management, for comment by dead-
line.
Morton Williams,
the single source for your
Memorial Day needs.
130 BLEECKER STREET
212-358-9597
Friends rock rent for a couple who were on the ropes
Villager photo by Marlis Momber
Photographer Corky Lee, left, with Matt Metzgar at the May 9 rent party for
Metzgar and his partner, Victoria Linchong. They are holding a vintage print by pho-
tographer Marlis Momber showing the actor Luis Guzman, in clown makeup, at a
1982 “Save the Lower East Side” anti-gentrification rally at Fourth St. and Avenue
C. Momber was selling the print for $600 to help out Metzgar and Linchong.
BY LINCOLN ANDERSON
The cause of death of an East Village
woman on the morning of Sat., May 9, in her
apartment is still undetermined, according
to the city’s medical examiner. But the local
precinct commanding officer says it was
definitely not a result of injuries sustained
in clashes with a group of local youth who
were “wilding.”
The woman, Lesia Pupshaw, 26, a resi-
dent of 202 E. Sixth St. near the Bowery, had
been involved the previous night in violent
skirmishes between the Tompkins Square
Park “crusties” and local Hispanic youths,
according to witnesses. Police confirmed last
week that “five to six men had been throw-
ing bottles at her earlier Friday night.”
However, this Tuesday, Ellen Borakove,
a spokesperson for the medical examiner,
said results of tests — likely toxicology and
tissue tests — are still pending. In addition,
a police investigation into Pupshaw’s death
is also ongoing.
Local photographer and blogger Bob
Arihood covered an ongoing series of violent
incidents between the two groups on his
Neither More Nor Less blog. Arihood noted
on his blog that Pupshaw had been “brutally
battered on the head and face” in the May
8 clashes.
“The attack appears from witnesses’
accounts to have begun with a blow delivered
by a bottle hurled at her head from 4 or 5 feet,”
Arihood wrote. “Then after Ms. Pupshaw fell
to the ground, her attackers continued the
attack by kicking her and striking her with
wooden sticks and perhaps a silver cane.” The
youths reportedly attacked Pupshaw again as
she was on her way home, Arihood said.
According to reports, Pupshaw had over-
dosed on heroin the day before the incident.
Speaking last week, Deputy Inspector
Dennis De Quatro, Ninth Precinct com-
manding officer, said one thing for certain is
that the woman definitely did not die of any
injuries she sustained in the altercations on
the night of May 8. De Quatro said police are
continuing their investigation but that wit-
nesses have been less than cooperative. After
the run-ins with the local youths on May 8,
two individuals from the “crusty” group did
file assault charges, he said.
Police say E. 6th St. woman did
not die from injuries from attack
6 May 20 - 26, 2009
Artists & Writers
Residencies
www.vermontstudiocenter.org
Villager photo by Isaac Rosenthal
Goth and gluten in the mix at the Veggie Pride Parade
The second annual Veggie Pride Parade of New York City spread the message of eating healthy while not eating animals. The plant-based-diet paraders marched from the
Meat Market toward Union Square, which is famed for its Greenmarket.
May 20 - 26, 2009 7
OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
Credit card purchases in store only. We reserve the right to limit quantities.
Not responsible for typographical errors. Prices effective through May 27, 2009.
Phone 212-982-7770
Fax 212-982-7791
WAREHOUSE WINES & SPIRITS
735 Broadway
Yes, We Deliver
Mon-Th 9am-8:45pm
Fri & Sat 9am-9:45pm
Sunday noon-6:45pm
We Have
Over 500 Wines
Under $10!
Discover our great values, low prices, incredible selection and huge inventory.
Warehouse Wines offers warehouse values and warehouse quantities each and every
day. Since we buy big, you always save big. We try harder bottle-by-bottle, to bring
our customers the best values.
We have wine to meet all tastes and all budgets. Our enormous selection of wine
under $10 is the finest in New York City. We always have brand-name liquor at
bargain prices too! Our knowledgeable sales staff is available to assist with your
selections, both large and small. Come in and let us welcome you to New York’s
greatest wine and liquor superstore, where everything is on sale every day. Shop
with us and save with us. You’ll be glad you did!
Sauvignon Blanc
Dashwood
Marlborough
2008 750ML
Starbucks Cream Liqueur
with coffee mug

750ML
Ch Grand Colombier
Montagne
Saint-Emilion
2005 750ML
Beringer
Stone Cellars
Chardonnay
2004 750ML
Domaine Calvel
Corbieres
2005 750ML
12.99
8.99
10.99
4.99
5.99
Bordeaux
Red or White
750ML
Ch Bourgneuf
Pomerol
1997 750ML
Georges Duboeuf
Pinot Noir Reserve
2005 750ML
Blackstone
Cabernet Sauvignon
2002 750ML
Chardonnay
Normans
Australia
2004 750ML
Carmenere
Loco Matico
Chile
2004 750ML
Malbec
Graffigna
Argentina
2004 750ML
Caliterra
Chardonnay
Chile
750ML
Chianti Classico
Villa Vistarenni
2002 750ML
Golden Kaan
Chardonnay
South Africa
2005 750ML
Merlot Fortant
South of France
750ML
Kunde
Chardonnay
2006 750ML
Cotes-Du-Rhone
Chateau la France
2005 750ML
Laboure - Roi
Shiraz Reserve
2003 750ML
5.99
19.99
6.99
9.99
6.99
6.99
7.99
4.99
5.99
3.99
4.99
10.99
5.99 4.99
8 May 20 - 26, 2009
BY PATRICK HEDLUND
SOHO HIGH-RISE D.O.A.
The developer of a Soho office building
has backed off its request for a zoning vari-
ance to construct a high-rise at the corner of
West Broadway and Grand St.
The original proposal sought to erect an
11-story building on the corner lot, which
represented a 55 percent increase in bulk
over what is permitted by the current zon-
ing designation in the light-manufacturing
district.
The project had faced opposition from
Community Board 2 and the Soho Alliance
community organization over its size and the
fact that the plan included a ground-floor
restaurant tenant. Representatives from the
nearby Soho Grand Hotel also feared the
building’s height would impede views from
its rooms on higher floors.
“This would be the tallest building out-
side the Sixth Avenue or Broadway corridors
and almost as tall as the Soho Grand, but
without the setbacks, thus making it much
bulkier,” read a note from the alliance. “A
large proposed restaurant with liquor license
in an area where new liquor-license applica-
tions have already been restricted by a 1995
agreement between the Soho Alliance and
the S.L.A. [State Liquor Authority] also ral-
lied opposition.”
But thanks to the recession, the deal
appears dead on arrival. The site’s owner,
John De Lorenzo and Bro Iron, is currently
engaged in litigation with the developer
regarding failure to provide payments after
initially agreeing to put down a half-million-
dollar deposit. The developer, listed as West
Broadway 330 LLC on the Department of
Buildings’ Web site, has filed a counterclaim
charging that De Lorenzo violated the deal’s
confidentially agreement after news of the
agreement’s collapse became public.
“They certainly were exchanging harsh
words, at a minimum,” said Shelly Friedman,
a lawyer with the firm Friedman and Gotbaum,
LLP, who is representing the Soho Grand.
“These [Board of Standards and Appeals]
applications aren’t cheap,” he added, hinting
that the deal could have collapsed completely.
“Now, they’d have to start over.”
FACADE-LESS ON 14TH
Residents had to evacuate their W. 14th St.
building last week after the structure’s facade
threatened to collapse near Seventh Ave.
The property, at 150-152 W. 14th St.,
has endured a history of violations stemming
from the five-story building’s cracked and
buckling facade.
The Department of Buildings executed an
emergency vacate order on May 7 regarding
a “wall in danger of collapse,” and removed
the entire facade the following day, exposing
about 15 rooms of the building to the street.
A tenant of the property charged that the
owners failed to repair the building’s exte-
rior following a September 2007 violation,
which had then cited a “failure to main-
tain exterior defects”; at that time, D.O.B.
“observed buckling and bowing of facade
and broken sills,” according to the depart-
ment’s Web site.
An additional violation this February
found a “failure to maintain bldg wall(s) or
appurtenances” and exterior bulging, as well
as loose mortar joints.
A resident who contacted Mixed Use
described “horrible living conditions” at the
building, and explained that a few months
ago an elderly tenant had to go to the emer-
gency room after a piece of debris fell from
the ceiling and hit him on the head. The
building’s landlord subsequently forced ten-
ants to evacuate the property on Fri., March
6, refusing tenants’ access to their apart-
ments for the entire weekend.
The resident also alleged that landlord
Stanley Wasserman’s failure to previously fix
the facade was part of a plan to vacate 80 per-
cent of the residents so he could remove the
properties’ rent-stabilization designation.
“To this day, two months after the vacate
order and 28 months after the first D.O.B.
violation issued, NO WORK has taken
place to fix the problem,” the resident wrote
prior to the May 7 vacate order. “We are
all desperate for help in any way, shape or
form.”
mixeduse@communitymediallc.com
www. ma n a t u s n y c . c o m Our 19th Year!
Full bar
and
outdoor
patio!
Have a happy and Safe
Memorial Day Weekend from:
MANATUS
Don’t miss our daily delicious specials!
Complimentary
Drink
for Mom only!
&
MIXED USE
We Have The Village Covered
We Know Our Community
Like No One Else
May 20 - 26, 2009 9
BY JOSH ROGERS
She doesn’t yet have a staff, a budget,
an organizational bank account or even an
office, but Ellen Baer started earlier this
month as the first president of the Hudson
Square Business Improvement District.
Baer took her first meeting in The
Villager’s Hudson Square office for an
interview with editors and reporters last
Wednesday, the same day the BID’s board of
directors approved her hiring.
Baer, 54, was a partner at Hamilton,
Rabinovitz and Alschuler, Inc., a large eco-
nomic-development consultant firm that
worked on the High Line park and advised
the Pier 40 Partnership on its community-
backed redevelopment proposal for Pier 40
at W. Houston St.
The new BID will concentrate on market-
ing the neighborhood, which is located just
west of Soho, and improving the quality of
life, but will not take on other traditional
BID duties, such as street cleaning and
security. The district’s $1.7 million budget
comes from property owners, who pay a fee
of about 19 cents per square foot.
The former Printing District’s population
is less than 1,000, some of whom live in
buildings not zoned for residents. In recent
years, media companies, architectural firms
and other new business tenants have helped
create what Baer calls a “creative vibe.”
“I love the whole feel of it,” she said.
“There’s a real vibe in this neighborhood.”
She said distinguishing the area from
Soho will come with time.
“Hudson Square has its own — or will
someday I think have its own — known iden-
tity, too,” she said. “Hudson Square needs to
evolve as a place.”
There is no consensus on the neighbor-
hood’s boundaries — some actually deny
its existence. But for the acceptors, Hudson
Square’s rough boundaries are Sixth Ave.,
Canal St., Houston St. and the Hudson
River. Trinity Real Estate, the district’s larg-
est property owner and the BID’s sponsor,
tried unsuccessfully to create a BID six
years ago. Trinity reduced the district size
this time to exclude more-residential areas,
including the area west of Greenwich St.
Community Board 2 opposed the original
application, but supported it last year with-
out any opposition.
Baer is beginning to make the rounds to
find out what people need and want.
“My job is to pull together a vision, not
create one out of the head of Ellen Baer,”
she said. “My first job is to get out talking
to people.”
She said some pedestrian crossings are
not safe, and she’s already put the Port
Authority on notice that she wants to dis-
cuss ways to improve conditions around
the Holland Tunnel; she said the city and
perhaps the state will also be part of the
conversations.
Tobi Bergman, a Hudson Square dweller
and C.B. 2’s nonvoting representative to the
BID, agreed traffic is the neighborhood’s big-
gest problem, particularly since it is mostly
drivers who are just trying to pass through
to other places.
“It’s kind of a dead-zone type of traffic —
it gets there and it doesn’t move,” he said in
a phone interview.
Streets like Varick, Spring, Broome and
Watts need more lanes for neighborhood
traffic and fewer for the tunnel, Bergman
said, pointing out that the federal govern-
ment has been funding studies of Canal St.
traffic for many years, developing plans that
could be implemented quickly.
That’s just the type of job Baer says she
can do well.
“I’m about taking plans from paper to
implementation,” she said.
Laura Walker, the BID’s chairperson, said
Baer’s résumé is right for the job.
“She has a lot of experience, not just in
the public and private sector, but also in the
intersection of the two, which is what a BID
is all about,” said Walker, who is C.E.O.
of WNYC, New York Public Radio, which
moved into the neighborhood last year.
Baer, whose master’s thesis was on
public-private partnerships, worked for
many years in city government, including
at the Parks Department and the Economic
Development Corporation’s predecessor, the
Public Development Corporation.
In 1993, Baer, who was then chief of
staff to Deputy Mayor Norman Steisel, was
accused of soliciting a job from Lockheed
Information Management Services while the
firm was bidding on a contract to collect
New York City parking fines. Baer, who
had withdrawn from the contract decision,
according to a 1995 Daily News article,
later left city government and agreed to pay
a $5,000 fine.
Without going into specifics last week,
Baer said she learned from the episode.
“It was in the past, and like all difficult
life experiences, I just try to take the posi-
tive out of it and leave the negative behind,”
she said.
Baer, a lifelong New Yorker, said her
connection to the city grew stronger after
9/11. She married David Lebenstein, a real
estate executive, four years ago and she
has two grown stepchildren. The couple
live on the Upper West Side. Baer grew up
in Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village,
attending P.S. 40 and Friends Seminary in
the Gramercy neighborhood. She also used
to live in the West Village Houses.
For now, she’s focused on preparing for
July 1, when the BID begins full operations.
Her salary is $150,000, and she expects to
hire three or four people.
The neighborhood’s building owners
hired her, so Baer is not too worried about
finding an office, saying, “There are lots of
good landlords in the district.”
Recreational Soccer for Fall 2009
Age appropriate skills training, FIFA recommended formats,
supervision by licensed coaches – FUN club experience.
Registration begins May 23
rd
.

Tryouts for Travel Soccer Teams 2009 – 10
Competitive teams U10 – 18. Play in local leagues and regional
tournaments. Tryouts take place in May: see websites for details.

Academy Training U6 – 9
Serious skills training without the pressure of league play.

Summer Camp: June 8 – August 21
Half- and Full- day options available: register by the week.

Summer programs for Travel level players 2009
Weeknight training + weekend games. ALL PLAYERS welcome.
DUSC Fratelsa Camp, July 20 – 24, players U10 – U14.
DUSC Markovic Summer Academy, June 29 – July 2, for HS players.

NEW! DUSC NORTH at Randalls Island
Summer camp, Fall Travel and Academy teams.
Soccer for all
seasons!
Hudson Square BID focusing on marketing, traffic
Villager photo by Josh Rogers
Ellen Baer
scientist.” As for Gleason’s behavior, well,
he flew out to San Diego to attend a dinner
last Thursday hosted by his friend Jeffrey
Krinsk, a big-time Democratic supporter, at
which Vice President Joe Biden was the guest
of honor. Gleason said that afterward he
handed the Veep a copy of the Hudson Rise
alternative plan for the Spring St. Sanitation
garage. The Council candidate showed us a
photo on his camera in which he and Biden
are both in the frame, though the back of a
woman’s head is unfortunately blocking the
view of the actual alleged transfer of the plan
from Gleason’s hand to Biden’s. “He said, ‘I’ll
have my staff look at this,’” Gleason said.
Gleason stressed that the fuel that would be
stored in the megagarage is a genuine threat
that Homeland Security should be concerned
about. Jeanne Wilcke, chairperson of Friends
of Noho, is Gleason’s campaign manager.
... Another candidate for the First District,
Margaret Chin, who was also at the D.I.D.
affair, happily told us she has “maxed out” in
terms of her fundraising under the Campaign
Finance Board’s matching public funds sys-
tem; so, she has no more fundraising to do.
WILL IT STAY OR WILL IT GO?
Word in the ’hood was that Cooper Union’s
Engineering Building on Astor Place would
be demolished imminently to start construc-
tion of a new office building on the site. A
few weeks ago, the closing of the Starbucks
in the building — located as it was along the
strongly Starbucks-saturated strip — lit up
the blogosphere. Trigger, owner of the for-
mer Continental rock club, now a bargain-
priced shots bar, across the street, told us
that he’d heard the Engineering Building
SCOOPY’S NOTEBOOK
Continued from page 2
Continued on page 27
10 May 20 - 26, 2009
BY LINCOLN ANDERSON
In the East Village equivalent of “man
bites dog,” a club is accused of being a
quality of life nuisance, but the club is
actually the Lower Eastside Girls Club,
and the accuser is a restaurant/bar, which
threatened to call the police on the girls.
It all started last Thursday afternoon
as the Girls Club was holding its seventh
annual free prom gown giveaway at 56 E.
First St. Hundreds of excited teenage girls
lined up along the pavement, in the pro-
cess, blocking the way into The Elephant,
a French/Thai restaurant and bar.
After some words between The
Elephant’s manager and a Girls Clubber,
the manager threatened to call the cops
on the teens.
Calling The Elephant’s threat mind-
boggling, Lyn Pentecost, the Girls Club’s
executive director, who lives on the block,
derided the place as “a yuppie bar” and
said it “keeps the street awake all night
every night.”
“The Girls Club gives away over 500
free prom gowns to neighborhood high
school girls at 4 to 6 in the afternoon, and
The Elephant — a noisy bar — threatens
to call the cops,” Pentecost marveled.
“The manager got verbally abusive with
the girls. Guess the early happy hour
crowd couldn’t bear to see real happi-
ness!”
Told that the Girls Club and its direc-
tor were incensed and that Pentecost
had contacted the media about the flap,
Eduardo Sontan, the restaurant’s general
manager, who was not at The Elephant
during the incident, sounded worried.
“Oh, my God,” he said. “No — we apol-
ogized to them. ... It’s so unfair what they
are doing... . It was like 300 girls in front
the restaurant. You couldn’t get in.”
Also, he added, they were afraid the
girls might get injured by falling through
the restaurant’s sidewalk vault doors into
the cellar, or by having something dropped
on their legs by a deliveryman.
Sontan said the manager working last
Thursday only threatened to call police
after one of the Girls Club members —
who was “standing on a chair” — spoke
to him curtly.
“One of the girls was rude to a 50-year-
old employee,” he said. “This younger girl
answered badly to the older man.”
Sontan said the 10-year-old Elephant
— which he called “a small, family estab-
lishment” — is more restaurant than bar.
Vice President Joe Biden and his son, as
well as Chelsea Clinton, all recently dined
there, he noted. If the place is really so
loud, why would such people go there “to
talk business,” he asked.
Sontan said he has a 17-year-old
daughter of his own whom he is hoping
to send to college.
“I am not against girls,” he stressed.
Tempt you with a touch?
