South Burlington

High School
PROGRAMS OF STUDY
GRADES 9-12
2 0 0 9 - 2 0 10
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION
School Board and Administration ...................................................................4
South Burlington High School Non-Discrimination Statement ......................4
South Burlington School District Mission Statement .....................................4
Graduation Requirements/Academic Credits .................................................4
Program Limits ...............................................................................................4
Equivalency Credits ........................................................................................5
Leveling of Class Sections ..............................................................................5
Defnition of Course Levels ............................................................................5
• Honors
• Accelerated
• Advanced Placement
• Level 1
• Level 2
Minimum Class Enrollment ............................................................................5
Selecting/Dropping Courses ...........................................................................5-6
• Scheduling Changes
• Balancing Class Sections
• Penalty for Dropping Courses
• Policy on Partial Credit
• Changing Levels in Courses
• Repeating Courses
• Policy on Credit/Placement for Outside Study
Auditing ..........................................................................................................6
Summer/Evening School ...............................................................................6
Technology Resources ....................................................................................6
Title IX Regulations........................................................................................6
NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) .........................................7
Guidance Department .....................................................................................7
COURSES OF STUDY
Alternative and Student Support Programs .....................................................8
Career Development Center (CDC) ................................................................9
Driver Education Department .........................................................................10
English as a Second Language ........................................................................10
English Department ........................................................................................10-14
Family and Consumer Science Department ....................................................14-15
Fine and Performing Arts ................................................................................16-17
• Art Department
• Music Department
Mathematics Department ................................................................................18-20
Physical Education Department ......................................................................20-21
Science Department ........................................................................................21-23
Social Studies Department ..............................................................................23-25
Technology Department ..................................................................................25-29
World Languages ............................................................................................30-33
ANOTHER APPROACH TO LEARNING ................................................33
TECHNICAL CENTER PROGRAMS
Burlington Technical Center ...........................................................................34-36
Center for Technology, Essex .........................................................................37-41
STUDENT SCHEDULE PLANNER ..........................................................42
INDEX ............................................................................................................43
2009-2010 SCHOOL BOARD AND ADMINISTRATION
Board of School Commissioners:
Mr. Richard Cassidy, Chairperson
Mrs. Janine Allo
Ms. Agnes Clift
Mrs. Elizabeth Fitzgerald
Mr. Theodore Manazir, Clerk
Superintendent: Mr. John Everitt
Principal: Mr. Patrick Burke
Assistant Principal: Mr. Patrick Phillips
Administrative Dean: Mrs. Lissa McDonald
Director of Student Activities: Michael O’Day
9th Grade Dean: Ms. Denise Weaver
Telephone numbers:
Superintendent’s Offce 652-7250
High School Main Number 652-7000
Principal’s Offce 652-7001
Attendance Offce 652-7002
Guidance Offce 652-7060
SOUTH BURLINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the South Burlington School District, a community
committed to excellence in education, is to ensure that each student
possesses the knowledge, skills, and character to create a successful
and responsible life. We will do this by building safe, caring, and
challenging learning environments, fostering family and community
partnerships, utilizing global resources, and inspiring life-long learning.
SOUTH BURLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL
South Burlington High School is a public 9-12 institution serving the
communities of South Burlington, Vermont and many nearby towns.
Ours is a comprehensive high school, offering a variety of educational
programs, which are open to all enrolled students. This Programs of
Study book is designed to assist SBHS students and parents as they
research, plan and realize a comprehensive high school academic
program. It is available on the Internet by visiting the school web site at:
http://sbhs.sbschools.net/
SOUTH BURLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL NON-
DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT
The South Burlington School District fully supports the philosophy
and intent of Title VI, Section 504, Title IX and all federal regulations
promulgated therein and to that end the District will not discriminate
on the basis of age, race, color, creed, sex, national origin, sexual
orientation or handicap in all matters related to the operation of and the
programs offered by the public schools of the City of South Burlington,
Vermont.
SOUTH BURLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL ACCREDITATION
South Burlington High School is approved by the State Department of
Education and is accredited by the New England Association of Schools
and Colleges.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS/ ACADEMIC CREDITS
The completion of a minimum of 20 credits is required for graduation
from South Burlington High School.* These requirements include:
Department Credits Equivalency Credit Allowed
English Language Arts 4 1.0
Social Studies 3 .5
(including World History, U.S. History and
Public Issues)
Mathematics 3 2.0
(including Algebra I)
Science 3 2.0
(including a Physical Science
and a Life Science)
Physical Education 1.5 .5
Fine Arts 1 0
Health .5 0
Information Technology .5 0
PROGRAM LIMITS
Students in grades 9-11 should plan to carry courses equivalent to a
minimum of 6 credits each year. Seniors should carry a minimum of
5 credits for the year. Students carrying fewer than 5 credits are not
eligible to participate in extracurricular activities. Students should
enroll for more than the minimum number of credits in case all
courses cannot be scheduled.
*Although school personnel will make every effort to communicate with
students and families, it is the student’s responsibility to insure that
requirements for graduation are met.
GENERAL INFORMATION
4
LEVELING OF CLASS SECTIONS
At South Burlington High School, those courses with multiple
sections may be leveled. Leveling is an effort to group students
whose demonstrated achievement and abilities are reasonably
comparable. Teachers familiar with students’ achievement levels will
make a recommendation for placement in the next sequential course.
(Recommendations from teachers at both the high school and the middle
school will be respected for initial placement.)
APPEALING STUDENT PLACEMENT: During the registration
period teachers make recommendations for student placement in
sequential courses. Requests for a change of placement are initiated via
a “Request for Change in Course Level Placement” form available in the
high school Guidance Offce. A transfer student will be placed in course
levels at the discretion of the Guidance Department based on his/her
previous academic records.
DEFINITION OF COURSE LEVELS
HONORS (HON): For students of high ability and achievement who
can research and absorb an enriched program in that course.

ACCELERATED (ACC): For students of high ability who are capable
of learning at a fast pace and in greater depth, are capable of independent
inquiry, and have proven their abilities in previous sequential courses.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP): For students of high ability who
are capable of college level study in the subject and who wish to prepare
for an AP exam on that subject.

LEVEL 1 (L1): For students in a strong college preparatory program
whose goal is to attend a four year college or university program.

LEVEL 2 (L2): For students of average ability who may seek admission
to a two-year college, a four-year college, or other post-secondary
pursuits.
MINIMUM CLASS ENROLLMENT
Elective courses of study will generally not be offered when course
enrollment falls below 15 students. Certain exceptions to this policy may
be allowed as a matter of administrative decision when staff and space
are available.
SELECTING AND DROPPING COURSES
SCHEDULING CHANGES: Students may change their schedules
during an adjustment period of two weeks at the beginning of the frst
semester and one week at the beginning of the second semester. Since
ample time has been allowed during these periods and throughout the
spring for changing schedules, students will only be allowed to make
schedule changes outside of these times in very unusual circumstances.
To implement a schedule change, a student must:
1. Discuss the proposed change with their current teacher.
2. See a counselor to request an add-drop form.
3. Discuss the proposed change with a parent or guardian and have
him/her sign the form.
4. Secure the required teacher’s signature.
5. Return change request form to the Guidance Offce within 24 hours
of the time it is picked up.
6. Students must remain in their current courses until they have been
notifed that the change has been completed.
BALANCING CLASS SECTIONS: In order to insure optimal
instructional situations, the school reserves the right to adjust student
schedules to balance classes.
PENALTY FOR DROPPING COURSES: The process of academic
planning represents a great deal of effort on the part of students, parents,
staff members and administrators. Therefore, students are strongly
encouraged to remain in the courses that are on their schedule at the
beginning of the school year. In cases where a course drop is necessary,
the student’s academic record will be affected in the following manner:
1. No frst semester or full year course may be dropped without penalty
after the last day of the frst marking period of the school year.
2. No second semester course may be dropped without penalty after
the last day of the third marking period of the school year.
3. No quarter course may be dropped without penalty after the fourth
week of the marking period.
4. Courses dropped before this time will not appear on the student’s
record. Courses dropped after these deadlines will be recorded as
a W/F unless there are extenuating circumstances which warrant
the student being given a W/P. Students changing to another level
course within the same discipline after the drop period is over may
be issued a W.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS INSTRUCTIONAL AREAS APPROVED FOR EQUIVALENCY CREDIT
Subject
Areas
Amount of
Credit Required
Family Living
Course/Credit Course/Credit Course/Credit
Business & Technology Dep’t.
Athletics
English
Math
Science
4
3
3
3
1
1.5
Principles of Accounting .5
Business Law .5 Social Studies
Fine Arts
Independent Living .5
Physical Education
Health
Information Technology
* Technical Center Programs result in equivalency credit being given in English, Math, Science, Social Studies, Fine Arts, Physical Education and Health. Please
refer to the program descriptions beginning on p. 33.
Sports Nutrition .25/ Dance .25
Athletics .5/Independent Study .25/.5
EQUIVALENCY CREDITS
5
.5
.5
6
TITLE IX REQUIREMENTS
Pursuant to the intent of Federal legislation (i.e. Title IX of the
Educational Amendments), the South Burlington School District will
not discriminate on the basis of sex in all matters related to the operation
of and the programs offered by the public schools of the City of South
Burlington. Citizens desiring information relating to Title IX or wishing
to fle a complaint of sex discrimination within the South Burlington
School District may do so by contacting The Superintendent of the
South Burlington School District or the designated Title IX Complaint
Offcer at 550 Dorset Street, South Burlington, VT 05403. Telephone
802-652-7250.
POLICY ON ISSUING PARTIAL CREDIT: Generally, no partial
credit will be given for full year, semester, or quarter courses.
Exceptions to this policy are as follows:
1. when a student fnishes graduation requirements at the end of the
frst semester and stops attending school.
2. when the Programs of Study indicates that the course may be taken
for partial credit.
3. in the fne and applied arts when scheduling will not permit the
student to attend the full duration of the course.
CHANGING LEVELS IN COURSES: Students who fnd it necessary
to change levels in a full-year course should arrange to do so no later
than the close of the frst semester. Students who change courses within
an academic discipline at SBHS during the school year will have grades
and attendance records follow them into the new course.
REPEATING COURSES: Usually courses that have been previously
taken and passed may not be repeated for additional credit. If a course
is repeated either here at SBHS, in summer school, night school or
through an approved correspondence school, the new grade will appear
on the transcript for purposes of GPA calculation. The original grade will
remain on the transcript but will not count towards the GPA.
POLICY ON CREDIT/PLACEMENT FOR OUTSIDE STUDY:
Credit will only be given and listed on the transcript for programs
of study from accredited institutions and in cases where this credit
is being used toward meeting the requirements for graduation. (See
Summer/Evening School policy below.) Accredited institutions include
higher education, secondary continuing education courses, legitimate
correspondence courses or independent courses of study under the
supervision of teachers in the South Burlington School District who will
monitor quality and record contact hours. Students will receive only
placement (as opposed to credit) from tutoring during the summer.
NOTE: When a student takes a course not needed to meet graduation
requirements, typically at an institution of higher education for academic
enhancement, the transcript of the college or university shall be sole
evidence of the student’s advanced standing and will not appear on the
SBHS transcript.
AUDITING (to take a course without credit):
Students who wish to take courses for enrichment without receiving
credit may enroll on an audit basis. Students will be expected to attend
Thanks to continued technology funding by the community, SBHS has
taken great strides toward increasing the accessibility and usability of
technology to enhance our students’ education. In line with recognized
high school “best practices,” technology is both integrated into the
content of our departmental offerings and is a content area focus in
the Technology Department particularly through that department’s
Business, Imaging, and Networking Labs. The high school is wired
with a local area network that connects to the Internet via multiple “T1”
connections, allowing students to access the Internet at high speed from
any computer in the building. All students are issued network accounts
and are provided with free e-mail services that can be accessed from any
computer (on or off campus) with an Internet connection. Our building
has over 250 workstations, all with the Windows XP operating system.
TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES
The Technology Department employs three full classroom labs for
computer related instruction. In addition, four “classroom” labs with
15-30 workstations are employed for integrating information technology
into regular instruction. Mini-labs also exist in a number of academic
areas providing a learning resource in the delivery of instruction. The
nationally recognized Imaging Lab has 24 “high-end” computers, 3D
design applications, and a dedicated fle server. The Library has a newly
upgraded state of the art on-line card catalogue that can be accessed
via the Internet as well as 14 workstations for student use. For more
information about SBHS and SBSD technology resources, visit the
district Website at
http://www.sbschools.net.
class on a regular basis, and they will be responsible for completing and
submitting all assignments. Tests and quizzes will be at the student’s
option. A note from the student’s parents/guardian indicating approval of
the audit should be placed in the student’s fle.
COURSES DELIVERED VIA HOME TUTOR
When a student is being tutored at home for a signifcant part of the
year (i.e., he/she has missed more than half of the instructional time in
the course(s) being taken), it is impossible to duplicate the course(s) as
they are delivered at SBHS. The teacher of the course, the CAS and the
student’s school counselor will confer to determine whether to rename
the course(s) to better align with the alternate delivery of the curriculum.
SUMMER/EVENING SCHOOL
Students planning to take summer or evening courses at other locations
must fll out a request form in the Guidance Offce prior to taking the
course. Students who need to make up credit for failing a course, for
traveling abroad without attending school, or for meeting a prerequisite
must:
1. receive approval from the SBHS Guidance Department prior to
registering;
2. register in a course at an accredited institution;
3. show evidence of completion of the course (to include institution,
date, grade, and credit earned) to the SBHS Guidance Department;
4. in some cases, students must take and pass a comprehensive test
covering prerequisite course materials. A student wishing to insure
a traditional grade in the course rather than a P (Pass) should pass
such a comprehensive exam.
South Burlington High School will:
1. issue 1 full credit if the student is repeating a full year course he/she
completed but failed at South Burlington High School;
2. issue .5 credit if the student completes a frst attempt at a course;
3. register the student in the new course for which he/she is qualifed if
the above conditions are met prior to the frst class meeting;
4. enter the institution’s name, date, grade, and SBHS credit on the
student’s offcial transcript;
5. in certain situations, department chairpersons may recommend a
variance in credit, depending on the intensity of the course.
NOTE: A summer school course must include 60 hours at a high
school and 45 hours (3 credits) at a college.
7
NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION (NCAA)
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has
required students-athletes who aspire to “practice, compete,
and/or receive athletic scholarship as a freshman in college” in
either Division I or II to meet the following requirements:
1. Graduation from high school
2. The highest scores achieved on the verbal and mathematics section
of the SAT or the highest scores achieved on the four individual
tests of the ACT correlated to a “Core GPA” score that is compiled
ONLY IN NCAA APPROVED COURSES.
Any student-athlete aspiring to play college Division I or Division II
athletics is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED to access registration
materials on-line at www.ncaaclearinghouse.net. From the home
page, the prospect should click on “Prospective Student Athletes,”
which will link the student-athlete to the necessary information.
The NCAA strongly suggests that student-athletes use on-line
registration.
While the NCAA Clearinghouse has approved many courses offered at
SBHS it is important to note that the following were NOT APPROVED
for 2008-2009 and students/athletes enrolling the these classes in 2009-
2010 may not use them to meet NCAA “Core GPA” requirements:
All offerings in the following departments are not approved:
• Business Ed • Family & Consumer Sciences
• Career Development Center • Physical Education
• Drivers Ed • Technology Education
• English as a Second Language • Technical Center Courses
• Fine and Performing Arts
The South Burlington High School Guidance Department serves the
school through providing personal counseling, consultation, academic
planning, college planning, career awareness, and preventive education.
Adolescents progress through signifcant developmental changes
during their high school years and the guidance department provides
programming to address those developmental needs as well as the
availability to address individual issues as they arise. Most students are
assigned a counselor according to their last name. Students are able to
have the same counselor all four years.
School Guidance Counselors:
Ms. Karen Grace Mr. Chuck Soule Ms. Nikki St. Mary
Ms. Halina Gangi Mr. Tim Wile
COURSE DESCRIPTION
JUNIOR SEMINAR
Course 042: .25 credit
If you are interested in spending time exploring post-secondary options
like college or an experiential learning opportunity (a “Gap Year”), then
Junior Seminar could be a great course for you. This course will involve
guest speakers, career and interest inventories, college searching, and
lots of opportunities for discussion. In addition, there will be small
group and individual help in researching and planning for life after
graduation!
SENIOR SEMINAR
Course 770: .25 credit
This course is designed for seniors who will be transitioning into the
college lifestyle. Participants will learn tips and techniques to reduce
stressful situations with roommates, professors, and family members;
ATTENTION STUDENT-ATHLETES!
NCAA This symbol, next to the course description in the Programs
of Study, indicates that the course is not yet approved by the NCAA.
The following courses are not approved as of December 2009:
• Lights, Camera, Activism! (127/887)
• Independent Eng. (138/139)
• Sports Literature (166)
• Justice in an Ever-Changing World (167)
• None of the Above - But Do I Have A Great Idea! (194)
• Economics (267)
• American History through Film: 1915 to Modern Movies (264)
• General Biology (352)
• Practical Chemistry (363)
• General Chemistry (362)
• Science Topics (364, 365)
• The Changing Earth (383)
• Consumer Math (455)
• T.I.E. (587)
It is the responsibility of the student to assure that the courses in
which they enroll will be acceptable to the NCAA and that they meet
the other requirements as defned by that association. If a student
or parent is unsure of a course’s approval status, they should check
with their school counselor prior to enrolling in the class.
The process for course approval has changed and it is expected
the SBHS list of approved courses will be expanded. More
information on the NCAA Clearinghouse (including the list of
approved courses*) is available on-line at:
www.ncaa.org/cbsa/clearinghouse.html
*The SBHS NCAA School Code number is: 460413
The NCAA can be reached by calling: 1-800-638-3731
GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT
how to healthfully negotiate the college cafeteria and dorm room; and
understand how to safely participate in the college social scene.
9th GRADE CURRICULUM: 10th GRADE CURRICULUM:
• Social and Academic Orientation • Career Exploration
• Guidance Services Orientation • Discuss Technical Center Offerings
• Registration for 10th Grade • Registration for 11th Grade
• PLAN test as preparation for ACT
11th GRADE CURRICULUM: 12th GRADE CURRICULUM:
• Orientation for •Group Presentations —
PSAT/SAT/ASVAB/ACT Employment Services;
• Junior Parents’ Nights— College Admission;
College/Career Planning Standardized Testing;
•Disseminate Future Planning Transcript Preparation
Information and Link Students • Host Financial Aid Seminars
with the CDC for Internships • Review Graduation
Requirements
•Clarify Post-Secondary Plans
NOTE FOR SENIORS
For many students, college matriculation is the end goal of their high school
education. The college application process requires pre-planning and excellent
organization. Seniors who plan on applying to colleges and who desire a letter
of recommendation from the Guidance Department need to have turned in
completed supporting materials from their college application packet three
weeks (in-session school weeks) before the frst college application deadline.
These include blue teacher recommendation forms, yellow senior activity sheets,
pink transcript release forms (one per college) and any school report forms. The
frst fve transcripts will be sent without any charge. The fee is $3.00 for each
transcript thereafter.
8
STUDENT SUPPORT PROGRAMS
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
The Special Education Program provides specialized instruction in the
basic skills areas of reading, math, written and spoken language. Tutorial
support is provided to help students meet course content requirements.
The program also offers transition planning and community-based
experiences. Students work towards mastering the goals noted on
their Individual Education Plan (IEP) In order to receive these services
a student must meet South Burlington and Vermont State eligibility
requirements. Each special education student’s program is based on an
IEP. This IEP is developed and implemented in cooperation with parents,
students and classroom teachers.
ENRICHMENT CENTER
The Enrichment Center is a structured academic center which is staffed
by special educators, paraeducators, UVM interns, and peer tutors.
The program is overseen by the Enrichment Center/504 Coordinator
who is responsible for service delivery and organization of the center.
The focus of the Enrichment Center is to provide academic support to
students in need of extra help, who have IEP, 504 or EST identifcation.
The Enrichment Center program is designed to assist students with their
daily homework assignments, help with organization and study skills,
and provide assistance on test-taking according to accomodations. The
ultimate goal of the program is to teach students the skills needed for
academic independence and success.
PROGRESSIVE PROGRAM
The Progressive Program is designed to provide academic and
behavioral support to students as an alternative to the mainstream school
setting. Students may be part of the core group or participate in different
aspects of the program. Academic instruction in English, Math, Social
Studies, Science, study skills and social skills is offered. There is a focus
on self-exploration and team building in order to provide students with
the skills they need to succeed in general education at the high school.
LEAP PROGRAM
The LEAP Program is designed to provide intensive academic support
for 11th and 12th grade students as an alternative to a mainstream
educational environment. LEAP offers alternative courses in English,
Public Issues, U.S. History, Algebra, Pre-Algebra, and Consumer Math.
The courses are organized by a personal contract so each student can
work at his/her own pace. LEAP offers supported study sessions for
students taking mainstream classes. The focus of LEAP is to provide the
support and structure that some students need in order to learn.
ALTERNATIVE and STUDENT SUPPORT PROGRAMS
ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS
THE SBHS-BHS HORIZON SCHOOL PROGRAM
The Horizon School is an alternative school, offered to SB students
through cooperation between South Burlington and Burlington Schools.
It is for students who have had diffculty succeeding in the traditional
school setting and are better able to meet SBHS academic requirements
through small classes and individualized instruction in an off-campus,
non-traditional setting. Students who are interested in pursuing
placement in this program should consult with their school counselor for
further information.
INDEPENDENT DIPLOMA PROGRAM
The Independent Learning Program serves students who are living
independently or face other responsibilities and personal issues that
make the regular school schedule and setting inappropriate. It is a
program of study for motivated, mature learners who are willing to
commit substantial time to independent study. Older students who need
three or fewer credits to graduate are eligible to apply. The program is
designed in .25 credit contract increments.
The course offerings include:
• Social Studies: Special Topics, PIWA
• English: Reading, Writing, Integrated (2
nd
semester)
• Science: Special Topics I, Special Topics II
• Math: Algebra I , Algebra II, Math Topics,
• ConsumerMath(2
nd
semester)
• Health: Health and Wellness (2
nd
semester)
• Phys. Ed.: Independent Lifetime Activities
• Elective: Employment
If you are currently enrolled in school, contact your guidance counselor
to learn more about the program and application process. Otherwise,
call Tim Wile at 652-7523.
INDEPENDENT STUDY PROGRAM (I.S.P.)
Course 015
Interested students must assume the initiative of presenting their ideas
to a staff member. The staff member will, in turn, discuss this with
the department chairperson and, assuming the program has merit,
the student would then be requested to write a proposal for further
considerations. Final approval rests with the administration. An I.S.P.
may be initiated at any time during the school year. The amount of
academic credit granted depends on the fnal evaluation made by
the staff member directly involved with the project, the curriculum
supervisors, and the principal.
COLLEGE CONNECTIONS
College Connections offers students in grades 10-12 from Chittenden
County and students from alternative programs, options for exploring
post secondary education prior to graduation. Students enrolling in the
program take college courses at all six of the area colleges and may earn
both high school and college credit for successful completion (refer to
p. 6 regarding SBHS policy on outside credit). The program includes
an orientation to college studies as well as academic advising and other
supports that students may need. College Connections is offered during
after school hours and is not intended to replace existing high school
courses. Currently enrolled students should see their guidance counselor
for more information.
Visit this link to learn more about College Connections:
9
The Career Development Center (CDC) offers students the opportunity
to explore their career plans and assist in the transition from student to
working professional and/or into the world of higher education. The
CDC provides numerous opportunities for students to design their own
special program of study. Students are encouraged to explore all the
options beginning early in their high school program.
INTERNSHIP
Course 032: 45 hours of service equals .25 credit
A program designed for the individual student, in an area of special
interest. The placement must be related to a specifc career path.
The student is required to maintain a log of hours, and evaluate their
participation in the program. In addition, the supervisor/mentor would be
required to submit an evaluation of the intern. Students who participate
in a Career-Related Employment Opportunity would be eligible for
credit. Enrollment is highly encouraged for students who have the last
block of any school day available.
COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING
Course 033
This is a program whereby students become the “doers” and take on
more responsibility for their learning. The student is required to maintain
a log of hours (45 on-site hours equals one-quarter credit) and complete
an evaluation form. Students who participate in Community Service
projects may accumulate credit hours throughout their high school
program.
BIG BUDDY PROGRAM
Course 033: 45 hours of service equals .25 credit.
The Big Buddy Program is designed to give elementary and middle
school students the opportunity to have a high school friend/mentor to
promote self-esteem and self-value. Volunteers spend one hour a week
with a Little Buddy doing such activities as reading together, playing
games and sports, studying for tests, talking, or completing any age-
appropriate activity that both buddies deem to be fun! The role of the
Big Buddy is to develop a supportive friendship with the Little Buddy,
CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CDC)
showing respect and understanding of individual needs. Also, the Big
Buddy should be a mentor, act as a role model, and encourage new
experiences for the Little Buddy. The Big Buddy Program requires a
one-year commitment, one hour per week (or equivalent), and a strong
commitment to be present in the life of the Little Buddy. Reliability,
consistency and compassion are key ingredients to a successful team.
TUTORING PROGRAM
Course 034: 45 hours of service equals .25 credit.
The Tutoring Program is a school-based or after-school educational
enrichment program for elementary, middle, and high school students
who attend school in the District. High school volunteers/tutors are the
heart of the program. They work with individual or pairs of students
in a variety of settings: the classroom, a specialized program, or one of
the After-School Homework Clubs. Also, peer-tutoring opportunities
abound within the high school setting during the day and after-school.
In addition to offering academic support, volunteers are friends and role
models to the students being tutored.
Students receiving this assistance work with their tutors to build
skills in all subject areas, complete their homework, and strengthen
their sense of self-esteem and self-respect. Enrollment is strongly
encouraged for students who have a free block(s) available during the
school day, especially the last block of the day. In addition, after-school
opportunities are plentiful and students may opt to tutor for a minimum
of one to a maximum of four days per week.
SENIOR CHALLENGE
Course 035: .5 credit per semester
The Senior Challenge is a student-designed project, based on an area
of special interest. Community and faculty member(s) will serve as
mentors to students as they spend forty-fve (45) hours in a professional
setting with a 30-hour minimum at the placement site. Students will
make a proposal for the project, carry out the experience, submit a
research paper on their fndings and do an oral presentation on the
learning experience before a panel of school and community members.
Enrollment will be dependent upon the ability to schedule core time with
course advisor.
Sr Challenge
Credit
(45 hrs = .25 credit to
max of 2 credits/year)
11-12*
(only w/ approval)^
CAREER EXPLORATION OPTIONS COMMUNITY SERVICE OPTIONS
DETAILED CDC PROGRAM OFFERINGS INCLUDE:
Program Title Big Buddy Tutoring
Volunteers in Action (VIA)
Mentoring Shadowing Internship
Open to Grades
Description
Examples of
Placements
Application:
Committment:
9-12* 9-12* 9-12 9-12
9-12 10-12*
Student matched
with child in grades
K-8, meeting on a
regular basis
Tutoring student(s) in
grades K-12.
Designed to enhance
student participation
in service-learning
opportunities.
Partnership with
adult mentor for
career and personal
support.
On-site visit in a
career feld.
Designed for the
individual student in
an area of special
interest for a specifc
period of time.
A student-designed
project culminating in
an oral presentation
and research paper.
•Area School
Districts
•United Way Sites
•Direct Requests
to SBHS
•Varied
•Laboratory
•Studio
•Area Businesses
•Service Agencies
•Municipal Depts.
•Hospitals
•Area Businesses
•School Districts-
Offce &
Educational Aides
Required Required Required Required Recommended Required Required
Yes* Yes* Yes No
No Yes*
Yes (.5 credit
course)
• 1 day/week for
1 year
• Other options
available
• 1-3 days/week
for 1 quarter to 1
year.
• Open
• Fall or Spring
semesters
• Summer options
available
• Twice/month
1 sem - 1 yr
• Other options
available
• Open
•1-5 days/week for
Fall, Spring and/or
Summer Sessions
^ Enrollment dependent upon ability to schedule core time with advisor
* Student must be in good academic standing
•Projects:
Fashion
Politics
Music
Education
Literature
Marketing
•Area School
Districts
10
COURSES OF STUDY
Grade Number Course Recommendations
9-12 101 ELL I ELL teacher recommendation
9-12 102 ELL II ELL teacher recommendation
9-12 117 ELL Enrichment ELL teacher recommendation

