382

City Council
Agenda Item Summary
Meeting Date: 6 August 2013
Prepared by: Marc Wiener, Senior Planner
N arne: Consideration of a use permit application; water allocation resolution; and certification of
an initial study/negative declaration for the establishment of an event center at a site
located in the Service Commercial (SC) District.
Description:
The project site is a 16,000 square foot commercial property that is developed with
two buildings totaling 5,357 square feet. The applicant is proposing to use the existing
buildings on the site as an event center to provide a venue for special events, such as
meetings, conferences, wedding receptions, cooking demonstrations, hands-on classes,
retail shows, etc. A valet service is proposed to park cars at the Carmel Plaza garage and
the Sunset Center parking lot. The project will require certification of the Initial
Study/Negative Declaration and the approval of a use permit to allow for off-site parking.
The project will also require the adoption of a water allocation resolution to transfer City
water into the "Commercial Category" to be used for this project.
Overall Cost:
City Funds: N/A
Grant Funds: N/A
Staff Recommendation:
With the attached findings and conditions: 1) Approve the use permit application to allow
for off-site parking 2); Adopt a resolution to certify the Initial Study/Negative
Declaration; 3) Adopt a resolution to pre-commit the water in the "Commercial" land
use category to the Event Center Project.
Important Considerations:
An Initial Study (IS) was prepared by RBF Consulting. Based on
the IS the consultant and staff determined that the project would not cause a significant
effect on the environment and prepared a Negative Declaration (ND).
Decision Record:
Planning Commission reviewed the project on 9 January 2013 and was supportive of the
proposed use of the site and request for off-site parking. On 4 June 2013 the City Council
determined that the applicant is equitably entitled to water that was previously donated to
the City to use for the Plaza Del Mar project.
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383
Attachments:
• Staff Report with Conditions and Findings
• Attachment "A" - Resolution with findings
• Attachment "B"- Initial Study/Negative Declaration
• Attachment "C" - Correspondence
Reviewed by:
Administrator Date
2
384
CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
STAFF REPORT
TO: MAYOR BURNETI AND MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL
FROM: MARC WIENER, SENIOR L ~ ~ R
THROUGH: JASON STILWELL, CITY ADMINISTRATOR
DATE: 6 AUGUST 2013
SUBJECT: CONSIDERATION OF A USE PERMIT APPLICATION, WATER
ALLOCATION RESOLUTION AND CERTIFICATION OF AN INITIAL
STUDY /NEGATIVE DECLARATION FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF
AN EVENT CENTER AT A SITE LOCATED IN THE SERVICE
COMMERCIAL (SC) DISTRICT.
BACKGROUND
The project site is a 16,000 square foot property located at the southeast comer of
Dolores Street and Seventh A venue. The site is developed with two commercial
buildings totaling 5,357 square feet and a parking lot containing 15 angled parking
spaces. The buildings were designed by Walter Burde in 1971 and have historically been
used as a bank and for retail purposes.
The City spent several years reviewing a proposal for an 18,000 square foot mixed use
building with underground parking at the subject property named Plaza Del Mar. The
project was denied by the City in November 2009 for reasons primarily related to the
preservation of the existing structure. The building has been vacant for the past several
years.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The applicant is proposing to use the existing buildings on the site as an event center to
provide a venue for special events. The project is named the Carmel Event Center.
Activities would likely include meetings, conferences, wedding receptions, cooking
demonstrations, hands-on classes, retail shows, etc. The maximum allowable occupancy
for any event would be 194 people. The proposed hours of operation are from 8:00a.m.
to 10:00 p.m. An Initial Study/Negative Declaration (!SIND) was prepared for the
project (Attachment "A") by RBF Consulting.
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Staff Report
Page2
To provide sufficient parking the applicant is proposing to use a valet service, National
Parking & Valet (NP & V), to park cars at the Carmel Plaza garage and the Sunset Center
parking lot. The project site will serve as the drop-off and pick-up point. The applicant
is also proposing to modify and reconfigure the parking lot at the project site to
accommodate 30 perpendicular parking spaces for the valet service.
Interior modifications are proposed to the main building to accommodate the new use.
The main building is 4,729 square feet and is comprised of a main floor (3,267 sf.), a
partial second floor (612 sf.), and a basement (850 sf.). The second floor is proposed to
be removed and the basement will be reduced in size and used for storage. Other interior
refurbishments include the installation of a kitchen and expansion of the existing
restrooms. The footprint of the building is not being expanded.
PLANNING COMMISSION REVIEW
The Planning Commission reviewed this project at its meeting on 9 January 2013 for the
purpose of providing recommendations to the City Council. Two Commissioners had to
recues themselves because they own property within 500' feet of the project site. The
Planning Commission Rules of Procedure states that four members are required to make
a quorum when voting on a use permit. Because only three Commissioners are able to
participate, this project has been forwarded to the City Council for consideration of the
use permit.
The Planning Commission was generally supportive of the project and found it to be an
appropriate use for the site. The Commission concluded that the use is permitted by the
zoning and should be classified as a "Community Center" as defmed in CMC 17 .68.030.
The Commission did have some concerns about parking and traffic, however, it was
noted that those issues would be addressed in the IS/ND. The Commission recommended
that the Council approve the use permit to allow off-site parking.
EVALUATION
Environmental Review: One of the primary reasons for the California Environmental
Quality Act (CEQA) is to disclose potential environmental impacts associated with a
project to decision-makers and the public prior to final action on a project. An Initial
Study (IS) was prepared by RBF Consulting. Based on the IS the consultant and staff
determined that the project would not cause a significant effect on the environment and
prepared a Negative Declaration (ND). The IS and ND were circulated for public review
and comment from March 11th through April 1st of 2013. No comments were received.
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The IS/ND shall only be certified if there is no substantial evidence in light of the whole
record that the project will have a significant effect on the environment that cannot be
mitigated or avoided. CEQA Guidelines Section 15384 defines substantial evidence as:
" ... enough relevant information and reasonable inferences from this information
that a fair argument can be made to support a conclusion, even though other
conclusions might be reached ... Substantial evidence shall include facts,
reasonable assumptions predicated upon facts, and expert opinion supported by
facts."
If the Council determines that substantial evidence exists that the project may have a
significant environmental impact, staff must be directed to identify mitigation measures
or to prepare an Environmental Impact Report (EIR). Staff has determined that no
substantial evidence exists in the current record that the proposed project would have a
significant environmental impact.
The I SIND has been revised by staff to reflect changing circumstances surrounding water
demand at the site. The Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD)
originally defmed the proposal as a Group III use requiring approximately 2.10 acre-feet
of water. The applicant funded an engineering study, produced by Axiom Engineers,
which estimated the anticipated water use to only be 0.8252 acre-feet.
Since the IS/ND was prepared the MPWMD changed the classification of the use to
Group II, which requires 0.8860 acre-feet of water. The IS/ND has been revised
accordingly to reflect the change in circumstances. The changes are minor in the context
of environmental impact and do not require a recirculation of the document per CEQA
Guidelines section 15073.5. The engineering study has still been provided as
supplemental information.
Definition of Use: Staff concludes that the proposed use is most characteristic of a
"Community Center" as defined by the Zoning Code. CMC Section 17.68.030 defines a
community center as: "Any public, private, commercial, or nonprofit facility established
to provide social, educational, recreational, or cultural programs, meetings, or lectures,
or similar activities. Examples include conference facilities, meeting rooms, youth
centers, and senior centers. This classification includes community facilities operated in
conjunction with an approved residential or commercial use that are not generally
available to the public." Per CMC 17.14.030, community centers are classified as a
permitted use in the Service Commercial (SC) District.
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The applicant has provided a broad description of events ranging from conferences,
weddings, wine tastings, cooking classes, retail shows, etc. The Planning Commission
determined that the proposed use of the property meets the definition of "community
center" as defined by the Code. Staff concludes that hosting activities such as
conferences, seminars, special classes, social gatherings (i.e. weddings) would be
consistent with the above definition. Temporary retail oriented events such as fashion
shows, home furnishings shows, etc, are also permitted.
One issue with the proposal is that retail activities including art galleries, jewelry stores,
antique stores and arts and crafts stores are not permitted where the project site is located,
in the SC District (CMC 17.14.030). The Council should consider whether these zoning
regulations apply to the proposed use of this building, which would prohibit any shows or
events that involve the sale of arts, jewelry and antiques. The intent of the Code could be
that the retail restrictions apply to permanent businesses and not occasional events.
A special condition has been added prohibiting the sale of these items at this site.
However, the City Council can remove this special condition if it is determined that the
zoning restrictions do not apply to the proposed use of the building.
With regards to monitoring the activities that could occur at the site, staff has conditioned
the approval so that the applicant shall make the schedule available to the City upon
request. The City is authorized to determine whether the scheduled events are consistent
with the permitted use of the building. In some cases the venue will be occupied by
individual business proprietors intending to temporarily operate in the City (i.e. cooking
classes, art classes, seminars, etc). A special condition has been added requiring business
proprietors renting the space to register with the City by applying for an In-and-About
business license.
Parking & Traffic:
Use Permit: CMC 17.38.020 (Table A) requires only seven parking spaces based on the
size of the building. However, this code section also states the following: "Table A
establishes the minimum amount of parking required for most land uses and land use
districts. The Planning Commission shall review proposed projects for their anticipated
parking demand and may require additional parking through use permit conditions if
substantial evidence supports the need for providing parking beyond the minimum
standard. The Planning Commission concluded that the proposed use would require
more than seven spaces.
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As a separate attachment (Attachment "D") staff has provided a section from CMC
17.38.30 which states the "parking requirements may be fulfilled by supplying the
required parking on another site upon approval of a use permit" and "the land area
required to provide such parking shall be legally committed for the full life of the
structure. " In order to obtain a use permit the applicant must demonstrate one of the
following five conditions:
1. The property owners of two or more adjacent properties have proposed a
combined development plan to provide the required parking for their properties,
in accordance with the parking standards established in this chapter, on part of
the several sites involved.
2. The project site for which the parking requirement applies is 5, 000 square feet or
less in size and has less than 50 feet of street frontage.
3. The construction of required driveway(s) for on-site parking would result in the
excessive loss of curb parking on street.
4. The topography, size, shape or peculiar conditions of the site or the existing
development on the site would make the provision of on-site parking impractical.
5. The site for which parking is required is located within the central commercial
(CC) land use district where on-site parking is prohibited.
Of the five conditions the only one that could potentially qualify the property is condition
#4. In this case the "peculiar condition" with the existing development could be that the
building is oversized in relation to the parking lot. For example, even a retail use would
have an occupancy of 97 individuals, which significantly exceeds the parking demand
that could be met by the 15 parking spaces currently on the lot.
The Planning Commission determined that condition #4 could be applied to this property
and recommended that the City Council approve the use permit. Pursuant to CMC
Section 17.38.020, a special condition has been included requiring the off-site parking to
be committed for the full life of the structure.
With regards to off-site parking General Plan (Objective 02-4) states that the City should
"recognize that it is not practical to provide sufficient parking that meets total demand at
every location; but that it is desirable to provide, where practical, alternate parking
where it could be removed from public view and in a scale appropriate to Carmel. "
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Valet Parking: A parking and traffic analysis was prepared by Hatch Mott MacDonald
on 27 February 2013. To meet the parking demand the applicant is intending to provide
off-site parking through a valet service named National Parking & Valet (NP&V).
NP&V would park cars at the Carmel Plaza and Sunset Center. Carmel Plaza has 110
spaces with a typical daily occupancy of 30 spaces. Sunset Center has 135 spaces with a
typical daily occupancy of about 35 spaces. NP&V would have discretion to park the
cars at either site.
The parking lot at the project site would be modified to accommodate 30 perpendicular
parking spaces for the valet service and an additional 15 temporary spaces ( 45 Total).
The project site will serve as the drop-off and pick-up point. Valet staffing will vary
depending upon the size of the event and will be actively moving cars to or from the
remote parking lots to prevent vehicle spill-over into adjacent streets. Vehicles would
enter the site from Dolores Street and exit onto Seventh A venue.
The IS/ND includes a thorough description of the parking plan as well as the study
prepared by Hatch Mott MacDonald. Figure 4 in the I S ~ T I presents a diagram of the
valet parking access routes and parking locations. It is estimated that the total parking
demand for any given event could reach as high as 120 vehicles (includes event staff),
which would be for the largest of events as indicated in the study.
It should be noted that parking availability at the Sunset Center will be impacted by the
farmers market, which occurs every Thursday between 10:00 a.m. to 2:00p.m. The City
has also initiated the process of developing a parking plan that could utilize more of the
Sunset Center Parking lot. The project applicant will have to plan around the farmers
market and the use permit may have to be amended at a future date to accommodate the
City's parking plan.
Traffic: The traffic analysis prepared by Hatch Mott MacDonald was peer reviewed by
RBF Consulting. The project was determined to have a "less than significant impact" on
transportation and traffic as identified in the IS/ND. The proposed project would
generate a total of 192 average daily trips.
The IS/ND notes that if the property were returned to being a bank, a total of 397 daily
trips would be anticipated. This number is based on the Institute of Transportation
Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual 9th Ed. In theory, the proposed event center
would generate 205 fewer average daily trips than a bank use.
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Although a negative traffic impact is not anticipated, the City could revoke the use permit
or amend it to allow for a lower occupancy and/or reduced number of events if the use
creates significant traffic or parking problems in the downtown commercial. A special
condition has been added to address this provision.
It should be noted that staff has been working with the Carmel Police Department
throughout the process to make them aware of the proposed activity and the traffic
studies. The applicant is proposing to hire off-duty police officers for each event to assist
with coordinating the traffic circulation.
Carmel's Public Safety Director, Chief Calhoun, has provided a memo to address this
proposal (Attachment "C"). Chief Calhoun indicates that the Carmel PD would work
with the applicant to assist with staffing events and will work with event coordinators to
suggest alternatives if staffing is not available. Chief Calhoun recommends that "only
trained and qualified law enforcement personnel be used for directing traffic" and "any
law enforcement or specially trained personnel not employed by the City of Carmel shall
receive approval by the Carmel Police Department prior to directing any vehicle traffic
on Carmel City streets."
The approval has been conditioned to meet the above requirements. It should be noted
that the determination of a "less than significant" impact is not contingent on having a
traffic coordinator. However, having a traffic coordinator would benefit the parking and
traffic situation, in particular for large events.
WATER ENTI1LElvffiNT
The site is currently categorized as a Group I use by the Monterey Peninsula Water
Management District (MPWMD) and would be required to obtain additional water
credits to support the event center, which is categorized as a Group II use. The site
currently contains .3750 acre-feet of water and at a minimum would need an additional
.5110 acre-feet of water. The applicant has requested that water be transferred to the site
from the City's reserves based on the history of the property.
Two commercial property owners, Denny LeVett and Zigmont Le Towt, transferred
water to the City's reserves for the purpose of being used for the Plaza Del Mar project.
However, the water was never transferred to the site from the City reserves because the
project was denied. The water transferred from Mr. LeVett (.3340 acre feet) remains in a
category entitled "Spinning Wheel". The water transferred from Mr. Le Towt (.3500)
acre-feet) had been unaccounted for because Water Management mistakenly did not
credit Carmel's water reserve account. This oversight was recently identified and the
water has been credited to the City and labeled "Le Towt" water.
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On 4 June 2013 the City Council reviewed the matter and determined that the applicant
was equitably entitled to the water. The primary reason for the decision was that
applicant of the Event Center project was one of the applicants involved in the Plaza Del
Mar Project. When the project was denied the City requested that the applicant return
with a project that would be an adaptive re-use of the building as opposed to demolishing
it. The applicant followed the City's direction for the treatment of the property and the
Event Center project is considered a derivative of the Plaza Del Mar Project. Staff has
prepared findings for adoption to reflect the determinations made at the June 4th meeting.
As a separate item staff has prepared a resolution to transfer.6840 acre-feet of water from
the "Spinning Wheel" and "Le Towt" categories into the "Commercial" land use
category. A second resolution has been provided to pre-commit the .6840 acre-feet of
water in the "Commercial" category to the Event Center Project. A special condition has
been added that any remaining water not needed for the project shall be placed in the
category entitled "Unallocated Reserve".
SUMMARY
When the Planning Commission reviewed the project on 9 January 2013 several Carmel
residents and business owners appeared to speak in support of the project. The general
sentiment was that the project would be a good use for the building and could potentially
benefit local businesses.
With regards to the business district, two applicable sections of the General Plan are
Objective 01-3, which states to "Preserve the economic integrity of the community and
maintain an economic philosophy toward commercial activity ensuring compatibility
with the goals and objectives of the General Plan." Policy P1-11 encourages "unique,
quality commercial uses that serve the intellectual, social, material, and day-to-day needs
of both the local community and visitors. " The proposed project meets these goals.
RECOMMENDATION
With the attached findings and conditions: 1) Approve the use permit application to allow
for off-site parking 2); Adopt a resolution to certify the Initial Study/Negative