TEKSERVE
New York’s Shop for All Things Mac
212.929.3645
tekserve.com
Open Mon–Fri 9am to 8pm,
Sat 10am to 6pm, Sun noon to 6pm
119 West 23rd St between 6th and 7th Avenue
Not responsible for typographical errors, all offers subject to availability
and may be terminated at any time. Buy local, support your city and state.
Closeout Special:
16GB iPod touch Only $229
This brand new first-generation iPod touch includes the full one-
year Apple warranty, extendable to two years with an AppleCare
protection plan. This iPod touch ships with original software.
Upgrade to version 2.2 online for access to the App Store and
much more for only $9.95.
&
Weekend
Service Changes
We understand the inconvenience this may cause you, and we will do everything
possible to help you get to your destination safely and easily. Uniformed NYC
Transit staff will be available at the affected stations to assist you with alternate
travel.
For the best alternate route for your trip, go to www.mta.info or pick
up a brochure at your station.
May 23 through 26
12:01AM Saturday to 5AM Tuesday
May 30 through June 1
12:01AM Saturday to 5AM Monday
Manhattan-bound & trains run on the % from
Roosevelt Av to 42 St, then on the ! to Jay St.
Brooklyn-bound $ trains run local from 34 St to
West 4 St.
Work is being done to make switch repairs.
©2009 Metropolitan Transportation Authority
Bar threatens to call the police on L.E.S. Girls Club
Hundreds of 17-year-old girls lined E. First St. last Thursday afternoon to get free
prom dresses at the Lower Eastside Girls Club, which is right next door to The
Elephant.
May 20 - 26, 2009 11
founder Robert Hammond back in 1999. “I’ve
seen it from step to step. But to see it through
their eyes — and see how struck they are by it
— is how I can feel that incredible sensation.”
The High Line is projected to open just
two to three weeks from now, giving parkgo-
ers access to the elevated structure’s initial
section between Gansevoort and 20th Sts.
Early risers and night crawlers will delight in
the High Line’s operating hours of 7 a.m. to 10
p.m. seven days a week, and jaunts down the
winding walkway will yield scenic views of the
Hudson River and Manhattan skyline.
Friends of the High Line, the nonprofit orga-
nization co-founded by David and Hammond
to advocate for the park’s creation and oversee
its construction, recently hired Patrick Cullina
as its vice president of maintenance and opera-
tions. Cullina most recently did a four-year
stint as vice president of horticulture at the
Brooklyn Botanic Garden.
Along with managing the High Line’s myr-
iad plantings, Cullina is tasked with ensuring
a quality experience for the throngs of visitors
likely to crowd the West Chelsea green space
during the warmer months.
“Any successful garden is one where the
decisions are formed by your experience,”
Cullina said, explaining that the park’s land-
scape will evolve as the plantings mature,
helping to dictate future decisions on the High
Line. “Each season has its lesson to teach, and
we’re going to gather those lessons as we go.”
While the project will benefit from its
partnership with the city Parks Department,
which will provide some enforcement staff
at the park, nearly all the labor required to
maintain the High Line on a daily basis will
fall on the Friends. Depending on the season, a
staff of about 15 to 20 — including gardeners,
groundskeepers, custodians and maintainers
for the park’s mechanicals — will tend to the
park and its infrastructure, while volunteer
“greeters” will help answer visitors’ questions
about the elevated greenway’s features.
One challenge for horticulturalists will be
balancing the park’s multiple plant varieties
atop the former viaduct, which is “essen-
tially the city’s largest green roof,” Cullina
said. Shallow soil depths, sunlight and wind
exposure will all affect the High Line’s “micro-
climates,” he added, which “change literally
from block to block.”
“A lot of this will have to unfold over time,”
Cullina acknowledged. “Our ultimate aspira-
tion is to have a consistently compelling land-
scape. It progresses from the time you enter to
the time you exit.”
But parkgoers will have to contend with
“a very different kind of public landscape
environment than anything anyone’s ever expe-
rienced,” Cullina said, including sometimes-
dubious delineations between the High Line’s
pathways and green spaces.
“There aren’t these really clear-cut defini-
tions of where the plants are,” he noted. “Over
time the plantings will become so dense and
thick that it will become clear.”
All in all, the park will provide a study
in transition as the flowers, shrubs and trees
mature through the months.
“You see it once,” Cullina said, “that’s not
the end of the show.”
Aside from its organic growth, the High
Line’s appearance will also be enhanced by a
“subdued lighting that goes the whole length
of the line at night,” as well as daily cleaning
by staff, Cullina added.
Both bicycles and pets are prohibited in
the park, but bike racks will be available at
the entrances. Residential buildings near the
former railway will not enjoy private access
points to the High Line, which will have “no
connectivity unless it serves the public first and
foremost,” David said.
Ironically, the park’s popularity as a public
realm could create problems, as initial over-
crowding is a chief concern of the Friends.
“We want everybody to come to the High
Line,” David said, acknowledging that the hype
surrounding the project has grown to near-
mythic proportions. “But we don’t encourage
everybody to come the very minute it opens.
It’ll be beautiful on Day Two and Day Three,
on Week Two and Week Three.”
However, the High Line’s biggest challenge
will be the park’s ability to grow some green —
and David isn’t talking plantings.
“Friends of the High Line’s budget basi-
cally doubles when the ribbon cuts,” he
explained, noting that the opening comes
at a time when most nonprofits are slashing
budgets. “Our biggest challenge is taking
all the excitement that’s out there about
the High Line and making sure that people
understand we still need people’s support.”
New V.P. Cullina views the park undertak-
ing not only as a singular achievement for New
York City, but an idea to build upon for future
urban planning and adaptive reuse.
“As much impact as this project will have,
[the Friends’] example and partnership with
the city will also be something that people will
look it,” he said. “It’s always inspiring to see
the reaction of folks. It’s sort of a vehicle for
excitement, and I think that’s great.”
*Up to $10,000 is deductible from New York State taxable income for
married couples filing jointly; single residents can deduct up to $5,000
annually. May be subject to recapture in certain circumstances—rollovers
to another state’s plan or non-qualified withdrawals.
**Earnings on non-qualified withdrawals may be subject to federal income
tax and a 10% federal penalty tax, as well as state and local income taxes.
Tax and other benefits are contingent on meeting other requirements and
certain withdrawals are subject to federal, state and local taxes.
Before you invest, consider whether your or the designated beneficiary’s
home state offers any state tax or other benefits that are only available
for investments in such state’s qualified tuition program.
The Comptroller of the State of New York and the New York State Higher Education Services
Corporation are the Program Administrators and are responsible for implementing and administering
the Direct Plan. Upromise Investments, Inc. and Upromise Investment Advisors, LLC serve as Program
Manager and Recordkeeping and Servicing Agent, respectively, and are responsible for day-to-day
operations,including effecting transactions. The Vanguard Group, Inc. serves as the Investment
Manager. Vanguard Marketing Corporation markets, distributes and underwrites the Direct Plan.
No guarantee: None of the State of New York, its agencies, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
(FDIC), The Vanguard Group, Inc., Upromise Investments, Inc., nor any of their applicable affiliates
insures accounts or guarantees the principal deposited therein or any investment returns on any
account or investment portfolio.
New York’s 529 College Savings Program currently includes two separate 529 plans. The Direct Plan
is sold directly by the Program. You may also participate in the Advisor Plan, which is sold exclusively
through financial advisors and has different investment options and higher fees and expenses
as well as financial advisor compensation.
Upromise is a registered service mark of Upromise, Inc.
For more information about New York’s 529 College Savings
Program Direct Plan, obtain a Program Brochure and Tuition
Savings Agreement at www.nys529directplan.com or by
calling 1-800-368-3332. This includes investment objectives,
risks, charges, expenses, and other information. You should
read and consider them carefully before investing.
© 2009 State of New York
Through all the homework, projects, and hours of practice, your child gives you her best.
All this hard work will pay off when it’s time for college. Do your part to help pay for her
education by opening a New York 529 College Savings Program Direct Plan. With as
little as $25, you, family and friends can open and contribute to an account for your child.
Contributions can qualify for a generous deduction from New York State taxable income.*
Earnings grow tax-deferred, and you pay no state or federal taxes on qualified withdrawals,
making a 529 plan one of the most tax-efficient ways to save.** Plus, a free rewards service
from Upromise
®
can add to your account.
It’s so easy—just visit nys529directplan.com, and
in about ten minutes, you’ve kept your promise.
Visit nys529directplan.com or call 1-800-368-3332
She promises to work hard.
Promisetodoyour part.
High Line park is steaming toward its grand debut
Villager photo by Jefferson Siegel
Patrick Cullina is the High Line’s new
vice president of maintenance and
operations.
Continued from page 1
12 May 20 - 26, 2009
A.T.M.’s are all wet
Police scuba divers located four A.T.M.’s in
Flushing Meadow Lake in Queens at 9:30 a.m.
Fri., May 15, and identified them as having been
stolen over the past five months from locations
on the Lower East Side and Uptown by a sus-
pect who drove them off in a white van.
The suspect, Valentin Garcia, of Queens,
was arrested on April 21 after he was pulled
from the East River and charged with trying to
steal an A.T.M. from in front of 23 Rutgers St.
The white van was found at the scene and was
identified as having been stolen in Queens.
Valentine is charged with stealing the first
A.T.M. from in front of 107 Clinton St. on Dec.
26, an A.T.M. at 1 Bennett Ave. in Inwood on
March 28, and one on W. 52nd St. on April 12.
He is also charged with auto theft, possession of
stolen property and criminal mischief.
Kiefer gets court date
Kiefer Sutherland, who plays the hard-
hitting anti-terrorist cop Jack Bauer on tele-
vision, was issued a summons at the First
Precinct on May 7, charging misdemeanor
assault for head-butting a fashion designer,
Jack McCullough, on the nose during a May
5 charity event in Submercer, the club at
The Mercer hotel on Prince and Mercer Sts.
Sutherland was freed on his own recogni-
zance pending a June 21 court date. He is
currently on probation in Los Angeles for a
2007 drunk-driving conviction.
Probe bias attack
A group of suspects waylaid a victim
at the corner of Seventh Ave. South and
Christopher St. around 2 a.m. Thurs.,
May 14, and punched him and knocked
him to the pavement, where he hit his
head, police said. The victim, identified
in a Daily News article as Alan Williams,
50, had a Gay Men’s Health Crisis card in
his possession when he was taken to St.
Vincent’s Hospital in critical condition.
Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said the
assault was being investigated as a possible
bias attack. Friends said Williams moved
to the city from Buffalo last fall and was
looking for a job. Witnesses told police that
a group of men in the neighborhood had
been harassing gay men and transvestites.
Williams’s attackers prevented the victim
from getting into two cabs before they
knocked him down, witnesses said.
Pepper-spray arrest
Police arrested a suspect whom they
said pepper-sprayed two men on the
morning of Sat., May 16, after an argu-
ment in a diner on W. Fourth St. near
Sixth Ave. The suspect left the diner
and waited for the victims to come out,
then sprayed them in their faces. Lucas
Dawson, 25, a Chelsea resident, was
arrested a short time later on Grove St.
at Seventh Ave. South and charged with
assault in connection with the incident,
police said.
Grove St. slashing
Police arrested Shaun Handy, 40, for
slashing a victim across his head during an
argument around 4 a.m. Sat., May 9, outside
80 Grove St. Handy, of Brooklyn, was freed
on bail pending an Aug. 17 court appear-
ance.
Seek slashing suspect
Police are still seeking a suspect in the
March 14 slashing of an 18-year-old victim
in the back of the head during an argument
on W. 14th St. at Eighth Ave. The suspect,
described as a Hispanic man, between age
25 and 29, about 5 feet 6 inches tall and
160 pounds, formerly worked in a deli at
350 W. 14th St., police said. Information
about the suspect may be telephoned to
800-577-TIPS (8477) or entered at the
Web site www.nypdcrimestoppers.com.
Stabbed on W. Fourth St.
An argument between two men at W.
Fourth and Grove Sts at about 5:45 a.m.
Sun., May 17, ended with the victim being
stabbed in the back and the arm, police
said. The victim, identified in a New York
Post article as Derek Brown, 41, a frequent
subject of arrest, was taken to St. Vincent’s
Hospital in stable condition. He refused to
cooperate with the investigation, according
to reports. The suspect fled and has not been
apprehended.
Juvenile arrest
Police arrested a 14-year-old boy on
Tues., May 12, in connection with the
April 22 beating and robbery of a victim
at Delancey and Essex Sts. The victim sus-
tained a broken jaw and had his cell phone
taken by the suspect and two accomplices,
police said. The suspect, whose name was
withheld because of his age, was arrested
after witnesses identified him in a photo
lineup, police said.
Wrong-way driver dies
A southbound driver who entered the
northbound lanes of the F.D.R. Drive
shortly before 4 a.m. Wed., May 13,
crashed into a Jeep going north near Exit
7 between 14th and 20th Sts., police said.
The southbound driver, identified only as
a black man, 23, was declared dead at
the scene, and the other driver was taken
to Bellevue hospital in serious but stable
condition.
L.E.S. D.O.A.
Police responding to a call at 2:10 p.m.
Sat., May 16, at 52 Canal St. at Orchard
St. found a woman, identified only as
28 years old and white, unconscious.
She was taken to New York Downtown
Hospital, where she was pronounced dead
on arrival. The medical examiner is inves-
tigating the cause of death.
Pedestrian hit
A man driving an S.U.V. hit a pedestrian
on W. 14th St. between Seventh and Eighth
Aves. and then ploughed into three parked
cars and turned over, police said. The vic-
tim, identified only as a white male, 55, was
taken to St. Vincent’s Hospital in critical
condition, police said. The pedestrian was
crossing from the north side of the street
to the south side midblock when the east-
bound Land Rover struck him, according
to police. The driver swerved but couldn’t
avoid the man, and then hit the parked
cars. The Land Rover then turned over on
its side, according to witnesses. The driver,
identified as Alan Naman, of Chelsea, was
not charged but the investigation was con-
tinuing, police said.
Alber t Amateau
POLICE BLOTTER
Villager photo by J.B. Nicholas
Kiefer Sutherland, the star of “24”, exited the First Precinct in Tribeca on May 7 after
being booked on assault charges, stemming from his alleged head butt of designer
Jack McCullough. Sutherland is smiling above because he is trying to get out but being
boxed in by a beefy police officer. His lawyer is to the right of him.
May 20 - 26, 2009 13
Items from the life of John Lennon went on display last week at the Rock & Roll
Hall of Fame Annex in Soho, at 76 Mercer St., in a new exhibit, “John Lennon: The
New York City Years.” Co-curated by Yoko Ono, the exhibit includes Lennon’s green
card from 1976, below, and letters of support from former Mayor John Lindsay and
others, documenting the musician’s fight against deportation for his antiwar views. His
iconic, sleeveless New York City T-shirt from 1973, right, is also on display. Original
song lyric sheets from such hits as “Whatever Gets You Thru the Night” are on view,
as are Lennon’s never-before-seen, handwritten production notes on track listing and
arrangements for songs on the “Double Fantasy” album, below right. Also included in
the exhibit is the Fender Telecaster custom guitar, below left, the former
Beatle used in a performance with Elton John at Madison Square Garden on
Nov. 28, 1974, when Lennon played “Whatever Gets You Thru the Night,”
“Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” and “I Saw Her Standing There.” During
the exhibit, there will be extended hours, from Sunday through Thursday,
from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to
midnight, with last admission one hour prior to closing. For tickets, call
866-9-ROCKNY or 866-976-2569, go to www.rockannex.com or visit
the box office at 76 Mercer St., between Spring and Broome Sts. For
more information, call 646-786-6680.
Hall rocks Lennon show
Beatle used in a performance with Elton John at Maddison Square GGarden on
Nov. 28, 1974, when Lennon played “Whatever Getts You Thru the e Night,”
“Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” and “I Saw Her SStanding There.” During
the exhibit, there will be extended hours, from Sunnday through Thuursday,
from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday through Saturday, from 11 a.m .m. to
midnight, with last admission one hour prior to cclosing. For tickets, , call
866-9-ROCKNY or 866-976-2569, go to www..rockannex.com or vis isit
the box office at 76 Mercer St., between Sprinng and Broome Sts. For or
more information, call 646-786-6680.
14 May 20 - 26, 2009
BY PATRICK HEDLUND
The first of a trio of renovated piers in
Chelsea, Pier 64, recently opened to the pub-
lic, marking the halfway point for construc-
tion of the 5-mile-long Hudson River Park.
The Michael Van Valkenburgh-designed
pier, between 24th and 26th Sts., juts 500
feet out into the Hudson River, with open
seating, sloping lawns and English oak trees
lining the pier’s length.
“Each addition to Hudson River Park
makes this magnificent treasure an even
greater gift to our city and state,” said Diana
Taylor, chairperson of the Hudson River
Park Trust, the city-state public authority
that oversees construction of the park, in
a statement. “It is thrilling to witness the
continued construction progress as the park
becomes a beautiful finished product.”
Pier 64 is one of three piers that will
make up the Chelsea section of Hudson
River Park, also known as Chelsea Cove.
The two others, Piers 62 and 63, are cur-
rently under construction and scheduled to
open next year. When complete, Chelsea’s
waterfront parkland will include more than
9 acres.
Robert Trentlyon, founder of the Chelsea
Waterside Park Association, has spent more
than two decades working to realize the piers’
redevelopment. Ahead of Pier 64’s official
opening, he gave a reporter a walking tour
of it on April 23 — the date of Trentlyon’s
80th birthday, no less — reminiscing on the
many years he spent advocating for public
open space on the waterfront.
“I said, ‘Where can we put a park?’ ”
Trentlyon explained, remembering the time
in the mid-’80s when Chelsea had only 7.5
acres total of parkland, and the city started
exploring what could be done with the
waterfront after abandoning Westway, a
megaplan for the West Side Highway.
So, he set out with likeminded advocates
Edward Kirkland and Dorris Corrigan,
and elected officials state Senator Franz
Leichter, Assemblymember Richard
Gottfried and District Leader Thomas
Duane.
“All of us have been working on this since
’86,” Trentlyon noted. (Indeed, more than
20 years later, Leichter is now a member of
the Trust’s board of directors, Gottfried still
holds his Assembly post and Duane is the
district’s state senator.)
Back then, Trentlyon ran into landscape
architect Thomas Balsley, who later designed
the Chelsea Waterside Park. They spent time
brainstorming on what could be done with
the waterfront space, and Balsley would
come back with renderings based on what
Trentlyon and the others were considering.
“I instantly fell in love with the language
of landscape architects,” said Trentylon, who
was then editor in chief of the community
newspaper The Chelsea-Clinton News. “We
had fun.”
