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Organisational Sustainability

Purpose
1. Business is destroying the world 2.What do we mean by sustainability? 3. A Sustainability Maturity Model

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability

5. Planning to make it happen

6. A Sustainability Maturity Rating System

Networking & References

Version 5

Purpose
The purpose of Organisational Sustainability is:
To describe a way organisations, both private and public sector, can : a) Improve theirs and others sustainability, and in doing so also b) Show how their progress can be measured in economic, community, and environmental terms .
Main Headings: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Business is destroying the world What do we mean by sustainability? A Sustainability Maturity model Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability Planning to make it happen How to assess Governments & Industries Sustainability Maturity
Copyright David Alman 2011

1. Business is destroying the world


Business is destroying the world: What are you doing about it?

Quote from The ecology of commerce by Paul Hawken


Copyright David Alman 2011

1. Business is destroying the world


Basically, environmental and social costs are growing faster than the benefits of economic growth, making us poorer not richer.*
Population explosion Famine & growing regional conflict / terrorism /refugees Depletion of biosphere & mineral resources Green house effects
*Rephrasing of a quote by Herman Daly, Senior Economist , World Bank (1988-1994) in The Consumption Dilemma. Report by Deloitte Touch Tohmatsu and the World Economic forum. January 2011
Copyright David Alman 2011

Unlimited Economic Growth

Civilisation in danger

1. Business is destroying the world


Actually it is more like this (too much for one slide!)

Slide 1 with 12 supporting slides from Interconnectness of world problems by Fritjof Capra
Copyright David Alman 2011

1. Business is destroying the world


But there are businesses that are working on changing from wasteful and destructive practices to restorative practices, cutting costs and finding competitive advantage. The way to becoming a Sustainable Organisation is difficult and involves changes to mindsets and innovation.

The Interface Model from Mid- Course Correction by Ray Anderson


Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.1 Sustainability defined 2.2 Translating sustainability into organisational terms 2.3 Brief explanation of organisational sustainability terms 2.4 Internal & External Sustainability issues and costs

Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.1 Sustainability Defined:

Organisational Sustainability
An Organisations ability to achieve its goals and increase long-term stakeholder value by integrating economic, environmental and social opportunities into its strategies.
Adapted from Symposium on Sustainability Profiles in Leadership, NYC, Oct. 2001.

UN Based Definition
Meeting the present generations needs in ways that are not only economically viable, environmentally sound and socially equitable but will also allow future generations to do the same .
Based on an explanation in the Brundtland Report Our Common Future United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987
Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.2 Translating Sustainability into Organisational terms
Developing Organisational Sustainability means shifting from a single - thin one dimension to a thick three dimension - approach, and recognising each dimension also affects the other in achieving sustainable value.

Thick Value
To achieve social, environmental, and economic (SEE) sustainability by optimising the value of resources and outcomes value to stakeholders (Organisational Health).

Thin Value
To achieve organisational sustainability by minimising waste in the use of resources (inputs) and optimising the value of services/products (outputs) (Financial Health).

Thin & Thick Value are terms coined by Umair Haque in The New Capitalist Manifesto Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.2 Translating Sustainability into Organisational terms

Sustainability Terms

Internal Organisational terms

Social

Well-being

Environment

Economic

Resources

Productivity

Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.3 Brief explanation of Organisational Sustainability terms: Productivity

Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.3 Brief explanation of Organisational Sustainability terms: Resources.
Energy & Materials Usage. Diagram below illustrates changes in materials usage.

Figure 4 from World Economic Forum report Redesigning business value: A roadmap for sustainable consumption

Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.3 Brief explanation of Organisational Sustainability terms: Well-being
1. Well- being covers: Employee Satisfaction Cost of disengagement in 2007 in Australia is estimated as $42.1 billion
(Ref: Gallop Q12 Employee Engagement Poll 2008 Results)

2. Well-being covers: Employee Health The World Health Organisation (WHO) and International Labour Organisation (ILO) define the aims of occupational health as: The promotion and maintenance of the highest degree of physical, mental, and social well-being of workers in all occupations by prevention of departures from health, and controlling risks. The four elements affecting employee well-being are therefore: Environmental factors; Physical health; Mental (psychological) health; and Social health.
Information drawn from Creating Healthy work organisations edited by Cooper & Williams

Cost of workplace stress in Australia (inc Presenteeism and Absenteeism) $14.81 billion a year
(Ref: The cost of workplace stress in Australia. August 2008. Medibank Private).