Declaration; 3) Adopt a resolution to pre-commit the water in the '"Commercial" land
use category to the Event Center Project.
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CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY PLANNING AND BUILDING
UP 12-20
Carmel Event Center
CPines 7 LLC
SECor. Dolores & 7th
Block 91, Lots 2, 4, 6 & 8
CONSIDERATION:
FINDINGS FOR DECISION
Consideration ofFindings and Conditions for the approval of a Use Permit application
and certification of a Negative Declaration for the Carmel Event Center Project.
FINDINGS OF FACT:
1. This site is a 16,000 sf. site comprised of lots 2, 4, 6 & 8 of Block 91 in the
Service Commercial (SC) District of Carmel-by-the-Sea.
2. The site is developed with two commercial buildings totaling 5,357 square feet
and a parking lot containing 15 angled parking spaces. The 612 square foot upper
level will be demolished as part of the project approval.
3. The property owner submitted an application to establish an event center at the site
on 16 November 2013. The project will require the approval of a use permit
application to allow for additional off-site parking.
4. The Planning Commission reviewed project proposal on 9 January 20 13 to
provide recommendations to the City Council.
5. The proposed use is categorized as Group II by the Monterey Peninsula Water
Management District and will require 0.8860 acre-feet of water. The site currently
contains 0.3750 acre-feet ofwater and requires an additional 0.5110 acre-feet from
the City's water allocation. A resolution has been prepared for adoption by the
City Council.
6. The City circulated an Initial Study (IS)/Negative Declaration(ND) for the project
in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) from 11
March 2013 through 1 April2013. No comments were received.
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FINDINGS FOR DECISION:
1. Allowing the proposed use is consistent with the City' s goal of achieving and
maintaining a balanced mix of uses that serve the needs of both local and non-
local populations.
2. The proposed use will provide adequate ingress and egress to and from the
proposed location.
3. The capacity of surrounding streets is adequate to serve the automobile and
delivery truck traffic generated by the proposed use as evaluated in the IS/ND.
4. The proposed use is not in conflict with the General Plan.
5. The proposed use will comply with all zoning standards applicable to the use and
zoning district.
6. The granting of the Use Permit will not set a precedent for the approval of similar
uses whose incremental effect will be detrimental to the City, or will be in conflict
with the General Plan.
7. The proposed use will not make excessive demands on the provision of public
services, including water supply, sewer capacity, energy supply, communication
facilities, police protection, and fire protection.
8. The proposed use will not be injurious to public health, safety or welfare.
9. The proposed use will be compatible with surrounding land uses and will not
conflict with the purpose established for the district within which it will be
located.
10. The proposed use will not generate adverse impacts affecting health, safety, or
welfare of neighboring properties or uses.
ENVIRONMENTAL FINDINGS:
1. Pursuant to the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act, and based
on the findings of the Initial Study, the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea has determined
that the project will not have a significant effect on the environment.
2. With the use of the Carmel Plaza garage and SWlset Center parking lots the Initial
Study/Negative Declaration determined that the project will have a "less than
significant" impact on parking and traffic.
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3. Minor amendments have been made to the Initial Study/Negative Declaration to
reflect circumstances around the water demand for project which changed during
the review process.
SPECIAL CONDITIONS:
1. This Use Permit (UP 12-20) authorizes an event center at the subject property with
additional off-site parking provided by the Carmel Plaza garage and Sunset Center
parking lot to be used for special events. Pursuant to CMC Section 17.38.020, the
off-site parking identified in the I SIND shall be committed for the full life of the
use. Any change to the terms of this condition shall be cause for the amendment
and/or possible revocation of the Use Permit.
2. The applicant shall obtain a business license and certificate of occupancy for the
building. Maximum occupancy shall not exceed the standards in the State
Uniform Building and Fire Codes. The maximum occupancy identified in the
staff report (194) is a maximum and may be reduced by the Building Official as
needed to meet safety standards depending on the floor plan and layout.
3. If the Event Center project is not implemented the pre-committed water will return
to the Affordable Housing Category. Any water not needed for the Event Center
project shall be reallocated into the ''Unallocated Reserve" category.
5. Hours of operation shall be limited from 8:00a.m. to 10:00 p.m. seven days per
week. Live music is not permitted without a permit. Recorded or reproduced
music shall not exceed 55 db-A as measured at the property line (CMC 9.16.040).
Complaints of excessive noise, lighting and other nuisances from the property
shall be cause for review of the permit.
6. Retail events including the sale of jewelry, art, antiques and arts and crafts as
defmed by CMC 17.68 are prohibited. Business proprietors renting the space for a
special event shall submit an "In-And-About" business license application to the
City prior to the event.
7. The applicant shall make a schedule of events available to the City upon request.
The City reserves the right to determine whether the scheduled events are
consistent with the permitted use of the property and consistent with the zoning
code.
8. The applicant shall work with the Carmel Police Department to provide traffic
coordinators for special events. Only trained and qualified law enforcement
personnel shall be used for directing traffic. Any law enforcement or specially
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trained personnel not employed by the City of Carmel shall receive approval by
the Carmel Police Department prior to directing any vehicle traffic on Carmel City
streets.
9. If the use creates a significant parking and traffic impact to the surrounding
neighborhood, as determined by the City, the Use Permit shall be reviewed by the
City Council to address the impact. Amendments may include, but are not limited
to, reducing the building occupancy, reducing number of allowed events or
amending the parking plan.
10. The use shall be conducted in a manner consistent with the presentations and
statements submitted in the application and at the public hearing, and any change
in the use which would alter the findings or conditions adopted as part of this
permit shall require approval of a new use permit by the Planning Commission.
11. This use permit shall become void and no further force or effect if the use is not
initiated within six months and/or upon termination or discontinuance of the use
for any period of time exceeding six months.
12. Violations of the terms of this use permit or other ordinances of the City may
constitute grounds for revocation of this use permit and the associated business
license by the Planning Commission.
13. All modifications made to the exterior of the building, including but not limited to
paint, window treatments, awnings, paving and landscaping, shall first require
written approval by the Department of Community Planning and Building. No
notice-attracting features, such as banners, balloons, streamers, lights, additional
signs, or flags shall be installed without written approval from the City.
14. Adequate facilities shall be provided on the site for the closed storage of trash and
garbage generated by the use. The on-site storage shall be designed so that the
area can be cleaned and the refuse removed without creating a public nuisance and
without being placed on the sidewalks or other public ways. If the method of
cooking used will generate hot ashes, a storage facility and disposal method shall
first be approved by the Fire Department.
15. At least one restroom shall be available for use by both sexes within, or
conveniently adjacent to, the specific business premises and on the same property
on which the use is located. This restroom shall comply with all provisions of the
State Uniform Building and Plumbing Codes as to the required size, location and
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accessibility standards, and shall be available for use by both the employees and
patrons of the business.
16. A summary sheet of basic Use Permit requirements (allowed allowed hours,
special mitigations) shall be posted on the premises or shall be available upon
request by any enforcement officer of the City.
17. The applicant agrees, at its sole expense, to defend, and hold hannless
the City, its public officials, officers, employees, and assigns, from any liability;
and shall reimburse the City for any expense incurred, resulting from, or in
connection with any project approvals. This includes any appeal, claim, suit, or
other legal proceeding, to attack, set aside, void, or annul any project approval.
The City shall promptly notify the applicant of any legal proceeding, and shall
cooperate fully in the defense. The City may, at its sole discretion, participate in
any such legal action, but participation shall not relieve the applicant of any
obligation under this condition. Should any party bring any legal action in
connection with this project, the Superior Court of the County of Monterey,
California, shall be the situs and have jurisdiction for the resolution of all such
actions by the parties hereto.
397
CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
CITY COUNCIL
RESOLUTION NO. 2013-
A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA:
a) ADOPTING FINDINGS REGARDING EQUITABLE RIGHT TO TRANSFERRED
WATER CREDITS; b) PRE-COMMITING WATER TO THE PROPOSED EVENT CENTER
PROJECT; c) ADOPTING AN INITIAL STUDY /NEGATIVE DECLARATION FOR THE
PROPOSED CARMEL EVENT CENTER PROJECT.
WHEREAS, In 2000 the City received an application for a mixed-use project named Plaza Del
Mar at the south east comer of Dolores Street and Seventh Avenue; and
WHEREAS, water was transferred to Carmel's water allocation from Mr. Z. J. LeTowt (.350
acre-feet) and Mr. Dennis LeVett, aka "Spinning Wheel", (.334 acre-feet) to be used for the Plaza Del
Mar project; and
WHEREAS, on 17 September 2009 the Planning Commission of the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea
denied all permits for the Plaza Del Mar Project; and
WHEREAS, the decision of the Planning Commission was appealed to the City Council and the
denial was upheld on 3 November 2009 with a recommendation that the project applicant return with an
adaptive re-use of the building; and
WHEREAS, on 16 November 2012 one of the original project applicants from the Plaza Del Mar
project submitted an application for a new project at the subject location named the Carmel Event Center;
and
WHEREAS, the City required preparation of an Initial Study (IS) and Negative Declaration (ND)
for the project; and
WHEREAS, the IS/ND has been completed in compliance with the California Environmental
Quality Act; and
WHEREAS, the IS/ND determined that the Carmel Event Center project will not create a
significant impact to the environment; and
WHEREAS, the City Council has reviewed and considered the information contained in the
Environmental Impact Report prior to approving the project and has applied its understanding of this
information when considering development permits for the project; and
WHEREAS, the project site has .375 acre-feet of water and will require an additional.551 acre-
feet of water, which the project applicant has requested be provided from the water that was donated to
the City for the Plaza Del Mar project; and
1
398
WHEREAS, on 4 June 20 13 the City Council determined that the applicant was equitably entitled
to water (.6840 acre feet) previously intended to be used at the site for the Plaza Del Mar project and
directed staff to return with a resolution and findings to pre-commit the water to the Event Center project;
and
WHEREAS, pursuant to the City's Water Management Program on 10 July 2013 the Planning
Commission reviewed the water allocation and recommended that the Spinning Wheel and Le Towt water
be transferred to the Commercial Category; and
WHEREAS, on 6 August 2013 the City Council adopted a resolution placing .6840 acre-feet of
water from the "Spinning Wheel" category and from the previously unallocated "Le Towt" water credit
transfer to the Commercial category; and
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY
OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA DOES:
1. Certify the Initial Study and Negative Declaration for the Carmel Event Center
2.
Project.
Adopt the attached findings (exhibit "A") for the equitable entitlement of water
project applicant.
to the
3. Pre-commit to the Carmel Event Center Project6840 acre-feet of water from the "Commercial
Category" of the City's water allocation. Any remaining water not needed for the
project shall be placed in the "Unallocated Reserve" category.
PASSED AND ADOPTED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-
SEA this 6 day of August 20 13 by the following roll call vote:
AYES: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
NOES: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
ABSENT: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
ABSTAIN: COUNCIL MEMBERS:
SIGNED:
Jason Burnett, MAYOR
ATTEST:
Heidi Burch, City Clerk
2
399
Exhibit "A"
Index of Documents Cited in Findings
1. All documents, plans, reports and correspondence contained in File No. UP 12-20 in
the City of Carmel-By-The Sea Community Planning and Building Department ("the
Application File").
2. Staff Report for January 9, 2012 Planning Commission consideration of a Preliminary
Concept Review for the establishment of an event center at a site located in the Service
Commercial (SC) District ("the Project").
3. Initial Study/Negative Declaration - Carmel Event Center (RBF Consulting, March
2013) ("ISIMND").
4. Legal opinion letter from Brian Finegan to Mark Wiener, March 20, 2013 re: Events
Center Project- Water Allocation ("the Legal Opinion").
5. Staff Report for June 4, 2013 City Council consideration of the water allocation for
the Project (including all attachments and exhibits) ("the StaffReport").
6. City of Carmel-by the-Sea City Council Resolution No. 00-84, passed and adopted
June 6, 2000 ("Resolution No. 00-84").
7. Letter from Rich Guillen, City Manager, to Monterey Peninsula Water Management
District dated November 18, 2002 regarding LeVett transfer ("the Guillen Letter.")
8. Application for Water Credit Transfer (Spinning Wheel Transfer, March 19, 2001)
("the Spinning Wheel Application.")
9. Monterey Peninsula Water Management District Staff Report on Spinning Wheel
transfer (April21, 2003) ("the MPWMD Staff Report.")
10. All documents and other items and materials related to the Project parcel and the
project, in all City files.
11. City of Carmel-by-the-Sea Water Management Ordinance (Ordinance (Ordinances
2004-1 and 2004-2, Sections 17.50.010 through 1 7-50-040 CMC) ("the Water Management
Ordinance").
12. City of Carmel-by-the-Sea 2006 Water Allocation Resolution (Updated 2/25/ 13)
("the Water Allocation Resolution").
13. Water History for South East Corner of Dolores Street and Seventh Avenue Site
(Applicant's submittal, undated) ("Applicant's Water History"), including letter from Denny
LeVett to Mayor Jason Burnett dated April15, 2013 ("the LeVett Letter".
14. Applicant's Evidence Packet, consisting of:
3
400
a) Staff Report- Carmel Center Project (DR 99-15 Tomlinson, June 6, 2000)
("Carmel Center Staff Report"
b) Page 3.9-3 from Plaza del Mar Mixed Use Project Draft EIR.
c) Copy ofResolution No. 00-84 (June 6, 2000).
d) Letter from Ron Motta to Monterey Peninsula Water Management District
(March 16, 2001) ("the Motta Letter").
e) Letter from Gabriela Ayala (Monterey Peninsula Water Management District)
to Mr. Z. J. LeTowt (December 16, 2002) ("the Ayala/LeTowt Letter").
f) Letter from Gabriela Ayala (Monterey Peninsula Water Management District)
to Mr. Dennis LeVett (August 22, 2005) (''the Ayala/LeVett Letter").
g) 2006 Water Allocation (Amended)
h) Exhibit "A"- Total Available Water Resources (March 7, 2006).
15. Letter from Zigmont J. Le Towt III to Mayor Jason Burnett dated April 17, 2013.
("the LeTowt Letter").
16. Letter from Anthony L. Lombardo to Marc Wiener dated June 4, 2013 regarding new
evidence pertaining to the LeTowt water transfer (''the Lombardo Letter").
17. E-mail message from Gabriela Ayala, Conservation Representative, Monterey
Peninsula Water Management District, to Marc Wiener confirming the addition of0.35 acre feet
of water from the LeTowt water transfer to the City's total water allocation ("the Ayala E-mail").
18. All evidence, both oral and written, including the oral testimony of Anthony
Lombardo and Jeff Peterson, presented at the City Council public hearing on June 4, 2013.
FINDINGS AND PROJECT DECISIONS
1. FINDING: The Project requires 0.886 acre feet of water per year ("afy").
a. Evidence: Monterey Peninsula Water Management District determination
that the use is categorized as a Group II use (0.0002 afy/sf); Staff Report.
2. FINDING: The City's Water Management Ordinance provides that no change in
land use shall be allowed through any permit or license that could result in a net
increase in water use unless such change has been approved in accordance with all
applicable provisions of the water management program.
a. Evidence: Section 17.50.040 CMC.
3. FINDING: The City's Water Management Ordinance provides further that if a
project would require more water from a land use category than currently remains,
after considering the original allocation minus all existing pre-commitments and
dedications, the application shall be returned to the applicant and shall not be
processed or shall be denied.
4
401
a. Evidence: Section 17.50.040.A.4 CMC.
4. FINDING: The Project would require water from the Commercial land use category
which currently has a zero balance remaining after considering the original allocation
minus all existing pre-commitments and dedications.
5.
a. Evidence: The Water Allocation Resolution.
b. Evidence: The Staff Report.
c. Evidence: The Legal Opinion.
d. Evidence: Testimony of staff at the June 4, 2013 public hearing.
6. FINDING: The Project site has a water credit of0.3750 afy based on the prior use of
the site and the existing floor area of the building.
a. Evidence: Staff Report, p. 2.
b. Evidence: Legal Opinion, p. X.
c. Evidence: Applicant' s Water History.
d. Evidence: Testimony at the June 4 public hearing.
7. FINDING: The Project requires approximately 0.511 afy of additional water over
and above the prior use credit.
a. Evidence: Staff Report, p. 2
b. Evidence: Testimony at the June 4 public hearing.
8. FINDING: The Water Allocation Resolution includes Category #8: Spinning Wheel,
containing .334 afy of water remaining from the 0.56 afy of water that came from the
Spinning Wheel Restaurant.
a. Evidence: The Water Allocation Resolution.
b. Evidence: Applicant's Evidence Packet.
9. FINDING. The Monterey Peninsula Water Management District has confirmed that
the City has an updated total of 3.320 acre feet of water available, reflecting a new
credit of 0.35 acre feet from the LeTowt transfer.
a. Evidence: The Ayala E-mail.
10. FINDING: Neither the Project nor the Project site has a legal right to water credits
from the Spinning Wheel (LeVett) transfer or the LeTowt transfer.
a. Evidence: Legal Opinion, p. 4
11. FINDING: Notwithstanding that neither the Project nor the Project site has a legal
right to water credits from the Spinning Wheel (LeVett) transfer or the LeTowt
transfer, and based expressly on the premise that the current Event Center project is a
5
402
derivative or continuance of the prior Plaza Del Mar project, the City Council finds
that the Applicant has an equitable right to the use of sufficient water credits from the
Spinning Wheel (LeVett) transfer and the LeTowt transfer to serve the needs of the
Project (0.551 afy), and that the.
a. Evidence: Testimony of Jeff Peterson that he was a partner in the Plaza Del
Mar project and paid the cost of obtaining the water transfers from LeVett and
LeTowt,
b. Evidence: Testimony of Jeff Peterson that he attended all of the public
hearings on the Plaza Del Mar project and heard the City Council direct that
the owners should come back with another project on the site that preserved
the historic character of the existing building.
c. Evidence: Testimony of Jeff Peterson that he never heard and did not
understand that the transferred water credits would not be available for a
revised project on the site.
d. Evidence: Testimony of Jeff Peterson that in reliance on his experience with
the Plaza Del Mar project as set forth above, he bought out the other partners
and now owns the project site.
e. Evidence: Testimony of Jeff Peterson that he has submitted the application
for the Event Center project, and paid the costs thereof, in the good faith
believe that he was responding to the prior City Council's request for a
revised project on the site.
12. FINDING: Under the unique circumstances of this case, and without acknowledging
that the City misled the applicant in any way regarding the availability of the water
transfer credits, the City Council finds that the failure of the City to acknowledge the
applicant's equitable right to the water transfer credits would work a fundamental
injustice, and that the four elements criteria for establishing this equitable right have
been satisfied.
a. Evidence: Finding No. 11 above, and the evidence cited therefor.