Former state Senator Fred Orenstein then
recommended to Governor Mario Cuomo
that Trentlyon be appointed to the West
Side Task Force, which had been set up to
address what could be developed in place
of the failed Westway highway-and-landfill
project.
“They agreed that there should be a park
on the West Side,” Trentylon said. “There
had been a lot of discussion of apartment
houses on the piers.”
Later, Trentlyon and others would fight
to get Community Board 4 and the Hudson
River Park’s governing body to agree that the
massive pier shed covering Pier 64 needed
to be removed for the park’s construction,
eventually winning support to develop the
pier as passive recreational space.
Reflecting on the landscape he helped
create, Trentlyon referenced a classic movie
by renowned Japanese filmmaker Akira
Kurosawa, in which the main character
realizes his dying wish to turn a rundown
cesspool into a children’s playground.
“I think they’ve done a beautiful job,” he
said of the finished product.
How’s that for a birthday present?
smart car owners receive $99 monthly
parking rates at over 180 Icon locations
throughout New York City. To find out more,
please call 888.660.smart or visit
IconParking.com and click the smart button.
smart center Manhattan is located at West 41st Street and 11th Avenue, NYC
Closest to Port Authority Bus Terminal/Times Square Subways:
A, C, E, N, Q, R, S, W, 1, 2, 3, 7
smartcenterManhattan.com
Parking in NYC for
$99 a month?
Only if you’re !
Villager photo by Patrick Hedlund
Robert Trentlyon showed some original renderings for the Chelsea park and piers
dating back to the 1980s.
From ’80s dream, pier’s a reality for advocate, 80
Photo courtesy Hudson River Park
Pier 64, at left, in the new Chelsea Cove section of Hudson River Park
May 20 - 26, 2009 15
BY ALBERT AMATEAU
Lois D. Fisher, a Village resident for
more than 30 years and an active member
of Fire Island’s Cherry Grove community,
died Mon., May 11, in Pax Christi Hospice
on E. 19th St. after a 10-year struggle with
breast cancer. She was 72.
“Lois was a woman of extraordinary
courage and grace, a kind and indomitable
spirit who set the bar high for living life
large in the face of unrelenting health chal-
lenges,” said her longtime partner, Barbara
Dowd. “She was a loyal and true friend,
a dedicated member of her cancer sup-
port group, an avid lover of animals and
a committed member of her Cherry Grove
community.”
Lois Fisher was a teacher in San Francisco
before coming to New York in 1977 to join
the staff of the General Service Office of
Alcoholics Anonymous, where she worked
until retiring in October 2000.
“Lois was enormously proud of her
work, which included coordinating the A.A.
International Convention in Seattle in 1990
and participating in the first A.A. film for
the public, ‘Alcoholics Anonymous - An
Inside View’,” said Dowd.
“She was born in Delta, Colorado — she
always said it was 26 miles from Grand
Junction, but I didn’t know where that
was either,” said Dowd about her partner’s
western Colorado hometown. She graduated
from the University of Colorado in Boulder
and received her master’s from California
State University in San Francisco. A teacher
and assistant principal in San Francisco, she
dealt blackjack in Reno and Lake Tahoe casi-
nos during summer vacations, Dowd said.
“You’d never think of her as a blackjack
dealer. She was full of surprises,” Dowd
said.
In addition to Dowd, Fisher’s sister,
Patsy Ballard of Denver, and close friends
Audrey Hartman of Manhattan and Lynn
Haley of San Francisco survive. Her dog,
Gracie, and two cats, Sweet Pea and L.C.,
also survive. A memorial will be sched-
uled later.
Contributions may be made in her
memory to the Cherry Grove Community
Association, Inc., Benefactors Fund, Lenox
Hill Station, Box 1615, New York, N.Y.
10021; the Arts Project of Cherry Grove,
Inc., 332 Bleecker St. Apt. F 10, N.Y.,
N.Y. 10014; or the Cancer Initiative of the
L.G.B.T. Community Center, 208 W. 13th
St., N.Y., N.Y. 10011.
St. Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan
Responding to the Signs of the Times:
A Day for Mind. Body. Spirit.
Worried? Stressed? Feeling the pinch of these economic times?
Join us for a day of relaxation and renewal.
Saturday, May 30, 2009
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
St. Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan
170 West 12
th
Street
Reservations not required, but we’d appreciate a call
at 1-800-CARE-421 to let us know you plan to attend.
Free activities include chair massage, ear acupuncture, reflexology,
screenings, lectures and panel discussions.
For details, visit our May 30
th
webpage at www.svcmc.org/mindbodyspirit
We thank our sponsors – Community Media, Fidelis Care New York,
Jamba Juice, Sodexo, and Vitamin Shoppe for helping to make this day possible.
St. Vincent’s. It’s your hospital.
www.svcmc.org 1-800-CARE-421
Peter C. DeLuca,
Owner-Director
Lois Fisher, 72, worked at A.A.
and active in Cherry Grove, F.I.
OBITUARY
DOCTOR DAVE - 03/28/2K9 - LOWER EAST SIDE NYC
WWW.LOWEREASTSIDEMEDICAL.COM - HEALTH CARE IS A UNIVERSAL RIGHT! NOT SOME SORT OF CRAPPY PRIVILEGE - A
HEALTH CARE SYSTEM FOR PROFIT WILL NEVER EVER WORK - NOT-FOR-PROFIT HEALTH CARE MISSION - TO PROVIDE
CRUCIAL & VITAL HEALTH SERVICES FOR ALL PEOPLE WHO NEED THEM - FOR-PROFIT HEALTH CARE MISSION - TO MAKE A
SELECT FEW OLD WHITE MEN INCREDIBLY & FANTASTICALLY WEALTHY - SEE THE DIFFERENCE? SEE SPOT RUN? I LOVE YOU.
Lois Fisher relaxing in her friends’ pool
in Cherry Grove.
PEOPS PORTRAITS PROJECT - WWW.BWAY.NET/~FLY
Find it in the archives
www.THEVILLAGER.com
16 May 20 - 26, 2009
aspect of the old plaza. “It was kind of skuzzy,” she said. “I
predict that on a sunny summer day this whole plaza will be
filled with people.”
Cathryn Swan no longer lives in the Village but neverthe-
less follows and writes about Washington Square for her blog,
www.washingtonsquarepark.wordpress.com. She agreed the
park looked pretty but she added that it wasn’t worth the
acrimony. She said the park could have been renovated as it
used to be.
Around 9:30 a.m. a first grade class from P.S. 41 entered the
park to explore all the living things they could find. They came
expecting only the as-yet-unreconstructed southwest quadrant
and east side of the park to be open, but found a brave new
world to explore in the newly opened section.
Rebecca McMackin, a Department of Parks gardener, was
on the job at 9 a.m. and took the time to talk to a visitor who
wanted to know the name of the purple spike flowers blooming
all over the place.
“Cat mint” was the answer. “It’s like catnip and cats really
like it,” McMackin said. Many plants native to the region are
expected to bloom soon. The yellow-and-brown black-eyed
Susans for example, and the purple echinacea, commonly
known as conehead, will come on in a few weeks. McMackin
confirmed that the echinacea in the park is the same plant that
has been touted as the remedy for the common cold.
“I’m interested in them and the other native plants because
they attracted native American bees. I’m doing a native-bee
survey for the park,” she said.
Michael Oppizzi, who has lived on the park all his life,
remembered the 1972 renovation and said the park needed
some beautification. He liked what he saw on Tuesday
morning.
“I think they’ve done a spectacular job,” he said.
By early afternoon, the park’s renovated section and the
fountain were packed with people. Around 1:30 p.m., the actor
Matthew Modine, who lives near Washington Square, was sit-
ting astride his new orange Puma bicycle by the arch where he
happened to be giving an interview on some other subject. He
simply raved about the renovation to The Villager.
“I think that the people responsible — the architects — for
this renovation will be looked on with as much reverence as
Olmsted on Central Park,” he predicted. “The park had gone
through renovations that made it very ’60s, with the globe
lights, and what they have done with the carriage lamps and the
plantings, the gardens — it represents Washington Square.”
Sandra Pailet, who has lived around the park for 40 years,
said she initially had been concerned about the project’s steep
price tag. But on Tuesday, admiring the completed first sec-
tion, she called it “divine,” and said she appreciated the new
symmetry.
“It’s such an important park,” Pailet said. “It makes such a
difference to have the fountain centered. Everywhere I go in
the park, I can see it. I’m an artist and I studied architecture —
maybe I’m a little more sensitive to it than most people.”
Sitting on the new, smooth steps inside the fountain, read-
ing a Robertson Davies novel, Ted Cardos, 28, an N.Y.U. Law
School student, gave the job an enthusiastic thumbs up.
“I think it’s great,” he said. “I like the new benches on the
outside, and I Iike the symmetry more.” He said the water jets
arcing on either side of him were great, but added, “The only
problem is, if the wind blows, you get wet.”
Barefoot little children were scampering around the foun-
tain’s steps, and Cardos noted that the youngsters were another
cause of wayward water spray — putting their hands or feet on
the spouts, deflecting the water’s direction.
“There was a 4-year-old kid spraying a homeless guy,” he
said. “I don’t think it was on purpose… . Parents got to be more
aware — have their kids on a leash,” he joked.
A number of dogs, some on leash and some off, were also
enjoying the watery scene on the fountain’s steps.
Asked if he thought the renovation looked good to him,
filmmaker Tim Hall, 45, sitting on the fountain’s lip as the
water jets audibly splashed into the fountain, smiled and said,
“It does — it sounds good, too.”
Speaking of sound, by the early afternoon, several groups
of musicians had already made their way to the new park.
Loose Marbles and Baby Soda, two old-style jazz bands from
New Orleans, were taking a break on the benches on the
plaza’s south side. They looked like they were right at home,
but a member of Baby Soda withheld giving the project his
seal of approval. He said he wanted to see how heavily the
park is used when the weather isn’t so beautiful.
“Give it a couple of weeks and see what the change is,”
he said.
Nearby, three women in their 20s hula-hooping on a lush
new lawn all said they liked the refurbished park.
“The wide tables are nice for doing homework,” observed
one of them, Megan DiBello, 23, a poet, regarding the new,
smooth black benches ringing the plaza.
However, local activists Doris Diether and Sharon
Woolums, who were checking out the smaller plaza area east
of the fountain where the Holley statue is located, were not
too pleased.
“These paths are too wide,” grumbled Diether.
“I don’t like the Holley statue on the side,” said Woolums.
Diether, a veteran member of Community Board 2, said she
had told Vellonakis from the beginning that the grassy median
along the path between the circle with the bust of Holley and
the fountain plaza reminded her of “Rockefeller Center.”
A public member of C.B. 2’s Parks Committee, Woolums
was a plaintiff on a community lawsuit against the project.
She called later to say she didn’t want to sound too negative,
and that the renovation did have some good points, too.
“The grass is nice and some of the plantings are nice — and
it’s clean,” she said.
Woolums said she hoped Parks at least leaves the park’s
eastern half open for the summer before starting phase two
of the renovations.
However, Cristina DeLuca, a Parks spokesperson, said the
department expects to begin construction on the second phase
this summer and that the work should take about a year to
complete.
“The second phase of the reconstruction project will
feature restored landscaping, plantings and flower beds,
replacing excess asphalt in the remaining northeast, southeast
and southwest quadrants,” DeLuca said. “The northeast play-
ground will be upgraded, and a new play area in the southwest
section will incorporate the mounds, rebuilt slightly below
grade to improve sightlines and minimize their impact on the
park landscape, and covered with carpet-style synthetic turf
for safety. A new performance stage will be built, the dog
runs will be relocated and expanded, the Giuseppe Garibaldi
monument will be conserved and relocated, the petanque
courts will be reconstructed, the paths will be repaved and
new lighting and fences will be added.
“We are not sure of the cost, as the project is currently out
to bid,” DeLuca added. “We will receive the bids on June 1,
and should have a better idea of the cost at that point.”
Fountain and park finally reopen; More work to come
Villager photo by Jefferson Siegel
A P.S. 41 class out exploring came upon the reopened Washington Square fountain on Tuesday morning before it
had been turned on.
Villager photo by Lincoln Anderson
Actor Matthew Modine praised the renovation’s
architect, George Vellonakis, as a Frederick Law
Olmsted for our time.
Continued from page 1
May 20 - 26, 2009 17
Villager photos by Jefferson Siegel
Clinton to grads: ‘You’ve made it to big leagues’
With Washington Square Park still in the middle of a two-phase renovation, New York University held its commencement ceremonies at Yankee Stadium last Wednesday, with
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton the keynote speaker. Clinton urged the graduates to make the world a better place and encouraged them to persevere through the tough
economy. “The times that you are graduating in are, yes, perhaps more difficult and somewhat more daunting,” Clinton said. “But that’s when we really rise together.” Although
N.Y.U. may be starting to like the stadium as its commencement venue, one graduating student couldn’t help showing his support for the cross-town rival Mets, below left.
18 May 20 - 26, 2009
EDITORIAL
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
IRA BLUTREICH
Continued on page 18
DIS•SO•NANCE: inconsistency between one’s statements and one’s actions.
A park is reborn
After a process that took years — from wrangling over
the design to community lawsuits to drawn-out construc-
tion work — phase one of Washington Square Park’s reno-
vation was finally reopened Tuesday morning.
The Parks Department couldn’t have timed it more
perfectly, because the weather was magnificent, with
the sun shining down gloriously on the sparkling new
renovated part of the park.
After the chain-link fencing was removed in the
early morning, a trickle of people entered at first. By
early afternoon, with the fountain having sprung to
life, the park was mobbed — and, in fact, looked pretty
much the way it used to.
There were musicians strumming guitars, bowing
fiddles, playing trumpets, pumping an accordion, rap-
ping spoons on a washboard — playing Celtic folk songs
and old-style New Orleans jazz. People were ringing the
fountain’s steps — although the steps were no longer
made of pebbly concrete but smooth, comfortable black
stone. Little children were flitting around the fountain
and playing with the new, improved water jets. There
were even dogs sitting around the fountain. Neighbors
strolled about, admiring the square’s spruced-up look. A
tourist from Madrid asked us to take a photo of her in
front of the arch. A man who looked like he might have
been homeless sat on one of the fountain’s steps, his shirt
off and some silver recorder-like device on his knee that
he was looking at. There were students, filmmakers, tour-
ists… . In short, this was exactly the Washington Square
Park that we remembered and loved.
Of course, there are differences, a major one being that
the park’s central plaza is now level, not angled like an
amphitheater. However, judging by how packed the park
was on Tuesday and how it was being used — basically, the
same way it was being used before — it seems that the flat-
tening of the surface won’t change the park’s fundamental,
freewheeling character. In other words, it seems unlikely, in
our preliminary view, that Washington Square will become
merely a “pass-through” park because of its leveling, as
some had predicted, as opposed to the famed place to
gather and just enjoy hanging out that it has always been.
The new plantings are impressive and the lawns look
lush and inviting. Hopefully, these lawns will be kept
accessible. The new paving is a welcome change from
the former cracked asphalt paths. After all the sturm und
drang over centering the fountain with Fifth Ave., we
have to say that it really is not such a big deal. The foun-
tain could have stayed where it was, in our opinion, but it
looks nice now in its central location, and does somehow
lend a feeling of greater spaciousness to the park’s central
plaza. Admittedly, a number of trees were felled around
the plaza, which also adds to this sense of openness.
The new black-stone benches ringing the plaza
look pretty classy and, we have to admit, on Tuesday
appeared to be getting heavier use than the former
pebbly-concrete retaining walls.
The secondary circular plaza area that used to have
the Holley monument at its center seems a bit large and
empty. But we assume that musicians or performers will
soon be using it for their shows. It was partly made this
way to eliminate a so-called “choke point” where drug
dealers used to be entrenched.
We’ll still have to see how some things work out, such
as whether musicians will be allowed to use the fountain
again for performances.
All in all, we have to say phase one of the renova-
tion looks, well, fantastic. Careful review of the next
phase’s elements have already been underway. Let’s
hope phase two is up to the high standards phase one
has achieved. We congratulate the Parks Department
and the renovation’s designer, George Vellonakis, on a
job well done on phase one.
EDITORIAL
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Mike and Joel must go
To The Editor:
Re “A new equity and transparency in school admis-
sions” (talking point, by Joel Klein, May 6):
I for one am tired of Joel Klein and tired of the Department
of Education. I am tired of the lack of communication and trans-
parency, and I am tired of the skewed numbers that are used to
try to make D.O.E. look good. I am tired of the blocking and the
“cannot do” attitude. This has been going on for years.
What passes for a Department of Education is in essence
a business model that has failed in the company of other
failures like AIG and Lehman. It is the result of bad manage-
ment, incompetence and a general disinterest in children.
At the head of the failure is Mike Bloomberg, who with
his rhetoric of “the buck stops with me,” has taken no
ownership for the overcrowding and insufficient budgets
and planning of D.O.E. Instead, he has padded the pockets
of his cronies in real estate, making billions while ignoring
the very clear urban planning issues that have caused this
inexcusable mess.
I think it’s time for change, Obama style. And it needs to
begin with Joel Klein and Mike Bloomberg. Mr. Bloomberg
will most likely be able, with his billions of dollars, to buy
the next election. But that is not the case for our other
elected officials. The parents of New York City have a lot of
power at the polls. And if we band together, as has happened
in the past few weeks, I believe we can bring real change to
what stinks about D.O.E. For starters, if our elected officials
cannot — or choose not to — overturn mayoral control of
the schools, then I for one will vote for the ones who will.
D.O.E., Joel Klein and Mike Bloomberg are out of time.
David Rosenberg
‘Bring back the corruption’
To The Editor:
Re “A new equity and transparency in school admis-
sions” (talking point, by Joel Klein, May 6):
It is outrageous that Mike Bloomberg and Joel Klein
have made our city such a desirable place to raise children
and our school system so attractive. We must correct this
immediately by bringing back David Dinkins and restoring
control to the incompetent and corrupt local school boards
of yesteryear. Urban flight is the answer!

Paul Piccone
Problem goes back years
To The Editor:
Re “A new equity and transparency in school admis-
sions” (talking point, by Joel Klein, May 6):
This is a citywide problem that needs to be dealt with
by the whole City Council. There was very poor planning
from the past administrations — not just Rudy Giuliani, but
mayors prior to him as well. On the Upper East Side, we
have more than 150 youngsters that do not have a place in
September. What a shame.
Richard Kayatt
NYCHA dogs its residents
To The Editor:
Re “Housing Authority puts bite on pit bulls, pinschers,
rotties” (news article, May 6):
This is not effective policy making and NYCHA gets away
with it all the time. They have targeted all types of behavior
without getting to the root causes of the social and economic
problems affecting public-housing residents.
Crime, poverty and disenfranchisement are rampant in
the Housing Authority’s developments, and all the agency
does is set more and more regulations that don’t solve any-
thing and create a greater need by displacing rather than
aiding. The Housing Authority wants to be a landlord when
it’s convenient and a city agency when it benefits its public
image.