Economic cost of work related injury and illness in 2005-6 in Australia was $57.5 billion
(Ref Australian Safety and Compensation Council quoted by Safe to Work) Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.4 Internal & External Sustainability Issues
Internal Organisational Issues
Productivity (efficiency & effectiveness)

External Stakeholder Issues


Economic progress

Sustainability

Resources (Energy and materials usage/waste) Employee (Wellbeing)

Environmental protection, restoration, & regeneration

Community well-being

Copyright David Alman 2011

2. What do we mean by Sustainability?


2.4 Internal & External Sustainability Costs
Internal Organisational costs
Productivity inefficiency (waste time) External Stakeholder Costs Product/service waste causing health & environment impacts e.g. diabetes, cancer, heart disease. Higher Taxes to cover community costs. Clean up of environmental damage, non-renewable/finite resource over usage (water, natural resource & fossil fuel usage): Regulation and Penalty charges. Education costs, medical costs, family and community costs. Higher taxes to cover welfare and unemployment costs.

Sustainability

Resources (Energy & material waste)

Employee (incompetence, injury inc stress)

Copyright David Alman 2011

3. A Sustainability Maturity Model


3.1 A Sustainability Maturity model 4 Levels 3.2 Level 1 Foundation 3.3 Level 2 Rebuilding 3.4 Level 3 New value chains 3.5 Level 4 Balanced systems

Adapted from the World Economic Forum Report Redesigning Business Value: A Roadmap for Sustainable Consumption
Copyright David Alman 2011

3. A Sustainability Maturity Model


3.1 A Sustainability Maturity model 4 Levels
Level 1. Foundation: Sustainability Reports available. Demonstrated mindsets, statements, and plans

2. Rebuilding: Breakthrough innovative improvements. The first step is toLevel firm up the foundation, as the current leading business practices of today Organisations integrate sustainability across all operations. Viable new operating and business models developed. Level 3. New value chains: Zero waste and no harm performance. Integrating sustainability across entire value chains to achieve no harm and zero net waste. Level 4. Balanced systems: Stakeholder driven sustainability. In which innovation drives sustainable value chains and value is redefined for all stakeholders as partners.
Adapted from the World Economic Forum Report Redesigning Business Value: A Roadmap for Sustainable Consumption
Copyright David Alman 2011

3. A Sustainability Maturity Model


3.2 Sustainability Maturity model Level 1 Foundation
Level 1. Foundation: Sustainability Reports available. Demonstrated mindsets, statements, and plans to support continuous improvements in sustainability.
Challenges : Developing a leadership mindset The first step is to firm up the foundation, as the current leading business practices of today Awareness at all levels Sustainable strategy planning Organisational (public & private sector) inertia Enablers: Employee engagement Stakeholder dialogue Internal measurement & reporting of non-financial information (e.g. Sustainable Balanced Scorecard)

Adapted from the World Economic Forum Report Redesigning Business Value: A Roadmap for Sustainable Consumption
Copyright David Alman 2011

3. A Sustainability Maturity Model


3.3 Sustainability Maturity model Level 2 Rebuilding
Level 2. Rebuilding: Breakthrough innovative improvements. Organisations integrate sustainability across all operations. Viable new operating and business models developed.
: Integrating sustainability intoleading all levels of the organisation The first step is Challenges to firm up the foundation, as the current business practices of today Trialling innovative new models Collaborative organisational change Value chain changes Enablers: Internal trust Deep smarts in knowledge and knowhow Cross industry & government reporting & transparent measurement Consumer/citizen engagement Employees enabled & empowered

Adapted from the World Economic Forum Report Redesigning Business Value: A Roadmap for Sustainable Consumption
Copyright David Alman 2011

3. A Sustainability Maturity Model


3.4 Sustainability Maturity model Level 3 New Value Chains
Level 3. New value chains: Zero waste and no harm performance. Integrating sustainability across entire value chains to achieve no harm and zero net waste.
Challenges: Sustainably integrated across value chains Towards zero net waste & no harm Major shifts to new models Refocus value towards all stakeholders Enablers: Industry & government collaboration External trust through transparency Markets/policies Sustainability literate citizens Co-opetition platforms