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ELL I
Course 101: 1 credit (Grades 9-12)
This is a course that focuses on English Language skills. Students learn
vocabulary, reading, writing, listening, speaking and grammar through
direct and thematic instruction.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
ELL II
Course 102: 1 credit (Grades 9-12)
This course is for more advanced English Language Learners. Through
literature and academic thematic units all language domains are
addressed and refned.

ELL Enrichment
Course 117
This is an individualized study time. Students receive turoring, support,
and homework help in their content classes. Individual language
instruction is also provided with credit arranged as appropriate.
DRIVER EDUCATION
Course 091: .25 credit
In the state of Vermont, Driver Education is mandatory for a junior
operator’s license. Driver Education is offered at South Burlington High
School during the academic year as a .25 credit course and the following
qualifcations and stipulations apply:
1. In situations involving over enrollment, priority for the opportunity
will be given in descending order with senior students having frst
priority, juniors second, and so on. Within a class, priority will be
given on an age basis with the older students receiving frst priority.
2. It will be necessary to schedule student’s driving time during their
unscheduled periods of the school day.
3. Because the specifed amount of time for course qualifcation is
six actual hours of “behind-the-wheel” experience, students should
expect to give out-of-school time to this need if necessary.
4. Since the state of Vermont mandates thirty hours of classroom
instruction, students cannot miss more than four classroom
instruction periods for non-school related reasons.
DRIVER EDUCATION PROGRAM
5. Students must obtain permits prior to the frst class.
Placement in Driver Education courses cannot be guaranteed by the
time students are eligible for a license.
If you wish to be considered for participation in the Driver
Education Program and you meet the qualifcations which
apply, sign up for this course on your registration form as you
would for any other course.
HOMEWORK EXPECTATIONS FOR DRIVER EDUCATION
It is strongly recommended that each student receive an additional 50
hours of supervised (parental) behind-the-wheel practice to supplement
the six hours received during school. In addition, the student should
expect to spend 30 minutes for reading assigned materials for each class.
NOTE: Students who take Driver’s Education outside of SBHS,with an
instructor accredited to teach at a high school, must fll out a “Request
for Outside Credit” form with their guidance counselor PRIOR to class
starting if they wish to receive school credit.
FULL-YEAR ELECTIVES FOR JUNIORS
AND SENIORS
GRADE NO. COURSE
11 160 Honors English 11
12 170 Advanced Placement English
Literature
SEMESTER ELECTIVES FOR GRADES 11/12
GRADE NO. COURSE
10-12 127 Lights, Camera, Activism!
(Team-taught for credit in
English and in Technology)
11-12 138/139 Independent English
11-12 161 Media Literacy
11-12 163 Holocaust Studies
(Team-taught for credit in
English and Social Studies)
11-12 165 Studies in Popular Literature
11-12 166 Sports Literature
11-12 167 Justice in an Ever-Changing
World
ENGLISH CREDIT
• Students must earn four credits in English in order to graduate.
• Students may take as many as two English classes in one semester.
COURSES FOR FRESHMEN
GRADE NO. COURSE
9 140 Honors English 9
9 141 English
9 145 Humanities

COURSES FOR SOPHOMORES
GRADE NO. COURSE
10 150 Honors American Studies
10 151 English 10
10 155 American Studies
10 191 Cont. Health Issues in Fiction
(Team-taught for credit in
English and in Health)

11
and Civilization,” “The Hero’s Journey,” “What We Believe,” and
“Celebration of Life and Language.” Students read The Odyssey, Romeo
and Juliet, and Things Fall Apart – among other titles – during this year-
long course.
FULL-YEAR ELECTIVES FOR SOPHOMORES
HONORS AMERICAN STUDIES
Course 150: 2 credits (1 credit English /1 credit Social Studies)
Honors American Studies is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course
in which students focus on American literature and American history.
This two-credit course meets each day with both a Social Studies and
an English faculty member. While reading The American Pageant, the
history textbook, students also read literary works that are historically
connected to the time periods. They read the following works in this
order: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Jungle, O Pioneers!,
Ragtime,AllQuietontheWesternFront,TheGreatGatsby,Catcher
in the Rye, The Glass Menagerie, The Grapes of Wrath, To Kill a
Mockingbird,Cat’sCradle,DeathofaSalesman,ARaisinintheSun,
and TheThingsTheyCarried. Group cooperation, writing, and critical
thinking are among the skills taught and reinforced. Typically, students
have two hours of work per night, one hour of literature and one hour of
textbook.
ENGLISH 10
Course 151: 1 credit
English 151 focuses on American literature. Some of the reading in the
course is from the anthology Responding to Literature. Students also
read some of these major works: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The
Awakening, The Great Gatsby, CatcherintheRye, A Separate Peace,
Our Town, To Kill a Mockingbird, DeathofaSalesman, I Know Why
theCagedBirdSings, TheThingsTheyCarried, and ThisBoy’sLife.
Students write several papers and continue to work on vocabulary,
grammar, and spelling.
AMERICAN STUDIES
Course 155: 2 credits (1 credit English/ 1 credit Social Studies)
American Studies is an integrated, interdisciplinary, team-taught course
in which students focus on American literature and American history.
This two credit course meets each day with both a Social Studies and
an English faculty member. Students focus on American literature,
history, and culture while completing traditional classroom activities,
group projects, and individual research projects. Students read fction
and nonfction about the themes they are studying and fnd material
illustrating that the themes are still alive today. They read the
following works: AllQuietontheWesternFront,CatcherintheRye,
DeathofaSalesman,TheGreatGatsby,AdventuresofHuckleberry
Finn, The Jungle, O Pioneers!, A Raisin in the Sun, A Separate Peace,
TheThingsTheyCarried, and To Kill a Mockingbird. The American
Pageant and Responding to Literature are the textbooks. Students
learn in a variety of ways and become active participants in the learning
process. Group cooperation, writing, and critical thinking are among the
skills taught and reinforced.
CONTEMPORARY HEALTH ISSUES IN FICTION
Course 191: 1.5 credit (1.0 English credit)
This course also meets the graduation requirement for a Health course.
This combined English-Health course meets every other day for the
entire year. The course is built around the reading of some major works
of American literature, selections from contemporary young adult
fction, research, writings, guest speakers, flms, and discussions. The
readings include To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Catcherinthe
Rye by JD Salinger, DeathofaSalesman by Arthur Miller, Speak by
Laurie Halse Anderson, Twisted by Laurie Halse Anderson, SLAM by
Nick Hornby, BottledUp by Jaye Murray, Cut by Patricia McCormick,
and short stories. Interpersonal communications and coping skills will
be taught to aid students in making decisions about such issues as self-
concept, goals, diet, stress, sexuality, substances, wellness and peers.
11-12 176 Grammar and Editing
11-12 177 Words, Words, Words
11-12 178 British Literature I
11-12 179 British Literature II
11-12 180 African American Literature
11-12 181 Early American Classics
11-12 182 Literature of Other Cultures
11-12 183 Poetry
11-12 184 Science Fiction and Fantasy
11-12 186 Public Speaking
11-12 187 Advanced Composition
11-12 188 Writing Workshop
11-12 189 Journalism
11-12 192 The Contemporary Short Story
and Essay
11-12 193 You Don’t Scare Me, Will
Shakespeare
11-12 194 None of the Above - but Have I
Got a Great Idea!

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
FULL-YEAR ELECTIVES FOR FRESHMEN
HONORS ENGLISH 9
Course 140: 1 credit
The pace of English 140, a reading and writing intensive course
for motivated students, permits students to complete units of study
quickly and thus cover more material. English 140 includes units
in Greek drama, The Odyssey, several novels, and one play by William
Shakespeare. Students work on various types of writing with emphasis
on developing thesis statements and writing literary analyses. At times,
students read several texts simultaneously. Students signing up for this
course must complete the course application that requires them to read
a short story or poem, answer questions about the reading, and write an
essay based on the reading. Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School students
who want to be in Honors English 9 do the application in March.
Students from other school districts who want to be in Honors English
9 must make arrangements to do the application. The South Burlington
School District Curriculum Area Supervisor for English will report the
results of the student applications to students and their parents/guardians
within one month of students’ doing the application. Students must do a
summer reading and writing assignment.
Students who do well in the English honors courses have these
characteristics:
• they are self motivated and able to work on their own;
• they show an interest in literature and language;
• they complete assignments on time;
• they read required work with understanding and insight;
• they participate in discussions regularly and constructively;
• they write organized prose without diffculties in sentence
structure, grammar, and mechanics;
• they earned at least a B+ average in the previous year’s English
class(es).
ENGLISH 9
Course 141: 1 credit
In English 141 students concentrate on reading and writing. They read
Romeo and Juliet, excerpts from The Odyssey, Elie Wiesel’s Night, short
stories, essays, poems, and plays. They also read novels of their choice.
Students work on spelling, vocabulary, punctuation, grammar, speaking,
and creative and expository writing.
HUMANITIES
Course 145: 2 credits (1 credit of English, 1 credit of Social Studies)
Humanities is a grade 9 interdisciplinary, team-taught English and
Social Studies course. It meets each day with both a Social Studies
teacher and an English teacher. Students study world literature
and world history in a thematic approach. Topics include “Culture
12
Class participation is crucial. Completion of this course satisfes the
Health graduation requirement. Daily homework, tests, quizzes, papers,
and a fnal exam are required. Although juniors and seniors may sign
up for the course, sophomores will be given preference. The course is
limited to 40 students.
FULL YEAR ELECTIVES FOR JUNIORS & SENIORS
HONORS ENGLISH 11
Course 160: 1 credit
The pace and standards of this class permit qualifed students to prepare
for Advanced Placement English, which they may take during their
senior year. The focus of English 160 is the close reading of British
literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 20th century. In addition,
students study vocabulary and syntax. Some of the students’ writing
centers on the literature studied. Students take parts of sample AP exams
during the course.
Students who do well in the English honors courses usually have these
characteristics:
• they are self motivated and able to work on their own;
• they show an interest in literature and language;
• they complete assignments on time;
• they read required work with understanding and insight;
• they participate in discussions regularly and constructively;
• they write organized prose without diffculties in sentence
structure, grammar, and mechanics;
• they earned at least a B+ average in the previous year’s English
class(es).
ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LITERATURE
Course 170: 1 credit
Advanced Placement English Literature offers students an opportunity
to earn college credit by preparing them for a national three-hour
examination given each May by the College Board. The course
presumes students’ willingness to work to understand sophisticated prose
and poetry from the late 16
th
century to the present. The course requires
students to go beyond comprehension to an understanding of how
writing achieves its effects. Students write some long essays on literary
topics, and they write many timed essays to prepare themselves for the
AP examination. Students must read at least three books during the
summer. (Students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam to
earn credit for this course.)
Students who do well in the AP course usually have these characteristics:
• they are self motivated and able to work on their own;
• they show an interest in literature and language;
• they complete assignments on time;
• they read required work with understanding and insight;
• they participate in discussions regularly and constructively;
• they write organized prose without diffculties in sentence
structure, grammar, and mechanics;
• they earned at least a B+ average in the previous year’s English
class(es).
SEMESTER ELECTIVES FOR JUNIORS & SENIORS
LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTIVISM!
NCAA

Course 0127 : 1 credit (.5 English credit/.5 Technology credit)
(Grades 10-12)
Film is a powerful and fun way to express ideas. In LCA, you will
collaborate with your classmates to create a documentary. This
includes conducting research and interviews, writing a script, and
editing your audio and video with digital editing equipment.
LCA will challenge your abilities and teach you new skills in a
different way from most of your classes. Students in this course will
answer the century-old question: “How can flms change the way we
think?” IMPORTANT NOTE: The technology portion of this course
meets one time per week in the evening, from 6:30-9:30pm (day of the
week TBD on a year-to-year basis, see your counselor for more
information).
INDEPENDENT ENGLISH
NCAA

Course 138-139: .5 credit
In this semester course students work in two-to-three-week writing
and reading units. Everyone works on a type of writing together, such
as memory pieces, case histories, opinion columns, and writing based
on issues. Students choose topics based on their experiences or on the
experiences of people they know well. They also write business letters,
resumes, dialogues, and minutes for meetings. In addition, students
choose the books they read and write responses to their readings. A
program for vocabulary, editing and spelling is also part of the course.
Students who want to earn a grade of C can complete most of their work
during class time. Students who want to earn B and A grades must do
regular homework. Students who take the course a second semester may
be asked to teach certain materials to new students and to assist them
when needed. Regular opportunities to share writing on a volunteer basis
are included in the schedule. Students are encouraged to publish their
writing in the school paper and in publications outside of school.
MEDIA LITERACY
Course 161: .5 credit
Did you know that as a teenager you are part of a group that spends an
estimated $155 billion each year and are heavily infuenced, many times
unknowingly, by the messages you receive from media? What is media?
What role does it play in your life? Media literacy is a critical life skill in
today’s world. This course helps students to “read” messages in regards
to authorship, point of view, intention, construction methods, as well
as to examine issues such as advertising and children, censorship and
regulation, media violence and stereotyping, consumerism, and news
reporting. Students also read Feed and CultureJam.
HOLOCAUST STUDIES
Course 163: 1 credit (.5 credit in English/.5 credit in Social Studies)
This is a combined English-Social Studies course, in which students
earn .5 credit in English and .5 credit in Social Studies. This course
meets each day with both a Social Studies and an English faculty
member. Holocaust Studies explores human behavior from a historical
and literary perspective. Students spend most of the semester studying
the Jewish Holocaust; they will also study Cambodian, Rwandan and
Bosnian genocides.
STUDIES IN POPULAR LITERATURE
Course 165: .5 credit
In this course students read and talk about contemporary works such as
Tuesdays with Morrie, Peace Like a River, Memoirs of a Geisha, and
AngelsandDemons. The course calls students’ attention to the literary
elements of this fction and non-fction. Discussions focus on theme,
confict, characterization, audience, and author’s purpose. Discussions
also require students to make connections between the reading and both
the world of ideas and the everyday world in which they live. Teachers
of this course require students’ consistent participation in discussions.
Students must take the fnal exam.
SPORTS LITERATURE
NCAA
Course 166: .5 credit
Sports and sporting events have been an integral part of many
cultures over the course of history. In our culture, sports are a way for
individuals, especially young adults, to fnd an identity, take risks, and
challenge themselves to succeed. Sports are also a place in which our
society constructs moral values and forges understandings about social
issues. In this course, students will read and analyze fction, nonfction,
and poetry that focus on a variety of traditional and nontraditional team
and individual sports. They will investigate the history and current
theories of sports; the roles of coaches, athletes and spectators; issues of
gender, race, and class in sports; and how sports stories take on aspects
of legends and myths. As they explore these topics through readings and
discussions, students will use a variety of writing styles to construct and
demonstrate their knowledge.
13
JUSTICE IN AN EVER-CHANGING WORLD
NCAA
Course 167: .5 credit
What is justice? What does it demand of individuals and societies? In
this course students will read literature from a variety of genres and
cultures to explore the idea of what is fair and the impact of decisions.
Students will help build curriculum with ideas of what topics and
questions address what is fair and just. In this course, all students
will be active participants in lively discussions and debates, critical
thinking and refection, reading and analyzing. Writing will be a daily
exercise for refection, persuasion and understanding. Student generated
questions regarding justice will be answered through research and
writing.
GRAMMAR AND EDITING
Course 176: .5 credit
This semester course is a concentrated study of usage, punctuation,
and parts of speech, of how grammatical structures get linked together
to make sentences, and of the communication of basic concepts. The
knowledge gained in the course is applied to the editing, analysis, and
reading of short sections of papers and texts. Students taking foreign
languages are invited to make short presentations comparing English
with other languages. The course does not include the writing of full-
length papers. The course does require a lot of class participation, about
half an hour of homework fve days per week, and a fnal two-hour
examination. A light vocabulary program of 10 words per week is also
part of the course. The grade for the course is based mainly on frequent
short tests.
WORDS, WORDS, WORDS
Course 177: .5 credit
This course offers an intensive, relentless study of 600 sophisticated
but common English words. Students often take this course to improve
their scores on tests such as the SAT and ACT. Through the study
of vocabulary, students improve their reading, writing, and thinking.
The course’s emphasis on the etymology of words expands students’
vocabulary well beyond the 600 words and also shows that a knowledge
of words reveals much about history and culture. Students memorize
much information, take frequent quizzes and a fnal exam.
BRITISH LITERATURE I
Course 178: .5 credit
Designed for college-bound students, this course focuses on British
literature written before 1700. Students study major works of the times
such as Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and TheCanterbury
Tales. They also read works by Shakespeare. Students make oral
presentations, write several papers and poems, and continue work on
vocabulary, grammar and editing as needed. Students must take the fnal
exam.
BRITISH LITERATURE II
Course 179: .5 credit
Designed for college-bound students, this course focuses on British
literature written after 1700. Students study selections by Alexander
Pope, Jonathan Swift, Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, William
Wordsworth, John Keats, Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Jane Austen,
Lord Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph
Conrad, Thomas Hardy, William Butler Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Dylan
Thomas, James Joyce, and other major writers of the times. Students
make oral presentations, write papers, and continue work on vocabulary,
grammar and editing as needed. Students must take the fnal exam.
Students need not take British Literature I before taking British
Literature II.
AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE
Course 180: .5 credit
This course introduces students to African-American fction, drama and
poetry. Authors whose works students read include Zora Neale Hurston,
Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Ernest Gaines, Charles
Johnson, Dorothy West, and August Wilson. Students write short
papers and make presentations on African-American poetry. Students
and teacher devote most of class time to discussion of the out-of-class
reading assignments.
EARLY AMERICAN CLASSICS
Course 181: .5 credit
For students who wish to continue their studies in American literature,
this course investigates the roots of our country’s literary heritage. Titles
include The Last of the Mohicans, The Scarlet Letter, MobyDick, and
TheRedBadgeofCourage—novels that shed light on shifting American
values, prejudices, and social movements and paint a
panorama of the American journey. This is a reading intensive course
with emphasis on group discussion. Students must commit to rigorous
studies and take the fnal exam.
LITERATURE OF OTHER CULTURES
Course 182: .5 credit
Several works by famous authors who are neither American nor
European introduce students to the literatures of Africa, Asia, Latin
America, the Pacifc, and the West Indies. This course emphasizes
what readers can learn about other cultures by reading fction written in
those cultures. The material in some of the works is sophisticated and
requires mature readers. Students write several short papers and present
a fnal project.
POETRY
Course 183: .5 credit
In this course students read and analyze classic and contemporary poetry
and have an opportunity to write some original poetry. In both their
reading and writing, students deal with such elements as pattern, meter,
rhyme, fgurative language, imagery, and irony. Students can expect to
prepare for discussions, oral presentations, and group work. The fnal
exam requires students to present a project to the class.
SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY
Course 184: .5 credit
Students read about and discuss future worlds and fantasy worlds as
envisioned by H. G. Wells, Ray Bradbury, J.R.R. Tolkien, Orson Scott
Card, Pat Frank, Kurt Vonnegut, Isaac Asimov, and other writers.
Students read 35-40 pages per class and write poems and short stories.
Students must take the fnal exam.
PUBLIC SPEAKING
Course 186: .5 credit
This course helps students to improve their voices, speech habits and
diction, as well as to sharpen their listening and writing. Students
have the opportunity to improve their public speaking through oral
interpretation of literature, radio announcing, panel discussions,
interviews and storytelling. Through such experiences students
develop confdence, learn to consider the audience, and use logic and
organization in thinking and in speaking. Students must present a public
tribute as part of the fnal exam.
ADVANCED COMPOSITION
Course 187: .5 credit
In this course college-bound students strengthen their writing skills
by learning how to develop their ideas in logical, convincing, and
interesting ways. Students read nonfction prose models and
experiment with several forms of writing, including description,
narration, exposition and freewrites. Also, in using the process
approach to writing, students complete at least eight edited papers,
participate in conferences and public readings, and keep writing folders.
Students may also be asked to keep journals and submit writing for
publication. Students must participate in the Public Reading as part of
the fnal exam. Some assignments in Advanced Composition may be
similar to assignments in Honors English 11.
14
FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
The Family and Consumer Science Department is a place where you can
practice your human relations and communications skills, learn more
about healthy physical, mental, emotional and social development, and
practice independent living skills that will help you now, on the job and
in the future when you are on your own. You can test out your ideas
about marriage, family life, child rearing, and family stress such as
divorce and family violence.
GRADE NO. COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
9-12 733 Outdoor Leadership None
10-12 758 Health & Human Development None
Issues (Required for Graduation)
11-12 760 Peer Leadership Meeting with Instructor
11-12 761 Child Development
11-12 762 Sports Nutrition**
11-12 763 Drugs and Society
11-12 764 Health Issues in Media
10 791^ Contemporary Health None
(191) Issues in Fiction
10-12 794* Independent Living None
11-12 797 Entrepreneurship None
* may be taken for .25 Social Studies credit.
** may be taken for .25 PE credit
^ team-taught for Health & English credit; meets Health graduation
requirement.
The Family and Consumer Service Department supports the philosophy
that homework assignments will be used to reinforce class work where
appropriate. The expectation is that homework will be assigned in most
elective classes one to two times per week. Upper level and required
courses can expect homework on a daily basis.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP
Course 733: .5 credit
The curriculum for this class was developed by the Teen Leadership
Project, based on the following beliefs:
• All people are leaders in their own right.
• A person learns how to exercise leadership through actively
engaging in efforts to improve his or her world.
• There are certain known skills which will help a person be effective
as a leader.
• Positive relationships are a key to leadership.
• Self awareness and moral integrity are key to building positive
relationships.
• A leader’s success rests in the capacity to vest and support a group
with the responsibility and power for change.
Participants will develop and practice leadership skills using the
outdoors as a medium.
HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ISSUES
Course 758: .5 credit
Interpersonal communications and coping skills will be taught to
aid students in making decisions about such issues as self concept,
goals, diet, stress, sexuality, substances, wellness, peers and careers.
This course complies with the Act 51 Alcohol and Drug Education
Curriculum. Daily homework is a requirement. Completion of this
course satisfes the Health graduation requirement.
WRITING WORKSHOP
Course 188: .5 credit
In this course students work on basic writing needs in all stages of
the writing process: generating ideas, planning, drafting, conferring,
revising, editing, proofreading, and reading aloud. With the help of the
teacher, students design methods for working on their own spelling,
punctuation, and sentence structure. They also keep journals. In addition,
students complete some writing exercises and readings taken from
the Evergreen workbook and other books on writing. Students who
have earned credit for Advanced Composition may not take Writing
Workshop.
JOURNALISM
Course 189: .5 credit
Student writing is the focus of this course. The course introduces
students to writing in a professional environment and to the forms of
writing for the mass media. These forms include news stories for print,
for broadcast and for the web, as well as writing for public relations.
In this course students analyze each form by discussing variations in
tone, audience, and purpose. Students acquire a knowledge of and
apply generally accepted principles of written communication and
copyediting. Students develop other skills such as gathering, analyzing,
and organizing information for proper context. In addition, students
edit each other’s written work. Students in this course collaborate with
students in Graphic Design for Publication to publish the Rebel Word at
the end of each quarter.
THE CONTEMPORARY SHORT STORY AND ESSAY
Course 192: .5 credit
In this course students read and discuss short stories and essays.
Students are encouraged to make connections between the content
and the culture surrounding them. Students compare and contrast the
techniques, voices and styles of essays and short stories, and of fction
and nonfction. Students read three to fve short stories per week. The
primary resource is TheAnthologyofBestAmericanShortStoriesofthe
Century, edited by John Updike. Throughout this course students are
assessed by their written responses to the literature. Students complete
all reading and most writing outside of class. The fnal exam requires
students to write their own short stories, a minimum of 8 pages.

