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Saitama Math. J.

Vol. 27 (2010), 35–80
35
The gonality conjecture for curves
on toric surfaces with two P
1
-fibrations
Ryo Kawaguchi
(Received March 25, 2010; Revised December 3, 2010)
Abstract
The gonality is an important invariant for the study of linear systems on a
curve. Although it is not so easy to determine the gonality of a given curve, the
gonality conjecture posed by Green and Lazarsfeld predicts that the gonality could
be read off from the minimal resolution of any one line bundle of sufficiently large
degree. In this paper, we consider this conjecture for a curve embedded in a toric
surface which has two P
1
-fibrations by toric morphisms, and prove it affirmatively
under several conditions.
1. Introduction
As mentioned in Abstract, the aim of this paper is to show the gonality con-
jecture (Conjecture 1.2) under certain conditions. First of all, in this section, we
would like to roughly review the background and preliminary results for gonality
and the gonality conjecture. Our main theorem will be stated at the end of this
section.
In this paper, a curve will always mean a nonsingular irreducible complex
projective curve unless otherwise stated. We denote by g
1
k
a 1-dimensional linear
system of degree k on a curve. For a curve C, the gonality is defined to be the
minimal degree of surjective morphisms from C to P
1
:
gon(C) = min{degf | f : C → P
1
surjective morphism} = min{k | C has g
1
k
}.
It is known that the gonality of a nonsingular plane curve of degree d (≥ 2) is
equal to d − 1 ([11]). Coppens and Kato generalized this result to the case of
singular plane curves in [2]. They computed the gonality of the normalization of
a plane curve with double points under several numerical conditions on its degree
and the number of singular points. Recently, more general cases were investigated
by Ohkouchi and Sakai ([13]). Besides, in [9], Martens determined the gonality
of a nonsingular curve lying on a Hirzebruch surface.
On the other hand, there exists a close relation between the theory of syzy-
gies and geometric properties of a projective variety. In particular, the gonality
2000 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary 14H51; Secondary 14M25.
Key words and phrases. The gonality conjecture, toric surfaces
36 R. Kawaguchi
conjecture (Conjecture 1.2) suggested by Green and Lazarsfeld in [7] predicted
the interaction between the gonality of a curve and the syzygies defined by a
line bundle on the curve. For a projective variety X, a line bundle L on X and
a coherent sheaf F on X, we denote by K
p,q
(X, F, L) the Koszul cohomology,
which is introduced by Green in [5] as the cohomology of the Koszul complex
p+1
_
H
0
(X, L) ⊗H
0
(X, F ⊗(q −1)L) →
p
_
H
0
(X, L) ⊗H
0
(X, F ⊗qL)

p−1
_
H
0
(X, L) ⊗H
0
(X, F ⊗(q + 1)L).
For simplicity, if F = O
X
, we suppress it and write K
p,q
(X, L). It is known
that there exists the following relation between the Koszul cohomology and the
syzygies :
Theorem 1.1 ([5]). Let X and L be as above. Denote by S the symmetric alge-
bra of H
0
(X, L), and consider the minimal free resolution of a graded S-module
as
· · · →

q≥q
2
S(−q) ⊗M
2,q


q≥q
1
S(−q) ⊗M
1,q


q≥q
0
S(−q) ⊗M
0,q

q=0
H
0
(X, qL) → 0.
Then K
p,q
(X, L) is isomorphic to M
p,p+q
as a complex vector space.
Conjecture 1.2 ([7]). Let C be a curve of genus g and L a line bundle on C
of sufficiently large degree compared to 2g. Then K
p,1
(C, L) = 0 for any integer
p ≥ h
0
(C, L) −gon(C).
This conjecture means that we can read off the gonality of a curve from the
minimal resolution of any one line bundle of sufficiently large degree. For the
cases where gon(C) = 1, 2, Green has shown this conjecture affirmatively in [5].
The case where gon(C) = 3 has been done by Ehbauer ([4]). As for curves on a
Hirzebruch surface Σ
a
, Aprodu showed it, and computed their gonality indepen-
dently of Martens’ result ([1]). In his proof, the following Theorem1.4 played an
essential role.
Definition 1.3. Let L be a line bundle on a curve C, and q a non-negative inte-
ger. We say that L satisfies the property (M
q
) if K
p,1
(C, L) = 0 for any integer
p ≥ h
0
(C, L) −q −1.
Theorem 1.4 ([1]). Let C be an irrational curve which has a g
1
k
. If there is a
nonspecial and globally generated line bundle L on C with the property (M
k−1
),
then C is k-gonal, and the gonality conjecture is true for C.
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 37
Recall that a toric surface has a finite number of P
1
-fibrations by toric mor-
phisms, and Hirzebruch surfaces are the simplest examples of toric surfaces which
have one or two such P
1
-fibrations. In the wake of Aprodu’s result, we proved the
gonality conjecture for curves lying on a toric surface with a unique P
1
-fibration
([8]). This is an extension of Aprodu’s result for Σ
a
with a ≥ 1. Therefore,
it is a valid question to ask whether we can generalize Aprodu’s result for the
case a = 0, that is, whether the gonality conjecture is true for the cruves on a
toric surface with two P
1
-fibrations. In this paper, we shall show the following
theorem:
Theorem 1.5 (Main theorem). Let S be a compact nonsingular toric sur-
face which has two P
1
-fibrations f and f