I grew up in public housing my whole life and I went on
to become a happy, healthy individual, and it was against
extreme odds: not because public housing was horrible but
because the community I lived in didn’t have enough social
and economic opportunity to survive. All my friends and
family around me were, and still are, fighting just to survive
and in need of a helping hand.
We need to tackle policies that target us and our pets as
vicious and aggressive. Tenants are organizing around this
issue and need all the help they can get. Make sure you sign
the online petition going around (http://www.PetitionOnline.
com/NYCHAPPE/petition.html).
The A.S.P.C.A. is against this new pet policy and they
are the animal experts in New York City. They have told this
to NYCHA but have been ignored and the public has been
lied to about grandfathering registered dogs. Many of the
IRA BLUTREICH
Continued on page 27
May 20 - 26, 2009 19
The Villager (USPS 578930) ISSN 0042-6202 is published
every week by Community Media LLC, 145 Sixth Ave., First
Fl., New York, N.Y. 10013 (212) 229-1890. Periodicals
Postage paid at New York, N.Y. Annual subscription by mail
in Manhattan and Brooklyn $29 ($35 elsewhere). Single
copy price at office and newsstands is $1. The entire contents
of newspaper, including advertising, are copyrighted and no
part may be reproduced without the express permission of
the publisher - © 2009 Community Media LLC.
PUBLISHER’S LIABILITY FOR ERROR
The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typo-
graphical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertise-
ment. The publisher’s liability for others errors or omissions
in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to
publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue.
Member of the
New York Press
Association
Member of the
National
Newspaper
Association
Published by COMMUNITY MEDIA, LLC
145 Sixth Ave., NY, NY 10013
Phone: (212) 229-1890 • Fax: (212) 229-2790
On-line: www.thevillager.com
E-mail: news@thevillager.com
©2009 Community Media, LLC
Named best weekly newspaper
in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005
by New York Press Association
GayCity
NEWS NEWSTM
PUBLISHER & EDITOR
John W. Sutter
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Lincoln Anderson
ARTS EDITOR
Scott Stiffler
REPORTERS
Albert Amateau
Josh Rogers
Julie Shapiro
Patrick Hedlund
OFFICE MANAGER
David Jaffe
PUBLISHER EMERITUS
Elizabeth Butson
SR. V.P. OF SALES AND MARKETING
Francesco Regini
SR. MARKETING CONSULTANT
Jason Sherwood
ADVERTISING SALES
Allison Greaker
Jeremy Marks
Jason Sparks
RETAIL AD MANAGER
Colin Gregory
ART / PRODUCTION DIRECTOR
Troy Masters
ART DIRECTOR
Mark Hassleberger
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Jamie Paakkonen
CIRCULATION SALES MNGR.
Marvin Rock
DISTRIBUTION & CIRCULATION
Cheryl Williamson
CONTRIBUTORS
Ira Blutreich
Doris Diether
Patricia Fieldsteel
Ed Gold
Bonnie Rosenstock
Jefferson Siegel
Jerry Tallmer
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Elisabeth Robert
Jefferson Siegel
Clayton Patterson
BY TED RALL
American soldiers serving in Vietnam wondered what they
were fighting for. U.S. troops in Afghanistan don’t have that
problem. They know exactly what they’re fighting for: rapists.
After President Obama’s coming “Afghan surge” there will
be 72,000 soldiers in Afghanistan. Their primary mission is to
prevent Afghans from overthrowing the unpopular regime of
Hamid Karzai, the former oil consultant installed by George W.
Bush when the U.S. occupation began nearly eight years ago.
America’s media repeatedly claimed that Afghan women
would be better off under the U.S.-supported Northern Alliance
puppet government headed by Karzai than under the Taliban.
But when I went to Afghanistan and asked women what they
thought, they had a different story. The defeat of the Taliban
brought about the collapse of law and order, making life even
more dangerous, especially for women.
“Under the Taliban,” a woman told me, “I watched rap-
ists being executed. Now I see them in the government.”
The Afghan women’s-rights group RAWA has repeatedly
told anyone willing to listen that there hasn’t been much
improvement for women and girls since the U.S. occupa-
tion began in 2001. But no one — least of all left-of-center
Americans eager to embrace the Afghan war — has wanted
to hear what they had to say.
“Most women still wear the all-encompassing burqa
through fear of attack and social pressure, a third of women
in Kabul do not leave the house, forbidden from doing so by
the male members of the family, and it is still almost impos-
sible for women to get a divorce,” reported The Sunday
Herald in 2005.
Liberal Democrats who cling to Afghanistan as “the good
war” the U.S. should be fighting are being forced to confront
the ugly truth about their ally. Karzai has signed a law that
states that “women cannot leave the house without their hus-
bands’ permission, that they can only seek work, education
or visit the doctor with their husbands’ permission, and that
they cannot refuse their husband sex,” reported the British
newspaper The Guardian on March 31.
The Shiite Personal Status Act applies only to devotees of
the Shia branch of Islam, which account for between 10 and
20 percent of the population. How can a secular democratic
state have different laws depending on a citizen’s faith? The
answer is: It can’t. Afghanistan isn’t secular or democratic.
The “new” Afghanistan’s constitution is based on sharia law
— exactly as it was under the Taliban. But the U.S. media has
purposefully failed to report the icky truth about our ally.
The new law requires women to have sex with their hus-
bands at least once every four days unless they are sick or
menstruating.
“Obedience, readiness for intercourse and not leaving the
house without the permission of the husband are the duties
of the wife,” reads the law of a nation ostensibly invaded by
U.S. troops in part to liberate Afghan women. “As long as
the husband is not traveling, he has the right to have sexual
intercourse with his wife every fourth night,” it says.
Afghan Senator Humaira Namati calls the rape bill
“worse than during the Taliban” and said it was rammed
through parliament without debate.
“Anyone who spoke out was accused of being against
Islam,” she said.
Several hundred women protesting the law on the streets
of Kabul were viciously assaulted by men as police stood
back and watched.
In fairness to the responsible male legislators, they did
add a provision to protect Shiite women from “dead bed”:
Afghan men have to put out “at least once every four
months.” Karzai signed legalized rape into law in order
to appease right-wing legislators in an election year. After
international criticism, however, he began backpedaling
with the lamest of all possible reasons: He didn’t read the
bill before he was for it.
“I was not aware of what I had signed,” Afghan parliamen-
tarian Sabrina Saqib said Karzai told her. The legislation “has
so many articles,” Karzai told CNN. “Now I have instructed, in
consultation with clergy of the country, that the law be revised
and any article that is not in keeping with the Afghan constitu-
tion and Islamic sharia must be removed from this law.”
As Karzai B.S.’es for the cameras, hundreds of Afghan
women languish in prisons around the country. Their crime?
They’re teen brides, some as young as 10, who ran away
from much older husbands who purchased them.
“In President Hamid Karzai’s Afghanistan, women are
still imprisoned for running away from home,” reports The
Sunday Herald.
Nice theocracy you got there, Mullah Karzai.
Remember these words the next time you watch a flag-draped
coffin returning from Afghanistan. The young man inside that
box didn’t die for nothing. He died to protect rapists.
Why we fight: Making Afghanistan safe for rapists
Villager photo by Elisabeth Robert
Participants in the inaugural Hudson River Pageant, wearing dresses of recycled
garbage, marched up Greenwich St. in Tribeca on May 9. They were near the start
of the ecologically-conscious event, which ended at Gansevoort St.
SCENE
The law requires ‘obedience,
readiness for intercourse and not
leaving the house without the
permission of the husband.’
TALKING POINT
20 May 20 - 26, 2009
Creating a physical connection with its new Hudson Square
neighborhood, WNYC on April 28 opened its new state-of-
the art, street-level Jerome L. Greene Performance Space
at 44 Charlton St. off of Varick St. The studio and perfor-
mance venue represents a new dimension for WNYC, trans-
forming the public radio station from an on-air and online
destination into a cultural destination as well. “The Greene
Space perfectly expresses WNYC’s impulse to continue to
innovate public radio and inspire people in new ways,” said
Laura Walker, WNYC president. “As we produce live events
and audio and video programming streetside on Varick St.,
we love the fact New Yorkers will be able to see our hosts
in action, participate in political dialogues and enjoy cultural
performances. We become a part of the New York City and
Hudson Square community in a tangible, visible way.” In
addition to hosting live radio shows with popular hosts like
Brian Lehrer and Leonard Lopate, the Greene Space will
invite local poets, writers, musicians and performing and
visual artists to use the space as a multimedia laboratory,
and will feature exclusive, commissioned works. The space
will even host singles events called First Fridays with food,
drink and live music for WNYC listeners. For a full schedule
of events, visit www.thegreenespace.org.
AMERICA’S FAVORTIE PASTIME…
Have a happy & safe
Memorial Day!
WNYC tunes into the neighborhood with new Greene Space
Top: Peruvian percussionists performed at the opening of WNYC’s Greene Space. Above: Laura Walker, WNYC
Radio president and C.E.O., left, and Indira Etwaroo, the Greene Space’s executive producer, at the opening.
May 20 - 26, 2009 21
BY JERRY TALLMER
When I was one-and-twenty
I heard a wise man say,
‘Give crowns and pounds and guineas
But not your heart away;
Give pearls away and rubies
But keep your fancy free.’
But I was one-and-twenty,
No use to talk to me.
*
When I was one-and-twenty
I heard him say again,
‘The heart out of the bosom
Was never given in vain;
‘Tis paid with sighs a plenty
And sold for endless rue.’
And I am two-and-twenty,
And oh, ‘tis true, ‘tis true.
—A.E. Housman
Anybody who was ever one-and-twenty
can relate to the rueful young cynical ideal-
ists in Jonathan Marc Sherman’s “Sophistry,”
though it helps if you were also in those years
a junior or senior at that prototypical “small
New England college” where so many plays
and novels and movies nowadays take place.
It helps even more if the campus in question is
at sword’s points over a charge of sexual abuse
brought against a popular oddball professor of
philosophy.
It is that same professor, Whitey McCoy,
who right at the beginning of the play eluci-
dates what the Sophists of ancient Greece were
all about: It wasn’t whether they were right
or wrong, it was the cleverness of how they
“argued both sides of an argument, sharpened
their skills, became better, more clever, more
persuasive…” In short, a bunch of double-
talkers — everything most despicable to the
emotionally tangled truth-seeking young ideal-
ists about to be dispatched, graduated, into the
wide, wide world.
They are, in the entanglement at the Samuel
Beckett on West 42nd Street, pot-smoking
senior-year rock-band buddies Willy (last name
unknown) and Ex (Xavier Reynolds); herky-
jerky intrusively lonely campus courier Igor
Konigsberg; uncompromising student editor/
reporter Robin Smith (who has broken up
with Ex); round-heeled undergraduate cutie
pie Debbie (last name unknown); and Jack
Kahn, the misanthropic misfit who has accused
Professor McCoy of making an erotic pass hors
du classe, so to speak.
Plus, of course, Whitey McCoy himself, and
Quintana Matheson, president of the college,
who, to the outrage of Ex and Robin and many
others, is hemming and hawing and obfuscat-
ing (and subsequently buying off) the ouster of
Professor McCoy.
This is the second time round in New York
for “Sophistry,” which had a workshopping
by Playwrights’ Horizons in the spring of
1993, and a full run there that fall headed by
the always on-the-mark Austin Pendleton as
Whitey McCoy.
Under the direction of James Warwick,
the current actors are Jonathan Hogan as
Whitey, Maximilian Osinski as Willy, Ian Alda
as Igor, Charlie Hewson as Ex, Natalie Knepp
as Robin, Michael Carbonaro as the accusa-
tory Jack Kahn, Mahira Kakkar as Debbie, and
Ellen Dolan as President Quintana Matheson.
“Sophistry” was Jonathan Marc Sherman’s
third full-length oeuvre. “Oeuvre,” he said with
a laugh over the phone last week. “A great
Scrabble word. Gets rid of a V.”
A 1993 photo in the Dramatists Play Service
text of “Sophistry” displays two young guys —
Ethan Hawke as Ex, Steve Zahn as Willy —
banging away on guitar and (I think) drums,
while a third character, sprawled beside them,
peruses a newspaper with a wicked grin on his
face. This is Jonathan Sherman himself as ubiq-
uitous Igor Konigsberg in that production.
He was then 25, having been born October
10, 1968, in Morristown, New Jersey, home
state of the Bell Laboratories where his father
worked.
“At the time I wrote it I felt like a real
expert,” says Sherman. “I’ve come to realize
how young I was.”
When he was even younger, in the 6th grade
in Livingston, N.J., “a teacher told me I talk
back a lot, so I might do well in acting classes.
So I started at age 11 or 12, and then went on
to theater camp — yes! — at the Karmel Hotel
in the Catskills, the first of four summers there
that were incredibly formative.”
“My wife got so sick hearing about it that
she made a documentary film about it, called
‘Stagedoor.’” His wife, Alexandra Shiva, moth-
er of their 2-year-old Sam, is better known for
her documentary film “Bombay Eunuch.”
In any event, Sherman has been stage-
struck ever since age 11, summers at theater
camp, other seasons at the American Academy
of the Arts on Madison Avenue at 30th Street.
“I’d come there on Saturday mornings, then
in the afternoons go to a matinee somewhere
in the city.”
The actual campus on which “Sophistry” is
set, he let slip out, is the famously progressive
Bennington College, in Vermont, from which
— “when they turned off the heat in midwin-
ter” — Jonathan would come down to New
York to take part in the Young Playwrights
Festival with this and other birth-process
works.
As for the “Sophistry” case of sexual aggres-
sion — two cases, really, of somebody making
an uninvited male-on-male pass at someone
else — (1) teacher/student (alleged), (2) stu-
dent/student (actual) — “There had been
more than one such incident,” says Bennington
graduate Sherman, “but the [Whitey McCoy]
one in the play is fiction.”
In any event, says the playwright, “you get
two different versions of the same story” —
sophistry or no sophistry.
Aha! The “Rashomon” effect?
“Exactly,” said Jonathan Marc Sherman.
Bennington had given him a degree, BA
in Drama—“They may regret it, but they did”
— whereupon he dropped out of Yale Drama
graduate school after a month. “Hated New
Haven, hated the program.”
Austin Pendleton, the onetime Whitey
McCoy, is a little too white-haired these days to
fit the part, but playwright and sometime actor
Sherman reveres actor-director-playwright
Pendleton. “Austin Pendleton,” says Jonathan
Marc Sherman, “makes it exciting and fun
for me to keep writing plays.”
And that ain’t no sophistry.
VILLAGERARTS&ENTERTAI NMENT
Playwright Sherman mines the ‘Rashomon’ effect
Greeks, professors know the most clever truth wins
Photo by Carol Rosegg
Natalie Knepp as Robin and Ian Alda as Igor
“ANGELS & DEMONS” (-)
Much of this film is incomprehensible and
a lot of what is understandable is ridiculous.
Notwithstanding the hoopla and incessant
appearances of Tom Hanks and director,
Ron Howard, on a number of television talk
shows, the theater was one-third vacant when
I saw the movie on opening night. The tom-
toms have already signaled people to stay
away. What a waste of talent and money.
The Pope has died, perhaps not of natu-
ral causes, and four cardinals have been
kidnapped. The Illuminati, an underground
society of true believers, is out to punish the
Vatican for having tried Galileo and prevent-
ing science from looking into the possibil-
ity of creating the source of life itself. The
organization is now out to physically destroy
the Vatican and half of Rome with a vial of
anti-matter stolen from a particle accelerator
in an underground lab near Geneva.
Harvard professor Robert Langdon (Tom
Hanks), a scholar on the Vatican, is flown
to Rome to find and rescue the cardinals.
He is accompanied by Vittoria Vetra (Ayelet
Zurer), a brilliant scientist who helped pro-
duce the anti-matter. The two of them rush
around Rome and Vatican City searching
for the abducted cardinals who are to be
executed, one per hour, at different locations
and by different means — all grotesque.
SOPHISTRY
Written by Jonathan Marc Sherman
Directed by James Warwick
A South Ark Stage production
Through June 6
At the Samuel Beckett Theater,
410 West 42nd Street
(212) 279-4200
THEATER
KOCH
ON FILM
Continued on page 23
22 May 20 - 26, 2009
BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN
Born in New Zealand and currently based
in Brooklyn, Louise Guerin is known for
her portraits and still lifes. Her third New
York solo exhibition, currently on display
at Blue Mountain Gallery, offers the public
a chance to see a collection of recent works
primarily featuring impressively tumultuous
landscapes.
These paintings are largely inspired by the
coasts of New Zealand, as well as by Park
City, Utah — where Guerin completed an
artist residency program last spring. In Park
City, Guerin found herself surrounded by the
Rocky Mountains. It was, as she remembers,
“the almost deafening silence and the mag-
nificent hum of the power of those peaks”
that left a lasting impression. It is interesting
that this description is much less visual than it
is related to sound. In her portrayals of nature
on the cusp of upheaval, Guerin seems to
capture a sort of noise.
Her compositions are far from tranquil.
Unlike many other landscape painters, she is
not trying to bestow an overt meditative qual-
ity upon her work. Instead, vivid brushwork
characterizes many of the compositions. It
initiates an overall dramatic quality, leaving
the unsettled pigment to further stress imbal-
ance. In Guerin, we see the ocean in turmoil,
its waves thrashing against a seemingly end-
less shoreline.
Water and sky are intertwined in a ges-
ture of movement, forming a multi-layered
pattern of weaving lines that bring Edvard
Munch’s “The Scream” to mind. In another
example, we find ourselves witnessing an
array of dark clouds as an approaching storm
casts its spell with deep shadows on the
land underneath. While they are foreboding
the turbulences to come, they also veil us in
uncertainty. Literally speaking, we are kept
in the dark. “These paintings do show nature
in full force,” Guerin states. It is nature at its
most raging and powerful. “It is not some-
thing that is often on view in the city, but
exhilarating to witness and to feel a distinctly
tiny part of,” Guerin adds.
In their overt expressionism, Guerin’s
works are reminiscent of the early 20th
Century works by the German Brücke art-
ists, such as Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig
Kirchner and Emil Nolde. As in many German
Expressionists’ works, Guerin’s landscapes
become transcending agents. To the viewer,
they offer an emotional experience rather
than a likeness of a physical reality.
One cannot help but think that Guerin’s
landscapes might address something larger
than what is shown. When asked if she
viewed her works as allegories, she replied
that indeed, the last time she “visited New
Zealand, there had been a series of huge
storms, which did seem to be a metaphor or
an allegory if you like, for the turmoil happen-
ing globally.” In other words, no matter how
traditional their subject matter, Guerin’s land-
scapes are meant to reflect very contemporary
concerns. The storms she paints might unfold
in a natural setting, but to her, they also refer
to the storms that have been unleashed in
today’s politics and economics. Guerin suc-
ceeds in capturing an energy that leaves us on
edge, wondering about the ranging forces that
might come and sweep us away.