b. Evidence: Legal Opinion and testimony of Brian Finegan at the June 4, 2013
public hearing.
13. FINDING: The equitable right acknowledged by this action extends only to so much
of the Spinning Wheel and LeTowt water transfer credits as may be necessary for the
Event Center project, and no more.
a. Evidence; Testimony of Jeff Peterson at the public hearing of June 4, 2013,
that he waived any claim in excess of that required for his Event Center
project.
6
403
Attachment "B"
Prepared for
March 2013
Initial Study I Negative Declaration
Carmel Event Center
Prepared by
• • •
t:IJNBULTING
AIJII!2"""""rw
404
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Notice of Availability I Notice of Intent
Negative Declaration
Initial Study
List of Fjgures
Figure 1: Site Vicinity
Figure 2: Aerial of Project Site
Figure 3: Proposed Project Floor Plan
Figure 4: Proposed Valet Parking Plan
Figure 5: Valet Parking Access Routes and Parking Locations
Figure 6: General Plan Land Use Designations
Figure 7: Zoning Designations
Figure 8: Photos of Proposed Project Site
List of Tables
Table 1 : Proposed Project Valet Staffing
Table 2: Proposed Project Water Supply and Demand Estimate
Table 3: Estimated Project Parking Demand & Supply
Table 4: City of Carmel Water Allocation
Appendices
A Traffic and Parking Study for the Proposed Carmel Event Center (Hatch Mott
MacDonald)
B Carmel Event Center Water Use Study (Axiom Engineers)
C City ofCarmel2006 Water Allocation (Updated 2/25/13)
3
9
17
C OMMUNI T Y P L ANNING & BUILDI NG 11
405
Z I Cl'l'Y OF CARMEL
406
Notice of Availability
NOTICE OF A V I
NOTICE OF INTENT
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 13
407
Cannel .Event Center
4 1 l: ITY Of CI\RMI!l
408
City of Carmel
Community Planning & Building
P.O. Drawer G
California 93921
Notice of Availability
Phone: (831) 620-2010 Fax: (831) 620-2014
March 8, 2013
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT A NEGATIVE DECLARATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Cannel-by-the-Sea has prepared a
proposed Negative Declaration, pursuant to the requirements of CEQA, for the proposed
Carmel Event Center. The project site is located on the east side of Dolores Street
between Seven and Eighth Avenues in the City of Carmel-by-the Sea, Monterey County,
California (Block 91, Lots 2, 4, 6, and 8; APN 010-145-020-000).
The proposed Negative Declaration, Initial Study and reference documents are available
for review at the Community Planning and Building Department at the Carmel-by-the-
Sea City Hall, located on the east side of Monte Verde Street between Ocean A venue and
Seventh Avenue and on the City's website at www.ci.cannel.ca.us (click on Government,
then Staff/Departments, then Community Planning & Building, then Projects).
An additional copy for public review is available at the Harrison Memorial Library
(northeast corner of Ocean Avenue and Lincoln Street) and copies are available for
purchase at Copies-by-the-Sea (northwest corner of Dolores Street and Fifth A venue).
The City Council will review this project on April 2, 2013. In accordance with time
limits mandated by State law (CEQA Guidelines Section 15073[a]), written comments on
this Negative Declaration and the Initial Study wi11 be accepted (for 20 days) from March
8, 2013 through 5:00p.m. on March 27, 2013.
Project Description
The proposed project is the conversion of an existing, vacant, retail bank building into an
event center that would provide a venue for special events throughout the year. Activities
would include meetings, conferences, wedding receptions, cooking demonstrations, hand-
on classes, retail shows, etc. The project site is currently developed with two buildings
totaling 5,357 square feet (sf.). Following refurbishment of the interior, the final project
will accommodate 3,888 sf. of occupied space.
The project site is 16,000 sf. and currently contains 15 angled parking spaces. To provide
additional on-site parking capacity, the surface parking lot will be modified and
COMMU NITY PLANNING & BUILDING I S
409
Cannel Event Center
reconfigured to accommodate 30 perpendicular parking spaces for the valet service, a
vehicle drop-off/pickup space for valet parking, and a valet waiting area with benches
and chairs, and accommodation for two ADA accessible valet parking spaces.
Reconfiguration of the parking lot will require minor modification to the existing curbs
(from a "zigzag" pattern to a straight curb) and resurfacing of the parking lot.
All events will be valet parked by National Parking & Valet (NP & V). While some
vehicle may remain on site under special circumstances, most vehicles will be valet
parked at either the Carmel Plaza garage or the surface lot at the northwest comer of the
Sunset Center.
The proposed project has an estimated water supply of 1.059 AFY and would generate a
water demand of0.8860 AFY, based on the use being categorized as Group II, resulting
in a net surplus of 0.1730 AFY. This estimated water supply assumes the proposed
project receives the necessary water allocations (namely, the Jody LeTowt allocation and
the Spinning Wheel restaurant allocation) from the City of Carmel.
Submit Comments to:
Mr. Marc Wiener
Associate Planner
Community Planning and Building
City of Carmel-by-the-Sea
P.O. Drawer G, Carmel-by-the-Sea
Els Monte Verde St. between Ocean and 7th Avenues
Carmel-by-the-Sea, California 93921
(831) 620-2010
mwiener@ci.carmel.ca.us
6 I CI TY OF CARMEL
410
Notice of Availability
For reviewing agencies: The City of Carmel-by-the-Sea requests that you review the
enclosed materials and provide any appropriate comments related to your agency's area of
responsibility. The space below may be used to indicate that your agency has no
comments or to state brief comments.
Distribution: (see below)
No Comments provided
Comments noted below
Comments provided in separate letter
__________________________________________ __
Return to:
Mr. Marc Wiener
Senior Planner
Community Planning and Building
City of Carmel-by-the-Sea
P.O. Drawer G
Carmel-by-the-Sea, California 93921
From:
Agency Name:
Contact Person:
Phone Number:
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDI NG 17
411
Cannel Event Center
AGENCY/ORGANIZATION DISTRIBUTION
1. Monterey County Clerk's Office
2. Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments
3. Transportation Agency for Monterey County
4. Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District
5. Monterey Peninsula Water Management District
6. Monterey County Environmental Health Department
7. Regional Water Quality Control Board
8. Monterey County Planning Department
9. City of Pacific Grove
10. City of Monterey
11. California Coastal Commission
12. Cannel Residents Association
8 I CITY OF CARMEL
412
Negative Declaration
NEGATI\TE DECLARATION
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 19
413
Carmel Event Center
lO I CI'I'Y Ol' CARMI::L
414
Negative Declaration
Negative Declaration
Lead Agency Name and Address
City of Cannel by-the-Sea
P.O.BoxG
E/s Monte Verde bet. Ocean and 7th
Carmel, CA 93921
Contact Person and Phone Number
Mr. Marc Wiener
Senior Planner
City of Cannel-by-the-Sea
831.620.2010
sconroy@ci .cannel.ca. us
Project Sponsor
Mr. Jeffiey Peterson
c/o Anthony Lombardo & Associates
450 Lincoln Avenue, Suite 101
Salinas, CA 9390
Project Location
The project site is located on the east side of Dolores Street between Seven and Eighth
A venues in the City of Cannel-by-the Sea, Monterey County, California (Block 91, Lots
2, 4, 6, and 8; APN 010-145-020-000).
Name of Project
Carmel Event Center
Project Description
The proposed project is the conversion of an existing, vacant, retail bank building into an
event center that would provide a venue for special events throughout the year. Activities
would include meetings, conferences, wedding receptions, cooking demonstrations, hand-
on classes, retail shows, etc. The project site is currently developed with two buildings
totaling 5,357 square feet ( s f . ) ~ Following refurbishment of the interior, the final project
will accommodate 3,888 sf. of occupied space.
The project site is 16,000 sf. and currently contains 15 angled parking spaces. To provide
additional on-site parking capacity, the surface parking lot will be modified and
reconfigured to accommodate 30 perpendicular parking spaces for the valet service, a
vehicle drop-off/pickup space for valet parking, and a valet waiting area with benches
and chairs, and accommodation for two ADA accessible valet parking spaces.
Reconfiguration of the parking lot will require minor modification to the existing curbs
(from a "zigzag" pattern to a straight curb) and resurfacing of the parking lot.
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING Ill
415
Carmel Event Center
All events will be valet parked by National Parking & Valet (NP&V). While some
vehicle may remain on site under special circumstances, most vehicles will be valet
parked at either the Carmel Plaza garage or the surface lot at the northwest comer of the
Sunset Center.
The proposed project has an estimated water supply of 1.059 AFY and would generate a
water demand of0.8860 AFY, resulting in a net surplus of0.1730 AFY. This estimated
water supply assumes the proposed project receives the necessary water allocations
(namely, the Jody LeTowt allocation and the Spinning Wheel restaurant allocation) from
the City of Carmel.
Review Period
March 8, 2013 through 5:00p.m. on March 28,2013
Comments
Any individual, group, or agency disagreeing with this determination or wishing to
comment on the proposed project may submit written comments to the City of Carmel-
by-the-Sea at the address listed above. All comments received by 5:00 PM on March 28,
2013 will be considered by the City of Carmel.
Findings and Reasons
The Initial Study identified potentially significant effects on the environment. However,
the proposed project will not have the potential to significantly degrade the environment;
will have no significant impact on long-term environmental goals; will have no
significant cumulative effect upon the environment; and will not cause substantial
adverse effects on human beings, either directly or indirectly.
The following reasons will support these fmdings:
1. No mitigation measures have been identified.
2. The proposed project is consistent with the adopted goals and policies ofthe City
of Carmel General Plan, City of Carmel Local Coastal Program Land Use Plan
(LUP), and the City of Carmel Municipal Code.
3. City staff independently reviewed the Initial Study, and this Negative Declaration
reflects the independent judgment ofthe City of Carmel.
Mitigation Measures
None required.
12 J CITY OF CARMEL
416
Initial Study
INITIAL STUDY
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 1 13
417
Cannel Event Center
14ICI TY Of ~ A ~ M E L -
418
City of Carmel
Initial Study I Environmental Checklist
Background & Project Description
Project Title
Carmel Event Center
Lead Agency Name and Address
City of Carmel by-the-Sea
P.O. Drawer G
E/s Monte Verde bet. Ocean and 7th
Carmel, CA 93921
Contact Person and Phone Number
Mr. Marc Wiener
Associate Planner
831.620.201 0
mwiener@ci.carmel.ca.us
Project Location
Initial Study
The project site is located on the east side of Dolores Street between Seven and Eighth A venues
in the City of Carmel-by-the Sea, Monterey County, California (Block 91, Lots 2, 4, 6, and 8:
APN 01 0-145-020-000). See Figure 1: Site Vicinity (below).
Project Site
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 115
419
Cannel Event Center
Project Applicant's/Sponsor's Name and Address
Jeffrey Peterson
c/o Anthony Lombardo & Associates
450 Lincoln Avenue, Suite 101
Salinas, CA 9390
General Plan Designation
Core Commercial
Zoning
Service Commercial (SC)
Project Description
The proposed project is the conversion of an existing, vacant, retail bank building into an.event
center that would provide a venue for special events throughout the year (see Figure 2: Aerial of
Project Site). Activities would include meetings, conferences, wedding receptions, cooking
demonstrations, hand-on classes, retail shows, etc. The proposed hours of operation are 8:00
AM to 10:00 PM, however, the property would be used only during such time as an event is
taking place, or preparation for such events. Some event may include recorded music and/or
entertainment, however no live music is anticipated at this time and would require a subsequent
permit.
Building Improvements
The project site is currently developed with two buildings totaling 5,357 square feet (sf.). The
main building is 4,729 sf. and is comprised of a main floor (3,267 sf.), a partial second floor (612
sf.), and a basement (850 sf.). The second floor is proposed to be removed and the basement will
be unoccupied space used for storage and mechanical systems, resulting in a net occupied area of
3,267 sf. A secondary subordinate building is 621 sf. and will remain essentially unchanged and
used as a separate event room. Once completed, the final project will accommodate 3,888 sf. of
occupied space.
The proposed project includes a number of interior refurbishments, including the instal1ation of a
kitchen to provide a full range of food and beverage services and expansion of the existing
restrooms. All building alterations would occur within the existing building footprint.
Based on the usable interior space of the building, the maximum allowable occupancy for any
given event would be 194 persons (City of Cannel, 119/13). An illustration ofthe proposed
building improvements is shown in Figure 3: Proposed Project Floor Plan.
Site Improvements
The project site is 16,000 sf. and currently contains 15 angled parking spaces. To provide
additional on-site parking capacity, the surface parking lot will be modified and reconfigured to
accommodate 30 perpendicular parking spaces for the valet service, a vehicle drop-off/pickup
space for valet parking, and a valet waiting area with benches and chairs, and accommodation for
two ADA accessible valet parking spaces. Reconfiguration of the parking lot will require minor
modification to the existing curbs (from a "zigzag" pattern to a straight curb) and resurfacing of
16 1 CITY OF CARMEL
420
Initial Study
the parking lot.
There are 14 pine trees on site, ranging in size from five (5) inch diameter to 28 inch diameter.
While a number of these trees are in poor health and some have Pitch Canker, these trees will
remain. The only modification will be potential impacts to the root zone associated with
reconfiguration of the surface parking lot.
Valet Parking Program
All events will be valet parked by National Parking & Valet (NP&V). The re-configured on-site
parking lot will be used both as a drop-off and pick-up point for visitor's vehicles as well as a
staging area for relocation of visitor cars to off-site parking areas (see Figure 4: Proposed Valet
Parking Plan). During a peak concentration of guests arriving on site, the first 30 valet parking
spaces will be filled. If needed, there is space in the drive aisle way for another 15 short-tenn
queuing spaces, for a total of 45 valet spaces. Valet staffing will vary depending upon the size of
the event and will be actively moving cars to or from the remote parking lots to prevent vehicle
spill-over into the adjacent streets. An off-duty police officer will be retained on site for each
event to coordinate traffic circulation.
Valet vehicles will enter the site from Dolores Street. Vehicles to be valet parked will exit right
(east) onto 7tit Avenue. While most ofthe vehicles wiJI be valet parked, there will be occasions
when a limited number of vehicles will remain on site for special circumstances (e.g., luxury
"high-end" vehicles) or for events (e.g. an automobile manufacturer event during the week of the
Concourse d' Elegance).
Vehicles to be parked at the Carmel Plaza garage will turn left onto Mission Street and enter the
garage. Vehicles parking at the Sunset Center will turn right onto Mission and enter the surface
lot at the southwest corner of Mission Street and gtit A venue. Cars returning to the project site
will make their way west on gth A venue and north on Dolores Street (See Figure 5: Valet
Parking Access Routes and Parking Locations).
NP&V operates the Carmel Plaza and Sunset Center parking facilities. NP&V will have the
discretion to park vehicles in either or both lots for any individual event, depending on the time
of day and parking availability. Cars arriving for an event at the project site would be valet
parked by NP & V staff. The number of valet staff would range depending on the number of
guests anticipated, as shown in Table 1: Proposed Project Valet Staffmg.
Table 1: Proposed Project Valet Staffing
Guests \" dl jl'] t'" Yakl :O.taff
50 20 2
80 40 3
100 50 4
125 60 5
175 75 6
200 85 7
Source: Natrona! Parlcrng &. Valet, 201 3.
C OMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING j 17
421
Carmel Event Center
Water
The following description of water supply and demand for the proposed project is based on the
use being classified as Group ll by the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District. The
project applicant has also prepared an engineering study indicating that the actual water demand
will be less than the Group II estimate. The engineering study, Carmel Event Center Water Use
Study, is dated February 7, 2013 and was prepared by Axiom Engineers (see Appendix B). It
was peer reviewed by RBF Consulting. While the engineering study is useful in evaluating the
estimated water demand, this Initial Study/Negative Declaration uses the estimate of 0.8860
AFY, which is based on the Group II classification multiplied by the floor area of the building.
Water Supply
Available water supply for the proposed project was identified by the project applicant as a credit
from the previous occupancy and from two water allocations that will require approval from the
Carmel City Council.
A credit from the previous occupancy was determined using the existing square footage of the
building (5,357 sf.) and applying a use factor based on the type of occupancy (Palo Alto Savings
and Loan Association [a bank]). Using the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District
(MPWMD) Group I Use Factor, (0.00007 ac-ft. per sq.-ft.) from Table 2: Non-Residential Water
Use Factors, results in an existing water credit of 0.3750 acre-feet per year (AFY).
In addition to the previous occupancy credit, there are two prior water allocations that were
applied by the project applicant to the project site from a previous project, namely Plaza Del Mar
Mixed-Use project (a.k.a. Carmel Center project or Plaza Del Mar project). The "Jody LeTowt"
aiJocation is a prior water transfer of 0.350AFY, originating from a former property owner Ms.
Jody LeTowt' s commercial allocation that was "pre-committed" to the prior Carmel Center
Project (Resolution 00-84, dated April 26, 2000).
The second water allocation is from the former Spinning Wheel Restaurant of0.560 AFY. The
terms of this transfer included the following allocations: 1) The dedication of a portion of the
transfer or 0.056 AFY to the "Los Costas Project' ', 2) Retention by MPWMD of0.112 AFY for
their reserves, 3) The dedication of .0455 acre feet to be retained by the City for its reserves, and
4) The remaining 0.334 AFY to be.cornmitted to the former Carmel Center project.
Together, these two allocations would total 0.684 AFY, or 20.6% of the city's total existing
water supply allocation of3.32 AFY.
Assuming the existing credit and the above allocations are approved from the City of Carmel, the
project applicant anticipates a total water supply of 1.059AFY. Any water not need for the
project from the Spinning Wheel and Le Towt transfers will be returned to the City' s reserves.
Water Demand
Monterey Peninsula Water Management categorizes the proposed use as Group II, requiring
0.8860 AFY of water. Water demand from the proposed project will occur from three activities,
namely restroom and kitchen use inside the building (accounting for 90% of total water use) and
landscaping outside of the building (accounting for 1 0% of total water use). The proposed
kitchen uses will include pre-rinsing and washing pots and dishes, preparing food and washing
18 I Cl T Y OF CARMEL
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Initial Study
produce, cooking and equipment cleanup, serving water, and making ice. Kitchen use is
typically high, and accounts for as much as 50% of all water use in commercial establishments
that are associated with food activities. Restroom use (2) includes toilets and wash basins.
Janitorial services was also included as part of internal water use. Landscaping is proposed to be
minimal to maintain the existing trees and for additional planters. For all internal water fixtures,
the project applicant proposes to use flow water fixtures, as required by MPWMD.
Based on the Group II classification the proposed project would use a total of 0.8860 AFY per
year of water. This equates to a net surplus of0.2338 AFYperthe assumed water supply
calculation of 1.0590 AFY.
The project applicant is required to provide a water meter that will be publicly accessible
for monitoring of water use.
A summary of water supply and proposed demand is shown in Table 2: Proposed Project Water
Supply and Demand Estimate.
Table 2: Proposed Project Water Supply and Demand Estimate
-
-iH't-.:h·
Water Supply
Existing Credit from Original Use
Jody LeTowt Allocation
Spinning Wheel Restaurant Allocation
Total Water Supply
Water Demand
Kitchen Use
Restrooms
10% Contingency
Landscaping
Total Water Demand
Net Surplus
Planning and Entitlements
City of Carmel
\\ a lt:: r· l .s.cl U· ' 1
0.3750
0.3500
0.3340
1.0590
0.2976
0.3776
0.0675
0.0825
0.8252
0.2338
• Conditional Use Permit for parking
• Commercial Construction Building Permit
• Water allocation by City of Carmel Resolution
COMMUNITY P LAN N ING & BUILD I NG 1 19
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Carmel Event Center
Other Public Agencies


