Process Description to configure and install HP ProLiant with Redhat Linux Enterprise

Contents 1 Purpose ......................................................................................................2 2 To Plan for the Configuration....................................................................2 2.1 Decide the number of logical drives that you want to set up as boot device & as data device.......................................................................2 2.2 Choose the Raid Level............................................................................2 3 Setting up the server..................................................................................4 3.1 Requirement 1: Configure HP Smart Array ..........................................4 3.2 Requirement 2: Installing and configuring Linux Redhat ....................6

1

Purpose
This document contains procedures on how to configure and install HP PROLIANT with Redhat Linux Enterprise.

2

To Plan for the Configuration

2.1

Decide the number of logical drives that you want to set up as boot device & as data device.

For syslog server: • Logical drive #1 - Boot Device - consist of physical drive 1 & 2 (72GB each) • Logical drive #2 - Data Device - consist of physical drive 3 & 4 & 5 & 6 & 7 & 8 (146GB each)

2.2

Choose the Raid Level

In the syslog server, RAID 1+0 is chosen for Boot Device (Operating System) and RAID 5 for Data Device (Data storage) respectively.

RAID stands for Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks. A RAID0 logical drive uses all of the available drive capacity for storage. This requires at least one drive and is the least fault tolerant meaning if any one drive fails, the logical drive is no longer available. A RAID1 logical drive mirrors the contents of one drive to another. The logical drive is one-half of the total capacity of the two drives used. This requires a minimum of two drives and provides better fault tolerance because any one drive can fail without affecting data integrity.

In syslog case, we choose: Boot Device - RAID 1+0

A RAID1+0 logical drive mirrors the contents of one set of drives to another set of drives. The logical drive is one-half the capacity of the total of the drives available. This is the most fault tolerant because up to two drives can fail as long as they are not in the same mirror set. Data Device – RAID 5 A RAID5 logical drive uses the equivalent of one drive’s capacity for parity but stripes the parity information on all drives. This implementation requires at least three drives and n-1 drive is used for parity. This provides better fault tolerance because any one drive can fail without affecting data integrity. A RAID ADG logical drive uses the equivalent of two drive’s capacities for parity but stripes the parity information on all drives. This requires at least four drives and n-2 drives are used for parity. This provides the best fault tolerance because any two drives can fail without affecting data integrity

3

Setting up the server

3.1

Requirement 1: Configure HP Smart Array
3.1.1 Power up the server 3.1.2 At the prompt for the controller that you want to configure, press F8 key The main menu appears, enabling you to do the following: • Create, View, or Delete a logical drive.

3.1.3 Create Logical Drive 3.1.3.1 Select ‘Create Logical Drive’ The screen displays a list of all available (unconfigured) physical drives and valid RAID options for the system From the available physical drives, select the drives you want in the array. To do this, use the up and down arrow keys to highlight a drive and then press the space bar to select the drive. Do this for each drive you want in the array. Note that if you select a drive by mistake, just re-highlight the drive and press the space bar to unselect it.

3.1.3.2

Press the arrow keys, spacebar, and Tab key to navigate the screen and set up the logical drive.

For syslog server: • • Select physical drive 1 & 2 (72GB each) and set to RAID1+0 Select the rest of the physical drive 3 4 5 6 7 8 (146GB each) and set to RAID5

3.1.3.3 3.1.3.4

Press the Enter key to accept the settings. Press the F8 key to confirm the settings and save the new configuration.

3.1.4 View Logical Drive Select ‘View Logical Drive’ You will be able to see the logical drive created with the total capacity of both drive.

For syslog server: • • Logical Drive #1, Raid 1+0 Logical Drive #2, Raid 5 68.3GB 683.5GB

3.2

Requirement 2: Installing and configuring Linux Redhat
3.2.1 Booting the Installation Program The Red Hat Linux installation program uses a screen-based Interface that includes most of the on-screen "widgets" commonly found on graphical user interfaces. Figures below illustrate the screens you will see.

Installation Program Widgets as seen in Boot Loader Configuration

Installation Program Widgets as seen in Disk Druid 3.2.2 Installing from CD-ROM

To install Red Hat Linux from a CD-ROM, choose the CD-ROM option from the boot loader screen and select OK. When prompted, insert the Red Hat Linux CD into your CD-ROM drive. Once the CD is in the CD-ROM drive, select OK, and press [Enter]. The installation program will then probe your system and attempt to identify your CD-ROM drive. It will start by looking for an IDE (also known as an ATAPI) CDROM drive. If found, you will continue to the next stage of the installation process

3.2.3

Booting the Installation Program HP ProLiant supports a bootable CD-ROM drive which use for installation. While it is easiest for a user to boot from CD-ROM and perform a graphical installation, sometimes there are installation scenarios where booting in a different manner may be needed. If you do not wish to perform a graphical installation, you can start a text mode installation using the following boot command:

boot: linux text

3.2.4

Welcome to Red Hat Linux The Welcome screen does not prompt you for any input. Please read over the help text in the left panel for additional instructions and information on where to register your Red Hat Linux product. Please notice the Hide Help button at the bottom left corner of the screen. The help screen is open by default. If you do not want to view the help information, click on Hide Help to minimize the help portion of the screen. Click on the Next button to continue.

3.2.5

Language & Keyboard Selection

Once you have the appropriate selection, click Next to continue. 3.2.6 Redhat Linux Installation To perform a new installation of Red Hat Linux on your system, select Perform a new Red Hat Linux installation and click Next.

Choose the type of installation you would like to perform. Red Hat Linux allows you to choose the installation type that best fits your needs. Choose Server as the installation type.

3.2.7

Partitioning Partitioning allows you to divide your hard drive into isolated sections, where each section behaves as its own hard drive. On this screen, you can choose to perform automatic partitioning, or manual partitioning using Disk Druid.

Partitioning Scheme used for syslog server • A “swap” partition (8GB) — swap partitions are used to support virtual memory. In other words, data is written to a swap partition when there is not enough RAM to store the data your system is processing. The size of your swap partition should be equal to twice your computer's RAM. A “/” partition — the partition mounted on “/” contains the operating system kernel (which allows the system to boot Red Hat Linux), along with files used during the bootstrap process. A “/var” partition — the partition mounted on “/var” contains files to which the system writes data during the course of its operation.

3.2.8

Network Configuration The installation program will automatically detect any network devices you have and display them in the Network Devices list.

If you have a hostname (fully qualified domain name) for the network device, you can choose to have DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) automatically detect it or you can manually enter the hostname in the field provided. Finally, if you entered the IP and Netmask information manually, you may also enter the Gateway address and the Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary DNS addresses.

Check Activate on boot, your network interface will be started when you boot.

3.2.9

Set Root Password

The root user (also known as the superuser) has complete access to the entire system. The root account is used to install packages, upgrade RPMs, and perform most system maintenance.

3.2.10

Package Group Selection & Prepare to install

After your partitions have been selected and configured for formatting, you are ready to select packages for installation. Unless you choose a custom installation, the installation program will automatically choose most packages for you.

You should now see a screen preparing you for the installation of Red Hat Linux. For your reference, a complete log of your installation can be found in /root/install.log once you reboot your system.

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