While Guerin’s paintings from the past
often featured vivid colors and stark con-
trasts, she began to experiment with a new,
much more subdued palette about two years
ago. In fact, many of the landscapes in this
exhibition appear as almost de-saturated.
While she plays with nuances, the colors
favored here are based on varying shades
of grey, black and white. Some of the larg-
er works are even almost monochromatic
and it is a surprise to find Guerin restrain
from employing dramatic colors in order to
describe a dramatic content. To Guerin, this
is not a contradiction. “The palette choice
was a way of emphasizing the seriousness
of the upheaval all around us,” she explains.
“Black and white can give light and shadow a
mysterious and expressive quality that is not
necessarily a gloomy one. I could also concen-
trate on the effects of light on the stark beauty
I chose as subject matter.”
Interestingly, Guerin’s subject matter is
very much inspired by her personal memo-
ries. She culls from personal experience and,
in particular, the individual seascapes are geo-
graphically specific. She grew up in a small
city “with the sea and mountains all around
in bright, clear light.”
Actual sites inspire many of the scener-
ies. The beach in “Last Lamp,” for example,
is one she has been visiting all her life and
studied in all kinds of weather conditions.
She remembers that on one occasion, “The
sea was wild, the waves so high and the
wind relentless. The driftwood did look like
bones.” Just as our memories aid in abstract-
ing first impressions over time, Guerin’s
paintings manifest as an abstraction of a real
experience. No matter how metaphorical,
they also provide an intimate glimpse into the
artist’s emotive world.
One of Guerin’s great strengths is her
ability to bestow a sense of timelessness
upon her works. She partially achieves this
through her unusual choice of colors —
think of the classicism of a black and white
photograph for example — but also through
her harmonious fusion of form and content.
Though her landscapes are specific, the
depicted forces seem universally applicable.
Guerin aims to leave as much room as
possible for the viewer’s own interpretations.
When asked if she would view her com-
positions as dreamscapes, Guerin reflects:
“Dreams often have somber tones and many
layers of meaning which aren’t immediately
obvious. Even though a situation can seem
utterly bleak, there are still sustaining ele-
ments — and even limits.”
74A East 4th Street,
New York, NY 10003
Box Office: 212-475-7710
www.lamama.org etc.
74A East 4th Street, NY, NY 10003
Box Office: 212-475-7710
www.lamama.org
La MaMa Moves! Dance Festival
Maverics in Motion
May 21-24, 2009 ~ 8:00 pm
Edgar Cortes; Gabriel Forestierl/ProjectLIMB; Zvi Gotheiner/ZviDance;
Jonathan Kinzel; Sydney Skybetter; Dario Vaccaro; Bergen Wheeler;
Anthony Whitehurst & Yen-Fang Yu; Katie Workum; Nancy Zendora
American Hybrids
May 22-24, 2009 / Friday & Saturday at 10:00pm / Sunday at 5:30pm
Monstah Black & Nicholas Leichter; Tom Pearson
HIJACK/Kristen Van Loon & Arwen Wilder
Cunningham Generations
May 29-31, 2009 / Friday & Saturday at 10:00pm / Sunday at 5:30pm
Kimberly Bartosik; Jonah Bokaer; Michael Cole; Ellen Cornfield;
Foofwa d’Imobilité; Douglas Dunn; Alan Good; Rashaun Mitchell;
Matthew Mohr; Dennis O’Connor; Daniel Squire
Poetry Electric ~ William Electric Black, Director
GROWING UP HIP-HOP ~ Kahlil Almustafa
The 6 Project- Jena, USA (excerpts) ~ Chelsea Gregory
May 26, 2009 at 8:00pm
La MaMa La Galleria ~ 6 East First Street NYC
Umbrellas, Social Justice & More by Luba Lukova
May 14 -31, 2009 / Thursday - Sunday 1 - 6 pm
Tumultuous landscapes reveal full force of nature
Favoring storms, turmoil over meditative tranquility
Photo supplied by the artist
Last Lamp, 40”x50”, oils on canvas, 2008
LOUISE GUERIN: STORMS
AND STILLNESS
Through June 13
Blue Mountain Gallery
530 West 25th Street, 4th Floor
(646) 486-4730 or www.bluemountaingal-
lery.org
ART
May 20 - 26, 2009 23
Meanwhile, the College of Cardinals is hold-
ing a Conclave behind locked doors to select
a new pope. Among the preferati – favorite
candidates – are the four kidnapped cardinals.
The Swiss Guard, led by Richter (Stellan
Skarsgard), may or may not be good guys. A
wise old cardinal on whom we can depend to
say and do the right thing is Cardinal Strauss
(Armin Mueller-Stahl). A witty, pink-cheeked,
boyish priest with a delightful Irish accent
is the Camerlengo (Ewan McGregor). The
Camerlengo is the priest who carries out the
deceased pope’s duties until a successor is
selected.
The balance of the story pertains to locat-
ing the kidnapped cardinals and saving the
Vatican. One gagged-and-bound cardinal
thrown into a fountain to drown appeared to
have the lungs of a sperm whale. It was like
watching 15 minutes of waterboarding. All
in all, this movie fits the title of Shakespeare’s
play, “Much Ado About Nothing.”
“NEXT DAY AIR” (-)
The cast of this film, directed by music video
executive Benny Boom, is made up of blacks
and Hispanics. With the exception of one indi-
vidual, all the characters are stereotyped in the
worst possible manner and the language they
use is vile. If the movie had been directed by a
white person, I believe activists and community
groups would demand that it be withdrawn.
The story line is simple. Ten bricks of cocaine
are mailed by a drug lord, Bodega Diablo (Emilio
Rivera), from Los Angeles to Philadelphia and
delivered to the wrong apartment by pot-
smoking Leo (Donald Faison) who works for
the Next Day Air Company. The thugs who
receive the package — Guch (Wood Harris),
Brody (Mike Epps), and Shavoo (Omari
Hardwick) — have just robbed a bank. They
try to sell the cocaine, the drug dealers seek
to recover it, and mayhem similar to that of a
Sam Peckinpah Western takes place.
Only one individual in the entire cast is a
sympathetic character, and that is the mother
of Leo, the stoned delivery man. Everyone
else turned me off. After witnessing the bru-
tality and negativity of the lives portrayed,
the movie left me totally cold and without a
kind word.
Roger Ebert gave this picture three stars,
calling it “a bloody screwball comedy, a film
of high spirits. It tells a complicated story
with acute timing and clarity, and gives us
drug-dealing lowlifes who are almost poetic
in their clockwork dialogue. By that I mean
they not only use the words, they know the
music.” Ridiculous.
I saw the show on a Sunday afternoon at
a Village theater, and there were only seven
people in the audience. The underground
has spoken again and properly so.
155 1st Avenue at East 10th St.
Reservations/Info 254-1109
Tickets available online at www.theaterforthenewcity.net
The Fabulous 14th Annual
L.E.S.
LOWER EAST SIDE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS
Friday, Saturday, Sunday, May 22, 23, 24
Theater • Music • Dance • Film • Poetry • Puppetry • Youth Program • Visual Arts
Performances Every Night 6pm-1am
Outdoors on E. 10th St. Saturday 11am - 6pm w/Performances & Vendors
Youth Program Sat 2 - 5pm Film Sat 12pm - 12am Poetry Sun 5pm - 7:30pm
Scheduled to Appear:
SPEAKERS: Joe Franklin, Council Member Rosie Mendez
PERFORMANCES BY: Reno, Tammy Grimes, Penny Arcade, Phoebe Legere, Judith Malina,
Epstein & Hassan, Vinie Burrows, Crystal Field, Richmond Shepard, steve ben israel, Rome Neal,
Katherine Adamenko, Danny & Josh Bacher, Stan Baker, William Electric Black, Louisa Bradshaw,
Candice Burridge, Cardone, Susana Cook, Gary Corbin, J. Lois Diamond, Faceboy, Ines Ferre, Kat Georges
& Peter Carlaftes, Amazing Grace, Inma Heredia, Lavinia Co-op, Evan Laurence, Mike Lesser,
Leslie Levinson, T. Scott Lilly, Megan Murtha, Jim Neu, Vicki Oceguera, Valery Oisteanu, Poez, Red Bastard,
Stan Rifken, Michael Sanders, Jonathan Slaff, Douglas Strick, Franca Vercelloni, Zero Boy, Lei Zhou,
Margo Lee Sherman, Wiggleicious Sisters, Ron B.
MUSIC: David Amram, Judy Gorman, Arthur Abrams, La Cumbiamba NY, Ramaz Percussion Ensemble,
Silvercloud Singers & Drummers, Mary Gatchell, Brandon Anderson, Joe Bendik, Judeth DeMott, Peter
Dizozza, Ehran Elisha Ensemble, Ben Harburg, Alexis Karl, Joseph Keckler, Kitsch, Mark Marcante, Melange,
Noam Faingold Orchestra, Quimbombo, Norman Savitt, Somi, Alison Tartalia, Tokyo Penguin,
Trashed On Fiction, Michael Vazquez, David Vernon, Chris Wade, Richard West, Stumblebum Brass Band
DANCE: Rod Rodgers Dance Co., eDance, The Love Show, Mariana Bekerman Dance Company,
Allessandra Belloni, Andre Brown, Judith Caporale, Diesel/Fusion Dance Theatre, Dunyana Dance
Ensemble, Kaoru Ikeda, Human Kinetics, Laura Shapiro, William Parker & Patricia Nicholson, Jack Tynan ,
Vangeline Theater, Coopdanza
THEATER GROUPS: New York Theatre Workshop, The Living Theatre, La MaMa E.T.C.,
ArtThrob Productions, Asteroid B612, Black Box Entertainment, Children of Salt, CAVE Gallery,
Chinese Theatre Works, Cobu, DADAnewyork, Dixon Place, Franklin Furnace, Frank Silvera Writer’s
Workshop, ID Studio, Irondale Ensemble Project, Joe s Pub, Jumping The Gun,
LINCOLN ON HESTER STREET, New Yiddish Rep, New York Lyric Circus, Teatro La Tea, THAW,
Rapsida, Things That Talk, Yangtze Repertory Theater,
WRITERS: Eduardo Machado, Robert Kornfeld, Crystal Field, Barbara Kahn, Lissa Moira, Bina Sharif,
Naomi Replansky, Miriam Sivan, Larry Myers, Laurel Hessing, Sabura Rashid, Sara Cooper,
Eugenia Macer-Story, Oliver Thrun, Maria Micheles
Come Enjoy the Cultural and Artistic Explosion of the Lower East Side!
FREE!!! FREE!!! FREE!!! FREE!!! FREE!!! FREE!!!
F
R
E
E
!!! F
R
E
E
!!!
Continued from page 21
Koch
BY BRIAN MCCORMICK
When audiences walk into the space at PS122 to see
Megan Sprenger’s new work “…within us.,” they will find
nowhere to sit. Dancers, who may or may not enter along
with viewers, may not be immediately identifiable. Inside,
they’ll find set designer Brad Kisicki’s natural wood cubes
— 60 of them — decorated with black stencil and arranged
in clusters as well as suspended from the ceiling. Guides will
lead people to their seats by reconfiguring the set to allot one
block to a customer.
Set in a 360-degree environment with audience members
integrated among the performers, “…within us.” subverts the
convention of viewer as voyeur by breaking spatial boundar-
ies and invading personal space. Drawing on the archetypes
of aggressor, inflicted, watcher, and fighter, the work exam-
ines the physical and emotional instincts that lay at the core
of human conflict.
For her first commission from PS122 in 2006, Sprenger
created “No Where,” a trio that brought the mystery, tension,
and beauty of Gregory Crewdson’s photographic imagery to
life. For this second commission, she drew inspiration from
the images of violence in Jacob Landau’s visual artwork, but
not in the same literal way. Here, she likened the material-
ity of Landau’s images to a color in a painter’s landscape;
world events and her own experiences also drove the work’s
objectives.
“I wasn’t going to protests,” Sprenger said in a recent
interview. “I wasn’t involved in the body count, or any of the
other activities that were going on. I was aware of things, but
also of my own apathy. There was a real disconnect — to be
so conveniently watching from my couch. I’m not interested
in being overtly political, but because of humanity, I became
interested in exploring these characters, these roles.”
Recently, one of her collaborators “got jumped,” a real-
life, frightening experience that underscored Sprenger’s
understanding of the deeply entrenched, almost hard-wired
behavioral characteristics humans manifest, especially in the
face of extreme or intense situations. “People watched and
did nothing,” Sprenger said. “There was no fighter. It was a
one-on-one real example” of how people behave according
to pre-defined social rules. The characters in “…within us.”
interchange among the performers, but each archetype can
be identified through behavior and body movement. “The
inflicted is weighted and boneless,” explained Sprenger, “the
aggressor, sharp and agitated; the watcher is watching and
disconnected.”
Sprenger’s team includes performers Tara O’Con, Maria
Parshina, Alli Ruszkowski, and Richert Schnorr, with cos-
tumes by Mary McKenzie. Jason Sebastian’s spatially dis-
persed score alternates between metallic, industrial noise,
and natural, melodic sonority. Electric god Joe Levasseur
contributes his lightning.
Inside View
Megan Sprenger’s new work puts the audience within
MEGAN V. SPRENGER
In Megan V. Sprenger’s “…within us.,” the view can’t
rest in the role of voyeur.
MEGAN V. SPRENGER/
MVWORKS
“…within us.”
Performance Space 122
150 First Ave. at E. Ninth St.
May 17, 24 at 5:30 p.m.; May 19-23, at 7:30 p.m.
$20; $15 for students & seniors
ps122.org or 212-352-3101
DANCE
24 May 20 - 26, 2009
BY SCOTT HARRAH
David Hyde Pierce is the only note-
worthy aspect of this otherwise medio-
cre revival of Samson Raphaelson’s 1934
play. Pierce is playwright Steven Gaye,
a 50-something man with a string of
hit comedies who is struggling to write
his first drama and falling for his young
assistant, Linda Brown (Mary Catherine
Garrison).
The show has lots of snappy dialogue
and quips, but director Daniel Sullivan
cannot conceal the fact that this story
is seriously dated. Any revival of a play
loaded with literary mothballs sometimes
needs a new spin to make it work for mod-
ern audiences, but there’s no twist here.
What was considered almost screwball
comedy in 1934 doesn’t translate well in
2009, and comes across as nothing less
than a theatrical anachronism.
In addition, the cast performs at such
a slow pace, much of Raphaelson’s witty
material is simply wasted. The actors play
everything so straight that most of the
jokes simply get lost and evoke few laughs.
Act one is mildly amusing, but the remain-
der of the show is downright dull.
David Hyde Pierce, best known for his
dry, deadpan delivery and haughty elegance
as Niles Crane on TV’s “Frasier,” is perfect
as divorced playwright Steven Gaye. He
has all the nuances of his dapper character
down. Unfortunately, there’s zero chem-
istry between him and the miscast Mary
Catherine Garrison. Their scenes together,
which should be full of farcical zest and
repartee, are anemic and flat.
Garrison delivers her lines by rote, with
no concept of proper characterization, and
has trouble segueing from Steven’s secretary
in act one to a stage actress later in the show.
The transformation isn’t believable, despite
Jane Greenwood’s glamorous costumes.
She’s supposed to help inspire him to write
a play about a man falling in love with a
much younger woman, but Garrison — who
was first-rate in such recent revivals as Caryl
Churchill’s “Top Girls”— simply doesn’t
have the acting chops for this demanding
role. Other cast members are also less than
stellar. Rosie Benton, as Genevieve Lang, is
mostly serviceable as a diva-like actress who
is about to head off to Europe with Steven.
There is some genuine talent here, most
notably former “Murphy Brown” star and
Tony nominee Charles Kimbrough as the
hilarious butler Flodgell, David Furr as mati-
nee idol Dickie Reynolds, and aging thespian
and hard drinker Frank Galloway (Byron
Jennings). Unfortunately, Sullivan directs
everyone as if they are one-dimensional cari-
catures of Broadway actors from yesteryear.
Visually, the play is also disappointing.
Scenic designer John Lee Beatty’s drab set,
complete with dark wood paneling, fails
to evoke the art deco glitz of 1930s New
York. The set is a poor anchor for a period
piece like this, and looks more like a law
firm or accountant’s office than a swank
apartment of a successful playwright from
the era.
There are indeed some mildly humor-
ous moments involving an Indian wrestling
match, and Jennings in a slapstick drunk
scene; but they offer far too little comic
relief from this otherwise sleep-inducing
production.
The Substance Use Research Center at Columbia University
needs non-treatment seeking STIMULANT USERS (includes Meth,
Cocaine, Ecstasy, stimulant pills, or others) age 21 – 45 to participate
in residential studies evaluating drug effects. Live on a research unit
at the NYS Psychiatric Institute for 22 days.
You can earn approximately $1479.
For more information (212) 543-6743.
Do you use uppers?
BIG FUN! SMALL BUCKS!
281 W 12th St @ 4th St. NYC 212-243-9041
Sun. $3.50 Screwdrivers & our famous Bloody Mary’s,
$2.50 Miller Lite Drafts & Bud Bottles
Mon. $4 Mojito’s all flavors Tues. $2 Margarita’s
CHEAP-EEZ COCKTAILS (except Fri. & Sat.) - Coors & Pabst Cans $3,
Rootbeer Floats $3, Sloe Gin Fizz $2, Tom Collins $3,
Whiskey Sours $3, Rum Lime Ricky $3
Neighborhood
Fusion!
“One of the 63 best bars
in NYC” — Time Out, 2009
Another anemic, flat, mediocre revival
“Youth” ages poorly, leaves Hyde Pierce unscathed
Photo by Joan Marcus
Mary Catherine Garrison and David Hyde Pierce
ACCENT ON YOUTH
Written by Samson Raphaelson
Directed by Daniel Sullivan
Open run
Samuel J. Friedman Theatre
261 West 47th Street
212-239-6200 or www.
ManhattanTheatreClub.com
THEATER
What was considered
almost screwball comedy
in 1934 doesn’t translate
well in 2009, and comes
across as nothing less than
a theatrical anachronism.
May 20 - 26, 2009 25
DEPRESSION BRUNCH
In-demand 74-year-old voice coach
and long-time Chelsea resident
Barbara Maier gets her due with a
ongoing series at Joe’s Pub. Maier
counts the Broadway cast of “Passing
Strange” and Deborah Harry among
her provocative and loyal clientele.
Now, she’s producing a new series of
“Depression Brunches” at Joe’s Pub.
