The Tutor/Mentor Connection

:
Creating a Virtual Corporate Office
If volunteer-based
tutor/mentor programs were
supported by a “corporate
office” the way big companies
support multiple stores,
would we have more and
better programs reaching
young people?
Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Maps show distribution of stores such as Wal Mart,
Walgreens, Bank of America. Find these on Google.com

These stores are supported by corporate and regional office teams.
Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 2

Every store offers a selection of merchandise and
services based on local customer needs.
Corporate office
teams, consisting
of buyers,
merchants, store
planners, human
resource
professionals,
researchers,
advertisers,
mangers, etc.
make sure each
store has products
customers seek,
and well trained
people to support
store operations.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 3

A site-based tutor/mentor program is a “store” that
offers various services to youth and volunteers.

Maps can show
where tutor/mentor
programs in a city
like Chicago are
needed and where
existing programs
are located.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 4

A site-based volunteer-based tutor/mentor program is a “store” with “stuff” for many
customers. Each list below represents products and services needed at every tutor/mentor
program in every high poverty neighborhood of cities like Chicago.

Tutor/Mentor

Stuff for
Donors
• Why we are needed
• Needs of youth in
neighborhood we
serve
• What we do
• How this influences
learning, school
performance, work
readiness
• Our Leaders
• Other donors
• What we accomplish
• Who we network
with
• Who we collaborate
with
• How well we use
their donations
• What is our impact

Parents, Teachers,
Community
Leaders

STORE














Stuff for

Stuff for

Youth

Volunteers

Mentors, Tutors
Fun activities
New experiences
Technology
Books
Safe Place
Arts
Social & Emotional
Support
College & Career
Job Skills
Network
Staff support
Friends
Long-term
involvement

Very few programs
offer all of these!

Stuff for

STAFF
• Vision, Mission
• Training
• On-Going
support
• Fun Activities
• Social network
• Career Network
• Financial reward
• Health care
• Retirement
• Safe, nurturing
place to work

• Youth
• Training
• On-Going
support
• Fun Activities
• Social network
• Career Network
• Sense of purpose
• Technology
• Books
• Safe Place
• Job Skills
• Staff support
• Friends

• What we do
• What we accomplish
• How do enroll a
youth
• How to make
programs like this
available to more
kids in more places
• How this helps kids

Stuff for
Industry,
Universities
• What we do
• What we accomplish
• How do volunteers get
involved
• Impact on volunteers,
business goals
• Impact on diversity,
workforce
development etc.

Pg 5

A well-organized tutor/mentor program needs a
team of skilled leaders & workers
Board of
Directors
Recruitment and
Development

Director/CEO

Admin
analyst

Tutor/Mentor
Program
Operations

Marketing and
Development

Secretary

Information
Technologies

Human
Resources

Database
Development &
Maintenance

Policy
Development
and Training

Web site
development &
Maintenance

Staffing/
Training

Facilities Mgr.

Legal &
Accounting
Student
Recruitment
& Support
Manager

Volunteer
Recruitment
and Training

School and
Community
Liaison

Coordinator
for
tutor/mentor
sessions

Supply/Food
Service

Events &
Activities

Security

College &
Career
Readiness

Board
Development

Communications
Manager

Grants
Manger

Newsletter (print
and email versions

Special
Events

Public
Relations

Direct Mail

Annual
Report

Web Site
Internal
Communications

Transportation

On-line
Documentation
Systems
On-line elearning (for
staff, students,
volunteers)

Employee
Records

Payroll and
Benefits
Management

Database mgt
Business
Liaison/
Vocational
Training
Computer
Learning
Center
Data
Collection
and Analysis

Internal
Network and
Server set up
and
maintenance
Hardware &
software
upgrades
(technology
plan
Technology
Support
Technology
Training

Computer
Technology
Center.
If available

Very few programs
have all of these!

Every box on this chart represents a role that a corporate volunteer with specific talents and
experience could fill in a volunteer-based tutor/mentor organization. Every box needs to be filled if the
organization is to provide effective service to its community. Similar charts should be developed to show the
organizational structure of different types of charities and service organizations.
Pg 6

The Case for a more comprehensive form of
tutoring/mentoring:
Many leaders, including the President of the United States, already
support the concept of mentoring.
However, very few have business plans that answer these questions:
“What are all the things we need to do to assure that youth born in
poverty, and participating in tutor/mentor programs, are starting
jobs/careers by age 25?”

How do we increase the number, and quality of “places” where
youth access these services?
Read more. This is what the
Tutor/Mentor Connection* focuses on every day.
Contact us at tutormentor2@earthlink.net
*since 2011 the T/MC has been a program offered by Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC
Pg. 7

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

No ‘corporate office’ yet exists to support tutor/mentor
programs in multiple locations. Leaders Needed.
The purpose of this T/MC essay is not to convince you
that tutoring/mentoring is an important education-tocareers and civic engagement strategy.
The purpose is to recruit leaders from industry… 
to share their skills and experiences… 
to make more and better tutor/mentor programs available in all places where they are
needed. 
to provide the operating and innovation dollars needed to fuel efforts like the T/MC in Chicago,
and similar structures in other cities. 
and provide resources to support collaborations which bring Science, Technology, Arts,
Engineering and Math mentoring into existing tutor/mentor programs

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg. 8

In a big city like Chicago, hundreds of non-profits have similar
organizational needs. Few are adequately staffed.

Corporate
Leadership needs
to draw volunteers,
talent and donors to
t/m programs in all
poverty
neighborhoods, not
just a few visible
places.

Chicago
Shaded Areas have
poverty levels of 20%
or greater. Dots on this
map are poorly
performing public
schools.

Since every shaded area on this map
needs a variety of comprehensive
tutor/mentor programs, the
Tutor/Mentor Connection leads a
public awareness campaign aimed to
draw dollars, volunteers, and training
directly to tutor/mentor programs in
every part of the city and suburbs of
Chicago.
We’d like to see this strategy
duplicated at the national and local
level by leaders in every industry,
and by leaders of the Points of Light
Foundation.
See maps and search for Chicago area
programs:
www.tutormentorprogramlocator.net

Pg. 9
Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Tutor/Mentor Programs are not available
in all places where they are needed 
There is a perception that many organizations offer
tutoring/mentoring or youth development services. 
In reality, in many neighborhoods there are few
programs that offer tutoring and/or mentoring. 
When the availability of programs is looked at by
age and time of day segments, it is obvious that a
contributing factor to the high drop out rate of teens
is the lack of programs to mentor them to careers.
View Chicago Community Area maps 2013 showing number of high poverty
youth in each area: http://tinyurl.com/TMI-communityareamaps
Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg. 10

Not all programs are equally effective
There are wide differences between the type of tutoring
and/or mentoring programs that are available. 
number and age group of children served 
number of volunteers involved 
quality of staff available to support youth or volunteers 
uneven availability of arts, technology, career mentoring
The Tutor/Mentor Connection has been building a master database of programs in
Chicago since 1993. As the T/MC builds its database of programs, it seeks to build
an understanding of the various types of programs, dividing them by age served,
time of day services is provided, and type of tutoring/mentoring offered.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg. 11

To support growth and operation of
multiple programs, borrow strategies
from proven business practices
Successful companies try to put
stores where there are large
numbers of potential customers;
Some companies have thousands of
stores distributed throughout every
state in the country
Economies of scale are used to
increase quality and lower the
operating costs per location

See more graphics like these at
http://pinterest.com/tutormentor/boards/

Volunteers from business can
help collect and maintain
information used to support
tutor/mentor program growth by
every industry.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg.12

It is not realistic to expect one
organization to have enough money
to do everything that a corporate
office of a company like Wal Mart,
Sears, Apple, etc. do to support
thousands of retail stores….
However, it is possible that thousands of volunteers
from different industries might take on roles similar to
corporate office teams, supporting a group of
programs in a geographic area, or all of the
tutor/mentor programs in an entire city like Chicago.
Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg. 13

A “Virtual” Corporate Office
Human
Resources
Research &
Development
Marketing,
Sales
Advertising,
PR
Finance &
Legal
Supply &
Logistics
Philanthropy
& Employee
Giving

Talent and resources from many
industries supporting program
growth in many places.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 14

A Learning “Distribution” System
STEM
Learning
Communications
Skills, Arts

Technology,
Digital skills
Leadership,
Team Building
Finance &
Legal
Social,
Emotional
Philanthropy
&
Volunteering

Important “learning” activities
should be made available in every
high poverty neighborhood.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 15

Example – Museums as Vendors
Science &
Industry
John. J. Shedd
Acquiarium

Field Museum
of Natural
History
Chicago
History
Museum
Chicago
Botanic
Gardens
Adler
Planetarium
Others....

Each museum should be putting
icons on map showing where it's
learning programs are a part of a
school, or non-school,
program's on-going strategy.
Each museum should think like
a company like Proctor &
Gamble, who wants its products
on the shelves of thousands of
retail stores.
They not only have a great
product, but they also offer
incentives, like training,
advertising dollars, point-ofpurchase displays, etc.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 16

Corporations and Military Leaders build strategies to distribute resources and support
stores in many locations. Teams of “talent” volunteers could take this role to help
make tutor/mentor programs available in all high poverty neighborhoods of Chicago
and other cities.
Feed &
Analysis
Equip
Our army better
than enemy

Public
Commitment
To sustain effort and
recruit troops
How do we educate
and inform public so
we can maintain
support for revenue
needed to support
war effort?

This is
a supply
chain issue.

We need to feed, cloth,
arm and re-supply our
troops and logistics
providers for as long as
war is in progress.

Of enemy
Strength &
weaknesses
Understand needs &
plan resource
allocation, e.g.
strategic planning

Recruit
& Retain

Organize
& Train

US forces

US forces

How to replace forces
that are lost with new
solders trained and
ready to pick up from
where previous left off

Direct
engagement

Enemy
sites

What resources do
we need to
implement the plan?
How to prepare
them?

Revenue

Logistics

To support
these efforts

To get forces
in place

How do we raise
money needed to pay
for this entire effort?

Forces

How do we distribute
needed resources
and troops to multiple
locations where they
are needed?

Forces
Include
tutors &
mentors

Poverty
in city
is
enemy

The goal is to support multiple programs in a geographic area, not just one!
Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 17

How do we increase number of people
who focus on same issue who connect,
learn, share in on-line learning so we
achieve long-term results?
Health

Education

Result focus

Government
World of
Knowledge

Justice

Recreation
Work &
Economy
MAP OF ISSUES
Boston Innovation Hub is example
of pie-chart showing potential
users & collaborators.

Growth of involvement

Pg 18

Most programs can’t get enough resources on their
own. We need the help of many leaders.
Everyone (students, and adults) could take this role on a daily basis.

faith

business

media
volunteers
dollars

college

you

Talent &
technology

Elected
leader
others

The main idea of this presentation is to show
actions that many people can take to support
program growth. YOU can do this!

Thousands of volunteers, business and faith leaders, students, etc. can use personal and organizational leadership, web
sites and communications to connect members of their network to information showing why certain types of volunteer
programs are needed, and where they are located. They can point to databases that enable volunteers, community
members, media and donors to search and find programs where they can get involved. Learning to stimulate such actions
on a regular basis, the way advertisers draw customers to retail stores each week, it a lesson we need to teach. We can
do that by giving recognition to those already doing this well.
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Pg 19

Many ways to volunteer… 
volunteers are needed to create innovative strategies that
increase visibility for tutor/mentor programs and increase the
flow of operating dollars to every tutor/mentor program in
Chicago and other major cities 
business partners are needed to develop strategies—
using employee volunteers, company assets & dollars to
PULL youth from poverty into jobs & careers. 
people and organizations are needed to organize and
provide curriculum, training,and ideas, to help educate all
stakeholders in the movement.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg.20

Build Involvement based on where
need for programs is greatest.
Create advertising and public awareness
that seeks to educate resource providers to
make choices of involvement, drawing from
a menu of ways individuals and
organizations could be involved, and using
GIS maps that show where the need for
tutor/mentor programs is greatest, and
where existing programs are located in
these areas.
Such a strategy will lead to a more even
distribution of resources to all
neighborhoods where tutor/mentor programs
are needed, not just to those with a visible
brand name or in a high profile
neighborhood.
Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg. 21

Role for Many Leaders:
Advertising and Public Awareness
We don’t have multi-millions dollar ad
budgets, yet we need similar reach
and frequency of daily and weekly
message delivery.
The T/MC seeks to recruit leaders
from business and faith communities
who will use their own media to create
and lead a call-to-involvement.
This evangelism will reach thousands
of people in every business, social and
faith sector many times each day with
messages that encourage people to
be volunteers, leaders, donors, etc.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg. 22

Become a Network Builder
• Write a weekly blog
• Create videos
• Host discussions on Facebook, Linked in,
or tutormentorconnection.ning.com
• Host gatherings on Google Hangouts,
Elluminate, etc.
Build your visibility and reputation by what
you do throughout the year.
Pg 23

Models of such leadership exist
The Abraham Lincoln Marovitz Lend A Hand Program at the
Chicago Bar Association is an example of the type leadership the
T/MC seeks to create in every industry and service sector. Since
1994 more than $2.5 million has been raised to support
volunteer-based tutor/mentor programs in the Chicago area. See
http://www.lawyerslendahand.org
If programs like this are in each industry,
each tutor/mentor program would have
volunteers modeling different career
opportunities, along with multiple
sources of funding.
Strategies like this can support volunteer-based tutor/mentor
program growth in every neighborhood of Chicago and other
cities with high concentrations of poverty.
Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 24

Volunteers from business, universities, and high
schools needed to help build knowledge base.
The T/MC seeks university partners,
interns, and graduate students, who will
help build a library of examples showing
how various businesses and industries
use their leadership, human capital and
communications resources to PULL
youth from poverty to careers.
Volunteers and partners can also
organize on-line learning communities,
such as the Education, Technology and
Media MOOC held in Jan-Mar 2013 at
http://www.etmooc.org
Such Examples will fuel the actions of
similar businesses throughout the
country.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg.25

As volunteers do “service” let’s seek
to enhance “learning” .
Every time a volunteer connects with a youth in a
tutor/mentor program we seek to enhance learning, so
the volunteer becomes a bridge to her industry, faith
group, and/or alumni network.
Such volunteers have the potential to bring
additional resources to tutor/mentor programs
every time they return to do service.

As some of these volunteers become CEOs, this become a
self-sustaining system with different leaders in different places
taking the lead at different times each year. See this idea
illustrated at
http://www.tutormentorexchange.net/images/flash/vol_leadership.swf
Pg. 26

Tutor/Mentor Program goals
are Business goals.
Organizations that offer volunteer-based tutoring/ mentoring services
seek to improve the quality of life for people living in poverty by
helping them move up the ladder to jobs and careers.
This creates new customers and new employees for industry and
lowers the costs associated with poverty, crime and workforce
development.
These programs also create networking, learning and skill building
opportunities for business volunteers who choose to get involved.
This strategy creates an army of people who are more personally
committed to helping inner city kids, because they have come to
know them, and understand their challenges, through volunteer
involvement.
Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg 27

Benefits to companies and their
employees
Involvement in well-managed volunteer-based programs provides
many benefits to employees in corporations, such as expanding
leadership skills, and expanding informal networks for those who
are involved.
Using Internet e-collaboration tools, volunteers in a T/MC strategy
learn skills and habits that can be applied profitably in 21st
century business applications.
Most of all, it’s the right thing to do. Businesses who are effective
at helping youth move to careers will earn public good will and
loyal employees and customers.
Read more about Benefits to business - http://tinyurl.com/T-MC-Civic-

Engagement
Pg. 28

Read about Collective Impact and role of “backbone” organizations on Stanford Social
Innovation Review: http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/collective_impact
“Collective impact requires
that funders support a longterm process of social
change without identifying
any particular solution in
advance.”

A Tutor/Mentor Connection is a “backbone” organization
and is needed in every city in the world.

A backbone organization with
a modest annual budget can
support a collective impact
initiative of several hundred
organizations, magnifying the
impact of millions or even
billions of dollars in existing
funding. Strive, for
example, has a $1.5 million
annual budget but is
coordinating the efforts and
increasing the effectiveness
of organizations with
combined budgets of $7
billion.”
Pg 29

Copyright 2011 Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC and Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il 60654 Email for permission to use: tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Invest in intermediary organizations
like T/MC and its partners
Become a sponsor, drawing attention to
your business, while you help us draw
attention to mentor-rich, tutor/mentor
programs
Point workplace donations to
tutor/mentor programs so volunteers
are well-supported and benefit more
from their involvement
If you are a venture capital manager, or
venture philanthropist, consider
becoming an investor in the Chicago
Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC. Your
investment helps T/MC do more of the
things described in this essay.

Property of Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection, Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654 tutormentor2@earthlink.net

Pg. 30

Get informed. Get involved.
Visit the following web sites to learn more about volunteer-based tutoring,
mentoring and strategies to build networks and support for programs in
multiple locations.

Www.tutormentorexchange.net
www.tutormentorconnection.org
www.tutormentorconference.org
http://tutormentor.blogspot.com
http://www.tutormentorprogramlocator.net
Http://mappingforjustice.blogspot.com
Http://tutormentorexchange.net.wordpress.com
or email: tutormentor2@earthlink.net
Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC, Tutor/Mentor Connection
Merchandise Mart PO Box 3303, Chicago, Il. 60654
Why Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC and Tutor/Mentor Connection (T/MC)?
From 1993 to June 2011 the T/ MC operated as partner to the Cabrini Connections tutor/mentor program in Chicago, under one 501c-3 non profit board of directors. Due to financial pressure the T/MC was separated from the Cabrini Connections program in June
2011 and the Tutor/Mentor Institute, LLC was created to provide alternative strategies for generating revenue to continue to operate
the Tutor/Mentor Connection in Chicago while helping similar intermediary structures grow in other cities. The names will be used
interchangeably in many of our materials since both focus on the same mission.

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