by toric morphisms, and C an irra-
tional curve on S. If 2 ≤ degf|
C
< degf

|
C
and |C − F| is base point free
(where F denotes the fiber of f), then the gonality conjecture is true for C and
gon(C) = degf|
C
.
In Section 2, we introduce toric surfaces which are the main stage of our
study, and collect basic facts about them. In Section 3, we will see the main idea
to prove the main theorem. Although a key point of the proof is the existence
of a certain divisor called an auxiliary divisor, we do not mention its concrete
construction at all. Instead, we spend Section4 and 5 to construct an auxiliary
divisor. In these two sections, we will treat essentially different cases. We close
this section with some basics of Koszul cohomology, which are essential for our
study.
Theorem 1.6 ([1]). Let X be a nonsingular projective variety, L a line bundle
on X and Y ∈ |L| an irreducible divisor on X. If the irregularity of X is zero,
then K
p,1
(X, L) K
p,1
(Y, L|
Y
) for any integer p.
Theorem 1.7 ([5]). Let L be a line bundle on a curve C and put m = dimϕ
|L|
(C).
Then L satisfies (M
m−1
).
Theorem 1.8 ([1]). Let C be an irrational curve, L a nonspecial and globally
generated line bundle on C, and q a non-negative integer such that L satisfies
(M
q
). Then, for any effective divisor D on C, also L + D satisfies (M
q
).
2. Summary of toric surfaces
In this section, we briefly review the theory of toric surfaces. It has the close
connection with the geometry of convex polytopes in the real affine space. Many
basic properties of toric varieties and divisors on them can be interpreted in terms
of the elementary convex geometry.
We will henceforth assume that a surface is always compact and nonsingular.
38 R. Kawaguchi
At first, it is a basic fact that a toric surface is obtained from the projective plane
or a Hirzebruch surface by a finite succession of blowing-ups with T-fixed points
(i.e. points which are invariant with respect to the action on a toric surface by the
algebraic torus T) as centers. A composite of such blowing-ups is called a toric
morphism. For a toric surface (except for the projective plane), a P
1
-fibration
obtained by composing a toric morphism and a ruling of the Hirzebruch surface
is called a toric ruling. Naturally, a toric surface has a finite number of toric
rulings.
In the present paper, we consider a toric surface S with two toric rulings. In
this case, the fan Δ
S
associated to S has two lines passing through the origin.
For each half-line (which is called a cone) in Δ
S
, a lattice point on it is called a
primitive element if it is closest to the origin. We denote by D
1
the T-invariant
divisor whose associated cone has a primitive element (0, 1) and number other
cones in Δ
S
clockwise. In particular, we set D
d
0
if its associated cone has a
primitive element (0, −1) (see Fig. 1). We denote by σ(D
i
) the cone associated
σ(D
1
)
σ(D
2
)
σ(D
3
)
σ(D
d
)
σ(D
d
0
)
Figure 1
to T-invariant divisor D
i
and by (x
i
, y
i
) the primitive element of σ(D
i
). We
set D
0
= D
d
and D
d+1
= D
1
formally. Then the self-intersection numbers of
T-invariant divisors are computed by the following formula.
Theorem 2.1 ([12]). For any integer i with 1 ≤ i ≤ d, two equalities x
i
D
2
i
=
−x
i−1
−x
i+1
and y
i
D
2
i
= −y
i−1
−y
i+1
hold.
The Picard group of S is generated (not freely) by the classes of D
1
, . . . , D
d
.
For instance, the canonical divisor of S has the relation K
S
∼ −

d
i=1
D
i
. Be-
sides, the fibers of two toric rulings can be written as
F
1

d
0
−1

i=2
x
i
D
i
∼ −
d

i=d
0
+1
x
i
D
i
F
2
∼ D
d
0

d
0
−2

i=1
y
i
D
i
+
d

i=d
0
+2
y
i
D
i
.
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 39
We denote by f
1
(resp. f
2
) the toric ruling of S whose fiber is F
1
(resp. F
2
).
Next we collect several basic properties of divisors on a toric surface. In the
remaining part of this section, let D be a divisor on S. In the case where the
complete linear system |D| is base point free, we have the following two results.
Theorem 2.2 ([12]). If |D| is base point free, then h
i
(S, D) = 0 for any positive
integer i.
Theorem 2.3 ([10]). The complete linear system |D| is base point free if and
only if D has a non-negative intersection number with every T-invariant divisor
on S.
Let
D
be a lattice polytope associated to D =

d
i=1
n
i
D
i
, that is, we define

D
= {(z, w) ∈ R
2
| x
i
z + y
i
w ≤ n
i
for 1 ≤ i ≤ d }.
Although this definition depends on the description of the linear equivalence class
of D, differences of the description cause only parallel translations of
D
. Hence
the shape of the lattice polytope is determined uniquely. We write the lines which
form the boundaries of
D
as
l
i
(D) = {(z, w) ∈ R
2
| x
i
z + y
i
w = n
i
}.
We can read off the dimension of cohomology group of D from the number of
lattice points contained in
D
:
Theorem 2.4 ([12]). The equation h
0
(S, D) = (
D
∩ Z
2
) holds. In particular,
for a curve C on S, its genus is equal to the number of the lattice points contained
in the interior of
C
.
Proposition 2.5. Let C be a curve on S and assume that C.F
1
, C.F
2
≥ 2. If
either |C −F
1
| or |C −F
2
| is base point free, then C is irrational.
Proof. We prove the case where Bs|C − F
1
| = ∅. By Theorem2.4, it
is sufficient to verify that there exists at least one lattice point in the inte-
rior of
C
. We first note that our assumption and Theorem2.3 imply that
(C − F
1
).D
1
= C.D
1
− 1 ≥ 0. Considering the construction of
C
, in the
case where C.D
1
≥ 2, we see that the lattice point l
1
(C) ∩ l
2
(C) + (−1, −1)
is contained in the interior of
C
. In the case where C.D
1
= 1, we put
a = min{i ≥ 2 | C.D
i
≥ 1} and b = max{i ≤ d | C.D
i
≥ 1}. The inequal-
ity
C.F
2
= 1 +
d
0
−2