Monterey Peninsula Water Management District - Water Permit
Alcoholic Beverage Control Permit (State of California)
Compliance with the Federal Asbestos Standard and Air District Rule 424 for potential
removal of asbestos building materials (as administered through the Monterey Bay
Unified Air Pollution Control District)
Environmental Setting
Background and Intent
The 16,000 sf. project site is was originally the site ofthe Palo Alto Savings and Loan
Association, designed by Walter Burde in 1971 and has historically been occupied as a bank and,
subsequent to their closure, various retail uses.
Starting in 2004, the City spent several years reviewing a proposal for an 18,000 sf. mixed-use
project at the subject property named the Plaza del Mar Mixed-Use Project. A Revised Final
EIR was issued in June of 2007 (SCH # 2003051149). The project included the following
components: 1) demolition of the existing structures and surface parking lot; 2) construction of a
mixed-use building with a total floor area of approximately 17,980 square feet and excavation
for an underground parking garage totaling approximately 26,540 square feet; 3) the mixed-use
structure would include approximately 14,530 square feet of apartments and condominiums and
approximately 3,170 square feet of retail space; 4) open space of approximately 4,310 square
feet, and 5) a maximum building height of 30 feet.
This project was denied by the City in November 2009 for various reasons, but primarily related
to preservation of the existing structure, and potential impacts associated with traffic and noise.
The building was most recently occupied by Jan De Luz Home Furnishings, but has been vacant
for more than a year.
Project Site and Existing Facilities
The project site is located in the City of Carmel and within the City's Core Commercial area as
designed by the General Plan. The 16,000 sf. project site is currently developed with two
buildings totaling 5,357 square feet (sf.). The main building is 4,729 sf. and is comprised of a
main floor (3,267 sf.), a partial second floor (612 sf.), and a basement (850 sf.).
Photos of the project site are shown in Figure 8: Photos of Proposed Project Site.
20 I CITY OF CARMEL
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Initial Study
III. Environmental Checklist
Environmental Factors Potentially Mfected by the Project
The environmental factors checked below would be potentially affected by this project,
involving at least one impact that is a "Potentially Significant Impact" as indicated by the
checklist on the following pages.
Aesthetics Agricultural Resources Air Quality
Biological Resources Cultural Resources Geology I Soils
Hazards I Hazardous Hydrology I Water Quality Land Use I Planning
Materials
Mineral Resources Noise Population I Housing
Public Services Recreation Transportation I Traffic
Utilities I Service Mandatory Findings of Significance
Systems
Instructions
I. A brief explanation is required for all answers except "No Impact" answers that are
adequately supported by the information sources a lead agency cites in the parentheses
following each question (see Source List, attached). A "No Impact" answer is adequately
supported if the referenced information sources show that the impact simply does not
apply to projects like the one involved (e.g., the project falls outside a fault rupture zone).
A "No Impact" answer should be explained where it is based on project-specific factors
as well as general standards (e.g., the project will not expose sensitive receptors to
pollutants, based on a project-specific screening analysis).
2. All answers must take account of the whole action involved, including off-site as well as
on-site, cumulative as well as project-level, indirect as well as direct, and construction as
well as operational impacts.
3. Once the lead agency has determined that a particular physical impact may occur, then
the checklist answers must indicate whether the impact is potentially significant, less than
significant with mitigation, or less than significant. "Potentially Significant Impact" is
appropriate if there is substantial evidence that any effect may be significant. If there are
one or more
11
Potentially Significant Impact" entries when the determination is made, an
EIR is required.
4. ''Negative Declaration: Less Than Significant With Mitigation Incorporated: applies
where incorporation of mitigation measures has reduced an effect from "Potentially
Significant Impact" to a "Less Than Significant Impact." The lead agency must describe
the mitigation measures, and briefly explain how they reduce the effect to a less than
significant level.
5. Earlier Analysis may be used where, pursuant to the tiering, program EIR, or other
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING ! 21
425
Carmel Event Center
CEQA process, one or more effects have been adequately analyzed in an earlier EIR or
negative declaration. Section 15063(c)(3)(D). In this case a discussion should identify
the following on attached sheets:
a. Earlier analysis used. Identify earlier analyses and state where they are available
for review.
b. Impacts adequately addressed. Identify which effects from the above checklist
were within the scope of and adequately analyzed in an earlier document pursuant
to applicable legal standards, and state whether such effects were addressed by
mitigation measures based on the earlier analysis.
c. Mitigation measures. For effects that are "Less than Significant with Mitigation
Incorporated," describe the mitigation measures, which were incorporated or
refined from the earlier document and the extent to which they address site-
specific conditions for the project.
22 I CITY OF CARMEL
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Initial Study
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING I 13
427
Carmel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACI'S
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
1. AESTHETICS. Would the project:
a) Have a substantial adverse effect on a scenic
vista?
b) Substantially damage scenic resources,
including but not limited to trees, rock
outcroppings, and historic buildings within a state
scenic highway?
c) Substantially degrade the existing visual
character or quality of the site and its
surroundings?
d) Create a new source of substantial light or
glare, which would adversely affect day or
nighttime views in the area?
Discussion
(a through c)
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lmpac
t
X
X
X
X
The project site is currently developed with two buildings totaling 5,357 square feet (sf.).
The proposed project includes a number of interior refurbishments, including the
installation of a kitchen to provide a full range of food and beverage services and
expansion of the existing restrooms. All building alterations would occur within the
existing building footprint would remain unchanged. Exterior alterations would be
limited to reconfiguration of the existing parking lot and minor landscape.
Because the site is located in an existing urban setting and only minor modifications are
proposed. As such, the proposed project will not substantially change the aesthetics and
visual character of the site or surrounding neighborhood and is therefore considered to
have no impact.
(d)
The existing building contains exterior lighting. Any refurbishment/upgrade to the
exterior lighting would be designed consistent with City requirements (CMC 15.36.070
Lighting Requirements) including a maximum of 25 watts on lighting attached to
buildings and 15 watts for landscaping. Therefore, there would be no new sources of
substantial light or glare, which would adversely affect day or nighttime views in the area
and is therefore considered to have no impact.
2. AGRICULTURE RESOURCES. In determining whether impacts to agricultural resources are
significant environmental effects. lead agencies may refer to the California Land
Evaluation and Site Assessment Model (1997) prepared by the California Department of
Conservation as an optional model to use in assessing impacts on agriculture and farmland. Would
the project:
24 I C ITY OF CARMEL
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Initial Study
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Significant Mitigation Significant Impac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Infonnation Sources):
a) Convert Prime Farmland, Unique Farmland, or
Farmland of Statewide Importance (Farmland), as
shown on the maps prepared pursuant to the
Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program of the
X
California Resources Agency, to non-agricultural
use?
b) Conflict with existing zoning for agricultural
use, or a Williamson Act contract?
X
c) Involve other changes in the existing
environment, which due to their location or nature,
X
could result in conversion of Farmland to non-
agricultural use?
Discussion
(a-c)
The proposed project is located in an existing developed community and no development
on land designated agriculture will occur (Carmel General Plan, 2003). As such, the
proposed project would have no significant impact to agricultural resources and is
therefore considered to have no impact.
3. AIR QlJALITY. Where available, the significance criteria established by the appJicable air
quality management or air pollution control district may be relied upon to make tbe following
determinations. Would tbe project:
a) Conflict with or obstruct implementation of the
X
applicable air quality plan?
b) Violate any air quality standard or contribute to
an existing or projected air quality violation?
X
c) Result in a cumulatively considerable net
. increase of any criteria pollutant for which the
project region is non-attainment under an
applicable federal or state ambient air quality
X
standard (including releasing emissions, which
exceed quantitative thresholds for ozone
precursors)?
d) Expose sensitive receptors to substantial
pollutant concentrations?
X
e) Create objectionable odors affecting a
X
substantial number of people?
Discussion
(a·c)
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Cannel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lmpac
t
The project site is located in the North Central Coast Air Basin (NCCAB), which is
under the jurisdiction ofthe Monterey Bay Air Pollution Control District (MBUAPCD).
In March 1997 the air basin was redesignated from a "moderate non-attainment" area for
the federal ozone standards to a "maintenance/attainment" area. The NCCAB is
currently in attainment for the federal PMIO (particulate less than 10 microns in
diameter) standards and state and federal nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and carbon
monoxide standards. The NCCAB is classified as a non-attainment area for the state
ozone and PMlO standards.
Short-term Construction Emissions
The proposed project would result in short-term construction emissions with
implementation of the proposed project. This would include interior demolition and new
construction and reconfiguration of an exterior parking lot.
Construction activities are generally short-term in duration, but may still cause adverse
air quality impacts. Typical construction emissions result from a variety of activities
including exterior alteration of existing structures, excavation, grading, and vehicle and
equipment exhaust. These emissions can lead to adverse health effects and cause
nuisance concerns, such as reduced visibility and the generation of dust. Emissions
produced during grading and construction activities are "short-term" because they occur
only during the construction phase of the proposed project. Construction emissions
would include the on-site and off-site generation of mobile source exhaust emissions as
well as emissions of fugitive dust associated with earth-moving equipment.
Because the proposed project is less than one acre and involves only minor construction
activity, it is not anticipated to result in a short-term increase in fugitive dust that could
exceed MBUAPCD significance thresholds (e.g. result in grading of more than 2.2 acres
per day) in accordance with MBUAPCD CEQA guidelines. As a result, fugitive dust
emissions from construction activities are not anticipated to contribute to regional non-
attainment air quality conditions and would be considered a less than significant impact.
The use of construction equipment could result in the generation of diesel-PM emissions
during construction. Exhaust emissions are typically highest during the initial site
preparation, particularly when a project requires extensive site preparation (e.g., grading,
excavation, etc.) involving a large number of construction equipment. Because short-
term construction activities would be very limited and are considered minor, they would
not contribute to regional non-attainment air quality conditions and is therefore
considered less than significant.
Long-term Operational Emissions
Operational emissions are considered long-term because they continue indefinitely. The
26 I CITY OF CARMEL
430
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Initial Study
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lmpac
t
proposed project would result in long-term area source and mobile source emissions with
implementation of the proposed project. Area source emissions wouJd include natural
gas combustion, hearth fuel combustion, landscape fuel combustion, consumer products,
and architecturaJ coatings. The proposed project would include only minor the
refurbishment of interior spaces and minor reconfiguration of the parking Jot. This
would be considered less than significant in accordance with the Monterey Bay Unified
Air Pollution Control District's CEQA Guidelines (Table 5-4: Indirect Sources with
Potentially Significant Impacts on Ozone).
Mobile Source Emissions
The proposed project would not increase the existing building footprint and the total
building square footage would be reduced. Additionally, an average of no more than
seven (7) events would occur per week, and therefore would not substantially increase
average daily traffic trips such that the project would significantly contribute to long-
term emissions when compared to the existing approved use (e.g. a bank). Therefore,
mobile source emissions on local and regional air quality would be considered less than
significant.
Carbon Monoxide
The most significant local air pollutant is carbon monoxide (CO). The primary source of
CO resulting from implementation of the proposed project would be automobile traffic.
Because there would be no substantial increase average daily traffic trips, the proposed
project would not result in a significant contribution to localized mobile-source CO
concentrations that would exceed applicable air quaJity standards. Therefore, the
proposed project would result in a less than significant impact to localized CO
emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
California is a substantial contributor of global greenhouse gases, emitting over 400
million tons of C0
2
a year. Climate studies indicate that California is likely to see an
increase of three to four degrees Fahrenheit over the next century. Due to the nature of
global climate change, it is not anticipated that any single development project would
have a substantial effect on global climate change.
Project related greenhouse gas emissions include emissions from area sources and mobile
sources. The primary source of greenhouse gas emissions resulting from implementation
of the proposed project would be automobile traffic and from energy use within the
project site. Because there would be no substantial increase average daily traffic trips,
and new construction would comply with state building regulations (e.g. Title 24) and the
City' s Green Building Program, the proposed project would have a less than significant
COMMUNITY PLANNI NG & BUILDI N G 127
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Carmel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMP ACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
impact on localized greenhouse gas emissions.
(d)
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lmpac
t
The MBUAPCD defines sensitive receptors as facilities that house or attract children, the
elderly, people with illness, or others who are especially sensitive to air pollutants. The
sensitive receptors closest to the project site consist of single-family residential homes.
However, as noted above, construction and operation of the proposed project would not
result in substantial pollutant concentrations and impacts on sensitive receptors would be
considered less than significant.
28 I CITY OF CARMEL
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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACfS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
4. BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES. Would the project:
a) Have a substantial adverse effect, either
directly or through habitat modifications, on any
species identified as a candidate, sensitive, or
special-status species in local or regional plans,
policies, or regulations, or by the California
Department ofFish and Game or U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service?
b) Have a substantial adverse effect on any
riparian habitat or other sensitive natural
community identified in local or regional plans,
policies, regulations or by the California
Department ofFish and Game or U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service?
c) Have a substantial adverse effect on federally
protected wetlands as defined by Section 404 of the
Clean Water Act (including, but not limited to,
marsh, vernal pool, coastal, etc.) through direct
removal, filling, hydrological interruption, or other
means?
d) Interfere substantially with the movement of
any native resident or migratory fish or wildlife
species or with established native resident or
migratory wildlife corridors, or impede the use of
native wildlife nursery sites?
e) Conflict with any local policies or ordinances
protecting biological resources, such as a tree
preservation policy or ordinance?
f) Conflict with the provisions of an adopted
Habitat Conservation Plan, Natural Community
Conservation Plan, or other approved local,
regional, or state habitat conservation plan?
Discussion
(a-d)
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Initial Study
Less Than
Significant
Impact
X
No
Impac
t
X
X
X
X
X
The project site is completely developed and there are no natural areas on the site. The
project site is not located within the City's Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Overlay
District (ESHA) as described in CMC 17 .20, Article V, and is therefore considered to
have no impact.
The proposed improvements will not result in removal of habitat and therefore
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 129
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Carmel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
considered to have no impact.
(e)
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
There are 14 pine trees on site, ranging in size from five (5) inch diameter to 28 inch
diameter. While a number of these trees are in poor health and some have Pitch Canker,
these trees will remain. The only modification will be potential impacts to the root zone
associated with reconfiguration of the surface parking lot.
Policy 1-45 ofthe Land Use Element ofthe General Plan requires that new development
be located at least six (6) feet from any significant tree.
The proposed project would retain all existing trees on the property and no trimming or
modifying to the existing trees is proposed. Construction activities will include re-
configuration of the curb that currently "zigzags" along the eastern and southern edges of
the property, some adjacent to and within six (6) feet of the base of the existing pine
trees.
For the purpose of safeguarding trees during construction, demolition or tree removal, the
project applicant will be required to conform with the City's trees and shrubs protection
ordinance (17.48.110) which shall apply to all trees other than trees for which a removal
permit has been issued. Protection requirements include a detailed inventory of the
location and condition of all trees, keeping unsafe chemicals (e.g. gasoline and oil) out of
the drip line of any tree, erecting protective barricades around all trees, preventing
exposed soil from drying out and causing damage to tree roots, and spaying the lower six
feet of all pine tree trunks with pesticide for the treatment of bark beetles, and reporting
any damage to trees as a result of construction immediately to the City Forester.
Because no trees are proposed to be removed or modified, and the applicant will be
required to adhere to existing City regulations regarding the protection of trees during
construction, there would be no conflict with any local policies or ordinances protecting
biological resources, and therefore impacts are considered less than significant.
(f)
The proposed project is located within an existing developed urban area and is not
located within the City's designated Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Overlay District
(ESHA, Chapter 17.20, Article V). There would be no conflicts with City' adopted
conservation plans and therefore no impact is anticipated.
30 I CITY OF CARMEL
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Initial Study
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Significant Mitigation Significant lrnpac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
5. CULTURAL RESOURCES. Would the project:
a) ·cause a substantial adverse change in the
significance of a historical resource as defined in
X
CEQA Guidelines section 15064.5?
b) Cause a substantial adverse change in the
·significance of an archaeological resource pursuant
X
to section 15064.5?
c) Directly or indirectly destroy a unique
paleontological resource or site or unique geologic
X
feature?
d) Disturb any human remains, including those
X
interred outside of formal cemeteries?
Discussion
(a-d)
The proposed project includes only interior refurbishments and the exterior of the
existing building would remain unchanged. Ground disturbance would be limited to
minor reconfiguration of the existing parking lot. Given these minor alternations, there
would be no substantial adverse change to significant historical and/or archaeological
resources and therefore no impacts are anticipated.
6. GEOLOGY AND SOILS. Would the project expose people or structures to potential substantial
adverse effects, including the risk of loss, injury, or death involving:
a) Expose people or structures to potential
substantial adverse effects, including the risk of
loss, injury or death involving:
i. Rupture of a known earthquake fault, as
delineated on the most recent Alquist-
Priolo Earthquake Fault Zoning Map
issued by the State Geologist for the area
X
or based on other substantial evidence of a
known fault? Refer to Division of Mines
and Geology Special Publication 42?
ii. Strong seismic ground shaking?
X
iii. Seismic-related ground failure, including
liquefaction?
X
iv. Landslides?
X
b) Would the project result in substantial soil
erosion or the loss of topsoil?
X
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 131
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Carmel Event Center
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIROl'"MENT AL IMPACTS
Significant Mitigation Significant lmpac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
c) Would the project be located on a geologic unit
or soil that is unstable, or that would become
unstable as a result of the project, and potentially X
result in on- or off-site landslide, lateral spreading,
subsidence, liquefaction or collapse?
d) Would the project be located on expansive soil,
as defined in Table 18-1-B ofthe Uniform Building
Code ( 1994 ), creating substantial risks to life or
X
property?
e) Would the project have soils incapable of
adequately supporting the use of septic tanks or
alternative wastewater disposal systems where
X
sewers are not available for the disposal of
wastewater.
Discussion
(a-e)
The proposed project includes only interior refurbishments and the exterior of the
existing building would remain unchanged. Ground disturbance would be limited to
minor reconfiguration of the existing parking lot. The existing structure has been
constructed to withstand earthquakes and other potential geological hazards. Given these
minor alternations, there would be no substantial adverse change to geologic and soil
resources and therefore no impacts are anticipated.
7. HAZARDS AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Would the project:
a) Create a significant hazard to the public or the
environment through the routine transport, use, or
X
disposal ofhazardous materials?
b) Create a significant hazard to the public or the
environment through reasonably foreseeable upset
X
and accident conditions involving the release of
hazardous materials into the environment?
c) Emit hazardous emissions or handle hazardous
or acutely hazardous materials, substances, or
X
waste within '14 mile of an existing or proposed
school?
d) Be located on a site which is included on a list
of hazardous materials sites compiled pursuant to
Government Code Section 65962.5 and, as a result,
X
would it create a significant hazard to the public or
the environment? (V.13)
32 J CITY OF CARMEL
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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
e) For a project located within an airport land use
plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted,
within two miles of a public airport or public use
airport, would the project result in a safety hazard
for people residing or working in the project area?
f) For a project within the vicinity of a private
airstrip, would the project result in a safety hazard
for people residing or working in the project area?
g) Impair implementation of or physically
interfere with an adopted emergency response plan
or emergency evacuation plan?
h) Expose people or structures to a significant risk
of Joss, injury or death involving wildland fires,
including where wildlands are adjacent to
urbanized areas or where residences are intermixed
with wildlands?
Discussion
(a-h)
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Initial Study
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
X
X
X
X
The existing structure was designed in 1971 and constructed in 1972. Given it age, there
may be a potential for the presence of hazardous materials including asbestos and lead
paint. However, the proposed project would be required to comply with the Monterey
Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District's Rule 424 (National Emission Standards for
Hazardous Air Pollutants), which applies to renovation or demolition of existing
buildings in order to identify the presence of and remove any asbestos containing
building materials (ACBM) found at the project site. In accordance with Rule 424, all
ACBM must be removed by a certified asbestos contractor in accordance with CAL-
OSHA requirements. The proposed project would also be required to comply with Rule
439 (Building Removals) in order to limit particulate emissions associated with the
removal and demolition of buildings.
The proposed project would not use any hazardous materials as part of their operation.
The proposed project is not located within the vicinity of an airport, and is not located
within an area identified as prone to wildland fires as identified in the City's General
Plan. Therefore, the project is considered to have no impact on hazards and hazardous
materials.
8. HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY. Would the project:
a) Violate any water quality standards or waste
discharge requirements?
b) Substantially deplete groundwater supplies or
interfere substantially with groundwater recharge
X
X
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 133
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Cannel Event Center
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMP ACTS
Significant Mitigation Significant Impac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
such that there would be a net deficit in aquifer
volume or a lowering of the local ground water
table level (for example, the production rate of pre-
existing nearby wells would drop to a level which
would not support existing land uses or planned
uses for which permits have been granted)?
c) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern
of the site or area, including through the alteration
of the course of a stream or river, in a manner,
X
which would result in substantial erosion or
siltation on- or off-site.
d) Substantially alter the existing drainage pattern
of the site or area, including through the alteration
of the course of a stream or river, or substantially
X
increase the rate or amount of surface runoff in a
manner, which would result in flooding on- or off-
site.
e) Create or contribute runoff water which would
exceed the capacity of existing or planned storm
water drainage systems or provide substantial
X
additional sources of polluted runoff?
f) Otherwise substantially degrade water quality?
X
g) Place housing within a 100-year flood-hazard
area as mapped on a federal Flood Hazard
Boundary or Flood Insurance Rate Map or other
X
flood hazard delineation map?
h) Place within a I 00-year flood-hazard area
structures, which would impede or redirect flood
X
flows?
i) Expose people or structures to a significant risk
of loss, injury or death involving flooding,
including flooding as a result of the failure of a
X
levee or dam?
j) Inundation by seiche, tsunami, or mudflow?
X
Discussion
(a-j)
The proposed project includes only interior refurbishments and the exterior of the
existing building would remain unchanged. Ground disturbance would be limited to
minor reconfiguration of the existing parking lot.
34 I CITY OF CARMEL
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ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACI'S
Issues (and Supporting Infonnation Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Initial Study
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
Carmel Bay is considered an Area of Special Biological Significance (ASBS) by the
State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). This City operates under the General
Permit issued to the Monterey Regional Stonn Water Permit Participants Group issued
by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) for storm water runoff that
affects Carmel Bay.
The City has adopted the Beast Management Practices Guidance Series found in
Appendix E of the Monterey Regional Storm Water Management Program. The
Guidance Series describes Best Management Practices designed to reduce the discharge
of pollutants from the municipal separate storm sewer systems to the maximum extent
practicable, to protect water quality of the ASBS, and to satisfy the appropriate water
quality requirements of the Clean Water Act.
Minor impacts to surface water quality could result from the project during construction.
The proposed project will be required to adhere to City' s adopted the Beast Management
Practices Guidance Series and therefore no impacts hydrology and water are anticipated.
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Carmel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACfS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
9. LAND USE AND PLANNING. Would the project:
a) Physically divide an established community?
b) Conflict with any applicable land use plan,
policy, or regulation of an agency with jurisdiction
over the project (including, but not limited to the
general plan, specific plan, local coastal program,
or zoning ordinance) adopted for the purpose of
avoiding or mitigating an environmental effect?
c) Conflict with any applicable Habitat
Conservation Plan or Natural Community
Conservation Plan?
Discussion
(a-b)
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
X
X
X
The project site has a General Plan Designation of Core Commercial and a Zoning
designation of Service Commercial (S-C) (see Figure 6: General Plan Land Use
Designation and Figure 7: Zoning Designations). The Carmel Municipal Code (CMC)
Section 17 .14.050, describes the regulations that apply to all commercial districts
including the S-C zone. Because the proposed project will not result in a net increase in
the amount of commercial floor area, a conditional use permit and coastal development
permit is not required. However, a conditional use permit is required for the proposed
off-site parking.
The primary use of the site would be for special events that would occur on a regular
basis. This would include meetings, small conferences, wedding receptions, cooking
demonstrations, etc. These types events are most characteristic of a "community center"
as defined by the Zoning Code (CMC Section 17.68.040):
Community Centers. Any public, private, commercial, or nonprofit facility
established to provide social, educational, recreational, or cultural programs,
meetings, or lectures, or similar activities. Examples include conference facilities,
meeting rooms, youth centers, and senior centers. This classification includes
community facilities operated in conjunction with an approved residential or
commercial use that are not generally available to the public.
Per CMC 17 .14.030, Community Centers are classified as a permitted use in the S-C
zone.
Secondary uses would be retail sales associated with a particular event. For example,
this could include wine sales associated with a wine tasting event, apparel sales
associated with a car event (e. g. the Concourse d'Elegance ), and other minor
miscellaneous sales as an adjunct to a particular event. These types of retail uses are
36 I CITY OF CARMEL
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Initial Study
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
most characteristic of a "specialty or theme retail use as defined by the Zoning Code
(CMC Section 17.68.050):
No
lmpac
t
Specialty or Theme. A retail store selling a specialized line of merchandise not
otherwise defined including art and architecture supplies, candles, coins and
stamps, gems, rocks and stones, telescopes, and binoculars. A theme store may
combine merchandise lines from several classifications with all merchandise
organized around a central concept or idea.
Per CMC 17.14.030, Retail is classified as a permitted use in the S-C zone.
The proposed project includes refurbishment of an existing building and the proposed use
is consistent with the City's General Plan and Zoning Code. The project is not located
within a Habitat Conservation Plan or Natural Community Conservation Plan.
Therefore, the proposed project will have no impact on land use and planning.
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 137
441
Cannel Event Center
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Significant Mitigation Significant lmpac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
10. MINERAL RESOURCES. Would the project:
a) Result in the loss of availability of a known
mineral resource that would be of value to the X
region and the residents of the state?
b) Result in the loss of availability of a locally
important mineral resource recovery site delineated
X
on a local general plan, specific plan, or other land
use plan?
Discussion
According to the City's General Plan, there are no known mineral resources located
within the City of Carmel and therefore, the project will have no impact on mineral
resources.
Jl. NOISE. Would the project result in:
a) Exposure of persons to or generation of noise
levels in excess of standards established in the local
X
general plan or noise ordinance or applicable