The inaugural production’s theme is
“Idol Idle Idyll Worship — Sacred
and Profane.” Expect dynamic per-
formances from Tammy Faye Starlight, trans singer/pianist Our
Lady J and Tony nominee Justin Bond. To help cut costs, audience
members are encouraged to bring their own brown bag lunch (but
order Joe’s Pub booze). Noon, May 31, at Joe’s Pub, 425 Lafayette
Street (btwn. Astor & E. 4th St.). $15 cover, $12 minimum. Call
212-967-7555 or www.joespub.com.
ALICE NEEL
Widely regarded as one of the most important American
painters of the twentieth century, Alice Neel (1900-
1984) bucked the American avant-garde trend of the
1940s and 50s. Dubbing herself a “collector of souls,”
Neel created unique portraits of downtrodden neighbors,
poets, lovers and strangers. Two concurrent exhibitions
focus on a selection of figurative paintings, ranging in
date from the late 1940s to the early 1980s. Alice Neel:
Selected Works can be seen at David Zwirner (533 West
19th Street). Alice Neel: Nudes of the 1930s can be found
at Zwirner & Wirth (32 East 69th Street). May 14 – June
20. For more information, call 212-727-2070 or www.
davidzwirner.com.
TRUE WEST
The next time you sublet your NYC apart-
ment, make sure to ask whether the
temporary tenants plan to stage an Asian-
American production of “True West” while
you’re gone. That’s the lesson learned
from Curious Frog Theatre Company, who
invite you to their East Village sublet for
this unique take on Sam Shepard’s peren-
nial tale of two warring brothers. Odds
are the audience and cast will see the
play’s themes take on a heightened inten-
sity — thanks to the crowded confines of
this tiny common living space. Tues-Sun,
through May 31, 7:30p.m. at 181 Avenue
B, (btwn. 11th & 12th). $25 tickets can
be purchased at www.brownpapertickets.
com/event/63066. Wednesday shows are
$10, cash-only, if you bring a loaf of
regular-sized bread. For more information
on Curious Frog, www.curiousfrog.org.
THANK YOU FOR BEING A FRIEND
Fans of Bea Arthur still hit hard from her recent passing,
take heart — to the rescue come four guys who dare
to portray the “Golden Girls” we’ve come to love. Fun,
frothy and unauthorized, “Thank You For Being a Friend:
The Musical” is a sassy theatrical tribute to the sitcom
whose repeats keep the WE and Hallmark channels rel-
evant. With original music, parodies of Broadway songs
and zippy choreography, these gals go where our much-
loved sitcom friends never dared. Let’s just hope they’ve
created a worthy tribute; or the show’s rabid fans will
let their dissatisfaction be known with pitchforks and
torches. May 24th through July 12th, Sundays, 8:00p.m.
at The Kraine Theater; 85 East 4th Street (btwn. 2nd &
3rd Aves). $20. To purchase tickets, call 212-352-3101
or visit SpinCycleNYC.com.
LOWER EAST SIDE FESTIVAL
Now in its 14th year, the Lower East Side
Festival of the Arts marks a fitting start to
outdoor summer events in NYC. The eclectic,
free, three-day arts festival puts a welcome
accent on downtown talent — featuring over
100 performing arts organizations, local and
international celebrities, independent art-
ists, poets, puppeteers, filmmakers and oth-
ers. It’ll cost you nothing to see jazz legend
David Amram, talk show legend Joe Franklin
and a bevy of handpicked young talent des-
tined for legend status themselves. See them
now and years from now, say “I saw them
when.” Friday, May 22 through Sunday, May
24; in and around Theater for the New City
(155 1st Avenue). For the complete lineup
and schedule, visit www.theaterforthenew-
city.net.
Photo by Nic Musolino
John Gardner, left, as Saul Kimmer and Edward Chin-Lyn as Lee
Photo by Tom Johnson
Will song & dance cast a golden glow on these gals?
Courtesy David Zwirner, New York
George Arce, 1959 (Oil on canvas)
Photo by Max Ruby
Flamenco dancers take to the stage
Photo by BA Faiella
Barbara Maier, at
home in Chelsea
A
LIST
THE
COMPILED BY
SCOTT STIFFLER
Scott@thevi l l ager.com
A
R
T
THEATER
M
U
S
I
C
E
V
E
N
T
S
MUSICAL THEATER
26 May 20 - 26, 2009
APP FOR AUTH FOR
PEPIAN REAL ESTATE
LLC
App for Auth filed with SSNY
12/11/08. LLC Registered in
DE on 09/13/08. Off. Loc.:
NY Co. SSNY designated as
agent upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY to mail copy of pro-
cess to The LLC, c/o Carlo
Giovannetti, Esq., 520 Eighth
Av., 18th Flr., NY, NY 10018.
Purpose: Any lawful act or
activity.
Vil 4/15/09 – 5/20/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF S.C. DISTRIBUTOR
NY, LLC,
Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY
on 03/25/09. Off. Loc.: Bronx
County, SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail a
copy of process to: The LLC,
1569 Metropolitan Ave., #3F,
Bronx, NY 10462. Purpose: to
engage in any lawful act.
Vil 4/15/09 – 5/20/09
PHOENIX ELIZABETH
STREET LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/12/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to The LLC
632 East 11TH Street #9 New
York, NY 10009. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/15-5/20/09
BOXING 360 PROMO-
TIONS LLC
a domestic Limited Liability
Company (LLC) filed with the
Sec of State of NY on 2/26/09.
NY Office location: New York
County. SSNY is designated
as agent upon whom pro-
cess against the LLC may be
served. SSNY shall mail a
copy of any process against
the LLC served upon him/her
to Grimble & Loguidice, LLC,
217 Broadway, Ste. 304, NY,
NY 10007 General purposes.
Vil 4/15-5/20/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
(LLC)
Name: Adavin Realty LLC.
Articles of Organization filed
with NY Dept. of State on
11/18/08. Office location:
New York COUNTY. NY DOS
shall mail copy of process
to: c/o Martin Shaw, ESQ.
350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2816,
New York, NY 10118. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/15-5/20/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF EL CUARTETO LLC
Arts Of Org. filed with Secy.
Of State of NY (SSNY) on
03/20/09. Office location:
Bronx County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to The LLC, 2481
Valentine Ave., Bronx, NY
10458. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
Vil 4/15-5/20/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF WARNER REALTY
LLC
Arts Of Org. filed with Secy.
Of State of NY (SSNY) on
09/26/08. Office location:
Bronx County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to The LLC, Hunts
Point Co-Op Market, Bldg.
G-2, Bronx, NY 10474. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 4/15-5/20/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF THE CUTTY-
HUNK FUND II LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 3/27/09. Office
location: NY County. LLC
formed in DE on 3/25/09. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail pro-
cess to the principal business
addr.: 10 E. 53rd St., 29th
Fl., NY, NY 10022, Attn: Gen-
eral Counsel. DE addr. of LLC:
1209 Orange St., Wilming-
ton, DE 19801. Arts. of Org.
filed with DE Sec. of State,
Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE
19901. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
Vil 4/15-5/20/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF DEAM TALF
OPPORTUNITIES FUND
I L.P.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 3/27/09. Office
location: NY County. LP
formed in DE on 3/06/09.
NY Sec. of State designated
as agent of LP upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail pro-
cess to the principal business
addr.: c/o DB Advisors Hedge
Fund Group, 345 Park Ave.,
24th Fl., NY, NY 10154. DE
addr. of LP: c/o The Corpora-
tion Trust Co., 1209 Orange
St., Wilmington, DE 19801.
Name/addr. of genl. ptr. avail-
able from NY Sec. of State.
Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec.
of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover,
DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful
purposes.
Vil 4/15-5/20/09
CHSA1 LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/20/08. Office
in NY Co. SSNY desig. agent
of LLC upon whom process
may be served. SSNY shall
mail copy of process to 8976
Echo Ridge Dr., Las Vegas,
NV 89117. Purpose: Any law-
ful purpose. Principal busi-
ness location: 1760 2nd Ave.,
#2., NY, NY 10128.
Vil 4/22/09 – 5/27/09
NAME: DG HANOVER
11, L.L.C.
Art. of Org. Filed Sec. of State
of NY 03/10/09. Off. Loc.: New
York Co. SSNY designated as
agent upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY to mail copy of pro-
cess to THE LLC, 22 Beaver
Street, 2nd Floor, NY, NY
10004. Purpose: Any lawful
act or activity.
Vil 4/22/09 – 5/27/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF KDW RESTRUC-
TURING & LIQUIDATION
SERVICES LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/02/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 03/30/09. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail processtoc/oKelleyDrye
& Warren LLP, 101 Park Ave.,
NY, NY 10178. DE address of
LLC: Corporation Service Co.,
2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400,
Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts.
of Org. filed with State of DE,
Secy. Of State, Div. Of Corps.,
P.O. Box898, Dover, DE19903.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF DFR MSTOWER
DEVELOPER, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
03/30/09. Office location: NY
County. Principal office of
LLC: c/o The Durst Organiza-
tion Inc., One Bryant Park,
NY, NY 10036. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to the LLC at the
address of its principal office.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
58TH & 8TH NOTES, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 12/22/2008.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to C/O Julie Silcox
328 West 86TH Street APT
6B New York, NY 10024. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
PRESCIENCE CAPITAL,
LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY
Sec. of State (SSNY)
3/24/2009. Office in NY Co.
SSNY design. Agent of
LLC upon whom process
may be served. SSNY shall
mail copy of process to Mr
Eiad S Asbahi Prescience
Investment Group 228 Park
Avenue South #28130 New
York, NY 10003. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
PRESCIENCE PARTNERS,
L.P.
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/25/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Mr.
Eiad S. Asbahi 228 Park
Avenue South #28130 New
York, NY 10003. Purpose:
Any lawful activity. Last date
for dissolution: 12/31/2039.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
PHM SECURITY LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/2/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Alexander
Sotirov 200 E 33RD ST. #9J
New York, NY 10016. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
GOOD CATCH PRODUC-
TIONS LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/3/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Stephanie F.
Scott 520 E 72ND ST 4C New
York, NY 10021. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
RYAN CONSULTING
ENGINEER PLLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY)1/16/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Legal Solutions
For The Digital Age Martha
Chemas, Esq. 3423 Steinway
Street, #333 Long Island City,
NY 11101. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity. Last date for dis-
solution: 12/31/2109.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFI-
CATION OF WILLIAM
WEBER GROUP, L.L.C.
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
3/20/2009. Office location: NY
Co. LLC formed in Michigan
(MI) on 9/12/2006. SSNY des-
ignated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to The LLC 42690
Woodward Ave Ste 325
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304.
MI address of LLC: 42690
Woodward Ave Ste 325
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304.
Arts. Of Org. filed with MI
Secy. of State, PO Box 30054
Lansing, MI 48909. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF VALLUGA CON-
SULTING LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
2/20/2009. Office location: NY
Co. LLC formed in Delaware
(DE) on 2/3/2009. SSNY des-
ignated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to The LLC 155 W
68th St. Apt. 1531 NY, NY
10023. DE address of LLC:
16192 Coastal Highway
Lewes, DE 19958. Arts. Of
Org. filed with DE Secy. of
State, PO Box 898 Dover, DE
19903. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF HAPPY MONKEY
PRODUCTIONS LLC
Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
9/12/08. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated
as agent of LLC for service
of process. SSNY shall mail
process to: 50 Murray St.
#1210, NY, NY 10007. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF B&M REALTY OF
NEW YORK I, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
4/2/09. Office location: NY
Co. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail
process to: The LLC, 68 Bri-
arbrook Dr., Briarcliff Manor,
NY 10510. Registered agent:
Bobby Wang, 68 Briarbrook
Dr., Briarcliff Manor, NY
10510 Purpose: any lawful
activities.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF AMICA, LLC
Authority filed with NY
Dept. of State on 12/30/08.
NYS fictitious name: Amica
Studios, LLC. Office loca-
tion: NY County. Princ. bus.
addr.: 124 Greene St., NY, NY
10012. LLC formed in DE on
12/17/08. NY Sec. of State
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served and shall
mail process to: c/o CT Cor-
poration System, 111 8th
Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agt.
upon whom process may be
served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Arts. of Org. filed with
DE Sec. of State, Dover, DE
19901. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF GOLDPERL, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
3/25/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: c/o Leslie Perlman,
200 E. 62nd St., Apt. 19D,
NY, NY 10065. Purpose: any
lawful activity.
Vil 4/22-5/27/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF CLIMATEONE, LLC
Articles of Organization filed
with Secretary of State of
New York (SSNY) on 02/18/09.
Office location: NY County.
SSNY has been designated
as an agent upon whom pro-
cess against the LLC may be
served. The address to which
SSNY shall mail a copy of
any process against the LLC
is to: ClimateOne, 307 east
18th st. Suite 3-B, New York,
New York, 10003. Purpose:
To engage in any lawful act
or activity.
Vil 4/29 – 6/3/09
LIMA SKY LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 12/11/2008.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Igor Pusenjak
447 W. 22ND ST. #3 New
York, NY 10011. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
EVEN CONCEPTS LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/25/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to The LLC
2297 7TH Avenue Apartment
2 New York, NY 10030. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
BUHLER LAW PLLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/27/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to The PLLC
11 Broadway, Suite 615 New
York, NY 10004. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF W & E SEAFOOD
WHOLESALE LLC
Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec.
Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
03/18/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Jeung Hing Lam, 47
Essex St., NY, NY 10002. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFI-
CATION OF GRAND
CENTRAL CAPITAL MAN-
AGEMENT, LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
Of State of NY (SSNY) on
06/12/08. LLC formed in DE
on 06/03/08. Office location:
NY County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it
may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to: The LLC, 230
Park Ave., Ste., 539, NY, NY
10169. DE address of LLC:
NRAI, 160 Greentree Dr., Ste.
101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts
of Org. filed with DE Secy of
State, 401 Federal St, Dover
DE 19901. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF RZ RESTAURANT
GROUP LLC
Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of
State (SSNY) 3/11/09. Office
location: NY County. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail copy of process to c/o
Michael Russell, 401 E. 34th
St., Apt. 20A, NY, NY 10016.
Purpose: any lawful activi-
ties.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF NEW YORK INVES-
TORS COUNCIL, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/09/09. Office location: NY
County. Principal office of
LLC: 317 Madison Ave., Ste.
1400, NY, NY 10017. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to Corporation
Service Co., 80 State St.,
Albany, NY 12207-2543. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF AMANDA ROSS LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/13/09. Office location: NY
County. Principal office of
LLC: 833 Madison Ave., NY,
NY 10021. SSNY designated
as agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to Attn: Amanda Ross
at the principal office of the
LLC. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF STONE KEY
GROUP LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 4/7/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. LLC formed
in DE on 9/23/08. NY Sec.
of State designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served
and shall mail process to: CT
Corporation System, 111 8th
Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agt.
upon whom process may be
served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Arts. of Form. filed
with DE Sec. of State, 401
Federal St., Dover, DE 19901.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF CANTILLON
INTERNATIONAL EQUITY
L.P.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 2/23/09. Office
location: NY County. LP
formed in DE on 2/19/09. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LP upon whom pro-
cess against it may be served
and shall mail process to the
principal business addr. of
the LP: c/o Cantillon GP LLC,
40 W. 57th St., 24th Fl., NY,
NY 10019. DE addr. of LP: c/o
The Corporation Trust Co.,
1209 Orange St., Wilming-
ton, DE 19801. Name/addr. of
genl. ptr. available from NY
Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed
with DE Sec. of State, 401
Federal St., Dover, DE 19901.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF TF CORNERSTONE
(CHLP GP) L.L.C.
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
4/7/09. Office location: NY
County. Principal business
location: 290 Park Avenue
South, 14th Fl., NY, NY 10010.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to:
290 Park Avenue South, 14th
Fl., NY, NY 10010, Attn: Gen-
eral Counsel. Purpose: any
lawful activity.
Vil 4/29-6/3/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF SUPREME REALTY
MANAGEMENT, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Sect’y
of State of NY (SSNY) on
4/15/2009. Office location,
County of New York. The
street address is: none. SSNY
has been designated as
agent of the LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Cilmi & Associates,
PLLC, 39 Broadway, 12th
Floor, New York, NY 10006.
Purpose: any lawful act.
Vil 5/6 – 6/10/09
PARK LAW FIRM PLLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 12/22/2008.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to THE PLLC 350
Fifth Avenue, Suite 5715 New
York, NY 10118. Purpose: Any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
ARES GROUP PART-
NERS LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/11/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to David Sajous
150 East 83RD Street #1B
New York, NY 10028. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
BLARGWARE LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/18/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Mark Schmit 36
ST. Mark’s Place Apt. 18 New
York, NY 10033. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
PRESCIENCE INVEST-
MENT GROUP, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/14/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Mr. Eiad
S. Asbahi 228 Park Avenue
South #28130 New York, NY
10003. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF ESTCO LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
1/24/2006. Office location: NY
Co. LLC formed in Delaware
(DE) on 1/23/1997 SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to The LLC 445
Park Avenue Ste 900 NY, NY
10022. Address of Principal
office: 445 Park Avenue Ste
900 NY, NY 10022 Arts. Of
Org. filed with DE Secy. of
State, P.O. Box 898, Dover,
DE 19908. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF SULLIVAN
DEBT OPPORTUNITY
FUND GP, LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
03/26/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 08/11/08. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to the LLC, 825
Third Ave., 37th Fl., NY, NY
10022. DE address of LLC:
c/o Corporation Service Co.,
2711 Centerville Rd., Ste.
400, Wilmington, DE 19801.
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of the State of DE,
John G. Townsend Bldg., 401
Federal St., Ste. 3, Dover, DE
19901. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF ENDURA PROPER-
TIES LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/17/09. Office location: NY
County. Principal office of
LLC: 120 11th Ave., 5th Fl.,
NY, NY 10011. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to c/o Carter Ledyard
& Milburn LLP, Attn: Mary
Beth Werner Lee, Esq., 2 Wall
St., NY, NY 10005. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF WIN TEMP, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/16/09. Office location: NY
County. Principal office of
LLC: the LLC, Attn: President,
122 E. 42nd St., NY, NY 10168.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served.
SSNY shall mail process to
the LLC at the address of its
principal office. Purpose: Any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
PUBLI C NOTI CES
May 20 - 26, 2009 27
dogs got denied registration or the owners’
paperwork was not accepted. NYCHA lied
and we must demand an inclusive and effec-
tive policy.
Angel R. Seda
Lack of communication
To The Editor:
Re “Have hookah, will travel” (Mixed
Use, May 6):
Thank you for your Mixed Use mention
of State Liquor Authority/New York City
licensing enforcement. To clarify: The com-
munity board does not investigate or enforce;
we work with enforcement agencies.