i=2
y
i
C.D
i
+
d

i=d
0
+2
y
i
C.D
i
≥ 2
implies that either a ≤ d
0
−2 or b ≥ d
0
+ 2 holds. We see that the lattice point
40 R. Kawaguchi
l
1
(C) ∩l
2
(C) +(0, −1) (resp. l
1
(C) ∩l
d
(C) +(0, −1)) is contained in the interior
of
C
if a ≤ d
0
−2 (resp. b ≥ d
0
+ 2).
3. Outline of the proof
In order to prove Theorem1.5, we need to introduce a certain divisor de-
fined with respect to a given curve, which is called an auxiliary divisor. Its
construction is, however, very complicated. Hence, in this section, we admit the
existence of auxiliary divisors satisfying Assertion 3.1–3.3 below, and will prove
Theorem1.5. We postpone their precise construction to Section 4 (the case where
degf
1
|
C
≤ degf
2
|
C
) and Section5 (the case where degf
1
|
C
≥ degf
2
|
C
).
Let S be a toric surface as in Section2, and C a curve on S. We denote by
F and F

the fibers of two toric rulings of S, and put k = C.F and k

= C.F

.
Assertion 3.1. Assume that k

≥ k ≥ 2 and |C − F| is base point free. Then
there exists an effective divisor I
C
satisfying the following properties (i)–(vi) :
(i) I
C
.F = 1,
(ii) H
1
(S, −I
C
) = 0,
(iii) The complete linear systems |C −I
C
| and |C −I
C
−F| are base point free,
(iv) (C −I
C
)
2
≥ 1,
(v) (C −I
C
)|
C
is nonspecial,
(vi) K
p,1
(S, C −I
C
) = 0 holds for any integer p ≥ h
0
(S, C −I
C
) −2.
We call I
C
the auxiliary divisor of C. By the properties (iii) and (iv), we can
take a nonsingular irreducible curve C
1
∈ |C −I
C
|. If C
j
.F

≥ C
j
.F ≥ 2, we can
take inductively
I
j
: the auxiliary divisor of C
j
,
C
j+1
: a nonsingular irreducible curve in |C
j
−I
j
|
for a positive integer j. We put C
0
= C and I
0
= I
C
. In this section, we admit
the following two assertions.
Assertion 3.2. Assume that k

> k ≥ 2 and |C − F| is base point free. There
exists a positive integer m
0
≤ k such that C
j
.F

= C
j
.F for j = 1, . . . , m
0
− 1,
and moreover, the inequality C
m
0
.F

> C
m
0
.F holds if m
0
≤ k −1.
Assertion 3.3. Assume that k

> k ≥ 2 and |C − F| is base point free, and let
m
0
be a positive integer in Assertion 3.2. Then the inequality
h
0
(S, C
j
) −h
0
(S, C
j
−I
j−1
) ≥ C
j
.F + 2
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 41
holds for any integer j with 1 ≤ j ≤ min{m
0
, k −1}. Besides, if k

= k = 2, then
this inequality holds for j = 1.
We have the following lemma, which can be shown by the same argument as
in the proof of Lemma 2.3 in [8].
Lemma 3.4. The isomorphism K
p,1
(S, C −I
C
) K
p,1
(C, (C −I
C
)|
C
) holds for
any integer p ≥ h
0
(S, C −2I
C
) + 1.
Theorem1.5 follows immediately from the following proposition and Theo-
rem1.4.
Proposition 3.5. Assume that C is irrational, k

> k ≥ 2 and |C − F| is base
point free. If Assertion 3.1–3.3 hold, then O
C
(C) satisfies the property (M
k−1
).
Proof. We first show the case where k = 2. By Assertion 3.1 and
Lemma 3.4, we see that K
p,1
(C, C
1
|
C
) = 0 for any integer p ≥ max{h
0
(S, C
1
) −
2, h
0
(S, C
1
−I
0
)+1}. Hence, by combining this fact with Assertion 3.3, we see that
K
p,1
(C, C
1
|
C
) = 0 for any integer p ≥ h
0
(S, C
1
) −2. The short exact sequence of
sheaves 0 → O
S
(−I
0
) → O
S
(C
1
) → O
C
(C
1
) → 0 induces the cohomology long
exact sequence
0 → H
0
(S, −I
0
) → H
0
(S, C
1
) → H
0
(C, C
1
|
C
) → H
1
(S, −I
0
) → · · · .
Since H
0
(S, −I
0
) = H
1
(S, −I
0
) = 0, we have h
0
(S, C
1
) = h
0
(C, C
1
|
C
). In sum,
we can conclude that K
p,1
(C, C
1
|
C
) = 0 for any integer p ≥ h
0
(C, C
1
|
C
) −2, that
is, O
C
(C
1
) satisfies (M
1
). Note that O
C
(C
1
) is nonspecial and globally gener-
ated by Assertion 3.1. Hence Theorem1.8 implies that also O
C
(C) satisfies (M
1
).
Here we note that in fact this lemma holds in the case where k