standards of other agencies?
b) Exposure of persons to or generation of
excessive ground borne vibration or ground borne X
noise levels?
c) Substantial permanent increase in ambient
noise levels in the project vicinity above levels X
existing without the project?
d) A substantial temporary or periodic increase in
ambient noise levels in the project vicinity above X
levels existing without the project?
e) For a project located within an airport land use
plan or, where such a plan has not been adopted,
within two miles of a public airport or public use
X
airport, would the project expose people residing or
working in the project area to excessive noise
levels?
f) For a project within the vicinity of a private
airstrip, would the project expose people residing
X
or working in the project area to excessive noise
levels?
Discussion
(a-b)
38 I CITY OF CARMEL
442
Initial Study
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACI'S
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
Temporary noise impacts will occur as a result of construction-related activities.
Surrounding commercial and residential use may experience temporary noise caused by
demolition of interior spaces and reconfiguration of the parking lot.
For projects requiring a building permit, the CMC (15.08.180- Hours of Construction)
limits construction to between 8:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, unless
other specified hours are approved or required by the Building Official or the Director of
the Department of Community Planning and Building. These hours apply in all land use
districts. The term "hours of construction" is defined as all times when builders,
contractors, work crews or other persons associated with the project are present on the
property and engaged in activities related to or including construction.
Given the fact that construction activities will be minor and largely limited to interior
refurbishments and the fact that construction hours are limited to daytime hours, the
proposed project will not result in the exposure of persons to or generation of temporary
construction-related noise levels in excess of City standards and no impacts are
anticipated.
(c)
Long-term noise impacts may occur as a result of events such as wedding receptions,
conferences, meetings, corporate events, etc. In some cases, the events may include
entertainment and/or recorded music which could cause noise impacts to adjacent
commercial and residential properties. No live music is proposed at this time.
As described in CMC 9.16.020- Dances and Other Public Entertainment, public dances
or any form of entertainment in or on any premises where alcoholic beverages are sold
and served are generally prohibited. However, SMC 9.16.020 -Playing Musical
Instruments, exempts the playing of music in conjunction with the sale or serving of
alcohol during private (nonpublic) events and during temporary uses/special events in
certain cases per authorization by the Director of Community Planning and Building.
Such events are required to comply with CMC 17.14.050(G)(l), noise restrictions and
the Director shall authorize no more than four public events per calendar year, per
property.
Proposals exceeding four events per year require a use permit issued by the Planning
Commission consistent with requirements established in SMC 9.16.020(B)- Special
Exemption for Establishments Serving Alcoholic Beverages. In approving such permits,
the Commission shall consider all of the following:
1. Use permits are generally allowed only in the Central Commercial (CC) and
Service Commercial (SC) districts.
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUI LDING 139
443
Cannel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supportiug Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
2. A noise management plan must be prepared.
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
3. An acoustical evaluation shall be prepared to qualify the noise levels and to
suggest appropriate attenuation measures specific to the site.
No
Irnpac
t
4. Music performances are generally limited to hours between noon and 10:00 p.m.
daily, but may be fewer to address site-specific circumstances.
5. All conditional use permits shall require renewal every three years.
6. The use permit must be posted on the premises and will be monitored by the City
and failure of compliance may result in the revocation of the permit. Any three
violations within any 12-month period shall require revocation of the use permit
by the Planning Commission.
7. Live music permits shall not include karaoke activities.
While there is the potential for periodic noise from events occurring at the project site,
compliance with the above described regulations will reduce any substantial temporary
or periodic increase in ambient noise levels to a less than significant level.
(e-f)
The project site is not located within two miles of a public or private airport and therefore
is considered to have no impact.
40 I CJ TY OF CARME L
444
Initial Study
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Significant Mitigation Significant lmpac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
12. POPULATION AND HOUSING. Would the project:
a) Induce substantial population growth in an
area, either directly (for example, by proposing
new homes and businesses) or indirectly (for X
example, through extension of roads or other
infrastructure)?
b) Displace substantial numbers of existing
housing, necessitating the construction of
X
replacement housing elsewhere?
c) Displace substantial numbers of people,
necessitating the construction of replacement X
housing elsewhere?
Discussion
(a-c)
The proposed project would not result in an increased number of housing units or
population and therefore is considered to have no impact.
13. PUBLIC SERVICES. Would the project result in substantial adverse physical impacts
associated with the of new or pbysicaUy altered governmental facilities or need for new or
physical altered governmental facilities, tbe construction ofwbicb could cause significant
environmental impacts, in order to maintain acceptable semce ratios, response times, or other
performance for any of the public services:
a) Fire protection?
X
b) Police protection? X
c) Schools?
X
d) Parks?
X
e) Other public facilities? X
Discussion
(a-e)
The proposed project is a change of use and a refurbishment of an existing building
which would not result in increased physical impacts associated with provision of new or
physically altered government facilities. Therefore, the project is considered to have no
impact on public services.
14. RECREATION. Would tbe project:
a) Increase the use of existing neighborhood and
regional parks or other recreational facilities such
X
that substantial physical deterioration of the facility
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDI NG 141
445
Cannel Event Center
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Significant Mitigation Significant lmpac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Infonnation Sources):
would occur or be accelerated?
b) Include recreational facilities or require the
construction or expansion of recreational facilities
X
which might have an adverse physical effect on the
environment?
Discussion
(a-b)
The proposed project is a change ofuse and a refurbishment of an existing building
which would not result in an increased use of existing parks or recreation facilities and is
therefore considered to have no impact.
15. TRANSPORTATIONffRAFFIC. Would the project:
a) Conflict with an applicable plan, ordinance, or
policy establishing measures of effectiveness for
the performance of the circulation system, taking
into account all modes of transportation including
mass transit and non-motorized travel and relevant X
components of the circulation system, including
but not limited to intersections, streets, highways
and freeways, pedestrian and bicycle paths, and
mass transit?
b) Conflict with an applicable congestion
management program, including, but not limited to
level of service standards and travel demand
X
measures, or other standards established by the
county congestion management agency for
designated roads or highways?
c) Result in a change in air traffic patterns,
including either an increase in traffic levels or a
X
change in location that results in substantial safety
risks?
d) Substantially increase hazards due to a design
feature (for example, sharp curves or dangerous
X
intersections) or incompatible uses (for example,
fann equipment)?
e) Result in inadequate emergency access?
X
f) Conflict with adopted policies, plans, or
programs supporting regarding public transit,
X
bicycle, or pedestrian facilities, or otherwise
decrease the performance or safety of such
42 I CITY OF CARMEL
446
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
facilities?
Discussion
(a-t)
Short-term
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Initial Study
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
During the construction phase the site will be accessed by construction vehicles such as
haul trucks, loaders, delivery trucks and other construction related equipment. These
vehicles would be relatively few and would not conflict with normal traffic patterns in
the area and therefore there would be no impact to short-term traffic and transportation
conditions.
Long-term
Parking Demand and Supply
Special events such as those proposed typically have a vehicle occupancy rate of two
persons per vehicle, resulting in a maximum guest parking demand of about 97 vehicles
(194 occupancy limit /2) (Hatch Mott MacDonald, 1129/13, see Appendix A). Parking
demand for event staff(e.g. cooks, servers, entertainment, valets and security) is
expected to be about 23 additional cars. Thus the total parking demand for typical
facilities (per national standards) would be 120 vehicles. Smaller events such as classes
and meetings could have one person per vehicle, but will have lower attendance.
This parking estimate is considered worst-case and is unlikely given the unique
circumstances associated with events in Carmel. Carmel is an internationally-recognized
visitor destination and many guests who come to Carmel stay at local hotels/motels and
walk. Visitors not staying overnight tend to park once and walk to multiple destinations
(i.e. Carmel Beach, shops, restaurants, etc.). Based on informal surveys of existing
wedding venues and hotels, at least one half of weddings in the Carmel area are for out-
of-town wedding participants, who tend to stay in local visitor accommodations (Hatch
Mott MacDonald, 1/29/ 13). Furthermore, while guests will be encouraged to use the
valet service, which will be announced as part of event promotion (flyers, tickets, etc.),
some guests wil1 choose to park themselves on surface streets and walk. This will be no
different than for most other businesses in downtown Carmel, many of which have no
on-site parking supply and no valet service.
Given this circumstance, it was determined that a conservative estimate of 25% of the
guests attending an event at the proposed project site would be arriving as pedestrians
(RBF Consulting).
The Carmel Plaza garage has 110 parking spaces. In 2012, there were 19,967
transactions from the parking machines at the Carmel Plaza garage. Assuming an equal
number of transactions per day as an average, 55 spaces would be used per day with 55
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDI NG 143
447
Carmel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lmpac
t
spaces being vacant (50%). On average, the actual number of spaces being utilized at
any one time would be less given the fact that most cars would not park at the Sunset
Center all day. Parking availability during the evening would be greater when the retail
stores are closed.
Sunset Center has three separate parking areas, herein referred to as the 8th Avenue lot
(135 spaces), the San Carlos lot (52 spaces) and the Mission Street lot (30 spaces) (See
Figure 5: Valet Parking Access Routes and Parking Locations). The proposed project
would utilize the 8th Avenue lot only. In 2012, there were 19,312 transactions from the
parking machines at the Sunset Center- 8th Avenue lot. Assuming an equal number of
transactions per day as an average, 52 spaces would be used per day with 83 spaces being
vacant ( 61% ). Similar to the Carmel Plaza garage, the actual number of spaces being
utilized at any one time would be less. Peak parking would occur during evening events
at the Sunset Center and during special events elsewhere in Carmel.
On average, the total estimated number of available parking spaces between the Carmel
Plaza Garage (55 spaces) and the Sunset Center 8th Avenue lot (83 spaces) would be
approximately 138 spaces.
The number of vacant spaces at any given time would vary depending on the time of day
and the occurrence of other events and activities. For example, parking availability is
expected to be generally lower in the Carmel Plaza garage during the daytime hours
when the retail stores are open and great during the evening when they are closed.
Conversely, parking availability at the Sunset Center is expected to be higher during the
daytime as it is farther from the commercial core, and less in the evening when there is
an event occurring. As such, valet parking management will be complementary between
the two sites and is expected to be managed effectively by NP&V without the need to
accommodate any additional off-site parking.
As shown in Table 3: Estimated Project Parking Demand & Supply, the proposed
project would result in a net requirement of 66 off-site guest parking spaces, which is
well under the 138 average number of parking spaces that would be available at the
Carmel Plaza garage and the Sunset Center- gt!i Avenue lot.
44 J CITY OF CARMEL
448
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Table 3: Estimated Project Parking Demand & Supply
-- -
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
l':lrl-inf! lh•mand
f;l('!rtt'
Maximum Guests Parking Demand
Less Guest Credit (25%)
Guest Parking Demand
Vendor/Employee Parking Demand
Total Parking Demand
Total On-site Parking Supply
Net OtT-Site Guest Parking Demand
Available Off-Site Average Parking
Supply
2
Notes:
97
(24)
73
23
96
20
1
76
138
(I) Assumes some cars will remain on site including valet vehicles and vendor delivery vehicles.
(2) Cannel Parking Garage and Sunset Center- 8" Avenue lot.
Source: RBF Consulting and Hatch Mott MacDonald, 2013.
Traffic and Circulation
Initial Study
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lrnpac
t
This section addresses potential impacts to traffic and circulation as a result of the
proposed project. The analysis is drawn from a transportation analysis prepared by
Hatch Mott MacDonald (February 27 2013, see Appendix A) and analysis conducted by
RBF Consulting.
The proposed project would generate a total of 96 net trips coming to and from the
project (see Table 3), for a total of 192 average daily trips. This trip count assumes that
vehicles that stop at the project site to be valet parked are treated similar to "pass
through" trips and therefore are counted as one trip via the project site but ultimately to
the parking garage (and the same in reverse) (RBF Consulting). The existing pennitted
use for which the building was constructed is a bank. Based on the Institute of
Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual 9th Ed., the existing 5,375 SF
bank would generate 397 trips daily, including 32 and 65 trips in the AM and PM peak
hours, respectively (RBF Consulting). Based on this fact, the proposed project would
generate 205 fewer average daily trips than the existing permitted use.
Based on the nature of the events, Saturday was considered the worst-case scenario when
there would likel be the Jar est event. Saturda mid-da eak-hour tri s were estimated
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING I 45
449
Carmel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lmpac
t
to be 65 trips in and 65 trips out (Hatch Mott MacDonald, 2013). Six intersections were
analyzed to determine potential impacts at intersections adjacent to the project site
including Dolores, Street, 7th Street, and Ocean Avenue. Operations of these
intersections
during the Saturday midday peak hour are all better than the City of Carmel's level of
service (LOS) standard of"D". The amount of traffic generated by the project would not
be sufficient to represent a significant impact upon the operations of these intersections
(see Table 4, Appendix A).
Given the fact that there is a sufficient supply of off-site parking, that the proposed
project would generate 210 fewer average daily trips as compared to the existing
permitted use, and that the proposed project would not cause a significant impact on the
adjacent intersections, the proposed project would have no impact on long term parking
and traffic and circulation.
The proposed project is located 5+ miles from the Monterey Airport and therefore would
not result in a change in air traffic patterns. No changes to public roadways are proposed
that therefore would not substantially increase hazards due to a design feature or result in
inadequate emergency access. Because there are no changes to the public roadways and
no impacts to traffic circulation, the proposed project would not conflict with adopted
policies, plans, or programs supporting regarding public transit, bicycle, or pedestrian
facilities, or otherwise decrease the performance or safety of such facilities. As such
there would be no impacts.
46 I CITY OF CARMEL
450
Initial Study
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACfS
Significant Mitigation Significant Impac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
16. UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS. Would the project:
a) Exceed wastewater treatment requirements of
the applicable Regional Water Quality Control
X
Board?
b) Require or result in the construction of new
water or wastewater treatment facilities or
expansion of existing facilities, the construction or
X
which could cause significant environmental
effects?
c) Require or result in the construction of new
storm water drainage facilities or expansion of
X
existing facilities, the construction of which could
cause significant environmental effects
d) Have sufficient water supplies available to
serve the project from existing entitlements and
X
resources, or are new or expanded entitlements
needed?
e) Result in a determination by the wastewater
treatment provider, which serves or may serve the
project that it has adequate capacity to serve the
X
project projected demand in addition to the
provider's existing commitments?
f) Be served by a landfill with sufficient
permitted capacity to accommodate the project's
X
solid waste disposal needs?
g) Comply with federal, state, and local statutes
and regulations related to solid waste?
X
Discussion
(a-c and e)
The proposed project is a change of use and a refurbishment of an existing building
which is already served by the City's existing sewer system and therefore would not
exceed wastewater treatment requirements of the Regional Water Quality Control Board
nor require or result in the construction of new water or wastewater treatment facilities or
expansion of existing facilities. The project site is also served by the City's existing
stormwater system and therefore would not require or result in the construction of new
storm water drainage facilities or expansion of existing facilities. Therefore, there would
be no impact to the existing sewer and stormwater facilities.
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 1 47
451
Carmel Event Center
ENVIRONMENf AL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Infonnation Sources):
(d)
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
As noted in Table 2: Proposed Project Water Supply and Demand Estimate, the
proposed use is categorized by the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District
(MPWMD) as a Group II use and would require 0.8860 AFY of water. The site has an
estimated water supply of 1.059 AFY. This estimated water supply assumes the
proposed project receives the necessary water allocations (namely, the Jody LeTowt
allocation and the Spinning Wheel restaurant allocation, as described in the project
description above) from the City of Carmel.
Monterey Peninsula Water Management District Requirements
The proposed project will require a water permit from the Monterey Peninsula Water
Management District (MPWMD or the District). A water permit allows an applicant to
obtain a building permit to change a use or an existing water fixture. A water permit is
also needed to set additional water meters or to change the size of an existing water
meter. All intensifications in use according to District Rule 24, Table II require water
permits. To receive a water permit, MPWMD requires the applicant to submit building
plans and complete a Water Release Form and Water Permit Application.
City Carmel Water Management Program
The City's Water Management Program (CMC Section 17.50) was established by the
City based on its recognition of the need to conserve and manage its water resources to
achieve adopted land use planning objectives. The water resources of the City are
presently derived from a water allocation system implemented by the Monterey
Peninsula Water Management District. The pmpose and intent of the Water Management
Program is to:
A. Reduce unnecessary water consumption in existing and new development;
B. Provide a process for dedication of the City's limited water resources in new
development;
C. Establish a process for determining the broad land use categories to be served
through allocations of existing and future water resources available to the City;
and
D. Implement the General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan.
Section 17.50.30 establishes procedures that City shall follow for locally al1ocating its
water supplies to land use categories and to an unallocated reserve, and permitting
procedures for proposed project that would result in net increases in water demand. The
Planning Commission is required to review water allocations for consistency with the
48 I CITY OF CARMEL
452
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
Potentially
Significant
Issues
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Initial Study
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
lmpac
t
General Plan and the Local Coastal Program in December of each year and forward any
recommendations for change to the City Council.
Before adoption of an allocation resolution, the City Council shall consider
recommendations on the appropriate distribution of water to implement the General Plan
and the Local Coastal Program as determined by the Planning Commission. Each
allocation resolution sha11 reserve at least 10 percent (10%) of available water resources
for projects that will create new affordable housing units for moderately low-, low- or
very low-income households. Each allocation resolution also shall ensure that water is
reserved for anticipated projects serving coastal recreation, access and essential public
services.
Water held in unallocated reserves shall not be used for any project or land use change
until transferred to a defined allocation category. Reserves are intended to provide a
means of adjusting water allocations to respond to changing conditions and General Plan
policy.
Section 17.50.40 of the CMC states that no change in land use shall be allowed through
any permit or license that could result in a net increase in water use unless such change
has been approved in accordance with the water management program. In determining
whether a project may result in a net increase in water use, the CMC stipulates that the
regulations of the MPWMD shall be followed.
As shown in Table 4: City of Carmel Water Allocation, the City of Carmel's total water
allocation is 3.32 acre-feet. This allocation is divided into 10 categories. Description of
each allocation are described in Appendix C - City of Carmel 2006 Water Allocation
(Updated 6/27/13).
Table 4: City of Carmel Water Allocation
1 - Low and Very Low Income Housing
2 - Single Family Residential
3 -Multi-Family Residential
4 - Commercial
5 - Municipal
6 - Unallocated Reserve
7- Mallery !Pescadero Water Transfer
Reserve
8 - Spinning Wheel
0.507
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.224
1.69
0.106
0.334
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING 149
453
Cannel Event Center
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
9- Forest Cottages Pre-commitment
10- Le Towt Water
Source: City of Carmel, 2013.
Conclusions
Potentially
Significant
Issues
0.109
0.335
Potentially
Significant
Unless
Mitigation
Incorporated
Less Than
Significant
Impact
No
Impac
t
With regards to water demand the use is classified as Group II. However, the project
applicant has prepared a study to support that the estimated water use is below the
supply. RBF Consulting conducted a peer review of the water use study and determined
that the analysis of proposed uses, frequency of events characteristics (e.g. use of the
kitchen four times a week), frequency of bathroom use, and proposed water-saving
features (i.e. water saving fiXtures and minimal landscaping) were reasonable and
consistent with the calculations of anticipated water use.
Based on the Group II use classification and analysis presented in the Carmel Event
Center Water Use Study prepared by Axiom Engineers and peer reviewed by RBF
Consulting, the proposed project would have sufficient water supplies available to serve
the project from existing entitlements and proposed water allocations if granted by the
City of Carmel, and therefore impacts to water supply are considered to be less than
significant.
Should the City Council deny the allocation, or determine a different allocation than that
proposed, the Project Applicant would be required to demonstrate to the satisfaction of
the City of Carmel and the MPWMD that there is sufficient water to supply the project
prior to issuance of a building permit. This could be achieved in a variety of ways
including on-site rain harvesting, approval by the City Council of a different water
allocation, further measures to reduce water consumption, and/or some other mean.
(fand g)
The proposed project is a change of use and a refurbishment of an existing building
which is already served by a landfill with sufficient permitted capacity to accommodate
the project's solid waste disposal needs and as such, there would be no impact.
17. MANDATOR\' FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE. Does the project:
a) Have the potential to degrade the quality of the
environment, substantially reduce the habitat of a
fish or wildlife species, cause a fish or wildlife
population to drop below self-sustaining levels,
threaten to eliminate a plant or animal community,
reduce the number or restrict the range of a rare or
endangered plant or animal or eliminate important
examples of the major periods of California history
SO / CITY OF CARMEL
X
454
Initial Study
Potentially
Significant
Potentially Unless Less Than No
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT'S
Significant Mitigation Significant lmpac
Issues Incorporated Impact t
Issues (and Supporting Information Sources):
or prehistory?
b) Have impacts that are individually limited, but
cwnulatively considerable? ("Cwnulatively
considerable" means 1hat the incremental effects of
a project are considerable when viewed in X
connection with the effects of the past projects, the
effects of other current projects, and the effects of
probable future projects.)
c) Have environmental effects, which will cause
substantial adverse effects on human beings, either X
directly or indirectly?
Discussion
(a-c)
The City of Cannel-by-the-Sea is built-out. Any additional development in the City will
primarily be infill development that will occur incrementally over time and would not be
cumulatively considerable. The City's General Plan provides a framework for orderly
future development consistent with goals and policies as approved by the City Council.
The proposed project is a minor expansion to an existing use and therefore will have no
impact.
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDING J SI
455
Cannel Event Center
IV. Determination
On the basis ofthis initial evaluation:
I find that the proposed project COULD NOT have a significant
effect on the environment, and a NEGATIVE DECLARATION
will be prepared.
I find that although the proposed project could have a significant
effect on the environment, there will not be a significant effect
in this case because revisions in the project have been made by
or agreed to by the project proponent. A NEGATIVE
DECLARATION will be prepared.
I find that the proposed project MAY have a significant effect
on the environment and an ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
REPORT is required.
I find that the proposed project MAY have a potentially
significant or a potentially significant unless impact on the
environment, but at least one effect (1) has been adequately
analyzed in an earlier document pursuant to applicable legal
standards, and (2) has been addressed by mitigation measures
based on the earlier analysis as described on attached sheets.
An ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required, but it
must analyze only the effects that remain to be addressed.
I find that although the proposed project could have a significant
effect on the environment, because all potentially significant
effects (a) have been analyzed adequately in an earlier EIR or
NEGATIVE DECLARATION pursuant to applicable standards,
and (b) have been avoided or pursuant to that earlier EIR or
NEGATIVE DECLARATION, including revisions or
mitigation measures that are imposed upon the proposed project,
nothing further is required.
Marc Wiener
Associate Planner
City of Carmel
Date: -----------
52 I CITY OF CARMEL
X
456
Initial Study
References
Axiom Engineers, Carmel Event Center Water Use Study, March 7, 2013.
City ofCarmel·by·the-Sea, General Plan and Coastal Land Use Plan, June 2003.
City of Carmel-by-the-Sea, Local Coastal Program, Zoning Ordinance, and Coastal
Implementation Plan, May 2004.
City of Carmel-by-the-Sea, Staff Report to the Carmel Planning Commission Re:
Consideration of a Preliminary Concept Review for the establishment of an event
center at a site located in the Service Commercial (SC) District, January 9, 2012.
Hatch Mott MacDonald, Traffic Analysis for the Carmel Event Center, February 27,
2013,2013.
MBUAPCD. CEQA Air Quality Guidelines. June 2004.
Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District (MBUAPCD). 2004 Air Quality
Management Plan for the Monterey Bay Region, September 2004.
State of California, California Department of Conservation. Available online at
http://www.conservation.ca.gov/dlrp/Pages/Index.aspx. Last accessed October 2009.
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDI NG I 53
457
Cannel Event Center
54 I CI TY OF CARMEL
Appendix A
Carmel Event Center Traffic Analysis
Hatt:h Mott Mat:Donald
458
Initial Study
COMMUNITY PLANNINC. &: BU I LDING I S5
459
Carmel Event Center
56 1 CITY OF CARMEL
AppendixB
Carmel Event Center Water Use Study
Axiom Engineers
460
Initial Study
COMMUNI TY l'LANNI J\' G & BUILDING I S7
461
Cannel Event Center
58 I CITY OF CARMEL
AppendixC
2006 Water Allocation (Update 60.7113)
City of Carmel
462
Carmel Event Center
54 I CITY OF CARMEL
Appendix A
Carmel Event Center Traffic Analysis
llatrb Mott Mac: Donald
463
Iuitial Stady
COMMUNITY PLANNING A BUILDINC 155
464
Hatch Mott
MacDonald
February 27, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
RE: Carmel Community Center, Carmel-By-The-Sea, California
1300-B First Street
Cllroy, CA 95020
T 408-8<48·31 22
www.hatch mott.c;om
The Carmel Community Center, which Is proposed to occupy two existing oommercial buildings
totaling 5,357 square feet at the southeast comer of the Dolores Street/Seventh Street
intersection in Camel-By-the Sea, California, will host a variety of activities. Hours of operation
will be from 8:00AM untfl1 0:00 PM. There wiU be no minimum event size. The maxirn..m
capacity of the building Is 194 people. The Staff Report prepared by the Planning Department
for the Pranning Commission meeOng on January 91ndlcates that parking for the project needs
to be addressed. This letter provides an overall evaluation of the proposed project parking
program and the effects of the projecfs traffic upon the surrounding street system.
A. Project Partdng Program
Larger specJal events will typicaUy have a vehicle occupancy rate of two persons per vehicle.
Combined with an estimated 25% of attendees walldng from nearby hotels, Inns and bed and
breakfasts, the guest parking demand would to1al about 73 cars. Parking demand for cooking
staff, servers, entertainment, valets and security Is expected to be about 23 additional cars for a
grand total parking demand of about 96 cars. Smaller events such as classes and meetings
.could have one person per vehicle, but will have lower attendance. Parking demand for the
worst case event Is 96 cars. Parldng management for the site will vary depending upon the size
of the event. For some of the smaller events, parking demand can completely contained on
The vast majority of events will be valet parked by National Parking & Valet (NP&V), although a
few smaller events could have suffic.iently low parking demand to not require managed valet
parking. The on-site parklng area will be used both as a drop-off and pick-up point for visitor's
vehicles as well as a staging area for relocation of visitor cars to off-site parldng areas. The
project currently has 15 on-site angled parking spaces. The parking lot wJII be reconfigured to
lnaease on-site perking supply to 30 vehicles. Valet staffing will vary depending upon the size
of the event, and valet operations can be quickly reconfigured to add multiple loading and
unloading rows as needed; together, these wiN combine to prevent vehicle spill-over Into the
adjacent street.
NP&V operates the Carmel Plaza and Sunset Center parking facllftles. NP&V will have the
discretion to park vehicles in either or both lots for any individual event. Based on fnfonnatlon
provided by NP&V, Cannel Plaza has 110 spaces with a maximum parking occupancy on a
typical day of about 30 spaces. A total of about 80 spaces are generally available. Sunset
Center has 135 spaces and a typical maximum parking occupancy of about 35 spaces. A total
of an additional 80 spaces are availabfe at Sunset Center. In total, about 160 spaces are
currently typically available to accommodate Carmel Community Center parking demand. This
is a surplus of over 60 spaces during maximum events at the Center. h Is also recognized that
some vehicles will park In other locations, including on public streets and public parking areas in
465
Hatch Matt
MacDonald
the vicinity. This wal be no different than fer most other businesses in downtown Carmel, many
of which have no on-site parking supply and no valet service.
B. Project Traffic Evaluation
The vast majority of events at the Carmel Community Center would be weddings, of which
virtually all would occur on weekend afternoons. As noted previously, the worst case event
would result in 73 guest vehicles (assuming an average of two persons .per vehicle) and an
additlonal23 vehicles from staff, security, and valet personnel. Table 1, below, summarizes the
estimated vehicle trip activity for such a worst case event.
Table 1 -Project Trip GfteratioD (Mulmum Capacity)
SAlURDAY PEAK HOUR 1RIPS
WEEKENl TOTAL
PROJECT DALY PEAK
SI2E TRIPS HOUR ttl OUT
GENERATED TRIPS {MAMMUM CAPACITY)
Attendee ArrhalsiDepartl 73 wtidea 146 49