The S.L.A. cannot enforce at locations
that do not have a license, and therefore can-
not enforce after a license has been cancelled
or revoked. The problem is communication
breakdown between the S.L.A. and New
York Police Department.
After a meeting following the incident
described in Mixed Use, this communication
problem seemed to be rectified in Community
Board 3. However, since then, we have lost
our cabaret units at the Ninth Precinct, so the
future of this communication is in danger.
For instance, in the Seventh Precinct, we
recently lost both the commanding officer
and the special operations lieutenant. Is
there an officer in charge of local S.L.A.
matters? Has anyone updated contact infor-
mation with the S.L.A.?
With the loss of our cabaret units, we
need to be even more concerned about this
problem, the burden on the community
boards and the impact on the community.
Susan Stetzer
Stetzer is district manager, Community
Board 3
Obit did ‘Barnacle’ right
To The Editor:
Re “‘Barnacle Bill,’ the last sailor of
Tompkins Square, dies at 44” (obituary,
May 13):
A wonderful, loving and true obituary.
The photo of Barnacle Bill is amazing and
goes right to the heart of this original, sweet-
natured man.
Suzanne Stout
‘Armed thug’ goes free
To The Editor:
Re “Delivery robbery” (police blotter,
May 13):
Your police blotter refers to a robber
who was armed with a gun being released
on $2,000 bail. Please follow this case, and
name the judge who released the accused.
Information may help prevent someone
dying at the end of this thug’s weapon.
Tim Ferguson
Violence isn’t funny
To The Editor:
The headlines in the police blotter in the
May 13 issue were in poor taste. As a public-
health nurse and feminist, I was particularly
disturbed by the report on domestic violence
titled, “Domestic punch-up.” Domestic vio-
lence is epidemic in this country and glob-
ally. Domestic violence is the leading cause
of injury to women in the U.S., with an esti-
mated 4,000 women killed each year. There
is nothing funny about intimacy violence.

Barbara Glickstein
Editor’s note: The headline “Domestic
punch-up” was not intended to be funny,
but factual. However, a better word than
“punch-up” could have been used, since
“punch-up” indicates a fistfight, as opposed
to one person striking another. The Villager
would not, and does not, make light of
domestic violence.
Motorists monopolized mic
To The Editor:
Re “Traffic changes are driving them
crazy on Lower East Side” (news article,
May 6):
I had the misfortune to attend the May 4
forum on traffic and parking at P.S. 137.
Albert Amateau accurately reported what
occurred, but omitted the fact that City
Councilmember Alan Gerson permitted the
first, second and fourth speakers from the
audience to collectively consume some 60
minutes of time, instead of the three-minute-
per-speaker time limit Gerson had repeat-
edly announced beforehand.
These speakers self-righteously and hypo-
critically denounced bike lanes and bicyclists
while ignoring their own motoring habits,
which pollute the air I breathe. If they are
so concerned with lack of space and con-
gestion, let them refrain from driving their
polluting cars.
Michael Gottlieb
E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words
in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to
212-229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters
to the Editor, 145 Sixth Ave., ground floor,
NY, NY 10013. Please include phone num-
ber for confirmation purposes. The Villager
reserves the right to edit letters for space,
grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does
not publish anonymous letters.
New Downtown Community Center and P.S. 234 home locations.
Private pool.
Outdoor ball felds.
Field sports, karate, computers, arts, crafts, movement, more!
Experienced administrators, teachers and childcare professionals.
Transportation below 23rd Street with many pick-up locations.
Generous counselor-to-camper ratio.
K through 6 program.
Nature Camp option for grades 5 to 8.
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
f
Why send your child on a long, hot bus ride
when all you need is right here?
Downtown
Day Camp
212-766-1104 x250
www.DowntownDayCamp.com
Camp is flling up fast —call today!
Available sessions
June 29 through August 14
June 29 through July 24
July 27 through August 14
August 17 through August 21*
Open house: 6 pm
April 7 and 28
120 Warren St.
* special add-on week, see
registration form for details
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Continued from page 18
was slated to come down in June. Wearing his
trademark Vietnamese rice-paddy hat as he
worked the watering hole’s door, Trigger said
he was interested in what the new building’s
commercial tenant would be. Personally, the
healthy-living former punk impresario said he
favors a Whole Foods or even a Trader Joe’s.
Jolene Travis, a Cooper Union spokesperson,
said that by this summer the school will have
completely moved into its new academic build-
ing at 41 Cooper Square, for which a Sept.
15 ribbon-cutting ceremony is planned. She
referred further questions on the Engineering
Building to the developer, Edward J. Minskoff
Equities, which will have a long-term lease on
the site. Minskoff C.F.O. Ben McGrath said,
“We are not commencing demolition next
month — that’s a certainty. Cooper Union is
still in the building. ... Obviously, the economy
has an impact on the decision, but we’re
still wrestling with what to do and when to
do it.” As for ground-floor commercial uses,
McGrath said their first priority will be a
tenant for the office building, and that com-
mercial uses would follow. On the existing
building’s last commercial tenant, McGrath
echoed a common sentiment when he said,
“I was always perplexed why there were two
Starbucks so close to each other.” The new
building’s planned design — resembling a
giant paperweight of sorts — was shaped by a
rezoning process about seven years ago heavily
influenced by community input. “Everything is
going to unfold the way the public expects it
to,” McGrath assured.
SHOW HIM THE MONEY: Ray Alvarez
unfortunately did not look pleased when we
saw him recently after we reported that a
Social Security Administration spokesperson
had told us the 76-year-old Avenue A egg
cream maestro could only collect retroactive
Social Security benefits going back six months.
“I was expecting 11 years,” Ray said quietly,
drying his hands on a towel. “I wait long time.”
... But then, shifting gears, he quickly added,
“I really don’t care about how much they go
back — I want my benefits every month, so I
can retire. I’m not here to get rich. ... I lost that
Navy ID, and Immigration has it. And it will
take 10 to 22 months to get a copy of it.”
VIVA LOISAIDA! Lower East Side pho-
tographer Marlis Momber is ticked off that
the Loisaida Festival on Sun., May 24, didn’t
get permission to run the length of Loisaida
Ave., that is the entire Avenue C all the way
to Houston St., and instead won’t go south
of Sixth St. As a result, Momber is going to
stage her own festival, south of Sixth St., out-
side Adelia, her favorite, old-school Puerto
Rican restaurant. She won’t have a permit
and fully expects to be arrested. She would
not divulge details of her own event, just say-
ing it will be “visual and unique.”
SCOOPY’S NOTEBOOK
Continued from page 9
28 May 20 - 26, 2009
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF ETF CONSULTING
GROUP LLC
Art. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
4/14/09. Office Location: New
York County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of the LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
to: c/o The LLC, 140 Charles
St., 14E, New York, NY
10014, Attn: Robert Jaeger
and Daniel Jaeger. Purpose:
To engage in any lawful act
or activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
GOLDEN DOORWAYS
LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/21/09.
Office in NY Co. SSNY desig.
agent of LLC upon whom
process may be served.
SSNY shall mail copy of pro-
cess to 51 MacDougal St.,
Ste 103, NY, NY 10012, which
is also the principal business
location. Purpose: Any law-
ful purpose.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF STEWARTSOFT, LLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
03/10/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY has been des-
ignated as an agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the LLC is to: Cor-
poration Service Company,
80 State Street, Albany, NY
12207. Purpose: To engage in
any lawful act or activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF THE M. A. SULLIVAN
GROUP LLC
Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of
State (SSNY) 4/13/09. Office
location: NY County. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail copy of process to M. A.
Sullivan, 155 E 4 St., NY, NY
10009. Purpose: any lawful
activities.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF D. E. SHAW
REAL ESTATE PORTFO-
LIOS 12, L.L.C.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 3/2/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. LLC formed
in DE on 10/23/07. NY Sec.
of State designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served
and shall mail process to:
D. E. Shaw & Co., L.P., 120
W. 45th St., 39th Fl., NY,
NY 10036, Attn: John Liftin,
General Counsel, regd. agt.
upon whom process may be
served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Arts. of Org. filed with
DE Sec. of State, 401 Fed-
eral St., Dover, DE 19901. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF D. E. SHAW
REAL ESTATE PORTFO-
LIOS 19, L.L.C.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 3/2/09. Office
location: NY County. LLC
formed in DE on 3/3/07. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail pro-
cess to: D. E. Shaw & Co.,
L.P., 120 W. 45th St., 39th
Fl., NY, NY 10036, Attn: John
Liftin, General Counsel, regd.
agt. upon whom process
may be served. DE addr. of
LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilm-
ington, DE 19801. Arts. of
Org. filed with DE Sec. of
State, 401 Federal St., Dover,
DE 19901. Purpose: any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF KURTZMAN
CARSON CONSUL-
TANTS, LLC.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 4/16/09. Office
location: NY County. Princ.
bus. addr.: 2335 Alaska Ave.,
El Segundo, CA 90245. LLC
formed in DE on 5/24/01. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served and shall mail process
to: CT Corporation System,
111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011.
DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange
St., Wilmington, DE 19801.
Arts. of Org. filed with DE
Sec. of State, 401 Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all
lawful purposes.
Vil 5/6-6/10/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a license, #TBA has been
applied for by Veselka Bow-
ery, LLC to sell beer, wine and
liquor at retail in a restaurant.
For on premises consump-
tion under the ABC law at 9
east 1st Street NY, NY 10003.
Vil 5/13/09 & 5/20/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a Liquor License, Serial
#1224570 has been applied
for by the undersigned to sell
liquor under the Alcoholic
Beverage Control Law at 111
South Street, New York City,
NY 10038 for on-premises
consumption. L & J Market-
place Inc. d/b/a Fish Market
Restaurant.
Vil 5/13/09 & 5/20/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a license, #1224104
has been applied for by the
undersigned to sell beer and
wine at retail in a restaurant
under the Alcoholic Bever-
age Control Law at 35 East
Broadway, 2nd Floor, New
York, NY 10002 for on-prem-
ises consumption. TYT EAST
BROADWAY INC
Vil 5/13/09 & 5/20/09
GREAT CATERERS LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/19/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to THE LLC 50
West 34TH Street, 3B7 New
York, NY 10001. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
PARK AVENUE PSY-
CHOLOGY PLLC
Articles of Org. filed NY
Sec. of State (SSNY)
3/31/2009. Office in NY Co.
SSNY design. Agent of
LLC upon whom process
may be served. SSNY shall
mail copy of process to Dr
Sedighe Flugelman 445 Park
Ave 10TH FL New York, NY
10022. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
MY NYC LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/17/2007.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to The LLC
1 Maiden Lane 5Th Flr NY,
NY 10038. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity. Registered Agent:
Spiegel & Utrera, PA PC 1
Maiden Lane 5Th Flr NY, NY
10038.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NEW YORK HALLELU-
JAH COMPANY LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/26/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to The LLC 2173
Third Ave #5 NY, NY 10035.
Purpose: Any lawful activ-
ity. Registered Agent: Kyoko
Uchiki 2173 Third Ave #5 NY,
NY 10035.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
BACKLIT PICTURES LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/12/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Guillermo
Suescum 209 East 25TH
Street, STE 3A New York, NY
10010-3022. Purpose: Any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF HARMONY FILMS,
LLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
02/23/09. Office location:
NY County. SSNY has been
designated as an agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the LLC is to: Har-
mony Films, 165 W. 18th
St., 8C New York, NY 10011.
Purpose: To engage in any
lawful act or activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF NAMYAC PROPER-
TIES LLC
Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec.
Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
10/24/07. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail
process to: Raymond Fares
Jr., 130 E. 72nd St., NY, NY
10021-4233. Purpose: any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF RAW US LLC
Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy.
Of State of NY (SSNY) on
11/18/08. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated
as agent of LLC for service
of process. SSNY shall
mail process to: 875 Ave. of
Americas #501, New York,
NY 10001. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF INDIGGO TWINS LLC
Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
2/13/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated
as agent of LLC for service
of process. SSNY shall mail
process to: 236 E.74 St., #3R,
New York, NY 10021. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF MANHATTAN RESTO-
RATIONS LLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
07/11/08. Office location:
NY County. SSNY has been
designated as an agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the LLC is to: The
LLC, 154 Orchard Street, #3,
New York, NY 10002. Pur-
pose: To engage in any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF BLACKSTONE
REAL ESTATE SPECIAL
SITUATIONS (ALBERTA)
II GP L.P.
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 4/8/09. Office
location: NY County. LP
formed in DE on 4/1/09. NY
Sec. of State designated as
agent of LP upon whom pro-
cess against it may be served
and shall mail process to the
principal business addr. of
the LP: c/o The Blackstone
Group L.P., 345 Park Ave.,
NY, NY 10154. Regd. agt.
upon whom process may
be served: CT Corporation
System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY
10011. DE addr. of LP: c/o The
Corporation Trust Co., 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Name/addr. of genl.
ptr. available from NY Sec. of
State. Cert. of LP filed with DE
Sec. of State, 401 Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF EXTRA SPACE
PROPERTIES THIRTY
SIX LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 4/27/09. Office
location: NY County. Princ.
bus. addr.: 2795 E. Cotton-
wood Pkwy. #400, Salt Lake
City, UT 84121. LLC formed
in DE on 4/23/09. NY Sec.
of State designated as agent
of LLC upon whom process
against it may be served and
shall mail process to: c/o CT
Corporation System, 111 8th
Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agt.
upon whom process may be
served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Arts. of Org. filed with
DE Sec. of State, 401 Fed-
eral St., Dover, DE 19901. Pur-
pose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF ATLANTIC UKUS, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
3/16/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Jocelyn White, 273
W. 12th St., NY, NY 10014.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF TEXTILES SOURCING
AND SERVICES LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
10/15/08. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: 1410 Broadway, 24th
Fl., NY, NY 10018. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF BOTSARIS MORRIS
REALTY LLC AMENDED
TO BOTSARIS MORRIS
REALTY GROUP, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
4/3/09. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC upon whom
process against it may be
served. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: Attn: Guy Morris, 358
Fifth Avenue, NY, NY 10001.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/13-6/17/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
that a license, #1225341 has
been applied for by Rolo
Rest, LLC to sell beer, wine
and liquor at retail in a res-
taurant. For on premises
consumption under the ABC
Law at 32 Avenue A NY, NY
10009.
Vil 5/20/09 & 5/27/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN
That a license, #1225514
has been applied for by the
undersigned to sell beer,
liquor and/or wine at retail
in restaurant / bar under the
Alcohol Beverage Control
Law at 155 8th Avenue, New
York, NY 10011 for on-prem-
ises consumption. Khanda-
kar R Amin d/b/a Bombay
Bar & Grill.
Vil 5/20/09 & 5/27/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF NB ALTERNA-
TIVES HOLDINGS LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
04/27/09. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in Dela-
ware (DE) on 02/19/09. Prin-
cipal office of LLC: 605 3rd
Ave., NY, NY 10158. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served. SSNY shall
mail process to c/o Corpora-
tion Service Co. (CSC), 80
State St., Albany, NY 12207-
2543. DE address of LLC:
c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville
Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington,
DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed
with Secy. Jeffrey W. Bullock,
Div. of Corps., P.O. Box 898,
Dover, DE 19903. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
XIV RIVER CONSULT-
ING LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 2/5/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to The LLC
200 Riverside Blvd #10A New
York, NY 10069. Purpose: Any
lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
TEN90 SOLUTIONS, LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 3/16/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to C/O David
Schanoes 150 Thompson
Street, Apt. 3C New York, NY
10012. Purpose: Any lawful
activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
TRIPLE T 143 HOLDINGS
LLC
Articles of Org. filed NY Sec.
of State (SSNY) 4/24/2009.
Office in NY Co. SSNY
design. Agent of LLC upon
whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Mark Friedland-
er Esq 15 Maiden Lane Suite
2000 New York, NY 10038.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
GARY G. VENTER, FCAS,
CERA, ASA, MAAA, LLC
Company Articles of Org.
filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY)
3/12/2009. Office in NY Co.
SSNY design. Agent of LLC
upon whom process may be
served. SSNY shall mail copy
of process to Gary Venter 5
West 91ST Street Suite 6E
New York, NY 10024. Pur-
pose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
TULLY’S BAKERY LLC
Company Articles of Org.
filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY)
4/17/2009. Office in NY Co.
SSNY design. Agent of LLC
upon whom process may
be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to Helen
Tully Lewis 201 West 11TH
Street, APT #3G New York,
NY 10014. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF AQUA ROSA
ADVISORS, LLC
Authority filed with Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
2/25/2009. Office location: NY
Co. LLC formed in Delaware
(DE) on 2/17/2009. SSNY des-
ignated as /agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to Oded Lev-Ari 327
E 12TH Street-Ground Floor
NY, NY 10003. DE address of
LLC: 2711 Centerville Road
Suite 400 Wilmington, DE
19808. Arts. Of Org. filed with
DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal
ST, Suite 3 Dover, DE 19901.
Purpose: any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF LITTLE APPLES PHO-
TOGRAPHY, LLC
Articles of Organization
filed with Secretary of State
of New York (SSNY) on
04/10/09. Office location:
NY County. SSNY has been
designated as an agent upon
whom process against the
LLC may be served. The
address to which SSNY shall
mail a copy of any process
against the LLC is to: Little
Apples Photography, 160
Riverside Blvd., Apt 32A New
York, NY 10069. Purpose:
To engage in any lawful act
or activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF 143 PROPERTIES LLC
Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy.
of State of NY (SSNY) on
12/23/04. Office location: NY
County. SSNY designated as
agent of LLC for service of
process. SSNY shall mail pro-
cess to: 875 Ave. of Americas
#501, New York, NY 10001.
Present name of LLC: 143
Development Partners, LLC.
Purpose: Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF GO PRETTY LLC
Art. of Org. filed w/ Secy. Of
State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/09.
Office location: NY County.
SSNY designated as agent
of LLC for service of process.
SSNY shall mail process to:
888C 8th Ave. #106, New
York, NY 10019. Purpose:
Any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
247 REALTY ASSOCI-
ATES LLC
Arts of Org filed with NY Sec
of State (SSNY) on 02/26/08.
Office: NY County. SSNY
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process may
be served. SSNY shall mail
copy of process to: c/o Redi
Management Corp., 4 Wash-
ington Ave. South, Lawrence,
NY 11559. Purpose: Any law-
ful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF REALM PART-
NERS FUND LP
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 5/5/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. Princ. bus.
addr.: 390 Park Ave., 16th Fl.,
NY, NY 10022. LP formed in
DE on 1/22/09. NY Sec. of
State designated as agent
of LP upon whom process
against it may be served and
shall mail process to: c/o CT
Corporation System, 111 8th
Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agt.
upon whom process may be
served. DE addr. of LP: 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Name/addr. of genl.
ptr. available from NY Sec. of
State. Cert. of LP filed with DE
Sec. of State, 401 Federal St.,
Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NAME OF LLC: MY FAIR
ROSES, LLC
Arts. of Org. filed with NY
Dept. of State: 4/24/09. Office
loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State
designated agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served and shall
mail process to: c/o Business
Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste.