= k = 2 also.
Indeed, for such case, we can develop the same argument as above by using the
latter part of Assertion 3.3.
We next consider the case where k ≥ 3 under the assumption that our propo-
sition is valid for a curve C

on S if C

.F ≤ k − 1, C

.F

> C

.F ≥ 2 and
Bs|C

− F| = ∅. For C, let m
0
be a positive integer as in Assertion 3.2. If
m
0
≤ k −2, then 2 ≤ C
m
0
.F ≤ k −1. Since |C
m
0
−F| is base point free by As-
sertion 3.1, we see that O
C
m
0
(C
m
0
) satisfies (M
C
m
0
.F−1
) by the hypothesis of our
induction. Consider the case where m
0
≥ k −1. We have C
k−2
.F

= C
k−2
.F = 2
by the property of m
0
. Since |C
k−2
− F| is base point free by Assertion 3.1, we
see that O
C
k−2
(C
k−2
) satisfies (M
1
). In sum, in any case, we can conclude that
there is an integer m ≤ k −2 such that O
C
m
(C
m
) satisfies (M
C
m
.F−1
). Note that
C
0
, . . . , C
m
are irrational by Proposition 2.5 and (iii) in Assertion 3.1.
By Theorem1.6, we have K
p,1
(C
m
, C
m
|
C
m
) K
p,1
(S, C
m
) for any integer p.
On the other hand, the short exact sequence of sheaves 0 → O
S
→ O
S
(C
m
) →
O
C
m
(C
m
) → 0 induces the cohomology long exact sequence
42 R. Kawaguchi
0 → H
0
(S, O
S
) → H
0
(S, C
m
) → H
0
(C
m
, C
m
|
C
m
) → H
1
(S, O
S
) → · · · . (1)
Since H
0
(S, O
S
) = C and H
1
(S, O
S
) = 0, we obtain h
0
(C
m
, C
m
|
C
m
) =
h
0
(S, C
m
) − 1. Hence the vanishing K
p,1
(S, C
m
) = 0 holds for any integer
p ≥ h
0
(S, C
m
) − C
m
.F − 1. Then by the same argument as in the case where
k = 2, one can show that O
C
m−1
(C
m−1
) satisfies (M
C
m−1
.F−1
). We can induc-
tively verify that O
C
j
(C
j
) satisfies (M
C
j
.F−1
) for integers 0 ≤ j ≤ m− 2. The
case where j = 0 is the statement of our proposition.
4. The case where degf
1
|
C
≤ degf
2
|
C
Let S be a toric surface defined in Section2, and C a curve on S. In this
section, we consider the case where degf
1
|
C
≤ degf
2
|
C
, that is, C.F
1
≤ C.F
2
. We
put F = F
1
and F

= F
2
. The aim of this section is to construct a divisor which
satisfies Assertion 3.1–3.3.
4.1 Division of the primitive element
First of all, we remark a basic fact about primitive elements of cones.
Fact 4.1. Let i be an integer with 2 ≤ i ≤ d
0
− 1, and define c = min{c

∈ Z |
c

x
i
−y
i
≥ 0}. Then there is an integer r with 2 ≤ r ≤ i such that (x
r
, y
r
) = (1, c).
In particular, if x
i
≥ 2, then r ≤ i−1 and there exists a pair of integers (s, t) with
r ≤ s < i < t ≤ d
0
−1 such that (x
i
, y
i
) = (x
s
, y
s
) +(x
t
, y
t
) and x
t
y
s
−y
t
x
s
= 1.
Remark 4.2. Let i be an integer with 2 ≤ i ≤ d
0
− 1. If x
i
≥ 2, then d
0
≥ 5,
3 ≤ i ≤ d
0
−2, and moreover, the equality c = min{c

∈ Z | c

x
s
−y
s
≥ 0} holds
in Fact 4.1.
The following lemma gives us more detailed properties of the above division.
Lemma 4.3. For an integer i with 3 ≤ i ≤ d
0
−2 such that x
i
≥ 2, the pair (s, t)
in Fact 4.1 is uniquely determined. If x
s
≥ 2, then we can divide (x
s
, y
s
) into the
sum of primitive elements as
(x
s
, y
s
) = (x
u
, y
u
) + (x
v
, y
v
) (r ≤ u < s < v ≤ d
0
−1, x
v
y
u
−y
v
x
u
= 1)
by Fact 4.1. Then the inequality v ≥ t holds.
Proof. Assume that r ≤ s < i < t ≤ d
0
−1, r ≤ s

< i < t

≤ d
0
−1,
(x
i
, y
i
) = (x
s
, y
s
) + (x
t
, y
t
) = (x
s
, y
s
) + (x
t
, y
t
)
and x
t
y
s
−y
t
x
s
= x
t
y
s
−y
t
x
s
= 1. We put x = x
t
−x
t
and y = y
t
−y
t
. Since
x
t
y
i
−y
t
x
i
= x
t
y
i
−y
t
x
i
= 1, we have x
i
y −y
i
x = 0. Hence there exists an inte-
ger n such that x = nx
i
and y = ny
i
. We thus have x
i
= x
s
+x
t
= x
s
+x
t
−nx
i
,
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 43
which implies n ≥ 0. Similarly, the equation x
i
= x
s
+x
t
= x
s
+nx
i
+x
t
implies
n ≤ 0. Hence we have n = 0, that is, (x
s
, y
s
) = (x
s
, y
s
) and (x
t
, y
t
) = (x
t
, y
t
).
Next we will show the latter part of the lemma. We put x