Adapted from the World Economic Forum Report Redesigning Business Value: A Roadmap for Sustainable Consumption
Copyright David Alman 2011

3. A Sustainability Maturity Model


3.5 Sustainability Maturity model Level 4 Balanced Systems
Level 4. Balanced systems: Stakeholder driven sustainability. In which innovation drives sustainable value chains, and value is redefined for all stakeholders as partners.
chain innovation The first step is toChallenges: firm up theContinuous foundation,value as the current leading business practices of today Closed value loops, zero waste, no harm Sustainable enriched communities & lifestyles Enablers: Societal collaboration Governance Regulation Eco-system replication & regeneration Business/government consensus and partnership True cost of resources reflected in resource value.

Adapted from the World Economic Forum Report Redesigning Business Value: A Roadmap for Sustainable Consumption
Copyright David Alman 2011

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability


4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model Level 1. Foundation Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model Level 2. Rebuilding Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model Level 3. New Value Chains Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model Level 4. Balanced Systems

Copyright David Alman 2011

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability


4.1 Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model: Concepts
1. Sustainability Maturity Levels
Level 1. Foundation: Sustainability Reports available Level 2. Rebuilding: Breakthrough innovative improvements Level 3. New value chains: Zero waste and no harm

3. Sustainability Factors (colour Coded)


Internal
Productivity: Outcome Differentiation Productivity: Waste efficiency Resources e.g. waste & emissions reduction Employee well-being

External
Shareholder dialogue

Level 4. Balanced systems: Stakeholder driven sustainability

2. Organisational Performance model


Economic Sustainability

Natural Environment

Resources: Supplier dialogue

Waste reduction

Value adding

Community well-being

Environmental & Social Sustainability


Copyright David Alman 2011

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability


4.1 Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model
Economic Sustainability
Productivity: Waste efficiency e.g. process & network efficiency Productivity: Outcome Differentiation value e.g. customer value Shareholder dialogue

Natural Environment

Waste reduction
Resources: Supplier dialogue Resources e.g. waste & emissions reduction Employee well-being e.g. health (physical, mental, and social)

Value adding
Community well-being

Environmental & Social Sustainability


Copyright David Alman 2011

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability


4.2 Organisational Sustainability Maturity Model Level 1. Foundation
Economic Sustainability
Productivity: Waste efficiency e.g. process & network efficiency Productivity: Outcome Differentiation value e.g. Customer/ citizen value Shareholder dialogue: Customers/citizens, Shareholders

Waste reduction
Resources: Supplier dialogue on value chains Resources e.g. waste & emissions reduction Employee well-being e.g. Employee engagement

Value adding

Environmental & Social Sustainability


Copyright David Alman 2011

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability


4.3 Application of Sustainability Maturity Model Level 2. Rebuilding
Economic Sustainability
Productivity: Waste efficiency e.g. process & network efficiency Productivity: New models of Differentiation value e.g. Customer/ Citizen value Shareholder dialogue: Cross industry & government ; Consumer/citizen engagement

Waste reduction
Resources: Supplier dialogue: On value chain change Resources e.g. waste & emissions reduction Employee well-being e.g. Employees enabled & empowered; use of Deep smarts

Value adding

Environmental & Social Sustainability


Copyright David Alman 2011

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability


4.4 Application of Maturity Model Level 3. New Value Chains
Economic Sustainability
Productivity: Waste efficiency e.g. process & network efficiency Productivity:
Major shift in models, refocus value onto all stakeholders (customers/citizens, shareholders, regulators, suppliers, environment).

Shareholder dialogue:
Industry & government collaboration; Consumer/ citizen engagement; co-opetition platforms

Natural Environment
Lower service & product impact on finite environmental resources

Waste reduction
Resources Supplier dialogue: Sustainability across value chains Community well-being. Reduced work related health costs. Resources e.g. Closed loops, Zero waste & emissions, No harm approach Employee well-being e.g. No harm approach & equity

Value adding

Environmental & Social Sustainability


Copyright David Alman 2011

4. Example of maturing Organisational Sustainability


4.5 Application of Maturity Model Level 4. Balanced Systems
Economic Sustainability
Productivity: Waste efficiency e.g. process & network efficiency Productivity:
Major shifts in models, refocus value onto all stakeholders (customers/citizens, shareholders, regulators, suppliers, environment).