YOU DON’T SCARE ME, WILL SHAKESPEARE
Course 193: .5 credit
Let’s face it -Shakespeare is the greatest-ever writer in English. Enroll
in this course if you want to fnd out what all the fuss has been about.
In this course, you’ll read some of his poems - and discover why some
people think they’re scandalous. You’ll also read at least two of
his plays, one tragedy and one comedy.
NONE OF THE ABOVE—BUT HAVE I GOT A GREAT IDEA!
Course 194: .5 credit
NCAA

Have you reached this, elective # 24, and seen no course that provokes
even an iota of interest? But do you have an idea or two that fascinate
you? Then elective # 24 is for you. This course is for students who
know what they would do if they could spend one semester working
on one or two reading or writing projects. Students signing up for this
course must know what they would like to read or write. By the end of
the second week of the course, they must submit to the teacher a
written description and schedule of what they will be doing through the
semester. They must regularly discuss with the teacher the work they
are doing, and, at the end of the semester, they must demonstrate to a
panel, composed of students, teachers, and community members, what
they did and what they learned during the semester. This course is not
for the faint-hearted, but it does offer the intrepid the opportunity to
demonstrate intellectual maturity.
15
PEER LEADERSHIP I
Course 670: .5 credit
Participants in the Peer Leadership I class will prepare to become
SLAM leaders in their senior year. Interested students must submit an
application when they register for classes (available in the guidance
offce). This class meets for one semester. See Ms. Randall-Mullins,
Mr. Painter, or Mr. Minard for details.

PEER LEADERSHIP II
Course 781: 1 credit
Participants in the Peer Leadership class become co-facilitators of the
Freshman SLAM (Student Led Advisory Meetings) groups. SLAM
assists frst year students to make the transition to the high school by:
• Developing confdence and problem solving skills
• Fostering leadership qualities
• Building relationships and teamwork
Members of the class participate in a two-day retreat prior to the
opening of school, assist with Freshman orientation, meet twice a week
to prepare and process SLAM sessions, and facilitate SLAM groups.
Participants for this class must be seniors and are selected through an
application (available in the guidance offce). Interested students must
submit an application when they register for classes. See Ms. Randall-
Mullins, Mr. Painter, or Mr. Minard.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT
Course 761: .5 credit
This course is designed for students who baby-sit after school. Students
in this course may be released period 8 to do babysitting/feld research.
Students will learn about development from infancy through age 6.
Excellent opportunity for students interested in working with children.
One semester long.
SPORTS NUTRITION
Course 762: .25 credit (may be taken for PE credit)
This course is for students interested in enhancing their athletic
performance through nutrition. Participants will develop individualized
food plan geared towards athletic goals, research current supplements,
and get advice from guest speakers. This course also counts as a
Physical Education course and the credit may be used toward the
graduation requirement for PE. One quarter long.
DRUGS AND SOCIETY
Course 763: .25 credit
This class will explore the role drugs have in our society and the impact
on individuals, communities and our society. Participants will explore
drugs in the social context, the history and culture of drugs, drug abuse
and social challenges, theories of drug use as well as crime control and
social policy. One quarter long.
HEALTH ISSUES IN THE MEDIA
Course 764: .25 credit
This course is designed for juniors and seniors focusing on current
health issues that are portrayed in the media. Class will involve
critiquing Hollywood’s portrayal of issues around bigotry, mental health,
substance abuse, disordered eating, etc. One quarter.
CONTEMPORARY HEALTH ISSUES IN FICTION
Course 191: 1credit (1.0 English credit/)
This course also meets the graduation requirement for a Health course.
This combined English-Health course meets every other day for the entire
year. The course is built around the reading of some major works of
American literature, selections from contemporary young adult fction,
research, writings, guest speakers, flms, and discussions. The readings
include To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, CatcherintheRye by JD
Salinger, DeathofaSalesman by Arthur Miller, Speak by Laurie Halse
Anderson, Twisted by Laurie Halse Anderson, SLAM by Nick Hornby,
BottledUp by Jaye Murray, Cut by Patricia McCormick, and short
stories. Interpersonal communications and coping skills will be taught
to aid students in making decisions about such issues as self-concept,
goals, diet, stress, sexuality, substances, wellness and peers. Class
participation is crucial. Completion of this course satisfes the Health
graduation requirement. Daily homework, tests, quizzes, papers, and a
fnal exam are required. Although juniors and seniors may sign up for the
course, sophomores will be given preference. The course is limited to 40
students.
INDEPENDENT LIVING
Course 794: .5 credit (may be taken for Social Studies credit)
The Independent Living Course is designed to help participants build
skills, expand knowledge and develop character. These outcomes will
enable the student to experience productive and fulflling lives.
Skills: Character:
• Communication • Community
• Effective thinking (successful interaction,
• Getting along with others giving back,
• Goal Setting responsibilities
• Utilizing technology of citizenship)
• Accessing community resources
Knowledge:
• Financials (checking accounts, personal budgets, credit, taxes)
• Career (selection, resume writing, interviewing)
• Consumerism (purchasing tangible goods, insurance)
• Health (accessing health services, meal planning)
• Legal system
• Housing (buying, renting)
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Course 797: .5 credit (one semester)
Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing felds in business and this
course is for anyone interested in someday starting a business, working
with an entrepreneurial company or using entrepreneurial skills to
revitalize a larger company. In this course students will use hands-on
examples and cases to gather the skills needed to effectively organize,
develop, create, and manage their own businesses. By the end of the
course the student will have completed a detailed business plan ready
for small business start-up. Learn how to make a difference in today’s
business world!
16
ART DEPARTMENT
GRADE NO. COURSE LEVEL RECOMMENDED PREP
9-12 700 Art I Intro None
9-12 701 Art & New Media Intro None
9-12 702 Pottery/3-D Studio Intro None
9-12 704 Painting Intermed. Art I or Basic Art &
New Media
10-12 710 Art II Intermed. Art I or
Basic Art & New Media
or by teacher
recommendation
10-12 712 Pottery II Intermed. Pottery/3-D Studio
11-12 720 Art III Advanced Art II
11-12 725 Art IV Advanced Art III
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
GRADE NO. COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
10-12 961 Music Composition None
10-12 962 Concert Chorus Audition or Teacher
Recommendation
9-10 963 Concert Band None
9-12 964 Jazz Ensemble Audition only
9-12 965 Symphonic Band Teacher
recommendation
9-12 966 Mixed Chorus First year music
students
9-12 969 World Drumming Interview w/ instructor
9-12 971 Jazz Improvisation None
10-12 973 Chamber Singers Enrollment in Chorus
& audition
9-12 980 Wind Ensemble Audition only
9-12 981 Guitar Interview w/ instructor
South Burlington High School offers a variety of courses to expose
students to the aesthetic, creative and intellectual opportunities available
by participating in the fne and performing arts. The following courses
allow students to specialize in art or music. A sequence of classes are
offered to teach students about the visual arts. The Introductory Level
courses are offered to students entering the high school art program
and provide the fundamental skills needed for them to continue in the
Intermediate and Advanced courses. The Intermediate Level classes
are directed toward the students who would like to specialize their study
in drawing/ painting, in sculpture/3D design or pottery. The Advanced
Level courses are designed for the highly motivated student to continue
refning his/her skills and develop a high quality personal portfolio. It
is advised that students preparing portfolio review for architecture,
graphic design, computer arts, fashion, or interior design schools
complete at least Art I and Art II. Homework may be assigned in all
art classes through sketchbook journals, research or studio work.
ART DEPARTMENT
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ART I
Course 700: 1 credit
This introductory course is recommended for students curious about art
for personal interests and as preparation for further study in the visual
arts. The elements of art and the principles of design are taught through
such media as pencil, pen and ink, tempera and acrylic paint, and
sculptural media. Students will begin to develop individual technique
and create early portfolio pieces. Sketchbook assignments help students
discover personal interests and enhance individual style.
ART & NEW MEDIA
Course 701: .5 credit
This introductory course is recommended for students interested in
developing art skills. Students will focus on the elements and principals
of art through various media including the computer and other electronic
peripherals. Students will explore drawing and painting techniques as
well as various software programs. Assignments will involve media
application, skill development, personal expression, and refection/
critique in a variety of media. (This course is recommended preparation
for Art II and Electronic Arts.).
POTTERY/3-D STUDIO
Course 702: .5 credit
This course is designed for students interested in a “hands-on”
approach to art. This course will teach students the fundamental
elements of pottery and 3-dimensional design. Traditional clay hand
building techniques such as slab, pinch and coil will be covered in the
frst quarter. Students will learn basic pottery terminology and glaze
applications. Students will also work on creating three-dimensional
objects using a variety of media. Papier mache, clay, wood and wire are
just some of the materials that may be used. The elements of art will be
used to guide the assignments and to ensure that the work has strong
visual appeal.
PAINTING
Course 704: .5 credit
Express yourself!! Put your fair to paint. This is a one semester course
offered to students who have an interest in exploring painting as a
specifc medium. Watercolor, tempera, and acrylics paints will be used.
Students will work from life and refer to artists from the 20th century
in realistic, abstract, and non-representational styles to create their own
expressive paintings. (RecommendedPreparation:ArtIorBasicArtand
New Media)
ART II
Course 710: 1 credit
This course is designed for those students who wish to pursue art in
college, as a career or for personal interest. It provides preparation for
further study in the visual arts, design, architecture or computer arts. Art
II offers students advanced study in drawing, painting and sculpture/3D
studies. Students will develop advanced skills and create works of art to
build their portfolios. Sketchbook assignments help students discover
personal interests and develop individual technique. (Recommended
prep:ArtI,BasicArtandNewMedia,orbyteacherrecommendation)
POTTERY II
Course 712: .5 credit
Pottery II is designed for students interested in further exploring the
infnite techniques of working with and decorating clay. Students will
work to develop a personal style of artistic expression. Some sculpture,
hand building and wheel work will be covered in assigned, individual
and group projects. (RecommendedPreparation:Pottery/3-DStudio)
ADVANCED ART III - Course 720: 1 credit
ADVANCED ART IV - Course 725: 1 credit
These courses are designed for those students who wish to pursue art
in college, as a career or for personal interest. They provide excellent
preparation for further study in visual arts, design, architecture, or
computer art. Art III is designed for the advanced student who is ready
to develop his or her own artistic voice. Students often have more
freedom and choice of subject matter, media and approach within the
structure of assignments. This class helps students prepare portfolios for
art school admission. Open to juniors and seniors who have completed
Art II. Art IV is designed for those students who have completed Art III
and wish to continue to develop their skills and portfolio. (Recommended
Preparation: Art II for course 720, Art III for course 725)
FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT
17
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
MUSIC COMPOSITION
Course 961: 1 credit
Music Composition involves the study of the mechanics of music;
scales, modes, chords, part writing and basic orchestration. The
emphasis of the course is applying the “mechanics” to your own creative
compositions that are written with the help of computers and music
software. Also, included is sight-singing and rhythmic reading. This
class is open to anyone who is interested in learning more about the
writing process of music.
CONCERT CHORUS
Course 962: 1 credit
Concert Chorus is a large, four-part vocal ensemble concerned with the
study and performance of standard choral literature. Students enrolled
in this class will also continue refning basic musicianship and theory
skills, and their individual vocal and choral technique. There are usually
three concert performances per school year in addition to participation
options in All-State, New England, and District Choral Festivals.
Students are expected to practice the music assigned for performance as
well as any written assignments. This is a full-year, performance-based
offering; students are graded on an individual basis. Open to students
in 10-12 grade who have had prior choral experience. If you are
new to the district or to the choral program, you must interview
with the director. Grade 9 students are welcome to audition following
completion of one year in mixed chorus.
CONCERT BAND
Course 963: 1 credit
This is a large instrumental ensemble open to all 9th and 10th grade
woodwind, brass and percussion players without an audition. The
Concert Band rehearses and performs music of all styles and performs
three to four concerts each year including participation in a music
competition. Students are expected to practice their music assigned for
performance as well as classroom assignments. Students who would
like to learn a new band instrument and learn how to read music,
but thought that it was too late, can do it this year in Concert Band!
Students can experiment with all of the instruments to fgure out which
suits them best and then choose from one of the following: percussion
(drums), any brass (trumpet, trombone, tuba) or any woodwind (fute,
clarinet, or saxophone)
JAZZ ENSEMBLE
Course 964: 1 credit or .5 credit
Open to all students by audition. Rehearsals occur two days a week
during the school day with occasional Thursday evenings. Concerts are
in the evenings three to four times per school year. Students who pass
the audition will be expected to attend all rehearsals, concerts and two
jazz festivals. Students take part in fund raising performances at their
choice in small combo settings.
SYMPHONIC BAND
Course 965: 1 credit or .5 credit*
This is a large instrumental ensemble open to woodwind, brass and
percussion players in grades 9-12 by audition only. Students in this
ensemble will learn challenging wind ensemble literature and work on
refning individual as well as ensemble musical skills. The Symphonic
Band performs in three to four concerts each year including participation
in a music competition. Students are expected to practice their music
assigned for performance as well as classroom assignments. (*.5 credit
for students who also enroll in Jazz Ensemble or Concert Chorus which
may be scheduled simultaneously)
MIXED CHORUS
Course 966: 1 credit
A small, full-year choral ensemble open to all 9th graders and 1st year
choral students. No previous experience is required. This course will
focus on learning and performing standard choral repertoire, refning
basic musicianship and theory skills, and choral technique. This
ensemble will prepare its own music as well as the Concert Chorus
music for performance at least three times per school year. Grades will
be assigned on an individual basis based on classroom work, work
outside of class and skill assessment. Students enrolled in this ensemble
also have the opportunity to participate in All-State, New England and
District Chorus Festivals.
WORLD DRUMMING
Course 969: 1 credit
World Drumming involves the study and practice of West African
drumming, singing and dancing. This is designed as an enjoyable,
interactive performance class in which students of all musical abilities
feel comfortable. Self-discipline, respect, teamwork and good listening
skills are all integral components in this class. There are several
performances each year including visits to the elementary schools and
community outreach concerts. Students are graded on participation
and preparation of material. Open to anyone in grades 9-12.
(Prerequisite: Interview with Mrs. Toner.)
JAZZ IMPROVISATION
Course 971: .5 credit per semester
Jazz Improvisation class is open to all interested instrumental and
vocal students, as well as guitar and piano students not involved in the
performing ensembles. Learn how to perform music in the jazz tradition
in a small combo setting. This class is designed to teach the skills
involved in improvising jazz, blues and Latin styles. Students will be
graded on inclass performance demonstrating material covered. Students
must have a moderate ability to read music.
CHAMBER SINGERS
Course 973: 1 credit
A smaller choral ensemble concerned with the study of more challenging
repertoire, ranging from Renaissance to Jazz. The members of this
ensemble are chosen through an audition process at the end of the
previous school year. It is a year-long commitment. These singers have
performed for WCAX Channel 3, Dessert Night, Graduation, faculty
meetings, and dedications. In addition, this emsemble participates in VT
American Choral Director’s Association Mid-Winter Madrigal Festival
It is recommended that students be enrolled in Concert Chorus and have
a basic knowledge of music theory and choral technique. Students will
be graded on an individual basis according to classroom rehearsal and
skills practice.
WIND ENSEMBLE
Course 980: 1 credit
A small, select wind ensemble open to anyone in grades 9-12 by audition
only. A “catch-all” class focused on intense musical study in every
aspect including theory, ear training, and challenging wind ensemble and
chamber music repertoire. This class is recommended for the serious
instrumental student who would like a challenge.
GUITAR ENSEMBLE
Course 981: 1 credit
Guitar Ensemble is open to all interested students by interview. This
course is designed to explore different guitar styles and music genres.
Students will learn the basics of reading music, chord charts and study
basic guitar theory. Students enrolled will be asked to participate in
performances during the school year. Grading for this course is based on
18
GRADE NO. COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
9-10 425 Pre-Algebra Completion of Grade 8 Math
9-11 431 Algebra I-Level 1 Minimum B Math 8
9-11 432 Algebra I-Part 1-Level 2 Teacher recommendation
9-12 433 Algebra I-Part 2-Level 2 Minimum C Algebra I-P1-L2
9-10 440 Geometry Accelerated Minimum B Algebra I, Grade 8 or
Minimum A in Algebra I 431 and
teacher recommendation
9-11 441 Geometry-Level 1 Minimum BAlgebra I 431
10-12 442 Geometry-Level 2 Minimum C Algebra I
10 450 Algebra II Accelerated Minimum B Geometry 440 and
teacher recommendation
11-12 451 Algebra II-Level 1 Minimum B Algebra 431 and
Minimum B Geometry 441
11-12 452 Algebra II-Level 2 Minimum C Alg 431 or B in Alg 433
and
Minimum C Geom 441 or B Geom 442
11-12 455 Consumer Math 2 credits of High School Math
11-12 460 Pre-Calculus Accelerated Minimum B Algebra II 450 and
teacher recommendation
11-12 461 Pre-Calculus-Level 1 Minimum B Algebra II 451 or
A in Algebra II 452
11-12 463 Probability and Statistics Minimum CAlgebra II
11-12 464 Advanced Placement Statistics Minimum B Algebra II 451
12 470 Advanced Placement Minimum B Pre-Calculus 460
Calculus (AB) and teacher recommendation
12 471 Calculus-Level 1 Minimum B Pre-Calculus 461
12 490 Advanced Placement Minimum A Pre-Calculus 460
Calculus (BC) and teacher recommendation
OUT-OF-CLASS ASSIGNED WORK POLICY
With few exceptions, out-of-class work will be assigned to students for
each period that a math class meets. Out-of-class assigned work is as
important as class interaction. Proper out-of-class preparation improves
class participation due to increased student confdence. Out-of-class
preparation:
1. promotes independent learning,
2. fosters more productive class discussion and work sessions,
3. expedites the learning process.
The length of out-of-class assignments will vary with a course such
as Pre-Algebra requiring thirty minutes out-of-class student time per
class period for the mid range student and a more rigorous course such
as Pre-Calculus requiring forty minutes out-of-class student time per
class period for the mid range student. The assignments are regulated by
teacher judgment following the above general rules.
TECHNOLOGY
Calculators and computers are used when appropriate throughout the
mathematics curriculum. Students are expected to have their own basic
operation or scientifc calculator depending on the course they are
enrolled in. The teacher will inform students of minimum calculator
specifcations. Graphing calculators will be supplied as required by the
school. Computer activities will be conducted when appropriate on the
SBHS computer network.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
PRE-ALGEBRA
Course 425: 1 credit
This course is designed to prepare the student for Algebra I. Following
a brief review of basic skills, the major topics in the course are using
variables to describe a variety of applications, solving equations,
graphing in the Cartesian plane, and functions. There is an emphasis
on recognizing and using patterns and hands-on experimental learning.
Recommended Prep: Completion of Grade 8 Math and teacher
recommendation
ALGEBRA I LEVEL 1
Course 431: 1 credit
This course provides the student with the skills and concepts needed
for further study of mathematics. The major topics in the course are
linear functions and graphs, systems of linear equations and inequalities,
absolute value and the real number system, quadratic functions and
equations, polynomials and exponents, factoring, radical expressions,
rational expressions and an introduction to probability and statistics.
Applications of these topics are included in each section. Graphing
calculators are used in the course. Completion of this course satisfes
the Algebra graduation requirement. Recommended Prep: Minimum B
Math 8
ALGEBRA I PART 1-LEVEL 2
Course 432: 1 credit
This course is designed for the student who learns at a slower pace.
This is part one of a two year Algebra I program. The major algebra
topics include linear equations and systems, functions and their
graphs, statistics, inequalities, rational numbers, polynomials, and
applications of these topics. Graphing calculators are used in the course.
Recommended Prep: Teacher Recommendation
ALGEBRA I PART 2-LEVEL 2
Course 433: 1 credit
This course is the second year of the two-year Algebra I program. The
major Algebraic topics covered are: systems of linear equations, systems
of linear inequalities, absolute value and the real number system,
polynomials, factoring, radical expressions, rational expressions and
applications of these topics. Graphing calculators are used in the course.
Completion of this course satisfes the Algebra graduation requirement.
Recommended Prep: Minimum C in Algebra I Part I L- 2
GEOMETRY ACCELERATED
Course 440: 1 credit
This course is designed for the accelerated student who requires
an in- depth study of plane and solid geometry. There is emphasis
on writing formal proofs using deductive reasoning and solving
challenging problems. Applications and history of geometry are
discussed. In addition to the topics listed under course 441, the topics
of transformations, coordinate geometry proofs or locus constructions
may be included as time permits. The Geometer’s Sketchpad software is
used to perform geometric explorations and set up mathematical models.
Recommended Prep: Minimum B Algebra I, Grade 8 or minimum A in
Algebra I 431 and teacher recommendation
GEOMETRY LEVEL 1
Course 441: 1 credit
This course is designed for the student who desires a rigorous study
of plane and solid geometry. Properties of geometric fgures and their
applications are learned. Topics covered are deductive and inductive
reasoning, formal proof writing, parallel lines and planes, congruent
triangles, polygons, similar fgures, circles, areas, volumes, and
right triangle trigonometry. Coordinate geometry, transformations,
constructions, and loci may also be included. Recommended Prep:
Minimum B in Algebra I 431
GEOMETRY LEVEL 2
Course 442: 1 credit
This course is intended for the student who would like an acquaintance
with geometric concepts but does not require an intensive presentation
of the subject. The student is involved in the discovery of geometric
ideas, often in cooperative groups, using inductive reasoning, logic, and
informal proof to make generalizations, formulate defnitions, and solve
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT
19
problems. The student develops visualization skills through drawings
and constructions. Major topics include polygons, congruent triangles,
circles, area, right triangles, volume, and may also include similarity.
Geometer’s Sketchpad software is used for a variety of activities.
Recommended Prep: Minimum C in Algebra I
ALGEBRA II ACCELERATED
Course 450: 1 credit
This course is designed for the accelerated student who will beneft from
a rigorous, faster paced approach to high school mathematics. Algebra
is presented as the study of classes of functions and their applications.
The types of functions covered are linear, quadratic, exponential,
logarithmic, rational, irrational and higher degree. Applications are
practiced by creating mathematical models of phenomena in the real
world. Inequalities, complex numbers, conics, trigonometry, matrices,
and determinants are included in the course. As time permits, the topics
of sequences and series, probability and statistics may be included.
Graphing calculators are used in the course.
Recommended Prep: Minimum B in Geometry 440 and teacher
recommendation
ALGEBRA II LEVEL 1
Course 451: 1 credit
This course is designed for the capable student who is preparing for
continued mathematics study. Algebra is presented as the study of
classes of functions and their applications. The types of functions
covered are linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational,
irrational and higher degree. Applications are practiced by creating
mathematical models of phenomena in the real world. Complex
numbers, conics, matrices, determinants, probability, statistics, and
an introduction to trigonometry are included in the course. Graphing
calculators are used in the course. Recommended Prep: Minimum B in
Algebra 431 Geometry 441
ALGEBRA II LEVEL 2
Course 452: 1 credit
This course provides the student with a thorough review and explanation
of the fundamentals of Algebra I such as factoring, fractions, simplifying
radicals, equation solving, graphing relations, and verbal problems.
Quadratic functions, matrices, exponential and logarithmic functions,
and linear programming are major topics in this course. Trigonometry
and conics are included when time permits. Graphing calculators are
used in the course. Recommended Prep: Minimum C in Algebra 431
or Minimum B in Algebra 433 and Minimum C in Geometry 441 or
minimum of B in Geometry 442
CONSUMER MATHEMATICS
NCAA