= x
t
− x
v
and
y

= y
t
−y
v
. Since x

y
s
−y

x
s
= 0, there exists an integer m such that x

= mx
s
and y

= my
s
. Then the equation x
s
= x
u
+ x
v
= x
u
+ x
t
−mx
s
implies m ≥ 0.
Hence we have x
v
y
t
−y
v
x
t
= x
v
y

−y
v
x

= m ≥ 0, which means v ≥ t.
4.2 The auxiliary divisor
Let S, C, F and F

be as above, and put k = C.F and k

= C.F

. If k ≥ 1,
we define
λ = max{i ≤ d
0
−1 | C.D
i
≥ 1},
μ = min{i ≥ d
0
+ 1 | C.D
i
≥ 1},
c
0
= min{c ∈ Z | cx
λ
−y
λ
≥ 0},
e
0
= −max{e ∈ Z | ex
μ
−y
μ
≥ 0}.
If x
λ
≥ 2, then by Fact 4.1 and Lemma 4.3, we can divide primitive elements
repeatedly as
(x
λ
, y
λ
) = (x
s
1
, y
s
1
) + n
α
1
(x
α
1
, y
α
1
), x
α
1
y
s
1
−y
α
1
x
s
1
= 1 (s
1
< λ < α
1
< d
0
−1) ,
(x
s
1
, y
s
1
) = (x
s
2
, y
s
2
) + n
α
2
(x
α
2
, y
α
2
), x
α
2
y
s
2
−y
α
2
x
s
2
= 1 (s
2
< s
1
, α
1
< α
2
< d
0
−1) ,
.
.
.
(x
s
a
0
−1
, y
s
a
0
−1
) = (1, c
0
) + n
α
a
0
(x
α
a
0
, y
α
a
0
), x
α
a
0
c
0
−y
α
a
0
= 1 (α
a
0
−1
< α
a
0
≤ d
0
−1) .
On the other hand, in the case where x
λ
= 1, it is obvious that the equation
(x
λ
, y
λ
) = (1, c
0
) holds. Consequently, we obtain the unique division
(x
λ
, y
λ
) = (1, c
0
) + n
α
1
(x
α
1
, y
α
1
) +· · · + n
α
a
0
(x
α
a
0
, y
α
a
0
), (2)
where λ < α
1
< · · · < α
a
0
≤ d
0
− 1. Considering the definition of the division
and Fact 4.1, one can obtain the equality
x
α
a
_
c
0
+
a
0

j=a+1
n
α
j
y
α
j
_
−y
α
a
_
1 +
a
0

j=a+1
n
α
j
x
α
j
_
= 1 (3)
for each integer 1 ≤ a ≤ a
0
.
Similarly, we can divide
(x
μ
, y
μ
) = (−1, e
0
) + n
β
1
(x
β
1
, y
β
1
) +· · · + n
β
b
0
(x
β
b
0
, y
β
b
0
), (4)
44 R. Kawaguchi
where d
0
+ 1 ≤ β
1
< · · · < β
b
0
< μ. The equality
_
−1 +
b−1

j=1
m
β
j
x
β
j
_
y
β
b

_
e
0
+
b−1

j=1
m
β
j
y
β
j
_
x
β
b
= 1 (5)
holds for each integer 1 ≤ b ≤ b
0
.
Definition 4.4. Let C be a curve on S such that k ≥ 1, and set n
i
= 0 for
integers λ + 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
except for i = α
1
, . . . , α
a
0
and m
i
= 0 for integers
d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ μ − 1 except for i = β
1
, . . . , β
b
0
. We define the auxiliary divisor
I
C
=

d
i=1
p
i
D
i
of C as follows :
p
i
=

















0 (1 ≤ i ≤ λ, μ ≤ i ≤ d),
x
i
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

j=i+1
n
j
y
j
_
+y
i
_
−1−
d
0
−1

j=i+1
n
j
x
j
_
(λ + 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
),
x
i
_
−e
0

i−1

j=d
0
+1
m
j
y
j
_
+y
i
_
−1+
i−1

j=d
0
+1
m
j
x
j
_
(d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ μ −1).
We note that (3), (5) and an easy computation imply that p
i
= 1 for
i = α
1
, . . . , α
a
0
, d
0
, β
1
, . . . , β
b
0
. Besides, it is obvious that I
C
.F = 1 by definition.
The rest of this subsection is devoted to verify that I
C
satisfies Assertion 3.1.
Proposition 4.5. The divisor I
C
is effective.
Proof. Let i
1
be an integer with λ+1 ≤ i
1
≤ d
0
−1. Since x
λ
y
i
−y
λ
x
i
< 0
for any integer i with λ + 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
−1, we have
x
λ
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=i
1
+1
n
i
y
i
_
−y
λ
_
1+
d
0
−1

i=i
1
+1
n
i
x
i
_
=x
λ
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
n
i
y
i
_
−y
λ
_
1+
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
n
i
x
i
_

i
1

i=λ+1
n
i
(x
λ
y
i
−y
λ
x
i
) ≥ x
λ
y
λ
−y
λ
x
λ
=0.
Hence we have the inequalities
y
i
1
x
i
1
<
y
λ
x
λ

c
0
+

d
0
−1
i=i
1
+1
n
i
y
i
1 +

d
0
−1
i=i
1
+1
n
i
x
i
,
which implies that p
i
1
> 0. Let i
2
be an integer with d
0
+ 1 ≤ i
2
≤ μ −1. Then
the inequality
x
μ
_
e
0
+
i
2
−1

i=d
0
+1
m
i
y
i
_
+y
μ
_
1 −
i
2
−1

i=d
0
+1
m
i
x
i
_
=x
μ
y
μ
−y
μ
x
μ

μ−1

i=i
2
m
i
(x
μ
y
i
−y
μ
x
i
) ≤ 0
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 45
implies that
y
i
2
x
i
2
>
y
μ
x
μ