0

Kitchen, Valet, SfJClllty Staff 23 'ollhlclea 46 0 0 0
DeUwriel: IJIIII.erle8 (Food, Suppllea, etc;.) 5 'llehiclel 10 Q !! !!
Tot.ll Trfp Genel"'tion: 202 41 411 0
Note: Maximlft'l capacity representa 194 people within the building, lncluclng guests and staff.
Such a worst case event would occur very rarely. A more typical event would be closer to half
the size of a worst case event, as shown in Table 2.
Table Z- Project Trip Generatio• (Half of Capadty)
SAl\JRDAY PEAK HOUR TRPS
WEEKEND lOTAL
PROJECT DAILY PEAK
SIZE lRIPS HOUR IN OUT
GENERA1ED lRPS (HAlF OF CAPACnY)
IAttaldeea: Attendee 36 whlclea 72 24 24 0

Kitchen, Valet, S.Curlty Staff 11 whlclee 22 0 0 0
[)elwrles: DeUwrtiS (Food, Supplies, etc.) 5 'odllclee 10
.!! .!! S2
Total Trip Genaration: 104 24 24 0
Note: Maximum capacity represents 97 people within the building, indudlng guests and staff.
Page2of4 212712013
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Hatch Mott
MacDonald
Note that these two trip generation estimates assume 25% of guests would walk to the project
from· nearby hotels. Based on informal surveys of existing wedding venues and hotels, at least
one half of weddings In the Carmel area are for out-of-town wedd;ng participants, who tend to
stay in local visitor accommodations. Many of these are within easy walking distance of the
Center. Therefore, the estimate of 25% of attendees walking to events at the site is not only
reasonable but may be conservative.
As a comparison, Table 3, below, compares the project trip generation with the previous use of
the project site as a bank. The bank would have generated considerably more vehicle trips
than the proposed event center- more than double the trips than the project at full capacity
and more than quadruple the trips than the half-capacity (i.e. typical) event.
Table 3-Site Trip Generatioa: IIJJtoml vs. Proposed
SA 1\JRDA Y PEAK HOUR TRFS
WEEKEND tOTAL
PROJECT DAILY PEAK
SIZE TRIPS HOUR N OUT
GENERA TED lRIPS
Hlstortcal Use: Bank 5,357 sq. ft. 462 141 72 69
Pro[!!!ed Use: Ewnt Center {Maximum Capacity) 73 wt.lcles 202 49 49 0
Procosed Use: Ewnt Center (Half of Capacity) 36 whiclaa 104 24 24 0
The traffic generated by the Carmel Community Center would be spread out over multiple
blocks. The off-site valet parking areas - Carmel Plaza and Sunset Center- are both within a
three-block radius of the site. The grid-like nature of the streets surrounding the site would also
provide multiple routes for guests to arrive and depart from events at the site. Therefore, project
traffic would not be concentrated along any one roadway in the immediate vicintty of the project
site.
Tabfe <4, below, summarfzes the operations of various adjacent inter&eetions to the project,
Including along Dolores Street, 7" Street, and Ocean Avenue. Operations of these Intersections
during the Saturday midday peak hour are all better than the City of The.Sea's level
of service (LOS) standard of •D". The amount of traffic generated by the project would not be
sufficient to represent a significant impact upon the operations of these Intersections.
These levels of serviced are based upon traffic volumes collected in May 2003. Monterey
County annual counts on Carpenter Street and Ocean Avenue at the City of Carmel-By-The-
Sea city limits indicate an average decrease in volume of -6.1% over the past eight years. This
is also consistent with no population increase, as documented in the 2000 and 2010 US
Census. For these reasons. the levels of service cited in Table 4 remain valid for assessing
current traffic Impacts.
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467
Hatch Matt
MacDonald
Table 4 -IDtenectioa Levell of Service
Exltting
LOS
CondltloJW
lnte,..ctlon
Standard
Saturday Midday
Peak Hour
Delay LOS
(sec)
1 Dol0188 Straet I Ocean A\enue D 9.8 A
2 Dolores Street /7th Awnue
D 7.4 A
(E) 13.9 B
3 Dototes Street /8th A\el'lUe D 7.8 A
4 San cartos Street I 7th Awnue
D 6.3 A
(E) 14.6 B
5 .llnlpero Avanue /7th Avanue
D 2.9 A
(E) 11.6
I
B
Junlpero Alo!BnUe I
6 Ocean Awnue/ 0 21.7 c
Mountain VISIN Avanue
I
CUmulatiw
Condition•
Saturday Midday
Peak Hour
Delay LOS
(sec)
1.8 A
7.1 A
14.2 B
7.8 A
6.5 A
14.7 B
3.0 A
11.7 B
23.8 c
Source: Ptaza Del Mar Development TI'Bffic Impact Ane/ysl8, Higgins .Associ8t88, January 4, 2005.
c. Summary
In conclusion, many, perhaps most, smaller events will be able to be accommodated by the on-
site partdng supply provided at the Carmel Community Center. All events. Including the
maximum attendance event, wiN be able to be easly accommodated by the use of a valet
service to park attendee vehicles off-site at the Carmel Plaza and Sunset Center (the same
valet service already. operating these off-site facilities). The vehicle management procedures to
be used by the valet service will prevent vehicle spill-over from the project site Into the adjacem
street. Finally, the vehicle trip actfvHy from the Carmel Community Center would not represent a
significant impact upon operations of the surrounding street system.
ii/l'rl;_
Keith B. Higgins, PE, TE
VIce President
T 408.848.3122 F 408.848.2202
keith.higgins@hatchmott.com
kbh:jmw
Page4of4 212712013
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Carmel Event Center
Appendix B
Carmel Event Center Use Study
Axiom
58 I CITY OF CARMEL
469
bitial Study
COMMUNITY PLANNING & BUILDI NG I 5t
470
Carmel Event Center
56 f CITY OF CARMEL
AppendixB
Carmel Event Center Water Use Study
Axiom n g i n ~ r s
471
Carmel Event Center Water Use
Study
Carmel, California
Prepared For
Jeff Peterson
Prepared by:
..
Axfom Engineers sM
22 Lower Ragsdale Drive, Suite A
Monterey, California 93940
(831) 649-8000
Fax: (831) 649-8038
Project 20120214
February 7. 2013
472

