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SOCIAL STUDIES 11

WORLD WAR I

Lesson Seven: Trouble at Home
Historical Understandings
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Establish Historical Significance Evidence and Interpretation Identify Continuity and Change Analyze Cause and Consequence Take an Historical Perspective Understand the Moral Dimensions of History

Rationale
The aim of this lesson is to have students analyze the historical significance of the conscription crisis and take the perspective of those for and those against conscription. Students will also begin to analyze the continuity and change in the motivations men had for enlisting. The following will be key questions:
1. 2.

“Why was conscription so hotly debated?” “Did the war unite or divide Canada?”

Prescribed Learning Outcome(s): Students will begin to...
- “Assess Canada’s role in World War One and the impact of the war on Canada” - “Demonstrate effective written, oral, and graphic communication skills” - “Apply critical thinking--including questioning, comparing, summarizing, drawing conclusions, and defending a position--to make reasoned judgments about a range of issues, situations, and topics”

Assessment
Formative
• Entry and Exit Slips • Elections posters created by students

Summative
• Posters could be adapted to create a summative assignment

Materials
• A/V Equipment • Blank Legal sheets (or bigger) for poster assignment (x15)
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DURATION: 75 MINUTES

SOCIAL STUDIES 11

WORLD WAR I

• Any available art supplies • Class set of iPads (if available)

Procedures
1.

(10 minutes) Entry Slip: “Do you think there should be mandatory military service in Canada? Would you go?”
• The aim here is for students to begin thinking about the reality of military service and

what it would be like to be forced into it.

2.

(10 minutes) Debrief the entry slip question as a class. Key question: Would your answer change if Canada was at war?
• The aim of this activity is for students to take an historical perspective by realizing the

reality of conscription and the impact it had on people their age.

3.

(15 minutes) Teacher-led mini-lecture on the conscription crisis of 1917. Key points to highlight:
• By this point in the war, the excitement had waned and more men were needed. • When the war began, PM Borden promised no conscription, but had now changed his

mind.

• This was a major issue in Quebec because of language. • This would all come together in the election of 1917--called the khaki election. • In order to gain support, Borden worked to ensure that those serving oversees could

vote

• Military Voters Act • Wartime Elections Act

4.

(30 minutes) Student assignment: In pairs, students will create an election poster for the 1917 election. Students can use iPads or their textbook as references. The poster must be aimed at one of the following groups: soldiers, women, French-Canadians, or English Canadians. A short paragraph explaining their rationale must be included. If time permits, allow students to present their posters to the class (this could also be done at a later date, as the project could be adapted into something larger and summative).
• The aim of this activity is to have students take an historical perspective and to make the

connection between how certain groups of voters would be motivated during a specific time period.

5.

(10 minutes) Exit Slip: “Is it accurate to say that ‘the war united Canada’?”

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DURATION: 75 MINUTES