−e
0

i
2
−1
i=d
0
+1
m
i
y
i
1 −

i
2
−1
i=d
0
+1
m
i
x
i
.
We thus obtain p
i
2
> 0.
Proposition 4.6. The complete linear system |C −I
C
| is base point free.
Proof. We put H = C −I
C
. By Theorem2.3, it is sufficient to verify that
H.D
i
≥ 0 for each integer 1 ≤ i ≤ d. For an integer i with 1 ≤ i ≤ λ − 1 or
μ + 1 ≤ i ≤ d, since I
C
.D
i
= 0, we have H.D
i
= C.D
i
≥ 0. For λ, we have
I
C
.D
λ
= p
λ+1
= x
λ+1
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=λ+2
n
i
y
i
_
+ y
λ+1
_
−1 −
d
0
−1

i=λ+2
n
i
x
i
_
= x
λ+1
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
n
i
y
i
_
+y
λ+1
_
−1 −
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
n
i
x
i
_
= x
λ+1
y
λ
−y
λ+1
x
λ
= 1
and H.D
λ
= C.D
λ
−1 ≥ 0.
For the case where i = d
0
, since (c
0
− 1)x
λ
0
< y
λ
0
, (e
0
− 1)x
μ
0
< −y
μ
0
and
D
2
d
0
= 0, easy computations give
C.D
d
0
= C.
_
d
0
−2

i=1
y
i
D
i
+
d

i=d
0
+2
y
i
D
i
_
(6)
≥ C.(D
1
+ y
λ
0
D
λ
0
+ y
μ
0
D
μ
0
) ≥ C.D
1
+ c
0
+ e
0
,
I
C
.D
d
0
=







c
0
+ e
0
(λ + 2 ≤ d
0
≤ μ −2),
c
0
(λ + 2 ≤ d
0
= μ −1),
e
0
(λ + 1 = d
0
≤ μ −2),
0 (λ + 1 = d
0
= μ −1).
Hence we have H.D
d
0
≥ 0.
We next consider the case where i = λ + 1. Since the case where i = d
0
was
already checked, we assume that λ + 1 < d
0
. By Theorem2.1, we have
I
C
.D
λ+1
= p
λ+1
D
2
λ+1
+ p
λ+2
(7)
= −(x
λ
+ x
λ+2
)
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=λ+2
n
i
y
i
_
+ (y
λ
+ y
λ+2
)
_
1 +
d
0
−1

i=λ+2
n
i
x
i
_
+x
λ+2
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=λ+3
n
i
y
i
_
−y
λ+2
_
1 +
d
0
−1

i=λ+3
n
i
x
i
_
= −x
λ
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
n
i
y
i
_
+ y
λ
_
1 +
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
n
i
x
i
_
46 R. Kawaguchi
+n
λ+1
(x
λ
y
λ+1
−y
λ
x
λ+1
)
= −n
λ+1
.
Namely, we have H.D
λ+1
≥ 0. For an integer i with λ + 2 ≤ i ≤ d
0
−1, we have
I
C
.D
i
= −n
i
by a computation similar to (7).
Let us consider the case where i = μ. If μ ≥ d
0
+ 2, then we have
I
C
.D
μ
= p
μ−1
= x
μ−1
_
−e
0

μ−2

j=d
0
+1
m
j
y
j
_
+ y
μ−1
_
−1 +
μ−2

j=d
0
+1
m
j
x
j
_
= −x
μ−1
y
μ
+ y
μ−1
x
μ
= 1.
If μ = d
0
+1, then we have I
C
.D
μ
= p
d
0
= 1. Hence we have H.D
μ
= C.D
μ
−1 ≥
0.
Consider the case where i = d
0
+1 under the assumption that d
0
+1 = μ. If
μ ≥ d
0
+ 3, then
I
C
.D
d
0
+1
= 1 −e
0
x
d
0
+1
D
2
d
0
+1
+ x
d
0
+2
(−e
0
−m
d
0
+1
y
d
0
+1
) + y
d
0
+2
(−1 + m
d
0
+1
x
d
0
+1
)
= 1 + e
0
x
d
0
−m
d
0
+1
−y
d
0
+2
= −m
d
0
+1
.
If μ = d
0
+2, then we have e
0
= 1 and m
d
0
+1
= −x
d
0
+2
−1 by definition. We thus
have I
C
.D
d
0
+1
= p
d
0
+ p
d
0
+1
D
2
d
0
+1
= 1 −x
d
0
+1
D
2
d
0
+1
= −m
d
0
+1
. Hence, in any
case, the inequality H.D
d
0
+1
≥ 0 holds. Let i be an integer with d
0
+2 ≤ i ≤ μ−2.
Then we have I
C
.D
i
= −m
i
and H.D
i
≥ 0 by computing similarly to (7).
Lastly, let us check the case where i = μ − 1. Since the cases of d
0
and
d
0
+ 1 were already checked, we assume that μ − 1 ≥ d
0
+ 2. Then we have
I
C
.D
μ−1
= −m
μ−1
by computing. Namely, we have H.D
μ−1
≥ 0.
We list the intersection numbers of I
C
and the T-invariant divisors for the
later use.
I
C
.D
i
=











−n
i
(i = α
1
, . . . , α
a
0
),
1 (i = λ, μ),
−m
i
(i = β
1
, . . . , β
b
0
),
c
0
+ e
0
(i = d
0
),
0 (otherwise).
(8)
Proposition 4.7. If |C − F| is base point free, then also |C − I
C
− F| is base
point free.
Proof. Since
(C −I
C
−F).D
i
=
_
(C −I
C
).D
i
−1 (i = 1, d
0
),
(C −I
C
).D
i
≥ 0 (otherwise),
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 47
it is sufficient to verify that (C − I
C
).D
1
and (C − I
C
).D
d
0
are positive. Since
(C − F).D
1
= C.D
1
− 1 ≥ 0 and I
C
.D
1
= 0, we deduce that (C − I
C
).D
1
is
positive. Besides, by an easy computation, we have
(C −I
C
).D
d
0
= (C −I
C
).
_
d
0
−1

i=1
y
i
D
i
+
d

i=d
0
+1
y
i
D
i
_
≥ (C −I
C
).D
1
≥ 1.

We next check the property (ii) in Assertion 3.1.
Proposition 4.8. The vanishing H
1
(S, −I
C
) = 0 holds.
Proof. By Riemann-Roch theorem and Theorem2.4, we have
h
1
(S, −I
C
) = h
0
(S, −I
C
) + h
0
(S, K
S
+ I
C
) −
1
2
I
C
.(K
S
+ I
C
) −1
= −
1
2
I
C
.(K
S
+ I
C
) −1.
Recall the remark after Definition 4.4 and (8). Then
I
C
.(K
S
+ I
C
)
= I
C
.
_
−D
λ
+
a
0

j=1
(p
α
j
−1)D
α
j
+
b
0

j=1
(p
β
j
−1)D
β
j
−D
μ
+ (p
d
0
−1)D
d
0
_
= I
C
.(−D
λ
−D
μ
) = −2.
Proposition 4.9. Assume that k ≥ 2 and |C − F| is base point free. Then the
divisor C −I
C
satisfies the properties (iv)–(vi) in Assertion 3.1.
Proof. (iv) We put H = C − I
C
and write H ∼

d−1
i=2
h
i
D
i
. As we saw
in the Proposition 4.6, |H| is base point free. By computing (using Theorem2.1
and 2.3), we see that h
i
is non-negative for each integer 2 ≤ i ≤ d −1. We have
h
d
0
= H.F = k −1 ≥ 1. Hence by (6) and (8), we have
H
2
≥ (C −I
C
).D
d
0
≥ C.D
d
0
−c
0
−e
0
≥ C.D
1
= (C −F).D
1
+ F.D
1
≥ 1.
(v) The short exact sequence of sheaves 0 → O
S
(−I
C
) → O
S
(H) → O
C
(H) → 0
induces the cohomology long exact sequence
· · · → H
1
(S, H) → H
1
(C, H|
C
) → H
2
(S, −I
C
) → · · · .
Since |H| is base point free, we have H
1
(S, H) = 0 by Theorem2.2. On the other
hand, since p
1
= 0 and p
d
0
= 1, we have H
2
(S, −I
C
) = H
0
(S, K
S
+ I
C
) = 0 by
Theorem2.4. We thus obtain H
1
(C, H|
C
) = 0.
(vi) We can take a nonsingular irreducible curve C
1
∈ |H| by (iii), (iv) and
Bertini’s theorem. Then Theorem1.7 shows that K
p,1
(C
1
, C
1
|
C
1
) = 0 for any
48 R. Kawaguchi
integer p ≥ h
0
(C
1
, C
1
|
C
1
) − 1. Considering the cohomology long exact sequence
similar to (1), we obtain h
0
(C
1
, C
1
|
C
1
) = h
0
(S, C
1
) − 1. Thus we see that
K
p,1
(C
1
, C
1
|
C
1
) = 0 for any integer p ≥ h
0
(S, C
1
) − 2. On the other hand,
by Theorem1.6, K
p,1
(C
1
, C
1
|
C
1
) K
p,1
(S, C
1
) holds for any integer p.
The following lemma is necessary to prove Assertion 3.3.
Lemma 4.10. Under the same assumption as in Proposition4.9, we can take a
nonsingular irreducible curve C
1
∈ |C −I
C
|. The divisor (C −2I
C
)|
C
1
is nonspe-
cial.
This follows from the inequality
deg(C
1
−I
C
)|
C
1
−2g
1
= C
1
.(−I
C
−K
S
) −2 ≥ C
1
.D
1
−2 ≥ −1,
where g
1
denotes the genus of C
1
. Here we used the equalities



p
i
= 0 (1 ≤ i ≤ λ, μ ≤ i ≤ d),
p
i
= 1 (i = α
1
, · · · , α
a
0
, d
0
, β
1
, . . . , β
b
0
),
C
1
.D
i
= 0 (otherwise),
which are obtained by (8) and the mention after Definition 4.4.
4.3 Proof of Assertion 3.2 and 3.3
In order to prove Assertion 3.2 and 3.3 for I
C
in Definition4.4, in this sub-
section, we consider the operation to take auxiliary divisors repeatedly.
Let D be a divisor on S such that D.D
1
≥ 1. For an integer y with
0 ≤ y <

d
0
−1
i=1
y
i
D.D
i
, we define
i(D, y) = max
_
j ≥ 1
¸
¸
¸ y <
d
0
−1

i=j
y
i
D.D
i
_
,
x(D, y) =
d
0
−1

i=i(D,y)+1
x
i
D.D
i
+
x
i(D,y)
y
i(D,y)
_
y −
d
0
−1

i=i(D,y)+1
y
i
D.D
i
_
.
Let C be a curve on S such as at the beginning of this section, and k, k