Con teats
Executive Summaey .......... _ ...... _._ .................................................................................... - ..... 1
Propoled Projeet. .................. ___ ... ___ ............. - ........ .-... .-........... _. ....................... -1
Propoted u ... ______ .................. .._.._... ...................................... .-.. .................................. 1
bttoduetioa ....................................... .-.................................. -...................................... -........ 3
............... -.......-................ . ........... ...-._. ............... - ......... ..._ ............ 3
OIJjec'tlve -···-·-................... - .... - .............. ___ ........ -.. ••• - ............ ._ ................ "....._ ...... 3
PJ'Ojeet Dea:alpdon ...................................................... ...--.............. - .................................. 3
Water Ute Basil for Evalaatioa ........................................ ..._ .................. " ••••• _ .................. - • .4
ABII.yda ad At: .... _ptlon•--·--............ - ............... - .............. ---................. --... -...-4
Use Basis ................................................................................................................ 4
Water AD.owaace ad Coallllllpdea ...... ..-........ , ...... " .... __... ......... - ..................................... '
Water :Demaad-......... -_ ........................... - .............. .............. --.. ................................ 6
Waar U• S....aey ·-................... - .................. ---·--·· ....................... --................ _ .. 7
Recomm.eJidatloDI .......................... - ............ , •• , .......... ..._. ... _... ....... -..... -. ....... .._ .......... _ .. 7
Ref'ereJteet .................................. ......_ ........ , _____ .. ____ ................ - .............................. __... ..... 9
Appadiees
Water Use Calculations .......................................................................................................... A
Site Plans and FJgures ........................................................................................................... B
Equipment Data Sheets ......................................................................................................... C
AXtOtl. EHGINEEJUtll
473
---·--- --- -----
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
PROPOSED PROJECT
Our clients are proposing to operate a Community Center at the southeast comer of Dolores
Street and 7tfl Avenue, Carmel, California. Their intent is to provide a facility equipped with
a full commercial style kitchen available for meetings, parties, weddings, and special events.
For the purposes of determining available water from all sources, ow clients are proposing a
change in use from the previous use, and intend to reduce the square footage of the building
from approximately 5,350 sq.-ft. to 4,428 sq.-ft. by removing the second floor of the main
building. This is comprised of a proposed facility area of 3,888 sq.-ft., plus a 540 sq.-ft.
basement. We anticipate that the basement will be unoccupied space, used for janitorial and
other storage and will house mechanical systems.
PROPOSED USE
Water Availability
The credit available from previous occupancy is determined using the existing square footage
of the building (5,357 sq.-ft.) and applying a use factor based on the type of occupancy. In
this case, Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD) Oroup I Use Factor,
(0.00007 ac-ft. per sq.-ft.) from Table 2: Water Use Factors, applied to the
original building occupant, which was a bank. Subsequent use as a retail establishment was
allowed under the same use. The square footage, under Group I allows for 0.3750 acre-feet
water credit pa year.
In 2000, 0.3495 ac-ft. of water was granted to the City of Cannel to be added to the city' s
allocation. Other available water allocations approved by MPWMD and being held by the
City are 0.3465 ac-ft:. from the Old Spinning Wheel restaurant. This project anticipates a final
availability, after water transfer of allocation from the City of Carmel, in the amount of
1.0710 ac--ft.
Change in Use
Our c1icot proposes a facility that falls under Group ID -Miscellaneous Use. The Group III
Use Factor for this application is 0.00053 ac-:ft. per sq.-ft., which is 2.06 ac-ft. per year. The
additional basement space increases this by 0.04 ac-ft. per year. When applied to this project
in a top down analysis, it is apparent that this project falls short of available water. We will
show, using a bottom up type of analysis, that the facility will use far less water than the
MPWMD factor supposes.
Using said bottom-up approach, we estimate that the maximum potential indoor use by the
center will not exceed 0.825 ac-ft. per year, including landscaping. We present two
alternative estimates, accounting for indoor use scenarios of 0.743 and 0.465 ac-ft. per year,
which is 0.825 and 0.516 ac-ft. per year including outdoor use. The formulas used to
calculate these estimates were derived after considerable deliberation, based on consultation
with vendolll and other personnel, literature reviews, and previously submitted water studies
to .MPWMD. Our calculations are more likely to over-estimate water use, rather than under
ENGINEERs-
1
474
Cannel Event Study·-- _ ___ ·-- .
estimate in an attempt to be conservative in our estimates. We provide our calculations in
Appendix A.
MPWMD has defined this project as a Meeting Hall. This category is ill defined, and
probably includes establishments such as Elks and Moose V ct.erans Halls, and
banquet halls associated with hotels and restaurants. The category may be described as "Very
High Use". These establishments typically offer at least one meal per day, whereas our
client's business model does not factor daily kitchen use.
Recorded water use at the location, is unavailable. There have been numerous owners over
the years and we did not pursue getting permission for water records from previous owners
for this report.
A
AxiOM
CONSUlnNG MECHANtcAL ENGINEERS
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475
carmel Event Center Water Study
INTRODUCTION
BACKGROUND
Our Client is proposing to remodel the existing building at the southeast comer of Dolores
Street and 7* Avenue, Carmel, California. The plans do not include any building shell
demolition but will remodel the interior to include a commercial kitchen, two meeting rooms,
and two restrooms. This building was a bank, previously and, more recently, was used as a
retail fumiture and design store. The square footage, under Group I credits the project with
0.3750 acre-feet per year.
The project has received a commitment from the City of Carmel by the Sea to usc an
allocation that the city has set aside for future development on the property equivalent to
0.6960 ac·feet per year. This allotment, plus the water credit from the previous occupan1B, is
1.0710 ac.ft.
OBJECTIVE
Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD) that a third party
opinion be provided regarding water usage estimates for proposed ccmatruction when there is
an intensification of use or an addition to an existing establishment. Axiom EngiJu:ers
completed a study to provide a professional engineering opinion as to the impact of pbmncd
usc that will allow our client to move forward with the development of an Event Center at the
site.
In this report, we plan to show that our clicot can offset water use based on the MPWMD
Table 2: Non-Residential Water Usc factors with various conservation m.easures and the use
will remain below the water available to the project sufficieutly to allow construction. The
purpose of this study is to account for all and to submit recommeodations for
mlucing water use, where feasible and demonstrable, in order to meet these goals.
In order to proceed with this project, since it is considered an intensification of use, our client
intends to use low flow water fixtures as by MPWMD, and where feasible, use
Ultra·low-.ftow (ULF) technologies. All the water using fixtuJes that are original to the
structure will be permanently removed.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Construction plans show that the useable square footage is 3,888 square feet plus a 540
square feet buement. (See Site Plans in AppeDdix B.) This space will be a community center
comprised of a large event room in the main building, along with a kitchen and restrooms.
Another building on the property will be a second evcm room.
We prepued this study to make recmnmendations for rcduciug the proposed water use for
the project iD order to :6ill below the proposed water available. Our study was limited to
1itcnlture reviews, personnel interviews, manufacturer's estimations, and our professional
opinion. Water use records were not obtained to illustrate historic use, because the previous
use fell under a diffemrt MPWMD use category, and because we are relying on a bottom up
approach to calculate water use.
AXIOM ENGINEERS ....
3
476
9a.nnel Event ___ --· _ _
WATER USE BASIS FOR EVALUATION
ANALYSIS AND ASSUMPTIONS
Our methodology for this opinion is typically two-fold. One approach is to build an estimate
for the facility's water use from the "ground up" based on a rational analysis of water using
functions and the proposed water saving features being installed The scope of these studies
included site reviews of existing fixtures, interviews, manufacturer's equipment data, and
literature reviews_ The second approach works from the "top down" using the base District
demand use factors.
A top down approach for this project indicates thltt the Carmel Event Center would use as
much as 2.06 ac-ft. This assumes a water use factor of0.00053 ac-ft. per ftl and 3,888 tr of
occupied space. Inclucling the 540 tr basement increases the demand to 2.10 ac-ft., assuming
the water use factor for the basement is 0.00007 ac-ft. per sq.-ft. The basement will be used
primarily for storage; the mechanical systems will also be located down there. We further
propose this is all unoccupied space, and should not be included in any calculations.
Use Baals
Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD) non-residential water use
category, Group III- Miscellaneous Use applies to this proposed project. The Center will be
used for private and public events, and we assume some of these events will use the kitchen.
For our summary, we assume potential kitchen use at maximum seven days per week, 52
weeks per year; however, our clients do not believe this is possible to achieve, so we
calculated several more likely scenarios and present two in Table I, below. Four scenarios
arc presented in Appendix A.
We made use assumptions based on two attendance scenarios. One scenario assumes a
maximum attendance rate of 200 persons per event for both rooms combined, or 1,400
people per week. The other scenario derives ftom discussions with the business community
and estimated business projections for profit-making, and is 975 persons per week. This also
includes 25 employees for 200 people, or 0.125 employees per attendee for events with 50 or
more guests. Table 1 illustrates demand using these two different attendance estimates and
different kitchen use frequencies.
Table 1 shows that even with a maximmn potential attendance of 200 people per day, seven
days per week, and 52 weeks per year, water use falls below the available water of 1.071 ao-
ft per year_
4
477
Table 1, Proposed Indoor Water Use
Proposed Indoor U1e SeeDarios
Kltdlen Used Twlee per Week
Maimum Attendance
1
Scczario 1·2 1165,836 OPY I 0.509 AFIYR
......
. . . ~ Attendance
1
Scenario 3·2 I124,74S GPY I 0.383 AFIYR ..
Kltehen Used Three Times per Week
Maximum Atteodmcc
1
Scenario 1-3 1181 074GPY I 0.556 AFIYR
Proposed Attendance
1
Scenario 3·3 Jl39983GPY I 0.430 AF/YR
Kitdaea U1ed Four Tima per Week
Maximuni AttendaDu
1
Sccoario 1-4 1196.313 GPY I 0.603 AFIYR
Proposed Attebdance' Scenario34 1151,454 GPY J 0.465 AFIYR
1
See Appendix A
Restn»om U..
Our restroom assumptions are based on studies perfonned in office settings, for which we
have the most reliable data. This results in higher than anticipated use for this application; we
feel restroom use by meeting attcm.dees is probably much lower. Our calculations for
restroom use are based on the assumption that women use 1he restroom once and men use it
0.88 times every two hours. We also assmne that every restroom visitor also uses the lavatory
sink. We added restroom use for employees at a rate of 0.125 employees per attendee for
events with SO or more people.
KltchenU••
The proposed kitchen uses will include pre-rinsing and washing pots and dishes, preparing
food and washing produce, cooking and equipment cleanup, serving water, and making ice.
Kitchen use is typically h i ~ and accounts fur as much as SOOAt of all water use in
commercial establishments that are associated with food activities.
Land.ceplng
There are a n.wnber of native pine trees on the property, aod a small area near the front door.
This is the cx.tcnt of landscapiDg. We anticipate that there will be planters and containers, in
addition to the existing landscaping, but that ovcra1l, landscapiDg water use will be VCI)'
minimal.
We looked at tbc various uses, including dishwashing, ice making, attendee restroom ust;
and miscellaneous use. We did DOt differentiate attendee restroom use from employees use,
and assumed each would use the facilities at similar rates. Our findings estimate water use by
area, based on staff interviews, manufacturer's equipment data, and liter'ature reviews. For
our recommmdations, we make the following assumptions;
• Exterior inigation is minimal, 90% of water use is indoors. Most of the landscaping is
established natives and needs no irrigation.
• Our estimates for customer restroom water use are based on previous report
submissions to MPWMD.
Page5
478
Cannel ·-·- - -· - · ----------·······-··· ·· _ ....
• All other assumptions are listed on the calculatioos spread sheet.
WATER ALLOWANCE AND CONSUMPTION
In Appendix A, we present our estimations regarding water usage in the restrooms and the
kitehen. Unaccounted water usage is assumed to be a combination of uncertainty, inefficient
water and systan losses. We add a 1 00,{, uncertainty factor to our calculations to account
for the unknown factors and inefficiencies, and to provide a more COllSeJ'Vative estimate of
water use at the site.
WATER DEMAND
The following sections summarize estimated water 1l8et and discuss our assumptions. In
general, most of the water used is divided between . the kitchen and the restrooms. We
calculate that restroom water use for this project accounts for approximately S3% of interior
water demand, and falls in Jine published studies that show restroom use BCCOUDts for
about SO% of all JlODrresidential interior water use. Our calculations show the remaining 47%
is used by kitchen cooking and cleaning activities.
Attenc:IM Restroom W..., UH
Water use was determined from a number of studies, aDd our professional opinion. We could
find no published reports tbat documc:nt water use for community centers, so we base our
opinions for restroom use on established criteria for offices; for kitchen use, we used
established criteria for restaarants. We believe water use in both groups is higher than for
meetings and events, which overestimates use in tbis study.
Restroom use is estimated to be between 8S, 700 and 123,000 galloos per year. We assume
100% of all customers will use facilities at least once during a 4 hour meetiug. and some will
use the facilities more than once in dlis time; this is a consc:rYidive estimate; actual restroom
use by is likely to be somewhat lower. We also assume all attr:ncbs (and staft) wash their
hands after using the restroom facilities. The data IJUIIliiWY for water use is in Appeodix A
Water saving restroom fixtures are essential in order reduce water use at the site. Existing
fixtures will be removed in the new building configuration. The total number of ratrooms
proposed will be two. See Appendix B for tbe Site Plans.
Emplo,H Restroom Wat8r Uu
We added employee restroom use at tbc rate of 0.125 employees per attlmdee for events with
SO persons or more. This assumes 25 employees at cwms with 200 people.
KltchenWateru ..
Studies from hotels with restamants, delis, and other food service oommercial
establishments conclude that kitchen water usc represents over SO% of total water use in
these establisbmcnts. Water efficient teclmologies have improved more rapidly for
commercial kitchen applications than for restroom fixtures since the publication of the most
recent of our study reference was published in 2003. We base our calculations on efficient
water using kitchen equipment, so we are able to show more substantial water savings in this
area than the reports. The most savings come from installing water etlicient dishwasbing
A. AxioM ENaJNEERSSM
T"\_ CONSUlTING MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
Page6
479
fixtures and equipment. We propose pre--rinse faucets that use 1.6 gallons per minute,
dishwashers that use 0. 74 gallons per rack, a scullery faucet that uses 2.2 gallons p« lllinum,
and hand wasbing faucets that deliver 0.5 gallons per minute. Foot operated faucets would
fmther reduce water demand. Cut sheets for equipment that meets these specifications are
included in Appmdix D.
We rccnmmcnd against installing a garbage disposer because of their high water use
requiremems.
Ice Milking
The combined water use by the ice making accounts for about 6% of all kitchen water use.
Our assumptions about water use by the ice machine is somewhat less than that proposed by
some sourees because they are based on less efficient models, different uses (e.g., sales of
icc, and restaurant activities that serve food several times per day.). The ice machine will be
an air cooled unit designed to use 12 gallons of water per 100 pounds of ice made.
Landscaping
The landscape plantiog in the parlcing lot is established evergreen ·shrubbery that requires no
additional inigation. We do not anticipate that the BIJI8lllandscaped area by the front door
will be significantly cbanpd, but if so, we recommc:ud plantings be native
species that will require no supplemental water once es1ablished.
WATER USE SUMMARY
The following calculation illustrates the amount of water use from the proposed facility, and
includes the recommended 1.19 gpftoilet, 0.125 gpfuriDals, and 0.5 gpm flow restrictors on
the faucets. These figures are presented to show that the facility will remain below 1.07 ac-ft.
per year, even in a Vf:f'J high use scenario.
Table 3. Water Use Summary
MPWMD Group Ill Factor 0.00053 so-W I Very High Use
Total Proposed Building Area 4,428ft2
Group rll FactoMd Use
3,888 X 0.00053 ac-ft.!ftZ
=2.06 ac>ftjyear
Group 1 Factored Use (Basement)
540 x 0.00007 ac-ft.lltZ
=0.04 ac-ft.IY&ar
Bottom Up Analysis Maximum Potential
Use Estimate
1
0.825 ao-ft.lyear = 268,900 gaJiyear
Bottom Up Analysis Proposed Use
2
0.516 ac-tltyear = 168,280 gallyvar
1
200 penoos per event, sevm days per week, 52 weeb per year,ldtchcn U8Cd rNct'J event, 9()0" indoor use,
10% inefticic:ncy fictor
2
97S per'IIOIIS per week, .lritcben used fom times per week, 90% indoor use, 10% incfficieucy factor
RECOMMENDATIONS
Following are recommendations designed to bep the water demand low at the proposed
Carmel Event Center. Manufacturer specification sheets for the recommended fixtures 2R
pn:scmtcd in Appendix c.
Page7
480
Cannel Event
• Water cloaets: AU water closets will have Automated Dual Flush Valves, 1.28 and
1.10 gallons per flush, (1.19 gallons per flush combined).
• Urinals: All urinals will be 1/8 gal (pint) urinals in the men' s restroom.
• All lavatory, and hand wash faucets: All hand washing faucets will be 0.5 gallons per
minute faucets that have vandal-resistant, non-removable aerators. If possible, ideally
the kitchen faucets will have foot operated faucets.
• /(jtcnen pre--rinse faucet We recommcmded a pre-rinse faucet with a flow rate of 1.6
gallons per minute. Lower flow faucets are available, and may be used; however, user
satisfaction with the cleaning ability of these may be reduced.
• .Automotic dish washer: The dishwasher should use no more than 1.0 gallons per rack.
We show one that uses 0.74 gallons per rack. (Our calculations were based on a
model that used 0.85 gallons per rack.)
• Garbage disposal: None.
• Ice machines: Air-cooled ice machines will be uaed.
• Fix all water leaks in a timely manner, upon discovery.
The suggestions in this report are meant to initiate a dialog to examine possibilities. In no
way does Axiom Engineers propose one alternative over another.
A
AxroM ENamEERsl"
CONSULTING MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
PageS
481
~ ~ ~ - ~ Event Center Water_Sfl:J_d)t,
···---- ----- --·------
REFERENCES
Waste Not, Want Not the Potential for Water Conservation in California; Gleick, Peter H.;
Haasz, Dana; Henges-Jeck, Christine; Srinivasan, Veena; Wolff, Gary; Cushing, Katherine
Kao, Mann, Amardip; November 2003
Handbook of Water Use and Conservation; Amy Vicken; 2001
Commercial and Institutional End uses of Water; Benedykt Dziegielewski, Jack C. Kiefer,
Eva M. Opitz, Gregory A. Porter, Glen L. Lantz; 2000
Monterey Peninsula Water Management District's (MPWMD) RuJe 24-9, ''Non-Residential
Water Use Factors", Table 2, page 24-9
City of Santa Barbara Water Demand Factor and Conservation Study "Technical Report••
Document No. 1, Prepares for the City of Santa Barbara's Community Development
Department and Public works Department, August 1989
AIJOM ENGINEERs-'
9
482
Water Use Calculations
--------- , ___ __ _______ _
Appendix A
483
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485
Equipment Water Usa
Domestic: Personal Use
we
1.19 Gal/Rush
Urinal
0.125 Gal/Flush
Handwuhlng
0.5 Gal/Minute
Kitchen
lea Maker
12 Gal/100 lbs. Ice
Dlshwuher
.85 GaiJRack
Pre-rinse
1.6 Gal/Minute
1. 73 Gal/Rack
Kitchen Prep
2.2 Gal/Minute
Handwashing
0.5 Gal/Minute
Assumptions
36 Items per Rack
Cannel Event Center
Water Use Analysis
Pre-rinsing takes twice as much water as the dishwasher
75% Drink water with Ice
lcemaking
10 Oz. Per Attendee
= 6.67 Oz. Water/Glass
= 3.33 Oz. Ice/Glass
8 Oz. Per Attendee
= 5.3 Oz. Water/Glass
= 2. 7 Oz. Ice/Glass
10 Oz. Per Attendee = 0.2025 LbJGiass Ice
8 Oz. Per Attendee = 0.162 LbJGiass rce
10 Oz. Per Attendee = 0.0518 Gal/Glass Water
6 Oz. Per Attendee = 0.0414 Gal/Glass Water
Oz. water/glass • 1 gal/128 oz = Gal. Ice per glass
Oz. ice/glass • 1 gal/128 oz • 7.68 lbJgal = Lb. Ice per glass
1/3012013 Page 3
486
Site Plans and Figures
---- --- ... . ·-· ··- ---· - ----·------.. ·--------.---- - - - ·- ·- ---
AppendixB
487