Shareholder dialogue:
Sustainable lifestyles, consensus business/government partnership

Natural Environment Eco system replication & regeneration

Waste reduction
Resources Supplier dialogue: Continuous value chain innovation. Closed loops. Resources e.g. Closed loops, Zero waste & emissions, No harm approach. True cost of resources in valuing resources Employee well-being e.g. Enrichment & social justice

Value adding
Community wellbeing. Sustainable enriched communities

Environmental & Social Sustainability


Copyright David Alman 2011

5. Planning to make it happen


5.1 Develop a Sustainability Life Cycle Assessment 5.2 Develop a Sustainability Balanced Scorecard

Copyright David Alman 2011

5. Planning to make it happen


5.1 Develop an Organisational Sustainability Life Cycle Assessment
Impact of organisation Impact in organisation Process waste/value
% new improvements % inefficiency (non value adding time) % of contaminants in supplies % of hazardous chemicals supplied % Energy used in supplies Sustainability of supplies Environmental damage from supplies Overall energy consumption Water usage/% recycled Solid waste/% recycled Emissions Hazards from materials used

Impact of organisation User value


User complaints User satisfaction Hazards from service/products Service/product life cycle length % recycled waste % toxicity of waste % compostable

Sustainability Factors Economic Environmental

Supplier on-cost waste

End Use waste

Social

Safety hazards (flow on) costs to suppliers employees from products/services provided Transport costs

Network value contribution Competency level assessments Employee participation levels Staff absence costs Conflict/complaint costs Injury/stress costs

Community costs of health impacts Community literacy on social/environmental issues.

Copyright David Alman 2011

5. Planning to make it happen


5.2 Develop a Sustainability Balanced Scorecard Generic Private/Public Sector Example
Financial effectiveness

Economic

Return on Capital/ Budget cost benefit

Customer/ Citizen
Complaints. Service/product satisfaction

Process productivity
% new improvements % inefficiency (non value adding activities)

Environmental

Suppliers
% of contaminants in supplies % of hazardous chemicals supplied % Energy used in supplies Sustainability of supplies Environmental damage from supplies

Process waste/value
Overall energy consumption Water usage/% recycled Solid waste/% recycled Emissions Hazards from materials used Network value contribution Competency level assessments Employee participation levels Staff absence costs Conflict/complaint costs Injury/stress costs

User hazards & waste


Hazards from service/products Service/product life cycle % recycled waste % toxicity of waste Community costs of health impacts Community literacy on social/environmental issues.

Social

Safety hazard (flow on) costs to suppliers employees from products/services provided Transport costs

Copyright David Alman 2011

6. How to assess Governments & Industries Sustainability Maturity


6.1 Rating Government & industry Sustainability Maturity Performance.
The following Sustainable Maturity Performance Rating System examples how government and industry are interconnected and can be assessed on their Sustainability Maturity. A rating system (1 to 4) is exampled as an easy way of gauging both industry and government agencies performance toward achieving full sustainability (Rating 4) to benefit stakeholders. Stakeholders interested in making this kind of assessment on government(s) and industries could include:

Individuals; Employees and unions; Community & community groups; Industries and shareholders; Government (local, state, & federal); Media (news, talk shows); Social media.

Copyright David Alman 2011

6. How to assess Governments & Industries Sustainability Maturity


6.1 Rating Government & industry Sustainability Maturity Performance.
Sustainability Maturity Performance Rating System*
Rating 1. Foundation: Sustainability Reports available . Demonstrated mindsets, statements, and plans (including legislation) that support continuous improvement in organisations performing as Sustainable Organisations; Rating 2. Rebuilding: Breakthrough innovative improvements. Organisations (including public sector agencies) demonstrate the application of the 3 sustainability factors across all operations, and viable new ways that show breakthrough innovation i n improving sustainability; Rating 3. New value: Zero waste and no harm performance. Organisations (including public sector agencies) demonstrate the integration of the 3 sustainability factors by the achievement of no harm and zero waste practices. Rating 4. Balanced systems: Stakeholder driven sustainability . Organisations (including public sector agencies) demonstrate innovation is driving ongoing sustainability improvements in their systems (and those they influence/affect), and the value of what is done is defined by stakeholders as partners. *Adapted from the World Economic Forum Report Redesigning Business Value: A Roadmap for Sustainable Consumption.

Sustainability maturity rating is based on the three integrated sustainability factors:


Economic (productivity) e.g. Industry/public sector efficiency (minimal non valued activity waste) and effectiveness in meeting stakeholder needs and values. Social (well-being) e.g. employee and community satisfaction and health & development (physical, mental, and social). Environmental (resources) e.g. energy/material waste, restoration, and regeneration.
Copyright David Alman 2011

6. How to assess Governments & Industries Sustainability Maturity


6.1 Rating Government & industry Sustainability Maturity Performance.
Sustainability Performance indicators * that could be reported to, and rated by, stakeholders include the following:
Economic (productivity) Financial value generated Customer satisfaction on life cycle product/service information & labelling % of products & services subject to life cycle assessment Environmental impacts of products/services % of products & packaging reclaimable. Renewable energy based products/services Health & safety impacts of products & services Transport impacts of products, goods, materials, & services Social (well-being) Health & Safety Injury rates, lost days, absenteeism Training, counselling, preventative/risk control programs. Number of incidents of discrimination & corrective action Training Hours per employee by gender & category Programs for skills management & life long learning % employees receiving regular performance & career development by gender & employee category Remuneration Rates of basic salary & remuneration by gender & employee category Community Proportion of locally based suppliers used Proportion of senior management living in local community Development & impact of infrastructure investments & services provided for local benefit (commercial, in kind, pro bono). % of operations implemented with local engagement, impact assessments, and development programs. Operations with potential or actual negative impacts on local communities.

Environmental (resources) Materials: % of recycled material used Energy: Energy saved due to conservation & efficiencies Water: % & total volume recycled & re-used Emissions, effluents, & waste: Greenhouse emissions by weight Ozone depleting substances by weight NO, SO, and other significant emissions by type & weight Total waste water discharged by quality & desalination Total weight of waste & hazardous waste. Total number and volume of spills Habitats affected by water discharge & run off

Biodiversity: Impact of activities, products, services on areas of high diversity value. Habitats protected or restored * Based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). Reporting Frameworks. G 3.1 Guidelines Copyright David Alman 2011

6. How to assess Governments & Industries Sustainability Maturity


6.1 Rating Government & industry Sustainability Maturity Performance - Example.
Queensland State Government Legislation supporting Organisational Sustainability Rating: 0 Industry operating within Legislative & Regulatory Requirements example industries Civil construction inc housing & infrastructure Rating: 0 Health services & support Rating: 0 Energy providers Rating: 0 Water & effluent management Rating: 0 Waste Management Rating: 0 Transport Rating: 0 Mining Rating: 0 Forestry Rating: 0 Fisheries Rating: 0 Agriculture Rating: 0 Hospitality & tourism Rating: 0 Manufacturing Rating: 0 Financial Services Rating: 0
Sustainability Maturity Performance Rating System Rating 1. Foundation: Sustainability Reports available . Demonstrated mindsets, statements, and plans (including legislation) that support continuous improvement in organisations performing as Sustainable Organisations; Rating 2. Rebuilding: Breakthrough innovative improvements. Organisations (including public sector agencies) demonstrate the application of the 3 sustainability factors across all operations, and viable new ways that show breakthrough innovation in improving sustainability; Rating 3. New value: Zero waste and no harm performance. Organisations (including public sector agencies) demonstrate the integration of the 3 sustainability factors by the achievement of no harm and zero waste practices. Rating 4. Balanced systems: Stakeholder driven sustainability. Organisations (including public sector agencies) demonstrate innovation is driving ongoing sustainability improvements in their systems (and those they influence/affect), and the value of what is done is defined by stakeholders as partners. Rating System based on three integrated sustainability factors: Economic (productivity) . Social (well-being) Environmental (Resources)

Queensland Government Agencies Rating: 0

Queensland Local Governments Rating: 0

Queensland Local Government By laws & Regulations Rating: 0

Copyright David Alman 2011

Social Network Acknowledgements


This PowerPoint has largely grown out of a LinkedIn group discussion on Gene Bellingers Systems Thinking World where Helene Finidori set up the following Thread:
UN call for revolutionary thinking and action to ensure an economic model for survival... How to make this happen? Warning for global suicide and time running out, Ban ki-moon called last Friday at Davos for revolutionary thinking and action to ensure an economic model for survival. What is needed to take a global interconnected perspective on the issues and threats our planet is facing and start action? How can this gain traction and produce the desired effect?

To make it happen we have to be prepared to make major changes in our lifestyles, our economic models, our social organization, and our political life. We have to connect the dots between climate change and what I might call here, WEF water, energy and food Together, let us tear down the walls, he declared. The walls between the development agenda and the climate agenda. Between business, government and civil society. Between global security and global sustainability. It is good business good politics and good for society.

In over 1250 posts (at time of writing) the discussion has ranged widely, been informative, and supplied many references. This Power Point covers only one perspective on a small part (Organisational Sustainability) of that much larger discussion, now being reset into Blogs at: http://www.systemswiki.org/blog/?p=285
Copyright David Alman 2011

Social Network Acknowledgements


In this respect I would like to express an especial thank you to the following for their many contributions and references as they relate to the subject area of this Power Point (while recognising that their views are not necessarily those expressed here).

Helene Finidori

T.A. Balasubramanian

Stephen Scott Wright


Copyright David Alman 2011

References
Models of Sustainability The ecology of commerce. Paul Hawken. Harper Business. Interconnectedness of world problems. Fritjof Capra. http://bit.ly/j7qPm9 The new capitalist manifesto. Umair Haque. Harvard Business Review Press. Capitalism at the crossroads. Stuart Hart. Wharton School publishing. Redesigning business value. Deloitte Touch Tohmatsu & World Economic Forum. http://bit.ly/k35zyx

Developing Organisational Sustainability Four steps to see sustainability as a strategic asset. Anton Breman. http://bit.ly/mdSXGV Creating Sustainable Value. Hart & Milstein. http://e4sw.org/papers/Hart_Milstein.pdf Mid-course correction toward a sustainable enterprise: The Interface model . Ray Anderson. The Peregrinzilla Press.
Productivity The Productivity Model. Philip McGee. http://bit.ly/lMhcmj Defining and measuring productivity in the public sector: Managerial perceptions . Linna, Pekkola, Ukko, & Melkas. http://bit.ly/iWWoMF Organisational Productivity. David Alman. http://slidesha.re/kZuPp7 Well-being Creating healthy work organizations. Ed. Cooper & Williams. Wiley & Sons The Gallop Q12 Employee Engagement- Poll 2008 Results. http://bit.ly/kOBxME The cost of workplace stress in Australia. August 2008. Medibank Private. http://bit.ly/kVRIPi The cost of work related injury and illness for Australian employers, workers and the community 2005-6. Safe to Work http://bit.ly/iGExb7 Workplace conflict and how business can harness it to thrive . CPP Global Human Capital Report. July 2008 http://bit.ly/lWJXST Sustainability Measures What is sustainable development? Kates, Parris, Leiserowitz. http://hvrd.me/jquAKT Translating ESG into Sustainable Business Value . UNEP Finance Initiative & World Business Council for Sustainable Development. http://bit.ly/lu67WO Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). Reporting Frameworks. G 3.1 Guidelines . http://bit.ly/mrtHfQ Sustainability Life Cycle Assessment The consumption dilemma. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu & World Economic Forum. http://bit.ly/ij396T Life cycle-based sustainability indicators for assessment of the US food system . Heller & Keoleian. http://css.snre.umich.edu/css_doc/CSS00-04.pdf The Balanced Scorecard The Strategy-Focused Organization. Kaplan & Norton. Harvard University Press. Sustainable Organisation Performance. Graham Hubbard. http://bit.ly/kMwnoS The Sustainability Balanced Scorecard. Figge, Hahn, Schaltegger, & Wagner. http://bit.ly/msctCA Sustainability Benchmarking Lists of the most sustainable companies. Bob Willard. bit.ly/isZ0Ku Leadership and corporate responsibility metrics for sustainable corporate performance. Szekely & Knirsch. http://bit.ly/mrdjBs Sustainability Futures Thinking Systems Theory: Balancing efficiency with resilience. John Fullerton http://bit.ly/iMpkol The New Economics Foundation http://www.neweconomics.org/ Scenarios for 2040. The Challenge Network. http://bit.ly/jqIupu

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Travelling Companions

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