Course 455: 1 credit
This course provides the student with a survey of some of the major
fnancial topics that one encounters after high school. Topics include but
are not limited to: Checking/savings accounts, automobile ownership
and insurance, health and life insurance, renting an apartment, owning a
home, credit cards, personal taxes, and investing. This course reinforces
fundamental mathematics concepts of computation, ratios, percents,
and graphing. It also emphasizes technology through Internet and
spreadsheet exercises. Recommended Prep: 2 credits of high school
mathematics
PRE-CALCULUS ACCELERATED
Course 460: 1 credit
This course is intended for the accelerated mathematics student who
seeks a rigorous pre-calculus course with a balance of theory and
application. Topics covered include functions, inequalities, analytic
geometry, exponents and logarithms, trigonometry, vectors, sequences
and series, statistics, matrices, combinatorics, probability, curve ftting,
limits, and an introduction to calculus. The student uses appropriate
computer software and a graphing calculator for graphing, data analysis,
discrete mathematics and programming. Recommended Prep: Minimum
B in Algebra II 450 and teacher recommendation
PRE-CALCULUS LEVEL 1
Course 461: 1 credit
This course is designed for the capable mathematics student. Topics
covered include functions, analytic geometry, exponents and logarithms,
trigonometry, a variety of graphing applications, and an introduction to
calculus. Graphing calculators are used in the course. Recommended
Prep: Minimum B in Algebra II 451 or A in Algebra II 452
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS
Course 463: 1 credit
This course is designed for the student who seeks a practical rather than
theoretical mathematics course. The class is taught primarily through
experimentation and discovery. The student who seeks a less rigorous,
but more practical course can use it as an alternative to Pre-Calculus.
The topics covered and data used are current and are directed toward
practical applications in business, science, advertising, sports, social
science, and medicine. Student use of the TI-83 Plus graphing calculator
Recommended Prep: Minimum C in Algebra II is an integral part of the
course.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS
Course 464: 1 credit
The AP Statistics course follows the College Board Advanced Placement
curriculum. It is divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis,
planning and conducting a study, probability and statistical inference.
Students will explore each of these areas in depth. Technology will be
an integral part of the course with students using graphics calculators/
computers on a regular basis. Recommended Prep: Minimum B in
Algebra II 451. (Students enrolled in Advanced Placement Statistics
are required to take the Advanced Placement exam to earn credit for this
course.)
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS (AB)
Course 470: 1 credit
Calculus AB follows the College Board Advanced Placement
curriculum. It is primarily concerned with developing the students’
understanding of the concepts of calculus (derivatives and integrals)
and providing experience with its methods and applications. The
course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with
concepts, results and problems being expressed graphically, numerically,
analytically and verbally. The connections among these representations
are stressed. Graphing calculators are used on a regular basis.
Recommended Prep: Minimum B in Pre-Calculus 460 and teacher
recommendation.
(Students enrolled in Advanced Placement Calculus (AB) are required to
take the Advanced Placement exam to earn credit for this course.)
CALCULUS LEVEL I
Course 471: 1 credit
This course is offered to the capable mathematics student who does
not require the accelerated pace and theoretical aspects of Calculus
470. Slope, rate of change, and defnition of derivative are reviewed .
Integration and differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions
are examined. Applied problems such as related rates, area, maximum/
minumum, volume, work, and velocity are emphasized. Graphing
calculators are used in this course. Recommended Prep: Minimum B in
Pre-Calculus 461
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS (BC)
Course 490: 1 credit
Calculus BC follows the College Board Advanced Placement course
description, which can be found on page 10 of the following document:
http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap08_calculus
coursedesc.pdf
20
GRADE NO. COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
9-12 059 Adaptive P.E. I.E.P.
9-12 061 P.E.-Life Time Activities (Qtr 1)
9-12 062 P.E.-Life Time Activities (Qtr 2)
9-12 063 P.E.-Life Time Activities (Qtr 3)
9-12 064 P.E.-Life Time Activities (Qtr 4)
11-12 068 Plyometrics
11-12 069 Fitness Walking
11-12 070 Advanced Physical Education
11-12 071 Fall Interscholastic Athletics 1 Sport Season
11-12 072 Winter Interscholastic Athletics 1 Sport Season
11-12 073 Spring Interscholastic Athletics 1 Sport Season
9-12 066 Dance
11-12 077 PE-Independent Physical Education
Graduation Requirement: 1.5 credits
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Course 059: .5 credit
The Adaptive P.E. Program is designed to meet the needs of students
with Individual Educational Programs. The course objectives include
assisting students in the development of physical ftness and motor
ability as well as promoting physical, mental, and social growth.
Activities are determined by the student’s individual plan and include
resistance-training, range-of-motion exercises, bicycling, and other
appropriate activities.
PE-LIFE TIME ACTIVITIES
Courses 061 (Qtr 1), 062 (Qtr 2), 063 (Qtr 3), 064 (Qtr 4):
.25 credit per quarter
The Life Time Activities Program is designed to provide opportunities
for the students to elect individual and team activities that have carry
over value associated with them. The Life Time Activities allow for
mixed grade, co educational participation and will provide a variety
of life and leisure time offerings. The Life Time Activities objectives
include assisting students in the development of physical ftness and
motor ability; aiding the students physical, mental, and social growth;
and offering activities which facilitate meeting these program objectives.
Activities may include:
061 Field Hockey, Lacrosse, Touch Rugby, Horseshoes, Archery,
Golf, Tennis, Orienteering, Fitness, Flickerball, Power/Race Walking,
Frisbee, Bowling, Weight Training, Soccer, Flag Football, Ropes Course,
Wallyball, Pillow Hockey
062 Weight Training, Conditioning, Bowling, Volleyball, Personal
Fitness, Aerobics, Badminton, Table Tennis, Broomball, Basketball,
Snow Lacrosse, Indoor Soccer, Indoor Field Hockey, Par Pool
063 Cross Country Skiing, Racquetball, Table Tennis, Badminton, Indoor
Games, Fitness, Aerobics, Orienteering, Weight Training, Pickleball,
Team Handball, Paddleball, Shuffeboard, Yoga, Tai Chi
064 Aerobics, Flickerball, Tennis, Softball, Personal Fitness, Walking,
Wellness, Golf, Mountain Biking, Orienteering, In-Line Skating,
Volleyball, Gatorball, Cooperative Games, Dance, Kick Boxing
DANCE
Course 066: .25 credit in Fine Arts or Physical Education
The Physical Education Department is offering a dance course for
the frst quarter and fourth quarter. The emphasis will be on Hip-Hop
or Jazz. The days and times of the course will be determined after
we have completed course registration. This is available to all high
school students in grades 9-12. This is for all students, beginners and
accomplished dancers alike. One-quarter credit will be given to those
students successfully completing the course.
PLYOMETRICS (SPEED SCHOOL)
Course 068:.25 credit
This course includes activities and exercises to enhance speed and
power. This course is designed for students interested in increasing their
reaction time and speed. This course is highly physical and demands
maximum physical effort. Classes will be flmed and students will have
time to analyze performance and process their progress visually.
FITNESS WALKING
Course 069: .25 credit
This quarter long ftness walking course will provide students with
the knowledge and skills needed to develop and maintain a lifetime of
optimal health and ftness. Students will learn about the components
of ftness: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, fexibility and
body composition as it relates to ftness walking. Activities associated
with this unit will include weight training, circuit training, treadmill
training, the utilization of pedometers, and how to train using heart-rate
monitors. Students will progress from fat easy walking to brisk paces,
hill workouts to intervals of walking workouts.
ADVANCED PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Course 070: .25 credit
This quarter long course will provide students with and accelerated
model of the present “Lifetime Activities”. Students will be exposed to
different activities with a focus on teamwork, fair play, rules and history
of sports, and leadership skills. Students will be expected to participate
rigorously and competitively. Grading/assessment will be based
on in-depth knowledge of each activity and advanced skill mastery.
Activities offered will include both team and individual sport activities.
(Prerequisite: Students must have participated in one-half (1/2) credit of
Lifetime Activities, and be a Junior or Senior.)
INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETICS
Course F071, W072, SP073: .25 credit (1 sport season)
The physical education department will give PE credit toward graduation
for participation in SBHS interscholastic activities or specifc out-of-
school activities which meet certain criteria consistent with departmental
practice and philosophy. This credit is only available to juniors and
seniors, who achieve PE objectives while involved in interscholastic
athletics, and are on the fnal team rosters at the end of each sport
season. One quarter (.25) credit can be earned per sport season, or per
out-of-school activity, to a maximum of one half (.50) credit (two sport
seasons).
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
The course covers all topics covered in AP Calculus AB, in addition to
the following topics: parametric, polar, and vector functions; calculation
of antiderivatives by parts and partial fractions; improper integrals;
Euler’s Method; L’Hopitals Rule; logistic differential equations; and
Taylor series. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach
to calculus, with concepts, results and problems being expressed
graphically, numerically, analytically and verbally. The TI-89 graphing
calculator is used in this course. Students who do not own a TI-89 will
be loaned one for the year.
Recommended Prep: Minimum A in Course 460 and teacher
recommendation.
(Students enrolled in Advanced Placement Calculus (BC) are required to
take the Advanced Placement exam to earn credit for this course.)
21
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
9TH GRADE INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS
Course 331, 332: 0.5 credit
IP is a one semester course designed to give students an opportunity
to develop at an introductory level, a conceptual understanding of
the rules by which the universe operates in the areas of motion,
forces, momentum, energy, and work. Activities, demonstrations, and
discussions will be used that center around the three parts of the learning
cycle (exploration, concept development, and application) to help
students achieve the appropriate level of conceptual understanding. An
attempt will be made to identify and discuss common misconceptions
related to each topic. (This one semester course is continued with Earth
Science.)
COURSE 331, LEVEL 1, is designed around the same topics and
activities as described in the course description and students are
expected to have a strong interest in science and math.
COURSE 332, LEVEL 2, is designed for the students that need more
instructional support in both the class and lab. Similar topics will be
covered. However, a number of the lab procedures will be demonstrated
prior to conducting labs.
EARTH SCIENCE
Course 341, non-leveled: 0.5 credit
Earth Science is a one semester lab science program designed to be
taken during the freshman year along with Introduction to Physics.
Topics covered in Earth Science include the Big Bang Theory, the
Origin of the Solar System, comparing the nature and composition
of the planets, star formation and how technology has affected our
understanding of the universe. Included in these topics is a review of
the contributions of scientists such as Ptolemy, Copernicus, Keplar, and
Einstein. The Rock Cycle, Plate Tectonics, analysis of rock sequences,
natural resources, and alternative energy are also covered.
BIOLOGY
Biology offers an understanding into the diversity of both plants and
animals. Particular attention is given to understanding cell structures
and how their functions relate to the development of the organism.
Special emphasis will be placed on how these organisms ft into the
environment. Most areas are illustrated through laboratory investigations
and feld studies. Biology homework is assigned on a regular basis. This
will include written assignments, lab reports, quizzes and tests. Course
350 or 351 is required for AP Biology and AP Environmental Science,
and suggested for those planning to take Chemistry 360, 361. Biology
Courses 350 and 351 will take a standardized fnal exam. Topics
GRADE NO COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
9 331 9
th
Grade Intro. to Physics
9 332 9
th
Grade Intro. to Physics
9 341 Earth Science
10 350 Accelerated Biology Minimum Grade A in all level
1 science and math courses
or
teacher’s recommendation
10 351 Lab Biology Minimum grade B in
331/341 or
teacher’s recommendation
10 352 General Biology Passing grade and teacher’s
recommendation.
11 360 AP Chemistry Should be enrolled Pre-
Calculus Accelerated and/or
have CAS permission
11 361 Lab Chemistry Minimum grade B in Algebra
I; enrolled in Algebra II, L-1
11 362 General Chemistry Minimum grade C in Algebra I
11 363 Practical Chemistry Solid math skills

All students will be required to take 9th grade science, biology and
chemistry prior to taking other science courses. Exceptions to this
may be granted by the Curricular Area Supervisor (CAS).
GRADE NO COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
11-12 367 Weather, Climate, and Successful completion or
Atmospheric Studies concurrent enrollment in
Chemistry
12 364 Life Sci. Topics Completed 2 years of science
12 365 Physical Sci Topics and teacher’s recommend.
12 370 AP Environmental Science Minimum grade B in Biology
and/or have CAS permission
12 371 Advanced Biology L-1 Minimum grade C in Biology
351 or 352.
12 380 AP Physics Minimum grade A in all math
courses. Enrolled in Calculus.
11-12 381 Lab Physics B in Geometry, Algebra II,
and Chemistry 360/361 &
teacher recommendation.
11-12 384 Astronomy Algebra I
12 390 AP Biology Minimum grade A in Biology
350/351 & A in Chemistry
360/361 and/or CAS
recommendation
SCIENCE
Interscholastic athletic offerings include:
071 (Fall): 072 (Winter): 073 (Spring):
Boys Soccer Boys Basketball Baseball
Girls Soccer Girls Basketball Softball
Field Hockey Boys Ice Hockey Boys Tennis
Football Girls Ice Hockey Girls Tennis
Cheerleading Cheerleading Boys Track & Field
Boys Cross Country Snowboarding Girls Track & Field
Girls Cross Country Gymnastics Boys Golf
Indoor Track Girls Golf
Dance Team Boys Lacrosse
Alpine Skiing Girls Lacrosse
Nordic Skiing
PE-INDEPENDENT STUDY
Course 077: .25 credit
Students who demonstrate and participate in a rigorous, consistent, and
supervised physical activity outside of the school day may apply to the
Physical Education Department Chairperson for Physical Education
credit. The objectives of this course include improving physical
development, hand-eye coordination, physical strength, and general
motor ability. Individual programs will be designed to meet the student’s
specifc needs. This course is only available to juniors and seniors who
apply to the department chairperson.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEP’T. HOMEWORK POLICY:
A. Generally, there is no daily homework in PE classes.
B. Units in LIFE-TIME ACTIVITIES will include written quizzes.
Quarter exams (written) are given which serve as a check for student
understanding of class material. Exams often include areas such as
sport rules and regulations, sport skill techniques, sport vocabulary,
and sport playing courtesies. Written work may be assigned as make
up for missed classes or for those students with a medical excuse.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT NOTES:
1. Students are required to provide appropriate attire for participation in
PE activities.
2. Parental requests for permanent excuses from PE activities must
include a physician’s statement.
3. Daily excuses must come at the written request of the parent/guardian.
4. All physical education programs and activities are in compliance with
Title IX legislation and PL 94 142.
22
included in biology are ecology, cells, genetics and evolution, heredity,
exploration of the six kingdoms with emphasis in bacteria, plants and
animals. Finally, the human body systems will be studied extensively.
ACCELERATED BIOLOGY
Course 350: 1.5 credits
Accelerated Biology is designed for the student that has achieved A
averages in prior level 1 science and math courses. It is intended for a
limited number of students that have a high interest and a desire to spend
more time in the feld of science. Topics will be similar to the other
biology courses, but a greater amount of content, readings and laboratory
work will be given. A year-long project will accompany the curriculum.
Grade expectations will be higher. Students will take a standardized
comprehensive exam at the end of the course.
LAB BIOLOGY
Course 351: 1.5 credits
Lab Biology is designed to place emphasis on detail and in depth study
of each unit. Additional readings beyond the text will be assigned.
This program is suggested for those students preparing for a four-year
college. Students will take a standardized year long test at the end of the
course.
GENERAL BIOLOGY
NCAA

Course 352: 1.5 credits
General Biology is designed as a laboratory oriented course. Labs will
be limited to the basic essentials of biology. This program is suggested
for those students planning to attend either a two-year college or a
school that does not stress science as a recommended preparation in their
entrance requirements.
ADVANCED BIOLOGY
Course 371: 1.5 credits
Advanced Biology is a laboratory-oriented course offered to students
interested in biology in their senior year. This provides an opportunity to
gain an understanding of the nature of scientifc inquiry through open-
ended experimentation in genetics, human anatomy and physiology, and
ecology. Field trips to lakes and terrestrial areas provide opportunities to
study organisms in depth and to collect data for lab analysis. This course
will provide the student with a deeper understanding and appreciation of
life by way of experiences both in the classroom laboratory and in the
feld. Students may prepare for programs beyond high school that either
directly or indirectly relate to biology.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY
Course 390: 1.5 credits
AP Biology is a college level course. It is limited to those students
that have achieved A averages in either Level 1 or accelerated science
courses. The AP curriculum requires an in depth study of biology
and twelve college labs. Content will be divided into three major
areas; molecules and cells, genetics and evolution, and organisms and
populations. A college text, approved by the College Board, will be used
as the major resource for information. The overall goal of the course is
to provide a solid background so that students will be prepared to take
the required AP exam in the spring. Students should expect lengthy
assignments and lab reports. Students should be interested in pursuing
a possible science career. They should also be enrolled in pre-calculus
or calculus. (Students enrolled in this course are required to take the
Advanced Placement exam to earn credit for this course.)
CHEMISTRY
ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY
COURSE 360: 1.5 credits
AP Chemistry is designed to be the equivalent of frst-year college
chemistry. Introductory topics such as measurement, structure and states
of matter, and reactions are covered quickly. More emphasis is placed on
equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and oxidation-reduction. These
topics are studied to a greater depth than in the Lab Chemistry class
(361). Students will take the American Chemical Society fnal exam and
are required to take the national AP exam in the spring. Students should
be enrolled in accelerated pre-calculus and have strong math skills.
(Students enrolled in this course are required to take the Advanced
Placement exam to earn credit for this course. )
LAB CHEMISTRY
Course 361: 1.5 credits
Lab chemistry is an intensive, year- long college preparatory course
designed for students who are applying to four year competitive colleges
and/or students interested in applying to four year colleges with an
interest in science. It includes units on atomic structure, bonding,
reactions, stoichiometry, acids and bases, kinetics, oxidation-reduction
reactions and some organic chemistry. Homework is assigned daily and
students take a standardized American Chemical Society test as their
fnal exam. Competence in mathematics is the best indicator of success
for Chemistry.
GENERAL CHEMISTRY
NCAA

Course 362: 1.5 credit
General Chemistry is designed for students who are applying to
two or four year colleges. This course moves at a slower pace than
Lab Chemistry. Emphasis is placed on major chemistry concepts
emphasizing vocabulary and problem solving . The course is still
primarily lab based. Enrolled students should have at least a C in
Algebra 1 and /or completed both parts of Algebra 1 with a C .
PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY
NCAA

Course 363: 1 credit
Practical Chemistry is recommended for students who want to
further their interest in the sciences and who are planning to attend
a two- year college or a school that does not stress science as an
entrance requirement. Units include matter and measurement, atoms
and molecules, reactions, electrochemistry, fbers, foods, fuels, and
environmental chemistry. Most assignments and labs are completed in
class and calculations are not emphasized.

PHYSICS
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS B
Course 380: 1.5 credits
Physics B is a college prep course. It is designed as a comprehensive
introduction to physics, including topics in modern and classical physics.
Physics B is the non-calculus AP curriculum. Students should have
completed or be enrolled in pre-calculus. Understanding of fundamental
principles and growth in ability to apply them in solving problems
are emphasized. Students are required to take the national AP test in
the spring. (Students enrolled in this course are required to take the
Advanced Placement exam to earn credit for this course.)
LAB PHYSICS
Course 381: 1.5 credits
Lab Physics is our standard high school physics course for students
who have better than average mathematical skills and have completed
Algebra II and Geometry. Students’ development as independent
learners is emphasized. There are more hands-on labs in Lab Physics
than in AP Physics. Major topics of physics, including mechanics,
energy, waves, light, sound, optics, astronomy, and electricity are
covered.
ASTRONOMY
Course 384: .5 credit
Astronomy is a one-semester course designed for students who are
interested in science, but are not planning to major in it in college.
We will study the universe from the planets to galactic superclusters,
including some of the most fascinating theories of science such as
Einstein’s relativity and the origin of the universe. We will do many
diverse labs, from the plotting of the orbits of planets to simulations of
telescopic data collection. The mathematics involved is limited to topics
learned in Algebra I plus a few skills that will be taught as part of the
course.

23
REQUIRED SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES
GRADE NO. COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
9 241 World History
9 245 Humanities
10 250 Honors American Studies Minimum grade of B+ in
World History & English 9
10 255 American Studies Successful completion of
World History & English 9
10 251 Survey of US History World History
12 271/272 Public Issues & World World History, US History
(S1/S2) Affairs (PIWA)
ELECTIVE SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES
GRADE NO. COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
11-12 261 American Foreign Policy World History, US History
11-12 262 Holocaust Studies World History
11-12 263 History of the Holocaust World History
11-12 270 AP US Gov’t. & Politics Teacher recommendation
11-12 267 Economics World History, US History
12 280 AP European History Teacher recommendation
11-12 285 Afro-American History World History, US History
11-12 286 Building Sustainable World History
Communities
11-12 287 Global Studies World History, US History
10-12 288 Asian Studies World History
10-12 264 American History through World History
Film: 1915 to Modern Movies
11-12 290 Psychology World History, US History
Grade 9 students are required to take World History. Students in grade
10 will take United States History since 1867 or Honors American
Studies. In addition to this required course, grade 10 students may
request an elective, either Special Topics or Asian Studies. Upon
completion of the required grade 10 course, a student will be eligible to
take any of the elective courses available in grades 11 and 12. Students
must take PIWA during the senior year. Students must pass a total of
three credits in the Social Studies including either one-half credit in an
elective or in an approved equivalency credit course.
SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT HOMEWORK POLICY:
Nightly homework assignments are a basic expectation of all courses
in the Social Studies program. Students will receive both written
assignments and reading assignments during the course of the year. The
value of these assignments in relation to the fnal grade will be stated in
the statement of expectations of students that each teacher will hand to
students on the frst day of classes.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
GRADE 9 OPTIONS
WORLD HISTORY
Course 241: 1 credit
All ninth grade students are required to take and pass this course. World
History is a survey course that deals with six major units. Each unit
deals with both Eastern and Western civilizations from pre history to
present day. The following units are studied: Early Civilization, Classical
civilization, Medieval World, transition to Modern Times, Contemporary
World, Early Americas.
HUMANITIES
Course 245: 2 credits (1 credit of English, 1 credit of Social Studies)
Humanities is a grade 9 interdisciplinary, team-taught English and
Social Studies course. It meets each day with both a Social Studies
teacher and an English teacher. Students study world literature
and world history in a thematic approach. Topics include “Culture
and Civilization,” “The Hero’s Journey,” “What We Believe,” and
“Celebration of Life and Language.” Students read The Odyssey, Romeo
and Juliet, and Things Fall Apart – among other titles – during this year-
long course.
GRADE 10 OPTIONS
HONORS AMERICAN STUDIES
Course 250: 2 credits (1 credit of English, 1 credit of Social Studies)
Honors American Studies is an intensive, interdisciplinary, team-taught
course in which students focus on American literature and American
history. This two-credit course meets each day with both a Social
Studies and an English faculty member. While reading The American
Pageant, the history textbook, students also read literary works that are
historically connected to the time period. They will read the following
WEATHER, CLIMATE, AND ATMOSPHERIC STUDIES
Course 367: .5 credits
This is a semester course designed for college bound students who
are interested in the physical sciences. This course will be focused on
developing a basic understanding of the atmosphere and the processes
that constantly shape and change it. Topics of study will be climate,
global warming, weather prediction, and a look at extreme weather
phenomena including hurricanes, El Nino, and tornados, Students must
be enrolled in or have already successfully completed chemisty.
AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (APES)
Course 370: 1.5 credits
This is a cross disciplinary course incorporating elements of study
from biology, chemistry, geography, and earth science as well as
environmental studies. It is a rigorous science course that stresses
scientifc principles and analysis, and includes a strong laboratory
component. The course is a national curriculum designed to provide
students with the principles, concepts, and methodologies needed to
understand the interrelationships of the natural world, and analyze local
environmental problems with the goal of examining alternative solutions
for resolving and preventing such problems. Local and state topics are
addressed through discussion, role play, feld trips, and consultants. This
course is open to juniors and seniors who have earned a B average for all
previous science courses. (Students enrolled in this course are required
to take the Advanced Placement exam to earn credit for this course. )
SCIENCE TOPICS
NCAA

Course 364/365: .5 credit per semester
This course is designed for those students who need science credit for
graduation, and are interested in making science relevant to their daily
lives. There will be a minimum of two parts with labs and activities
each semester including: environmental biology, human biology, basic
chemistry, basic physics and interest-based topics, including forensics,
and current science events. Students should enroll in the course for the
entire year; however, credits may be earned at the successful completion
of the semester.
24
works in this order: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Jungle, O
Pioneers!, Ragtime, All Quiet on the Western Front, The Great Gatsby,
CatcherintheRye,TheGlassMenagerie,TheGrapesofWrath,ToKill
aMockingbird,Cat’sCradle,DeathofaSalesman,ARaisinintheSun,
and TheThingsTheyCarried. Group cooperation, writing, and critical
thinking are among the skills taught and reinforced. Typically, there is
one hour of literature and one hour of textbook work per night.
Recommended Prep: Minimum B+ in 9th grade Social Studies and
English classes.
AMERICAN STUDIES
Course 255: 2 credits (1 credit English/ 1 credit Social Studies)
American Studies is an integrated, interdisciplinary, team-taught course
in which students focus on American literature and American history.
This two credit course meets each day with both a Social Studies and
an English faculty member. Students focus on American literature,
history, and culture while completing traditional classroom activities,
group projects, and individual research projects. Students read fction
and nonfction about the themes they are studying and fnd material
illustrating that the themes are still alive today. They read the
following works: AllQuietontheWesternFront,CatcherintheRye,
DeathofaSalesman,TheGreatGatsby,AdventuresofHuckleberry
Finn, The Jungle, O Pioneers!, A Raisin in the Sun, A Separate Peace,
TheThingsTheyCarried, and To Kill a Mockingbird. The American
Pageant and Responding to Literature are the textbooks. Students
learn in a variety of ways and become active participants in the learning
process. Group cooperation, writing, and critical thinking are among the
skills taught and reinforced.
SURVEY OF U.S. HISTORY
Course 251: 1 credit
A chronological treatment of historical trends and events from the
Reconstruction Period to the present day. The content of this course will
concentrate on the 20th Century United States.
GRADE 10, 11, 12 OPTIONS
ASIAN STUDIES
Course 288: .5 credit
This course will present a broad overview of Asian civilizations with
a strong emphasis on China and Japan. Students will learn about Asia
from a number of perspectives including social, political, economic and
geographic. Students will also look at Asia from cultural perspectives
including art, architecture, language, music and food.
AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH FILM :
1915 TO MODERN MOVIES
NCAA
Course 264 .5 credit
American History and culture are deeply connected to American popular
movies. Films can both refect and infuence our history ,from early
stereotypes to wartime propaganda, from happy suburbs to brooding and
rebellious teens , movies have told us a lot about our history. Students
will view a variety of flms and flm clips which relate to our most
turbulent times. Students will watch our history through an informed and
critical lens and will create their own projects on an area of American
flm which has particular interest to them.Topics covered are the 20’s,
the great Depression, WW II, the Cold War and the Fifties, the 60’s and
Youth Rebellion, the 70’s and Vietnam,the 80’s and 90’s, and current
flm topics.
GRADE 11-12 OPTIONS
AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
Course 261: .5 credit
The study of American foreign policy will emphasize the post World
War II diplomacy - the policy of Containment, the decision and impact
of dropping “the bomb” at Hiroshima, the UN, the Korean Confict, the
Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, the Middle East, Central America, and
current foreign policy issues. The course is aimed at students interested
in probing world affairs and trying to determine America’s place in those
affairs.
HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST
Course 262: .5 credit
This semester long course will be an in-depth study of the history of the
Holocaust during World War II. Through discussion, internet research,
connection with Holocaust survivors, flms and action projects, this
class will explore the historical background leading to the Holocaust, the
factors contributing to the Holocaust, modern day cases of genocide, and
the moral and ethical questions raised in studying the Holocaust.
HOLOCAUST STUDIES
Course 263: 1 credit (.5 credit Social Studies/.5 credit English)
This combined Social Studies-English course, in which students earn
.5 credit in Social Studies and .5 credit in English, meets every day for
one semester. The Social Studies content is similar to that of HISTORY
OF THE HOLOCAUST. Holocaust Studies emphasizes the relationship
between the literature and the context in which it was written.
ECONOMICS
NCAA

Course 267: .5 credit
This course is an introduction into the nature of economics, the types
of economic systems, and the characteristics of the American private
enterprise system. Topics will include: types of business organizations,
money and banking, role of government in the economy, principles and
procedures in investing, protection through insurance, how to choose a
home, buying a used car, the taxation system, infation, and the national
debt.
AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS
Course 270: .5 credit
This course is intended to be the equivalent of the one-semester college
introductory course in United States government and politics. The main
topics include the kind of government established by the Constitution,
the political beliefs of our citizens, political parties and the mass
media, civil rights and civil liberties, and the major institutions of our
government (Congress, Presidency, Courts). The course follows the
rigorous AP curriculum. (StudentsenrolledinAPUSGovernment
& Politics are required to take the Advanced Placement exam to earn
credit for this course.)
AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY
Course 285: .5 credit
This semester long course traces the history of blacks in America
including their African roots, slavery and its abolition and the long and
arduous struggle for social, political and economic equality. Students
will investigate the major African-American leaders and evaluate the
contributions of infuential fgures in music, the arts and literature.
The course concludes with an analysis of contemporary attitudes and
problems in regards to race in America.
BUILDING SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES
Course 286: .5 credit
Students will learn about sustainable development, cross-cultural
relations, environmental issues, international politics and service
learning. Through a discussion group format, students will explore
issues of sustainability as they relate to personal and societal decisions
involving the economy, agriculture, environment and lifestyle. Students
will be exposed to a curriculum that recognizes the potential of people
working together to create a lasting and benefcial change within a
community and will be expected to complete a service learning project
using the guiding principles of sustainable development.
GLOBAL STUDIES
Course 287: .5 credit
Global Studies is a semester course designed to help the student
25
GRADE NO. COURSE RECOMMENDED PREP
Business Strand
9-12 802^ Mastering Computer Applications None
10-12 806^ Accounting None
10-12 807* Business Law None
9-12 808^ Introduction to Business None
11-12 812^ Personal Management & Finance None
11-12 797 Entrepreneurship None
9-12 809 Busine$$ L.A.B. None
Imaging Lab Strand
9-12 820^ Electronic Arts I See course description
9-12 821 Electronic Arts II Electronic Arts I
9-12 824^ Flash Animation & Game Design None
10-12 828 Electronic Arts III Electronic Arts II
9-12 822^ Digital Video I None
10-12 829 Digital Video II B+ in 882 & instructor
permission
9-12 823^ Advertising and Propaganda None
11-12 827**^ Lights, Camera, Activism! Digital Video I
Technology Education Strand
9-12 831^ Computer-Aided Architectural None
Design
9-12 833^ Web Design None
9-12 834^ Cisco Networking Academy I 838 recommended
10-12 835 Cisco Networking Academy II None
9-12 847^ Graphic Design None
9-12 837^ Robotics and Design Lab 831 recommended
9-12 838^ IT Essentials: PC Hardware &
Software
9-12 839^ Programming for the Internet None
10-12 840^ AP Computer Science 839 recommended
9-12 841^ Digital Photography None
9-12 842 Fine Metals None
9-12 844^ Yearbook None
*May be taken for one-half Social Studies credit
**May be taken for one-half English credit
^ Meets SBHS graduation technology requirement
Gender Equity Statement: The Technology Department is committed
to gender equity. The Department recognizes the excellent career
opportunities for both females and males in careers that require
technological knowledge and skill. No favoritism is made in any
course for or against individuals, regardless of gender. All students are
encouraged to enroll in our exciting diversity of courses.
Homework Statement: The philosophy of the high school regarding
homework is that “every teacher has the right to expect that their
students will complete assigned homework; such homework is largely
independent practice in skill building and content acquisition that
supports the teachers’ learning objectives for their students.” While
homework is not assigned for every class period, many Technology
Department classes include satisfactory completion of assignments as
a component of student assessment.
TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Teaching Assistants: Motivated students are encouraged to talk with
an instructor about the possibility of earning credit as a teaching
assistant in any Technology Department courses. Credit can be earned
through the Career Development Center.
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Coursesareofferedonanas-neededbasis;availabilitymaybe
dictated by course sign ups.
BUSINESS STRAND
MASTERING COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Course 802: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
Want to learn the tricks and features that separate the computer masters
from the newbies? Whether you need to improve your keyboarding
skills, want to embed YouTube videos into your PowerPoint
presentations, learn more about spreadsheets, or create brochures in
Publisher; this course is for you. You’ll start from your current level
of mastery and learn new skills and techniques that will make you the
go-to expert when your friends are stumped.
ACCOUNTING
Course 806: .5 credit (Grades 10-12)
Utilizing professional accounting software, this one-semester course
teaches students to journalize accounting transactions, post to ledgers,
and prepare fnancial statements. The goal of this course is to provide
students with realistic experiences in keeping accounting records for a
small business. A great introduction to a college Accounting class.
PERSONAL MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE
Course 812: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)
This course is designed to educate students about real-life fnances
before taking on the responsibilities of the adult world. It will focus
on different aspects of managing and making money (saving vs.
investing). In addition, you will learn how to balance a checkbook,
take out a car loan, manage credit cards, apply and pay off student
loans, apply for grants, fnance a house, create a monthly budget,
purchase insurance (life, car, and home owners), and fnance a small,
at-home business. Don’t be caught not knowing how to make ends
meet once you leave high school. Instead, get a jump start on making
and keeping your frst million.
recognize that he/she is a member of a world system and help foster
respect for all people, their values and way of life. The ultimate
objective is to help the student to develop an awareness of the problems
facing the world and move, through skills development, to action in
taking part in the problem-solving process. Among the topics that
will be considered are: Global Resources, (food, soil, energy, toxic
waste), Quality of Life (population, human rights, health, poverty),
Ethnocentrism, (racism, sexism, systems of repression), The Threat
of nuclear War, Confict Resolution, (peace-war, militarism, national
security and disarmament, the UN).
PSYCHOLOGY
Course 290: .5 credit
Psychology is the study of human behavior. This course focuses on
human development and poses such critical questions as: Who am I?
What personality type do I have? Why do I act the way that I do? What
is abnormal behavior and how should it be treated? Students investigate
the leading psychological theorists, take several personality tests and
complete classroom experiments in human behavior.
GRADE 12 OPTIONS
PUBLIC ISSUES & WORLD AFFAIRS (PIWA)
Courses 271, 272: .5 credit
PIWA is a required one semester senior course which covers local,
state, and national issues of the day as well as selected international
topics through the use of guest speakers, research, panel discussions,
debates and flms. Student involvement is stressed through student topic
selection, planning, and individual student interest.
AP EUROPEAN HISTORY
Course 280: 1 credit
AP European History is a year long course that traces European
Civilization from the Middle Ages through the present. The course
follows the rigorous AP curriculum, using both original and secondary
sources. The culminating activity of the course will be the AP
examination by which students may receive college credit or placement.
(Students enrolled in this course are required to take the Advanced
Placement exam to earn credit for this course.)
26
BUSINESS LAW
Course 807: .5 credit (Grades 10-12)
This one-semester course uses a case-study approach to investigate
the law relating to contracts, minors, consumers, and business
organizations. Contract Law and laws focusing on torts (Civil Law)
are emphasized. In addition, students are encouraged to develop an
appreciation for and interest in current legal questions. (May be taken
for Social Studies credit.)
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS
Course 808: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
This course is designed to help prepare students to make decisions
in their roles as consumers, wage earners, and citizens. It examines
basic economic principles and theories and encourages students to
apply this economic knowledge to their own lives. It explains the
private enterprise system and discusses a wide range of occupational
opportunities available to students. Students will draft a plan for their
own business that they may wish to start. Grade 9 students need to
obtain instructor permission to enroll.
ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Course 797: .5 credit (Grades 11-12)
Entrepreneurship is one of the fastest growing felds in business and this
course is for anyone interested in someday starting a business, working
with an entrepreneurial company or using entrepreneurial skills to
revitalize a larger company. In this course students will use hands-on
examples and cases to gather the skills needed to effectively organize,
develop, create, and manage their own businesses. By the end of the
course the student will have completed a detailed business plan ready
for small business start-up. Learn how to make a difference in today’s
business world!
BUSINE$$ L.A.B. (Learning About Business)
Course 809: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
Gain hands-on experience managing a real business! You will cycle
through a series of business adventures, including Purchasing/Inventory
Management, Marketing/Sales, Advertising/Displays, Accounting/
Financials, and Customer Service/Rebel Retail; as well as a Community
Field Experience or on-line component. Gain actual work experience as
you start building your resume or try out a future career path!
IMAGING LAB STRAND
FLASH ANIMATION & GAME DESIGN
Course 824 .5 Credit (Grades 9-12)
Are you someone who spends hours trying to get to the next level
of n-Ninja? Do you get your kicks fring the kitty cannon? Ever
wonder how these popular games are designed and built? What
makes some games more fun or satisfying than others? In this course,
you will learn the basic techniques for building and programming
games with Adobe Flash, the premiere application for creating
interactive programming for the Internet. But most importantly,
you will learn how to design a game from the ground up to create a
satisfying experience for the gamer, because Flash games show us
that realistic graphics are not as important as a challenging and fun
game experience. In designing your own games, for both learning and
entertainment, you will look at the history of all types of games to get
ideas about what makes certain ones stand out. No prior experience
with Flash is required.
ELECTRONIC ARTS I
Course 820: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
Creating realistic or surrealistic 3D worlds like those you see in
“Lord of the Rings” or “Bolt” requires a strong sense of observation,
a creative fair and the ability to solve problems effectively. While
some of us are born with these gifts, most of us take Electronic Arts I
to help learn these important skills that will help us with whatever we
choose to do. Electronic Arts I offers you the chance to create virtual
3D environments and characters and use animation to tell stories
about the worlds you’ve designed. Be prepared to immerse yourself
in a classroom world unlike any you have experienced. Required for
students considering the Electronic Arts Academy.
ELECTRONIC ARTS II
Course 821: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
This advanced course will build on the skills acquired in Electronic
Arts I. Students will work both individually and in groups and
presentations of work are required. Students will use industry-
standard software programs such as Autodesk 3D Studio Max 2009,
Adobe Premiere Pro and Adobe After Effects to create professional-
quality models and animations. Atleasta“B”averageinElectronic
Arts I is required. This is a key course in the Electronic Arts Academy.

ELECTRONIC ARTS III
Course 828: .5 credit (Grades 10-12)
Your assignment: fne tune your 3D and animation talents and take
them to next level …college…the big time. This project-based
course will allow you to fully explore the areas of animation,
lighting and design. Your goal will be to design, produce, refne, and
present multiple computer-generated ideas from concept to creation.
Additionally, you will complete a student portfolio that details the
work completed during all your Electronic Arts classes. Since many
colleges prefer digital portfolios for admission, you may also want to
include work from other graphics classes in this portfolio. This course
is primarily designed for students in the Electronic Arts Academy.
Studentsmusthaveatleasta“B”averageinEAIandEAIIandthe
approval of the instructor
DIGITAL VIDEO I
Course 822: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
We all love to go to the movies, right? But what goes into making
those movies we all love? You’ll be surprised by the complexity of
the process, and empowered by your ability to plan, shoot and edit a
movie using state-of-the art video technology such as Adobe Premiere
Pro, After Effects and Soundbooth. This is a hands-on, project-based
course in which you collaborate with classmates to produce short
videos using professional-quality cameras, microphones, software
and other tools of the trade that help you tell your story with “moving
pictures.”
DIGITAL VIDEO II
Course 829: .5 credit (Grades 10-12)
As a continuation of the Digital Video I course, this class offers
the opportunity and challenge to make a longer original flm (8-12
minutes) over the course of the semester. During the frst quarter,
students will write an original screenplay and work on short video
exercises intended to build on the skills they developed in Digital
Video I. In the second quarter of this semester-length class, each
student will produce his or her original screenplay as a short flm.
To illustrate effective storytelling techniques in flm, students view
several award-winning short flms and independent flms. This course
offers a great opportunity to built independence, organization and the
satisfaction of seeing an original idea through to a fnished product.
ADVERTISING AND PROPAGANDA
Course 823: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
Why do we buy? By understanding advertising strategies, persuasive
techniques and propaganda messages, you will become an informed
and enlightened consumer. Putting your new knowledge to use you
will develop advertising campaigns for radio, television, print and
the Internet. You will work individually and within groups and are
encouraged to work with local businesses to gain an insider’s look
at how advertising works. Developing solutions to sell products to
specifc markets and to promote ideas to an uninformed audience will
27
be accomplished by brainstorming, using industry-standard software,
digital video equipment, and creative energy.
LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTIVISM!
NCAA
Course 827 : 1 credit (.5 English credit/.5 Technology credit)
(Grades 10-12)
Film is a powerful and fun way to express ideas. In LCA, you will
collaborate with your classmates to create a documentary. This
includes conducting research and interviews, writing a script, and
editing your audio and video with digital editing equipment.
LCA will challenge your abilities and teach you new skills in a
different way from most of your classes. Students in this course will
answer the century-old question: “How can flms change the way we
think?” IMPORTANT NOTE: The technology portion of this course
meets one time per week in the evening, from 6:30-9:30pm (day of
the week TBD on a year-to-year basis, see your counselor for more
information).
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION STRAND
COMPUTER-AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
Course 831: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
How do our creative thoughts evolve from an idea we dream about
to the real thing? CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software enables
us to communicate ideas and plans from the creative/design stage
through computer-generated production drawings. You will develop
valuable skills in the use of powerful 2D and 3D CAD software. Your
work may even reach a world-wide audience by being published in
Google™ Earth!
ROBOTICS & DESIGN LAB
Course 837: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
This course provides opportunities for students to engage in a
challenging, practical, team-based approach to solving engineering
problems, and to develop critical thinking, research, leadership, and
communication skills for application in science, engineering, and
technology. RAD Lab students have participated in such competitions
as the West Point Bridge Building Competition, UVM’s DesignTASC
(Technology and Science Connection) and the Boston University
Robotics competition. This course has been recognized by the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers as an exemplary program
in high school pre-engineering and has been redesigned to provide a
greater emphasis on robotics.
WEB DESIGN
Course 833: .5 credit (Grades 9*-12)
How do professional web gurus create those fantastic websites that
grab your eye and draw you in? Today’s websites sell products,
provide facts, display artwork, publish journals, stream videos,
follow sports stars, let us play games, and offer us information about
everything from ants to zebras. Transform yourself from an Internet
user into a profcient Web designer. Using state-of-the-art software,
you will create dynamic, well-designed, interactive websites. Whether
you are interested in a career in the Web industry, or just enjoy
working with computer graphics and animation, log on! This course
is recommended for IT Academy students. *Grade 9 students must
receive instructor permission.
CISCO NETWORKING ACADEMY I
Course 834: 1 credit (Grades 9-12)
The Networking Academy program has been completely overhauled.
The new Networking Academy is even more hands-on and
now includes topics on wireless networking, security and home
networks, while continuing to prepare students for industry-standard
certifcations. In semester 1, you will learn how to design and create a
Local Area Network (LAN) using wired and wireless connections. In
semester 2, you will learn how to connect networks together securely
and how to protect the network from disasters and attacks. Whether
you are interested in an IT career, or just want to learn more about
computers and networking, this is the course for you. This course
prepares the student for the CCENT (Cisco Certifed Entry Networking
Technician) exam. This course earns 4 college credits through the
Community College of Vermont
CISCO NETWORKING ACADEMY II
Course 835: .5 credit (Grades 10-12)
The second year of the Cisco Networking Academy program builds on
the strong foundation in computer networking that you have gained the
previous year. Advanced concepts in network switching and wireless
networking are among the topics covered in the frst semester, with
network design and support being the main topics in semester 2. Upon
successful completion of this course, students should be prepared to
earn the CCNA (Cisco Certifed Network Associate) certifcation.
Prerequisite: Cisco Networking Academy I (834)
PC HARDWARE & SOFTWARE
Course 838: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
Does the inside of a computer continue to be somewhat of a mystery
to you? Or, are you a budding computer whiz who would like to take
your skills to the next level? Either way, you should join PC Hardware
and Software to gain an in-depth understanding of computer hardware
and operating systems. No chip is left unchopped in this hands-on,
content-rich course. You will learn the functions of a computer’s
components, and how professional computer technicians maintain
hardware and software. Working together in a lab environment, you
will have opportunities to assemble and confgure your own computer,
install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot problems.
This class prepares you for CompTIA’s A+ certifcation, and is a great
way to begin your career in information technology. Next stop…the
Networking Academy!
PROGRAMMING FOR THE INTERNET
Course 839: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
The era of static, text-oriented websites is over. Today’s Internet
users expect interactive, dynamic websites, which means that today’s
designers need to understand fundamental programming concepts.
Students will learn to use scripting languages such as JavaScript,
work with Macromedia Flash and its ActionScript language, and will
be introduced to PHP and Java™. This course is a great choice for
anyone who loves solving puzzles or who wants to learn how to think
logically, as a computer must. Recommended for IT Academy students
and others interested in computer programming.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE
Course 840: 1 credit (Grades 10-12)
Whether you are a budding computer programmer, or just want to
get a better idea how your computer works, this is the course for
you! Java™ is an important programming language for Internet
web designers and business programmers. The Java™ language’s
object-oriented technologies and cross-platform capabilities
make it an ideal tool to use in solving business and engineering
problems. Topics include the creation of Java™ classes, objects and
applications, language fundamentals, and the Java™ API (Application
Programming Interface). Intermediate programming concepts related
to algorithm development, data structures, program design and
abstraction are included. (StudentsenrolledinAPComputerScience
arerequiredtotaketheAdvancedPlacementComputerScienceA
exam to earn credit for this course.)
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Course 841: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
What does a “good” photograph look like? Students in Digital
Photography will spend the semester exploring this question by taking
their own photographs and viewing and discussing those created by
28
their classmates. This course uses photography as a means to explore
the design process from idea through execution to critical evaluation.
Students will shoot and edit photos as well as speak and write about
their own work and the work of others.
FINE METALS
Course 842: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
Metal is a versatile material that has been used for centuries to make
functional and decorative pieces used in our everyday life. Its unique
qualities of strength and endurance make it possible to build large
structures, like bridges. However, metals can be also used to make
delicate functional and ornamental objects. Fine Metals allows you
to study metallurgy, and to design and make a variety of exploratory
projects using traditional jewelers’ skills in soldering, sawing, forming
and fnishing metals, such as copper, brass, and semi-precious
alloys. Make a gift for a special friend or family member. Gain
hands-on experience with materials. Fine Metals is a fun application
of chemistry and physics that improves problem-solving and fne
psychomotor skills.
YEARBOOK
Course 844: .5 credit (Grades 9*-12)
Become an active part of future memories. You and your classmates
will oversee the production of the Sentry, South Burlington’s
yearbook. The capability to work independently, as well as within
a group, and the ability to multi-task while meeting deadlines, are
essential qualifcations for success in this course. In only one semester,
you will participate in layout and design, photography, writing, editing
and fund raising. Students must be willing to dedicate time outside of
class to fulfll responsibilities and meet deadlines. *Open to 9th and
10th graders with instructor approval.
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Course 847: .5 credit (Grades 9-12)
Ever feel your pulse quicken looking at a snowboard catalog? Well it
isn’t just because of the pretty people. Savvy designers use principles
and elements of design to create publications that market all types of
products and services. Effective graphic design can stir emotions, grab
attention, provide detail, offer information and, yes, excite us. Now
you, too, can learn techniques and use industry-standard software to
design publications that just might get people to take action. During
each semester, students will layout and design the SBHS newspaper:
The Rebel Word.
29
The Information Technology Academies provide opportunities for
students to investigate and gain experience in a career feld within the
IT business world. Students choose a track that most closely matches
their personal interests, either in computer technology, electronic arts,
business, or a combination of the three. This launches a series of courses
and learning activities that lead to experience and mastery in that career
feld.
Students enrolled in the IT academy will have a more open schedule
than other students, allowing them to take part in internships and
learning activities beyond the scope of the traditional school day. In
addition, students will have the opportunity to take academic courses
that address skills required in the business world and receive college
credit for several courses taken in high school. Students will be able to
customize their schedules to allow pursuit of their personal interests,
choosing from the rich array of academic and elective programs at
SBHS.
Students enrolled in a career academy will be taking part in an exciting,
dynamic program that provides the skills and knowledge necessary to
be competitive in today’s business environment. Upon completing the
program, students will be prepared for professional certifcation and/
or will have advanced placement in a postsecondary degree. Students
will create a professional portfolio and experience authentic work in the
business world through workplace internships.
I.T. Academies: A New Approach to Learning at SBHS
PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS
Computer Networking & Technologies IT Academy
The Computer Networking & Technologies Academy builds on the
Cisco Networking Academy program, and is designed to help meet the
strong demand for information technology professionals. This academy
is designed for students who are interested in computer technology,
computer hardware and software, computer networking, and computer
programming. The more technical courses within this academy are
rigorous and hands-on and feature online, multimedia curriculum.
Students taking part in the Computer Networking Academy may receive
from 4 - 10 college credits upon completion of the program.
Some courses may be offered in alternate academic years.
Electronic Arts IT Academy
The Electronic Arts Academy will provide opportunities for students to
learn about graphic design, computer animation and web design. The
Imaging Lab is a state-of-the-art computer graphics lab specializing
in 3D animation, digital video, and web page creation. Students use
the same software programs as Hollywood flm makers, NASA and
corporate professionals. They will work with powerful workstations,
digital animation recorders, non-linear editing programs, digital
cameras, and HD video projection. Students who are interested in
careers in animation, video production, game design, medical imaging,
architectural imaging, or web page creation will be very engaged in
the Electronic Arts Academy. The software includes Alias/Wavefront’s
Maya, Discrete’s 3D Studio Max, and Avid’s Express DV among many
others.
Business Academy
Your fred! If you watch The Apprentice, you might get the idea that the business world is a cut-throat shark pool where only the strong survive,
and not all that long. While some jobs may resemble this scenario, business can be a very rewarding career in which careful planning and intelligent
risk-taking can bring rich rewards. Business success requires leadership, knowledge and skill that can by acquired and honed over time. Students
in the Business Academy will learn not only how to balance the books, but they will create and manage companies, buy & sell stocks and other
investments, create and market Internet companies, and learn effective leadership and management skills. South Burlington is the retail and
hospitality center of this entire region. What a great opportunity for the Tycoons of Tomorrow!
For more information on the SBHS career academies, visit htp://sbhs.sbschools.net/CA
I.T. ACADEMIES
Networking
IT Academy Courses
PCHardware&Software •
CiscoNetworkingI* •
CiscoNetworkingII* •
Computer-AidedDesign •
Robotics&DesignLab •
Any Electronic Arts courses •
* Indicate required courses
Electronic Arts
IT Academy Courses
Electronic Arts I*, II & III •
DigitalVideoI*&II •
FlashAnimation&GameDesign* •
Lights,Camera,Activism! •
Any Networking courses •
* EAIandVideoIrequired,then
selectElectronicArtsorVideo
track
Business Academy Courses
MasteringComputerApplications •
Accounting* •
BusinessLaw* •
IntroductiontoBusiness* •
BusinessL.A.B. •
Entrepreneurship •
* Indicate required courses
Courses Common to
All Academies
Advertising •
Programming for the Internet •
APComputerScience •
WebDesign •
GraphicDesign •
Public Speaking •
30
The most effective way to learn a second language is to be exposed to it for a sustained period of time. Most students need a minimum of four years
of study to become comfortable in that language. During the frst two years students are given many fundamentals; however, it is during the third and
fourth years that they begin to gain command of the language. In addition to learning further basic elements, they are also given a chance to express
themselves more freely with much of what they have learned. Therefore, the World Languages Department encourages students to consider following
at least a four year course of study. Teachers of world languages focus on the principles set forth in the ACTFL Oral Profciency guidelines so that our
curriculum may help students function as accurately as possible in the situations they are most likely to experience. These guidelines, developed by
the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, consist of a series of descriptions of profciency levels for speaking, listening, reading,
writing, and culture in a foreign language. They have been undertaken in a response to a recommendation of the President’s Commission on Foreign
Language and International Studies to establish “language profciency achievement goals for the end of each year of study at all levels, with special
attention to speaking profciency.”
Exchange programs with students from other countries are offered by the World Languages Department with support from faculty members in
many other departments. These programs include short term experiences with Québec, three-week exchanges where students live with families in
German, French, Spanish, and Japanese environments, and longer, academic-year experiences at our partner schools, or through third parties such as
the Rotary. Requirements for admission and costs for the programs vary. Programs are publicized through oral announcements at the high school
well in advance of the application deadlines. Interested students and parents should feel free to contact the TIE coordinator at any time for further
information.
GRADE NO. COURSE REQUIRED PREP
9-12 501 Spanish 1 None
9-12 502 Spanish 2 Minimum C+ (77%) in Spanish 1 or Spanish 8 or teacher recommendation
9-12 504 Conversational Spanish – Novice level Minimum of C- (70%) in Spanish 2 or teacher recommendation
9-12 503 Spanish 3 Minimum C+ (77%) in Spanish 2 or teacher recommendation
9-12 505 Conversational Spanish – Intermediate level Minimum of C- (70%) in Spanish 3 or teacher recommendation
10-12 506 Spanish 4 Minimum (C+ (77%) in Spanish 3 or teacher recommendation
11-12 507 Pre-AP Spanish Minimum C+ (77%) in Spanish 4 or teacher recommendation
11-12 508 AP Spanish Minimum B (83) in Pre-AP Spanish or teacher recommendation
9-12 510 French 1 None
9-12 512 French 2 Minimum C+ (77%) in French 1 or French 8 or teacher recommendation
9-12 511 Conversational French – Novice level Minimum of C- (70%) in French 2 or teacher recommendation
9-12 513 French 3 Minimum C+ (77%) in French 2 or teacher recommendation
9-12 514 Conversational French – Intermediate level Minimum of C- (70%) in French 3 or teacher recommendation
10-12 517 French 4 Minimum C+ (77%) in French 3 or teacher recommendation
11-12 520 Pre-AP French Minimum B (83) in French 4
11-12 521 AP French Minimum B (83) in French 4 or Pre-AP or teacher recommendation
9-12 531 German 1 None
10-12 532 German 2 Minimum C+ (77%) in German 1 or teacher recommendation
10-12 533 German 3 Minimum C+ (77%) German 2 or teacher recommendation
12 534 German 4 Minimum C+ (77%) German 3 or teacher recommendation
9-12 541 Latin 1 None
9-12 560 Japanese 1 None
10-12 561 Japanese 2 Minimum C+ (77%) Japanese 1 or teacher recommendation
10-12 562 Japanese 3 Minimum C+ (77%) Japanese 2 or teacher recommendation
10-12 563 Japanese 4 Minimum C+ (77%) Japanese 3 or teacher recommendation
NOTE: Middle school students who have successfully completed French/Spanish 8 should enroll in French/Spanish 2 at the high school. Students who have had
diffculty with world language study in grades 7 and 8 but would like to continue, should enroll in French/Spanish 1 or choose a different language. Middle school
students who have successfully completed French/Spanish 8 have the advantage of being able to enroll in the 2nd level at the high school; however, no high school
credit is awarded for middle school courses.
WORLD LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
SPANISH 1
Course 501: 1 credit
This course is an introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish
speaking world. A high level of student participation is achieved through
the use of materials and activities designed to enable the student to use
the language correctly for communication, and basic skills of listening
comprehension, reading, and writing are also stressed. Special emphasis
is placed on studies of the Hispanic culture in the United States.
SPANISH 2
Course 502: 1 credit
This course is a continuation of Spanish 1. Emphasis is placed on
helping the student to communicate orally through continued drill on
the basic grammatical structures and through vocabulary expansion. The
reading skill is reinforced through selected reading materials. Students
are also encouraged to write and perform original dialogues.
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH – NOVICE LEVEL
Course 504: 1 credit
This course gives students the opportunity to engage in conversations,
express their likes and dislikes and make comparisons. Emphasis is
placed on helping students to communicate orally through continued
drill and vocabulary expansion. The speaking skill is reinforced through
the study and discussion of selected current, cultural and historical
topics. Students are also encouraged to participate in original dialogues,
debates and exposés.
SPANISH 3
Course 503: 1 credit
This course is a continuation of Spanish 2, presenting the more complex
structures of basic Spanish, increasing the student’s communicative
vocabulary and expanding the broad cultural themes of Spanish 1
and 2. Major emphasis is placed on improving the student’s ability to
communicate orally. However, the skills of reading and writing are also
developed through the use of supplementary reading selections and
frequent written assignments. Students use all simple tenses. This class
is taught primarily in Spanish.
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CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH – INTERMEDIATE LEVEL
Course 505: 1 credit
This course challenges students with the opportunity to engage in
situational conversations, understand and interpret spoken language and
present their ideas. Emphasis is placed on helping the student to narrate
/ communicate orally in all commonly used tenses. The speaking skill
is reinforced through the study and discussion of current events and
sophisticated cultural and historical topics. Students are required to solve
problems, and to participate in original dialogues, debates and exposés.
SPANISH 4
Course 506: 1 credit
This is a continuation of the Spanish 3 program. In this course emphasis
is placed on the study of more advanced grammatical structures as well
as the review of the grammar of previous courses. Rapid acquisition
of active and passive vocabulary through selected literary readings is
also a major objective of this course. Written compositions based on
the reading selections are required. Students work throughout the year
with materials which are specifcally designed to correlate with the
ACTFL oral profciency guidelines and to enable them to communicate
successfully in basic survival situations. The class is conducted in
Spanish.
PRE-AP SPANISH
Course 507: 1 credit
This advanced course, which is offered if enrollment warrants, provides
a wide variety of topics and exercises to present all aspects of learning
Spanish: everyday conversation, reading comprehension, civilization and
culture, grammar review as well as discussion and composition topics.
Students begin the study of Hispanic literature through the reading of
selected short stories and poems of Spanish and Hispanic American
authors. Students are encouraged to expand their active vocabulary and
to improve their oral skills through discussion of literature covered in the
course. Their ability to analyze literature is stressed through discussions
and the frequent writing of compositions.
AP SPANISH
Course 508: 1 credit
This course is equivalent to a third-year college course and is taught
exclusively in Spanish. It is intended for those students who have
chosen to continue to develop their language profciency in the four
skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The AP class
prepares students to understand lectures and to participate actively in
discussions on literary topics. The course reviews all grammar topics
and emphasizes listening and reading comprehension. Students will be
prepared to analyze critically the form and content of literary works,
have discussions of current topics, write essays in different formats, and
hold daily conversations, all in Spanish. (Students enrolled in this course
are required to take the Advanced Placement exam to earn credit for this
course.)
FRENCH 1
Course 510: 1 credit
The primary purpose of French 1 is to establish rapid and effective
communication through the use of the Verbal-Active method. This
method frst stresses conversation and listening reinforced by reading
and writing. Students learn how to express their everyday needs in
basic vocabulary, and learn the present and near future. Instruction
focuses on their vocabulary acquisition and organizational skills as
reinforcement of their work in class. Students also explore a variety of
cultural topics ranging from Francophone geography to regional French
cuisine. Both the text series and the supplemental sources (authentic
materials, Internet, library research) serve as the launching point for
projects and discussions.
FRENCH 2
Course 512: 1 credit
French 2 continues the primary focus of the preceding year: vocabulary
retention, organizational and study techniques, and basic conversational
skills. Most class work is conducted entirely in French. Graded written
and oral work is an integral part of this course, and students are required
to write a composition or dialogue for each chapter. Students perform
classroom skits and interviews with classmates as well as produce
visuals and display projects. They review the tenses learned in French 1
and learn the imperfect and conditional tenses. The cultural focus builds
on French 1 with greater focus on everyday life, Paris, the chateaux of
France, and Francophone countries and regions.
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH - NOVICE LEVEL
Course 511: 1 credit
This course gives students the opportunity to engage in conversations,
express their likes and dislikes and make comparisons. Emphasis is
placed on helping the student to communicate orally through continued
drill and vocabulary expansion. The speaking skill is reinforced through
the study and discussion of selected current, cultural and historical
topics. Students are also encouraged to participate in original dialogues,
debates and exposés.
FRENCH 3
Course 513: 1 credit
French 3 is an intermediate level French class where students are
expected to express themselves almost entirely in the target language.
Tasks include expanding on their vocabulary using French synonyms,
antonyms and defnitions, writing short compositions and dialogues,
and reading short selections of authentic prose and poetry. Students
memorize and perform short skits, improvise sentences based upon
given models, and give short exposés on a variety of topics (everyday
occurrences/cultural aspects). Previous tenses are reviewed, and
composite tenses and the subjunctive mood are introduced. Cultural
topics include travel abroad, the workplace, famous French historical
fgures and Francophone regions. Most class work is in French.
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH – INTERMEDIATE LEVEL
Course 514: 1 credit
This course challenges students with the opportunity to engage in
situational conversations, understand and interpret spoken language and
present their ideas. Emphasis is placed on helping the student to narrate
/ communicate orally in all commonly used tenses. The speaking skill
is reinforced through the study and discussion of current events and
sophisticated cultural and historical topics. Students are required to solve
problems, and to participate in original dialogues, debates and exposés.
FRENCH 4
Course 517: 1 credit
French 4 reviews the grammatical structures previously taught,
especially those used in conversation, and introduces students to
advanced forms of grammar and additional tenses. With the profciency-
based program students will be able to use French in realistic situations
in the fve skill areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture.
This course will heighten students’ interest in and appreciation of the
cultural realities in the French-speaking world and will provide insight
into the daily life of French speakers. It will also develop their reading
skills at a pace appropriate to their interests and abilities. All class work
is in French.
PRE-AP FRENCH
Course 520: 1 credit
This course is designed to mirror a college level masterworks language
course, and is considered a prerequisite for the French Advanced
Placement program. A survey of the 17th through 20th centuries is the
main focus of the course. Art, history, literature, music, and politics are
considered the essential elements of this multimedia approach. Much
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time is spent on increasing the students’ profciency in the ACTFL-
based four profciency skills. Above all, at this advanced level, the aim
is to perfect the students’ speaking as well as their writing ability. With
the help of a multimedia approach, students will be exposed to many
authentic, culturally rich experiences.
Students will write short compositions and resumes often through the
acquisition of new French vocabulary and computer skills. Emphasis is
on group discussions, debates and small group presentations often using
multimedia. Reinforcement to this total experience in French is given by
many varied activities such as:
1. attending, viewing and/or producing French plays, flms, videos, etc.,
2. preparing/tasting French foods,
3. surviving and succeeding in contextualized situations/simulations,
4. Internet — telecommunications,
5. French computer pen-pals,
6. Signifcant oral and written projects.
All classwork is in French.
AP FRENCH
Course 521: 1 credit
Advanced Placement French is a program designed to give students the
equivalence of a third year college level advanced language experience.
The National Advanced Placement French Program for literature and
language study is followed. Students will increase their language
profciency skills as set forth by the ACTFL profciency guidelines.
Students participate in a more in-depth study of the sixteenth through
the twentieth centuries. Throughout the year students work on perfecting
their writing through dissertations, explications de texte, commentaries
and projects. Also students enhance their oral/aural skills by making
signifcant in-depth project presentations (often using multimedia),
debating regularly and participating in daily classroom topical
discussions. All classwork is in French. (Students enrolled in this course
are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in either French
literature or French language to earn credit for this course.)
GERMAN 1
Course 531: 1 credit
In this beginning German course, seven language skills are emphasized:
speaking, listening, reading, writing, culture, grammar, and vocabulary
acquisition. The primary focus is on students’ learning to speak to and
understand native speakers of German. After completion of German
531, students will be comfortable conversing about the following topics:
greetings, farewells, introductions, my family, likes and dislikes, school,
visiting Germans, going to a restaurant, shopping for clothing, and
celebrations. Materials used include the 1998 edition of Deutsch Aktuell
1, videos, songs, computer programs, and communication with our
partner school in Hamelin, Germany via e-mail and the Internet.
GERMAN 2
Course 532: 1 credit
The basic language skills continue to be developed. While the emphasis
is still on students’ ability to speak and understand German, some
writing of compositions is begun toward the end of the year. Cultural
materials are chosen to enable students to deal comfortably with
everyday situations: shopping, going to movies, mailing a letter, buying
a train ticket, and talking about past events.
GERMAN 3
Course 533: 1 credit
The course is taught primarily in German. Upon completion of German
3 students will have learned all the basic German grammar. Emphasis
is still primarily on the oral mastery of material, but students write
compositions and Nacherzaehlungen regularly. Topics include travel,
living in a German-speaking country, and how Germans celebrate
holidays.
GERMAN 4
Course 534: 1 credit
German 4 is taught exclusively in German. Longer works of German
literature are read and discussed including plays, short stories, opera
selections, and articles on contemporary problems in the German
speaking countries. Compositions are regularly written. Students are
given a thorough review of German grammar.
LATIN 1
Course 541: 1 credit
Latin I provides the necessary background in the language to enable the
student to read simple Latin. An attempt to understand how language
(any language) operates is revealed through a comparison of a highly
infected language like Latin with a much less infected language,
English. In building vocabulary, the importance of English derivatives
is constantly stressed. Basic grammar of declensions of nouns and
conjugations of verbs, plus other points of syntax are covered. The
readings cover a broad overview of ancient Roman daily life and
culture and form a basis for discussion of its infuence on American and
English culture. Additional cultural material includes the mythology of
Ovid, Livy, and Vergil. Included are hands-on projects to learn about
the culture of the ancient Roman world as well as to give students
opportunities to acquire skills for real-world experiences. All work
aligns with the Standards for Classical Language Learning.
JAPANESE 1
Course 560: 1 credit
This class is designed to get you speaking Japanese. You can expect to
be able to negotiate greetings, description of family, hobbies and daily
routines. You’ll be able to talk about food, prices, and schedules. You
will also learn two of three writing systems used in Japan (Hiragana
and Katakana) with 46 symbols each. There will be much emphasis on
cultural context to support communications and interaction with native
speakers.
JAPANESE 2
Course 561: 1 credit
This course expands the student’s communication skills in spoken
Japanese and builds a basic (50-80) repertoire of Kanji. Topics from
Japanese I are reviewed with more in-depth vocabulary and structures.
New topics in language and culture include regional divisions and
specialties within Japan, school subjects and grades, folktales, and
language necessary for participating in travel and entertainment in Japan.
JAPANESE 3
Course 562: 1 credit
This course expands the student’s communication intermediate skills
in spoken Japanese and builds a larger repertoire of Kanji. Topics from
Japanese 2 are reviewed with more in-depth vocabulary and structures.
New topics in language and culture include target language survival
level skills.
JAPANESE 4
Course 563: 1 credit
This course is designed for students to review and reinforce previously
learned structures of Japanese and acquire additional ones for successful
oral and written communication. The course includes a thorough review
of the writing systems introduced in Japanese 1, 2, and 3 and introduces
a signifcant number of new kanji with an aim toward developing fuent
reading comprehension of authentic written materials. Students will
read and understand longer and more complex materials and refne their
basic writing skills through journals and other writing assignments.
Students will experience a variety of communicative activities designed
to improve their listening comprehension and oral communicative
competence. The course also focuses on fostering a better understanding
of Japanese culture by refning students understanding and usage of
formal and informal registers and honorifc expressions in a variety of
situations.
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THE INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE (TIE)
NCAA

Course 587: .25 credit
Four student foreign exchange programs are sponsored by the World
Languages Department with inter-departmental support from throughout
the school. Students spend approximately 2 ½ weeks living with
families, attending our partner schools, and participating in activities
planned by our hosts. Students participating in the French or Spanish
programs must be enrolled at least in French or Spanish 2. All TIE
students must have and maintain a 2.5 grade point average. They
must prepare reports on some aspect of life in the U.S. to be presented
abroad. Regular attendance at orientation sessions and in classes at
the foreign school is also required. Adherence to all TIE and SBHS
program policies and SBHS student handbook is required. Interested
students submit an application form to a TIE selection committee in the
spring preceding the school year in which students travel abroad.
Are you one of those students who fnd it diffcult to engage in school through the traditional structure? Would
you like your learning to be more geared toward your interests and needs? Here’s a new approach available to
students who will be Sophomores & Juniors during the 2009-2010 school year:
Next year there will be an opportunity for you to approach learning in a new and exciting way. Learning will
start with the student, not the courses or subject area. Each student will have an individualized curriculum
based on his/her strengths and challenges and who he or she wants to become.
What will a weekly schedule look like?
• Each week students will spend two full days working at an internship site of their choice.
• Each student will be paired with a mentor at the site who is considered a valuable member of the
educational team.
• Students will spend three days per week at South Burlington High School in a Core Advisory Group
with a student/adult ratio of 10/1.
• Each student will develop a personalized curriculum in close collaboration with their teacher and
parent(s)/guardian(s).
• All learning will be framed by a set of goals that will include questions or statements that place an
emphasis on “doing”.
• All learning will be connected to relevant issues and topics and students will experience the direct
connection between their (school) work and the real world.
How will students be evaluated?
• Students will demonstrate and defend their work through quarterly exhibitions which are dynamic and
rich in dialogue.
• Students will present their quarterly work in the form of a portfolio which will include samples of their
best work including refection on their internship.
• Each quarter the student will be provided a narrative evaluation addressing the core learning goals.
Will this new model prepare me for college?
• Yes! Students develop skills in the areas of writing, organization, creativity and independence which are
all necessary for a successful college experience.
• Students will continue to enhance their knowledge in the core subject areas.
• An emphasis will be placed on college preparation and juniors will be able to enroll in college courses
during the school year.
How can I get additional information?
Have a conversation with your guidance counselor if this sounds interesting to you. They will let you know
about upcoming informational meetings for students and parents/guardians.
ANOTHER APPROACH TO LEARNING
34
The Burlington Technical Center offers high school juniors and seniors
the opportunity to develop the technical, academic and employability
skills needed to start careers either through employment after high
school or by continuing on to college. BTC partners with area
businesses and organizations to provide career exploration and develop
technical and employability skills through job shadows, internships or
paid work experiences.
Students attend the Burlington Technical Center for 2 hours and 15
minutes, either in the morning or the afternoon, and may earn a total of
3 credits each year toward graduation. They are able to return to their
home schools for other academic courses. BTC programs are designed
to be completed in two years, although some students attend for one year
to begin an introduction to a career feld. Qualifed students may earn
college credits from a number of post-secondary institutions including
Community College of Vermont, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University,
Lyndon State College, New Hampshire Technical College, Vermont
Technical College and the University of Northwestern Ohio. Visit the
BTC web site at www.burlingtontech.org for additional information and
consult your school counselor to see how a BTC program can ft into
your schedule.
Students from South Burlington High School who wish to enroll in a
technical program may do so at either the Burlington Technical Center
or Center for Technology, Essex depending on the chosen course.
The tuition is paid for by the City of South Burlington and The State
Department of Education. These programs are open to juniors and
seniors with the exception of the Essex Pre-Tech Program which is
open to sophomores. Completion of a full program (2 years at BTC)
may result in an equivalency credit being given in Social Studies,
English, Fine Arts, Math, or Science (See course description for details.).
Construction II
B939 Welding/Metal Fabrication I
B940 Welding/Metal Fabrication II [MA]
[MA] = Embedded MathCredit [SC] = Embedded Science Credit
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
TECHNICAL CENTER PROGRAMS
BURLINGTON TECHNICAL CENTER
Programs taught at the Burlington Technical Center are half day in
length and may be held in either the morning or the afternoon.
Programs taught at the Center for Technology, Essex are full day
programs, with students returning to SBHS for a class at the end of the
day. Any student or parent/guardian interested in learning more about
a particular program should contact the Guidance Offce at the high
school. There is a special registration form to fll out for these programs.
The following are descriptions of the available courses:
BURLINGTON TECHNICAL CENTER:
COURSES FOR SBHS STUDENTS
B903 Auto Body Repair I
B904 Auto Body Repair II [SC]
B905 Automotive Science and Technology I
B906 Automotive Science and Technology II [MA]
[SC]
B901 Aviation Technology I
B902 Aviation Technology II [MA] [SC]
B960 Computer Systems I
B961 Computer Systems II [SC]
B941 Criminal Justice I
B942 Criminal Justice II [SS]
B911 Culinary/ Professional Foods I
B912 Culinary/Professional Foods II [SC]
B935 Design & Illustration I
B936 Design & Illustration II [ART]
B913 Electronic Recording Arts I
B914 Electronic Recording Arts II [SC]
B909 Human Services/Early Childhood Education I
B910 Human Services/Early Childhood Education II
[SS]
B933 Medical & Sports Sciences [SC]
B934 Medical & Sports Sciences II
B937 Principles of Engineering/Architecture/
Construction I [MA]
B938 Principles of Engineering/Architecture/
AUTO BODY REPAIR I & II*
Course B903/B904: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Science credit after two years
This two-year program is designed to provide the student with
job-entry skills for auto body repair equipment, body repair and
alignment, refnishing, welding techniques, frame and chassis repairs
and estimating and management procedures. Emphasis is placed on
technical knowledge as well as the manual skills associated with auto
body craftsmanship. The curriculum utilizes ASE (Automobile Service
Excellence) certifed instructional materials, a symbol of quality in this
industry. Qualifed second-year students may be placed in Co-op jobs at
local auto body shops upon approval of the instructor.
AUTOMOTIVE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY I & II*
Course B905/B906: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Science credit/Math credit with independent study after two years
The modern automobile has become a very technologically advanced
machine with vehicle systems rapidly changing. Computers, electronic
engine controls, fuel injection and antilock braking have entered the
world of the automotive technician. These technology and future
advancements require the development of new skills and techniques.
Students in this program will receive the technical education
increasingly in demand by automotive dealerships, independent repair
facilities, and equipment manufacturers. The program offers in-depth
theory with extensive hands-on training in the well-equipped automotive
lab. Qualifed students can earn guaranteed admission status and up
to six college credits in the General Motors-Automotive Associates
Degree Program at New Hampshire Technical College at Laconia, six
college credits at University of Northwestern Ohio, advanced standing at
Nashville Auto-Diesel College and advanced standing and two credits at
New England Institute of Technology.
35
AVIATION TECHNOLOGY I & II*
Course B901/B902: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Science credit and Mathematics credit after two years
High salaries and extremely challenging jobs make Aviation Technology
a very attractive career. If you enjoy subjects such as aerodynamics,
are fascinated by complex machinery and love aircraft, this is an
excellent choice for you. The use of specialized tools to work on aircraft
components in the laboratory, and work experience in local aviation
companies provide the opportunity to become a certifed aircraft
technician. All training received in this program is FAA approved and
is applied to Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Certifcation. Students
who successfully complete the Aviation program at BTC may enroll
for additional training in Airframe and Powerplant systems on a tuition
basis, which is also available at our facility at the airport. We not
only have training sites for Airframe and Powerplant, but also have
a maintenance examiner on staff for complete A&P certifcation and
written testing. This two-year program is designed to provide instruction
in a wide variety of skills and knowledge related to the aviation
technology feld. These areas include basic aircraft maintenance,
principles of aerodynamics, fight electronics, troubleshooting, drawing,
metallurgy, sheet metal fabrication, physics of fight and trends and
careers in the aviation industry. This program exceeds the requirements
for Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) part 147 under certifcate
number VMQT049K. Qualifed students earn twelve college credits at
Embry Riddle Aeronautical University, through articulated agreement, or
advanced placement at any other FAR part 147 school.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS*
Course B960/B961: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Science credit after two years
The frst year of the program focuses on PC Hardware and Software Skills,
which include Personal computers, Safe lab procedures, Troubleshooting,
Operating systems, Laptop computers, Printers and scanners, Networks,
Security, Communication skills. After successful completion of Computer
Systems I, students are prepared to take the CompTIA A+ Essentials Exams.
An A+ Certifcation candidate must pass two exams. The frst exam is
CompTIA A+ Essentials. The second advanced exam depends on the type
of certifcation desired. Each advanced exam assesses specialized skills in
one of the following areas: IT Technician, Remote Support Technician, or
Depot Technician. The second year of the program is the Cisco Networking
Academy. Cisco Networking is designed to provide students with classroom
and laboratory experience in current and emerging networking technology
that will empower them to enter employment and/or further education and
training in the computer-networking feld. After successful completion
of Computer Systems II, students are prepared to take the CCNA (Cisco
Certifed Network Associate) exam. Qualifed students may earn eight
transcripted college credits from Community College of Vermont. Students
may transfer these credits to other colleges and universities.
oarding or Instructor Approval
Prerequisite: Keyboarding or Instructor Approval
CRIMINAL JUSTICE I & II;
Course B941/B942 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Social Studies credit after two years
This rigorous college preparatory program introduces students to careers
related to the law, public safety and security. Students will engage in
classroom instruction, simulations, labs, feld trips and job shadows.
Students will also be introduced to the use of technology in the feld and for
investigative work. Through curriculum instruction and activities students
will develop critical thinking skills, writing skills, articulation skills, and use
of the scientifc method. Students will have the opportunity to earn valuable
certifcations, embedded academic credit and college credit. Credentials
may include First Responder, Emergency Medical Technician-Basic,
Incident Command, CPR, First Aid and Hazardous Material Awareness.
Dual enrollment options at area colleges that provide transcripted college
credits are being developed.
CULINARY/ PROFESSIONAL FOODS I & II*
Course B911/B912: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Science credit after two years
Culinary/Professional Foods is designed to introduce students to
all aspects of the restaurant and institutional food service industry.
Emphasis is on quantity food preparation. Instruction includes
sanitation, safety, use and care of equipment, basic meal preparation,
and table service (i.e., waiter/waitress). Foods prepared are salads,
meats, poultry, fsh, soups, sandwiches, vegetables, breads and desserts.
Students take part in a Career Experience Rotating Co-op program to
observe and participate in varied aspects of food service in the school
and community. Students are introduced to the world of work including
such areas as self-appraisal, fnding a job, applications, resumes,
interviews, employment laws, employee benefts and responsibilities.
Prerequisite: Interview with the instructor. Note: Attendance records
must be provided prior to the interview.
DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION I & II*
Course B935/B936: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Fine Arts credit after two years
If you have creative talents, like to draw and want to explore careers that
will help you use these skills, this course will give you the opportunity. You
will learn about the many careers associated with design and illustration
and get a chance to begin building your career in the following ways:
Build a portfolio of design and illustration work; discover which feld of
design and illustration is right for you; see the work of successful design
professionals; map out an individual course to help prepare you for your
chosen career; enhance your creative skills; develop a critical eye for design;
organize complex jobs; build your visual vocabulary; self promote; protect
yourself and your work; work with clients; and improve communication
skills. You will also learn to use programs such as Adobe Creative Suite
(Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign).
In addition to AP Studio Art credits available to all students, second year
students may earn up to ffteen college credits through a state-wide portfolio
review process and articulation agreements with Lyndon State College and
Community College of Vermont.
Prerequisite: Interview and Portfolio Presentation
ELECTRONIC RECORDING ARTS I & II*
Course B913/B914: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Science credit after two years
Electronic Recording Arts has been designed to introduce students to
creative careers in non-print media (television, flm and multimedia
presentations). Students create numerous projects using the equipment
in the ERA Digital Media Lab including Apple computers; 15 digital
video editing suites including Final Cut Pro; Newtek Video Toaster;
Photoshop; Adobe After Effects; Lightwave 3D; Yamaha AW4416 Audio
Workstation; PowerPoint; feld and studio camcorders by Canon and
Sony. Hardware and software upgrades occur in a timely manner so
that the program will remain technologically current. Field trips and job
shadows to observe and participate in local audio/video productions are
available throughout the year. The course will include the following
topics: Introduction to Video Production; Ethical, Legal Implications
of Video Technology; Video Equipment; Camera Techniques; Audio;
Lighting; Computer Graphics; Script Writing; Interview Techniques;
Producing; Editing and posting video on the web. Students will be able
to develop projects in the Burlington Technical Center Video Studio
using a variety of cameras, video recorders, audio processors, editing
systems, computers and lighting instruments. ERA II students will
continue to have an opportunity to expand their knowledge by producing
more independent projects. Internships with area producers can be
arranged for second year students.

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HUMAN SERVICES/ EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION I & II*
Course B909/B910: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Social Studies credit after two years
Human Services prepares students to pursue further education towards
a career in the Human Services feld or to fll entry-level jobs requiring
good people, communication, teamwork and workplace skills. Students
learn many valuable skills in addition to the core curriculum of human
development and the exploration of careers in the Human Services
feld. Many of the assignments are long term and require students to be
self-directed, organized and to plan time thoughtfully. During their frst
year in the program, opportunities for students include teaching in our
state licensed, on-site preschool program, learning direct observation
techniques and digital photography, observing a preschool child and
creating a comprehensive child portfolio that is shared with the parents of
the child, creating materials to use in the feld, including displays, books,
brochures, games, power point presentations, etc. and listening to guest
lecturers from the Human Services feld. During their second year of the
program, students choose an area of concentration in the Human Services
feld. Those continuing in early childhood (birth through age 8) continue
to work in the on-site preschool program. Students indicating the desire
and aptitude are promoted to assistant teachers. Those wishing to explore
careers working with adolescents, elderly and special needs populations
participate in internships in the community. All majors participate in a
Community Work Experience their last month of the program. Qualifed
students may earn six transcripted college credits through a dual enrollment
program with Community College of Vermont. Students may transfer
these credits to other colleges and universities. Students completing this
two-year course meet state requirements for entry-level positions in the
early childhood feld.
MEDICAL & SPORTS SCIENCES I & I*
Course B933/B934: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Science credit after the frst year
The Medical and Sports Sciences Program is a two-year college
preparatory program. The rigorous curriculum prepares students to
pursue further education towards a career in either the medical or sports
sciences.
The two years of the program correlate with a complete Anatomy and
Physiology (A & P) course (i.e. Year I covers A & P I, Year II covers
A & P II). As we progress through Anatomy and Physiology we will
be covering the associated medical terminology, associated diseases
(pathologies) as well as evaluation and treatment procedures specifc to
the body system being covered. Students will participate in laboratory
experiences including microscopic analysis, dissection, phlebotomy
(blood drawing), massage, microbiology and wound care. Students will
also be orientated to medical instruments (i.e. refex hammers, hot and
cold packs, blood pressure cuffs, EKG’s, and inspirometers,…). Life-
like, computerized manikins are used to simulate patients and introduce
students to normal and abnormal patient fndings. The frst year
curriculum also includes the study of Human Growth and Development
(exploring physical, cognitive and social-emotional development
through the life span). Study strategies (including note-taking, textbook
reading, studying, test-taking,…) are taught in the early part of the frst
year and reinforced throughout the duration of the two-year program.
Students spend time during the frst year program exploring various
medical and sports related felds in order to fully understand the details
of each of these positions. Students then have the opportunity to observe
different medical professionals through clinical observations, in order
to identify their own area of interest. In the second year, in addition
to the continued study of Anatomy and Physiology, the curriculum
also includes an in-depth study of nutrition, including nutritional
considerations for the athlete. Students in the second year program are
placed in career work experiences in their identifed area of interest,
allowing them to acquire valuable hands on experience with patients as
well as the chance to interact with medical/sports professionals.
Because the instructors of the Medical and Sports Sciences Program
are adjunct faculty at local colleges, qualifed students may earn up to
fourteen transcripted college credits (seven credits in the frst year and
seven credits in the second year) through dual enrollment programs at
Vermont Technical College and the Community College of Vermont.
Former students have successfully transferred these credits to the
colleges and universities they have attended.
Prerequisite:BiologyorInstructorApproval
PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE
& CONSTRUCTION I & II*
Course B937/B938: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Mathematics credit after the frst year
PEAC is a college preparatory program designed to meet the needs
of students who are interested in pursuing careers that encompass the
design, engineering and construction of commercial and residential
buildings. Included in the curriculum is the study of manual and
computer aided drafting, surveying to include topographical and
boundary details, architectural design concepts and building construction
principles and practices. Students will select small projects to design and
build for area nonproft agencies. Through classroom activities students
will explore career opportunities and post-secondary options. They
will also develop professional portfolios to present to colleges or future
employers. In this program you will: gain competency in computer
aided design and drafting; work with mentors who are professionals
in the engineering, architectural and construction felds; interact with
area planning and zoning commissions; build a professional portfolio;
produce a boundary survey map including contour drawings; learn
construction practices and inspection guidelines; study the effects of
natural and manmade forces on structures; and explore post secondary
options. Qualifed students may earn two transcripted college credits
through a dual enrollment program at Vermont Technical College. These
credits may transfer to other colleges and Universities.
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry or Instructor Approval
WELDING/METAL FABRICATION I & II*
Course B939/B940: 3 credits per year (1 or 2 years)
*Mathematics credit after two years
The welding industry today presents continually growing opportunities
for skilled workers. This program trains students in the recognition of
metals, as well as the proper procedures in welding. Instruction includes
electric arc, oxyacetylene and gas tungsten arc welding. Instruction also
includes blue print reading and the safe use of small hand and power
tools used in the feld of metal fabrication. Students are encouraged to
design and fabricate projects such as trailers, log splitters, gyroscopes,
etc. AWS certifcation is possible upon completion of this program.
37
CENTER FOR TECHNOLOGY, ESSEX (CTE)
FULL DAY PROGRAMS
Visit our web site www.gocte.org for more details and photos.
The Center for Technology, Essex (CTE) operates a full day, fexible
block schedule. This schedule allows juniors and seniors to complete
a technical program in one year. Most students attend CTE daily, from
9:17 a.m. - 2:05 p.m. Every program offers two to three academic cred-
its (math, science, English, social studies, etc.) as well as up to four elec-
tive credits toward high school graduation. In addition, some students
take separate academic courses (e.g. algebra, chemistry) through CTE,
Essex High School, or a local college to help with graduation or college
entry requirements. Our schedule allows fexibility for serious students.
The primary objective of our technical programs is to provide each
student with the specifc knowledge, skills, and theory to enable him/
her to either obtain employment upon completion of the program, and/
or to enter college. All eligible students work at a job-based “Career
Work Experience”/ internship during their year at CTE. For successful
students, this may evolve into a paid work (Co-Op) position. Industry
credentials and/or licenses are affliated with all programs.
College Connection: Many CTE programs have agreements with
colleges that award eligible students college credit in a particular feld.
Some of these agreements include college transcripts and transferable
credit, while others apply credit toward a specifc college and course of
study. In addition, CTE students are also offered the opportunity to take
college courses.
Admission Requirements (visit program and attend Step-Up Day;
plus the following):
1) a minimum of 10 high school credits
2) good attendance (no more than 20 absences, unless there are
extenuating circumstances)
3) ability to work both independently and in group situations
4) ability and willingness to follow safety instructions
5) respect for self, others, the environment, the learning process,
and the CTE worker traits
PROGRAMS OFFERED
All programs offer 6 credits; 2-3 core academic credits (math, science,
fne arts, English, social studies, etc.) and 3-4 elective credits.
Automotive Technology I & II
Building Technology I & II
Business Academy I & II
Child Care/Human Services I & II
Computer Animation & Web Page Design I & II
Computer Systems Technology I & II
Cosmetology Arts and Sciences I & II
Dental Assisting
Engineering/Architectural Design I & II
Graphic Design & Digital Publishing I & II
Health Information Management
Natural Resources and Agri-science I & II
Ophthalmic Medical Assisting
Pre Tech Exploration
Professional Food Services I & II
Embedded and Integrated Credits: Embedded credits are credits ap-
proved by the Vermont State Board of Education that meet state required
high school graduation requirements. Integrated credits are taught by
licensed academic instructors.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
The Automotive Technology Program provides training and experience
in the principles of automotive diagnosis and repair. The Automotive
Technology Program has been recognized nationally for its excellence;
it is a NATEF (National Automotive Technicians Education Founda-
tion) certifed course. The Automotive Technology program can provide
students with the basic knowledge and skills to acquire entry-level jobs
in many automotive areas, or to pursue a post-secondary education in
the automotive feld. Students have the opportunity to learn both basic
and advanced technical skills, along with essential worker traits. While
at CTE, students work two weeks as practicing technicians in the “live”
auto shop environment operated within the center and eligible students
are placed in a two week Career Work Experience in area auto tech busi-
nesses.
Recommended Prerequisite(s): Grade Level Math and Science
H.S. Credits: One embedded math credit and one embedded science
credit, plus four elective credits.
Certifcations: Student ASE, AYES, SP/2 Safety Training
College Credits: Articulation Agreements with University of Northwest-
ern Ohio, Universal Technical Institute and Ohio Technical College
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY APPRENTICESHIP
This program is available to students who successfully complete the Au-
tomotive Technology Program and to second year applicants. It is made
available for qualifed students through the Automotive Youth Educa-
tion System (AYES), a national program sponsored by manufacturers
and dealers. Second year students are required to take two college level
courses throughout the school year.
H.S. Credits: One embedded math credit, one embedded science credit
and four elective credits.
Certifcation: ASE
BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
The Building Technology Program prepares a student to work in many
areas of the construction world. Students work in the shop as well as on
the custom home being built in a local neighborhood development near
CTE. Successful students have the potential to fnd well-paid jobs in the
feld, and some go on to further education in architecture and design,
civil engineering, or construction management. Curriculum components
include basic safety, construction industry math, hand tool use and
identifcation, power tool safety, use and maintenance, blueprint reading,
basic rigging, construction materials and adhesives, and framing meth-
ods and planning. In addition, some students may enroll in a licensed
apprenticeship program for electricians or plumbers which are accredited
by the State of Vermont.
H.S. Credits: One embedded math credit, one integrated science credit
and four elective credits.
BUSINESS ACADEMY
The Business Academy prepares students for success in the business
world and for further education. Students who complete the program are
likely to be successful in such careers as sales, advertising and market-
ing, retail, accounting, computer operation, banking, and small business
management. The core curriculum includes interpersonal communica-
tions, marketing and sales, small business management, accounting,
and computer software. The cumulative project is the development of
individual business plans. The classroom creates an authentic business
and retail environment with the operation of the on-campus school store.
Students work independently and collaboratively to analyze and solve
problems. Guest speakers, feld trips, Career Work Experiences in area
businesses and cooperative education placements provide additional
program enhancements.
38
Recommended Prerequisite(s): Keyboarding.
H.S. Credits: One embedded math credit, one embedded English credit
and four elective credits.
Certifcation(s): Mouse Computer Certifcation; Microsoft Offce Spe-
cialist available to advanced students.
College Credits: Students are eligible to earn up to six college credits
for successful completion of the program. In addition, qualifed students
may take one three credit college course per semester at CCV, UVM or
Vermont Tech.
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES
This program is designed to prepare students to work with infants, tod-
dlers, preschoolers and school age children. Students are introduced
to careers in education and instructed in the steps they need to take to
pursue a teaching career. The program introduces students to elementary
school math, science, reading, and social studies instruction. Students
are also trained to work with the handicapped and the elderly. In co-
operation with the Community College of Vermont students are able to
earn six college credits in child care while participating in this program.
Students are also able to attend Champlain College or Community Col-
lege of Vermont for additional credits.
CTE Preschool is operated by the students enrolled in this program.
The program is recognized by the State of Vermont Day Care Licensing
Unit as a training program for assistant teachers and caregivers in state
licensed child care facilities. Students who become employed and com-
plete all the requirements receive certifcation as assistant teachers.
Special Requirement of All Students: Due to the professional require-
ments in this feld, all applicants must be able to satisfy the criminal
records check required by the state Child Care Services Division.
Prerequisites: 2 credits English, 2 credits Math, 1 credit Science, 1
credit Social Studies
HS Credits: One integrated English credit, one embedded social studies
credit and, four elective credits.
Certifcation(s): Assistant Child Care Teacher.
College Credits: Up to twelve credits awarded by CCV.
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES 2
Qualifed students are invited to apply to our apprenticeship program.
Students involved in this program work at area child care facilities. This
is a supervised work experience and students are expected to fulfll the
planned course work at the center as well as complete a college level
course. Students are paid by the employers for their time at the centers.
Students are also require to do three rotations in school settings; one
rotation in an alternative school, one rotation in an elementary school
classroom, and a rotation observing elementary school math, music, and
art classrooms.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of CE/HS frst year program.
HS Credits: One integrated English credit, one embedded social studies
credit and, four elective credits.
COMPUTER ANIMATION AND WEB PAGE DESIGN
The Computer Animation and Web Page Design Program is designed for
students interested in acquiring new media skills and who are inter-
ested in the combination of art and technology. Our Computer Anima-
tion component takes advantage of state of the art 2D and 3D digital
computer hardware and software used in the Disney/Pixar flm, Cars. On
our web design component students create a number of different types of
web sites and graphics, form clean XHTML with CSS, using Photoshop
fr image manipulation and creation; to dynamic sites using PHP to in-
teractive Flash sites and video games. Upon completion of the program,
students will have an interactive online portolio for their best work to
take on to higher education, internships or the work force.
Recommended Prerequisite(s): Creativity and interest in the combina-
tion of art and technology
H.S. Credits: One integrated English credit, one embedded fne art
credit, and four elective credits.
Certifcation(s): World Organization of Webmasters
College Credits: Articulation agreement with CCV for up to six college
credits. In addition, qualifed students can earn up to twelve college
credits at area colleges.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY
The Computer Systems Technology Program prepares students to enter
a career in computer support as part of an information technology team.
Students will learn how to diagnose and solve computer problems,
upgrade computer systems, properly install internal computer compo-
nents, set up networks, operate network servers, and maintain computers
in a Windows or network environment. Students gain necessary skills
to become support/service/bench or help desk technicians. The program
is excellent preparation for students considering computer engineering
in college, and transferable college credits are awarded to successful
students.
HS Credits: One math and one science credit embedded, plus four elec-
tive credits.
Certifcation(s): A+
College Credits: Articulation agreement with CCV for up to eight
credits.
COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY II
Successful students who earn required certifcations may apply to return
to CTE for an advanced/second year to work on Network and Cisco
Certifed Network Associate (CCNA) certifcation. Study, in combina-
tion with co-op placement, will help students qualify for this challenging
license needed by information technology support staff.
HS Credits: One math and one science credit embedded, plus four elec-
tive credits.
Certifcation(s): Network +, CCNA

COSMETOLOGY I
Approved by the State Board of Cosmetology and Barbering as a
licensed school of cosmetology, this full-time program prepares students
for employment and further education in the feld of cosmetology.
Students can complete up to 750 hours toward their required 1500 hours
for a state cosmetology license. Students will learn, through theory and
practice, foundational skills including: hair structure and chemistry,
hair shaping and design decisions, color and lightening application and
scientifc process, and chemical restructuring of the hair. Additionally,
level one anatomy and physiology, skin and nail diseases and disorders
are all class topics of extreme importance. The introduction of interper-
sonal and workplace readiness skills are an integral part of this program
of study.
HS Credits: One embedded science credit, one integrated English
credit, and one integrated math credit, plus three elective credits.
Certifcation(s): OPI certifcation (nail system)
COSMETOLOGY II: SALON MANAGEMENT
Students who successfully complete Cosmetology I may be accepted
into the client-oriented second year program. Cosmetology II students
can complete up to an additional 750 clock hours toward the required
1500 hours for a state cosmetology license. Students in this program will
focus on applying fundamental skills learned in the frst year while prac-
ticing on clients in a business setting. In preparation for licensure, all
competencies introduced in Cosmetology I are revisited in a theoretical
manner. Cosmetology II Salon Practices Management emphasizes the
day to day operation of the salon. This yearlong program reinforces and
enhances salon management, scientifc application of chemical services
and interpersonal communications.
HS Credits: One embedded science credit, one integrated English
credit, and one integrated math credit, plus three elective credits.
39
DENTAL ASSISTING
Accredited by the American Dental Association, this program is
designed for students who are strong in science and want to work with
people. Students will become familiar with all aspects of dental assist-
ing in the general dental practice. Curriculum is designed to prepare
motivated individuals to become competent and knowledgeable in
professional orientation, dental materials, dental radiology, anatomy and
physiology, head and neck anatomy, infection control, clinical assist-
ing, medical emergencies/CPR. Instruction takes place in our in-school
dental laboratory and operatories and (for eligible students) clinical
training at area dental offces. Students who successfully complete the
program are prepared to challenge the Dental Assisting National Board
examination and become Certifed Dental Assistants and are eligible for
employment as dental assistants in a variety of dental practices. Some
students continue their education, pursuing a career in dental hygiene or
dentistry.
Recommended Prerequisite(s): General or biological science.
HS Credits: One embedded science credit and one integrated math
credit, plus fve elective credits.
Certifcations: CPR and AED (defbrillator) certifcations; radiology
certifcation.
ENGINEERING / ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN
The Engineering and Architectural Design Program is an excellent
hands-on preparation for students interested in architecture or mechani-
cal engineering. Students learn the graphic language basic to all forms of
engineering, architecture and design. The program provides an essential
background and early opportunity for students to explore the feld prior
to college. College credit may be awarded to eligible students who
complete this program. Students will also complete a portfolio valuable
for college application. This course has been recommended by UVM
and VTC to all students considering engineering careers. The program
utilizes an individualized approach. A student may enter the program on
a one or two year basis; fex scheduling is accommodated. Students must
be enrolled in both math and science courses while taking this program
(Algebra II, Pre-Calc, Chemistry, Conceptual Physics or Physics). By
graduation, students should plan to have successfully completed Algebra
I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calc. or A.T.P.S., Chemistry and Physics as
minimum requirements for any two or four year college.
Part I: TECHNICAL DRAFTING
In this course, students progress through a series of drafting problems,
providing them with a sound foundation in the methods and techniques
used in various drafting and design applications. Orthographic, isomet-
ric, sectioning, perspectives, schematics, developments and many other
types of graphics will be covered. Computers with AUTOCAD and
SOLIDWORKS software will be used to solve and draw many of these
problems. Multimedia portfolios will also be produced using Microsoft
Offce applications.
Recommended Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry (80% or better in
each)
Part II: DESIGN
After completion of technical drafting, the student may enter the design
area in which he/she wishes to concentrate - Mechanical Design or
Architectural Design.
MECHANICAL DESIGN provides students with experiences in
advanced detail drafting, assembled mechanisms, precision measuring,
fxture design, CNC computer numerical control and programming. .
The design, building and testing of structural models will be covered
through involvement with engineering competitions. Work in this course
is done entirely on computer with SOLIDWORKS and other software.
Students chosen to participate in the VTC course MEC-1011 will receive
two (2) transcripted college credits.
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN covers residential buildings. Topics
include styles, construction, design foor plans, elevations, foundations,
electrical, plumbing, heating, kitchens, lot and plot plans. Students will
be involved in the actual design of buildings that will be built. Work
in this course is done entirely on computer with AUTOCAD and other
software. Students chosen to participate in the VTC course ARC-1021
will receive two (2) transcripted college credits.
HS Credits: One embedded fne arts credit, one embedded math plus
four elective credits
College Credits: In addition to the VTC MEC-1011 or ARC-1021 tran-
scripted credits, some colleges have waived courses for work demon-
strated in students’ portfolios.
EHS/CTE/VERMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE
ENGLISH COMPOSITION 1060
Interested in qualifying for high school and Vermont State College
composition credit? If you have the skills and the drive, seek enroll-
ment in this course. “ENG 1060 is the standard course of VTC’s English
offerings. It introduces students to four literary genres – the short story,
poetry, the novel and drama – and to research writing. The course aims
to 1)master the techniques of essay writing, 2) educate students about
the rewards inherent in reading, analyzing and refecting upon literature,
3) communicate effectively, both orally as well as in exposition, and
4) increase their awareness of their responsibilities as global citizens
who have both technological and academic skills.” A student must meet
Vermont Technical College acceptance standards to enroll in this three
credit option. CTE enrollment is limited to 10 students per year.
HS Credits: one English and three VTC credits available upon accep-
tance and successful completion of the course.
GRAPHIC DESIGN AND DIGITAL PUBLISHING
In the Graphic Design and Digital Publishing program, students learn
how to take a graphic design project from concept, through the creation
of the digital fle, to preparation and printing in a setting that duplicates
a design/print studio. Students learn how to use design and publishing
software, gain experience with the various stages involved in graphic
design, and create a portfolio of their own work. They combine creative
applied art with technology. Emphasis is placed on creative thinking,
attention to detail, knowledge of computer hardware and software, and
work performance. Students work on client jobs through the design/print
studio (Next Generation Design & Print) as well as assignments from a
semester project sheet. Eligible students have the opportunity, through
career work experience, to beneft from employer-based instruction and
on-site training.
HS Credits: One embedded math credit, one embedded art credit, one
integrated English credit, plus four` elective credits.
College Credits: Student portfolios can earn up to nine articulated
credits from Lyndon State and nine articulated credits from the Vermont
State College system.
GRAPHIC DESIGN AND DIGITAL PUBLISHING 2
Upon completion of the Graphic Design and Digital Publishing 1 pro-
gram, students have the opportunity to apply to the second year program.
Second year students have a choice between two program models.
Qualifed students can complete program requirements by participating
in an apprenticeship in which they go directly into the workforce and
expand their skills through employer based programs. Other students
may wish to complete their second year in our in-house design and print
studio, Next Generation Design & Print. In both instances, students can
engage in software certifcation and learn to manage the design and print
studio. In addition, second year students develop concepts for client
jobs, produce and prepare the digital job fles, and print/fnish the live
client jobs.
HS Credits: One embedded math credit, one embedded art credit, one
integrated English credit, plus four elective credits.
College Credits: Student portfolios can earn up to nine credits from
Lyndon State and nine credits from the Vermont State College system.
HEALTH INFORMATICS
This program focuses on training for diverse administrative positions or
an introduction to health care professions. The business of health care
40
increasingly relies upon the expertise of staff trained in interpersonal
communications and technical skills. Course topics include: medical
terminology, human biology, keyboarding and transcription, career
development, medical offce management, medical insurance reimburse-
ment and diagnostic/procedural medical coding. The Microsoft Offce
computer software package is studied and used. Students also discuss the
ethical and legal issues in health care as well as personnel management,
health insurance issues, the specifc skills involved in working from
home, and other information management topics.
Eligible students in this program participate in at least 30-hour career
work experience in the health care industry, with placements in private
physicians’ offces, hospitals, clinics or insurance companies. Possible
career felds include but are not limited to: Health care supervision,
medical coding, and insurance reimbursement, transcription, medical of-
fce secretary and patient scheduling. Students could qualify for clinical
health related careers with additional training.
HS Credits: One embedded math credit and one integrated English
credit, plus four elective credits.
Certifcations: CPR, First Aid and Fire Safety
College: Up to six credits for eligible students awarded for successful
completion of the program and college assessments and an additional
three – six credits by taking classes at area colleges.
NATURAL RESOURCES AND AGRISCIENCE TECHNOLOGY
Students are offered a unique opportunity to experience the science,
technology, and management of a “living laboratory” in this award win-
ning, fast paced program. The program is organized into two one-year
options. Students select either Forestry (Environmental Science/Hor-
ticulture) or Mechanical Science after completing an introductory unit
featuring core skills. Forestry (Environmental Science/Horticulture) cur-
riculum includes: Timber Harvesting, Forest Management, Landscaping,
Greenhouse Management, Plant & Soil Science, Hydroponics/Aqua-
culture and Hand and Power Tools. Mechanical Science curriculum in-
cludes: Heavy Equipment Operation, Welding Fabrication, Small Engine
Repair, Electrical Systems, Water Systems, Hydraulic Systems and Hand
and Power Tools. In both concentrations, students have the opportunity
to develop leadership and entrepreneurial skills as they produce a variety
of seasonal food products. Several traditional food products include
maple syrup, honey, rainbow trout, and hydroponic vegetables.
Students interested in attending college to major in mechanical engineer-
ing, natural resources and environmental felds will beneft from this
program. Students preparing for careers relating to industrial mechanics,
or the management, use and preservation of land, soil, and water will
fnd this course tailored to meet their needs.
Recommended Prerequisite(s): Demonstrated maturity with respect to
safe equipment operation such as chainsaws and heavy machinery. Able
to work effectively in teams; maintain a high level of respect for class-
mates, and instructors; and act in a manner congruent with authorized
ambassadorship of a highly visible program. Demonstrated mastery
of basic mathematical operations, measurement, fractional and metric
conversions, and logical manipulative skills. Preference will be given to
students with math and science backgrounds.
HS Credits: One embedded math credit and one embedded science
credit, plus four elective credits.
Certifcations: Games of Logging I-IV, Outdoor power equipment certi-
fcation in small engines (OPE).
College Credits: Articulation agreement in place with SUNY
Cobleskill, NY in Agricultural Engineering and the Department of Plant
Sciences. An articulation agreement with VTC is pending.
OPHTHALMIC MEDICAL ASSISTING
CTE offers an exciting program in Ophthalmic Medical Assisting. Oph-
thalmic Medical Assisting is a highly professional career for high school
juniors, seniors, and adults with a strong interest in medical professions.
The program requires profcient academic achievement in math and sci-
ence. The program will train students to work under the supervision of
an ophthalmologist to assist the physician in the treatment and diagnosis
of ocular disease. Technicians routinely gather medical information take
ocular measurements, administer tests and evaluations and assist the sur-
geon in surgery. Students who demonstrate maturity and professional-
ism can participate in this program which combines academic instruction
and classroom clinical experience. Following a four month introductory
period of intensive lecture and clinical skill development, qualifed
students will be assigned to ophthalmology practices in the area to work
with physicians and technicians. Certifcation in Ophthalmic Medical
Assisting has been approved by the American Board of Education for 12
college credits
Program curriculum includes: General Anatomy and Physiology,
Medical Terminology, Medical Law and Ethics, Ocular Anatomy and
Physiology, Ophthalmic Optics, Ophthalmic Pharmacology, Ocular
Motility, Introduction to Diseases of the Eye, Visual Fields, Tonometry,
Surgical Assisting, Ophthalmic Photography, Refractometry, and Spe-
cialized Ophthalmic Testing. The supervising Medical Director for this
program is Dr. Michelle Young, Fletcher Allen Health Care.
Recommended Prerequisite(s): Algebra I and a biological science.
HS Credits: One embedded math credit and one embedded science credit
currently.
Certifcation: Accreditation by the Joint Commission on Allied Health
Personnel in Ophthalmology is pending.
PROFESSIONAL FOOD SERVICES I
The Professional Food Services Program is designed to offer training in
all areas of the food service industry. Students in this program will learn
food preparation, baking, and restaurant operation and management.
Teamwork, professionalism and positive worker traits are stressed as
well as technical skills in order to give students a chance to secure and
retain employment in the food service feld.
Students work and learn in a commercial kitchen and use professional
equipment as part of their training. Part of the instruction involves oper-
ating the Center’s restaurant “The Colonial Room”. Students learn basic
weights and measures, food service safety and sanitation, product identi-
fcation and use, time management, nutrition, use and care of equipment
and mastering food service competencies. There is a close working rela-
tionship with area businesses which allows students to spend two weeks
with a participating employer on a Career Work Experience.
Recommended Prerequisite(s): Good basic math and writing skills.
HS Credits: One embedded math credit and one embedded science
credit, plus four elective credits.
Certifcations: ServSafe
College Credit: An exciting “tech prep” program with New England
Culinary Institute (NECI) awards up to one semester’s classroom time
and related credits.
PROFESSIONAL FOOD SERVICES II
Students who complete the Professional Food Services I program can
attend this second year program. The curriculum focuses on menu de-
sign, marketing, and sales in an entrepreneurial food production setting.
Students will learn to work more independently and assume responsibil-
ity for food production management decisions. Students produce and
market healthy meals to be sold in the school’s cafeteria. There is a
close working relationship with area businesses which allows students to
spend two-three weeks with a participating employer on a Career Work
Experience. Some students may qualify for an extended Apprenticeship
placement in the second semester.
Recommended Prerequisite(s): Professional Food Services I
HS Credits: One embedded math credit and one embedded science
credit, plus four elective credits.
Certifcations: ServSafe
College Credit: An exciting “tech prep” program with New England
Culinary Institute (NECI) awards up to twenty (20) college credits to
eligible students.
41
APPRENTICESHIP TRAINING
The Center for Technology, Essex (CTE) offers those students who
have successfully completed one year at CTE and are highly motivated,
focused, and highly skilled a second year option of student apprentice-
ship in certain career areas. This workplace, competency delivered
curriculum, combines both non-paid and paid training, vital for students
to achieve advanced job placement or acceptance in a post-secondary
institution in their selected career area. Successful frst year students
must interview for these placements.
TheCenterforTechnology,Essexisanequalopportunityagencythat
offersallpersonsthebeneftsofparticipatingineachofitsprograms
and competing in all areas of employment. This agency does not
discriminate because of race, religion, color, ancestry, national origin,
sex,sexualorientation,placeofbirth,orage,oragainstaqualifed
individual with a disability.
SCHEDULE PLANNER STUDENT NAME:________________________
Fill in the courses you completed each year and those in which you plan to enroll next year.
The number in parentheses is total number of credits required in that subject for graduation.
Art/Music (1):
English (4):
Math (3):
Science (3):
Social Studies (3):
Health (.5):
Phys. Ed. (1.5):
Technology:
World Language:
Elective A:
Elective B:
TITLE CREDITS
GRADE 9 GRADE 10
GRADE 9
GRADE 12 GRADE 11
Art/Music (1):
English (4):
Math (3):
Science (3):
Social Studies (3):
Health (.5):
Phys. Ed. (1.5):
Technology:
World Language:
Elective A:
Elective B:
TITLE CREDITS
TOTAL TOTAL
TOTAL
TOTAL
Art/Music (1):
English (4):
Math (3):
Science (3):
Social Studies (3):
Health (.5):
Phys. Ed. (1.5):
Technology:
World Language:
Elective A:
Elective B:
TITLE CREDITS
Art/Music (1):
English (4):
Math (3):
Science (3):
Social Studies (3):
Health (.5):
Phys. Ed. (1.5):
Technology:
World Language:
Elective A:
Elective B:
TITLE CREDITS
Year of Graduation:______________
42
INDEX
Alternative and Student Support Programs .....................................................8
Another Approach to Learning ......................................................................33
Auditing ..........................................................................................................6
Burlington Technical Center ...........................................................................34-36
Career Development Center (CDC) ................................................................9
Center for Technology, Essex .........................................................................37-41
Defnition of Course Levels ............................................................................5
• Honors
• Accelerated
• Advanced Placement
• Level 1
• Level 2
Driver Education Department .........................................................................10
English as a Second Language ........................................................................10
English Department ........................................................................................10-14
Equivalency Credits ........................................................................................5
Family and Consumer Science Department ....................................................14-15
Fine and Performing Arts ................................................................................16-17
• Art Department
• Music Department
Graduation Requirements/Academic Credits .................................................4
Guidance Department .....................................................................................7
Leveling of Class Sections ..............................................................................5
Mathematics Department ................................................................................18-20
Minimum Class Enrollment ............................................................................5
NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) .........................................7
Physical Education Department ......................................................................20-21
Program Limits ...............................................................................................4
School Board and Administration ...................................................................4
Science Department ........................................................................................21-23
Selecting/Dropping Courses ...........................................................................5-6
• Scheduling Changes
• Balancing Class Sections
• Penalty for Dropping Courses
• Policy on Partial Credit
• Changing Levels in Courses
• Repeating Courses
• Policy on Credit/Placement for Outside Study
Social Studies Department ..............................................................................23-25
South Burlington High School Non-Discrimination Statement ......................4
South Burlington School District Mission Statement .....................................4
Summer/Evening School ................................................................................6
Technology Department ..................................................................................25-29
Title IX Regulations ........................................................................................6
Technology Resources ....................................................................................6
World Languages ............................................................................................30-33
43
55O Dorset Street
South Burlington, Vermont
05403
802.652.7000
http://sbhs.sbschools.net/
SOUTH BURLINGTON HIGH SCHOOL

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