lw!! "" .,.,_ • Tit!
c,t..
488
......
..
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i
ENTRACE
1
489
Equipment Data Sheets
·-----· ·-- -- ··· ·-··
AppendixC
490
STANDARD FEATURES
fJJ .74 gallons per rack final rinse water
• 58 racks per hour - hot water sanitizing
• 65 racks per hour- chemical sanitizing
• NSF pot and pan listed for ~ , ~ & 6- minute
cycles
• Timed wash cycles for 1, 2, 4 or 6 minutes
a Solid state, integrated controls with digital status
lndicato111
11! Self-draining, high efficiency stainless steel pump
and stainless steel impeller
• Stainless steel drawn tank, tank shelf, chamber,
trim panels, frame and teet
• Spring counterbalanced chamber with
polyethylene guides
• Revolving, interchangeable upper and lower anti-
clogging wash arms
• Revolving, interchangeable upper and lower rinse
anns
• Slanted, self-locating, one-piece scrap screen
and basket system
• Automatic fin
• Door actuated start
I! Automatic drain closure
• Vent fan control
• External booster activation
• Delime cycle
• Service diagnostics
• NAFEM Data Protocol capable
• Straight-through or comer installation
• Hot water or chemical sanitation
VOLTAGE
[J 208-240/60/1
Q 208-24016013
0 48016013
0 2()()-240/5013*
tJ 380-41515013•
•Not submitted for ULICUL Ustlng
F-40078 -AM Select Dishwasher
Item# ___________ _
Quanti1y ___________ _
MODEL
OAM15
OP110NS AT EXTRA COST
Cl Gasheat
Cl Sense-A-Temp"' 70°F rise electric booster heater
Cl Single point electrical connection for booster
equipped machines (3 phase only)
ACCESSORIES
a ~ · pressure regulator valve
o Peg rack
IJ Combination rack
0 Splash shield for comer installations
!J Flanged and seismic feet
CJ End of cycle audible alarm (field activated}
!J Delime notification (field activated)
0 Drain water tempering kit
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491
Style That Works Better
SELECTRONIC,.. FloWise•
DUAL FLUSH TOILET FLUSH VALVE
BATTERY POWERED, SENSOR OPERATED, 1.2811.1 GPF
. , . . , . ~
GENERAL DESCRIPTION:
Exposed, Battery Powered, Sensor Operated
SelectronicTM Dual Flush Water Closet Flush Valve
for floor-mounted or wall-hung 1-11'2" top spud bowls.
Inlet Includes 1" I.P.S. angle stop with back-flow
protection, vandal-resistant cap, sweat solder kit,
cover tube and wall flange.
Outlet includes 1·1/2" vacuum breaker with
adjustable tailpiece, spud coupling and ftange.
PRODUCT FEATURES:
• light flush (1.1 gpt 30% water savings} tf user
is in detection zone for 60 seconds or less.
• Standard flush (1.28 gpf: 20% water savings) if user is In
detection zone for more than 60 seconds.
• EJectrcnic flush valve with SelectronicTM proximity
system for "Hands Free" operation.
• Self-Cleaning Piston with Integral wiper sprfng prevents
clogging and reduces maintenance.
• Piston operation delivers superior flush accuracy and
repeatability.
• Fully mechanical Manual Ovenide Button can
operate for an unnmited time without power.
• Vatve remains closed and does not need 1o be reset
after loss of power or water pressure.
• Sanitary Ffush: Valve automatically flushes after 24
hours of non-use to clean fixture & maintain trap seal.
• Sensor & electronic controls are fully enctosed and
water resistant
• Range can be adjusted manually or with optionaJ remote
control.
• Chemical resistant EPDM seals are unaffected by chlo-
ramines & other chemicals.
• Adjustable tailpiece.
• Factory-lnstaUed CR·P2 lithium battery Included.
• No external volume adjustment.
• Can be Installed left or right-handed.
RECOMMENDED SPECIFICATION:
MODEL NUMBER:
[J 606&.721.002 Dual Flush Toilet Flush Valve
for 11-112• Supply C\L to top of bowl, 1.28/1.1 gpf
[J 6065.521.002 Dual Flush Retroftt for Existing
Aush Valves, 1.2811.1 gpf. Replaces industry
standard manual and electronic valves. Does
not include the vacuum breaker assembly, angle
step or sweat solder kit.
OPERATING PRESSURE:
Overall Range: 20-125 psi**
Recommended: 2.5 psi (flowing)-80 psi (static)
FLOW REQUIREMENT:
25gpm (94.6 Urnin.)
... Water pressure over 80 psi is not recommended
for most plumbing fiXtures.
BATTERY UFE:
200,000 cycles (4 years @ 4000 cycles per month)
ACCESSOFUES:
• cast wan flanges w & 1-1/2.)
• Solid ring pipe supports (2-1/2" & a• C-E)
• Split ring pipe supports (2-112• & 6" C-E)
TYPICAL WATER CLOSET INSTALLA110N:
AfWALLTIIlOILET SHOWN
FINISHED WALL
FINSHED
ROOA
~ - - ..... - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - - -
Electi'OniD proximity Infrared sensor aoUvated toilet flUSh valve shan feature self-cleaning piston valve with lntagral wiper spring In refill ortnce
to prevent l o g g l ~ . Flush volume Is detennlned by amount of time user lain detection zone. 80 aaconda or leas: 1.1 gpt/4.2 L.pf, Mora than 60
aec:onds: 1.28 gpf/4.8 Lpf, Includes a fuly mechanical maooar CMr-tide that can piOIIId8 a complete flush without ballery power. Includes cast
breu valve body and metal cover with ctvomeliriah, vandall'llllslanllmp cap and IIIUn balliely. Angls *'P with back-ftow proeectlon and vacwm
brealclll' lnWded. Ruah vaiY8 lhall be Amertcan Standard Model # 8085._21.002.
l193
0 2012 AS America tnc. Revised 1112
492
Style That Workl Better
GENERAL DESCRIPTION:
Manual Piston-Type Urinal Flush Valve for 314• top
spud urinals.
INCLUDES:
• 314" I.P.S. angle stop with back-flow prevention and
vandal-r,slstant cap
• Sweat solder kit including cover tube and wall flange
• High back pressure vacuum breaker with down tube
• Spud coupling & flange for 314" top spud
PRODUCT FEATURES:
• Self-cleaning brass piston with integral wiper spring
prevents clogging and reduces maintenance
• Piston operation def!Y81'S superior flush accuracy
and repeatabUHy
• Piston valve remains closed and does not need
to be reset after loss of water pressure
• Non-hold open handle
• Positive seal ensures leak-free perfonnance
• No axtemal volume adjustment
• Durable chrome-plated cast brass construction
is ideal for commercial applications
• Chloramine-resistant EPDM seals
• Adjustable tailpiece for rough-In flexibility
• Can be Installed left or right handed
• ADA complaint
RECOMMENDED SPECIFICATION:
MANUAL FloWise•
URINAL FLUSH VALVE
0.125 GPF
MODEL NUMBER:
0 6045.013.002 Rush VaJve for 3/4" top spud
urinal, 0.125 gpf
OPERAnNG PRESSURE:
Overall Range: 20-125 psi**
Recommended: 20 psi (flowing)-80 psi (static)
•• Water pressure over 80 psi Is not recommended
for most plumbing fixtures.
FLOW REQUIREMENT:
Bgpm (30.3 Umin.)
ACCESSORIES:
• cast wall flanges (314,
TYPICAL URINAL INSFAU.ATION:
WASHBAOOK URINAL SHOWN
Manual urinal tluah valva shall feature &elf-cleaning brass piston valw With Integral wiper spring In bwaiB orifice to pnMint clogging. Valw
remains clo&ed and doea not need to be reset after loss of water preaaure. lncluc:IN cast brass valve body and oovar with ctlromsftnllh and
vandal l8ll&tant cap. Include& sweat solcfer ldl wllh wall ftangs and CCMII' tube. Angle IIIOp wllh back-ftaw PIOIBC:tbl and vacuum b1'881Ger Included.
0.125 gpf /O!J.fA FUh valva shall be Amerloan Standard Mocfelll 8045.013.002.
1..213
c 2012 AS America Jnc:. Revised
493
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RNS-0244 I RNS-0385 Nugget Ice Machines
Model
D ANS-0244A 0 RNS..038SA
Modelltl5-024411 Model AN5-038SA
Nugget Ice Machine Nugget 1cz
Features
• New .. gget bollsts 90961u mnl211r Mth
ani)' 1096 o«ertng one af the best nugget
ratfCIS for maxtnlum cooling and minimum
drink dilution.
, !nst1Uatlon - RN$0244 for kitchen
counten•nd IUIS0385 for bitr height counte!S.
• Up to 300 lbs. (136 kgst ully nugget
Ice procluc110n Including Ice ilnd IUCI!r. Tl'ue Ice
procludlon calcuJds just the lc» produced helping
e11d usen size tr.Jr lnKhlnes 11pproprta1ely. Up to
270 lbs. (1221cgs) of True Ice dally production.
• Ferfltt far carbarmecl beverages. blended
5mCIOth15 and "--'thca!Wphy&IE'.ill thenPf.
• Up to lllbs. (40 legs) Ia! Cilpildty.
• High load capacity burtngs for enhanced rebblhty.
J.----------------------1 . Heavy duty narntess steel WJ!net lt!SktsCDITOSion.
Standard Equipment
1at Scoop. 6" Bin Legs, Alllmlte Low Profile Legs
Slllndlnd Legs Adjustlble hm 4-1/l" to 6" and
Law Phillie Non-Adjustable at 1/4"
Ice Machine Electric
•t15/6CV1 (l31V50/1 ilbO iWlllble.)
t15/Wt Ice mldllneute flctory
pre-wtn!d with a6'(110an) power
aJJd and NEMA 5-15P
plug conflgumlon.
"2J015011 Ice mKhlnes fKtory
pre-wnd with a6' (1110 an) power
cord wtfJI either. no plug or prewlred
with Schuko or Blldl! "G Type- Plugs.
Totalln'l,.dty:
Alr-oooll!d: 1 0 amps.
MIJdmum fuse size:
AIH:OOied: 15amps.
HACJt-type drt:ult breilkers can be
used In place of fuses
Specifications
Candenser HMtof ReJection
onu pef ttour):
2.AOO (average) on RNSD244 •nd
3,500 on RNS0385
eo-pressor:
NomiMII'iltlng: 1/4 HP on
RN50244 1nd 1n.,., on RNS0385
Rmlg....m:
R-4041.
OperaUng Umits:
• Ambient Tempt!Til\n
llillnge:
11 O"F no·
• w.tet TemperatuR! Ringe:
3r-90"F B"-12'0
• Water Pressure k.e Milker
Waurln:
Min. 141J5l (516.5 liP!\)
Max. 80 psi (551.6
• Ea, ac.a15 door. sldu up lo out of the wq.
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N.FIT.Ice Maldng
Water Inlet
CC 112" (1 em)
N.P.T. Ice Making
W.tterOutlet
........, __

5111eJ:rts.tlltmJ
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RH50244 25.JII"
(66.0Dcm}
61111'
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Space-Saving Designs
RNW244A RNS.0385A
Helght 33.17" 3!152"
84.2o4 em 100.4cm
Width 19.69" 29.()6"
SO.OOcm 73.81 em
Depth 25.98" 27.17"
66.00 em 69.00cm
Bin 40 lbs. 881bs.
Storage 18 kgs 40kg5
Heigfrt lncludu adJustable bin leg$ .UO"to6.DD"
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alroutbKk,
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POJ•1720
M•nl-., WI 5G21·1720 USA
Til: 1.110.10.0111
Fu:, .120.111.75111
-ltDwec-CIIInl
496

58 I CITY OF CARMEL
AppendixC
2006 Water Allocation (Update 6127/13)
City of CarmrJ
497
2006 Water ADoeadoa (Updated 6127113)
TOTAL AVAILABLE WATER RESOURCE 3.32 af
*(Note: Water resource will be 3.189 af after water is traasferred to Seenle Restroom•)
Category #1: Low & Very Low Income Housing .507 af
This category includes residential housing units that meet the affordable housing standards for
low-income and/or very low-income households as estimated by the municipal code.
Category #2: SingleFamiJyResidclltial 0.0 af
Category #3: Multi-Family Residential 0.0 af
This category includes permanent and non-transient multi-family housing in all commercial and
R-4 Districts, including new apartments and condominiums, conversions of commercial space to
residential dwellings, and the housing component of mixed-use projects.
Category #4: Commercial 0.0 af
This category includes construction of new commercial floor space and conversion of existing
space to uses with a greater demand for water. This category also includes the commercial
component of mixed-use projects.
Cateaory #5: Municipal .224 af
This category includes all forms of municipal projects including or renovation of
existing fiwilities, construction of new facilities and changes in use.
·Category#§: Unallocated Reserve 1.69 af
This category is unallocated and is to be held as uncommitted until assigned to a defined
category through adoption of a new Al1ocation Resolution by the City Council.
Category #7: Mallery/Pescadero Water Transfer Rcsetye .106 af
This category includes the remaining balance from .960 feet of water originally set aside
through a transfer of development rights for four vacant lots in Pescadero Canyon owned in 1998
by Tim Mallery but dedicated as pcm1anent open-space. This water may be used for residential,
family residential, commercial or public use development as determined by Mallery
provided that the project complies with all zoning and provided that the is located with the City
limits.
Category #8: Spinning Wheel .334 af
This category is for water remaining from .56 acre feet of water that came from the Spinning
Wheel Restaurant.
Category #9: Forest Cottages Pre-commitment .109 af
This category is fur water pre-committed to the Forest Cottages Specific Plan for the creation of
two ]ow-income housing units. If this project is denied by the City Council or Coastal
Commission or the project is not under construction by 13 Febmary 2014 or is otherwise
abandoned, the water shall return to Category #I.
498
Category #!10: Le Towt Water .350 af
Water transferred to the City from Zigmont Le Towt to be used for the Plaza Del Mar project
located at the southeast comer ofDolores Street and Seventh Avenues.
499
500
Attachment "C" CoJTCSpondence
TO:
FROM:
DATE;
SUBJECI':
CARMELPOUCE DEPARTMENT
INTBR DEPARTMENT MEMO
MAR.C WIENER, ASSOCIATE PLANNBll
MICHAEL CAIJiOUN, POUCB CHIEF
MARCH 19, 2013
CARMEL EVENT CENTER.
The March 2013 Cannel Event Center Negative Declaration report statrs
that an off duty police officer will be retained on site for traffic control at
each event under their Valet Parldng Program (pg 17).
The Carmel Police Department will do everything within our capacity to
staff events but will not be able to provide an off duty officer or reserve
officer at every event We can schedule pasonnel as long as we are
atfon:led ample notice and have available staffing.
We will work with event coordinators to suggest alternatives if staffing is
not available, and to limit liability, reCOtimlcnd only trained and qualified
law enforcement peraomcl be used for directing traffic on any CarmeJ
streets during an event.
It is my recommendation that any law cnforcemeot or specially trained
personnel not employed by the City of Carmel shall mceive approval by the
Carmel Police Department prior to directing any vehicle traffic on Carmel
City streets.
501
Marc Wiener
FnNn:
Tonyl..onabaR!o. • - . --·- ···--· •
Manday, December 17, 2012 2:01 PU
MarcWlarw'
Sent:
To:
Cc:
SUbject: CARMEL EVENT CEHJ'ER

I am wrllng on behalf d the CWmel E\'8rt Canlar praJect located In what II commoriy known as the HomiiCIIpM bulldiiiQ
(on the South E8'Jt comer of Dolorel and 'fl) in to J1U l"8qUUI.t for a more delaftad d the pmJeot
and h p"OpOI8d 118111 or 1he lnllldlng.
The Cannel Evart Center wll ccnllrt of the adapi!Ye 1'81118 of the buldlng to prvvtde a new com11H1'111)' I"88IUU'C8 for local
bullfniiNI. and I'IGident8 by prowtdJna aliWIJ• fill' evem. DUCih • COl,,.., ... City avenll. w.ddlnga,
coaldntJ demonllnlllona at ,.,._.,n ol8nel.
The venue wllallo provide a COIMtliert for aciMiaaiUCh • .t wlna tastqs. falhlon lhowa n clher
IICivlfll whrch wtl be open 1o the and e1'10C111'8Qe addRianal vfBiiDr and CCII'ftltle1d8 8CIIvlly '" clol.vnblm CWmel.
For -.nple,locll j8'MIIerw may come together for alpeclll event rabililahow. The GOncept II for the EYenl c.nter to
ellllbl81cx:al butlinesa ownera, ellh• alone or In groupe, ID lhe •r-- • an 8XIInllcll'l t1 thetr notm111 bualr'll.-
facl/lllee.
Normal Jan d Clpll8tlon propoead wll be 8:00 a.m. ID no later thin 10:00 p.m. All CRy onlfl'lllnC$ regmrdq nolle wll
be adraed to 11 • pat al the pmjeGt The Ewnt Cenler will pnMde full food and beV8111Qe faclll• far liaae usq th9
prt.mlaes.
The appllcn PfVPCIHI 1o donafa one free use dey per month far &188 by local non..prafils, pnwlded that the praceeda
benefit ht Jocal and one day per rncnf\ for municipal MclionL
The applrcant II J1lqU8Btq tt1at thl Cll)t docale 1111 of the Wlllrlr lhlt was plaoed on thltlle towards lhll
projeCt The eppltclnt Is not requeetlng that the City dacalll any addldanal W8l8r tD thll prDJect other than lfult which ..
fRVIDU•fY prqJOIId b.,.. on the Bite.
Thank ,au far )1UUI' ullltlnce. We look faN.wd 1o being -* to p:eHnlllfll projiCt to the Planning CommleBlon at the
public,_,_ on Janlay 'if. Pll8le Ill me know r t1wn II any adclllonal fnbmatlon need.
Anthony L LOmbardo
ANTHONY LOMBARDO a ASSOCrATES
A Prufesslonel
450 Uncoln Avenue, SUite 101
Salinas, CA 93901
(81) 751·2330

Emell tonyl!afombll'dolaw.com
P1M1S1ED 0 CONRDEimAL- ATToRNEY CUENT PRIVI.EG£ -ATTORNEY WDIUl PIIODUCI'
The lnfarmttlon conbllned In this electronic transmission fl!aplly prMfl8ed and and It II Intended for the sole use of
the Individual or entity to whom It 15 •ddreued. If you ate not the tntalded recipient, please tiki nodce that any form of
disseminatiOn.. distribution or photocoPVInl af this elec:ttonfe transmission Is prchlbfted. If you have this electronic
tr1nmalsslo" rn errvr, pleue Immediately contact Anthony Lombarcfa .r (831} 751-2330 or tpnyftalombardofaw_mm and
Immediately delete the elecb'Onk tr.msmlsslon.
1
502
M.rcWtener
HIM1rk,
Stephanie Pintar l
Tue.day, Mardi 18, 2013 1:41 PM

Dave StDidt Gabbv Ayllla
c.m.r Event eenrar Pn:1JeGt (APN 010·145420)
Red C8tagary
lhls emlills to confirm that MPWMD c:onstden the proposed mmrnunlty center to be • Group 11 mmrnen:fal use with 1
water fJc:tor of 0.0002 IE/SF. The bulldln& currently Is Group 1 (O.CIJD07 Af/Sf). The conver51on from Group f to Group 11
fortht entire sqwre-footiP rasulls In en incrHSed CIPICfty af 0.697 Af, based on your stltement that there Is
presenttr 5,357 SF totaiiiJeable spate on the site. Any demolition (i.e. pet'll!lnent abandonment} of square faotap on
the e:ond floor would reduce the amount of water needed from the City's Allocltlon.
Also at I mentioned: 1)1s PJO.fect does not appear to be surt.ble fur peywater use. 1hls Is due to the unpredictability of
event frequenc.y (to p11erate sufftc:lent srev-ter for the Ql'n!nt •n.VOr next event) and the unfellslbDJty of stGrfiW
11'6ywater. fm not 1ure about 'the posslbllty oftreatlna areywarer and then stortnr It, hDWIM!I'. You ml&ht want to tllk
with Environmental Hetlth (Richard Le Wame) about It
Let me! mow If vou !Wed anythJnc else.
Rep ..
Stephanie
SK.,...anier Pintor
• • . .t-:"'
• • ....
tf'l nr-M"...!UJ .r-zt !WI:
l
503
Marc Wiener
From:
.,.:
To:
Co:
lllbject:
Man:,
Gal Halter·,
Thurlday, Ma""' 21, 201312:10 PM
UnWiener

.._ ___ ---..
aqu.. b*igel and water

As per our cb:ussion, the aq.,.re footlles ldentlftld pnwlously In the project description for the bulldfrw's second floor
Ia 612 sq. ft. My amdemandq yesterday from bale math on the 1• floor llld Gisement subtrac:tad from I!Xlltin& end
communfcetlons with Fred led me iD bllleW! the second floor w.slltrJ8r .t 929sq. ft. Hawever, I must not hive been
dear In my communicatiDnl. M you end 1 dlsaraecl, r believe tM llffarence Is explained In the basement 1be
Jemnd ftaor Of &12 sq. ft. Is to be NrniM!d. lbe buerntnt of 850 sq. ft. llttll wll only have 540 sq. ft. of •useable
squiJ"e feet within the control of the taMnt" at the candusfon ofthl& remodel. S..II'MIIs llld mechlnk:ftl moms ere not
useable spiC8. The difference between my 2
1111
floor number of929 •nd the ac:m.l of 612 Is 317 sq. ft. 1he dlffBence
between the J.S. sqUMt foomp far the basement of850 and the actUal post pnJjKt number Is 3UJ sq. ft.
Therefore the total pmt project space, u noled In my emaH yeste,.y, wRI be 31811q. ft. sq. ft.= 4428 sq. ft.
at Group U fora wetar use need of .511.
lhanlc you for alf"' tD aet clarification on 1hls. Pfa .. feel free to contact me IIPin, lf yuu hlw lddltlonal quesllonl. I
look forward 10 rec:tMna e copy of the staff report n soon as It Is IVIIIable. Also 11 plase emil I me 1 CDJ'r of
the project descrtpllon lbr me ta review and edtt IS needed.
.........., a CDRJErnW- ATIOMIYCUJITPIUVI.EGI- ATIOI1NEY WDUPIIDDUCT
111e luram.tfon cont1lned In tNs n..-.ron llllpJIV and c:onftdentlill. tnd It Is rnt.nded far the IGI'e u.e of
the lndfvldual or en11tv to whont It ISIICidlased. If ¥DU.,. not II'-lillie nollce 111tt -.yo farm fl
dllllrr*'ltlon,llstrtbutloft afU.IIectronle tnmrnlllfon II strlclly prohibited. If you hOM l'el:ltiv8d lhlleb:tronlc
tnnsmlulan In enar, pleasalnmecllllelr cantact Glil Hder Crlwforcllt(ISl) 151-2110 or§IUalomblnlolaw.gxn and
mneclatly cWeta the tnnanblltA

Sr. Lind UJe Specidlt
ANJHONV IDMBARDO & ASSOCIATES
A Pmfesllonll COipOMton
450 Lincoln Avenue. SUite 101
SIJIMs, CA 93901
Phone (831) 751-2330
FIX (831) 151-2331
EmeU G;jflhfombardO!aw.FQm

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