101, Albany, NY 12205, regd.
agt. upon whom process
may be served. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
PUBLI C NOTI CES
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to law, that the NYC
Department of Consumer Affairs will hold a public
hearing on Wednesday, May 27, 2009, at 2:00 p.m. at
66 John Street, 11th floor, on the petition from Sounds
of Cuba, Inc., to continue, maintain, and operate an
unenclosed sidewalk café at 405 West 14th Street, in
the Borough of Manhattan, for a term of two years.
Request for copies of the proposed Revocable Consent
Agreement may be obtained by submitting a request
to: Dept. of Consumer Affairs, 42 Broadway, New York,
NY 10004, Attention: Foil Officer.
Vil 5/13/09 & 5/20/09
May 20 - 26, 2009 29
BY RITA WU
The New York Sun bowed out with
its last issue on Sept. 30 of last year. But
reminders of the defunct daily still dot
Downtown’s landscape in the form of
newspaper boxes, such as at Eighth Ave.
south of 14th St., on Charles St. near
Greenwich St., on LaGuardia Place near
Bleecker St. and on Broome St. in Soho, to
name a few. More than half a year has gone
by since the paper folded, yet its yellow
boxes still are strewn about the streets.
The news boxes are considered private
property owned by the publication, as
far as the Department of Transportation,
which regulates such matters, is con-
cerned. The Sun is obligated to inform
D.O.T. of any changes — such as stopping
publication and going out of business —
which permits D.O.T. to get rid of the
boxes. However, that the news boxes are
abandoned is not enough in and of itself to
get them disposed of — and, in fact, news
boxes in this state are not even considered
a violation, according to D.O.T.
D.O.T. is only allowed to remove aban-
doned news boxes and news racks in cer-
tain situations: “serious grounds,” such as
posing a safety hazard; construction; if the
agency has been notified by the owner to
do so; if the owner has not registered with
D.O.T.; or if proof is provided through
“research, calls or e-mails,” that the publi-
cation is not functioning.
The Sun is clearly inoperative. A quick
Internet search brought up the New York
Sun’s Web site and a parting note from its
editor, Seth Lipsky, last September: “It is my
duty to report today that Ira Stoll and I and
our partners have concluded that the Sun
will cease publication.” A Wikipedia entry
on the paper states: “The paper published its
last edition on 2008-09-30 amidst a historic
week of financial losses in the American
economy.” Apparently this information must
not be enough proof for D.O.T.
Owners are expected to certify to D.O.T.
every four months that they are making their
“best efforts” to maintain the appearance of
their news boxes. They are also obligated to
annually register their news boxes by Nov. 1.
According to D.O.T., the newspaper sent a
certificate of maintenance for its news boxes
on Sept. 15, 2008. There hasn’t been any
word since then. According to a department
spokesperson, they have received “no official
notification” from the paper regarding its
folding.
Stoll, the Sun’s former vice president
and managing editor, last week said The
Villager could lend a hand by telling the
Sun where its news boxes are, so they can
be collected.
“If you can tell us the location or loca-
tions of the racks you are concerned about,
please let us know, and we’ll pass word
along to the people we sold the racks to, so
that they get picked up,” he said.
APTS
FOR RENT!
Studios $2,000
1 bdrms $2,800
Conv. $3,200
189 Sullivan Street
K V N Y
Call Today:
(212) 377-5757
www.KVNY.com
Holiday Hams, Roast Turkey, Smoked Sausage
Custom Cut Meats, Cheese, Bread, Babka, Strudel, Angel Wings
We Make Wonderful Party Platters!
139 2nd Ave., New York, NY 10003 (Btw. St. Marks & E. 9th St.)
Tel. 212.228.5590 / Fax. 212.979.6593
eastvillagemeats@hotmail.com
Mon-Sat: 8am-6pm
Fri: 8am-7pm
Sun: closed
The Finest Home-Made, American & European Style Food!
COMMUNITY
BUSINESS
SECTION
Advertise
Your
Business
Here It’s
Affordable
and Delivers
Results!
Call Allison @
646-452-2485
filmmaking
on the
edge
,'/%+/.%=@CD■NNN%GKFNE=@CD=<JK%FI>
Sponsors: The Phoenix, Provincetown Banner, HBO, Bacardi, Crown & Anchor,
Art House, Mass. Cultural Council, Visitors Service Bureau
Sun never sets on defunct New York Sun news boxes
Villager photo by Lincoln Anderson
A New York Sun news box covered with stickers on Broome St. in Soho.
30 May 20 - 26, 2009
YMCA and the Virgin Megastore to the
vacant Balducci’s building at 14th St. and
Eighth Ave.
As a stopgap, D.O.E. decided on May 4 to
cancel the incoming class of pre-K children to
Greenwich Village and East Village schools in
order to make room for kindergarten students.
But the potential space at Greenwich House,
27 Barrow St., is intended to save pre-K and
provide kindergarten space. Three classes of
pre-K children, with gym or playroom access,
would go into 27 Barrow St., which would
free classroom space at P.S. 41/3 for most of
the students on the kindergarten waiting list,
according to John White, the D.O.E. official at
the May 14 meeting. White added that parents
on the waiting list who had applied for gifted
and talented kindergarten classes at NEST on
the Lower East Side and the Anderson School
on the Upper West Side would be receiving
offers this week. At least a few Village parents
are expected to send their children to those
schools, he said.
In addition, a “small number” of parents
might chose to send their children to kinder-
gartens at P.S. 33 on Ninth Ave. and W. 26th
St. or to P.S. 11 on W. 21st St. between Eighth
and Ninth Aves., White said.
“It’s safe to say the waiting list is cleared for
now,” he said, “But it’s not something we can
do year after year.”
The longer-term solution would come when
the Greenwich Village Middle School, currently
in P.S. 3 on Hudson St., has a new stand-alone
home, White indicated.
“We are committed to moving it by the fall
of 2010,” White said of the middle school. He
did not specify the location, but said the new
middle school would have 10 full-size rooms,
including cluster rooms for science and art.
Moreover, a new location is being consid-
ered for the Clinton Middle School for Writers
and Artists now located in the P.S. 11 building.
Moving out the Clinton Middle School
“would add considerable space in P.S. 11,”
White said.
Quinn said the Department of Education
and elected officials still hope for school space
in the New York State-owned building at 75
Morton St., even though getting the build-
ing’s seventh floor does not appear as likely
as it did before. The elected officials’ educa-
tion task force now hopes the state will make
space available for elementary or middle school
classes on the second floor of 75 Morton St.,
Quinn said.
“I’m glad we’ve pulled something togeth-
er for most people,” said Assemblymember
Deborah Glick. “But I’m disappointed at the
response of Mayor Bloomberg and D.O.E. to
the red flag about overcrowding raised two
years ago, not only in the Village but on the
Upper East Side.
“This has not been a great planning pro-
cess,” Glick said. “I hope this is a real change,
not merely an election-year offensive.”
Overcrowding has severely affected seven
zoned elementary schools on the Upper East
Side, where there were 139 zoned children on
a kindergarten waiting list, White said. But he
said the list was dwindling.
“We dropped 20 from that waiting list last
week,” he said. White said Councilmembers
Jessica Lappin and Dan Garodnick are help-
ing look for classroom space on the Upper
East Side, and D.O.E. is currently negoti-
ating for the Our Lady of Good Counsel
School on E. 91st St.
“It may look like it’s just about numbers
but it’s about your child,” said White about
the efforts to find school space to relieve over-
crowding.
Parents at the meeting were skeptical about
whether the Village and the Upper East Side
would have enough classroom seats to accom-
modate zoned kindergarten students.
Cecelia Leong, a parent at P.S. 183 on the
Upper East Side, doubted that offers of seats
in gifted and talented kindergarten programs
would reduce the school’s waiting list.
“Last year P.S. 183 sent three children to
gifted and talented and two of them returned,”
she recalled.
Leonie Haimson, a P.S. 41 parent and
president of Class Size Matters, said D.O.E.
has reneged on a promise to reduce the size of
early-education classes.
“We’re moving backwards,” Haimson said.
“Do you think mayoral control is working?”
asked the father of a child at P.S. 41 in the
Village. The audience shouted, “No.”
The New York State Legislature is sched-
uled to vote in June whether to renew
the 2002 school governance law that gave
authority to Mayor Bloomberg. Under the
law, the New York City Board of Education
was replaced by the Panel for Educational
Policy, to which the mayor appoints eight
of the 13 members. Parents elect the
Community Education Councils for each of
32 districts to consult with D.O.E., but the
law does not specify how the department
responds to suggestions.
However, a parent advocacy group, the
Parent Commission of School Governance and
Mayoral Control, is calling for a 15-member
panel with the largest group, of six parent rep-
resentatives, elected by the district Community
Education Councils, three members appointed
by the mayor, one by the public advocate and
one by the City Council. Four members would
be selected by the rest of the board to provide
expertise in specific policy areas.
Manhattan Borough President Scott
Stringer has suggested that the Community
Education Councils, with training and tech-
nical support provided by the five borough
presidents, take part in what he is dubbing
a Uniform Parental Engagement Procedure,
or UPEP, with timelines for consultation and
review, involving public hearings and requiring
a D.O.E. response.
The final decision on Uniform Parental
Engagement Procedures would come from the
schools chancellor and the mayor through the
Panel for Educational Policy as it is currently
configured, with the mayor having eight of 13
Barrow St., not Balducci’s, is likely for pre-K’ers
Villager photos by J.B. Nicholas
More than 300 local parents packed the meeting on overcrowding last Thursday.
Continued from page 1
The kindergarten wait list
at P.S. 41 and P.S. 3 was
79 at last week’s end.
May 20 - 26, 2009 31
DEADLINE WEDNESDAY 5:00PM MAIL 145 SIXTH AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL 646-452-2485 FAX 212.229.2790
VILLAGERCLASSIFIEDS
COMPUTER SERVICES
PERSONAL COMPUTER SERVICES
Reliable!
Repairs, upgrades, installations,
troubleshooting, instruction,
custom-built PCs and consulting.
212-242-7221
PROFESSIONALSERVICES
DEADLINE WEDNESDAY 5:00PM MAIL 145 6TH AVE., GROUND FL, NEW YORK, NY 10013 TEL 646-452-2485 FAX 212.229.2790
PRINTING
FURNITURE REPAIR
Furniture Refinished
Reupholstered
polished & repaired. Hand rubbed fin-
ish if desired in your home. Antiques
restored. Over 45 years exp.
Free estimates.
Call Alex
1-800-376-6757
Cell: 917-837-4012
www.myspace.com
DRORI ANTIQUE RESTORATION
PAINTING & PLASTERING
Wall Women Painting & Plastering
Over 25 yrs experience. Located in
Chelsea area. Excellent References.
Free estimate Call 212-675-0631
APARTMENT RENTALS
Does your child need help with
school work?
I am an energetic, creative, compassion-
ate, organized, reliable and experienced
NYS Certified teacher with a Masters
degree in Education from NYU.
Affordable tutoring is available for all
ages and levels of students in all areas
of english, math, social studies and
study skills.
Please contact me at 917-952-5849,
or at Merylamy@gmail.com.
FRENCH RIVIERA. Charming town-
house, authentic village Gorges du Loup,
France, near Nice, Cannes, Grasse.
Breathtaking views, 2 bdrm, 2 bath
$1250/wk. Available year round, turn key
furnished. 941-363-0925
ADVENTURE
TRAVEL
Choose from 12,000 worldwide
adventure tours incl. volunteer,
family, culinary and photography
trips. We also have discounted
int’l airfares and Eurailpasses.
5 day Eurail Selectpass only $125
(1959 price, while supplies last)
Adventure Travel Co
212-674-2887
124 MacDougal St., West Village
TRAVEL
Lithomatic Business
Forms, Inc.
Established 1971
New service - Shredding of your
personal papers.
Continuous Business forms,
Snap-a-part Forms, Laser Forms &
Checks for all systems. Offset form,
4-Color Post Cards. Announcements,
Envelopes, Letterheads &
Business Cards, Xeroxing, Bindery &
Mailing Services on site
Tel: 212-255-6700
Fax: 212-242-5963
233 West 18th Street, NYC 10011
(Next Door to the Chelsea Post Office)
Apartment WANTED
to BUY or RENT
Large Studio in
Lower Manhattan,
UWS or Hells Kitchen.
Please e-mail me
details/photos to:
mykonos55@yahoo.com
REAL ESTATE
TUTORING
FLEA MARKET
TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE
Greenwich Village/54 West 9th St $6.85M
James Nelson 212-696-2500
TheVillager.com
PETS
Flea Market-Saturdays & Sundays
May 9th thru June 14th
Esat 4th St betwn Ave. B & C
Contact Jeanette 212-979-2186
Deb 347-216-4691 Open 7 am
Two Free Yorkie Puppies
need a new home.
They are registered and friendly
For more information contact:
whitep2009@gmail.com
Excellent Professional Home and
Apartment Cleaning and Related Serv-
ices Reasonable Rates.
Call DJB at 212-581-7082
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
My Teacup Yorkie Terrier & English
Bulldog puppy for adoption which is AKC
registered. Interested person should
email Rev. Alan Walker through
revalan09@live.com
GV Cooper Union/NYU Prime
Students, Students, Students!
41 COOPER SQUARE
PRICE REDUCED!
Across from “Table 8” the new
Cooper Square Hotel Restaurant
3000 sf New Construction. 100’
Frontage. NON-COOKING FOOD
CONSIDERED $115 psf.
Immediate Possession
JDREALTY.COM 212-216-9777
PUBLI C NOTI CES
NOTICE OF QUALIFI-
CATION OF FLEXIBLE
OPPORTUNITIES, LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept. of
State on 3/4/09. NYS fictitious
name: Flexible Opportunities
Fund, LLC. Office location: NY
County. LLC formed in DE on
2/26/09. NY Sec. of State des-
ignated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served and shall mail pro-
cess to the principal business
addr.: 522 5th Ave., NY, NY
10036. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The
Corporation Trust Co., 1209
Orange St., Wilmington, DE
19801. Arts. of Org. filed with
DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal
St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF REALM PART-
NERS SUB-FUND LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 5/5/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. Princ. bus.
addr.: 390 Park Ave., 16th Fl.,
NY, NY 10022. LLC formed in
DE on 4/30/09. NY Sec. of State
designated as agent of LLC
upon whom process against
it may be served and shall
mail process to: 111 8th Ave.,
NY, NY 10011. Regd. agt. upon
whom process may be served:
CT Corporation System, 111
8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE
addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St.,
Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts.
of Org. filed with DE Sec. of
State, 401 Federal St., Dover,
DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful
activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF ASTAR 325
ROUTE 17M - MONROE
LLC
Authority filed with NY Dept.
of State on 4/29/09. Office loca-
tion: NY County. Princ. bus.
addr.: 1114 Ave. of the Ameri-
cas, 39th Fl., NY, NY 10036.
LLC formed in DE on 3/31/09.
NY Sec. of State designated as
agent of LLC upon whom pro-
cess against it may be served
and shall mail process to: c/o
CT Corporation System, 111
8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd.
agt, upon whom process may
be served. DE addr. of LLC:
c/o The Corporation Trust Co.,
1209 Orange St., Wilmington,
DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed
with DE Sec. of State, 401 Fed-
eral St., Dover, DE 19901. Pur-
pose: real estate investments
and finance.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF QUALIFICA-
TION OF O-CAP GP, LLC
App. For Auth. filed with Secy.
of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
4/23/2009. Office location: New
York County. LLC formed in
DE on 4/21/2009. SSNY des-
ignated as agent of LLC upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: 140 E. 63rd St.,
Apt. 17C, New York, NY 10065,
Attn: Michael Olshan. DE
address of LLC: 615 S. DuPont
Hwy., Dover, DE 19901. Cert.
of Form. filed with DESS, P.O.
Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Pur-
pose: to engage in any act or
activity lawful under the NY
LLC Law.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE OF FORMATION
OF CAPOSALDO 37TH
STREET, LIMITED PART-
NERSHIP
Certificate filed with Secy.
of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on
1/8/09. Office location: New
York County. SSNY desig-
nated as agent of LP upon
whom process against it may
be served. SSNY shall mail
process to: Davis & Gilbert LLP,
1740 Broadway, New York, NY
10019. Name/address of each
genl. ptr. available from SSNY.
Term: until 1/8/2089. Purpose:
any lawful activity.
Vil 5/20-6/24/09
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that a license, number 1225560
for Beer and Wine has been
applied for by Local Shop Inc.
to sell Beer and Wine at retail
in a café under the Alcoholic
Beverage Control Law at 144
Sullivan Street, New York, NY
10012 for on premises con-
sumption.
Vil 5/20
TO PLACE A
LEGAL
NOTICE
in The Villager,
call Dave Jaffe
at 646-452-2477
or email
david@thevillager.com
32 May 20 - 26, 2009
WWW. FULTONSTALLMARKET. COM º 21 2 SEA- PORT
FRESH BAKED
FRESH CUT
FRESH PI CKED
NOW OPEN AT THE SEAPORT
FRI DAYS AND SATURDAYS FROM 1 0AM - 6PM
BREAD ALONE
European-style, organic breads and hand-
crafted pastries from the Hudson Valley.
BREEZY HI LL ORCHARD
& KNOLL KREST FARM
Pears, apples, cider, eggs, fresh pasta,
and baked goods from Rhinebeck, NY.
CUPCAKEXPRESS
Named #1 cupcake by the NY Post!
Made daily with 100% butter, 100% love.
FLORA PERFECTA
Cut roses, lilies and stock flowers,
grown outside New Paltz, New York.
HOBOKEN FARMS
Creamy mozzarella, homemade ravioli, crusty
bread, and gourmet entrees.
IL BRIGANTE
Imported Italian specialties plus homemade
sauces, dishes and more.
NEW YORK WI NESTAND
A rotating roster of winegrowers from across
New York State plus chef demonstrations.
SANG LEE FARMS
Organic greens, mesclun mixes, heirloom
tomatoes, chutneys, and soups from the
North Fork of Long Island.
SHORE CATCH
Fresh, local catch straight to market from
Long Beach Island, New Jersey.
STONY HI LL FARM MARKET
Fruits, vegetables, plants, and baked goods
from the Garden State.
VALLEY SHEPHERD CREAMERY
Artisan cheese, yogurt and lamb from
Long Valley, New Jersey.
YUMMY COFFEE
Fair trade, organic and rainforest-alliance
certified coffees, roasted in NYC, all profits
donated to the autism community.
Visit Our Purveyors on Historic South Street between Fulton and Beekman Streets

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful