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Design Consistency Guidelines

Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission October 2011

DESIGN CONSISTENCY GUIDELINES


October 2011 EDITION

Tracking Changes: Text marked in yellow are changes introduced in this October 2011, edition. Chapters 13, 15, 16 and 18 have not been revised in this edition. Chapter 14 is reserved for future use.

DESIGN CONSISTENCY GUIDELINES TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. Chapter 1 Chapter 2 INTRODUCTION SURVEYS
2.0 2.1 Introduction Survey/Plan Requirements for GPS Utilization A. Control/Monument Recovery B. Evaluation of Control for Final Design and Construction Control C. Verification of Mapping Accuracy Surveys for Supplementing Project Mapping Survey Control for Construction A. Projects Defined as Minor Projects and Small Bridges/Structures B. Projects Defined as Major Projects C. Major Bridge Structures/Tunnels (over 800ft. in length) Survey Deliverables Introduction Mainline Typical Sections Flexible Pavement A. B. C. D. 3.2 Six-lane Section Four-lane Section with Future Lane Addition in Median Shoulder Treatment adjacent to Superelevated Pavement Typical Section Sheet Note 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-4 2-6 2-8 2-9 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-5 3-6 3-7 3-12 3-12 3-12 3-12 3-12

2.2 2.3

2.4

Chapter 3

ROADWAY DESIGN
3.0 3.1

Horizontal Alignment Mainline A. B. C. D. Maximum Degree of Curvature Spirals Guidelines for Setting Bearings and Angles Plan Presentation

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Chapter 4

Vertical Alignment Mainline A. Maximum Percent Grade B. Guidelines for Setting Profile Grades and Elevations C. Guidelines for Setting Graphic Grade Profiles and Elevations D. Plan Requirements 3.4 Superelevation Transition and Spiral Lengths 3.5 Cross-sections 3.6 Interchange and Service Plaza Ramps 3.7 Two-Lane to Three-Lane Transitions 3.8 Local Roadway Design A. General 3.9 Access Ramps 3.10 Toll Plaza Design 3.11 Title Sheet and Limit of Work A. Early-Action Overhead Bridge Replacement Project B. Mainline Reconstruction Project C. Title Sheet General MAINTENANCE AND PROTECTION OF TRAFFIC 3.3 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 Introduction General Notes Temporary Pavement Temporary Emergency Pull-offs (EPOs) Detours Temporary Concrete Barrier Guide Rail Temporary Major Guide and Overhead Signs Introduction TS&L Submission A. TS&L Submission Requirements B. TS&L Drawings

3-13 3-13 3-13 3-16 3-17 3-17 3-17 3-21 3-21 3-23 3-23 3-23 3-25 3-25 3-25 3-25 3-25 4-1 4-1 4-7 4-7 4-7 4-10 4-10 4-10 5-1 5-1 5-1 5-1

Chapter 5

STRUCTURAL DESIGN
5.0 5.1

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5.2

5.3

5.4

Mainline Structures (Carrying Mainline Traffic) A. Approach Slabs B. Substructure C. Superstructure Overhead Structures (Carrying Facilities Over Mainline) A. Approach Slabs B. Substructure C. Superstructure D. Early Action Bridge Contracts General Structures Guidelines A. Substructure B. Superstructure C. Drainage D. Retaining Walls E. Sound Barriers F. Soldier Pile/Post and Plank Walls (NonAnchored) G. Sign Structures H. General I. Software Introduction Re-establishing Turnpike Right-of-Way Baselines-Best Fit A. History Plan Requirements A. Right-of-way Mainline Only B. Right-of-way Early Action Bridges, Side Roads, Access Ramps accepting/discharging traffic onto any public roads C. Title Sheet D. Preparation of Property Plots Plans E. Right-of-way/Geometry Plans F. Required Right-of-Way Lines Right-of-Way Summary Chart Utility Easements

5-4 5-4 5-4 5-4 5-5 5-5 5-6 5-6 5-7 5-7 5-7 5-9 5-10 5-10 5-11 5-11 5-11 5-12 5-12 6-1 6-1 6-1 6-5 6-5

Chapter 6

RIGHT-OF-WAY
6.0 6.1

6.2

6.3 6.4

6-5 6-6 6-7 6-8 6-9 6-9 6-10

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Chapter 7

DRAINAGE, STORMWATER MANAGEMENT DESIGN, AND EROSION AND SEDIMENT POLLUTION CONTROL PLANS
7.0 7.1 Introduction Drainage Design Criteria A. General B. Storm Drainage Stormwater Management A. Stormwater Management Ordinances B. Act 167 Plans and Municipal Ordinances C. Antidegradation and Post Construction Stormwater Management Plan Requirements D. Post Construction Stormwater Management Plans E. Post Construction Stormwater Management Plans for PTC Maintenance F. NPDES Permit Submittal Procedures G. BMPs Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Measures Reconnaissance Plan A. Objective B. Scope C. Deliverable Problem Statement Draft Exploration Plan (PSDEP) A. Objective B. Scope C. Deliverable PTC Open-End Contract Drilling Guidelines and Procedures A. Objective B. Scope C. Deliverable Geotechnical Engineering Report (GER) Submission Guidelines A. Objective B. Scope of Work C. Deliverable 7-1 7-1 7-1 7.2 7-8 7-8 7-9 7-9 7-10 7-10 7-11 7-12 7-23 8-1 8-1 8-1 8-2 8-3 8-3 8-3 8-3 8-5 8-5 8-6 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-7 8-12

7.2

7.3

Chapter 8

GEOTECHNICAL DESIGN
8.0

8.1

8.2

8.3

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8.4

8.5

8.6

8.7

8.8

Soil Profile Plan Submission Guidelines A. Objective B. Scope of Work C. Deliverable Geotechnical Treatment Plan Guidelines A. Objective B. Scope of Work C. Deliverable Structure Foundation Submission Geotechnical Report Guidelines A. Objective B. Scope of Work C. Deliverable PS&E Review Guidelines A. Objective B. Scope C. Deliverable Miscellaneous A. Notes for PTS-100 Use B. Guidance for Rock Embankment Design C. Dynamic Pile Load Testing Guidelines Permanent Pavement Flexible Pavement A. General B. Flexible Pavement Design Guidelines C. Permanent Pavement Design Parameters Permanent and/or Temporary Median and Outside Shoulders Flexible Pavement Permanent Pavement for Local Road and State Routes Standard Pay Items Total Reconstruction Pavement Introduction Guide Rail A. General B. Clear Zone Concept C. Slopes D. Tapers E. Outside of Horizontal Curves
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8-12 8-12 8-13 8-13 8-14 8-14 8-14 8-14 8-14 8-14 8-15 8-17 8-19 8-19 8-19 8-19 8-19 8-19 8-20 8-21 9-1 9-1 9-1 9-2 9-5 9-6 9-8 10-1 10-2 10-2 10-8 10-8 10-8 10-8

Chapter 9

PAVEMENT DESIGN
9.0

9.1 9.2 9.3

Chapter 10

GUIDE RAIL AND MEDIAN BARRIER


10.0 10.1

October 2011

F. G. H.

10.2

Inside of Horizontal Curves Length of Need Equation Recommended Clear Runout Area Behind VATET I. Burying of Guide Rail J. Trailing End of Guide Rail K. Drainage Features L. Rounding of Guide Rail Panel Lengths M. Treatment of Guide Rail Where Access Ramps Meet the Turnpike Roadway N. Treatment of Guide Rail at Maintenance Opening Concrete Median Barrier and Single-face Barrier A. Concrete Median Barrier B. Single-face Barrier Introduction Signing A. General B. Presentation of Plans C. Reflectivity D. Mounting (Ground Overhead) E. Sign Structures F. Solar Powered Flashing Beacons G. Wiring/Conduit H. PTC Signing Guidelines for Acceleration Ramps I. PTC Access Road Signing Pavement Markings A. General B. Patterns C. Tapers for Lane Transitions D. Lane Transition Arrows E. Snowplowable Raised Pavement Markers Introduction Site Inspection

10-9 10-9 10-10 10-10 10-10 10-11 10-11 10-11 10-11 10-12 10-12 10-12 11-1 11-1 11-1 11-1 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-3 11-3 11-4 11-4 11-4 11-4 11-4 11-4 12-1 12-3

Chapter 11

SIGNING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS


11.0 11.1

11.2

Chapter 12

LIGHTING
12.0 12.1

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12.2

12.3

12.4 12.5 12.6

Conceptual Lighting Design (Lighting Study) A. Mainline Turnpike B. Mon-Fayette and Southern Beltway Projects Preliminary Lighting Design A. Conventional Lighting B. High Mast Lighting C. Offset Lighting (Post Mounted Tenon) Preliminary Lighting Design Report Final Lighting Design Final Lighting Design Report General Utility Tracking Chart Gas and Waterline Attachments to Overhead Structures

12-3 12-3 12-4 12-4 12-4 12-11 12-13 12-13 12-13 12-14 13-1 13-1 13-1

Chapter 13

UTILITIES
13.0 13.1 13.2

Chapter 14 Chapter 15

(Reserved for Future Use) ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES, MITIGATION AND PERMITS


15.0 15.1 15.2 Slopes Departmental of Environmental Protection Submerged Lands Licenses 105 Permit Permanent Pull-off Areas Landscape Planting Introduction Background Information A. Field View B. Research C. Survey Hydrologic Analysis A. Methodology B. Drainage Area C. Discharges 15-1 15-1 15-2 16-1 16-1 17-1 17-1 17-1 17-1 17-2 17-2 17-2 17-2 17-3

Chapter 16

ROADSIDE DEVELOPMENT
16.0 16.1

Chapter 17

HYDROLOGIC AND HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS


17.0 17.1

17.2

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17.3

17.4 17.5 17.6

Hydraulic Analysis A. Modeling Method B. Backwater Analysis C. Scour Analysis Risk Assessment or Analysis Summary Data Drawings A. Provide a full size plan that includes the following items: B. Provide an elevation new of the structure that includes the following items:

17-3 17-3 17-4 17-5 17-6 17-6 17-6 17-6 17-7

Chapter 18

SPECIFICATIONS, ITEM NUMBERS, QUANTITIES AND COST ESTIMATING


18.0 18.1 Introduction Specifications A. General B. PennDOT Publication 408 C. Commission Specifications D. Commission Standard Special Provisions E. Category F-Non-standard Project Specific Special Provisions Item Numbers A. General B. PennDOT Publication 408 C. Commission Specifications D. Commission Standard Special Provisions E. Non-Standard Project Specific Special Provisions F. Alternate Structure Items G. Item Number Sequencing Quantities Cost Estimating Introduction Tips for Design Field View Presentation Tips for Plan Presentation Tips for Property Plots Plans 18-1 18-1 18-1 18-1 18-1 18-1 18-3 18-3 18-3 18-4 18-4 18-4 18-5 18-7 18-9 18-9 18-9 19-1 19-1 19-1 19-1

18.2

18.3 18.4

Chapter 19

PLAN PRESENTATION
19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3

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19.4

Tips for Cross Section Presentation

19-2 20-2 20-3 20-4 20-6 20-7 20-8 20-10 20-11 1-4

Chapter 20

SAMPLE LETTERS AND FORMS


20.1 Notification of Project to Municipalities 20.2 Notification of Project to Local Officials 20.3 Notification of Project to PennDOT 20.4 Intent to Enter 20.5 Notification of Sound Barrier Meeting 20.6 Sound Barrier Survey Form 20.7 Geotechnical Quality Assurance Form-PS&E Review 20.8 Monument Data & Recovery Form Sample Deed Description

Appendix A

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DESIGN CONSISTENCY GUIDELINES


October 2011 EDITION

Tracking Changes: Text marked in yellow are changes introduced in this October 2011, edition. Chapters 13, 15, 16 and 18 have not been revised in this edition. Chapter 14 is reserved for future use.

Chapter 1 - INTRODUCTION
The following information was developed by the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC) to be used as a set of guidelines in the design of Total Reconstruction projects. These guidelines will be periodically updated to reflect the most current design decisions and information related to these types of projects. The information included herein will not be applicable to every project. Each project is to be designed on an individual basis, taking into account all applicable information included herein, yet making decisions using sound engineering judgment based on the unique aspects of each project. PennDOT standards and publications, AASHTO design guidelines and Commission specifications and standards should all be used in conjunction with these guidelines in design. It is understood that federal, state or local regulations may require deviations from these guidelines. It is the mission of the Commission to operate and manage a safe, reliable, cost-effective and valued toll road system and in cooperation with our Consultants, our mission will be accomplished. FOR SECURITY PURPOSES, ANYONE THAT INTENDS TO MAKE A FIELD VISIT ON TURNPIKE DESIGN PROJECTS MUST NOTIFY THE APPROPRIATE MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN ADVANCE OF THE FIELD VIEW. OBTAIN THE MAINTENANCE FACILITY CONTACT INFORMATION FROM THE TURNPIKE PROJECT MANAGER AT THE START OF THE PROJECT. Prior to Working within the PTC Right-of-Way Consultants doing any work on Turnpike R/W (surveyors, drillers, utilities, R/W personnel, environmental specialists, etc.) should inform the PTC project manager prior to performing the work. The following information should be provided:

location of work (mileposts) make, year, and model of vehicle(s) color of vehicle(s) and markings state in which registered and license tag number(s) Contact information (including phone number) for responsible office parties Number of workers to be on-site Field contact name and information - with cellular number Brief scope of work - impact (working on shoulders, off roadway, etc.) general timeframe

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(The PTC PM will provide this information to the Duty Officer at the Operations Center.) On each day of work the consultant should telephone the Duty Officer at the Operations Center at 866-3325889 or *11 by cellular and ask for the Duty Officer. He will need the location and vehicle description along with a telephone number for contact. (They keep a log of those on the PTC system so that they know who is where and what they are doing.) Following these procedures is important because it prevents conflicts with ongoing Maintenance Department activities, conflicts with activities by other Consultants, and allows the PTC to notify appropriate parties and hopefully keep you from being challenged by the PA State Police.

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Chapter 2 SURVEYS 2.0 Introduction


Engineering surveys shall be performed according to methods and practices outlined in PennDOT Publication 122M (Surveying and Mapping Manual) except as directed by this section, and any project specific directives issued by the Commission, in writing. All surveys are to be based upon the U.S. Survey Foot definition, and NOT to be based upon the International Scientific Foot definition. Any metric / U.S. Survey Foot conversions of data are to utilize the 1200 / 3937 ratio.

2.1

Survey/Plan Requirements for GPS Utilization


The goal of this section is the establishment of a network of vertical and horizontal control points to support the Final Design surveying and utilization of GPS survey equipment by the Contractor for each construction section. The network will also support conventional survey methods for Contractors who do not intend to utilize GPS equipment on projects defined as Minor Projects and Small Bridges/Structures in Section 2.3 A. A. Control/Monument Recovery The Final Design Consultant shall recover all available horizontal and vertical control points shown in field notes, mapping control reports, record of control data sheets, and plans provided by the Commission. This recovery shall include control points adjacent to the project, on adjoining sections, with the intent of utilizing adjacent projects control to create a seamless connection with the adjoining sections. B. Evaluation of Control for Final Design and Construction Control The Final Design Consultant for Minor Projects and Small Bridges/Structures shall evaluate their section for a GPS Permanent Control Network to support Final Design surveying and construction. A GPS Permanent Control Network is required for Major Projects and Major Bridges/Tunnels. The requirements for control of construction projects are defined in Section 2.3. Location, condition, stability, and spacing of recovered survey control points is to be reviewed to determine suitability as safe (out of jeopardy of destruction from future construction activities) and usable points for the duration of construction. If the evaluation of the available horizontal and vertical control is determined to not meet the requirements outlined in Section 2.3, densification / augmentation of the control network as described in Section 2.3 is necessary.

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The horizontal position of the monuments will be established by static GPS observations. Offsite static stations should be included in the GPS observations as necessary to ensure strong geometric figures for network adjustments. Incorporate primary control monuments from adjacent design sections in the adjusted network to attempt to provide a seamless fit with existing projects. The vertical position of the augmentation monuments will be based upon the same datum (NAVD 1988 for extended NGS Monuments) utilized for the Primary Control Mapping Monuments. Plans to add any additional permanent control points to the section shall be submitted to the Design Manager and Commission Surveyors for review (if applicable). Additional permanent vertical and horizontal control monuments and supplementary permanent benchmarks shall be constructed as specified in the PTC Standard Special Provisions. Except for Minor Projects and Small Bridges/Structures as defined in Section 2.3-A, a minimum of two pairs of inter-visible concrete monuments (as defined below) per design section shall be required along the right-of-way so as to provide a network of points for the utilization of GPS survey equipment. Projects in Section 2.3 must be in Project Grid Coordinates derived from Pa. State Plane Coordinates, N.A.D. 83, with the Combined Grid Factor provided. Projects in Section 2.3A should be evaluated to determine if they should be in a Project Grid or State Plane Coordinate System. See the Project Manager for further clarification. An Inter-visible Monument Pair consists of two poured-in-place concrete monuments (each of the monuments to be constructed per guidelines in the Horizontal Control Discs Commission Standard Special Provision) set between eight hundred (800) feet and twentyfive hundred (2500) feet apart. Monuments are to be GPS accessible, and set near the right-of-way fences in stable ground. Ideally, monuments should be located so they are set at or near proposed roadway grade at places of transition from cut (excavation) to fill (embankment) so they are easily accessible by surveyors and not prone to disturbance from future construction activities. A Vertical Control Monument is a poured-in-place concrete monument (Benchmark Disc as described in Commission Standard Special Provisions). A benchmark is a firm and vertically stable object (chiseled corner of a concrete structure, railroad spike driven horizontally into tree, chiseled fire hydrant bolt, etc.) capable of holding an elevation. The object should be able to be occupied by leveling rod / digital bar staff. Benchmarks should be located beyond the limits of disturbance from construction activities. A Horizontal Control Re-bar is a three-quarter inch (3/4) diameter number six (6) re-bar thirty inches (30) long. The re-bar is to have no plastic cap, driven flush with the ground,
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and is to be punched or drilled so it has a defined center. The re-bar should be GPS accessible, and set near the right-of-way fence in stable ground. Avoid placement in fill (embankment) areas, if possible. Ideally, re-bars should be located so they are set at or near proposed roadway grade at places of transition from cut (excavation) to fill (embankment) so they are easily accessible by surveyors and not prone to disturbance from future construction activities. An orange fiberglass marker post approved by the Commission shall be placed against the right-of-way fence so it is radial / perpendicular to the Survey and Construction Baseline at the station of the re-bar. C. Verification Of Mapping Accuracy Final Design Consultant is to perform a Map Accuracy Tests in accordance with Publication 122-M and as follows: Final Design Consultant shall obtain three or more test profiles. Each test profile should be a minimum of one thousand (1000) feet in length and spaced evenly throughout the project. There should be a minimum of twenty-five (25) feet elevation differential in each profile over its 1000 foot length. Test profiles are to be taken in tangent (not curved) areas (if possible), along the roadways edge of lane where mapper created a break line in the T.I.N. Profile elevations will be taken (utilizing conventional surveying or Real Time Kinematic (R.T.K.), Geographical Positioning System) at intervals not exceeding fifty feet (50) and will include a minimum of two mapping control points for each profile (either primary control monuments or mapping panel points). Final Design Consultant shall obtain three or more mapping test cross-sections. Each cross-section should include edges of roadways, edges of shoulders, lane lines, breaks in grade, and at least two mapping panel points as a check. The points selected shall be compared to the elevations extracted from the mapping Digital Terrain Model as supplied by the Commission and the differences for each elevation summarized and submitted for test profiles and cross sections. Occupy all Primary Control Monuments with total station survey instrument and obtain horizontal distances to three nearby mapping panel points. Field-derived inverse distances shall be compared to coordinate inverse distances and results summarized and submitted. Obscured areas (shadows, structures, heavy ground cover, etc) require topographic field survey to augment mapping. Traverses and data collection performed to augment aerial mapping should be checked against the mapping for inconsistencies. Significant differences in areas not indicated obscured will warrant additional test sections. The GPS network shall tie into the existing mapping control points.
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2.2

Surveys for Supplementing Project Mapping


Final Design Consultant is to extend Project Mapping Control to collect all information necessary to complete Final Design. Traverses, GPS observations, and differential digital leveling for layout and data collection shall be tied to the expanded network of existing Commission monuments. Any inconsistencies found should be reviewed with the Design Manager and the Commission Surveyors.

2.3

Survey Control for Construction


The Final Design Consultant shall reference the Survey and Right-Of-Way Baseline for all mainline Turnpike, state and local roads, service plazas, and ramps improved by the project. Publication 122M shall serve as a guide, where no specific direction is mandated by the Commission. Projects are to be based upon the U.S. Survey Foot definition, and NOT to be based upon the international Scientific definition. Any metric / U.S. Survey Foot conversions of data are to use the 1200 / 3937 ratio. Final Design Consultant shall comply with House Bill No. 1859, as amended June 30th, 1992, effective January 1, 1996, mandating projects be on Pa. State Plane Coordinate System, North American Datum (NAD) 1983, and comply with PennDOT policy implemented January 1, 1996, that the vertical datum: North American Vertical Datum (NAVD) 1988, be utilized, unless directed otherwise in writing by the Commission. Projects shall be classified into four categories, Minor Projects, Small Bridges/Structures, Major Projects, and Major Bridge Structures / Tunnels, Control for construction shall be under the following guidelines: A. Projects Defined as Minor Projects and Small Bridges/Structures This section is applicable to both Minor Projects and Small Bridges/Structures except where specifically noted.

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Baseline Referencing Baselines shall be staked at limits of work, endpoints of all tangents (PIs if accessible) and on long curves and tangents at intervals of no farther than six hundred (600) feet apart. Description of point (P.C., P.T., T.S., etc.) and stationing shall be marked upon the stake or pavement, as appropriate. Additional baseline points shall be set as necessary to ensure a clear line of sight between adjacent baseline points. Each baseline point shall be referenced by using no less than three durable, recoverable, ferrous objects or drill holes / chisel cuts in stable concrete objects, the references each being at least as far apart as the closest reference is to the baseline point being referenced. Final Design Consultant shall provide both the distance and angular relationships between the references and the baseline point being referenced. When setting references, care should be taken to consider future construction activities and if possible, references should be placed beyond the limits of planned construction disturbance. In areas of significant cut or fill (10 feet or more) it is preferable to reference baseline points at or near transition grade from cut to fill instead of P.C.s and P.T.s (even if in curves) to avoid baseline points and references from being disturbed by construction and making them more easily accessible by surveyors from roadway grade. Random Horizontal Control Traverse Network As an alternative to the above, after review by Commission Surveyors, in congested or restricted areas, the Commission will permit a Random Horizontal Control Traverse Network to be established. Randomly-placed durable ferrous inter-visible traverse points, clearly identified (marked stakes or paint) with traverse point number, shall be set in areas out of jeopardy of destruction from construction activities. Fiberglass witness marker posts (approved by the Commission) shall be set adjacent to the traverse points (or paint placed, if applicable). A closed horizontal traverse network (point locations submitted to the Commission for review) shall be established from the primary project control monuments. The traverse shall be adjusted by least squares, shall meet a closure precision ratio of no less than one to ten thousand (1:10,000) for Minor Projects and no less than one to fifteen thousand (1:15,000) for Small Bridges/Structures, and a printout of the raw field data, closure ratio, and adjustment performed shall be submitted to Commission Surveyors for review. If applicable, a Project Grid coordinate system shall be used, and the coordinates of the traverse points, Right-Of-Way corners, all baseline change in direction points and ends, and primary control monuments shall be presented upon the construction plans. Baseline Stakeouts In areas where proposed alignment deviates significantly from the existing roadway footprint and new roadways, lath or painted points (as applicable) shall be placed on baselines at two-hundred (200) foot intervals to support field view orientation during the
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bid phase. Where it is not practical to set baseline lath, an appropriate offset line (preferably parallel/concentric with the baseline) shall be established with stations, offsets and whether the line is left or right of the baseline. Within thirty (30) days of the advertisement for bidding, verify that the lath installed is intact for the bidding phase. For Minor Projects the Final Design Consultant shall establish benchmarks (as defined in Section 2.1-B) for construction at a maximum of one thousand (1000) foot intervals two (2) near each bridge and arch/box culvert, and located beyond the limits of disturbance. As an alternative to the thousand foot intervals described above, the Final Design Consultant, after review by Commission Surveyors, may utilize the Random Horizontal Traverse Network points for construction benchmarks. For Small Bridges/Structures the Final Design Consultants shall establish two (2) benchmarks on stable, rod/digital bar staff accessible points near each bridge and arch/box culvert, and located beyond the limits of disturbance. B. Projects Defined as Major Projects Existing Inter-visible Monument Pairs (as described in Section 2.1-B), as established for Primary Mapping Control, shall be the backbone of the vertical and horizontal control networks for the project. Inter-visible Monument Pairs should be spaced no farther than two and one half (2 1/2) miles apart throughout the length of the project. Existing Intervisible Monument Pairs established for adjacent projects should be incorporated to make a seamless transition with adjacent projects. Additional Survey Control for Construction To densify the horizontal control network, Horizontal Control Re-bars as defined in Section 2.1-B should be set in between Inter-visible Monument Pairs. Place Horizontal Control Re-bars so the distance to the closest monument from an Inter-visible Monument Pair is no farther than one and one half (1 1/2) miles. At roads with overhead bridges crossing over mainline Turnpike, Final Design Consultant shall set no less than three (3) thirty-inch (30) long inter-visible five-eights-inch (5/8) diameter (no. 5) re-bars flush with the ground. Re-bars shall have no plastic caps, shall have punched or drilled center points, shall be placed at stable locations no farther than five hundred (500) feet apart, out of jeopardy from construction activities. It is preferable (if possible) to avoid placing re-bars in embankment (fill) areas. Final Design Consultant shall show and label the locations of re-bars on construction plans and Right-OfWay/Geometry Plans. Final Design Consultant shall present re-bars Project Grid Coordinates (displayed to the nearest hundredth of a foot) on construction plans and RightOf-Way/Geometry Plans.
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All horizontal control set for construction is to be tied-in by GPS network or closedtraverse conventional surveying methods and adjusted. Vertical Control Monuments as defined in Section 2.1-B shall be placed in between Inter-visible Monument Pairs. They should be spaced no farther than one (1) mile apart, nor farther than one (1) mile from the closest monument in an Inter-visible Monument Pair. The Final Design Consultant shall set two (2) benchmarks on stable objects out of jeopardy of destruction from construction activities at each bridge and arch/box culvert location. Each of these benchmarks shall be a part of a closed and adjusted level circuit, sufficient to control construction on the project. Descriptions of benchmark locations with stations and offsets to the nearest foot from the Survey and Construction Baseline shall be computed by the Final Design Consultant and provided as a deliverable. All control for the project is to be on the same vertical datum and horizontal datum as are the Primary Mapping Control Monuments. Final Design Consultant shall submit the following control points to the Design Manager or the Commission Surveyors (if applicable) for review: 1. The planned locations for all Inter-visible Monument Pairs 2. The planned locations for all Vertical Control Monuments 3. The planned locations for all Horizontal Control Re-bars proposed to be set. Commission Surveyors may request a stake-out of the proposed control point locations and a field view before accepting the locations. Final Design Consultant shall reference each new horizontal and vertical control monument and/or re-bar set by collecting three swing tie distances to visible stable objects nearby (if unable to find close by, use drill holes, punched railroad spikes, magnetically detectable surveyors nails, or small re-bars). Final Design Consultant shall utilize a digital level and bar-encoded staff to run closed level circuits throughout the project, establishing adjusted elevations on the tops of all Inter-visible Monument Pairs, Vertical Control Monuments, and Horizontal Control Rebars set tying into the adjusted elevations on the Primary Mapping Control Monuments.

Project Grid Coordinates for all Right-Of-Way corners, all baseline beginning points, baseline end points and baseline change in direction points, all primary control monuments set or found on the project, and Horizontal Control Re-bars shall be presented upon the Right-of-Way/Geometry plans.

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Baseline Stakeouts In areas where proposed alignment deviates significantly from the existing roadway footprint and new roadways, lath or painted points (as applicable) shall be placed on baselines at two-hundred (200) foot intervals to support field view orientation during the bid phase. Where it is not practical to set baseline lath, an appropriate offset line (preferably parallel/concentric with the baseline) shall be established with stations, offsets and whether the line is left or right of the baseline. Consultant should stake out baseline for all side roads. Within thirty (30) days of the advertisement for bidding, verify that the lath installed is intact for the bidding phase. C. Major Bridge Structures / Tunnels (over 800 ft. in length) Horizontal control for the project shall be a network of no less than five (5) primary Intervisible Monuments (discs set in poured-in-place concrete) each of the monuments to be constructed per Turnpike Commission Standard Special Provision Horizontal Control Discs. If possible, set monuments with the same offset at either end of the structure. A minimum of two monuments at each end of bridge/tunnel shall be set. The extents of the network of Inter-visible Monuments shall be at least as far as the structure is long with strength of network figure complying with Third Order, Class II surveys. Adjusted monument location coordinates shall meet a horizontal precision ratio of no less than 1:30,000, with no more than 2.54cm positional deviation from reported position for any single monument in the network. A Project Grid coordinate system shall be established, and the coordinates of the traverse points, all baseline change in direction points and ends, and primary control monuments shall be presented upon the construction plans. Project Grid Coordinates for right-of-way corners and baseline changes in direction shall be presented upon the Right-ofWay/Geometry Plans. No less than two (2) Vertical Control Monuments (discs set in poured-in-place concrete, per Commission Standard Special Provision for Benchmark Disc), shall be established on both shores/sides of the bridge/tunnel. At least one Vertical Control Monument shall be placed on islands and at major grade break points in between tunnel portals. After review and determination by Commission Surveyors that the Horizontal Primary Control Monuments at both ends of the tunnel/both shores of the bridge have been established at vertically stable locations, they may be used as both Horizontal and Vertical control, thus eliminating the requirement to set the Vertical Control Monuments.

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2.4

Survey Deliverables
Final Design Consultant shall submit the following to the Commission: Leveling data, field notes, GPS log sheets (if applicable) A Combined Grid Factor for the project and the latitude/longitude and Pa State Plane Coordinates for the point selected for its basis shall be provided (if applicable). A Monument Data Recovery Form (M.D.R.F.) and sketch plan for each control point established shall be completed (applicable fields completed) and delivered in both hard copy and as a Microsoft Word document, on CD. See Chapter 20, Sample Letters and Forms. If a Random Horizontal Control Network was established for the project control, provide ASCII coordinate points files for the raw unadjusted field control traverse, the adjusted Pa. State Plane Coordinates, and adjusted Project Grid Coordinates (if applicable) for all traverse points and horizontal control included in the network.. Provide raw traverse angles and distances, closure precision ratio for field traverses, and method of adjustment utilized, in Microsoft Word format on Compact Disc. Construction Phase Information At the conclusion of the final design phase, the Final Design Consultant shall be required to provide digital (CD-ROM) proposed design information to the Design Manager, Commission Project Manager and Construction Manager. This information shall consist of all 2D reference files (alignments, property lines, right-of-way lines, drainage, proposed contours, etc.), digital files which make up the existing project mapping including the planimetrics, 3D grid points, 3D proposed contour file (if available), the mapping plane grid and break lines. This information will allow the Contractor to reproduce roll plots of the paper design plans. A disclaimer to be furnished by the Commission shall be included in the contract documents which addresses the use of these files by the Contractor.

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Chapter 3 ROADWAY DESIGN


3.0 Introduction There are many factors that contribute to the decisions required in applying the geometric design elements within a given design project. This chapter presents the basic framework of the design guidelines required to tailor a consistent roadway network. Additional sources of information to supplement these design guidelines and related concepts are contained in, but not limited to, AASHTOs A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets; PennDOT Publication 13M, Design Manual Part 2 Highway Design; PennDOT Publication 70M, Guidelines for Design of Local Roads and Streets; PennDOT Publication RR-441, Access to and Occupancy of Highways by Driveways and Local Roads; PennDOT Publication 72M, Roadway Construction Standards; and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Standards for Roadway Construction. 3.1 Mainline Typical Sections Flexible Pavement The typical sections for mainline were developed for two scenarios: Six-lane section Four-lane section with future lane addition in median

On new construction or reconstruction projects having a flexible pavement, the roadway pavement structure shall extend two feet into the outside shoulder area. Locate the pavement base drain at this point. The widened portion of the pavement should be constructed at the same slope as the pavement, and the shoulder slope should begin at the edge of the widened pavement. Label all cross-slopes as a percentage (%). On the typical section, show both the total width of the travel lanes and shoulders as well as the width of the pavement section. For areas with two travel lanes, this would consist of a 24-foot and 12-foot dimension for travel lanes and outside shoulder, respectively, and a 36foot and 12-foot dimension for travel lanes and outside shoulder where there are three travel lanes. The pavement structure widths will also be shown on the typical section. Show a two-foot dimension for the extension of the pavement structure into the outside shoulder area. On the plan sheets, show only the total width of the travel lanes (24 foot or 36 foot), median, and shoulders (12 foot), not the width of the pavement structure. A. Six-lane Section Figures 3.1.1, 3.1.2, and 3.1.3 depict the typical sections for the six-lane tangent, sixlane superelevated (2% < SE < 6%), and six-lane superelevated (SE > 6%) scenarios, respectively.
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Figure 3.1.1 illustrates two (2) tangent (Normal Crown) sections with the PG (Profile Grade) located between the inside and middle travel lanes.

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Figure 3.1.2 illustrates a superelevated section (2% < SE < 6%). This section introduces a graphic grade profile on the low side of superelevation so that a profile elevation adjustment can be made to ensure that the edges of median elevations are equal. Superelevation Table 1 depicts the elevation adjustments for the simple curve portion of a spiraled curve or a circular curve. Further explanation of the graphic grade profile can be found in Section 3.3. Figure 3.1.3 illustrates a superelevated section (SE > 6%). This section also utilizes a graphic grade profile on the low side of superelevation and introduces a change in cross-slope transition on the low side inside shoulder and a four-foot rounding on the high side outside shoulder 50 feet prior to the SE = 6%. Superelevation Table 2 depicts the elevation adjustments as described in Superelevation Table 1, but for SE > 6%. B. Four-lane Section with Future Lane Addition in Median Figures 3.1.4, 3.1.5, and 3.1.6 depict the typical sections for the four-lane tangent, four-lane superelevated (2% < SE < 6%), and four-lane superelevated (SE > 6%) scenarios. Figure 3.1.4 illustrates two tangent (Normal Crown) sections with the PG (Profile Grade) located at the edge of roadway, which under the future six-lane section will be between the inside and middle travel lanes. Figure 3.1.5 illustrates a superelevated section (2% < SE < 6%). This section introduces a graphic grade profile on the low side of superelevation so that a profile elevation adjustment can be made to ensure that under the future six-lane section, the edge of median elevations are equal. Superelevation Table 1 depicts the elevation adjustments for the simple curve portion of a spiraled curve or a circular curve. Further explanation of the graphic grade profile can be found in Section 3.3. Figure 3.1.6 illustrates a superelevated section (SE > 6%). This section also utilizes a graphic grade profile and introduces a change in cross-slope transition on the low side inside shoulder and a four-foot rounding on the high side of a superelevated shoulder 50 feet prior to the SE = 6%. Superelevation Table 2 depicts the elevation adjustments as described in Superelevation Table 1, but for SE > 6%. The four-lane section will provide a grass median with a swale located at the baseline. The details regarding type of guide rail and cross-slope design is still currently being researched, and further direction will be given in the future.

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C.

Shoulder Treatment Adjacent to Superelevated Pavement Outside shoulder and median shoulder cross slopes adjacent to superelevated pavement should follow the criteria shown in Figures 3.1.2, 3.1.3,3.1.5, 3.1.6, 3.1.7, and 3.1.8. The notes on superelevation shall appear on the typical sections where applicable. These notes may only be modified when certain superelevation rates may not exist within the plan set. (i.e. no SE rates are greater than 6%).

D.

Typical Section Sheet Note The following note shall appear on the typical sheet with the mainline typical: ORIGINAL PAVEMENT CONSTRUCTION SHOWN. REPAIR AREAS OF FULL-DEPTH BITUMINOUS MATERIALS MAY BE PRESENT. EXCAVATION OF EXISTING ROADWAY TEMPLATE IS PAID AS CLASS 1 EXCAVATION REGARDLESS OF THE MATERIAL ENCOUNTERED.

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3.2

Horizontal Alignment - Mainline Horizontal alignments are to follow PennDOT Publications and AASHTO guidelines except where criteria within these guidelines supersede those manuals. A. Maximum Degree of Curvature The maximum degree of curvature for mainline horizontal alignment shall not exceed 300'00". B. Spirals Spirals shall be used on all mainline curves with a Degree of Curvature of 100'00" or greater. See note on Page 3-3, Figure 3.1.2. C. Guidelines for Setting Bearings and Angles The bearings of proposed roadways shall be set to seconds of a degree without decimals. Bearings that tie into an existing roadway may be set to decimals of a second but is not recommended or encouraged. Bearings of an existing roadway may be set to decimals of a second but it is not recommended or encouraged. Angles between proposed baselines should be set to seconds of a degree without decimals. Angles shown in the curve data should produce the bearings shown for the roadway, and the roadway bearings should produce the curve data angle.

D.

Plan Presentation Follow PennDOT Publication 14M, Design Manual Part 3 Plans Presentation, and the information provided below: 1. Baseline Labels a. Construction Plans b. PTC Mainline Survey and Construction Baseline Side Roads S.R. or T-___ Survey and Construction Baseline

Right-of-way/Geometry Plans PTC Mainline Survey and Right-of-way Baseline and Original Right-of-way Baseline Side roads S.R. or T-____ Survey and Right-of-way Baseline
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The construction plans for both Early Action Projects and the Mainline Total Reconstruction require Right-of-way/Geometry Plans indicating the tie between the Original Right-of-way Baseline and the Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline. 2. Curve Data Presentation Horizontal curve data shall be presented as indicated in Figure 3.2.1 or Figure 3.2.1.A. Presentation shall be consistent throughout the plans. 3.3 Vertical Alignment Mainline Vertical alignments are to follow PennDOT Publications and AASHTO guidelines except where criteria within these guidelines supersede those manuals. A. Maximum Percent Grade The desirable maximum percent grade is 3%. Steeper grades can be investigated due to topography or other conditions that may justify the use of steeper grades and must be approved by the Commission. B. Guidelines for Setting Profile Grades and Elevations PI stationing should be at a +25-foot interval, when possible, and decimals in the PI stationing are discouraged. Normally, all grades are to be set and shown to two (2) decimal places. When tying into an existing roadway, three (3) decimal places for the tie-in grade may be used. Grades can be rounded provided the rounded grade produces no change to the elevations of the established or set points (PVI station and elevation). 17.18' (set difference in elevation)/480' (distance between PIs) = .03579 (3.5792%) = 3.58%. Grade is to be used. .0358 (3.58%) x 480' = 17.184' and rounds to the set difference in elevation of 17.18'.

EXAMPLE:

CHECK:

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Elevations can be rounded provided the rounded elevation produces no change to the grade. All PVI elevations are to be established using the rounded elevation of the back PVI. PG elevations at any point along the survey and construction baseline are to be established using the rounded elevation of the PVI and the rounded grade. EXAMPLE: 3.58% (set grade) x 480' = 17.184' ~ 17.18' is to be used. CHECK: 17.18' / 480' = .03579 (3.579%) which rounds to the set grade of 3.58%.

C.

Guidelines for Setting Graphic Grade Profiles and Elevations As described and depicted in Section 3.1, Typical Sections, the low side of a superelevated curve will have a graphic grade to adjust the profile elevations so that the edge of median barrier elevations are equal in fully superelevated sections and within three (3) inches in transition areas. A maximum of three inch reveal and a minimum of zero (0) inch reveal must be maintained on the concrete glare screen throughout. Graphic Grade Elevation Calculations in Full Superelevation The Graphic Grade elevations will be determined utilizing the concepts depicted in Figures 3.1.2 and 3.1.3 for the six-lane mainline section and in Figures 3.1.5 and 3.1.6 for the four-lane mainline section with future lane addition in median. This constant elevation adjustment, (GG, will provide a three (3) inch reveal on each side of the concrete glare screen within a fully superelevated section. Graphic Grade Elevation in Transition Areas Since a constant elevation adjustment, (GG, will occur in a fully superelevation curve, a transition from the profile grade to the PC or SC is needed. The following guidelines are to be used for spiraled curves and simple curves. Spiraled Curves Provide linear transitions from the profile grade to the constant elevation adjustment, GG between the TS and SC stations entering the curve and from the CS to ST stations exiting the curve. Circular Curves Provide linear transitions from the Profile Grade to the constant elevation adjustment, GG between the (PC-L), Where L = Length of Superelevation Runoff, and the PC station entering the curve and from the PT to (PT+L) station exiting the curve.
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D.

It is the designers responsibility to evaluate profiles along the edge of roadway to avoid rapid grade changes and to ensure a smooth graphic profile. Figures 3.3.1 and 3.3.2 depict how the aforementioned Graphic Grade Transitions occur for the example horizontal curve data provided in Figure 3.2.1.

Plan Requirements Provide one mainline profile depicting the Profile Grades and Graphic Grades in accordance with Figure 3.3.1. Provide Profile Grades at 50 foot intervals. Provide Graphic Grades at 25 foot intervals in Transition Areas and at 50 foot intervals in constant elevation adjustment, GG areas. The existing elevations depicted on the single profile will be along the profile grade points. Follow guidelines in Section 3.3.B when applicable. At locations where tying to existing conditions, set and tie one direction as Profile Grade, tie the opposite direction as Graphic Grade Transition Area, and label as per Figure 3.3.1. Show clearances to all structures and overhead utilities.

3.4

Superelevation Transition and Spiral Lengths As per typical sections presented in Section 3.1, use current PennDOT Publication 13M, Design Manual Part 2 Highway Design, for determining minimum superelevation transition (T), Minimum Tangent Runout (X), Minimum Superelevation Runoff (L), and Minimum Spiral Lengths (LS). Values shown in DM2 for minimum superelevation runoff (L) and minimum spiral length (Ls) should be adjusted to the next highest even multiple of ten feet (10). The tangent runout length (x) should also be adjusted to provide a linear transition rate from normal crown to full superelevation using the value established for L or Ls as a basis. Figure 3.4.1 illustrates the superelevation transitions for the same horizontal curve data presented in Figure 3.2.1.

3.5

Cross-sections Provide mainline cross-sections at 50 foot intervals and as required depicting unique features. Partial cross section inserts to adequately show proposed storm drainage shall be provided when deemed necessary by the design manager, the project manager or as determined by the designer. Provide 4:1 or flatter fill slopes when economically feasible. The use of 3:1 fill slopes shall be avoided unless in transition areas. Provide pavement base drain as the subbase drainage outlet for all fill slopes flatter than 2:1.

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3.6

Interchange and Service Plaza Ramps Interchange and service plaza ramps shall be designed as per AASHTO criteria. Deceleration ramps shall be designed as an AASHTO taper design and acceleration ramps shall be designed as an AASHTO parallel design. Ramp widths shall be designed as per AASHTO Exhibit 10-67 Design Widths for Turning Roadways Case II for all ramps being designed as single lane ramps and as per Case III for dual lane ramps. Design Traffic Condition B shall be used when determining ramp width as per either Case II or Case III. The attainment of superelevation over the gradually widening auxiliary lane and over the whole of the turning roadway terminals should not be abrupt. The design should be in keeping with the cross-slope controls as given in AASHTO Exhibit 9-49. The right shoulder shall be designed as a 10 foot full depth pavement shoulder. The left shoulder shall be designed as 8 foot full depth pavement when guide rail is present; when no guide rail is present a 4 foot Type 2 concrete shoulder shall be provided along with a 4 foot graded area. When guide rail is present anywhere adjacent to the left shoulder the entire shoulder length shall be designed as an 8 foot shoulder. Where left shoulders intersect the gore at the mainline the gore shall be designed as full depth pavement. Ramp medians shall be designed as a 4 foot minimum with a 6 foot median as the desirable median width.

3.7

Two-Lane to Three-Lane Transitions Figure 3.7.1 provides information on the geometry, pavement markings and signing for transitioning between 2-lanes and 3-lanes. In general, for conditions that require the transition from 2-lanes to 3-lanes, a 100:1 taper rate should be used. This rate can be increased to 70:1 during periods of construction.

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Figure 3.7.1 3-22 Oct 2011

3.8

Local Roadway Design A. General Follow local governmental design ordinances, PennDOT publications, and AASHTO guidelines when developing local roadway designs. Prepare a Design Criteria Chart for each roadway containing the following information: roadway classifications, existing and design year average daily traffic and design hourly volumes, existing posted speed limit, design speed, existing and proposed pavement and shoulder widths, existing pavement depths (if known), existing and proposed vertical grades along with sight distances, existing and proposed bridge width, and include any other design features such as sidewalks, parking lanes, etc. This Design Criteria Chart is to be reviewed by the Design Manager prior to submitting to local agencies and PennDOT. Follow guidelines set forth in PennDOT Publication RR-441, Access to Occupancy of Highways by Driveways and Local Roads, for driveway adjustments due to construction. Provide side road cross-sections at 25 foot intervals and at critical points (driveways, etc.).

3.9

Access Ramps Access ramp design is to follow the details that are depicted in Figure 3.8.1.

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3.10

Toll Plaza Design Toll plaza design shall follow the guidance provided in the PTC publications Toll Plaza Guidelines and Toll Collection Equipment Design Parameters.

3.11

Title Sheet and Limit of Work A. Early-Action Overhead Bridge Replacement Project The project should be titled as Replacement of Bridge B- _____ at Milepost ______._____. The labeled Milepost is the intersecting point of the Mainline and side road. Associated with this bridge replacement will be Limits of Work for both the Mainline and side road. These Limits of Work are to contain physical work ( physical work does include the temporary pavement, median barrier removal, etc.; but, does not include the advance signing associated with Maintenance and Protection of Traffic). These limits should appear on the Index Sheet, General Notes Sheet, Location Map, Construction Plans, etc. B. Mainline Reconstruction Project The project should be titled as Roadway and Bridge Reconstruction From Milepost ____ ____ to Milepost ____.____. The labeled Mileposts will be the point of Full Depth, full width reconstruction. Associated with this project will be Limits of Work for the Mainline and any impacted side roads. These Limits of Work are to contain physical work ( physical work does include the temporary pavement, median barrier removal, etc.; but, does not include the advance signing associated with Maintenance and Protection of Traffic). These limits should appear on the Index Sheet, General Notes Sheet, Location Map, Construction Plans, etc. C. Title Sheet General Sample Title as follows: Drawings For CONTRACT NO. ____________ ROADWAY AND BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION MP ____.____ TO MP ____.____ IN _________________________ COUNTY

3-25 Oct 2011

Chapter 4 MAINTENANCE AND PROTECTION OF TRAFFIC


4.0 Introduction The Maintenance and Protection of Traffic Plan (MPT) is to provide clear directions for safely and efficiently handling the flow of traffic through or around the work zone. A comprehensive MPT plan at a scale of 1 = 50, including a written sequence of construction and special provisions, will be developed for all work areas for the entire project. Traffic control plans will consist of plan sheets detailing the staging at each end of the project where Turnpike traffic will be transitioned into and out of the work zone. If the majority of the mainline reconstruction work will be done under the same continuous setup, a typical staging plan can be developed for each stage of mainline work. Typical sections can be provided for those areas that deviate from the typical staging plan. Typical sections can also be provided for structures where lane widths and work areas are restricted. The MPT plans will be an Also Plan set to the contract documents. Additional sources of information to supplement these design guidelines and the Commissions MPT Standard Drawings (PTS 900 Series) are contained in, but not limited to, the PennDOT Publication 14M, Design Manual Part 3, Highway Plans Presentation, Chapter 4; PennDOT Publication 212, Official Traffic Control Devices; PennDOT Publication 213, Work Zone Traffic Control Guidelines; PennDOT Publication 236M, Handbook of Approved Signs; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD); and applicable PennDOT Traffic Standards from the various TCs. Detail drawings will be prepared for every stage/phase of work showing all traffic control signs except those signs shown on the Commissions MPT Standard Drawings (PTS-900 Series), and devices, temporary concrete barriers, temporary pavement markings, etc. Where applicable, the PTS 900 series will be utilized in lieu of detailed drawings and/or referenced on the drawings. 4.1 General Notes Review PennDOTs Work Zone Safety and Mobility Policy (WZSM) found in PennDOT Publication 46, Traffic Engineering Manual, and apply as necessary to the project. Discuss results and recommendations with the Commissions Traffic Department. Long term traffic control operations will include maintenance of 12-foot wide travel lanes. The number of lanes shall be consistent with existing lanes available and only be reduced if authorized by the Commissions Traffic Department. Mainline turnpike traffic traveling in the same direction must be maintained on two adjacent lanes for two lane sections or three adjacent lanes for three lane sections and can not be split.
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Typical MPT staging for the mainline total reconstruction projects is to include an additional run of temporary concrete barrier in the main reconstruction stages. The additional run of temporary concrete barrier is to eliminate continuous single lane patterns for the movement of temporary concrete barrier between the main reconstruction stages. A 1 foot or 2 foot (preferred) median in each direction is desirable during construction staging when traffic in one or both directions is restricted between concrete barrier during construction. Use the following format and statements in the General Notes sections for Maintenance and Protection of Traffic (MPT) on the first sheet of the MPT drawings, if applicable. Add additional notes as necessary for site specific conditions. GENERAL NOTES FOR MAINTENANCE AND PROTECTION OF TRAFFIC 1. THIS WORK CONSISTS OF THE MAINTENANCE OF TRAFFIC AND PROTECTION OF THE TRAVELING PUBLIC APPROACHING THE CONSTRUCTION AREA AND WITHIN THE LIMITS OF CONSTRUCTION. 2. THE CONTRACTOR IS CAUTIONED THAT OTHER COMMISSION CONTRACTOR(S) AND/OR COMMISSION MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL MAY BE WORKING ADJACENT TO THE WORK AREA(S) DURING PORTIONS OF THIS CONTRACT PERIOD. THE REPRESENTATIVE WILL SPECIFY THE WORKING SEQUENCE OF THE CONTRACTS IN ORDER TO FACILITATE COORDINATED TRAFFIC CONTROL OPERATIONS. 3. FURNISH, ERECT, PLACE, AND MAINTAIN TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS AND DEVICES AND MAINTAIN TRAFFIC DURING HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION AND AT ALL OTHER TIMES ACCORDING TO THE METHODS INDICATED IN THESE DRAWINGS AND a. THE SPECIAL PROVISIONS OF THE CONTRACT. b. PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION STANDARD DRAWINGS. c. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 212, OFFICIAL TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES. d. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 408, SPECIFICATIONS, _____. (Insert Contract Edition) e. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 72M, STANDARDS FOR ROADWAY CONSTRUCTION f. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 111M, TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNING STANDARDS TC-8600 AND TC-8700 SERIES. g. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 236M, HANDBOOK OF APPROVED SIGNS. h. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 35, APPROVED CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS (BULLETIN 15). 4. IMMEDIATELY UPON COMPLETION OF WORK, ALL TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES WILL BE REMOVED BY THE CONTRACTOR AND REMAIN THE CONTRACTORS PROPERTY UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED IN THE SPECIAL PROVISIONS OF THE CONTRACT. THE PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION WILL REMOVE ANY TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES ERECTED BY PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION PERSONNEL.
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5. HAVE ALL TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES IN PLACE FOR INSPECTION BY THE REPRESENTATIVE BEFORE WORK BEGINS. 6. REMOVE EXISTING WARNING, REGULATORY, GUIDE, AND DIRECTIONAL SIGNS AS REQUIRED TO ACCOMMODATE CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS. DO NOT REMOVE STOP OR YIELD SIGNS UNLESS AN ALTERNATE TYPE OF TRAFFIC CONTROL IS PROVIDED, SUCH AS FLAGGERS, TEMPORARY TRAFFIC SIGNALS, ETC. CONTINUE THE ALTERNATE TRAFFIC CONTROL UNTIL THE STOP OR YIELD SIGNS ARE REPLACED. STAKE OR MARK SIGN LOCATIONS OR LOCATE SIGNS ON CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS BEFORE REMOVING ANY SIGNS. MARK SIGNS WITH THE MILEPOST OR STATION OF ITS EXISTING LOCATION. WITH THE EXCEPTION OF STOP OR YIELD SIGNS AS HEREIN NOTED, REINSTALL EXISTING WARNING, REGULATORY, GUIDE AND DIRECTIONAL SIGNS AT APPROPRIATE LOCATIONS AS SOON AS OPERATIONS THAT INTERFERE WITH THE SIGNS ARE COMPLETE. THE CONTRACTOR IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SIGNS OR SUPPORTS DAMAGED OR LOST. 7. COVER EXISTING SIGNS AND TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS THAT CONFLICT WITH THE TRAFFIC CONTROL PLAN (TCP) OR THAT DO NOT APPLY TO EXISTING CONDITIONS. COVER WITH RUBBER ROOFING MATERIAL (EPDM) HAVING A THICKNESS OF 1.1 MM (O.045 INCH) OR ANY OTHER APPROVED MATERIAL, TO COVER THE ENTIRE SIGN. BURLAP OR SIMILAR OPEN MESH MATERIALS ARE UNACCEPTABLE. STABILIZE AND FASTEN THIS MATERIAL TO THE SIGN WITH EITHER PLASTIC OR WOOD TO PREVENT ANY MOVEMENT. DO NOT APPLY TAPE TO THE FACE OF THE SIGN. DO NOT DEFACE OR DAMAGE THE SIGN FACE USING THIS PROCEDURE. MAINTAIN SIGN COVER RETAINERS IN GOOD CONDITION. REMOVE SIGNS NOT REQUIRED OR NOT USED FOR A PERIOD OF TWO WEEKS. STORE SIGNS OFF THE TURNPIKE RIGHT-OF-WAY UNTIL REQUIRED ON THE PROJECT. 8. INSTALL AND MAINTAIN TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS AND DEVICES THAT ARE IN NEW CONDITION THROUGHOUT THE DURATION OF THE PROJECT. ANY DAMAGE INCURRED WILL BE IMMEDIATELY REPAIRED OR REPLACED BY THE CONTRACTOR TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE REPRESENTATIVE. 9. THESE PLANS ARE NOT INTENDED TO RELIEVE THE CONTRACTOR OF HIS RESPONSIBILITY AS SPECIFIED IN SECTION 901.3(A). THE STANDARDS PRESCRIBED ARE MINIMUM AND ADDITIONAL MEASURES MAY BE NEEDED IF PROBLEMS ARE ENCOUNTERED DURING THE CONTRACT. CONSTANTLY REVIEW THIS PLAN FOR ADEQUACY AND RECOMMEND CHANGES FOR THE REPRESENTATIVES APPROVAL WHEN INADEQUACIES ARE DISCOVERED. 10. MAINTAIN CONSTANT SURVEILLANCE OF THE TRAFFIC CONTROL OPERATION AND REPLACE OR CORRECT ANY MISSING, DAMAGED, INEFFECTIVE, OR MISALIGNED EQUIPMENT TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE REPRESENTATIVE. 11. USE THE SAME TYPE OF PENNDOT APPROVED CHANNELIZING DEVICE THROUGHOUT THE PROJECT. CHANNELIZING DEVICES ARE TO BE VERTICAL PANELS WITH SELF-BALLASTING BASES UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED. THE ENTIRE FACE OF THE VERTICAL PANEL VISIBLE TO TRAFFIC IS TO BE REFLECTORIZED. 12. PROVIDE SIGNS WITH PENNDOT APPROVED TYPE VII REFLECTORIZED MATERIAL.
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13. POST MOUNT ALL LONG TERM ADVANCE SIGNING UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED OR AS DIRECTED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE. 14. SIGN LOCATIONS AND DISTANCES MAY BE ADJUSTED SLIGHTLY TO FIT FIELD CONDITIONS. 15. ALL TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS AND DEVICES MUST COMPLY WITH THE MOST CURRENT NCHRP 350 CRITERIA. 16. REMOVE ALL CONFLICTING PAVEMENT MARKINGS PER SECTION 963 AND AS APPROVED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE. REPLACE PAVEMENT MARKINGS UPON COMPLETION OF THE PROJECT. 17. PROVIDE ALL REQUIRED TEMPORARY MARKINGS AS SHOWN ON THE DRAWINGS AND AS DIRECTED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE. REMOVE ALL TEMPORARY PAVEMENT MARKINGS WHEN THEY ARE NO LONGER REQUIRED AND AS DIRECTED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE BY METHODS THAT WILL CAUSE THE LEAST DAMAGE TO PAVEMENT STRUCTURE OR PAVEMENT SURFACE. 18. COORDINATE A PRESS RELEASE WITH A PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION REPRESENTATIVE AT LEAST FOUR (4) WEEKS PRIOR TO THE START OF WORK AND/OR THE START OF A NEW CONSTRUCTION STAGE. 19. PROVIDE FLAGGERS AS REQUIRED TO DIRECT AND CONTROL TRAFFIC AT ANY CONSTRUCTION VEHICLE ENTRANCE TO WORK AREAS FROM ANY PUBLIC ROADWAY. Use the following format and statements in the General Notes sections for Detours on the first sheet of the Detour drawings, if applicable. Add additional notes as necessary for site specific conditions. GENERAL NOTES FOR MAINTENANCE AND PROTECTION OF TRAFFIC 1. THIS WORK CONSISTS OF THE MAINTENANCE OF TRAFFIC AND PROTECTION OF THE TRAVELING PUBLIC APPROACHING THE CONSTRUCTION AREA AND WITHIN THE LIMITS OF CONSTRUCTION. 2. FURNISH, ERECT, PLACE, AND MAINTAIN TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS AND DEVICES AND MAINTAIN TRAFFIC DURING HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION AND AT ALL OTHER TIMES ACCORDING TO THE METHODS INDICATED IN THESE DRAWINGS AND a. THE SPECIAL PROVISIONS OF THE CONTRACT. b. PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION STANDARD DRAWINGS. c. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 212, OFFICIAL TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES. d. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 408, SPECIFICATIONS, _____. (Insert Contract Edition) e. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 111M, TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNING STANDARDS TC-8600 AND TC-8700 SERIES. f. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 236M, HANDBOOK OF APPROVED SIGNS. g. PENNDOT PUBLICATION 35, APPROVED CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS (BULLETIN 15).

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3. IMMEDIATELY UPON COMPLETION OF WORK, ALL TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES WILL BE REMOVED BY THE CONTRACTOR AND REMAIN THE CONTRACTORS PROPERTY UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED IN THE SPECIAL PROVISIONS OF THE CONTRACT. THE PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION WILL REMOVE ANY TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES ERECTED BY PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION PERSONNEL. 4. HAVE ALL TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES IN PLACE FOR INSPECTION BY THE PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION AND THE PENNSYLVANIADEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LOCAL DISTRICT OFFICE OR THEIR REPRESENTATIVE BEFORE WORK BEGINS. 5. REMOVE EXISTING WARNING, REGULATORY, GUIDE, AND DIRECTIONAL SIGNS AS REQUIRED TO ACCOMMODATE CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS. DO NOT REMOVE STOP OR YIELD SIGNS UNLESS AN ALTERNATE TYPE OF TRAFFIC CONTROL IS PROVIDED, SUCH AS FLAGGERS, TEMPORARY TRAFFIC SIGNALS, ETC. CONTINUE THE ALTERNATE TRAFFIC CONTROL UNTIL THE STOP OR YIELD SIGNS ARE REPLACED. STAKE OR MARK SIGN LOCATIONS OR LOCATE SIGNS ON CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS BEFORE REMOVING ANY SIGNS. MARK SIGNS WITH THE MILEPOST OR STATION OF ITS EXISTING LOCATION. WITH THE EXCEPTION OF STOP OR YIELD SIGNS AS HEREIN NOTED, REINSTALL EXISTING WARNING, REGULATORY, GUIDE AND DIRECTIONAL SIGNS AT APPROPRIATE LOCATIONS AS SOON AS OPERATIONS THAT INTERFERE WITH THE SIGNS ARE COMPLETE. THE CONTRACTOR IS RESPONSIBLE FOR SIGNS OR SUPPORTS DAMAGED OR LOST. 6. COVER EXISTING SIGNS AND TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS THAT CONFLICT WITH THE TRAFFIC CONTROL PLAN (TCP) OR THAT DO NOT APPLY TO EXISTING CONDITIONS. COVER WITH RUBBER ROOFING MATERIAL (EPDM) HAVING A THICKNESS OF 1.1 MM (O.045 INCH) OR ANY OTHER APPROVED MATERIAL, TO COVER THE ENTIRE SIGN. BURLAP OR SIMILAR OPEN MESH MATERIALS ARE UNACCEPTABLE. STABILIZE AND FASTEN THIS MATERIAL TO THE SIGN WITH EITHER PLASTIC OR WOOD TO PREVENT ANY MOVEMENT. DO NOT APPLY TAPE TO THE FACE OF THE SIGN. DO NOT DEFACE OR DAMAGE THE SIGN FACE USING THIS PROCEDURE. MAINTAIN SIGN COVER RETAINERS IN GOOD CONDITION. REMOVE SIGNS NOT REQUIRED OR NOT USED FOR A PERIOD OF TWO WEEKS. STORE SIGNS OFF THE TURNPIKE RIGHT-OF-WAY UNTIL REQUIRED ON THE PROJECT. 7. INSTALL AND MAINTAIN TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS AND DEVICES THAT ARE IN NEW CONDITION THROUGHOUT THE DURATION OF THE PROJECT. ANY DAMAGE INCURRED WILL BE IMMEDIATELY REPAIRED OR REPLACED BY THE CONTRACTOR TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE REPRESENTATIVE. 8. THESE PLANS ARE NOT INTENDED TO RELIEVE THE CONTRACTOR OF HIS RESPONSIBILITY AS SPECIFIED IN SECTION 901.3(A). THE STANDARDS PRESCRIBED ARE MINIMUM AND ADDITIONAL MEASURES MAY BE NEEDED IF PROBLEMS ARE ENCOUNTERED DURING THE CONTRACT. CONSTANTLY REVIEW THIS PLAN FOR ADEQUACY AND RECOMMEND CHANGES FOR THE REPRESENTATIVES APPROVAL WHEN INADEQUACIES ARE DISCOVERED.
4-5 Oct 2011

9. MAINTAIN CONSTANT SURVEILLANCE OF THE TRAFFIC CONTROL OPERATION AND REPLACE OR CORRECT ANY MISSING, DAMAGED, INEFFECTIVE, OR MISALIGNED EQUIPMENT TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE REPRESENTATIVE. 10. USE THE SAME TYPE OF PENNDOT APPROVED CHANNELIZING DEVICE THROUGHOUT THE PROJECT. CHANNELIZING DEVICES ARE TO BE VERTICAL PANELS WITH SELF-BALLASTING BASES UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED. THE ENTIRE FACE OF THE VERTICAL PANEL VISIBLE TO TRAFFIC IS TO BE REFLECTORIZED. 11. PROVIDE SIGNS WITH PENNDOT APPROVED TYPE VII REFLECTORIZED MATERIAL. 12. POST MOUNT ALL LONG TERM ADVANCE SIGNING UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED OR AS DIRECTED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE. 13. SIGN LOCATIONS AND DISTANCES MAY BE ADJUSTED SLIGHTLY TO FIT FIELD CONDITIONS. 14. ALL TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNS AND DEVICES MUST COMPLY WITH THE MOST CURRENT NCHRP 350 CRITERIA. 15. PROVIDE SUFFICIENT TYPE III BARRICADES TO COMPLETELY CLOSE ROADWAY DURING CONSTRUCTION. 16. PROVIDE SUFFICIENT CONCRETE BARRIER TO COMPLETELY CLOSE ROADWAY NEAR THE STRUCTURE DURING CONSTRUCTION. 17. REMOVE ALL CONFLICTING PAVEMENT MARKINGS PER SECTION 963 AND AS APPROVED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE. REPLACE PAVEMENT MARKINGS UPON COMPLETION OF THE PROJECT. 18. PROVIDE ALL REQUIRED TEMPORARY MARKINGS AS SHOWN ON THE DRAWINGS AND AS DIRECTED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE. REMOVE ALL TEMPORARY PAVEMENT MARKINGS WHEN THEY ARE NO LONGER REQUIRED AND AS DIRECTED BY THE REPRESENTATIVE BY METHODS THAT WILL CAUSE THE LEAST DAMAGE TO PAVEMENT STRUCTURE OR PAVEMENT SURFACE. 19. COORDINATE A PRESS RELEASE WITH PENNDOT DISTRICT COMMUNITY RELATIONS COORDINATOR AND A PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION REPRESENTATIVE AT LEAST FOUR (4) WEEKS PRIOR TO THE START OF WORK AND/OR THE START OF A NEW CONSTRUCTION STAGE. 20. NOTIFY AT LEAST TWO (2) WEEKS PRIOR TO THE START OF WORK AND/OR THE START OF A NEW CONSTRUCTION STAGE THE FOLLOWING - PENNDOT, TOWNSHIP SUPERVISORS, LOCAL EMERGENCY UNITS (POLICE, FIRE, MEDICAL, ETC), SCHOOL DISTRICT, LOCAL BUSINESSES, AND LOCAL MEDIA OR OTHERS AS AGREED UPON BY THE REPRESENTATIVE. 21. PROVIDE FLAGGERS AS REQUIRED TO DIRECT AND CONTROL TRAFFIC AT ANY CONSTRUCTION VEHICLE ENTRANCE TO WORK AREAS FROM ANY PUBLIC ROADWAY. 22. MAINTAIN ACCESS TO ADJACENT PROPERTIES AT ALL TIMES AT EXISTING DRIVEWAY ACCESS POINTS. RELOCATE MAILBOXES AS NECESSARY THROUGHOUT CONSTRUCTION. MAINTAIN ACCESS TO FIRE HYDRANTS AND UTILITIES.

4-6 Oct 2011

4.2

Temporary Pavement For temporary paving of existing medians, shoulders, and/or temporary widening, see Chapter 9.

4.3

Temporary Emergency Pull-offs (EPOs) EPOs are to be located at approximately one-mile increments per direction. A Service Plaza and Interchange can be considered as an EPO. Access gates, maintenance sheds and construction entrances/exits can not be considered as an EPO. The Consultant must field view the project for locations of temporary EPOs and proceed as follows: Generate a list of existing wide-area locations and provide this list to the project manager for inclusion as an attachment to the contract. If the EPOs can be built on the existing grade without extensive grading and/or excavation, the design plans will not specify the locations of the EPOs. If significant grading and/or excavation is required for the construction of the EPOs, the designer will specify the locations of the EPOs on the plans and crosssections and tab each EPO individually.

4.4

Detours Coordinate proposed detours with PennDOT and applicable municipalities. For appropriate detour signing of numbered and un-numbered traffic routes, refer to PennDOT Publication 212, Official Traffic Control Devices; PennDOT Publication 213, Work Zone Traffic Control Guidelines; PennDOT Publication 236M, Handbook of Approved Signs; and the MUTCD. See Figures 4.4.1 and 4.4.2 for examples of detour signing.

4-7 Oct 2011

Figure 4.4.1

Figure 4.4.2

4-8 Oct 2011

See Figure 4.4.3 for an example of a project specific sign and a sign tabulation. Figure 4.4.3

4-9 Oct 2011

4.5

Temporary Concrete Barrier Include the painting and repainting of the temporary concrete barrier during construction in the temporary pavement marking quantities with the unit of measurement to be linear foot. The use of slotted temporary concrete barrier may be required to convey water into the work area to meet the positive drainage criteria during staging including but not limited to the high side of super, sags, existing roadway with poor drainage, etc. Pinning of the temporary concrete barrier may be required if the project involves traffic running adjacent to the temporary concrete barrier. A list of the location(s) for pinning the temporary concrete barrier is to be included as an attachment to the contract. Taper temporary concrete barrier on the shoulder so that any temporary impact attenuator is a minimum of 2 feet off the edge line.

4.6

Guide Rail Additional quantities of guide rail are to be provided for the replacement of final guide rail damaged in the construction zone. Additional quantities will include 50% of total panel length and 20% of total posts and offset brackets.

4.7

Temporary Major Guide and Overhead Signs Existing Major Guide and Overhead Signs are to be maintained or relocated as necessary during construction. Overhead Signs may be relocated as a ground mount Type A or Type E signs. The need and the project specifics for the temporary Major Guide and Overhead Signs is to be included in the Maintenance and Protection of Traffic specification in the Construction, B section. Payment for temporary Major Guide or Overhead Signs are to be incidental to the maintenance and protection of traffic.

4-10 Oct 2011

Chapter 5 STRUCTURAL DESIGN


5.0 Introduction The intent of this section is to clarify the Commissions requirements for submission of type, size, and location studies, and for the design and detailing of bridge structures. In general, design specifications are in accordance with AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications and PennDOT Design Manual Part 4, except where superseded by requirements stated herein or as directed. 5.1 TS&L Submission A. TS&L Submission Requirements The Commission will provide direction if a Streamlined TS&L submission is to be employed. Also, identify problem areas so that there are no surprises at the final plan submission. If problems or questions arise after approval of the TS&L Plan, these issues should be brought to the immediate attention of the Commission. Quality Assurance (QA) Forms (per Design Manual Part 4, PP 1.9.3.3.1(f)) are only required for structures that will be transferred to PennDOT ownership Design runs (input and output files) from PennDOT computer programs may be provided electronically on DVD or compact disc; however, hard copy of full input echoes and rating summaries are to be included in the submission. Jackets for all discs are to be bound in the report (no loose discs). The TS&L Plan for retaining walls, culverts and other buried structures will not be approved until a foundation recommendation and report is submitted. For structures over waterways or carrying waterways, the TS&L Plan will not be approved until a Hydrologic and Hydraulic Report has been submitted and approved. B. TS&L Plans In addition to the requirements of PennDOT DM-4, the following information is to be the minimum shown on all TS&L drawings submitted to the Commission. The scale for the plan and elevation will be no less than 1" = 30'. The submission may consist of more than one drawing. A Key Plan is to be provided if the General Plan and Elevation does not fit on one sheet.

5-1 Oct 2011

1.

Plan View a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l. m. n. All existing topography. Label features being crossed. North arrow. Points of controlling vertical clearances. Station at each centerline of bearing. Proper lengths of wingwalls shown to scale and dimensioned. Limits of approach slabs, if required. Limits of slope protection and scour protection. Proposed roadway items and right-of-way lines within the limits of the plan view. Existing utilities and, if available, new and relocated utility lines. Existing and proposed lighting, sound barriers and signs. Existing streams and wetlands. Approximate location of anticipated temporary shoring. Proposed lane and shoulder widths on bridge and for roadways under bridge (existing and future proposals). Equality stations for intersection of mainline Baseline and side road Baseline.

2.

Elevation View a. Centerline of bearing station and profile grade at each substitute unit. b. Location of proposed field splices. c. Type of slope protection and type of scour protection. d. Width and elevation of the bench in the abutment fill slope. e. Protective fence, light poles, sound walls, and structure mounted signs, if required. f. Normal pool elevations and the high water elevations (for 100-year flood and record floods) for structures over waterways. g. Identify lane and shoulder widths either by labels or illustrating pavement structures for underlying roadways. h. Existing utilities and, if available, new and relocated utility lines, including aerial lines. i. Anticipated footing types, spread or piles, etc. and estimated bottom of footing elevation. Typical Cross-section a. Protective fence, light poles and sound barriers if required. b. Electrical and fiber optic conduits, if required. See Mainline Structures Section for details.

3.

5-2 Oct 2011

4. Additional Information to be Provided on TS&L Drawings a. Proposed nonstandard details. b. All applicable general notes for the type of structure proposed for final design. Refer to PennDOT Design Manual Part 4, for a listing of common general notes. Add special notes or revise the common general notes to meet special conditions on individual projects. c. Typical sections indicating a future redecking scheme, if required. d. Typical sections and, if necessary, plan views indicating the construction stages for bridges that are to be built using staged construction. e. For projects with a four-lane typical section and wide median, show the future condition for the six-lane typical section with future beam spacing. f. Conceptual details for temporary support or underpinning of a structure. g. Live load rating summary. h. Superelevation transition rate and profile of gutter lines to assure that there are no sag points on the bridge or along the wing walls, if applicable. 5. Early Action Contracts (Overhead Bridges) a. On the TS&L drawings show the proposed structure spanning the existing mainline configuration, i.e., four travel lanes with 10-foot median. Show contouring, finished ground lines, drainage, guiderail/barrier and other proposed features for the interim condition with normal line weight and type. Show contouring, finished ground lines and guiderail/barrier for the future condition for the proposed mainline reconstruction with an alternate broken line type and line weight. Show proposed/future lane shoulder configuration and width. b. On the TS&L drawings, indicate the horizontal and vertical geometry of the mainline for both existing and future conditions. c. Adjacent box beam superstructures will not be allowed for any overhead bridges and should not be studied. d. Provisions for electrical conduit shall be reviewed on an individual basis with the project manager. 6. Bridge Rehabilitation Projects (include the following on the TS&L drawings) a. Age of the existing structure and dates of past rehabilitation, present and cumulative ADTT, portion of existing structure to be replaced, type of existing steel for steel structures, date of last inspection, type of existing diaphragm connections (e.g. welded, riveted, or bolted), type and location of deterioration for both the superstructure and substructure, deck drainage, expansion dam type, parapet type, and other pertinent items. b. Live load ratings for existing structural members before and after proposed strengthening. Live load ratings of existing members are to be calculated using the dead and live loads proposed for the rehabilitated structure.
5-3 Oct 2011

c. Proposed methods for rehabilitating and strengthening deteriorated and deficient structural members in both the superstructure and substructure. d. Recommendations for resetting expansion bearings, if required. e. Recommendations for retrofitting fatigue-prone and seismic-prone details. f. Typical sections and, if necessary, plan views indicating the proposed method of accomplishing the rehabilitation while maintaining traffic on and under the structure. 5.2 Mainline Structures (Carrying Mainline Traffic) A. Approach Slabs 1. Depress approach slabs five inches and overlay with three inches of bituminous binder course and two inches of bituminous wearing course or as directed. Do not reduce approach slab thickness, maintain in accordance with current PennDOT standard drawings. 2. Extend approach slab width across travel lanes and the right shoulder with a minimum length of 25 feet measured along the shortest side of the skewed angle (see Standard Drawing PTS-111). 3. Do not extend the approach slab across the left shoulder or median. 4. Provide inlets in the shoulders and median on the low side of mainline bridges. Provide inlets in the median on the high side. Inlets in the right shoulder are to be placed at the end of the approach slab with curbing extending from the wing wall or safety to the inlet. B. Substructure 1. Abutments for dual mainline structures should be continuous for the full outto-out width of the combined superstructures. Show the locations of the construction and expansion joints. 2. Provide an architectural treatment on mainline structures only as directed by the Commission and in accordance with PTC standard details. 3. Provide slope protection in front of stub and mid-height abutments. Use Random Stone Scope for mainline structures over waterways and railroads. Use Articulating Cellular Concrete Block for mainline structures over roads. 4. Locate a new benchmark disc on top of the abutment, wing wall or safety wall at the northeast corner of all mainline bridges. Show location on plan sheet. 5. Do not provide bearing pedestals on the substructure units. Slope or step the bridge seat from bearing area to bearing area. 6. Provide cheek wall at end of pier caps to hide bearings. C. Superstructure: 1. Design separate superstructure or dual structures for each direction of traffic. 2. Weathering steel should be considered in accordance with PennDOT Design Manual Part 4.
5-4 Oct 2011

3. The cross-slope on the water table should be consistent with the roadway typical section. Use 40% on the right water table in a normal section. 4. Use a maximum beam spacing of 8-6 unless otherwise approved by the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager. 5. Provide uniform beam spacing on all superstructures unless otherwise approved by the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager. 6. Specify white cement concrete to be used in all structure barriers or if directed, call for the barriers to be coated with a pure white, anti-graffiti paint. 7. Provide HPC (High Performance Concrete) for all bridge decks. Do not specify deck surface treatments (i.e., boiled linseed oil) for exposed deck surface. 8. Provide a 4-inch nominal diameter multi-cell galvanized steel conduit with factory installed inner-ducts (four (4) inner-ducts each having an inside diameter that matches the inside diameter of the 1-1/4 HDPE conduit) below deck in accordance with PTC ITS Standard Drawings (PTS-355), and no conduit in the parapets. The exception to this will be bridges at interchanges, where a 2 conduit in the outside parapets is to be provided for potential lighting or other electrical needs . 5.3 Overhead Structures (Carrying Facilities Over Mainline) A. Approach Slabs 1. For structures carrying state routes, follow PennDOT guidelines to determine if an approach slab is warranted and verify with the PennDOT District Office to see if the approach slab is desired. Do not provide approach slabs for bridges carrying Township roadways, unless approved by the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager. 2. Do not depress the approach slab unless directed by the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager. 3. Provide inlets in the shoulder on the low side and high side of overhead bridges. Locate the inlets at the end of the approach slab if present and provide curbing extending from the wing wall or safety wing to the inlet.

5-5 Oct 2011

B.

Substructure 1. Typically, provide a 14-foot shoulder from the edge of Turnpike travel lane to the face of the abutment for full height abutments and 12-foot shoulder from the edge of Turnpike travel to the curb for stub or semi-height abutments. (Early coordination with the PennDOT District office on offset measurement is required) Provide abutment transition pieces in accordance with PTS-145 for full height abutments or place single-face barriers in front of the full height abutments as directed by the PTC. 2. Provide slope protection between the abutment and the mainline shoulder for stub and partial-height abutments. Use articulating cellular concrete block for all overhead structures with a concrete curb at the edge of the shoulder. 3. Provide an architectural surface treatment on all overhead bridges, unless directed otherwise by the PTC. This treatment should be consistent throughout the project corridor. Treatment on the pier should only extend down to the top of the median barrier. If a reconstruction job changes the mainline Turnpike profile consideration should be given to treatment at the top of barrier. Portion of the pier from top of barrier to grade should be exposed concrete. No Anti-Graffiti coating to be applied. 4. Do not provide bearing pedestals on the substructure units. Step or slope bridge seat from bearing area to bearing area. 5. Provide 6 cheek wall at end of pier caps to hide bearings. 6. For piers within the 10' existing median (interim condition), provide a minimum of 3'-6" clear from the edge of the lane to the face of the pier. 7. For piers within the 10' existing median (interim condition), do not permit pier cap to extend more than two inches beyond the face of the stem when the pier cap is within the 16'-0" vertical clearance envelope. 8. For piers within the 10' existing median (interim condition), transition CMB to the faces of the pier and extend SFB the length of the pier on each side. 9. For median piers (final condition), transition Concrete Glare Screen to both ends of the pier with a pier transition piece, PTS-147.

C.

Superstructure 1. Provide a minimum vertical clearance of 16'-0" over all travel lanes, shoulders and traversable areas. Exemptions may be given by the PTC for specific situations where this clearance cannot realistically be achieved over all points. At a minimum, 16'-0" vertical clearance must be achieved over one lane in each direction of traffic. 2. Do not use weathering steel for structures over the mainline. 3. Adjacent box beam superstructures will not be allowed on any overhead bridges because of the longer construction time to set beams. 4. Future redecking schemes (staged or detour) should be considered for beam/girder arrangements. Use beam spacing of 8'-6" (maximum) where possible.

5-6 Oct 2011

5. Provide protective fencing for full length of structure on both exterior barriers for all structures except on interchange ramp bridges. Anti-climb shields will not be used on PTC owned Bridges. Verify with the PennDOT District Office if Anti-climb shields are warranted. Do not extend fencing onto wing walls, unless directed. 6. Use precast structure-mounted median barrier if a median barrier is required on PTC structures. D. Early Action Bridge Contracts 1. Two (2) General Plan and Elevation sheets should be prepared. The first will not show the future mainline lanes. The second should show the future mainline lanes and clearly state that the sheet is only provided to depict horizontal and vertical clearances for alternate bids. Note: The ownership of overhead structures carrying state routes (S.Rs) over the mainline will be transferred to PennDOT upon replacement. Therefore, coordination with the appropriate PennDOT district throughout the design process is required.

5.4

General Structure Guidelines A. Substructure 1. Stub or mid-height abutments are preferred. Full height abutments may be used if required to attain minimum vertical clearance or to accommodate other site restrictions. 2. Integral abutments may be considered where favorable geological conditions exist and the necessary bridge geometry requirements can be met. Comply with the requirements in PennDOT DM4, Appendix G, and standard drawings BD-667M. Constructability should be considered in accommodating construction staging, future widening and future redecking, when applicable. 3. Using 11/2:1 slopes in front of stub or mid-height abutments, in conjunction with articulating cellular concrete block slope protection, is permissible to minimize span lengths. 4. Use same wing wall type and orientation for all wings on a particular structure. Unless there is a significant cost savings or site needs to utilize different types. Differing wing wall types are subject to the approval of the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager. 5. Design the height of flared wingwalls to provide a 12" clear dimension between the top of the wing wall and finished grade on the back of the wing wall. 6. Provide either flowable backfill or geogrid reinforced backfill for mainline bridges and PTC owned overhead bridges. Use current PTC standard drawings for details and pay limits. Use backfill in accordance with

5-7 Oct 2011

PennDOT standard drawings for all overhead bridges to be owned by PennDOT. 7. For multi-span overhead bridges, use a wall type pier for all piers. Piers located within the median are restricted to a maximum wall width of 3'-0". Provide a pier cap with a maximum width of 3'-4 on all piers. The pier cap is to be a minimum height of 2'-0". The ends of all pier walls and caps are to be rounded. Exceptions will only be made for special site conditions or where bridge vertical clearance is greater than 25 feet. In these special cases other pier types (i.e. hammerhead, multi-column, etc.) can be considered with approval of the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager. 8. Submit details and basic dimensions for the proposed pier type to the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager for approval prior to starting the pier design and detailing. This information should be included as part of the TS&L and foundation submissions. 9. Minimum concrete cover over the steel reinforcement on all substructure units with architectural surface treatment will be measured to the point of maximum relief of the formliner. 10. Provide a two foot minimum to four-foot maximum flat bench in front of stub and mid-height abutments for future maintenance and inspection needs. 11. The bottom of footing elevations near streams is to be determined using the criteria in DM 4. 12. Consider Design Manual 4, Foundation Special Considerations. 13. For foundations in a river environment, spread footings on soil are only allowed with PTC approval. 14. For spread footings on soil, perform a minimum lab testing of one classification series and one direct or triaxle shear for each footing. Perform a minimum of one consolidation test for saturated clay below each footing. Perform a minimum of one corrosion series test for each structure. 15. For pile and drilled shaft foundations, provide applicable information listed in DM 4. 16. Prepare a Foundation Report for each structure. The report will be a standalone document and not part of the Preliminary Geotechnical Engineering Report as indicated in DM 4. 17. 50 ksi steel H-piles may be designed for axial capacity using a steel yield stress of 50 ksi. Special consideration should be given to quality of the rock bearing stratum and pile driving requirements to achieve the proper design load/refusal without damage to the pile. For overhead bridges carrying stateowned roadways, generally use 36 ksi for pile designs. Verify the design criteria with the PennDOT District. 18. When calculating the bearing capacity of rock using q ultimate for an equivalent soil mass, choose a resistance factor, 0.35-0.55, based on rock quality and expected performance. (Consider rock RQO [%] and RMR method for determining how the rock will be modeled for bearing resistance computations.)

5-8 Oct 2011

19. When selecting a friction angle for soil, referencing Foundation Analysis and Design by Joseph E. Bowles or older versions of Design Manual 4 is acceptable. 20. For replacement of existing structures on the same alignment, it may be beneficial, if feasible; to have one of the proposed structure borings taken through the existing footing (to determine as-built BFE) and one boring taken outside the existing foundation footprint (to determine a more accurate top of bedrock profile). Existing footings keyed 2' to 3' into rock may yield overly conservative proposed BFEs if only taken through existing footings. 21. Follow DM 4, for locating the bottom of footings impacted by scour requirements. 22. Design substructure units with provisions for future jacking for bearing replacement and/or bearing reset. The preference is to widen the beam seat, or provide a jacking shelf for shallow bearings, to accommodate the jacks. 23. Provide the notes and details for anchor bolt installation as shown on BD613M, sheet 14 of 15. 24. Concrete bearing pedestal walls used with precast concrete arches will be limited to 3 in height. B. Superstructure 1. Eliminate deck joints as much as possible. Use concrete end diaphragms instead of backwalls where calculations permit. For multi-span bridges, make superstructure continuous over the piers. 2. When staged construction results in placing a deck slab on a portion of a structure adjacent to a previously placed portion, the difference in deflection due to dead load must be less than three inches. Because of web layover, curved and skewed structures require a suggested construction procedure. 3. Minimize or eliminate entirely the number of scuppers on the bridge deck but do not allow water to spread into the travel lane. Size and space roadway inlets off the structure to collect all runoff. Place scuppers before tooth and modular expansion dams, if necessary. 4. For beam rehabilitation designs, achieve an inventory rating factor of 1.0 or greater for the H-20, HS-25, ML-80 and TK-527 vehicles and an operating rating factor of 1.0 or greater for the P-82 vehicle. This requirement may be waived by the bridge engineering manager if it results in larger or additional beams. Use the PHL-93 vehicle for all new beam designs. 5. In lieu of moment and shear diagrams for PTC owned structures, provide on the contract plans unfactored shear and moment values at tenth points for continuous girders; or the maximum values and splice point values for simple spans. Include the values as indicated in DM 4. Also include a table of reactions for dead load, superimposed dead load and positive and negative live load plus impact without load factors applied. 6. Provide load ratings on the design plan for all new bridges in accordance with PennDOT DM 4

5-9 Oct 2011

7. Provide on the contract plans composite and non-composite section properties at each resisting section. 8. Properly detail the expansion slots in the sole plates of elastomeric bearings to account for the longitudinal movement due to end rotation of beams caused by camber. 9. The use of stone slopes within 50 of the abutment will be prohibited. A minimum of 50 of bituminous curbing will be placed at each quadrant to allow grass slopes to stabilize. C. Drainage 1. Place inlets beyond ends of approach slabs. Do not place within approach slab. Provide curbing from the bridge parapet to the inlets. For long U-wings, place inlets at end of wingwalls. 2. Provide a minimum of 50' of bituminous or concrete curbing extending out the front end of the wing wall or safety wing wall at all four corners of the bridge, unless there is an inlet, in which case the curbing is to terminate at the inlet. D. Retaining Walls 1. Single-face barrier is required in front of all retaining walls located at the edge of mainline shoulder. Place barrier directly against retaining wall with no gap between. In the alternatives analysis for retaining walls, several factors should be considered. Engineering judgment should be applied and presented by the designer to the PTC Project Manager. If an MSE wall is to be used, then provide a moment slab underneath the shoulder with an integral single face barrier to accommodate any impact. If a post and plank wall is to be used, then no moment slab is required. See the PTC Project Manager or Bridge Engineering Manager if further clarification is needed. 2. Provide architectural treatment on all retaining walls visible from mainline and on other retaining walls at the direction of the PTC. This treatment should be consistent throughout the project corridor. 3. The design consultant should prepare a design that will be bid as an either/or item as follows: Either: Retaining Wall, EB-XXX As Designed Or: Retaining Wall, EB-XXX Contractor Alternate This either/or item will require a project specific specification.

5-10 Oct 2011

E.

Sound Barriers 1. Use steel posts for all sound barriers located at edge of mainline shoulder. 2. All steel posts are to be galvanized and then powder coated or painted. 3. Single-face barrier is required in front of all sound barriers located at edge of mainline shoulder (see Figure 5.7.1). Place barrier directly against sound barrier. The sound barrier should not be designed for impact. 4. Provide architectural treatment to the sound barrier panels as per the direction of the PTC. This treatment should be consistent throughout the project corridor. The Turnpike side of the sound wall will utilize formliners and the resident side will be pressed. 5. For Commission owned structures, a 20-foot high (including the barrier height) sound barrier may be constructed across the superstructure. If the height of the barrier adjacent to the bridge cannot be maintained, the variation must be approved by the PTC Project Manager. 6. For Commission owned structures, the panel length shall not exceed 12 feet.

F.

Soldier Pile/Post and Plank Walls (Non-Anchored) 1. The preferred design method should be in accordance with DM-4 using the LRFD discrete method of design. Alternate methods may be considered if project site conditions dictate, subject to approval by the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager. 2. When deflection controls design of steel post, limit deflection to 1. 3. Caissons are to be designed (diameter and length) using COM 624P or similar program. 4. Caissons are not to be reinforced. 5. Wall friction angle (delta) is 0 degrees when calculating passive pressure. 6. Multiple Ka values can be used to help reduce the active earth pressure. 7. An increased phi value can be used (reduced Ka) for rock.

G.

Sign Structures 1. Use monopipe sign structures for all mainline sign structures in accordance with PTC standard drawings. A test bore should be drilled at the foundation location. Pay the foundations for these structures as individual items, i.e. Class 3 Excavation, Class A Cement Concrete, Reinforcement Bars, Temporary Shoring, etc. Do not pay as incidental to the sign structure.

5-11 Oct 2011

H.

General 1. Provide an anti-graffiti coating on all exposed concrete surfaces without architectural surface treatment, except for the bridge deck surface, abutment backwalls and bearing seats. The colors will be provided by the Commission on a case by case basis. Coated areas include abutments, wingwalls, piers, all faces of the bridge parapet and the outside face of P/S concrete fascia beams. Do not place coating on the top and inside surfaces of the bridge parapets for overhead structures carrying, state owned roadways. Boiled linseed oil will be applied to those areas, as well as across the deck. 2. Bid items for alternate structure designs will generally be utilized for both overhead and mainline structures. Only one alternate structure will be used, consisting of a different material type than the designed structure (i.e. if steel is designed only P/S will be allowed as an alternate.) 3. Provide separate pay item, with special provision, for jacking of the superstructure after deck placement in order to relieve stresses in elastomeric pads. 4. For highly skewed structures investigate improving the skew to 70 or greater to improve performance. The ability to improve the skew is likely more attainable on mainline structures than for overheads which may be governed by the alignment of the median pier. 5. Detail highway lighting components to eliminate the need for structure mounted poles. Any proposed structure mounted lighting must be approved by the Bridge Engineering Manager. 6. For curbed and skewed structures indicate if the structure is to be plumb at erecting or plumb under the full dead load existing at the end of construction, which is preferred. Provide on the contract plans the anticipated differential lateral deflection and resulting lateral rotation. For staged construction provide a suggested procedure for connecting diaphragms and constructing the deck slab. Do not use concrete end diaphragms for these structures.

I.

Software 1. For abutment, wall, pier, and culvert design and analysis on structures where ownership will be transferred to PennDOT, use the current ABLRFD, PAPIER, and/or BXLRFD programs. For vertical pile lateral resistance, use COM 624P computer program (Wang & Reese, 1993). 2. For PTC owned structures, other design/analysis programs are acceptable, contingent on approval by the PTC Bridge Engineering Manager (i.e., GStab17, LPile, FBPier, etc.).

5-12 Oct 2011

FIGURE 5.7.1

5-13 Oct 2011

Chapter 6 RIGHT-OF-WAY
6.0 Introduction There are numerous factors that contribute to affecting private property that occur within a design project. This chapter presents the guidelines required to prepare the associated plans depicting these affected properties. All plans are to be prepared in accordance with PennDOT Publication 14M, Design Manual Part 3 Highway Plans Presentations, PennDOT Publication 16M, Design Manual Part 5, Utility Relocation, and as directed by the Commission. 6.1 Reestablishing Turnpike Right-of-Way Baselines Best-Fit A. History The Original part of the Pennsylvania Turnpike was built utilizing portions of the old Southern Pennsylvania Railroad and Mining Company (South Penn) right-of-way from Irwin, Pennsylvania (Turnpike milepost 67) to Carlisle, PA (Turnpike milepost 226). Through most of this section of Turnpike no permanent baseline reference monuments were set. Baselines were staked in the field, and the only references set were hubs and tacks or nails/tacks in trees, all long gone. The only exception to this was the construction of massive eight-foot (8) square-topped stone pillar tower monuments (some twelve feet high) the South Penn Railroad built at the breaks in grade over the tunnels, upon which surveyors could set-up their instruments. With no permanent monuments being set to perpetuate the location of most of the Turnpikes Centerline, the highway itself (the original 24-foot wide concrete cart ways underneath the bituminous pavement, the bridges, storm water structures, and the concrete median barrier occupying the middle of the tenfoot (10) wide medial strip) is the monument. The Right-of-Way Centerline utilized simple curve geometry. The Construction Centerline in spiraled high degree-of-curve areas was offset (throw p distance) and was spiraled utilizing a peculiar approximation of a spiraled curve (not a real mathematical spiral) unique to the Pennsylvania Turnpike. As reestablishment of the Right-of-Way Centerline requires the physical location of the Construction Centerlines monument (the highway) and then applying the offset distances between the two centerlines, a copy of the Standard Turnpike Spiraling Method can be obtained from the Turnpike Project Manager, and should be utilized for spiraled curves between mileposts 67 and 226. Generally, the precision ratio for Original Turnpike surveys was between 1:1500 and 1:2000. The methodology for reestablishing a best-fit of the Right-of-Way Centerline is presented below under Original Turnpike Best Fit.

6-1 Oct 2011

After completion of the Original Turnpike, the Philadelphia Extension (Carlisle to Valley Forge, milepost 226 to milepost 326), the Western Extension (Ohio State Line to Irwin, milepost 0 to milepost 67), the Delaware River Extension (Valley Forge to the New Jersey State Line, milepost 326 to 359), and finally, the Northeast Extension (Norristown to Clarks Summit, milepost A-20.0 through A-131) were constructed. The Philadelphia, Western, and Delaware River Extensions had a few sections built without centerline reference monuments being set (and are to be treated for the purpose of reestablishing the best-fit Right-of-Way Centerline as Original Turnpike), but for the Turnpike sections properly monumented, the methodology for reestablishment should be in accordance the procedures below under Turnpike Extensions Best-Fit. The Northeast Extension was fully-monumented (re-bars approximately forty inches (40) long, some set in concrete), with their surveys having precision ratios of 1:4000. Generally, the precision ratio for the Philadelphia, and Western Extensions surveys was 1:2500. The Delaware River Extensions surveys precision ratio averaged 1:3500. Reestablishment of the Right-of-Way Centerline will require adjustments be made to accommodate technological advances in surveying precision. 1. Original Section And Turnpike Extensions Best Fit - Because most of the Original Turnpike had no Centerline reference monuments set, these procedures are to be followed. In addition, on Turnpike Extensions without reference monuments, utilize Original Turnpike procedures: i. On Original Sections of the Turnpike, the structures centerline by centerline points (established from substructure working points) and location of the highway (the highway being the monument) shall be utilized to precisely set the reestablished location of the original right-of-way baseline. The best-fit centerline will be an adjustment (modern precise surveying techniques) applied for technological measuring advances. On Turnpike Extensions, the original Right-of-Way baseline reference monuments (recovered and positioned on the project datum) are based on the structures centerline to centerline points (established from the substructure working points).

ii.

The centerline geometry shown on the 1990 mosaics will be stored as a figure in COGO as the Right-of-Way Centerline No. 1. The coordinate geometry shown on the original construction as-built plans will be stored as a figure in COGO as the Right-of-Way Centerline No. 2. The two rightof-way centerlines shall be rotated, translated, and compared to one another for fit.
6-2 Oct 2011

Right-of-Way Centerlines 1 and 2 should match. Any discrepancies between the two shall be reported to the Commission Project Manager for referral to and resolution by Commission Right-of-Way staff. The resulting resolution shall be called the Right-of-Way Centerline. It is understood that the Right-of-Way Centerline is in simple curve format (which may be either arc or chord definition, possibly both, if two or more construction sections span this project); please verify. ON the Northeast Extension ONLY, there are a few places where the Legal Right-of-Way Lines For Limited Access are concentric with and offset from spiraled baselines. This is a special circumstance and Commission right-of-way staff is to be consulted for special procedures to deal with these lines. iii. The aerial photography centerline (the centerline of the median barrier) will be supplied to Consultant in an ASCII coordinate file provided by the Commission. Curves derived from this file will reflect as-built spiral curves. This file will be stored in COGO and a figure derived by the best-fit command through tangents to establish PIs. The Right-of-Way Centerline figure will be superimposed in COGO upon the aerial photography centerline (ASCII file), tied at one end to the ASCII file figure and rotated onto the ASCII file figure. The Rightof-Way Centerline will be slid incrementally in COGO along the ASCII file figure and through the referenced centerline points (established from structure centerline by centerline points, median barrier ties, where available on the Original Sections; and established from recovered original monuments and structure centerline by centerline points on the Turnpike Extensions, where available.) until the two centerlines match each other as closely as possible. When comparing the Right-of-Way Centerline to the aerial photography centerline, the simple curve to spiral association (utilizing the unique Standard Turnpike Spiraling Method) where applicable on the Original Turnpike Sections) shall be considered. The objective is to hold as much of the right-of-way geometry as possible, especially along the tangents, and to adjust the curves as required, generally holding the radius, and applying the spiraled curves.

iv.

6-3 Oct 2011

v.

As a check for best-fit, offset distances will be computed between the two lines by stations and offsets at 50-foot intervals. It is understood that differences of one (1) foot or less will generally be acceptable. Areas of incongruity between the two centerlines that require the introduction of any new PIs will be reviewed with the Commissions staff prior to finalizing the best-fit centerline. The station and offset comparisons and referenced field centerline tie comparisons will be submitted to the Commission with a brief report on methodology, problems encountered, and resulting procedures used to achieve the best-fit centerline. The Commission will review and approve the bestfit line. The best-fit as-built centerline will become the basis for the reestablishment of the existing Right-of-Way of the Turnpike for this section of roadway. The existing right-of-way lines will be reestablished by using the breakpoints from the Right-of-Way mosaics (verified by deed) at the appropriate stations and offsets and tying them to the best-fit centerline. The addition of station equations (best fit as-built centerline) will be required to accomplish this to compensate for the systematic errors created by earlier surveying technology inadequacies, resulting in precision ratios of only 1:3000 (or less) on some original surveys. The right-of-way corners / rightof-way shift points between these station equation points on the best fit as-built centerline shall have their positions stationing prorated to adjust for the discrepancies created by the systematic early surveying errors. The corners offset distances from the baseline shall NOT be prorated; they are to be HELD. Simple curve format will be used for the establishment of right-of-way geometry. As a check, reestablished right-of-way lines and breakpoints will be compared with existing right-of-way fence breakpoints and field-located property corners added to the mapping on the aerial photography wherever possible. At the limits of the project, the best-fit as-built centerline will be tied to the nearest PI (located by field survey) outside the projects actual limits of work in order to facilitate geometric conformity in matching adjacent projects. Station and offset ties between the approved best-fit as-built centerline and the projects new Right-of-Way - Construction Baseline line will be shown on the final Right-of-Way / Geometry Plans in no less than two places on each sheet (both edges).

vi.

vii.

viii.

6-4 Oct 2011

ix.

Prior to beginning the work necessary to establish the best-fit asbuilt centerline, a meeting to review the above procedures will be held with the Commissions Right-of-Way staff.

6.2

Plan Requirements A. Right-of-way Mainline Only The right-of-way plan set will consist of a title sheet Right-of-way/Geometry Plans and property plots for properties requiring perpetual easements and/or fee simple acquisitions. Mainline Right-of-way property plots will have Survey and Right-of-way Baseline for the side road and a Survey and Right-of-way Baseline (which is the proposed baseline) for the Turnpike mainline. Right-of-way acquisitions that affect the side road right-of-way will be referenced off the Survey and Right-ofway Baseline for the side road. Right-of-way acquisitions that affect the Turnpike mainline right-of-way will be referenced off the Survey and Right-of-way Baseline (which is the proposed baseline) for the Turnpike. All references (plusses and offsets) are to be shown on the plan as measured perpendicular or radial to the baseline from which they are referenced. No separate plot will be prepared for properties requiring only Temporary Construction Easements (TCE). These TCE impacts will be shown on the Roadway Plans, which are to be submitted in conjunction with the plots as part of the Construction Plan set. Stations, offsets, and areas for TCEs will be referenced to the Survey and Construction Baseline and labeled on said Roadway Plans. Metes and bounds are not required to be shown for TCEs. The standard TCE note should be included on said Roadway Plan. All perpetual easements and fee simple acquisitions will show only the lines plotted and labeled accordingly. B. Right-of-way Early Action Bridges, Side Roads, Access Ramps accepting/ discharging traffic onto any public roads: For Early Action Side Roads requiring right-of-way acquisitions, side-road relocations, and access ramps discharging/accepting traffic onto/off public roads, a complete set of right-of-way plans are to be prepared in accordance with the manuals listed above. The R/W plan set should mimic what is being built/acquired for that job. Applicable Right-of-way/Geometry Plans should be included in the right-of-way plan set.

6-5 Oct 2011

Early Action Right-of-way plans will have Survey and Right-of-way Baseline for the side road and the Original Right-of-way Baseline for the Turnpike. Right-ofway acquisitions that affect the side road right-of-way will be referenced off the Survey and Right-of-way Baseline for the side road. Right-of-way acquisitions that affect the Turnpike mainline right-of-way will be referenced off the Original Right-of-way Baseline for the Turnpike. All references (plusses and offsets) are to be shown on the plan as measured perpendicular or radial to the baseline from which they are referenced. No separate plot will be prepared for properties requiring only Temporary Construction Easements (TCE), unless a TCE goes to condemnation or the PM requires it. These TCE impacts will be shown on the Roadway Plans, which are to be submitted in conjunction with the plots as part of the Construction Plan set. Stations, offsets, and areas for TCEs will be referenced to the Survey and Construction Baseline and labeled on said Roadway Plans. Metes and bounds are not required to be shown for TCEs. The standard TCE note should be included on said Roadway Plan. All perpetual easements and fee simple acquisitions will show only the lines plotted and labeled accordingly. C. Title Sheet The information to be presented on the Title Sheet shall be in accordance with Design Manual 3, Chapter 3, except as follows: 1. Maps. a. State Map with Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Districts shown in the upper right corner b. Location map with project shown in upper left corner with scale presented. 2. The block for the PTC Chief Engineer to stamp on the R/W title sheet should be removed since the Design Engineer is stamping it and the Chief Engineer already has a place to sign it. 3. The Contract Number for the R/W plan set should match the construction contract number. Each Plot will have a separate WBS number that is different than the construction contract number. 4. Stationing Limits. The Stationing Limits shall be shown. If a parcel is affected by both the Early Action Project and a Mainline Project, a plot shall be prepared identifying the required right-of-way for both projects. 5. Side Road Right-of-way Plan Sets. For the Turnpike, identify the eastern/southern and western/northern most limits of right-of-way as:

6-6 Oct 2011

LIMIT OF ESTABLISHMENT, RE-ESTABLISHMENT, AND AUTHORIZATION STATION XX+XX a. For State Side Roads, identify the Limits of Right-of-way as: BEGIN AUTHORIZATION STATION XX+XX SEGMENT XX, OFFSET XX S.R. XXXX, SECTION XX Right-of-way END AUTHORIZATION STATION XX+XX SEGMENT XX, OFFSET XX S.R. XXXX, SECTION XX Right-of-way b. For Non-state Side Roads, identify the Limits of Right-of-way as: BEGIN AUTHORIZATION STATION XX+XX T.R. XXXX (Local Road Name) END AUTHORIZATION STATION XX+XX T.R. XXXX (Local Road Name) The right-of-way title sheet, index plans and general notes should be consistent with the limits shown on the Right-of-way Plan, Profile and Plots. D. Preparation of Property Plots Plans 1. Legal metes and bounds descriptions shall be prepared for all fee simple and perpetual easement acquisitions except properties which are total takes. Total take acquisitions shall utilize the owners description, unless directed otherwise by the Commission. These descriptions are to be furnished by the Consultant in electronic (MS-Word) format for each parcel Where pluses (stationing) numbers for corners are shown as encircled (scaled dimension) on the right-of-way plans, the metes and bounds description shall identify the station as +/-. Where the baseline offset distance numbers for corners are shown as encircled (scaled dimension) on the right-of-way plans, the metes and bounds description shall identify the offset distance as more or less. . 2. No property plot plan will be required for total takes unless otherwise directed by the Commission. 3. For general notes, refer to the PTC CADD Standards, sub-file Title_Blocks.
6-7 Oct 2011

4. Plot the entire Deed of Record property on one sheet. The deed calls (metes and Bounds) shall be labeled on each property line, parallel to the applicable line. Label this information as it is shown in the deed. When perches are given, also add the (feet) conversion in parenthesis. If clutter is a problem, a full or partial tabulation should be used (preferred use numbers inside octagonal). 5. Consistent use of labels, text, charts and plan preparation (in general) shall be maintained throughout the project. E. Right-of-way/Geometry Plans This work involves the preparation of final Right-of-way/Geometry Plans at a scale of 1"=50'. The Right-of-way/Geometry Plan Sheets will show all ties between the Proposed Construction and Survey Baseline (to be labeled as Survey and Right-of-way Baseline on these plans) and the original best fit alignment that has been reestablished as the Original Right-of-way Baseline. Dual station and offset baseline ties will be shown to all break points in the right-of-way lines. Project grid coordinates will also be shown for these points. These stations and offsets will denote station and offset data from the Original Right-of-way Baseline in slanted text and stations and offsets in bold vertical text from the Survey and Right-of-way Baseline for each tie point with appropriate notations and legends. Centerline geometry data will be provided for both the Original Right-of-way and Survey and Right-of-way Baselines. It is the consultants responsibility to obtain all recorded instruments to verify supplemental right-of-way information provided by the Commission. In addition, copies of all records are to be forwarded to the Commission and/or the Design Manager. Right-of-way/Geometry Plans will show and label all side road names and route numbers, watercourse names and flow arrows, structure numbers, baseline stationing and station equalities, planimetric features, owner names, project parcel numbers, old and new right-of-way numbers, north arrow, labeled topography, and right-of-way dimensions. All coordinate notes, project grid coordinate conversion notes, centerline mileposts, and horizontal and vertical control monuments will be shown on each plan. All primary control will be depicted with elevations, coordinate values, and type of control point established, i.e., bronze disc in concrete. Primary vertical control benchmarks will be shown with elevations in NAVD88 and coordinates in project grid. Primary horizontal control monuments will be shown with coordinates in both project grid and NAD83 SPC with (applicable Zone) values with notation on both datum. Stations and offsets will be provided to all primary horizontal and vertical control monuments referenced to the Survey and Right-of-way Baseline and the Original Right-of-way Baseline.

6-8 Oct 2011

Baselines with bearings will be noted on each plan as the Survey and Right-ofway Baseline and the Original Right-of-way Baseline. The Legal Right-of-Way Line for Limited Access will be shown, labeled and noted with right-of-way numbers. The plans will be prepared in accordance with Commission requirements including the above stated information. These Right-of-way/Geometry Plans will indicate/label those corners of the Legal Right-of-Way line for Limited Access, which are to be monumented during construction. Commission staff will review the plans at the pre-PS&E submission and will specify which corners are to be monumented. These plans will be incorporated into the final Construction Plans. It is not necessary to show plusses and offsets to the Legal Right-of-Way Line on the construction plans if the right-of-way/geometry plans are included as part of the Contract Documents. F. Required Right-of-Way Lines Required Right-of-Way is to be taken in chords (creating straight right-of-way lines and not curves). If a circumstance requires that a take creates a concentricto-baseline or curved right-of-way line, approval by the Total Reconstruction Program Manager must be obtained. Avoid (if possible) creating ANY new rightof-way corners/shifts in right-of-way on existing property lines separating adjacent owners. It is far more desirable to create new right-of-way corners away from existing property lines by station (plus)/offset distance from a Commission baseline. If it is necessary to create a new corner/shift in right-of-way on an existing property line between adjoining owners retracing and reestablishing that boundary line will be required. If a property line coincides with the legal right-of-way line, the property line symbol shall be shown on the right-of-way line on deed plots and Right-of-Way plans. However, on Construction/Roadway plans or Right-of-Way/Geometry plans do not show the property line symbol.

6.3

Right-of-way Summary Chart The Commission will supply the chart template which is to be prepared and updated by the consultant and submitted with each right-of-way submission. Commission staff will be responsible for assigning right-of-way numbers for all impacted properties.

6-9 Oct 2011

6.4

Utility Easements A. The property plot plan and the construction plan shall show all utility easements. If a utility crosses the Turnpike right-of-way and the utility has an existing private easement connecting to the legal limited access right-of-way line, the private easement will remain for any portion of the easement bounded by the old and new right-of-way lines. A note shall also be included that indicates the name of the utility involved with the easement. See Figure 6.4.1. B. When it is necessary to acquire substitute right-of-way for a utility, the designer shall obtain a copy of the utilitys existing right-of-way documents for the right-of-way overtaken by the highway. Also, a copy of the utilitys current right-of-way agreement form shall be obtained. Prior to obtaining the right-of-way, a meeting with the utility shall be held to discuss the private rights. The legal description for the replacement right-of-way shall provide the replacement of the utilitys existing private rights. The utility shall approve of the legal description before it is finalized. When the right-of-way acquisition is complete, a copy of the legal description shall be provided to the utility. Refer to Design Manual Part 5, Section 6.3, Utility Relocation for more details on the acquisition of substitute right-of-way.

6-10 Oct 2011

6-11 Oct 2011

Chapter 7 Drainage, Stormwater Management Design, and Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Plans
7.0 Introduction While this chapter is divided into separate sections for Drainage and Stormwater Management, the designer must approach the layout of the roadway drainage system from a stormwater management perspective. As the Regulatory Agencies, Counties and Townships become more sophisticated in their approach to the regulation of stormwater discharges (i.e., the Post Construction Stormwater Management section of the NPDES permit), the use of sound stormwater management practices must be applied during the development of drainage designs. 7.1 Drainage Design Criteria A. General 1. Primary References Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) Design Manual Part 2, Highway Design, Publication 13M, Chapter 10, Drainage Design, and Related Procedures, Latest Edition. Chapter 13, Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control, Design Manual Part 3, Plans Presentation, Publication 14M, Chapter 6, Contour Grading and Drainage Plans and Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Plans, Latest Edition. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), Pennsylvania Code Title 25, Chapter 102 and Chapter 105. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Manual, Latest Edition. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), Pennsylvania Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual, Latest Edition. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Transportation, Publication 584, Latest Edition. HEC 22 Urban Drainage Design Manual Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Transportation (PennDOT), Standards for Roadway Construction (RC), Latest Edition. Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC), Standards for Roadway Construction (PTS), Latest Edition. United States Department of Agricultural Soil Conservation Service, County Soil Survey.

7-1 Oct 2011

2. Compliance Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood maps will determine if the proposed activity encroaches on a regulatory floodway. A water obstruction or encroachment with a drainage area more than 100 acres requires a joint (DEP and US Army Corps of Engineers) or general permit (DEP) application, whichever is applicable. Provide supporting hydrologic and hydraulic computations as required by DEPs General Permit for wetland disturbance areas of less than 0.1 acre. However, for wetland disturbance areas of 0.1 acre or more, DEPs Joint Application with supporting documentation is required. Any stormwater management detention basin with an embankment 15 feet or greater in height, or with contributing drainage area exceeding 100 acres, or with impounding capacity at maximum storage elevation exceeding 50 acre-feet requires a DEP Dam Permit and should be avoided where possible.

3. Drainage Systems All drainage facilities less than 10 feet in depth from the existing or proposed finished grade to the top of the pipe will be replaced. Drainage facilities greater than 10 feet in depth from the existing or proposed finished grade to the top of pipe will be inspected and the results included in a Deep Culvert Inspection Report. The designer will physically inspect pipes greater than 36-inches in diameter. Pipes less than or equal to 36-inches in diameter will be video logged by the designer and a copy of the tape provided to the Commission as part of a Deep Culvert Inspection Report. The Deep Culvert Inspection Report should indicate whether the drainage system is recommended for rehabilitation, reconstruction, or extension. In developing the new drainage system and the construction staging for the project, consideration will be given to placing the new drainage system at the existing drainage location as much as possible to minimize boring. For shoulder and paved median inlets, use flowable backfill material.

B.

Storm Drainage 1. Hydrology a. Runoff factors should follow Design Manual 2, Chapter 10, Table 10.2.1 or local governing storm ordinances if the ordinances are more stringent for the design and approval by the necessary regulatory agencies. b. Design storm frequency:
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For temporary conditions use 2-year storm. 2. Storm Pipe a. The minimum diameter of cross pipes under the roadway that are deeper than 10 feet shall be a minimum 24 inch. b. A 0.5% minimum slope to be provided, with 1% being the desired minimum. Maximum slope to be 10% unless a steep slope pipe design is provided. c. Combination storm sewer and underdrain is to be used for parallel storm sewers in cut conditions and in the median. d. Two pipe alternates will be used for all storm sewer pipes. In general, reinforced concrete and thermoplastic will be used for most conditions and coated polymer corrugated galvanized steel pipe or thermoplastic pipe will be used for slope pipe. The design will be based on the highest n factor for the alternatives. The pipe outlet design will be based on the lowest n factor for the alternates. Reinforced concrete pipe will be Type A with an approximate 100-year expected service life. PAIDD must be used for all concrete pipes with fill heights greater than 15 feet. Coated (polymer) corrugated galvanized steel pipe will be Type I with 2-2/3" x 1/2 " corrugations and designed with an approximate 50-year expected service life. For thermoplastic pipe; Slopes: Group V All Other Areas: Group VI e. Designers should consider the available sizes of pipes when developing drainage systems and verify that pipe sizes being specified are available as alternatives. 3. Inlets a. Locations Minimum spacing of inlets is to be 100 feet except in sag conditions. Bypass flow will be permitted to achieve economical spacing as long as depth and spread criteria are maintained Inlets in depressed or unpaved median sections are to be placed so the width of water flowing in the median does not exceed 2/3 the total median width, for medians greater than or equal to 22 width. For medians less than 22, see the project manager for requirements. Additional inlets beyond the minimum spacing criteria may be needed to achieve the 2/3 spread in certain instances, such as full superelevation or flat grade.
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Provide inlets in the shoulders and median on the low side of mainline bridges. Provide inlets in the median on the high side. Inlets in the right shoulder are to be placed at the ends of the approach slabs with curbing extending from the wing wall or safety wall to the inlet. Provide inlets in the shoulder on the low side of overhead bridges. Locate the inlets at the ends of the approach slabs if present and provide curbing extending from the wing wall or safety wing to the inlet. Outletting of median inlets into shoulder inlets and slope pipes is preferred. Depress inlets in median and shoulder areas one inch below the normal flow line, unless temporary traffic is anticipated over the inlets.

b. Types Use Type C Inlets on shoulders which have approach slabs and concrete curbs. Use Type M Inlets with frames in paved medians requiring drainage on only one (1) side of a concrete median barrier and on shoulders adjacent to single-face barrier. Use Type M Double Inlets with concrete top units in paved medians requiring drainage on both sides of a concrete median barrier. Use Type M Inlets with concrete top units in fill shoulders and unpaved medians. Use Type S Inlets in swales and on shoulders with rollup curbs and swale conditions. Type D-H inlets may be used to accommodate high storm runoff but may only be used if approved by the project manager. PTC has not utilized this type of inlet and it should only be used if approved by the project manager.

4. Ditches/Swales a. The minimum ditch grade to be used is 1.0 percent. b. The minimum ditch depth to be used is one (1) foot. c. Design ditches and their locations in accordance with the following hierarchy: Cut Slopes Refer to the Figure 7.1.8(A) entitled, Typical Ditch Cut Slope As indicated on the figure. As indicated on the figure with 3:1 side slopes on ditch. As indicated on the figure, eliminate the top of cut rounding with 3:1 side slopes on ditch.
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As indicated on the figure, eliminate the top of cut rounding with 2:1 side slopes on ditch. Locate ditch, with 2:1 side slopes, two (2) feet from right-of-way line. Ditch can intersect roadway cut slope (2:1) and round intersection point. Take additional right-of-way and use preferred ditch as indicated on the figure. Fill Slopes Refer to the Figure 7.1.8(B) titled Typical Ditch Fill Slope. As indicated on the figure. As indicated on the figure with 3:1 side slopes on ditch. Extend embankment slope directly to bottom of ditch. Use 4:1 backslope to existing ground line to form V-ditch. Extend embankment slope directly to bottom of ditch. Use 3:1 backslope to existing ground line to form V-ditch. Extend embankment slope directly to bottom of ditch. Use 2:1 back slope to existing ground line to form V-ditch. Locate ditch, with 3:1 side slopes, eight (8) feet from right-of-way line. Take additional right-of-way and use preferred ditch as indicated on the figure.

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d. Concrete lined ditches are not to be used. 5. Pipe culverts under the Pennsylvania Turnpike a. In general, shallow culverts, culverts less than 10 feet deep from the existing or proposed finished grade to the top of the culvert, will be replaced. Hydrologic analysis for the 50-year storm frequency will be used to determine flows. For culverts in excess of 100 feet in length, the 100-year storm shall be included in the hydraulic computations for flood risk evaluation. b. Deep culverts, culverts greater than 10 feet deep will be addressed based on the results of the Deep Culvert Inspection Report. Culverts that require rehabilitation will be lined with an acceptable material and system. c. Where horizontal elliptical pipe is needed because of a restrictive vertical clearance, a concrete pipe will be used. d. Culverts listed in the PTC bridge log should be inspected for replacement or rehabilitation and extension. e. discussion on the use of depressed culverts by agencies. 7. Endwalls and End Sections a. Inlet Conditions Concrete end sections shall be used. All pipes, 36 inches and greater, require a Type D-W endwall.

b. Outlet Conditions Concrete end sections shall be used to terminate pipes out letting on traversable slopes (without guide rail) within the clear zone. If an end section is necessary, it should be concrete. All pipes, 36 inches and greater, require a Type D-W endwall.

8. Pavement Base Drain a. Use six-inch minimum pavement base drains. b. Base drains will extend to the limits of the project along both inside and outside edges of pavement in both tangent and superelevated sections of roadways and as follows:

Along the median centerline for paved medians unless combo storm sewer is used.
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Along the back edge of shoulders in cut conditions unless combination storm sewer and underdrain is used. Along the back edge of shoulders in fill conditions where subbase cannot be daylighted (slopes flatter than 2:1). Additional base drains may be required along acceleration/ deceleration ramps.

c. Base drains will be outlet in accordance with the Commission Specification Section 615. d. Outlet spacing for 300 feet desirable, 450 feet maximum. If this outlet spacing cannot be obtained, the size of the base drain will be increased from six (6) inches to eight (8) inches at the Commissions discretion. 9. Rock Armor and Bituminous Curb a. Rock armor is to be in accordance with PTS-124 and should be utilized on all fill slopes 2:1 or steeper in conjunction with guide rail to prevent embankment erosion. b. Rock armor should extend to the top of rock in rock embankments. c. Rock armor may also be utilized on fills with recurring erosion problems. d. Bituminous curbs should be used to prevent sheet flow drainage onto retaining walls or geogrid reinforcement fill embankments. 7.2 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT A. Stormwater Management Ordinances Stormwater Management Ordinances should be met according to the regulations as described below and in Section 7.2.B.1. A matrix comparing these Ordinances should be prepared and submitted to the PTC PM. This matrix will show the requirements and any discrepancies between a through c below, at which point the Commission can make a decision on the criteria to follow. It is possible for a job to pass through multiple municipalities and Act 167s. a. Municipal Ordinance (City/Township/Borough) b. Approved Act 167 Plan c. PaDEP regulations

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B.

Act 167 Plans and Municipal Ordinances The Commission must be consistent with the standards of watershed-based stormwater management plans approved and implemented under the Stormwater Management Act (1978 Act 167); The Commission does, strive to maintain good relations with local municipalities and, at the Commissions direction will comply with local ordinances when feasible and practicable. It is the intent of the Commission to submit the Post Construction Stormwater Management Plan (PCSM Plan) to each municipality for their review. The Design Consultant will request a Stormwater and Floodplain Consistency letter from the municipality for inclusion in the Joint Permit Application and NPDES. If after significant coordination, the local municipality will not provide the requested Consistency letter, then the Design Consultant will submit to DEP appropriate correspondence documenting said coordination efforts in lieu of the Consistency Letter. If there is no Act 167 plan or municipal ordinances, follow DEP regulations.

C.

Antidegradation and Post Construction Stormwater Management Plan Requirements Four key measures are used to assess the potential for impacts from stormwater runoff volume, rate, thermal impact and water quality. The goal of PCSM Plan is to prevent or minimize any increase in the quantity (rate and volume) of runoff while also minimizing the factors affecting the water quality and thermal impact. The best way to achieve antidegradation is to mimic the natural, pre-development hydrologic conditions, which are usually dominated by infiltration and evapotranspiration. This is a two-fold solution because stormwater management strategies that address quantity normally also address water quality and thermal impact. Often the linear nature of highway projects could limit viable options for rate and volume reduction. Therefore, it is also important to have a combination of strategies that reduce the amount of runoff being generated. Serious consideration must be given to the property impacts that occur due to meeting the requirements and it is possible that a balance between criteria and property impacts must be evaluated. It is important that the Designer develop plans to a sufficient level of detail that can be presented to the public, therefore it is important to coordinate early with regulatory Agencies and municipalities. The Commission does not want to present a stormwater plan to the public that will require significant changes in final design.

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D.

Post Construction Stormwater Management Plans The County Conservation District and PaDEP may not review the PCSM Plan. However, they will review the NPDES application for completeness and make sure a post construction stormwater management plan has been prepared and is attached. The information for the table in Section E of the NPDES Application will need to be completed. A summary (peak flow control) shall be included in the PCSM Plan, including summary tables of hydrologic parameters and pre and post-development peak discharges. It is the intent of the Commission to manage stormwater per the criteria where practical and feasible. If these criteria cannot be fully met, then all appropriate documentation shall be included in the PCSM Plan for review and concurrence by the County Conservation District and PaDEP. A PCSM Plan must be included with the NPDES Permit submittal as a separate document and shall document all permanent stormwater BMPs. It should not be incorporated into the erosion and sediment pollution control plan and narrative. However, the development of both plans should be closely coordinated. For PCSM guidelines, refer to PaDEPs Pennsylvania Stormwater Best Management Practices Manual, Latest Edition. Submit a copy of the approved PCSM Plan to the PTC Roadway Unit. It is the intent of the Commission to use similar BMPs and materials for ease of maintenance and as such, the design of these facilities should be coordinated with the PTC Roadway Unit before they are submitted to the Agencies for approval.

E.

Post Construction Stormwater Management Plans For PTC Maintenance A PCSM Plan will need to be provided for use by the PTC for maintenance activities. This Plan must be submitted with the 90% submission and is to be reviewed by the PTC Roadway Unit. This plan should only contain information necessary to allow for the proper maintenance of the SWM facilities. The following items shall be included in the plan set. Location/ Index Map Plan sheet(s) showing the baseline and location of each BMP used with the milepost designation called and station shown on the sheet. Plan Views Plan sheet(s) showing plan views of each BMP. Multiple BMPs can be shown on a sheet. This needs to be shown at a scale such that all important information is easily readable. Details Plan sheet(s) showing all details needed to properly maintain the BMPs. This may not include all the design details, such as anti-seep collars,
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that are not pertinent to maintenance. If a BMP has an access point off the system, the location of the access needs to be shown on the plan. Written PCSM Plan Plan sheet giving written maintenance instructions including type of maintenance required and frequency. List the BMP and instructions in general terms, if a BMP requires special maintenance list that BMP and its location separately. The goal is to produce a concise set of plans that only pertains to maintenance. To that end, keep the number of sheets to a minimum.

F.

NPDES Permit Submittal Procedures A pre-application meeting will be held prior to the submittal of either the E&SPC plans or the NPDES Permit Application to the appropriate County Conservation District (CCD) and\or the PaDEP Regional Office. The E&SPC Plans should then be revised based upon any comments the Agencies may have and be submitted promptly following the pre-application meeting. The NPDES Permit Boundary needs to be clearly defined and include the entire project site. For a multiple phase and multiple year project, the NPDES Permit Boundary, limit of disturbance, right-of-way and easement lines should be coincidental. Use engineering judgment for all other projects. The Design Consultant will be responsible for preparing and submitting the application for the NPDES (Chapter 102 Earth Disturbance) Permit for the project. The NPDES Permit Package will consist of a complete NPDES Permit Application and Checklist, a completed Conservation District Review Application, the General Information Form (GIF), Act 14, 67, 68, and 127 letters, PHMC approval letters, a U.S.G.S Topographic Map Section 1" = 2000 with coordinates showing the location of the project, and copies of up-to-date PNDI approval letters. In general the Commission will be the applicant for and sign for the permits, and upon award of the construction contract, the Contractor(s) will become Co-Permittees. PaDEP Co-Permittee forms will be prepared and sent to the PaDEP Regional Office once the Contractor is selected. The Design Consultant will provide coordination with the appropriate CCD and/or PaDEP Regional Offices for plan reviews and approvals. The specific requirements of Design-Build projects may vary.

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A PCSM Plan must be included with the NPDES Permit submittal as a separate document and shall document all permanent stormwater BMPs. It should not be incorporated into the erosion and sediment pollution control plan and narrative. However, the development of both plans should be closely coordinated. As part of the Chapter 102 Regulations which became effective on Nov. 19, 2010, DEP is charging review fees for NPDES permit applications. The fee structure is outlined in Section 102.6 and the Commission is required to submit those fees with the application. Consultants should issue the checks and submit them as a direct cost in an invoice. Conservation Districts may charge additional fees according to the Conservation District Law. The Commission is in the process of coordination with the PA Association of Conservation Districts to establish a uniform fee structure within the counties through which the Turnpike traverses. Further information will be provided regarding this matter. In some instances the Commission might reimburse the municipality for reasonable costs incurred up to a maximum dollar amount during the stormwater management review. G. BMPs The Commission intends to follow the PCSM Levels for Projects in Table 7.2.1 below and the preferred order of BMP toolbox level listed in Table 7.2.2 below. It is important to remember that not all projects will have the ability to use the following BMPs in the preferred order listed below in Table 7.2.2. Circumstances that require BMPs not listed to be considered should be justified to and approved by the Commission prior to being utilized. Site specific infiltration testing should be included for the design of infiltration BMPs. If site conditions prohibit infiltration (i.e. shallow bedrock, karst geology, shallow groundwater, etc.), then specific recommendations from the RSGER should be included to document these constraints.

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TABLE 7.2.1 PTC PROJECTS AND PCSM LEVELS TYPE OF PROJECT Mill & Pave Minor Bridges, Access Ramps Reconstruction, New Alignment, Slip Ramps, Interchanges, Major Bridges, Maintenance Facilities Level 2 or 3 Projects in an HQ/EV Watershed PCSM LEVEL 1 2 3

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TABLE 7.2.2 PTC PREFERRED ORDER OF BMPs LISTED BY BMP TOOLBOX LEVEL

LEVEL 1 BMP Restoration of temporary staging areas4 Preserve trees and re-vegetate using native species Minimize compaction4

LEVEL 2 BMP Vegetated swales

LEVEL 3 BMP Level 2 BMPs Infiltration basin, dry extended detention basin, riparian buffer, landscaping and planting3

LEVEL 4 BMP1 Constructed Wet ponds

Impervious disconnection2

Constructed wetlands

Soil amendments Infiltration Trench Bioretention Rain Garden5

Underground Detention Evapotranspiration Basin

1 2

Level 4 BMPs may be used with Level 3 Projects as a last resort approved by the PTC PM. Impervious Disconnection is routing sheet flow directly into BMPs as opposed to a closed system. 3 These BMPs are in no order. The Designer should base the use of BMPs on economics and site conditions/restraints. 4 If areas are compacted, then the compacted soil needs to be tilled at a minimum depth of 8 inches prior to seeding. 5 Follow details in Figures 7.23 through 7.26 for BMP structures

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Permanent Detention Basins 1. See the following Figures 7.2.1 and 7.2.2 for general guidelines for permanent detention basins. 2. If a basin requires fencing, use Type 1 Right-of-way Fence, per RC-60M, around the perimeter of the detention basin with a Vehicular Access Gate. Install the access gate where the access drive meets the fence. It should be noted that if a facility is in a populated area, the Commission would consider alternative fencing types. 3. If a basin is within Commission right-of-way and Commission right-of-way is fenced, then no fencing around the basin is required. 4. Provide the access drive to the detention basin at the end of the guide rail run beyond the detention basin. 5. Provide a minimum 10-foot-wide berm around the perimeter of the detention basin. 6. Use 10-inch minimum depth of 2RC Aggregate around the top of the berm. 7. Use 10-inch minimum depth of 2RC aggregate for access drives with grades less then 6 percent. Pave the access drive with six (6) inches of subbase and four (4) inches of binder for access drives with grades of 6 percent or greater. 8. The mainline shoulder should be 14 feet wide for a distance of 100 feet before and after the access ramp. Use a 50-foot taper to widen the shoulder. 9. Mosquito issues should be considered during the design of a basin. 10. Design detention basins following review of the local stormwater ordinances and with an aesthetic approach to the final look, particularly when the basin will be highly visible. 11. Designers should attempt to avoid detention basins 15 feet and greater in depth, since this makes the basins jurisdictional dams as per DEP regulations, see Section 7.1.A.2. 12. Access drive desirable width is 15 feet and minimum width is 12 feet. 13. The desired radius off the mainline is 50 and the minimum is 40. 14. Provide correct grading at the connection of the access drive to the mainline. Maximum side slopes of 6:1 are required within the clear zone. 15. Provide guide rail as required by current design criteria. 16. Use sediment forebays for all Rain Gardens/Bio-Retention and Permanent Basins. 17. Construction vehicles should not be permitted to traverse across the BMP area. 18. Any amended soil mix for a rain garden/bio-retention or any other BMP structure should not be compacted. The placement of the soil should be made by hand or by a means not to have any equipment on the amended soil during placement. This note should be placed on all applicable plan sheets. 19. Use Plant List Figure 7.27 as a recommended guide all BMPs requiring plant material.

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Fig. 7.2.7 Plants for Rain gardens or Wet Ponds


Sun Herbaceous New England Aster Turtle head Blue Lobelia Royal Fern Switch Grass Blue Vervain New York Ironweed Soft Stem Bulrush Tussock Sedge Swamp Milkweed Common Three Square Shady Herbaceous New York Aster Spotted Joe-Pye Bonset Blue Flag Iris Soft Rush Cardinal Flower Sensitive Fern Tussock Sedge Sun Shrubs Sweet Pepperbush Winterberry Holly Common Elderberry Steeplebush Meadowsweet Virginai Rose Black Chokeberry Arrowwood Viburnum Speckled Alder Shade Shrubs Red Chokeberry Black Chokeberry Silky Dogwood Sweet Pepperbush Winterberry Holly Arrowwood Viburnum Pussy Willow (Aronia arbutifolia) (Aronia melanocarpa) (Cornus amomum) (Clethra alnifolia) (Ilex veticillata) (Viburnum dentatum) (Salix discolor) 7-22 Oct 2011 (Clethra alnifolia) (Ilex verticillata) (Samucus nigra) (Spiraea tomentosa) (Filipendula ulmaria) (Rosa Virginia) (Aronia melanocarpa) Viburnum dentatum) (Alnus incana) (Symphyotrichum novi-belgii) (Eupatoriadephus maclatum) (Eupatorium perfoliatum) (Iris virginica) (Juncus effusus) (lobelia cardinalis) (Onoclea sensiblis) (Carex stricta) (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) (Chelone oblqua) (Lobelia siphilihica) (Osmunda regalis) (Panicum virgatum) (Verbena hastate) (Veronia noveboracensis) (Scirpus validus) (Carex stricta) (Ascelepias incarnate) (Scripus amercianus)

Trees Swamp White Oak Red Maple River Birch American Sycamore Serviceberry Blackgum Willow Oak (Quercus bicolor) (Acer rubra) (Betula nigra) (Platnus occidentalis) (Amelanchier Canadensis) (Nyssa sylvatica) (Quercus phellos)

7.3

Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Measures Prepare Erosion and Sediment Pollution Control Plans as required by 7.1, Drainage Design Criteria.

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Chapter 8 GEOTECHNICAL DESIGN


8.0 Reconnaissance Plan A. Objective This is a project specific task which, if scoped to be formally completed, is performed during Preliminary Engineering. The magnitude and scope of this task is sized to fit the project. Generally, Total Reconstructions and Expansion projects require a separate Reconnaissance Plan deliverable. Smaller projects may combine the submission with the Problem Statement Draft Exploration Plan (PSDEP) submission or others may delete it entirely. However, on all projects, the consultant is responsible for a review of available information and the performance of a site inspection. A Reconnaissance Plan is required for all bridge projects to be turned back to PADOT. It should be submitted with the TS&L submission. The Reconnaissance Plan is a presentation of available geotechnical information and observed site conditions. The purpose is to obtain an overall perspective of the site and identify geotechnical issues needing further investigation. The plan will also be used to provide a basis for future exploration needs. It is not intended to evaluate, in detail, the quality of the soils and geologic materials, but to identify the favorable and objectionable geotechnical issues and features of the site. B. Scope Reconnaissance Plan requirements: . 1. Review available published and unpublished information including an evaluation of the following: Preliminary plans of the proposed construction. As-built plans of the existing roadway and/or structures (if, applicable). Surface features on topographic maps. Geologic maps and other sources of geologic information. Soil survey maps. Aerial photographs. Previous geotechnical explorations in the vicinity of the project, including any studies done during the environmental evaluation for the project. Location of water supply wells and/or springs Logs of existing borings and water wells Records and photographs regarding the construction and behavior of nearby structures relative to planned structures.

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2. Conduct a site inspection to verify information obtained by the publication search, including the following: Location of proposed construction. Existing structures (type and condition). Surface soils. Topography and vegetation. Drainage features. Rock outcrops, excavations, and other visible indications of subsurface conditions. If possible, confirm geologic contacts and formations. Existing problem areas, such as slope movements, subsidence, mine shafts, or sinkholes Location of water supply wells and/or springs within 200 ft of future geotechnical borings Utility locations.

3. Prepare the Reconnaissance Plan C. Deliverable Prepare a set of plans to present the obtained information. Provide the plan on a topographic base map with cross sections and profile. Since the field reconnaissance typically occurs early in preliminary design, the development of project plans, cross sections, and profiles may be limited. The use of CAD is encouraged since it is easy to continually transfer the reconnaissance information to updated project line and grade plans as they are developed. Prepare the plans at a scale appropriate for the project, with 1 inch equals 50 feet commonly used. Submit half-size (11-inch x 17-inch) copies. Include the following: Proposed construction (provide date of line and grade). Data obtained during the search of published and unpublished information, including inferred or actual geologic contacts, lithologies, bedding orientation and structure. Features and structures observed during the visual site inspection and, if appropriate, air photo interpretation. Identification of soil units and geological formations in the area, including a stratigraphic column identifying the geologic units encountered for the project. Conditions and anticipated geotechnical issues to be encountered in the subsurface.

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Submit deliverable electronically in PDF format through the prime consultant. On larger projects or projects with significant geotechnical issues or geologic hazards (i.e., slope stability, mining, karst, etc) a presentation of the draft reconnaissance plan (with a hard copy of the Draft Reconnaissance Plan Deliverable) shall occur with the project team at a special geotechnical meeting. Parties to the discussion may include the PTC, General Engineering Consultant (GEC), the Design Manager, the geotechnical consultant, and the designer. Collectively the geotechnical representatives of the PTC, GEC and the Design Manager are referred to as the Geotechnical Design Management Team (GDMT). A summary of the key findings of the final deliverable can be presented at a design status meeting.

8.1

Problem Statement Draft Exploration Plan (PSDEP) A. Objective The PSDEP is the most project-tailored of the geotechnical submissions. For Turnpike bridge projects of one (1) to as many as three (3) spans, the PSDEP can, and should, consist of only a boring plan and schedule of borings. However, for all bridges to be turned back to PADOT and all bridge projects of four or more spans, a full PSDEP report with appendices is required. Many projects are scoped such that the PSDEP is submitted in combination with the Reconnaissance Plan. The purpose of the PSDEP is to communicate problematic geotechnical issues, if any, for the proposed construction in conjunction with outlining the proposed boring and laboratory testing programs. B. Scope The PSDEP requirements: 1. Identify problem areas where more soil, rock and/or water information is needed. 2. Propose a drilling program to address the needs of the identified problem areas. 3. Propose a laboratory testing program for soil, rock and/or water to address the needs of the identified problem areas. C. Deliverable Include the following: 1. Project description and identified problem issues and/or areas of concern. Provide simple references to the information on the reconnaissance plan (if appropriate), and a brief statement that presents the geotechnical issues identified at the project.
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2. Provide a summary of available information from previous sources including previous laboratory test results, if available. Presentation of data in tables is preferred, but not required. 3. Drilling program Provide the following: Attach a copy of the reconnaissance plan with the proposed boring location plan. Provide a clear description of the borehole termination criteria. For structures, get a full subsurface geologic section where practical. Include a summary table that identifies each boring, boring depths, depths of soil to be sampled, depths of bedrock to be cored, applicable borehole termination criteria, and costs. Typical termination criteria may include: Spread Footings: Two borings per substructure; one of which extends 2B (width) below the estimated bottom of footing and the other extends 10 ft into rock below the estimated bottom of footing. End-bearing piles: Two borings per substructure, 15 ft into rock below the anticipated pile tip. o Drilled shafts: Two borings per substructure; one of which extends five times the diameter of the shaft into rock and the other extends 10 ft into rock below the tip. o Friction piles: Determined prior to drilling based on a preliminary friction pile length estimates. o Roadway Embankment: 5 ft into rock or suitable % of embankment height and upon reaching competent material. o Roadway Cuts: 10 ft of stratigraphic overlap with adjacent borings or 10 ft below the proposed finish or subgrade elevation. If drilling is by PTC open-end drilling contract, adapt the submission to comply with the requirements of Section 8.2 PTC Open-End Contract Drilling Guidelines and Procedures. If the Consultant is administering a Subsurface Boring Sampling and Testing Contract (SBSTC), then a copy of the contract documents with special provisions should be provided with the PSDEP submission. Identify whether Maintenance and Protection of Traffic (MPT) will be required Include, if available, TS&L or other preliminary plans for structures to be drilled. Drill final design structure borings prior to TS&L approval only with the PTC project managers and the Design Managers concurrence. Significant structural changes may render the boring information useless. The need to maintain project schedule should be compared to the risk of having to re-drill the boring(s).

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4. Laboratory Testing Program Include the following: Identify the AMRL certified lab that will perform the tests and provide a copy of their AMRL certification. Provide a summary table identifying the type of test, the purpose for testing, number of samples, sample cost per test and total estimated cost. Include an explanation as to why any special tests are requested. Consideration should be made to use presumptive values instead of performing uniaxial compression tests or point load tests of rock specimens. Provide hand drawn subsurface cross sections to verify that significant soil, rock and/or water are being tested and identify the number of tests to verify that the significant soil, rock and/or water issues are adequately addressed. Generally, for projects with less than 2000 LF of drilling, the Laboratory Testing Program submission is to be a single request for the entire project. For projects with greater than 2000 LF drilling, partial submissions of the proposed laboratory testing are permissible. The submission should include: Laboratory testing budget (from Scope of Work) Previously approved testing and cost Currently requested testing and cost

Generally, corrosivity and/or acid-base testing is conducted in Final Design, except for field pH measurements of surface waters. 5. Electronic file Submission Submit electronically in PDF format through the prime consultant. 8.2 PTC Open-End Contract Drilling Guidelines and Procedures A. Objective The following guidelines are to be followed for projects requiring PTC administered open-end contract drilling. They are not intended for Consultant or Design Manager administered open-end contracts. PTC open-end drilling is performed on a work order basis. A work order consists of those borings which are approved for drilling, identified on a contract specific schedule of borings, and are staked (survey optional) in the field. Individual bridge replacement projects are typically completed in one work order. Larger multiple bridge or total reconstruction projects may require several work orders for each phase of design, e.g., roadway borings, structure borings, pavement borings.

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B.

Scope The PTC will: 1. Prepare and administrate the Subsurface Boring, Sampling and Testing Contract for subsurface drilling. 2. Provide the Consultant with a copy of the applicable open-end drilling contract documents along with a contract specific schedule of borings. 3. Establish initial contacts between other PTC departments (e.g., Maintenance, State Police, etc.) regarding the proposed drilling. 4. Coordinate the geotechnical subsurface drilling and sampling. 5. Review and process drilling invoices. The Consultant will: 1. Stake or otherwise mark the boring locations using white flagging and/or paint. Surveyed locations are not required. The white color is required by the PA one-call. 2. Assume a drilling rate of 30 feet per day of drilling for non-karst areas and 20 feet per day for karst areas. 3. Submit a boring location plan and an open-end contract specific schedule of borings. The schedule of borings should include the contract pay items proposed quantities and termination criteria. For out-of-scope items, the consultant is responsible for providing a special provision. The PTC will negotiate a unit price with the Drilling Contractor and notify the Consultant of the results. 4. Provide property owner information to driller for borings located outside the Commissions right-of-way. 5. Attend a pre-drilling test boring field view meeting. This meeting is arranged by the PTC to present the boring locations to the drilling contractor and to discuss starting dates and workday schedules, boring access/property owner issues, possible utility interferences, MPT requirements, exchange cell phone numbers, etc. The Consultants inspector in charge during drilling is required to attend this meeting and prepare meeting minutes. 6. Submit bulleted meeting minutes and, if needed, a revised plan and schedule of borings within 2 days of the test boring field view meeting. These are needed in order for the PTC to issue a notice to proceed to the drilling contractor. 7. Provide full-time inspection of the boring operations and complete field logs and PTC daily reports. The lead inspector is required to carry a cell phone during drilling operations. 8. Provide a daily quantities summary of drilling contract pay items weekly and/or upon a completion of work.

8-6 Oct 2011

C.

Deliverable The deliverables are to be submitted as electronic pdf files and include: Prior to Drilling 1. Boring Plan and Layout (along with the PSDEP or equivalent). 2. Open-End Contract Specific Schedule of Borings. 3. Meeting Minutes of predrilling test boring field view. During and Upon Completion of Drilling 1. Boring Logs (draft field logs). 2. Daily Quantity Sheets (in triplicate form). 3. Drilling Quantities Summary. 4. Any Additional Meeting Minutes.

8.3

Geotechnical Engineering Report (GER) Submission Guidelines The distinction between a roadway project with a bridge and bridge project with roadway work is up to the project team with the Commissions approval. In general, when the approach roadway work limit is within 500 feet from the bridge, the cut/fills are less than 10 feet, and unusual conditions are not anticipated, the project can be considered a bridge project and a roadway GER is not required. A. Objective The GER is intended to present recommendations addressing the subsurface conditions identified in investigations which will impact the design and construction of the roadway and its associated structures. B. Scope of Work The process from collection of field data to GER approval can be expedited through the use of three major steps: 1. Collection and Submission of Data to be Used for Geotechnical Design (Geotechnical Data Submission)

8-7 Oct 2011

Upon completion of the boring and testing programs, submit draft versions of the as-drilled boring location plan, typed engineers boring logs, and relevant boring profiles. Submit a summary of soil, rock and water testing performed, along with the raw test data. Reference the date of the boring and testing program approval, and note any major discrepancies. Also submit other significant subsurface information to be considered during geotechnical analysis. Include a paragraph that summarizes the Geotechnical information and any readily identifiable geotechnical problems or concerns. It may be appropriate to submit cross sections of such problem areas or concerns showing conceptual treatments. This information will receive a preliminary QC review for format, content and completeness. 2. Informal Discussion of Geotechnical Data to be Considered and Analyses to be Performed by means of Geotechnical Working Meetings After submission of the data and prior to the consultants formal evaluation of geotechnical findings and results, informal discussions will be held to review the data at one or more geotechnical working meetings. Parties to the discussion may include the PTC, General Engineering Consultant (GEC), the Design Manager, the geotechnical consultant, and the designer. Collectively geotechnical representatives of the PTC, the GEC and the Design Manager are referred to as the Geotechnical Design Management Team (GDMT). PennDOT representatives will be invited to participate where applicable. As a result of this discussion, geotechnical concerns will be identified for further evaluation. The need/requirement for detailed analysis of geotechnical information will not be warranted if the outcome is predictable from review of the basic data. Informal discussions will arrive at a consensus as to the geotechnical concerns, further geotechnical evaluation needs and geotechnical design recommendations anticipated from this effort. The geotechnical consultant will prepare and distribute minutes of the meeting discussions. The meetings conclusions and issues for further analyses, with a schedule of action items (e.g., further drilling, testing, study, analysis, etc) will be submitted with the meeting minutes. Larger projects requiring significant earthwork, such as off-alignment and total reconstruction projects, may warrant an additional separate cross-section review meeting. This meeting would be a follow-up to the initial review of data meeting.

8-8 Oct 2011

3. Draft and Final GER Submission The GER generally follows PennDOT Pub 293 with several simplifying changes that include: No straight-line diagram. No repetitions from chapter to chapter - keep it brief. ALL recommendations are in Chapter 2 as a concise list or table. Recommendation list does NOT have to follow the PennDOT outline list. Structure reports are completely separate - information from the structure reports are not to be reiterated in the GER. Instead, identify the structures on the project and the respective separate reports to be prepared.

The submission is expected to include the report, geotechnical treatment plan, subsurface profile plans, draft details and draft special provisions for construction. It should build upon the previous Reconnaissance Plan, PSDEP, and Geotechnical Data submissions. Maintain consistency among cross sections (basis for construction), geotechnical treatment plan (pictorial rendering with caveat), tables (if/as necessary e.g.; coal), details (show limits) and text (if/as necessary). Example geotechnical special provisions and details are available upon request. A list of current sample specifications will be provided upon request. The report itself should be kept to a minimum by avoiding repetitive text while still providing appropriate documentation to support the recommendations (including relevant meeting minutes). Incorporate figures and tables within the body of the report or at the end of the text, but not a mixture of both. The following items are to be provided in the report, IN THE ORDER PRESENTED BELOW: 1. INTRODUCTION Include project location and description. This should be a brief overview discussion, of not more than three paragraphs. Provide the general conditions, features, and any relevant items of note. 2. RECOMMENDATIONS This is a concise summary of the geotechnical recommendations, referencing the Geotechnical Treatment Plan and including a list of applicable special provisions and construction details, a list of the construction notes to appear on the plans, and design guidance (including geotechnical parameters) for the engineer. In order to expedite the design, use the Commissions Construction Standards and Specifications as a basis for recommendations. Discuss deviations with the GDMT prior to making formal revisions.
8-9 Oct 2011

The recommendations section shall address, as applicable: Embankment Construction. Cut Construction. Use of On-Site Materials. Transition Zones and Subgrade Construction. Pavement Design Parameters. Special Treatments Not Listed Above. Instrumentation for Construction Control. Additional Testing, Study and Analysis needed for Final Design. (Applicable when a Preliminary GER is prepared during preliminary design on major projects.)

3. ANALYSIS OF DATA AND CONCLUSIONS Prepare this chapter to generally parallel Chapter 2.0 Recommendations on a section-by-section basis. This is an analysis of the field and laboratory data and assessment of the site conditions, subsurface investigations and laboratory findings. The analysis and interpretation must support the conclusions. Minimize geotechnical analysis where standardized details and specifications are applicable. During the analysis and design process, identify the basis for using any value, parameter or procedure, e.g., laboratory test results, reference material and/or engineering judgment. Identify and estimate the amount of each rock type available from project excavations, i.e., Type B Rock, Type C Rock and Shale. The sum of these materials will equal the total amount of rock excavation. Assume that rock layers thinner than 10 ft can not be excavated cleanly without mixing with surrounding material and assign an appropriate average material type designation. Include these calculations with the appendix. The conclusions are to be developed from the analysis. The conclusions shall be concise, specific and supporting of each recommendation. Do not repeat recommendations in this chapter. Include in this section, a brief statement as to why items or issues common to the projects general area are not addressed in the report. Examples are karst conditions, coal mines, oil & gas wells, etc. 4. SOIL, ROCK AND HYDROLOGIC SETTING Provide a concise, integrated summary of findings of the office investigation, field reconnaissance, test drilling and laboratory testing, as they relate to proposed roadway construction. The section will include: Regional Physiography and Topography.
8-10 Oct 2011

Soils - Provide a concise written overview of soil classifications (USCS, AASHTO), types (alluvium, colluvium, etc.) and identified problem soils. Do not reiterate the USDA soil identifications from published soil maps. Geology - Summarize bedrock units with elevation ranges on a stratigraphic column and show key stratigraphic units (marker beds) on the Reconnaissance Map. Hydrology - Include surface drainage and groundwater. Coal and Mining or other special Issues - Summarize in the text or on a table and show on Reconnaissance Map. Environmental Impacts Include hazardous waste or potentially contaminated media sites, wetlands, streams, water wells, oil wells and gas wells.

5. GEOTECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS - Provide a very brief summary of the boring and testing programs conducted for the project. Reference the boring logs and test results. 6. REFERENCES 7. APPENDICES - Provide the following appendices to the report: A Geotechnical Treatment Plan (Also Plans) as outlined in Section 8.5 (Add a note: Refer to the details and cross sections for precise locations and applications.). B Draft Special Provisions and Details. C Soil Profile Plan (Also Plans) as outlined in Section 8.4. D Plan of borings, with reconnaissance notes and mapping. E Test Boring Records. F Laboratory Test Results. G Calculations. H Relevant Correspondence. Provide unique page numbers for all sheets within each Appendix. Additional Appendices may be provided for photographs, mine maps, or other relevant materials. For tables, provide only those tables that are needed during the natural course of design development. Do not develop tables simply to meet any perceived GER submission requirement.

8-11 Oct 2011

Organize calculations with a table of contents. Include method and calculation used to estimate quantities of various types of rock anticipated during excavation for the project. Include a cover sheet containing a list of persons whose initials appear on the calculations, with a statement prepared, signed and sealed by a Professional Engineer, registered in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, that all calculations are checked. C. Deliverable The GER submission can be made in one or more volumes, depending on its overall size. The deliverables are to be submitted as electronic pdf files. Bookmarks within the pdf file should be provided for each section and appendix of the report. Additionally, a hardcopy of the final submission is required. If a multi-volume submission is made, provide the report text and Appendix A, B, and C as the first volume. On larger projects, Appendices D Plan of Borings with Reconnaissance Notes and Mapping, E Test Boring Records and F Laboratory Test Results can be submitted at the Informal Discussion of the Geotechnical Data meeting. If there are no revisions, then the boring logs and lab testing data will not have to be resubmitted with subsequent hard copy submissions. However, these appendices are required with subsequent electronic pdf file submissions The GER will be modified in response to comments on the Draft GER submission. Modifications can be made through submission of individual pages or report sections, for approval. After approval of modifications is received, provide a complete final GER submission.

8.4

Soil Profile Plan Submission Guidelines A. Objective The Soil Profile Plan is to be prepared to provide an illustrative view of the subsurface conditions across the project. It is to be considered a tool to identify and communicate subsurface conditions of concern, potential sources of material required for construction, material located at the bearing elevation of proposed structures; and support the construction of the project. The Soil Profile Plan will be incorporated into the PS&E as a set of Also Plans. This submission may not be required on single bridge projects. Such projects have limited subsurface information which is adequately shown on the structure tracings of all borings.

8-12 Oct 2011

B.

Scope of Work A soil profile is a restatement of subsurface boring information which generally emphasizes the vertical axis or elevation and deemphasizes the horizontal and is usually oriented along the construction or stationing centerline. Because of the orientation being along the construction or stationing centerline, the subsurface profiles are typically aligned perpendicular to major structural features. Where more than one boring is at or near the same station, show the subsurface boring information on the closest regularly spaced cross section. Borings nearest the project centerline will appear in both the subsurface cross sections and profile. Show only those cross sections which have boring information. Borings which do not appear on either the subsurface cross sections or profile should be shown on a separate sheet(s). Include the following on the Soil Profile Plan: Centerline with stationing along the x- axis and elevation to mean sea level along the y-axis for the profile. Correct elevation and stationing of project structure locations. Existing and finished ground lines. Correct elevation, stationing and offset of project boring. Proper soil and bedrock symbols for units encountered in the boring on graphical logs, plotted at proper elevation (No black-line boring log, must be graphical log. No different scale log, must be same scale as profile.). Correct groundwater elevation. Provide note at the bottom of the boring if it was dry or that water was not encountered. Correct normal pool elevation of water body (if encountered). Potential sources and estimated quantity (or quantities) of rock available within the project limits that may be required for stability and/or drainage. Significant geologic formations and/or seams, e.g., Morgantown Sandstone, Pittsburgh Coal. A note indicating that the Soil Profile Plan is to be used for informational purposes only.

C.

Deliverable The deliverable is submitted as draft and final submissions with the GER. The draft submission is reviewed and comments are provided. The final submission addresses the comments and serves as the final Soil Profile Plan for the project.

8-13 Oct 2011

8.5

Geotechnical Treatment Plan Guidelines A. Objective The Geotechnical Treatment Plans (Also Plans) purpose is to present recommended geotechnical treatments which impact the design and construction of the roadway and its associated structures. The objective of the Geotechnical Treatment Plan is to provide an efficient description of geotechnical design features that must be incorporated into the construction effort. The draft Geotechnical Treatment Plan is to be developed (as necessary) for geotechnical treatments identified at the Design Field View. The final Geotechnical Treatment Plan is to be incorporated as a set of Also Plans in the PS&E. They are to be sealed by an Engineer registered in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. B. Scope of Work The Geotechnical Treatment Plan is an index or overview working drawing. For each Geotechnical Treatment Plan use/show: 1. Scale of 1=200 2. Topographic base map with alignment, cut/fill limits, roadways and structures. 3. Anticipated locations of the types of treatments along with the limits of such treatments. 4. North arrow. 5. Title block. 6. Existing and Proposed Structures C. Deliverable The deliverable is submitted as draft and final submissions with the GER. The draft submission is reviewed and comments are provided.

8.6

Structure Foundation Submission Geotechnical Report Guidelines A. Objective The structure foundation submission consists of a letter, foundation plans, geotechnical report and the QA Form D-505.

8-14 Oct 2011

Typically, the letter references the geotechnical report, foundation plan, and the QA form as attachments. The purpose and objective of the Structure Foundation Geotechnical Engineering Report (SFGER) is to provide the structure engineer with the parameters used to develop the design, geotechnical constraints on structure design (e.g.; settlement, stability, etc), and geotechnical notes and details related to construction of the structure. The geotechnical report includes the foundation plans and QA Form D-505 as appendices. B. Scope of Work The process from collection of field data to foundation approval can be expedited through the use of three major steps: 1. Collection and Submission of Data to be used for Foundation Design Upon completion of the boring and testing programs, submit draft versions of the as-drilled boring location plan, typed engineers boring logs, and relevant boring profiles. Submit a summary of soil, rock and water testing performed, along with the raw test data. Reference the date of the boring and testing program approval, and note any major discrepancies. Also submit other significant subsurface information to be considered during foundation analysis (prior to Com 624, ABLRFD, and similar computer analyses). This information will receive a preliminary QC review for format, content and completeness. 2. Meetings to Informally Discuss Foundations to be Considered and Analyses to be Performed After submission of the data and prior to formal evaluation of foundation alternatives, a meeting (or meetings on multi-structure projects) will be held to review the data. Depending on the project, parties to the discussion may include the PTC, GEC, and/or the Design Manager, collectively known as the Geotechnical Design Management Team (GDMT); the design engineer, the geotechnical consultant, and the structural designer. PennDOT representatives will be invited to participate where applicable. As a result of this discussion, foundation alternatives will be identified for further evaluation, including cost comparisons, as warranted. The requirement for detailed analysis of any foundation alternative will not be warranted if the outcome is predictable from review of the basic data.

8-15 Oct 2011

The alternative analyses will be summarized, and submitted for concurrence. Informal discussions will arrive at a consensus as to the foundation type(s) and the general substance of the geotechnical foundation recommendations. Maintain coordination with the GDMT during analyses. Perform technical and economic comparisons for the various options considered only when approved. The geotechnical consultant will prepare and distribute minutes of these discussions and meetings. 3. Draft and Final Foundation Submission The submission is expected to include all four major components and meet the submission requirements of PennDOT DM-4. The following items should be covered in the SFGER, IN THE ORDER PRESENTED BELOW: 1. INTRODUCTION Include project location, structure description, and site description. This should be a brief overview discussion, of not more than three paragraphs. Provide the general conditions, features, and any relevant items of note. 2. RECOMMENDATIONS This is a concise summary of the geotechnical foundation recommendations, including the summary table required by DM-4 subsection 1.9.4.3(a), a list of applicable special provisions and construction details, a list of the foundation notes to appear on the structure plans, and design guidance (including geotechnical parameters) for the structural engineer. Place the table at the front of the text for this chapter; not at the end of the report. In order to expedite the design, use the Commissions Construction Standards and Specifications as a basis for recommendations. Discuss deviations with the GDMT prior to making formal revisions. Minimize geotechnical analysis where standardized details and specifications are applicable. 3. SPECIAL CONCERNS - Provide a paragraph on any special geotechnical concerns identified. This may include stability, settlement, mining, karst, or other concerns.

8-16 Oct 2011

4. FOUNDATION ALTERNATIVES AND ANALYSES - Provide a concise summary of the alternatives considered at each substructure site, and the reasons for selecting or rejecting each alternative. Reference supporting documents, calculations, analysis and meeting minutes where alternatives were discussed. Provide these documents in appendices. In this section, identify the basis, analysis performed, and conclusions reached with respect to factors for the structure (for example, settlement and stability analyses). 5. SUBSURFACE CONDITIONS AT SUBSTRUCTURE UNITS - This should concisely summarize the geotechnical consultants interpretation of the data and understanding of conditions at each substructure. Soil, rock, and water conditions should be addressed. Include critical or design flood and flow information. Provide one paragraph for each substructure unit. 6. SITE EXPLORATION AND TESTING - Provide a two-paragraph summary of the boring and testing program, referencing the boring logs and test results. 7. APPENDICES - Provide the following appendices to the report: A - draft special provisions and construction details. B - test boring tracings. C - foundation plan. D - laboratory test results. E - subsurface profiles. F - geotechnical analyses. G - cost comparisons (if needed). H - relevant correspondence. I QA Form. The most important parts of the geotechnical report are items two and seven A, B and C. These will be the basis for the foundation approval letter and preparation of the foundation elements of the structure plans. The report itself should be kept to a minimum by avoiding repetitive text while still providing appropriate documentation to support the recommendations. C. Deliverable The deliverable includes the four foundation submission components: 1. 2. 3. 4. Foundation Letter Foundation Plans (SFGER Appendix C) Structure Foundation Geotechnical Engineering Report (SFGER) QA Form D-505 (SFGER Appendix I)
8-17 Oct 2011

The submission can be made in one or two volumes, depending on its overall size. Under most circumstances, a single volume submission is preferred. If a twovolume submission is made, include the foundation letter, geotechnical report text and Appendices A, B, C, and I in the first volume. The remaining appendices may be in a second volume. The deliverable is submitted in draft and final submissions. The draft submission is reviewed and comments are provided. The final submission addresses the comments and serves as the final Structure Foundation Geotechnical Engineering Report for the structure or bridge being addressed for the project. The deliverables are to be submitted as electronic pdf files. Bookmarks within the pdf file should be provided for each section and appendix of the report. Additionally, a hardcopy of the final submission is required.

8-18 Oct 2011

8.7

PS&E Review Guidelines A. Objective The purpose of the Plans, Specifications and Estimate (PS&E) review is to review the draft contract documents to make sure that the design criteria and specifications contained in the plans, details, and cross sections accurately meet the geotechnical recommendations for the project. The objective of the review is for the contract documents to achieve concurrence with the geotechnical recommendations so the project may advance forward. B. Scope A PS&E review consists of a review of the draft contract documents conducted by the geotechnical representative responsible for or tasked with the geotechnical portion of the project. The geotechnical representative is to review the Pre PS&Es plans, special provisions, details and cross sections for accuracy and ensure that the geotechnical recommendations are being correctly interpreted in the design. C. Deliverable The deliverable is to be a QA/QC form signed by the Geotechnical representative and the Designer that acknowledges the review has been completed and that the PS&E documents appropriately incorporate the geotechnical recommendations. This form is to be submitted with the PS&E documents. A sample form is provided as an attachment at the end of the Design Consistency Guidelines.

8.8

Miscellaneous A. Notes for PTS-100 Use PTS-100 is intended as a guide for embankment bench design and construction. It is not intended to replace project-specific analysis of proposed embankments. The limits and dimensions shown on the details may be modified to ensure adequate stability based on project-specific analysis. The minimum factor of safety required for embankments is 1.3. For embankments within 50 ft of a structure the minimum factor of safety is 1.5. It is recognized that problematic areas may exist where the minimum factor of safety cant be obtained through reasonable design approaches. In these areas, the minimum global stability after construction is required to be at least equal to existing embankments stability. This may require back-analysis of existing conditions to determine appropriate assumptions. It is important that the existence of this condition be captured in correspondence to the Designer and PTC. Include the extent and limits of where this situation occurs within the project.
8-19 Oct 2011

B.

Guidance for Rock Embankment Design Attempt to utilize on-site materials for embankment construction and avoid a borrow condition. The rock types identified in the PTS standards were selected to perform adequately in cases where geotechnical information is limited or absent. The Geotechnical designer should evaluate if an onsite rock type of lower quality is adequate for stability. The future performance of on-site embankment materials can be aided by observing the performance of existing Turnpike embankments. Much of the Turnpike has 1:1 H:V stable slopes which were constructed from onsite material. In the GER (but not in contract documents) identify and estimate the amount of each rock type available from project excavations, i.e., Type B Rock, Type C Rock and Shale. The sum of these materials will equal the total amount of rock excavation. Assume that rock layers thinner than 10 ft can not be excavated cleanly without mixing with surrounding material and assign an appropriate average material type designation. Attempts should be made to utilize readily available rock types for construction provided that adequate stability is maintained. In the event that such rock types do not fit the strict definition of Type A, Type B or Type C Rock, then project specific special provisions can be written to allow the use of a suitable project specific rock type. For example, a Type B-Modified Rock special provision could be developed to permit the use of either a hard siltstone or a suitable limestone. The Designer should request permission from PTC-Geotech to pursue a modified type rock material and only allowed from project excavations. This request should be accompanied by boring logs and testing as justification. The Contract will define the rock embankment requirements for construction but not to define the source location of the rock. The only information to be provided regarding the source of the rock types is in the Soil Profile Plan (included in the Contract as Also Plans). Here the laterally continuous and substantially thick layers (greater than 10 ft) are labeled without any markings delineating the upper, lower or lateral boundaries. However, the Contract should be clear as to the general acceptability of onsite material for construction of embankments, especially, steepened embankments. The Geotechnical designer should work closely with the roadway design team as the rock embankment requirements (toe bench, drains, blanket, etc.) are being placed on the contract documents.

8-20 Oct 2011

Type A Rock The vast majority of projects do not contain sufficiently thick layers of Type A Rock which can be excavated cleanly. Therefore, unless otherwise approved by PTCGeotech, assume that all Type A Rock specified for a project will be obtained from an outside source. The utilization of Type A Rock should be limited to areas where significantly high drainage flow is anticipated or high strength is required, i.e., 1:1 embankment. In the contract, provide a borrow quantity for the amount of Type A Rock required for construction. Use typical strength parameters in the range of phi = 40 to 45 degrees or higher for Type A Rock design. Type B Rock In order to access the constructability of a project, during design, tabulate the quantity of Type B Rock available from the project excavation. Do not consider seams less than 10 ft thick or seams that are not greater than 90% pure in the tabulation. Furthermore, use a reduction factor of: 20% for seams 10 to 15 ft thick; 15% for seams 15 to 20 ft thick; and 10% for seams over 20 ft thick. Identify in-situ locations and quantities of Type B Rock available. Make comparisons between the rock available from excavations and the rock required for construction. If appropriate, consider staging. Type B Rock is acceptable as rock toe material, even below drainage, where conditions are anticipated to be saturated and/or with normal seepage. The typical strength parameter range for Type B Rock is phi = 36 to 40 degrees. Type C Rock Type C Rock is an uncontrolled mixture of all rock available on the project excluding large quantities of slaking claystone, redbeds, and other forms of clay, silt, sand or mud. In some situations, Type C Rock can be specified for use when other rock types are not available. Typical strength parameters can not be readily defined because of the project specific nature of this rock type. C. Dynamic Pile Load Testing Guidelines
GENERAL A. B. C. Driving in accordance with Section 1005. Drive test and/or bearing piles to absolute refusal, unless otherwise indicated or directed. The amount of Dynamic Pile Test locations is to be determined according to the characteristics of each structure. Specify two (2) tests per substructure unit unless otherwise directed. The Engineer may request additional piles to be dynamically tested if the hammer and/or driving system is replaced or modified, the pile type or installation procedures are modified, the pile capacity requirements are changed, unusual blow counts or penetrations are observed on any other piling behavior different from normal installation.
8-21 Oct 2011

D.

E. When the wave equation supplemented with stress wave measurements and CAPWAP analyses is used to predict the pile capacity, the product of a resistance factor of 0.7 times the predicted ultimate axial pile capacity must meet or exceed the maximum factored axial pile load shown on the plans. EQUIPMENT Use a hammer and capblock which produces an acceptable driving stress range of 60% to 90% of the yield strength of the steel, at absolute refusal. EXAMPLE Determining the Allowable Stress Range* for Steel H Piles: Yield Stresses (f y = steel yield strength in ksi): for ASTM A36 (f y = 36 ksi) for ASTM A572 or A690, Grade 50 (f y = 50 ksi) Calculation of Driving Stresses: Using ASTM A36: 0.60 x f y = 0.60 x (36) = 21.6 ksi 0.90 x f y = 0.90 x (36) = 32.4 ksi Therefore the driving stresses should range between 22 ksi to 32 ksi for ASTM 36 steel; or between 30 ksi and 45 ksi for ASTM A572 steel. Driving stress range applies to both Special Provisions "Piles" and "Dynamic Pile Load Testing".

8-22 Oct 2011

Chapter 9 - PAVEMENT DESIGN


9.0 Permanent Pavement Flexible Pavement A. General The pavement analysis and design shall be completed in accordance with the following guidelines and in conjunction with the policies and procedures provided in the AASHTO Guide for the Design of Pavement Structures and the PennDOT Publication 242, Pavement Policy Manual, hereinafter referred to as AASHTO and Publication 242, respectively. The pavement design computations shall be conducted using AASHTOWare DARWin 3.01 software, hereinafter referred to as DARWin. The use of the publications noted above does not preclude the application of engineering judgment for any unusual situations or problems that may be encountered on a specific project. Federal, state or local regulations may also require deviations from the aforementioned guidelines. All deviations from these policies and design procedures must be fully documented. B. Flexible Pavement Design Guidelines All permanent flexible pavement projects are currently being designed using Superpave mix design specifications for wearing and binder. The selection of the PG-binder is to be in accordance with Commission Specification, Section 409. For all Turnpike mainline paving, use an asphalt mixture with a 10 to <30 million ESALs design life for binder and wearing courses. All pavements are to utilize SRL-E wearing courses. All projects are incorporating a minimum pavement structure comprised of two (2) inch wearing course and three (3) inch binder course layers, a bituminous concrete base course layer of variable depth (to be computed), a four inch drainage layer of asphalt treated permeable base course, and a six (6) inch subbase layer. The bottom four (4) inches of bituminous concrete base course shall be a rich bottom mix. The rich bottom mix is achieved by adding additional PG 64-22 asphalt, and will require utilization of the PTCs Special Provision. The bituminous concrete base course layer is the only pavement layer that varies significantly in depth from project to project. The depth of the base course layer is not only a function of the anticipated traffic loadings but also of the subgrade soil conditions. This is consistent with the Publication 242 design approach for flexible pavements on weak subgrade soils, which is to provide a stronger base course able to withstand the effects of lower bearing support in the subgrade soils. It is this layer that is adjusted to provide the needed structural strength required by the pavement design.

9-1 Oct 2011

Roadbed soil testing must be conducted to evaluate the condition of the roadbed soil. Areas of low subgrade support and/or frost heave susceptible soils must be identified. Procedures used to improve subgrade support where needed, such as undercutting or subgrade stabilization, must be analyzed and the most feasible and economical solution chosen that does not reduce pavement thickness. Methods to reduce the detrimental effects of frost heave on the pavement, such as undercutting or increasing pavement base course layer depth, shall be considered and the most feasible and economical solution chosen. Refer to Chapters 3 and 5 of Publication 242 for additional guidance on subgrade soil evaluation procedures. The following pavement layers are the minimum to be used on any Total Reconstruction project: 2-inch Bituminous Wearing Course SRL-E, Superpave (12.5mm) 3-inch Bituminous Binder Course, Superpave (19mm) 10-inch Bituminous Base Course, Superpave (25mm) 4-inch Asphalt Treated Permeable Base Course 6-inch Subbase (No. 2A) 25-inch minimum depth

The thickness of the Bituminous Concrete Base Course will be determined by subtracting the difference between the required structural number of the entire pavement structure and the structural number of the other pavement layers. C. Permanent Pavement Design Parameters This section describes the Design Parameters recommended for use in the design of permanent flexible pavements. For the most part, the parameters given are to be standard for all projects; however, there are specific parameters that must be determined by the designer. For example, traffic input parameters must be calculated from traffic data provided by the Commission, and roadbed soil input parameters must be determined from various test results of soils from the project area. These computed parameters are noted in Table 9.1.1. The selection of the design parameters for input into the DARWin software shall be in accordance with Chapters 6, 7, and 9 of Publication 242. The ESAL Calculation method in DARWin shall be used to compute the total 18-kip ESALs for a projects performance period. The Compounded Growth Rate calculation method in DARWin should be used to determine the total 18-kip ESALs unless historical evidence or traffic studies show a linear growth trend. If a linear growth trend exists, then the Simple Growth Rate calculation method in DARWin should be used. Use either the Specified Thickness Design method or the Optimized Thickness Design Method in DARWin to determine the pavement layer thicknesses.

9-2 Oct 2011

DESIGN PARAMETER DESCRIPTION


DESIGN VARIABLES Performance Period Analysis Period Total 18-kips Design ESALs
Traffic counts to be provided by the Turnpike Commission. See Table 9.1.2 to convert Turnpike vehicle classifications to PennDOT classifications.

DESIGN VALUE
20 years 20 years Must be computed. See Publication 242, Chapter 7. 98%

Reliability PERFORMANCE CRITERIA Initial Serviceability Terminal Serviceability PSI Loss due to Frost Heave of Natural Subgrade
No reduction will be allowed for stabilized subgrades.

4.2 3 Must be computed. See Publication 242, Chapter 9.

ROADBED SOIL CONDITIONS Effective Roadbed Resilient Modulus


Natural subgrade bulk sample must be representative of roadbed soils and must be tested at field moistures. The number of tests is dependent upon variations in soil characteristics. Adjust the effective roadbed resilient modulus value for seasonal variations.
Must be computed. See Publication 242, Chapter 6.

DRAINAGE CHARACTERISTICS Drainage Factor for Layer Coefficient - Good


Based upon new construction.
1.0

STANDARD DEVIATION Relatively confident of ESAL calculation STRUCTURAL LAYER COEFFICIENTS Bituminous Wearing Course Bituminous Binder Course Bituminous Concrete Base Course Asphalt Treated Base Course Subbase
0.44 0.44 0.40 0.20 0.11 0.45

TABLE 9.1.1 PERMANENT PAVEMENT DESIGN PARAMETERS FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT

9-3 Oct 2011

CONVERSION FACTORS TO CONVERT TURNPIKE CLASSIFICATIONS TO PENNDOT VEHICLE TYPES IN PERCENTAGES


PENNDOT VEHICLE TYPE Passenger Cars / Non Trucks 2-Axle, 6-Tire 3-Axle, Single Unit 4-Axle, Single Unit 3-Axle, Single Trailer 4-Axle, Single Trailer 5+-Axle, Single Trailer 5+-Axle, Twin Trailer TOTAL % 100% 100% 100% 8% TURNPIKE CLASSIFICATION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

99%

1%

1%

61%

27%

3%

1%

13%

29%

6%

1%

2%

1%

1%

1%

50%

10%

1%

1%

17%

2%

7%

1%

1%

1%

1%

30%

81%

88%

86%

91%

90%

30%

1%

8%

13%

7%

8%

20%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

TABLE 9.1.2 PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION PAVEMENT DESIGN MATRIX

9-4 Oct 2011

9.1

Permanent and/or Temporary Median and Outside Shoulders - Flexible Pavement The following minimum pavement structure is the standard for permanent shoulders: 2-inch Bituminous Wearing Course, Superpave (12.5mm) 3-inch Bituminous Binder Course, Superpave (19mm) 4-inch Bituminous Base Course, Superpave (25mm) 6-inch Subbase (No. 2A)

This standard pavement structure has a structural number of 4.46. If traffic will be running on the shoulder, a pavement structure must be designed based on roadbed soil conditions, traffic, and the duration of time that traffic is running on the shoulder. The permanent shoulder pavement shall be designed using the same roadway pavement design parameters as detailed in Section 9.0B. The structural number of this pavement design shall be checked against the standard 4.46 structural number. If the required shoulder structural number is less than the minimum 4.46 structural number, then the standard (minimum) pavement structure shall be used. If the required shoulder structural number is greater than the minimum (4.46) structural number, then the subbase depth will be increased to a maximum of 12-inches until the required structural number is met. If the required structural number is not achieved using 12-inches of subbase, adjust both the BCBC depth and subbase depth to achieve the most economical design. For two-stage construction, signing to keep trucks and buses out of the right lane is typically used as part of the maintenance and protection of traffic. A value of 25% trucks should be used for the percentage of all trucks in the design lane for the shoulder evaluation. The temporary pavement design parameters to be used are provided in Table 9.3.1. If the maintenance and protection of traffic scheme uses the existing shoulders as part of the traveled way, then the structural number requirements must be met in addition to surface milling/overlay work to provide ride quality, if necessary. If these requirements cannot be met, then a temporary pavement shall be designed to accommodate the anticipated traffic loadings. For projects such as an overhead bridge replacement, which requires traffic to run on the existing median or shoulders for a short length of time for maintenance and protection of traffic purposes, no pavement design is needed. A temporary pavement consisting of a 2 inch bituminous wearing course layer on a 6 inch bituminous binder course layer should be utilized for the short-term traffic pattern.

9-5 Oct 2011

9.2

Permanent Pavement for Local Roads and State Routes Turnpike construction that impacts local or state route roadways will require a pavement design for the replacement pavement structure or rehabilitation (e.g. mill/overlay) for the impacted side roads. For local roads, the local municipality ordinances must be reviewed to determine the appropriate design and materials for the rehabilitation or replacement pavement structure. If local ordinances are not available, Publication 242 guidelines shall be followed. The pavement design of the Pennsylvania states routes impacted by Turnpike construction shall be completed in accordance with Publication 242. The pavement design of local routes and states routes must be reviewed and approved by the local municipality and PennDOT, respectively.

9-6 Oct 2011

DESIGN PARAMETER DESCRIPTION


DESIGN VARIABLES
Performance Period Analysis Period Total 18-kips Design ESALs

DESIGN VALUE
Construction Duration Construction Duration Must be computed. See Publication 242, Chapter 7. 95%

Traffic counts to be provided by the Turnpike Commission. See Table 9.1.2 to convert Turnpike vehicle classifications to PennDOT classifications.
Reliability

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Initial Serviceability Terminal Serviceability PSI Loss due to Frost Heave of Natural Subgrade Must be computed. See Publication 242, Chapter 9. 3.6 2.5

ROADBED SOIL CONDITIONS


Effective Roadbed Resilient Modulus Natural subgrade bulk sample must be representative of roadbed soils and must be tested at field moistures. The number of tests is dependent upon variations in soil characteristics. Adjust the effective roadbed resilient modulus value for seasonal variations. Must be computed. See Publication 242, Chapter 6.

DRAINAGE CHARACTERISTICS
Drainage Factor for Layer Coefficient - Poor 0.90

STANDARD DEVIATION
Relatively confident of ESAL calculation 0.45

STRUCTURAL LAYER COEFFICIENTS - NEW PAVEMENT


Bituminous Wearing Course Bituminous Binder Course Bituminous Concrete Base Course Asphalt Treated Base Course Subbase 0.44 0.44 0.40 0.20 0.11

STRUCTURAL LAYER COEFFICIENTS - EXISTING PAVEMENT


Bituminous Courses Subbase * Typically use value at high end of range. 0.25-0.35* 0.07-0.09*

Table 9.2.1 TEMPORARY PAVEMENT DESIGN PARAMETERS

9-7 Oct 2011

9.3

Standard Pay Items Total Reconstruction Pavement The following is a list of typical pay items for the pavement reconstruction: 2409-0751 SY SUPERPAVE ASPHALT MIXTURE DESIGN, HMA WEARING COURSE, PG 76-22, 10 TO < 30 MILLION ESALS, 12.5 MM MIX, 2" DEPTH, SRL-E SY SUPERPAVE ASPHALT MIXTURE DESIGN, HMA WEARING COURSE, PG 64-28, 10 TO < 30 MILLION ESALS, 12.5 MM MIX, 2" DEPTH, SRL-E (Note: MILEPOST A89 to MILEPOST A130 only) SYSUPERPAVE ASPHALT MIXTURE DESIGN, HMA BINDER COURSE, PG 64-22, 10 TO < 30 MILLION ESALS, 19.0 MM MIX, 3" DEPTH SYBITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 4 DEPTH SYBITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 5 DEPTH SYBITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 6" DEPTH SYBITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 7" DEPTH SY BITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 8" DEPTH (Note: The minimum depth of BCBC in the roadway pavement is 6. Depths other than those listed may be utilized and would follow PADOTs item numbering and placing the 2 as the lead-in.) SYRICH BOTTOM BITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 4" DEPTH SY ASPHALT TREATED PERMEABLE BASE COURSE, 4" DEPTH SY SUBBASE 6" DEPTH (NO. 2A)

2409-9651

2409-6660

2305-0003 2305-0005 2305-0007 2305-0009 2305-0011

4305-0003

2360-0001

2350-0106

The restricted performance specification is not included in the item.

9-8 Oct 2011

Chapter 10 GUIDE RAIL AND MEDIAN BARRIER


10.0 Introduction These guidelines are based on a review of the 2011 AASHTO Roadside Design Guide, the 2009 Edition of PennDOT Publication 13M, Design Manual Part 2, Highway Design, current PennDOT Publication 72M Roadway Construction Standards, Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Standards for Roadway Construction, discussions with and training by FHWA in May and October of 2000, and existing PTC practices for the design and installation of guide rail on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. The use of these guidelines should be reviewed for conflicts with more current standards. The following information and criteria are guides and should be supplemented with sound engineering judgment. For additional guidelines, refer to the Standards for typical guide rail and median barrier placement and installation details. Reference should also be made to the source references listed above. As written in the introduction to Chapter 12 - Guide Rail, Median Barrier, and Roadside Safety Devices from PennDOT Design Manual Part 2: Highways should be designed through judicious arrangement and balance of geometric features to preclude or minimize the need for roadside or median barrier. To provide for maximum roadside safety, a thorough study during the early stages of design is necessary to recognize and eliminate, where practical, those items and conditions which require barrier and impact attenuating devices. While every reasonable effort should be made to keep a motorist on the roadway, the highway design engineer should acknowledge the fact that this goal will never be fully realized. Motorists continue to run off the road for many reasons, including driver error in the form of excessive speed, falling asleep, reckless or inattentive driving, or driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. A driver may also leave the road deliberately to avoid a collision with another motor vehicle or with objects on the road. The following guidelines should be applied for the design of guide rail and end treatment installations on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Guide rail and end treatment installations on state and local roads should follow the procedures as described in the current PennDOT Design Manual Part 2. The guidelines discussed in the PennDOT Design Manual Part 2 and the AASHTO Roadside Design Guide should be used for guide rail and end treatment installations not addressed in this chapter.

10-1 Oct 2011

10.1

Guide Rail A. General Installation of guide rail is to be measured on a geometric line in conjunction with the white solid line (edge of travel lane). (Measurement should be along the survey and construction baseline.) Guide rail is to be installed as far off the roadway as practical. The back edge of the existing paved shoulder will be the minimum distance from traffic that guide rail is to be installed. Guide rail currently located outside of the determined Clear Zone should be evaluated for possible removal. Specifically, guide rail at the back edge of a pull-off area should be reviewed to determine if a hazard/obstruction is present behind the existing run of guide rail. The preferred methods, in order of preference, of terminating the approach end of guide rail are by burial or by Vehicle Attenuating Terminal End Treatments (VATETs), except at Maintenance Openings. Flared VATETs (PennDOT Gating Type II) are to be installed according to Figure 10.1.1 and are preferred on tapered runs of guide rail. Parallel VATETs (PennDOT Gating Type III) are to be installed on a straight line and are preferred on parallel runs of guide rail. Parallel VATETs for two-way traffic (PennDOT Gating Two-way Traffic Type IV) are to be installed on a straight line and are preferred on parallel runs of guide rail. Application would typically be in gore areas at deceleration ramps and in gore areas where traffic splits directionally (directional ramps that traffic encounters after leaving the toll booths). All Length of Need Calculations shall be performed using the Commissions LON spreadsheet. The electronic version of this spreadsheet is available directly from the Full Depth Roadway Reconstruction Project portal and shall be used as provided and submitted with the final deliverables for the project in both hard copy and original excel file format. See Figure 10.1.2, 10.1.3, 10.1.4 and 10.1.5 for samples of input sheets.

10-2 Oct 2011

10-3 Oct 2011

Figure 10.1.2

10-4 Oct 2011

Figure 10.1.3

10-5 Oct 2011

Figure 10.1.4

10-6 Oct 2011

Figure 10.1.5

10-7 Oct 2011

B.

Clear Zone Concept For Clear Zone information, refer to the PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, AASHTOs A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, and the AASHTO Roadside Design Guide.

C.

Slopes For guide rail installation on fill slopes, refer to the PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, AASHTOs A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets, and the AASHTO Roadside Design Guide.

D.

Tapers Guide rail is to be tapered at 30:1 when the guide rail is located inside the shy line until either the guide rail reaches the shy line distance or the guide rail reaches the back edge of the paved normal shoulder, whichever is greater. The shy line is defined as the distance from the edge of the traveled way, beyond which a roadside object will not be perceived as an obstacle and result in a motorist reducing speed or changing vehicle position on the roadway. For a roadway with a 70 mph design speed, the shy line distance is 10 feet from the edge of the white line. Guide rail is to be tapered at 15:1 outside of the shy line unless a parallel guide rail installation is more practical. A 10:1 or flatter slope must be maintained in front of guide rail tapered at 15:1. If the grading necessary to maintain the 10:1 or flatter slope in front of the guide rail is more than what would be considered incidental to the installation of the guide rail, then note and include a quantity for this grading.

E.

Outside of Horizontal Curves These guidelines are based on the Pennsylvania Turnpike mainline curvature, which generally does not exceed six (6) degrees. Guide rail runs should be determined by using the Length-of-need (LON) calculations and applying the curve correction factor. Parallel runs of guide rail should be measured concentrically from the white solid line with the approach end terminated by burying into the backslope or with a VATET suitable for a parallel installation.

10-8 Oct 2011

Tapered runs of guide rail should be tapered as measured from the white solid line at 15:1 over flat grading (10:1 or flatter with 10:1 the most common grade) and drawn to scale on the plans. Offsets for the Type II, Flared VATET are measured off the tapered line extended. F. Inside of Horizontal Curves The guidelines described in the section "Outside of Horizontal Curves" are to be applied to guide rail installed on the inside of horizontal curves. Do not use Horizontal Curve Adjustments for calculating clear zone widths on the inside of curves. G. Length of Need Equation In an area where multiple hazards/obstructions (bridge abutment or parapet fill, slopes 3:1 or steeper, endwalls, etc.) are located in close proximity to one another, a LON calculation is to be performed for each hazard/obstruction to determine the greatest LON distance for that area. LON calculations are to be performed per the current PennDOT Design Manual Part 2 for each run of guide rail, except where guide rail is being buried in a nontraversable cut slope. Use the shoulder width at the obstruction (distance from the white solid line to the face of the obstruction) for the L2 value in the LON equation. In locations where the guide rail must be tapered at a rate of 30:1 to reach either the shy line or the back edge of the paved normal shoulder, include that length of guide rail tapered at 30:1 with the tangent length of barrier upstream from the obstruction to determine the L1 value in the LON equation. Use the 15:1 taper rate in the LON equation (i.e.: b=1 and a=15). For ramp LON equations, adjust the taper rate in accordance with the ramp design speed. The portion of the VATET length to be included as part of the guide rail LON is 25 feet.

10-9 Oct 2011

H.

Recommended Clear Runout Area Behind VATET Provide the manufacturer's recommended clear runout area behind a VATET. If the recommended minimum clear runout area is not achievable, or the economic cost to achieve the minimum value is determined to be restrictive, then modify the run of guide rail for an acceptable solution without lessening the total length of guide rail below the calculated LON value.

I.

Burying of Guide Rail Earth mounds are not to be created for the burying of guide rail. A concrete anchorage back slope is to be used to bury the guide rail as shown on the Standard Drawings. Where guide rail is to be buried in the roadway cut slope, extend the guide rail a minimum of 75 feet beyond the cut/fill line at a taper rate of 15:1, parallel, or a combination thereof. This combination of parallel and 15:1 tapered guide rail can be used for up to 112.5 foot run. The taper can start prior to the cut/fill line as long as the taper runs a minimum of 75 feet past the beginning of the cut slope. A 10:1 slope must be maintained in front of guide rail. When the width needed to bury the end anchorage necessitates a taper length greater than or equal to 125 feet, install the last 50 feet (or "quick taper") per the PennDOT Standard Drawings, RC-54M. Extend the guide rail for a minimum of 75 feet beyond the cut/fill line at a taper rate of 15:1, parallel, or a combination thereof prior to the "quick taper." For rock slopes 1:1 or steeper, a Terminal Section, Bridge Connection may be used in lieu of burying the end treatment if the nature of the rock slope is that which would make burying the end treatment not practical or desirable. If a Terminal Section, Bridge Connection is proposed, the rock at the location is to be reviewed by a Geotechnical Engineer to determine if the rock is compatible with the anchor bolt connection. Guide rail may be buried behind the front face of a slope which is 2:1 or steeper. The 75-foot minimum guide rail length is not required here.

J.

Trailing End of Guide Rail The preferred methods, in order of preference, of terminating the trailing end of guide rail are by a Type 2-S Post Anchorage per the Standard Drawings, or by running the guide rail 50 feet past the hazard/obstruction so that full tension is developed. A Terminal Section, Single is to be installed on guide rail runs 50 feet past the hazard/obstruction.
10-10 Oct 2011

K.

Drainage Features If a headwall is required, the headwall is to be installed outside the Clear Zone or at a distance greater than the recommended deflection rate of the guide rail. Pipes not protected by guide rail are to be extended, where practical, outside the Clear Zone. Drainage ditches, which must be placed inside the Clear Zone, are to be designed to be traversable if they are not protected by guide rail. The preferred methods, in order of preference, of addressing an existing drainage ditch located inside the Clear Zone are by regrading the ditch such that the ditch is traversable, relocating the ditch outside the Clear Zone, extending existing drainage pipes to be outside the clear zone, installation of end sections, or installing guide rail. General engineering judgment should be utilized in determining designed drainage layout. Extension or realigning of drainage features may require the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers or a PaDEP permit.

L.

Rounding of Guide Rail Panel Lengths Always round up to the next full guide rail panel (12.5 feet) when determining the total length of guide rail required in each individual run of guide rail.

M.

Treatment of Guide Rail Where Access Ramps Meet the Turnpike Roadway In cases where the guide rail LON would continue past an Access Ramp entrance, install guide rail as shown for a Driveway Entrance on the PennDOT Standard Drawings, RC-54M. In cases where the guide rail LON would end on an Access Ramp entrance, the options to treat this condition would be to install a VATET before the Access Ramp if the hazard necessitating the guide rail can be moved downstream from the Access Ramp, or install a Driveway Entrance as described above.

N.

Treatment of Guide Rail at Maintenance Opening A Maintenance Opening is defined as an opening in a run of guide rail to allow the Commission's Maintenance Forces access to perform routine maintenance (mowing of grass, etc.). Install the Maintenance Opening as shown on the Commission Standard Drawings, PTS-130. A Type 2-S Post Anchorage is to be used at the guide rail approach and trailing end treatment at the Maintenance Opening.
10-11 Oct 2011

10.2

Concrete Median Barrier and Single-face Barrier In general, concrete median barrier and single face concrete barrier is to follow the design guidelines for guide rail in section 10.1 when determining Clear Zone needs. Taper rates are to be per the standard drawings. Shy line taper rates are to be per section 10.1.D of guide rail. A. Concrete Median Barrier 1. Mainline Typically, all median barriers are to be 52-inch concrete glare screen per the RC standard drawings. Typically, all median barrier transition sections, tied to various types of existing barriers at either end of the project, are to be per the PTS standards.

2. Interchange Ramps Typically, all median barriers on two-way ramps are to be 34-inch concrete median barrier per the RC standards. For curves with a radius equal to or less then 250 feet specify five-foot barrier sections from the PC to the PT Where the two-way ramp split into two single ramps, the 34-inch concrete median barrier should be designed to follow the deceleration ramp and taper away from this ramp at the appropriate taper rate for the design speed of this ramp. Following this procedure, the barrier will typically end in the middle of the gore area between the ramps. An impact attenuator is to be placed on the end of the barrier at a point outside the calculated Clear Zone of the deceleration ramp pavement. The gore/shoulder area on either side of the barrier should be paved and extended a minimum of 12 feet beyond the attenuator (only on ramps outside the full plaza) to facilitate the ability for maintenance trucks to turn. In addition, the drainage in this area is to be designed to ensure that no ponding occurs. B. Single-face Barrier Utilize single-face barrier on cut slopes and other areas in accordance with the Standard Drawings

10-12 Oct 2011

Utilize necessary transition section(s) and end transition to bury single face concrete barrier in cut slopes. If guiderail does not connect to the trailing end of the SFCB then the SFCB should terminate with the necessary transition(s) and an end transition

10-13 Oct 2011

Chapter 11 SIGNING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS


11.0 Introduction In addition to these guidelines for Signing and Pavement Markings, refer to the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), PennDOTs Standards: Publication 111M that includes the TC-8600 Series (Pavement Marking and Markers) and TC-8700 Series (Sign Lettering and Spacing); PennDOTs Publication 236M, Approved Sign Handbook, and the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Standards for Roadway Construction. General Notes are not to be repetitious of the Commission Specifications. 11.1 Signing A. General Sign wording must be approved by the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission. Major Guide Signs and Overhead Guide signs are to use Clearview Font for all text. All Major Guide and Overhead sign spacing must agree with the sign spacing charts provided in the PennDOT TCs. Design consultants can use a PennDOT approved sign software program; however the output must agree with the TCs. B. Presentation of Plans Identification Numbers are to be provided with signs that are to be new or relocated. Signs that are to be removed do not require an identification number. Signs that are existing and are to be relocated will use an italicized ID#, while new signs will use PTC CADD standard font type. All signs throughout the plan set are to be shown with a rounded border as well as the perpendicular sign edge. All secondary signing is to be new and to have sign nomenclature, sign size and type of mount listed under sign. Information for PTC specific signs (i.e. sign nomenclature beginning with PTC - ___) will typically be provided by the Commission. Secondary signing should not have identification numbers. Secondary signing replaced as part of a mill and pave or single bridge replacement project are not to be part of a signing plan and will be included in a list as an attachment to the contract, typically provided by the Commission. Fabrication drawings for PTC specific signs will be included as an attachment to the contract, typically provided by the Commission.

11-1 Oct 2011

C.

Reflectivity Retro reflectivity of signing must be according to current PennDOT standards.

D.

Mounting (Ground/Overhead) Type A ground mounted signs will be used, when feasible, in lieu of Monopipe sign structures and Type E signs. Gore Area Exit signs to be Type A. Major guide and supplemental guide signs, mounted on breakaway post mountings, shall have a minimum 7 foot clearance under the signs regardless if the signs are to be located where it is very unlikely to be hit by an errant motorist. See PTS-980 for the Structure Mounted Flat Sheet Aluminum Signs mounting detail onto overhead structures.

E.

Sign Structures Provide and show guide rail or concrete barrier for sign structures per PennDOT RCs and Turnpike Standards. See PTS-740 for monopipe structure details. See Chapter 5, Section 5.7G1 for payment information.

F.

Solar Powered Flashing Beacons The use of solar powered flashing beacons may be required to provide added emphasis of a warning sign, typically a truck rollover sign, where providing power to a standard flashing beacon system is difficult.

G.

Wiring/Conduit For all projects that are including HDPE conduit, indicate that the four colors of the conduit to be used are black, orange, blue, and green. For projects that will also include fiber in the conduit and ITS devices installed and connected to the fiber communication, indicate that black conduit be used for ITS.

11-2 Oct 2011

H.

PTC Signing Guidelines for Acceleration Ramps Warning (Turn, Chevrons, etc.) and/or Other Regulatory Signs (No Parking Symbol, etc.) not included below are to be shown along the ramp and the ramp/mainline area as required by specific site conditions. The signs listed below are to be shown at appropriate locations in their given order, taking into account the locations of any necessary Warning and/or Other Regulatory Signs mentioned above. 1. Ramp: a. Emergency Call Box Every Mile, PTC-P12, 72x36. b. Buckle-Up (Its Our Law), I14-6A, 30x36. c. No U-Turn, use R3-4, 36x36. d. Notice Unattended Vehicles Removed After 24 Hours, PTC-VR, 30x30. 2. Ramp and Mainline Area: a. Interstate Route Marker, M1-1, 36x36 or 45x36. b. Speed Limit, R2-1, 48x60. c. Interchange Post Destination Signs, Type A, Size varies. d. Emergency Cellular Telephone (*11), D12-14, 48x60. e. Slower Traffic Keep Right, R4-3, 48x60. 3. Other Signs to be Considered Based on Existing Conditions: a. Litter fine ($300), I14-4, 30x24 (Ramp). b. Yield, R1-2, 48x48 (Ramp and Mainline area). c. Speed Enforced From Aircraft, PTC-R211, 48x36 (Ramp and Mainline Area).

I.

PTC Access Road Signing The Private Roadway (PTC-PR) and Private Property No Trespassing (PTC-LAW1) signs are to be located at the intersection of the Access Road and the state/local road. The exception will be when the Commissions access off the state/local road is a shared access. For a shared access, the PTC-PR and PRC-LAW1 signs are to be installed inside the Commissions property line on the shared access. See PTS-980 for PTC access road signing.

11-3 Oct 2011

11.2

Pavement Markings A. General All pavement markings within the state and local right-of-way must be according to the MUTCD and PennDOTs TC-8600 Series. All pavement markings within the Turnpike right-of-way must be according to Commission specifications, standard drawings, the PennDOT TC-8600 series and the MUTCD within the state and local right-of-way. B. Patterns For concrete surfaces, a 10 black line will be placed directly after the 15 white skip mark. Confirm use with Project Manager. C. Tapers for Lane transitions See Project Manager for lane transition taper rates. D. Lane Transition Arrows. Lane Transition Arrows are to be located in the ending lane and next to the Lane Transition Signing. E. Snowplowable Raised Pavement Markers Overhead Bridges: Confirm use with Project Manager.

11-4 Oct 2011

Chapter 12 LIGHTING 12.0 Introduction This chapter presents the design criteria for the formulation of conventional and high mast lighting systems. The information herein is written for qualified lighting engineers and to assist them in preparing a uniform and standard lighting design. The designers engineering judgment in the application of the criteria is subject to review and concurrence by the Commission. The designer shall obtain prior approval from the Commission on matters of design which raises questions in the application of these criteria to a specific condition. Sources of reference which may be used in addition to this manual are: Roadway Lighting Design Guide October 2005, or the latest edition AASHTO. Standard Specifications for Structural Supports for Highway Signs, Luminaires, and Traffic Signals AASHTO. Publication 408, Specifications and Associated Changes PennDOT. Current Standards for Roadway Construction Highway Lighting Standard Drawings, RC-80M, RC-81M, RC-82M, RC-83M, and RC-84M PennDOT. Current Bridge Construction Standard Drawings, BC-721M and BC-722M PennDOT. Design Manuals, Part1, Part 1A, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4 PennDOT. IESNA Lighting Handbook RP-8-00 Reaffirmed 2005 or the latest edition. International Dark Sky recommendations. Good Neighbor Policy The Commission would like to maintain good neighbor status with local residents. Consider the impact of lighting on surrounding residential areas. Avoid light trespass. The standard Commission lighting design is based on High Pressure Sodium (HPS), or Metal Halide semi-cutoff luminaires at a 40-foot mounting height, Full cut-off luminaires and house-side shielding may be considered, Lower mounting heights may also be considered, but not desirable. The designer should evaluate concerns and present to the Commission for consideration. Local Ordinances The Commission is considered its own political jurisdiction; however, if local municipalities enforce stricter rules, the Commission may opt to comply with local ordinances as a good neighbor. The lighting designer will be required to contact local authorities for their standards.

The Commission will be responsible for all energy and maintenance related costs unless other provisions are established for these costs. Energy and Maintenance Agreements with local agencies will be required to establish responsibilities if others will perform maintenance or supply energy to the lighting system. During the early stages of design, a pre-design meeting shall be conducted at the Commission headquarters to discuss lighting design criteria, and to address all projectspecific requirements relating to the highway lighting design. 12-1 Oct 2011

Where existing lighting systems are being partially modified, the new lighting standards will match the existing system including pole heights, luminaire and arm types, materials, etc. If possible, existing lighting standards may be reused on new foundations. If breakaway features are required, current AASHTO requirements must be met. Lighting systems will be designed and installed to limit light trespass onto adjacent properties. In general, arm-mounted, conventional cobra-head luminaires with cutoff optics are preferred over high mast or tenon-mounted luminaires. This preference does not preclude considering the latter systems. These systems should be considered if other factors such as ease of maintenance, light distribution limits, or economic savings support an improved final product. Houseside shielding on luminaires may be used to minimize light trespass. Highway lighting designs typically include a conceptual (Lighting Study) initial, a preliminary and a final submission. The conceptual (Lighting Study) initial submission should include an evaluation of options and alternatives such as the use of high mast lighting, conventional lighting and offset lighting within the project. Also included should be the general limits of the proposed lighting, as well as luminaire mounting height and wattage data, and any required recommendations to avoid light trespass. The conceptual (Lighting Study) submission should include typical lighting calculations for each lighting type specified. The conceptual (Lighting Study) initial submission requirement may be waived by the Commission if the project is clearly not suitable for high mast or offset lighting, as determined at the pre-design meeting. Upon approval of the conceptual (Lighting Study) submission, a preliminary submission should be prepared that includes highway lighting plan sheets indicating each luminaire mounting height and offset, and each luminaire location by station. A preliminary highway lighting report should be submitted along with the plans that includes: summary of all lighting design criteria, IES photometric file for the luminaire and lamp, calculations that indicate the end of rated life average footcandle level, uniformity ratio and glare ratio for each unique pole spacing in accordance with PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, Chapter 5. Footcandle calculations shall be provided for ramps, transition zones, toll plaza areas and employee parking lots only. The lighting of mainline roadways is not required and any lighting falling on these areas is considered incidental light. The lighting of shoulders is not required. Negative luminaire overhangs (-5-foot, -10-foot) may be considered in the lighting design; however luminaire overhangs must be consistent within the same area. The final submission should include final lighting plans, complete with tabulation of quantity sheets, circuit wiring diagram sheets, special detail sheets and plan sheets in accordance with Design Manual Part 3, Chapter 9. Also included in the final submission shall be wire size calculations, guide rail clearance worksheets, special provisions, cost estimates and all necessary design information such as roadway cross sections, drainage plans, contour grading plans, and bridge structure drawings to allow satisfactory review of the lighting design. 12-2 Oct 2011

Sign lighting of overhead sign structures is not required. 12.1 Site Inspection It is the responsibility of the design consultant to become familiar with existing overhead and underground facilities that may interfere with lighting pole locations. The lighting design should also be coordinated with proposed facilities such as underground drainage pipes and inlets, guide rails, utility relocations, overhead sign structures, and bridge structures. Attempts shall be made to avoid mounting lighting poles on bridge structures unless necessary to maintain satisfactory footcandle levels. Where necessary, locate poles as close to pier locations as possible, the distance from the pier not to exceed one-third of the length between adjacent piers. Make arrangements with the Commission for inspection of all existing power supply facilities that may be affected by this work. Coordinate with the local electric utility to determine the type and location of all available electric sources. Interchange lighting will be controlled from a central location using a photoelectric cell and lighting contactor. Controls will utilize a manual-automatic switch and High Intensity Discharge (HID) rated lighting contactor. Avoid locating the photoelectric cell near a light pole to avoid on-off cycling of the lighting system. Time clocks are not acceptable. 12.2 Conceptual Lighting Design (Lighting Study) A. Mainline Turnpike 1. The Study shall include an evaluation of options and alternatives such as the use of high mast lighting, conventional lighting, offset lighting, some combination of high mast & conventional lighting, and some combination of high mast and offset lighting within the project limits. Note where underpass lighting may be required. Also included should be the general limits of the proposed lighting, as well as luminaire mounting height and wattage data 2. Lighting warrants are not required. Full lighting shall be provided, however lighting on the mainline roadway is not required. Any spill light is considered incidental. In areas where ramps run parallel with the mainline, only the ramp width is considered in the calculations. 3. To be considered in the conceptual lighting design is the construction cost estimate, yearly energy cost comparison, 30 year operation and maintenance costs, safety concerns, and light trespass concerns. 4. Sample lighting design calculations should be included for each lighting scheme. 5. Provide recommendation for best option with supporting documentation.

12-3 Oct 2011

B.

Mon-Fayette and Southern Beltway Projects Investigate lighting warrants to determine either full or partial lighting. 1. Full lighting is defined as the complete lighting of the entire ramp length from the intersection with the cross road to an area merging with the mainline 600800 feet before (exit ramp) or after the theoretical gore (entrance ramp). This is applicable to ramps with both toll plaza and non-toll plaza facilities. Cross road intersections will be lighted. Cross road and mainline Turnpike are not lighted. Only the ramp width is considered in the lighting calculations for design purposes. 2. Partial lighting is defined as the full lighting of ramps with toll plaza facilities, as noted in Paragraph (a) above, and the lighting of the intersections of the cross roads, and the partial lighting of the ramp/mainline gore area on the non toll plaza facilities ramps. Cross roads and mainline Turnpike are not lighted. Only the ramp width is considered in the lighting calculations for design purposes. 3. As a minimum, the Commission will provide partial lighting. 4. Only Conventional type lighting will be considered. High mast lighting is not acceptable. Offset lighting will be considered at Mainline Plazas only. 5. Lighting warrants will be based on the traffic counts for the roadway design year.

12.3

Preliminary Lighting Design A. Conventional Lighting 1. Design Criteria a. All areas The depreciation (light loss) factor for all High-Pressure Sodium lighting calculations will be 0.64 and is based on a lamp lumen depreciation factor of 0.80 and a dirt depreciation factor of 0.80. The depreciation (light loss) factor for all Metal Halide lighting calculations will be 0.56 and is based on a lamp lumen depreciation factor of 0.70 and a dirt depreciation factor of 0.80. Do not exceed a uniformity ratio of 4:1, average to minimum. The veiling luminance (glare) ratio) shall not exceed 0.3:1. All illumination levels shall be indicated at end of rated life.

12-4 Oct 2011

b. Ramps Ramp areas are defined as the connecting roadway between the mainline roadway and the secondary (crossroad) roadway. Toll Plaza ramp lighting will be continuous, beginning at a point 600-800 feet from the theoretical gore, extending to the transition zones, and extending from the transitions zones to the intersection or ramp system of the secondary roadway. No partial lighting will be considered unless directed by the Commission. The installation of a go ahead light pole along the mainline will not be required. Do not include the mainline roadway adjacent to the ramp and gore areas in the footcandle analysis. The target illumination level for all ramp roadway surfaces shall be 0.60-0.90 average maintained horizontal footcandles. Actual design average shall not be below 0.60 footcandles. The minimum illumination level at any point on the roadway surface shall not be lower than 0.20 footcandles. Unprotected lighting poles that are within the clear zone will be mounted onto breakaway bases (Type S) and foundations conforming to latest AASHTO requirements. Lighting poles that are outside the clear zone, or that are protected by guide rail or concrete barrier will be mounted onto non-breakaway bases (Type A) and foundations conforming to latest AASHTO requirements. c. Transition Zones Transition zones are defined as the roadway between a ramp and a toll plaza area. Transition zones will not extend more than 400 feet from the centerline of the tollbooths. The transition zones will be designed to gradually transition the average maintained lighting levels from the ramp 0.60 footcandles to the toll plaza area 1.50 footcandles. All lighting poles in this area will be mounted onto non-breakaway bases and foundations conforming to latest AASHTO requirements. Lighting circuitry in this area will be connected to the interchange stand-by generator, where available, on new interchange projects. d. Toll Plaza Areas The toll plaza area is defined as the roadway area extending towards the transition zone, a distance of 100 feet on either side of the toll plaza from the toll booth centerline. The toll plaza area will be designed for 1.50 average maintained horizontal footcandles. Lighting contribution from canopy fixtures will not be considered in the lighting design analysis. All lighting poles in this area will be mounted onto non-breakaway bases and foundations conforming to latest AASHTO requirements. Lighting circuitry in this area will be connected to the interchange stand-by generator, where available, on new interchange projects.

12-5 Oct 2011

e. Employee Parking Areas Employee parking areas adjacent to the interchange building will be designed for 1.00 average maintained horizontal footcandles. All lighting poles in this area will be mounted onto non-breakaway bases and foundations conforming to latest AASHTO requirements. Design special pole foundations with elevated pedestals at all pole locations that may be subject to vehicle contact within the parking lot. Pedestal foundations shall be a minimum of 24 inches above the parking lot surface. Lighting circuitry in this area will be connected to the interchange stand-by generator, where available, on new interchange projects. f. Underpass Lighting Under certain conditions, underpass lighting may be required to maintain adequate levels of illumination. These conditions include, but are not limited to, the overall width of the overpass and the vertical clearance beneath the overpass. If underpass lighting is required, the underpass roadway will be designed for the same average maintained footcandle as the roadway outside and adjacent to the underpass area. 70-watt or 100watt high pressure sodium, wall-mounted luminaires shall be used for underpass lighting, when possible. If the concrete bridge abutment or pier cap is greater than 30 feet from the edge of traveled roadway, 70-watt or 100-watt high pressure sodium, overhead-mounted underpass luminaires will be considered. If overhead-mounted luminaires are required, they should be attached to the bridge structure steelwork directly over the edge of pavement. Do not attach the luminaires to the underside of the concrete deck. Mount bottom of luminaire flush with bottom of steelwork. Attachment to concrete girders will require a special design. Coordinate with the bridge design to ensure that all structure mounted lighting items such as junction boxes, conduits and mounting brackets are included in the bridge design. g. Temporary Lighting On existing reconstruction projects where all, or portions of, existing lighting need to be removed for roadway/toll plaza construction, temporary lighting will be required to provide adequate lighting to maintain operations of the toll plaza facility. Temporary lighting may consist of wood poles and overhead wiring. Utilize 250 and 400 watt HPS, M-SC-II conventional (cobrahead) luminaires on wood poles at a 35 foot luminaire mounting height.

12-6 Oct 2011

The pole spacing will be based on the following design parameters: 1. 2. 3. 4. 1.0 to 1.5 footcandles, average maintained. Maximum Uniformity Ratio of 4.0:1 Light Loss Factor of 0.80 Glare Ratio of 0.4:1

Provide arm lengths that provide the required overhangs to the edge of roadway. 20 foot arms or longer may be required. Refer to Standard Drawing RC-83M for definitions. Limit overhead spans to 250 feet. Guy poles as necessary. Locate the poles in areas protected from traffic, or provide protection by use of guide rail, crash barrier or other approved devices. Provide material meeting the applicable sections of the Standard Specifications. New material is not required as long as the performance is acceptable. Provide Creosote, Penta, CCA or equivalent wood poles as permitted meeting environmental requirements. Provide either copper or aluminum aerial cable. Electric service may be provided from the existing lighting circuitry, existing electrical service from the toll plaza facility or a separate service drop from a electrical utility company service. Where applicable, power supply material shall meet NEC and Power Company requirements. Enameled or hot dipped galvanized enclosures may be used in addition to stainless steel or aluminum. Where applicable, provide luminaires with individual photoelectric control, or provide a main contactor and photocontrol at the main power supply location. Ground the lighting system. Coordinate any required electrical service drop with the electric utility company. Select a location for the power supply pole to minimize the distance to the light fixtures to minimize voltage drop. Size the cable to operate the luminaires with a maximum 5 percent voltage drop to the end of the circuit. Provide equipment for the service as required by the Electric Utility Company and as required to provide an operable lighting system. As a last resort, consider the use of portable generators when electric power is not readily available. Provide a single point of contact for 24/7 emergency.

12-7 Oct 2011

2. Luminaire and Light Source Information a. Photometric Data The Photometric data utilized in all calculations shall be in accordance with the latest Commission requirements. The standard light source for conventional lighting is high pressure sodium. b. High Pressure Sodium Lamps High pressure sodium lamps with the following initial lumens shall be used: Wattage 70 100 200 250 400 ANSI Designation S62ME-70 S54SB-100 S66WA-200 S50VA-250 S51WA-400 Rated Avg. Life Hours 24,000 24,000 24,000 24,000 24,000 Initial Lumens 6,300 (Underpass) 10,500 (Underpass) 22,000 27,500 50,000

c. Metal Halide Lamps Metal halide lamps with the following initial lumens may be specified by the Commission for use in areas adjacent to toll booths and toll plaza buildings: Wattage 250 400 ANSI Designation M58/E-250 M59/E-400 Rated Avg. Life Hours 10,000 20,000 Initial Lumens 22,000 36,000

12-8 Oct 2011

3. Luminaire Mounting Height a. Conventional Lighting The luminaire mounting height is the height of the luminaire above the finished pavement surface. Pole shaft lengths may vary to compensate for the difference in elevation between the top of the pole foundation or anchorage and the roadway surface. This adjustment to the pole shaft is noted by the C-dimension as shown on the Standard Drawings and shall be indicated on the lighting plans. The standard nominal mounting height for conventional luminaires shall be 40 feet. Mounting heights of 35 feet and 45 feet may be permitted if special conditions exist. Each Commission Maintenance District operates a 65-foot bucket truck to maintain lighting systems. The reach of the 65-foot boom limits excessive pole heights. If it is necessary for the bucket truck to extend its boom horizontally, the 65foot height will be reduced accordingly. The boom will also be used to lift and remove the lighting standard. The weight of the pole may also be a limiting factor. Verify that Commission maintenance equipment is capable of servicing luminaires with mounting heights greater than 40 feet if higher mounting heights are required. b. High Mast Lighting The nominal mounting height for high mast lighting is 100-foot. Lighting poles between 80 and 120 feet may be used in the lighting design to achieve desired results. High mast poles shall not exceed 120 feet. High mast lighting systems utilizing 60-foot mounting height may be considered for extenuating circumstances. Approval by the Commission is required.

4. Roadway Width Roadway Width is defined as follows: a. Edge of traveled pavement for all open roadways. Entire cartway (parapet to parapet) on bridge decks. Curb-to-curb for all curbed roadways. b. Although shoulders will be incidentally lighted, light levels on these areas will not be part of roadway lighting calculations. 5. Calculation Methods Calculations should be submitted in a form that is legible and that can be easily reviewed. Provide all applicable photometric curves, point-to-point calculations, straight-line calculations, etc. Provide IES luminaire photometric information in electronic form. Submit lighting calculations in paper form. 12-9 Oct 2011

Include a CD-ROM with site-specific software files in VISUAL, version 2.0 or later format for all computer-assisted calculations. Provide all input criteria for the software including luminaire coordinates. When a portion or section of the highway is under analysis, it shall be analyzed by single pole spacing as self-contained areas of analysis (as required in PennDOT Design Manual Part 2). While calculation of entire ramps or roadway areas may assist the designer with layout and spacing of luminaires, the overall area illumination statistics will not be accepted as meeting the Commissions lighting criteria. The self-contained areas of analysis shall correspond to the highway geometry under investigation and Commissions requirements. Each self-contained area shall be considered a flat plain with 0 foot elevation for conventional lighting calculations. Lighting pole layout parameters shall conform to PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, Section 5.5-A. Interchange ramp lighting calculations and tabulations will be submitted in the form detailed in PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, Section 5.14. Roadway lighting point calculations will have a transverse spacing that results in a minimum of three rows of analyzed points across each lane of the roadway. Use a longitudinal point spacing that will result in a minimum of 15 columns of analyzed points along each lane of the roadway per luminaire spacing cycle. Points should be distributed evenly across the calculated areas and should be located along the edge of pavement as much as possible. Interchange toll plaza areas, transition zones and parking lot calculations will be provided in sufficient detail and with enough lighting calculation points to determine the adequacy of the lighting system. Maximum transverse and longitudinal spacing of calculation points should not exceed 10 feet. Provide a separate calculation for each luminaire spacing cycle. The standard light source for conventional lighting at ramp locations is highpressure sodium. Either, high-pressure sodium or metal halide light source may be required by the Commission at transition zones, toll plaza areas and employee parking lots. For the preliminary lighting design, the average point method for single pole spacing shall be used. The Commission utilizes the Visual lighting design program. All designers shall use this program. Other lighting design software may be approved, but the designer would be responsible for providing the Commission a registered copy of the software and training at no cost to the Commission.

12-10 Oct 2011

Computerized Calculation Information: Plan view of each calculation zone with all plan information required in 12.3A with the following additional information; a. Point by point shown with footcandle values b. Elevation of statistical area (high mast only) c. End of Rated Life statistics of the area including Average Illumination, Minimum Point Illumination and Uniformity Ratio (average to minimum). d. Glare ratio calculation (conventional lighting only) B. High Mast Lighting 1. Design Criteria All roadway surfaces are to be designed for illumination of 0.60 to 0.90 average maintained horizontal footcandle at the end of rated life of the lamp. The minimum illumination level at any point on the roadway surface shall not be lower than 0.20 footcandles. Do not exceed a uniformity ratio of 4:1, average to minimum. Use 400-watt High Pressure Sodium (HPS) lamps with the required number of luminaires necessary to achieve the proper footcandle and uniformity ratio. The maximum number of luminaires permitted at each high mast pole is ten. If more than 10 luminaires are required, structural calculations for the high mast pole design, sealed by a Professional Engineer licensed in the state of Pennsylvania, must be submitted for review and approval. Mount luminaires (Type V distribution) on high mast poles at a nominal mounting height of 100 feet above the road surface. Pole lengths may vary between 80 and 120 feet. Do not exceed a pole length of 120 feet. High mast poles will be constructed of galvanized steel. Weathering steel is not acceptable for new or replacement poles. Where applicable, new galvanized steel high mast poles will be used to replace existing weathering steel high mast poles. Provide at least one portable winch drive motor for new luminaire lowering ring assemblies. The required candlepower and footcandle data necessary to accomplish this lighting design shall be furnished to the Consultant by the Commission at the time of the pre-design meeting. Lumen contributions at angles greater than 75 degrees need not be considered. Roadway baseline elevations shall be considered when performing high mast lighting calculations.

12-11 Oct 2011

2. Calculation Methods Manual Calculations NOTE: Manual computations for specific projects may be acceptable with prior approval of the Commission. Determine the average maintained footcandle level on the roadway in the following manner: a. Locate points at 50-foot intervals on the centerline of all ramps, toll plazas, and the crossroad, in each direction. The entire illuminated portion of each roadway shall be considered a separate design entity for the analysis of high mast lighting. b. Determine the end of rated life maintained horizontal footcandle level at each of these points, considering the usable contribution from all poles in the vicinity of each point. c. Determine the average maintained footcandle level in each section by adding all footcandle points in that section and dividing by the number of points in the section. The result shall be between 0.60 and 0.90 maintained footcandle. d. Determine the uniformity ratio of each road section by dividing the average maintained footcandle level in that section by the minimum footcandle level at any point in the section. The result shall be equal to or less than 4:1, average to minimum. e. High mast pole layout parameters shall conform to PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, Section 5.5-B. Computer Calculations The calculation of the footcandle level at each point is to be accompanied by use of Visual lighting design software, version 2.0 or later as stated in 12.3-A5. a. Divide the interchange area into sections for each ramp, toll plaza, parking lot and the crossroad. Each roadway shall be further subdivided if the baseline elevation changes more than +/- 5 feet within a 400 foot section of roadway. Provide baseline elevation data with the calculations for all roadways where high mast lighting is designed. b. When a portion or section of the highway is under analysis, it shall be analyzed as self contained areas of analysis. The self-contained areas of analysis shall correspond to the highway geometry under investigation and the Commissions requirements. c. The point to point interval shall be 5 feet longitudinally and transversely for multilane or wide areas greater than 12 feet. For single lane areas (equal to or less than 12 feet), the point to point interval shall be 5 feet longitudinally and 3 feet transversely. 12-12 Oct 2011

d. High mast pole location parameters shall conform to PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, Section 5.5-B. C. Offset Lighting (Post Mounted Tenon) Offset lighting shall be considered for use at transition zones, toll plaza areas and employee parking areas where the total roadway width exceeds the limitations of conventional, arm mounted luminaires. 250-watt or 400-watt metal halide luminaires shall be considered for use at new interchange locations. 250-watt or 400-watt high pressure sodium luminaires shall be considered for use at existing interchanges where portions of the existing high pressure sodium lighting system will remain in operation in the areas noted above. 12.4 Preliminary Lighting Design Report Provide a Preliminary Design Report including plans, calculations and details in accordance with PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, Chapter 5.3. 12.5 Final Lighting Design The final design for proposed highway lighting shall contain all information shown in PennDOT Design Manual Part 2, Chapters 5.10 and 5.11 as applicable, and as follows. A. All lighting pole assemblies shall be installed with transformer bases. Provide breakaway bases (Type S) with frangible type bases and anchor (non-breakaway) (Type A) bases with non-frangible bases. B. Do not install transformers bases on structure mounted light pole assemblies. Provide junction boxes (Type JB-25), in the bridge parapets, or retaining walls to be used as a means for the line splice to the luminaire. C. Maximum arm length for a breakaway pole is 20-feet. D. All conventional type lighting poles will be truss-type aluminum poles similar in style and appearance as shown on PennDOT Standard Drawing RC-83M, Sheet 1 of 2. Conventional steel lighting poles are not acceptable. E. The Commission Highway Lighting Plans are typically bid as a lump sum pay item, with a breakdown of material items and quantities listed on the lighting plan quantity sheet for information only. Utilize standard PennDOT pay item material descriptions to list material items. On Commission projects associated with PennDOT, which may require Federal participation, detailed Tabulation of Quantity summary sheets, listing all individual unit price pay items and light pole location descriptions shall be utilized. Format to be determined at the lighting pre-design meeting. F. Typically, Turnpike related highway lighting systems utilize circuitry from a 277/480 volt, 3 phase, 4 wire system, associated with mainline utility building installations, with lighting connected at 277 volts, single phase,. For remote locations, a 240/480 volt, single phase, three-wire system, with lighting connected at 240 volts, shall be considered. Where only a 120/240-volt, single phase, three wire system is available, a step-up transformer to 240/480-volt will be considered. G. Provide single pole circuit breakers for all lighting circuits. 12-13 Oct 2011

H. Additional information in the development of Final Lighting Plans can be obtained on PennDOTs highway lighting web site at: www.dot.state.pa.us/highwaylighting 12.6 Final Lighting Design Report Provide a Final Design Report including plans, calculations, details, specifications and construction cost estimate. A. Plans will be prepared in accordance with PennDOT Design Manual Part 3, Chapter 9. B. Calculations 1. Provide voltage drop calculations for all lighting circuits. Wire loss will not result in more than 3% voltage drop at any lighting fixture on the circuit. 2. Include a Guide Rail Clearance worksheet for all lighting poles that are located behind guide rail to ensure that proper guide rail clearances are maintained. C. Special Provisions shall be included for all nonstandard items. D. A construction cost estimate for all proposed lighting and all lighting to be removed and/or modified shall be included in the final design report.

12-14 Oct 2011

12-15 Oct 2011

Chapter 13 UTILITIES
13.0 General A. PennDOT Publication 16M, Design Manual Part 5, Utility Relocation, will be used to guide this work. B. All utility meetings are to be set up and conducted by the consultant with the minutes completed for all meetings and uploaded to the website in a timely manner. C. All exchanges of information with the Utilities, submissions to them, and responses from them, will be the responsibility of the Designer. PennDOT forms are to be forwarded, along with the Designers drawings, either electronic or paper per the Utilities request. Upon receipt and approval of relocation plans, proof of property rights, and a completed estimate, the Design manager will prepare a reimbursement agreement for execution by the Commission. Relocation work less than $25,000 can be approved by Commission letter, without formal action, upon the recommendation the Design Manager. Upon the Design Managers review and approval of all required documentation, the Commission will issue a notice to proceed to the Utility. Prior to the Commission letting the project for bid, the Designer will be responsible for obtaining the completed form 4181-UC from the Utilities and providing to the Design Manager. The Design Manager will be responsible for providing the Utility Clearance Forms to the Commissions Contract Management Group. D. Coordinate the design of the entire project with all the agencies having existing (or proposed) facilities within the project limits. 13.1 Utility Tracking Chart Each design consultant is to maintain a current Utility Tracking Chart that will be kept on the website. This chart is to be updated within five business days of any new pertinent utility information. 13.2 Gas and Waterline Attachments to Overhead Structures A. The attachment of gas and waterlines to overhead structures owned by the Turnpike should be minimized. B. New PTC Crossing agreements will contain a Loss of Revenue clause for future coverage due to possible ruptures, leaks, etc. Shut-off valves will be required at the Commissions right-of-way. C. The utility will be requested to submit for Commission review an estimate to relocate onto the structure and to not relocate onto the structure. D. For overhead structures whose ownership will be transferred to PennDOT, any attachment will need PennDOT approval. The Commission will also require shut off valves and a Loss of Revenue clause.

13-1 2010

Chapter 14 Reserved for future use.

14-1 2010

Chapter 15 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES, MITIGATION AND PERMITS


15.0 Slopes Design slopes to avoid impacts to environmental factors. Wetland, stream impacts, and drainage structures will need to be evaluated to determine if slopes need to be steepened to minimize or avoid permanent impacts. If slopes cannot be steepened, then justification of such (e.g. excessive cost, right-of-way issues, safety, etc.) will need to be provided for permitting purposes. 15.1 Departmental of Environmental Protection In current DEP applications, there is a section entitled Permit Coordination Review that includes a Compliance History Review portion. The following is the text of the questions and suggested reply. We should use this response until otherwise directed. Compliance History Review: Is/was applicant in violation of any permits issued by DEP? ____Yes ____No (Do not check) If yes, list each permit that is/was in violation and provide compliance status of the permitted activity (use additional sheets to provide information on all permits). Permit Program: Permit Number: Brief description of non-compliance: Steps taken to achieve compliance and date(s) compliance achieved: The commission has obtained hundreds of DEP permits since the mid-1980s. The request for the above information creates an undue burden on the applicant based upon the volume of records requested and upon our records retention policy and capacity. In infrequent instances where a noncompliant activity occurred, steps were immediately taken to correct the situation. Current Compliance Status: __X__ In Compliance ____In Non-Compliance If the applicant is not in compliance with any law or regulation, permit, order or schedule of compliance of the Department, provide a narrative description of how the applicant will achieve compliance including the appropriate milestones.

15-1 2010

15.2

Submerged Lands Licenses 105 Permit The Section 105 Permit should use the following in regard to the submerged lands licenses: The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission was created by Act 211 of the Pennsylvania General Assembly on May 21, 1937.

15-2 2010

Chapter 16 ROADSIDE DEVELOPMENT


16.0 Permanent Pull-off Areas No permanent pull-off (parking) or stopping areas will be designated into Total Reconstruction projects. All existing pull-off and stopping areas are to be eliminated. 16.1 Landscape Planting Landscape planting plans, when required, are to be prepared by the consultant and coordinated with the PTC Landscape Architect. Coordination with underground utilities, conduit, etc., must be ensured so maintenance problems do not occur. In addition, these plans should be reviewed to ensure required Clear Zones and proper sight distances are maintained. Typically, landscape planting should not be included as a lump sum item in the construction contract.

16-1 2010

Chapter 17 Hydrologic and Hydraulic Analysis


17.0 Introduction The intent of this section is to clarify the Commissions requirements for the Hydrologic and Hydraulic Report that will be submitted as a supporting document for Pa Department of Environmental Protection. The Joint Permit Application is required for all features that impact waterways and floodplains. The Hydrologic and Hydraulic Report addresses the impacts of structures, embankment encroachments, and channel changes due to proposed design. A report is required for all modified and new structures with a drainage area greater than 100 acres. The report is to be certified in accordance with Chapter 105 of Pennsylvania Code, Title 25, and sealed by a professional engineer registered in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Detailed report content guidelines and format are provided in Section 10.7 of PennDOT Design Manual Part 2. In general, the report should contain: 17.1 Background information obtained from field view, research, and survey. Hydrologic analysis methodology, drainage area, and discharges. Hydraulic analysis modeling method and backwater and scour analyses. Risk assessment or risk analysis of the impacts on channel and floodplain. Summary of waterway and structure data. Drawings required for the joint permit application.

Background Information Provide or reference background information obtained through field view, research, and survey. Bind or attach maps, photographs, and reference material. A. Field View 1. Locate and describe the type, size, and waterway opening of existing structures (upstream and downstream) and the conditions of debris and scour for comparison with the proposed structure. 2. Describe channel size, nature, and condition of channel and floodplain. 3. Record flood history from high water marks and interviews with local residents and business owners. 4. Determine environmental concerns and aquatic habitat. B. Research 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Federal Emergency Management Agency Flood Insurance Studies and Maps. Municipal Stormwater Management Plans per 1978 Act 167. USGS and USACE stream gage data. Documented historical flood information. Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission stream stocking data. Pennsylvania Code, Title 25, Chapter 93 Water Quality Standards.
17-1 Oct 2011

7. Existing structure design and rehabilitation plans. 8. Determine soil properties and land use properties for the watershed. 9. Check for municipal ordinances. C. Survey 1. Obtain alignment and profile of roadway and stream channel a minimum of 500 feet upstream and downstream for the H&H report. 2. Record low chord and streambed elevations and span lengths of existing structures, including the upstream and downstream structures. 3. Develop floodplain topography. 4. Identify wetlands and environmentally sensitive areas. 17.2 Hydrologic Analysis Select the hydrologic analysis methodology and design discharges for the applicable watershed drainage area from among the approved options listed in PennDOT Design Manual Part 2. A. Methodology 1. Select hydrologic modeling method based on watershed drainage area and land use. 2. Use alternate methods in cases where the chosen method produces questionable results. 3. Compare discharge results from all methods with those obtained through research. 4. Select values that produce hydraulic results that correspond with conditions observed during the field view and obtained from site flood history records. B. Drainage Area 1. Determine the watershed drainage area above the crossing of the stream of interest from topographic mapping. 2. Determine drainage area for any other stream(s) that contributes backwater or in any other way affects the stream of interest or that causes negative backwater effects on the Commission facilities...

17-2 Oct 2011

C.

Discharges 1. Use the 50-year flood event as the design flood for all mainline structures. 2. Base the design flood for other structures over waterways in accordance with the classification of the roadway that the structure carries based on Design Manual 2 criteria, unless potential impacts to the Turnpike warrants use of the 50-year flood. 3. Include an analysis for the 100-year flood in accordance with DEP floodplain management criteria. 4. Determine additional check floods as required.

17.3

Hydraulic Analysis Select a hydraulic modeling method that is acceptable to the environmental permitting agencies and perform a backwater analysis to determine the effects of the project on the existing floodplain. Include structures, channel changes, and embankment encroachments paralleling floodplains in the same hydraulic model, but address separately in the report. Provide hard copy analysis results from applicable computer programs, including profiles and cross-sections, as an appendix to the report. Include electronic computer program files on floppy or compact disc bound into the report using a pocket or sleeve. A. Modeling Method 1. Select the hydraulic modeling method based on the type and size of the structure and its impacts to the channel and floodplain. 2. Use HEC-RAS for situations where floodplain topography influences the backwater analysis, including multiple culverts in a series where backwater is affected. a. Construct the HEC-RAS model in accordance with the programs users and hydraulic reference manuals. b. Model the stream reach of interest and adjoining reaches when backwater from the adjoining reach affects the reach of interest. c. Include appropriate discharges for all modeled reaches. d. Locate stream cross-sections in accordance with program guidelines and far enough along the reach to account for all impacts that could affect flood water surface elevations. e. Extend cross-sections to a high enough elevation to contain the 100-year flood. f. Establish flow boundary conditions based on survey data or water surface elevations that result from downstream factors. g. Model replacement structures in the same manner as existing structures unless the type of replacement warrants a different technique.
17-3 Oct 2011

h. Use the culvert routine to model structures under fill that generate a headwater to depth ratio greater than 1.0. i. Select the appropriate high and low flow analysis methods for bridge models. j. Disregard existing silt and sediment deposits that will be removed by high flow when modeling the streambed in bridge routines; transportable deposits do not affect water surface elevations. k. Disregard streambed shape when modeling natural bottom structures as culverts. HEC-RAS does not consider ground points in its culvert routine. The program models a level surface across the culvert bottom based on input invert elevations. l. Deduct depth of streambed material from overall height of opening or use blocked bottom option to establish reduced vertical height of solid bottom structures that are anticipated to fill in with streambed material and are modeled using the culvert routine. m. Use the Generate Report option to provide a reviewable, detailed output of the HEC-RAS model. n. Plot HEC-RAS cross-sections and profiles in landscape style to a reasonable and consistent scale. 3. Use HY-8 for culvert extensions and similar situations where simplified backwater analysis is generally accepted. Additional analysis is necessary when culvert extensions are a different shape, slope, size or material type using the appropriate reference material (HEC-22, Hx5-5, etc.) to ensure related headwater elevations. a. Construct the HY-8 model in accordance with the on-screen menu. b. Adjust Mannings value to account for streambed friction for silted-in and natural bottom culverts. B. Backwater Analysis Perform a backwater analysis for the existing and proposed conditions to determine the effects of the structure modifications, embankment encroachment, and channel change on flood flow. 1. Create an existing condition HEC-RAS model that establishes the base flood elevations against which the effects of the proposed condition are compared. 2. Superimpose on the existing condition HEC-RAS model the proposed structure modifications, associated embankment encroachments, and channel changes to create a proposed condition model that computes their backwater effect.

17-4 Oct 2011

a. Use the same stream cross-sections for both the existing and proposed conditions to the maximum extent possible. b. Avoid adding or deleting cross-sections in the proposed model when possible; adding, subtracting, and re-orienting cross-sections leads to questionable results. c. When adding cross-sections is unavoidable, ensure that reach lengths are adjusted. d. Make reach lengths for the existing and proposed models the same unless channel changes necessitate modifying the reach length for the proposed condition. Make the proposed reach lengths consistent with the differences resulting from the channel change. e. Justify hydraulic performance of transitions due to culvert extensions with a dissimilar shape. f. Maintain the modeled slope of the existing culvert for the culvert extensions unless there is a clear and compelling reason to break the slope. The existing slope of the culvert is best determined by survey of the culvert roof or crown at each end. g. Model a cleaned streambed for both the existing and proposed conditions; streambed cleaning is not a justifiable reason for backwater decreases resulting from the hydraulic analysis of the proposed condition.
3.

Account for the effect of any temporary facilities required for construction in an additional HEC-RAS model. a. Include a temporary stream crossing when necessary to facilitate construction access. b. Model stream crossings as culverts and size the pipes and embankment material for normal flow, or greater depending on the anticipated use of the temporary facility, with adequate freeboard. c. Model cofferdams and causeways as blocked obstructions. d. Include the existing and proposed structures in the same model where phasing will require both structures to be in place at the same time. e. Evaluate the temporary condition for a 2.3-year storm and include a discussion in the risk assessment. If the backwater from a 2.3-year storm associated with the temporary crossing is contained within the channel banks, no flowage easements will be required. If the proposed temporary crossing causes an increase in the 2.3-year that is not contained within the channel banks and causes additional flooding on land outside the Turnpike right-of-way, written consent from the affected property owners allowing this temporary flooding of their property will be required.

C.

Scour Analysis Perform a scour analysis for the recommended structure in accordance with Section 7.2 of PennDOT Design Manual 4 and the equations and guidelines provided in FHWA Hydraulic Engineering Circular No. 18, Evaluating Scour at Bridges.

17-5 Oct 2011

1. Compute contraction scour for all natural bottom structures; compute local scour for piers and abutments when they are subject to flood flow. Compute scour depths as needed for setting footing depths in accordance with PennDOT Design Manual 4 PP7.2.4. 2. Address aggradation and degradation scour based on field observations. 3. Ignore backwater resulting from existing downstream factors, such as a confluence with another waterway, when computing scour depths. 4. Determine properly-sized rock for backfilling of substructure excavations within the floodplain. 17.4 Risk Assessment or Analysis Include a risk assessment or analysis that addresses permanent and temporary impacts to the natural and manmade features of the floodplain. Perform a risk assessment for impacts that occur in non-sensitive rural locations and that produce minimal changes in floodwater elevations and velocities. Perform a risk analysis for impacts in sensitive urban locations that potentially produce significant economic damages to existing properties.

17.5

Summary Data Provide a summary of waterway and structure data. An acceptable blank form Summary Data Sheet form may be downloaded from the PennDOT website, www.dot.state.pa.us/hh/.

17.6

Drawings Attach drawings for use in obtaining the joint permit that are consistent with the permit requirements. A. Provide a full size site plan that includes the following items: 1. Layout of existing and/or proposed structures, stream channels, and embankment encroachments. 2. Existing and proposed contours. 3. Wetlands. 4. Property lines and owners. 5. Location and extent of all survey/HEC-RAS cross-sections. 6. Delineated 100-year flood boundary for existing and proposed conditions. 7. Temporary facilities required during construction (stream crossing, access road, cofferdam, diversion facility, etc.).

17-6 Oct 2011

B.

Provide an elevation view of the structure that includes the following items: 1. 2. 3. 4. Existing and proposed roadway profile. Streamed and floodplain configuration. Span arrangement and clearances. Normal water design flood and 100-year flood water surface elevations.

17-7 Oct 2011

Chapter 18 SPECIFICATIONS, ITEM NUMBERS, QUANTITIES AND COST ESTIMATING


18.0 Introduction The intent of this section is to clarify the Commissions use of specifications, formatting of quantities and cost estimating procedures. A spec book is not a cook book actual thinking and engineering judgment are required. 18.1 Specifications A. General Specification for a project consisting of the following: B. PennDOT Publication 408; Commission Specifications (CS-XXX); Commission Standard Special Provisions; and Non-Standard Project Specific Special Provisions

PennDOT Publication 408 In general, all work is to be performed in accordance with PennDOT Publication 408 unless replaced by a Commission Specification (CS-XXX) or modified by a Special Provision.

C.

Commission Specifications Commission Specifications (CS-XXX) replace in whole the corresponding PennDOT Publication 408 Specifications section. Commission specifications are never changed. They are only modified by project specific special provisions.

D.

Commission Standard Special Provisions Commission Standard Special Provisions fall into two categories. Those in Categories A thru E inclusive and Category F. Each provision includes a date following the title. When a Commission Standard Special Provision is used as is, with no modifications, the date of that Special Provision is to be shown where indicated in the title in the spec book but not in the index.

18-1 2010

Various Standard Special Provisions in Categories A thru E include different applications which are identified with an * and are typed in bold and italic lettering. These notes are to be removed by the designer/consultant prior to the provision being included in a spec book. Various Standard Special Provisions in Category F contain notes to designers marked with an * and are typed in bold and italic lettering or have left space or XXXX for project specific information to be added. These notes are to be removed, spaces are to be filled in, and the underline removed (if it exists), prior to the provision being included in a spec book. 1. Categories A thru E (no modifications) When a Commission Standard Special Provision in Categories A thru E is used as is with no modifications, that Special Provision along with the date of the Special Provision is included in the spec book. Deletion of information not relevant to the given project does not constitute a modification as long as the remaining information is not revised in any way. As previously noted, the date of the Special Provision is only shown where indicated for the Special Provisions in the spec book; it is not shown in the index. 2. Categories A thru E (modified) When a Commission Standard Special Provision in Categories A thru E is modified, the Standard Special Provision is replaced with a Project Specific Special Provision and is included in the spec book as FXX.00. Deletion of information not relevant to the given project does not constitute a modification as long as the remaining information is not revised in any way. The date that was associated with the Commission Standard Special Provision is not used. 3. Category F (no modifications) When a Commission Standard Special Provision in Category F is used as is with no modifications, that Special Provision along with the date of the Special Provision is included in the spec book. Completion of the information in the blank or XXXX spaces where project specific information is to be added or deletion of information not relevant to the given project does not constitute a modification as long as the remaining information is not changed in any way. The date of the Special Provision is only shown where indicated in the Special Provision in the spec book; it is not shown in the index.

18-2 2010

4. Category F (modified) When a Commission Standard Special Provision in Category F is modified the item number associated with that Standard Special Provision is changed to 4XXX-XXXX and the date associated with the Commission Standard Special Provision is not shown. Completion of the information in the blank or XXXX spaces where project specific information is to be added or deletion of information not relevant to the given project does not constitute a modification as long as the remaining information is not changed in any way. E. Category F - Non-standard Project Specific Special Provisions Specifications in this category are those that are specific to a project and either modify a Commission Specification (CS), a Commission Standard Special Provision, a PennDOT Specification or do not relate to any of the above. They are included in Section F in the spec book. No dates are shown with these Special Provisions. 18.2 Item Numbers A. General The PennDOT Master Items list is used as a basis for establishing item numbers on a project. Items are arranged on the Summary Sheet, Tab sheets, and in the Schedule of Prices in exactly the same order as they appear in the PennDOT Master Items list. Items proceeded by a 0 or 1 indicate that all work pertaining to that item is in accordance with PennDOT Publication 408. Items preceded by a 2 indicate that PennDOT Publication 408 has been modified by either a Commission Specification (CS) or a Commission Standard Special Provision. Items preceded by a 3 indicate that PennDOT Publication 408 has been modified by a non-standard project specific special provision. Items preceded by a 4 indicate that either a Commission Specification (CS) or a Commission Standard Special Provision has been modified by a non-standard project specific special provision. In certain instances, the Commission has established standard item numbers for items covered by either a Commission Specification or Commission Standard Special Provision that do not appear in the PennDOT Items Catalog. These items are identified in the PTC Master Item List and/or the Standard Special Provision.

18-3 2010

B.

PennDOT Publication 408 Work to be performed in accordance with PennDOT Publication 408 is shown on the Summary Sheet, Tab Sheets and in the Schedule of Prices with a standard PennDOT item number. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as 408.

ITEM NO 0205-0100

QTY 13,666

UNIT CY

DESCRIPTION FOREIGN BORROW EXCAVATION

REF 408

TAB ON SHEET

C.

Commission Specifications When a Commission Specification (CS-XXX) is used, the item number to which that specification pertains is shown on the Summary Sheet, Tab Sheets and in the Schedule of Prices as 2XXX-XXXX and the reference on the Summary Sheet on the column headed Specification Reference is shown as CS. As an example, CS-305 Bituminous Concrete Base Course and CS-1001 Cement Concrete Structures are Commission Specifications that replace in whole Sections 305 and 1001 in PennDOT Publication 408. When these Commission Specifications are used on a project, the items to which they pertain are shown on the Summary Sheet as:

ITEM NO 2305-0005 2001-0010

QTY 12,726 22

UNIT SY CY

DESCRIPTION BITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 5 DEPTH CLASS A CEMENT CONCRETE

REF CS CS

TAB ON SHEET

D.

Commission Standard Special Provisions The item number to be shown on the Summary Sheet, Tab Sheets and in the Schedule of Prices is the item number associated with that particular Special Provision. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as SP. There are instances where Standard Special Provisions incorporate materials that are required by the particular item of work but wholly provided by the PennDOT 408 specification without materially revising the item. These items are identified within the Standard Special Provision as a standard PennDOT item number. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as 408.

18-4 2010

For example, if Commission Standard Special Provisions AXX.00 Construction Schedule, B0X.00 Construction Lighting, DXX.00 Shoulder Reconstruction in Unsuitable Material Areas, FXX.00 Temporary Traffic Signals and FXX.00 Underdeck Protection Shields were applicable to a project and were to be used with no modification, they would be shown on the Summary Sheet as follows:
ITEM NO 2108-0001 2203-0001 2203-0003 0212-0007 2350-0121 2901-0202 2901-1000 2090-0200 QTY --25 5 40 15 10 --5,000 UNIT LS CY CY SY TON EA LS SF DESCRIPTION CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE CLASS 1 EXCAVATION CLASS 1A EXCAVATION GEOTEXTILE, CLASS 4 SUBBASE (NO. 2A) CONSTRUCTION LIGHTING TEMPORARY TRAFFIC SIGNALS UNDERDECK PROTECTION SHIELDS REF SP SP SP 408 SP SP SP SP TAB ON SHEET

E.

Non-standard Project Specific Special Provisions 1. General Items in this category are those that are specific to a project and either modify a Commission Specification (CS), a Commission Standard Special Provision, a PennDOT Specification or do not relate to any of the above. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as SP. There are instances where Non-standard Project Specific Special Provisions incorporate materials that are required by the particular item of work but wholly provided by the PennDOT 408 specification without materially revising the item. These items are identified within the Standard Special Provision as a standard PennDOT item number. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as 408. 2. Modifications to Publication 408 When a Publication 408 Specification is modified and there is no Commission Specification or Commission Standard Special Provision, it becomes a Nonstandard Project Specific Special Provision and the item number will begin with a 3. The other 7 digits must match the PennDOT Items Catalog. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as SP.
18-5 2010

For example, if it were necessary to modify the Publication 408 specification for mobilization to be job specific, the item number would be shown on the Summary Sheets as follows:
ITEM NO 3608-0001 QTY --UNIT LS DESCRIPTION MOBILIZATION REF SP TAB ON SHEET

3. Modifications to either Commission Specifications or Commission Standard Special Provisions The item number associated with the Commission Specification or Commission Standard Special Provision is changed so that the first number comprising the item number is always a 4. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as SP. For example, if Commission Specification CS-305 Bituminous Concrete Base Course and Commission Standard Special Provisions AXX.00 Construction Schedule, B0X.00 Construction Lighting, and FXX.00 Underdeck Protection Shields were modified, they would be replaced with Non-standard Project Specific Special Provisions and included as FXX.00 Bituminous Concrete Base Course FXX.00 Construction Schedule, F0X.00 Construction Lighting, and FXX.00 Underdeck Protection Shields. These items would be shown on the Summary Sheets as follows:
ITEM NO 4108-0001 4305-0005 4901-0202 4090-0200 QTY --12,726 10 5,000 UNIT LS SY EA SF DESCRIPTION CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE BITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 5 DEPTH CONSTRUCTION LIGHTING UNDERDECK PROTECTION SHIELDS REF SP SP SP SP TAB ON SHEET

4. Items that do not relate to any PennDOT or Commission Standard Specification All items in this category are shown on the Summary Sheet, Tab Sheet and in the Schedule of Prices as: 4000-XXXX. The reference on the Summary Sheet in the column headed Specification Reference is shown as SP. Examples of such items are:
18-6 2010

ITEM NO 4000-0046 4000-0047 4000-0050

QTY -------

UNIT LS LS LS

DESCRIPTION EXPRESS E-Z PASS POWER SUPPLY UNINTERRUPTIBLE POWER SUPPLY DEMOLITION OF PORTION OF EXISTING TOLL PLAZA

REF SP SP SP

TAB ON SHEET

F.

Alternate Structure Items If alternate structures are included with either/and/or line items, each like item of work for each structure must have a unique item number. This unique number may be associated with the alternate if the alternate provides for and items. This item must also be different than a like item that is not included in the either/and/or line items. The following illustrates the proper item number assignment:

18-7 2010

ITEM NO 1002-0001 1002-0053 1002-0153 EITHER: 4120-0001 AND: 1002-0114 AND: 1002-0152 AND: 1002-1153 AND: 1002-0180 AND: 1002-0190 AND: 1005-1104 AND: 1005-1154 OR: 4000-0001 AND: 1005-1104 AND: 1005-1154 EITHER: 4120-0002 AND: 1002-0181 AND: 1002-0191 AND: 1002-1114 AND: 1002-1152 AND: 1002-1153 AND: 1005-1114 AND: 1005-1164 OR: 4000-0002 AND: 1005-1114 AND: 1005-1164

QTY 28,000 7,200 20 --104 628 538 50,395 231,370 9,205 225 ---

UNIT LB LB EA LS EA EA EA LB LB LF EA LS LF EA

DESCRIPTION REINFORCEMENT BARS REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED MECHANICAL SPLICE SYSTEM FOR NO. 6 REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED BRIDGE STRUCTURE AS DESIGNED, ABC-123 MECHANICAL SPLICE SYSTEM FOR NO. 7 REINFORCEMENT BARS MECHANICAL SPLICE SYSTEM FOR NO. 5 REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED MECHANICAL SPLICE SYSTEM FOR NO. 6 REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED REINFORCEMENT BARS REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED STEEL BEAM BEARING PILES, HP12x74 STEEL BEAM PILE TIP REINFORCEMENT, HP12x74 PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BRIDGE STRUCTURE, ABC-123 STEEL BEAM BEARING PILES, HP12x74 STEEL BEAM PILE TIP REINFORCEMENT, HP12x74 BRIDGE STRUCTURE AS DESIGNED, XYZ-789 REINFORCEMENT BARS REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED MECHANICAL SPLICE SYSTEM FOR NO. 7 REINFORCEMENT BARS MECHANICAL SPLICE SYSTEM FOR NO. 5 REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED MECHANICAL SPLICE SYSTEM FOR NO. 6 REINFORCEMENT BARS, EPOXY COATED STEEL BEAM BEARING PILES, HP12x74 STEEL BEAM PILE TIP REINFORCEMENT, HP12x74 PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BRIDGE STRUCTURE, XYZ-789 STEEL BEAM BEARING PILES, HP12x74 STEEL BEAM PILE TIP REINFORCEMENT, HP12x74

REF

TAB ON SHEET

--35,570 200,927 70 676 600 12,995 171 ---

LS LB LB EA EA EA L.F EA LS LF EA

18-8 2010

G.

Item Number Sequencing All item numbers appear on the Summary Sheet, Tab sheets, and in the Schedule of Prices in numerical order as if that item were in the PennDOT Items Catalog, regardless of the first digit. Item numbers associated with Project Specific Special Provisions (4000-XXXX) are the last item numbers shown in the Summary Sheet, Tab Sheets and in the Schedule of Prices. An example of the proper arrangement of items on the Summary Sheet, Tab Sheets, and in the Schedule of Prices follows:

ITEM NO 2108-0001 0205-0100 4305-0005 0501-0020 3608-0001 2623-2001 0703-0025 2850-0031 2001-0010 1002-0190 3005-1104 2018-0001 4090-0200 4000-0001 4000-0002

QTY --263 12,726 8,567 --158 790 12 56 183,564 9,205 --5,000 -----

UNIT LS CY SY SY LS LF CY CY CY LB LF LS SF LS LS

DESCRIPTION CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE FOREIGN BORROW EXCAVATION BITUMINOUS CONCRETE BASE COURSE, 5 DEPTH PLAIN CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT, 4 DEPTH MOBILIZATION CONCRETE SAFETY WALL NO. 57 COARSE AGGREGATE ROCK, CLASS R-3 CLASS A CEMENT CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT BARS EPOXY COATED STEEL BEAM BEARING PILES, HP12x74 REMOVAL OF BRIDGE NO. _________, MP. _____ UNDERDECK PROTECTION SHIELDS REMOVAL OF PORTION OF EXISTING CANOPY MODIFICATION OF EXISTING CANOPY

REF SP 408 SP 408 SP SP 408 CS CS 408 SP SP SP SP SP

TAB ON SHEET

18.3

Quantities To be added at later date

18.4

Cost Estimating When preparing cost estimates, the customary contingencies to be used shall be 20% for the design field view submission, 10% for the 60% submission and 5% for the pre-PS&E (90%) submission.

18-9 2010

Chapter 19 PLAN PRESENTATION


19.0 Introduction All plan drawings are to be developed in accordance with the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commissions Engineering Department current CADD standards and the Design Deliverable Scope with this Manual superseding the current CADD standards where applicable. All other CADD standards or plan presentation details not covered by the previously noted documents shall be in accordance with PennDOT Publication 14, Design Manual Part 3, Highway Plans Presentation. 19.1 Tips for Design Field View Presentation A. Show existing drainage on the proposed cross sections. B. Show proposed drainage on the proposed cross sections. 19.2 Tips for Plan Presentation A. Right-of-Way lines for all state and township highway easements are not shown through Turnpike limited access Right-of-Way. B. List contract drawings on the title sheet and not in the specifications. C. On index maps show Structure numbers, Mile Post, Stationing, etc. D. Show contours on construction plans only for special conditions. E. Show match lines between drawing sheets denoting adjacent sheet numbers. F. Right-of-Way numbers and Station/Offset values for right-of-way are not shown on construction drawings; but, they are shown on the Right-of-Way/Geometry Plan. G. Show item number on plan for special details that have special provisions. H. Items are to be arranged in the tabulation and summary sheets based on the last three (3) digits of the first grouping of four (4) digits. I. Typical sections do not show stationing on final plans. J. Do not include the inlets conditions (CS-605.3) on the plan sheets. K. Profiles it is not necessary to show longitudinal drainage. L. Graphic Scale Bar shall be used on all scaled drawings. M. For Mainline sections, provide Milepost references every tenth of a mile. N. Labels for BEGINS and ENDS for pavement markings are to run with the stationing. Do not run the BEGINS and ENDS with direction of travel. 19.3 Tips for Property Plot Plans A. Take areas should be subtracted from the larger of either the deed area or the calculated deed area. If the deed area is not able to be obtained, use the calculated deed area. Areas to be shown in acre units to three decimal places. Square feet to be used for areas less than 40 square feet. If the deed area is square feet, then show the take are in both square feet and acres. B. Calculate and subtract legal right-of-way areas (S.R.s, Township Roads). C. Take area descriptions should be based upon the project bearings except for total takes.
19-1 Oct 2011

D. E. F. G. H. I. J.

K. L. M. N. O. P. Q.

R.

S. T. U. V. W. X.

Plots without limited access takes do not need oil, gas or surface mining note. Cut and Fill lines should not be screened on property plot drawings. Proposed and existing roadway pavement lines should be shown. Existing PTC limited access right-of-way can be shown as an adverse or exception, as applicable. Show adverse and exception areas, but do not show the bearings and distances on these areas. Change Pre-Final date in Property Plot block with each submission. Show all features close to the right-of-way that may experience damage (fences, mailboxes, lights, statues, swings, shrubs, trees, etc.) and features (buildings, septic systems, wells, etc.) affecting the property assessment. Show details of existing driveways and proposed driveways. Proposed utility work should be shown. Remove any hatching where it obscures important topographic features. Required Right-of-Way breaks should be set with whole numbers (+00.00, +05.00, etc.) when ever possible. Scaled offset values should be rounded to the nearest foot. New offset values should be expressed to 2 decimal places. With the exception of total takes, avoid creating new right-of-way corners / changes in direction upon existing property lines. Establish and define new right-ofway corners by station (plusses) and offset distances from baselines. Creating a new right-of-way corner / change in direction on an existing property line could require record research and field recovery of evidence to re-establish that property line. If possible, try to avoid creating any new right-of-way or easement corners radial to spiraled baselines. In spirals, try to make required Right-of-Way lines straight lines originating and ending at points perpendicular to tangents and radial to simple curves. A submission of the computer print out denoting all courses and error of closure is to be submitted with the original deed. Legal descriptions should always be in a clock-wise direction. Prime consultants should make all right-of-way submissions. No abandonment or vacations should be shown without approval of legal department. The use of abbreviations should be avoided. Limits of the 100 year flood plain should be shown on the plot when it is in the vicinity of the required take area.

19.4

Tips for Cross Section Presentation A. Should be presented using PennDOT Design Manual Part 3 and the following: B. Label Superelevation rates on each section when in transition or pick a point in the pavement and state the elevation difference from the profile grade. C. Show the following on the cross sections: guide rail with out the start/stop notes, right-of-way lines, perpetual easements, drainage inserts and super elevation. D. Label the Legal Right-of-Way Lines and Perpetual Easements (i.e. Drainage Easements, Utility Easements) E. Ensure that the Graphic Grade (GG) elevations are labeled where applicable. F. Clearly label the Edge of Barrier elevations at the Concrete Glare Screen when the reveal varies throughout the Graphic Grade transition areas.
19-2 Oct 2011

G. Provide lateral offsets from the Survey and Construction Baseline to objects that vary with respect to the Baseline. (i.e. retaining walls, 50 rounding when SE >6%) H. Provide lateral offsets and elevations for pavement breakpoints that are not clearly defined either on the plans or typical sections. (Examples could include, but are not limited to, interchange gore locations and mainline/auxiliary lane junctions) I. Label the invert elevations of parallel ditches along with the associated Class 2 Excavation J. Provide Earthwork Quantities (Cut/fill) by the overall stage and not each phase in each stage. K. Cross section grids are generally acceptable as generated by the design software and only needs to be shown in the area of the cross section. L. Label inlet conditions along with the required drainage data. M. Provide benching quantities for earthwork. rock and embankment.

19-3 Oct 2011

Chapter 20 SAMPLE LETTERS AND FORMS

20-1 Oct 2011

Figure 20.1 Notification of Project to Municipalities

Date

Name xxxx Township Address Address RE: Design Contract No. xx-xxx-xxxx Total Reconstruction Milepost xx to Milepost xx xxxx Townships xxxx County

Dear Name:

The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC) has initiated preliminary design for the reconstruction and widening of the Pennsylvania Turnpike from Milepost xx, approximately xx miles east of xxxx Interchange, to Milepost xx, approximately xx mile east of xxxx Interchange, in xxxx County. The municipalities that are affected include xxxx Townships. The PTC will conduct a study as one of the first tasks to determine the impacts to utilities, local road and stream crossings, and properties adjacent to the Turnpike due to the roadway widening and will investigate and evaluate impacts from flattening existing substandard horizontal curves. In addition, this project will require the replacement of bridge structures carrying local traffic over or under the Turnpike and the potential elimination of a few of these low traffic volume structures during the study task will be evaluated. The PTC will investigate the distribution of local road traffic during the construction activities at each bridge structure and will evaluate the need for separate construction contracts in order to utilize effective detour routes where detours are required. Consultant name is under contract with the Commission to perform the study task as well as the design for the project. They may be contacting you in the near future for pertinent traffic or other information. Your cooperation and input will be greatly appreciated. At the completion of the widening study task (six to eight months), the PTC will schedule a public officials meeting to discuss our findings and to hear your concerns. Should you have any questions, please contact me at (717) 939-9551, extension xxxx, or by email at xxxxx@paturnpike.com. Sincerely,

Name
Title

20-2 Oct 2011

Figure 20.2 Notification of Project to Local Officials Date Name Title of Position Address Address RE: Design Contract No. xx-xxx-xxxx Total Reconstruction Milepost xx to Milepost xx xxxx Townships xxxx County

Dear Name: The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC) has initiated preliminary design for the reconstruction and widening of the Pennsylvania Turnpike from Milepost xx, approximately xx miles east of xxxx Interchange, to Milepost xx, approximately xx mile east of xxxx Interchange, in xxxx County. The municipalities that are affected include xxxx Townships. The PTC will conduct a study as one of the first tasks to determine the impacts to utilities, local road and stream crossings, and properties adjacent to the Turnpike due to the roadway widening and will investigate and evaluate impacts from flattening existing substandard horizontal curves. In addition, this project will require the replacement of bridge structures carrying local traffic over or under the Turnpike and the potential elimination of a few of these low traffic volume structures during the study task will be evaluated. The PTC will investigate the distribution of local road traffic during the construction activities at each bridge structure and will evaluate the need for separate construction contracts in order to utilize effective detour routes where detours are required. Consultant Name is under contract with the Commission to perform the study task as well as the design for the project. They may be contacting you in the near future for pertinent traffic or other information. Your cooperation and input will be greatly appreciated. At the completion of the widening study task (6-8 months), the PTC will schedule a public officials meeting to discuss our findings and to hear your concerns. Should you have any questions, please contact me at (717) 939-9551, extension xxxx, or by email at xxxx@paturnpike.com. Sincerely,

Name Title

20-3 Oct 2011

Figure 20.3 Notification of Project to PennDOT

Date Name District Engineer Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Engineering District x-0 Address Address Re: Design Contract No. xx-xxx-xxxx Total Reconstruction Milepost xx to Milepost xx xxxxxxxx County

Dear Name:

The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission has initiated the design for the total reconstruction of the Pennsylvania Turnpike mainline from Milepost xx, approximately xxxx miles east of xxxx Interchange, to Milepost xx, approximately xx miles east of xxxx Interchange. Consultant Name will perform the design for this reconstruction project. Due to the coordination that will be required between the Department and the Commission for traffic control, detour routes, highway occupancy permits, and other issues, we are writing to inform you of this project. The total reconstruction project will include the removal of the existing bituminous and concrete pavement and replacement with a full-depth bituminous pavement, the replacement of the drainage, and the widening of the median from the existing 10-foot width to a 46-foot width, if possible. We are currently in the Study Phase of this project to determine if a 46-foot width median is feasible, and, if not, what widths can be obtained. The additional median width will require replacement or possible elimination of overhead bridges and replacement or widening of the mainline Turnpike bridges to accommodate the proposed typical section. The Commission has identified the replacement or elimination of the following bridges as key components within this project.
Overhead or Mainline

(i) Bridge Number

Milepost

Intersecting Feature

Number of Spans

Structure Type

20-4 Oct 2011

Currently, it is anticipated that the study and design work for this project will extend from ___________ _________ through __________ ________. It is also anticipated that construction for the mainline Turnpike total reconstruction project will extend from the 200__ through the 200___ construction seasons. However, some of the bridge replacements or possible eliminations may occur in separate contracts in which the construction could be as early as the 200___ construction season. This would insure that two bridge crossings in the same vicinity are not being detoured at the same time. As the design efforts for this project progress, we will continue to keep you informed of any issues with regard to this project that require Department attention. We currently anticipate scheduling a preliminary coordination meeting for this project between the Department and the Commission at the end of the study phase/beginning of the design phase, which will be in approximately six months. We will contact you closer to that time to set up a meeting date, time, and location. Should you have any questions concerning this project, please do not hesitate to contact me at (717)939-9551, extension xxxx, or via e-mail at xxxx@paturnpike.com. Sincerely,

Name Title

20-5 Oct 2011

Figure 20.4 Intent to Enter Date County: Name Municipality: Name Map: xx-xx-xx Parcel Number: xx-xx-xx-xxx Name Address Address

Re:

Notice of Intent to Enter

Dear Property Owner: The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission is beginning engineering and environmental studies for the reconstruction of the Pennsylvania Turnpike from Milepost xx, approximately xxxx miles east of xxxx Interchange, to Milepost xx, approximately xxxx mile east of xxxx Interchange. In order for these studies to be performed, it will be necessary for employees and/or agents of the Commission to enter properties in this vicinity to obtain information required to complete surveys and obtain information for permits and reports. You are hereby notified, pursuant to Act of May 4, 2006, Number 34, Section 1, P.L. 112 known as the Eminent Domain Code (26 Pa. C.S.A. 309), that in order to conduct surveys, studies, tests, soundings, core borings, and/or appraisals, it will be necessary for employees and/or agents of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission to enter your property or properties along, adjacent to, or in the vicinity of the contemplated highway improvements on or after ten (10) days from receipt hereof and continuing until the completion of the work. Some or all of the listed work may be done on your property. The employees and/or agents of the Commission who may need to enter your property have been cautioned to do their work expeditiously, courteously, and with minimal interruption to your use of the premises. Also, they have been instructed to minimize disturbance of property and to assure its expeditious restoration. Your cooperation with them in their performance of this necessary work is gratefully appreciated. Should you have any questions after receipt of this letter, please contact Project Manager Name, at (717) 939-9551, Extension xxxx. This notice is not to be interpreted as a condemnation of your property.

Sincerely,

Alphonse P. Lepore, Jr. Deputy Chief Counsel


20-6 Oct 2011

Figure 20.5 Notification of Sound Barrier Meeting

Date

Name Address Address

Re:

Design Contract No. XX-XXX-XXXX Roadway and Bridge Reconstruction from Milepost XXX to Milepost XXX XXXXXXXX County Sound Barrier Meeting

Dear Property Owner: The Turnpike Commission is currently performing the engineering design work for the reconstruction of the Carlisle Interchange on the inside of the toll booths. As part of the design efforts for this project the Turnpike Commission conducted noise analysis studies throughout the project limits. The noise analysis studies indicated the area along the Eastbound Exit Ramp, south of the Turnpike, as a potential sound barrier location. Since your property is adjacent to the potential sound barrier, the Turnpike Commission seeks your opinion on whether or not the proposed sound barrier should be constructed at this location. If there is agreement among property owners in the adjacent residential neighborhood to proceed with this sound barrier construction, then the Turnpike Commission seeks your opinion on the appearance of the proposed sound barrier facing the residential neighborhood. A meeting is scheduled for Date from XX:XX XM to XX:XX XM at the Location, Address to discuss the proposed sound barrier for the above referenced project. In order to have an influence on this process, you must be present at this meeting. During this meeting, you will be shown the location and height of the proposed sound barrier, along with texture and color options. A consensus needs to be reached on the desire for a sound barrier, and if a sound barrier is desired, a consensus also needs to be reached on the texture and color of the sound barrier on the side facing the residential neighborhood. Please contact me at Telephone Number to let me know if you are able to attend this important meeting. Your cooperation in this matter is appreciated. Sincerely, Name Title Company
20-7 Oct 2011

cc:

Figure 20.6 Sound Barrier Survey Form

PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE COMMISSION


ROADWAY AND BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION MP XXX to MP XXX

SOUND BARRIER SURVEY


DATE
Where do you live? ___Along Hill Drive ___Other _________________ ___________________ (Specify)
Do you own the property where you live?

___yes ___no
Do you want a sound barrier constructed?

___yes ___no Which wall texture do you prefer? Please rank your first and second choice. (1 for first; 2 for second) ___ (A) STONE ___ (B) 6 CEDAR ___ (C) GRAPE STAKE ___ (E) SHIPLAP Which color do you prefer? Please rank your first and second choice for the textures chosen above. (1 for first; 2 for second) STONE ______ GRAY 6 CEDAR ______ RED _______ TAN ______GRAY GRAPE STAKE ______ BROWN _______ TAN ______GRAY SHIPLAP ______ BROWN _______ TAN ______GRAY
General Comments:______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ Please print. Name:_________________________ Address:______________________ ______________________________ Telephone:_____________________

Please leave this comment form with or mail to: Name Title Company Address Address e-mail:

20-8 Oct 2011

_______________________________________________
Place Stamp Here

Name Company Address Address

20-9 Oct 2011

Figure 20.7 Geotechnical Quality Assurance Form-PS&E Review GEOTECHNICAL QUALITY ASSURANCE FORM - PS&E REVIEW PROJECT NAME PTC DESIGN CONTRACT # Element of Design:_________________

By signature and seal, I hereby certify that I have completed a review of the PS&E plans, special provisions, details and cross-sections, and other PS&E documents; and they accurately and appropriately include the geotechnical recommendations presented in the final approved geotechnical reports for this project.

<stamp here>

___________________________________ __________________________________ Printed Name (Geotechnical Representative) Date

___________________________________ Signature

__________________________________ Firm Name

By signature and seal, I hereby certify that I have reviewed the geotechnical reports and incorporated their recommendations in the design.

<stamp here>

____________________________________ Printed Name (Engineer of Record)

__________________________________ Date

____________________________________ Signature

_________________________________ Firm Name

Notes: A hard copy of this completed form is to be included with the PS&E submission. An electronic pdf copy of this completed form is to be submitted with the final project documentation.
20-10 Oct 2011

Figure 20.8 Monument Data & Recover Form

Monument Data & Recovery Form


Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission

20-11 Oct 2011

Monument Data & Recovery Form


Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission

20-12 Oct 2011

Monument Data & Recovery Form


Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission

20-13 Oct 2011

APPENDIX A REQUIRED RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR LIMITED ACCESS Beginning at a point on the northerly legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, said point being ______ feet left of and opposite Turnpike Survey & Right-of-way Baseline Station ___________. Thence along the northerly legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, North _______ East, a distance of ______ feet, to a point being located _________ feet more or less far of and opposite Turnpike Survey and Right-of-way Baseline Station _____________, said point also located on the required right-of-way line for limited access. Thence through lands of grantor, South ___________ East, a distance of ___________ feet, to a point being located ___________ feet left of and opposite Turnpike Survey and Right-of-way Baseline Station __________. Thence through the same, South ___________ East, a distance of ______ feet to a point being located ___________ feet left of and opposite Turnpike Survey and Right-of-way Baseline Station ______________, said point also located on the northerly legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee. Thence along the northerly legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, North ________ West, a distance of ____________ feet, to the point of beginning. Containing _______ Acre(s) of which includes __________ Acre(s) of drainage easement for channel change granted to the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission by Ralph K. Landis and Luella R. Landis by their deed dated ______________ and recorded ______________, in the Recorder of Deeds Office of and for __________ County at Somerset, Pennsylvania, in Deed Book ___________, at Page ________. REQUIRED RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR S.R. ____ Beginning at a point on the eastern legal right-of-way line for S.R. _____, said point being located _________ feet right of and opposite S.R. __________ Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _____________, said point also located on the northerly legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee. Thence along the eastern legal right-of-way line for S.R. ______, by a curve to the right, having a radius of ___________ feet, an arc length of ___________ feet, and a chord bearing North ____________ East, a distance of _________ feet to a point being located ____________ feet right of and opposite S.R. __________ Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ____________, said point also located on the required right-of-way line for S.R. _________. Thence through lands of the grantors, South _____________ East, a distance of ____________ feet to a point being located ___________ feet right of and opposite S.R. _________ Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ____________.

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February 2007

Thence through the same, South _____________West, a distance of __________ feet to a point being located __________ feet more or less right of and opposite S.R. __________ Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station __________, said point also located on the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee. Thence along the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, North ____________ West, a distance of __________ feet to the point of beginning. Containing __________ Acre(s). Being portions of the same property The Court of Common Pleas of Somerset County, by Decree of Distribution dated ____________, and recorded _________, in the Recorder of Deeds Office of and for ___________ County at __________, Pennsylvania, in Deed Book ______, at page ________, awarded grant and conveyance unto ______________, the grantor herein. All those certain tracts or parcels of land situated in _______________ Township, Montgomery County, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, being bound and described according to Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission Plan No. R/W _______, Contract No. ____________, dated ____________ and as follows to wit: REQUIRED RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR LIMITED ACCESS Area No. 1 Beginning at a point of intersection on the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee and the Required Right-of-way Line for Limited Access, said point being located ______ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ________, said point also located _______ feet left of and opposite Existing Turnpike R/W Centerline Station ______; Thence through lands of the grantor, North ___________ East, _______ feet to a point being located ____________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _________. Thence through the same, North ___________ East, ________ feet to a point being located _________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station __________. Thence through the same, South _________ East, ________ feet to a point on the northern legal rightof-way line for limited access of the grantee, said point being located ____________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ____________, said point also located ______ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ___________. Thence along the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, _________ feet along the arc of a curve to the left having a radius of ________ feet, the chord of which has a bearing of South ____________ West and a length of _______ feet, to the Point of Beginning. Containing ________ Acre(s).

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February 2007

Area No. 2 Beginning at a point on the southern legal right-of-way line of Jefferson Street (___ feet wide), said point being located __________ feet more or less left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ___________. Thence along the southern legal right-of-way line of Jefferson Street, North _________ East, __________ feet to a point on the western legal right-of-way line of Flint Hill Road (____ feet wide), said point being located _____ feet more or less left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station __________. Thence along the western legal right-of-way of Flint Hill Road, South ____________ East, ________ feet to a point on the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, said point being located _________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _________, said point also located _________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _________. Thence along the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, South _____________ West, _________ feet to a point being located _________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _____________. Thence along the same, ___________ feet along an arc of a curve to the left having a radius of ___________ feet, the chord of which has a bearing of South ________ West and a length of _________ feet to a point being located __________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _________. Thence along the same, __________ feet along an arc of a curve to the left having a radius of ___________ feet, the chord of which has a bearing of South __________ West and a length of __________ feet to a point, said point being located ________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station __________, said point also located __________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ________. Thence through lands of the grantor, North ____________ East, _______ feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing _________ Acre(s).

REQUIRED SLOPE EASEMENT Beginning at a point on the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, said point being located __________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station __________, said point also located _________ feet left and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station ________.
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February 2007

Thence through lands of the grantor, North __________ West, ______ feet to a point on the southern legal right-of-way line of Jefferson Street (____ feet wide), said point being located ________ feet more or less left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station __________. Thence along the southern right-of-way line of Jefferson Street, _______ feet along the arc of a curve to left having a radius of _________ feet, the chord of which has bearing of North _________ East and a length of _______ feet to a point being located ______ feet more or less left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station __________. Thence along the Required Right-of-way Line for Limited Access (described herein), South ___________ West, ______ feet to a point on the northern legal right-of-way line for limited access of the grantee, said point being located _________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _____________, said point also located ________ feet left of and opposite Survey and Right-of-Way Baseline Station _________. Thence along the northern legal right-of-way line for limited of the grantee, South ______________ West, ________ feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing ___________ Acre(s). SLOPE EASEMENT AN AREA LOCATED OUTSIDE THE RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR SUPPORT AND/OR PROTECTION OF THE AREA WITHIN THE RIGHT-OF-WAY LINES. PLACEMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF DRAINAGE FACILITIES ARE INCLUDED AS ALLOWED FOR IN THE PROTECTION OF THE HIGHWAY. ACQUISITION OF PROPERTY AS SLOPE EASEMENT SHALL NOT PREVENT THE PROPERTY OWNER FROM MAKING ANY USE OF THE AREA COVERED BY THE SLOPE EASEMENT WHICH IS NOT DETRIMENTAL TO THE NECESSARY SUPPORT OF THE AREA WITHIN THE RIGHT-OF-WAY LINES NOR TO THE SAFETY OF THE TRAVELING PUBLIC. Being portions of the same property Gambone Bros. Development Co., by deed dated March 3, 1992, and recorded August 25, 1992, in the Recorder of Deeds Office of and for Montgomery County at Norristown, Pennsylvania, in Deed Book 5017, Page 2413, granted and conveyed unto Heritage Manor Homeowners Association, the grantor herein.

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February 2007