, λ and
μ the integers as in the previous subsection.
Remark 4.11. By definition, we have x(C, 0) = 0 if y
ν
≥ 1. Besides,
x(C, y) = x
λ
y/y
λ
if i(C, y) = λ.
Lemma 4.12. Assume that k ≥ 1 and C.D
1
≥ 1. Let y be an integer with
c
0
≤ y <

d
0
−1
i=2
y
i
C.D
i
, and define p = min{n ∈ Z | n > x(C − I
C
, y − c
0
)}.
Then
x(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) + 1 ≤ x(C, y) < p + 1.
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 49
Proof. (i) We first consider the case where y ≥ y
λ
. By definition,
i(C, y) ≤ λ and
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
y
i
C.D
i
≤ y <
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)
y
i
C.D
i
. (9)
By computing, we have
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
=
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)
y
i
C.D
i
−y
λ
I
C
.D
λ

a
0

j=1
y
α
j
I
C
.D
α
j
=
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)
y
i
C.D
i
−y
λ
+
a
0

j=1
n
α
j
y
α
j
=
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)
y
i
C.D
i
−c
0
,
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
=





y
λ
−c
0
(i(C, y) = λ),
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
y
i
C.D
i
−c
0
(i(C, y) ≤ λ −1).
Hence, by (9) and the assumption y ≥ y
λ
, we have
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
≤ y −c
0
<
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
,
which means that i(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) = i(C, y). If i(C, y) = λ, then
x(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) = −
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
x
i
I
C
.D
i
+
x
λ
y
λ
_
y −c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=λ+1
y
i
I
C
.D
i
_
= x
λ
−1 +
x
λ
y
λ
y −x
λ
= x(C, y) −1.
If i(C, y) ≤ λ −1, then
x(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) =
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
x
i
C.D
i
−x
λ
+
a
0

j=1
n
α
j
x
α
j
+
x
i(C,y)
y
i(C,y)
_
y −c
0

d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
y
i
C.D
i
+ y
λ

a
0

j=1
n
α
j
y
α
j
_
=
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
x
i
C.D
i
−1
+
x
i(C,y)
y
i(C,y)
_
y −
d
0
−1

i=i(C,y)+1
y
i
C.D
i
_
= x(C, y) −1.
50 R. Kawaguchi
We obtain x(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) = x(C, y) −1 in both cases. Therefore, the claim is
trivial.
(ii) We next consider the case where y < y
λ
. Note that y
λ
≥ 1 and i(C, y) = λ
in this case. Since
y −c
0
< y
λ
−c
0
=
a
0

j=1
n
α
j
y
α
j
= −
d
0
−1

i=α
1
y
i
I
C
.D
i
=
d
0
−1

i=α
1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
,
there exists an integer a with 1 ≤ a ≤ a
0
such that i(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) = α
a
. Then
x(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) =
a
0

j=a+1
n
α
j
x
α
j
+
x
α
a
y
α
a
_
y −c
0

a
0

j=a+1
n
α
j
y
α
j
_
= x
λ
−1 −
a−1

j=1
n
α
j
x
α
j
+
x
α
a
y
α
a
_
y −y
λ
+
a−1

j=1
n
α
j
y
α
j
_
< x
λ
−1 −
x
λ
y
λ
a−1

j=1
n
α
j
y
α
j
+
x
λ
y
λ
_
y −y
λ
+
a−1

j=1
n
α
j
y
α
j
_
=
x
λ
y
λ
y −1 = x(C, y) −1.
We next show the inequality x(C, y) < p + 1. Recall the notation s
i
which ap-
peared at the beginning of Subsection 4.2. Then y
s
a
≤ y < y
s
a−1
and
x(C −I
C
, y −c
0
) =
a
0

j=a+1
n
α
j
x
α
j
+
x
α
a
y
α
a
_
y −c
0

a
0

j=a+1
n
α
j
y
α
j
_
= x
s
a
−1 +
x
α
a
y
α
a
(y −y
s
a
).
Suppose that p + 1 = x(C, y) = x
λ
y/y
λ
. Then we have y = 0 by the inequality
y < y
λ
and the fact that x
λ
and y
λ
are relatively prime. It follows that p is
negative, a contradiction. Suppose that p +1 < x
λ
y/y
λ
. Since x
λ
/y
λ
< x
α
a
/y
α
a
,
we have
(p + 1)y
α
a
−yx
α
a
≤ −1 = −x
α
a
_
c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=α
a
+1
n
i
y
i
_
+ y
α
a
_
1 +
d
0
−1

i=α
a
+1
n
i
x
i
_
p ≤
d
0
−1

i=α
a
+1
n
i
x
i
+
x
α
a
y
α
a
_
y −c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=α
a
+1
n
i
y
i
_
=
d
0
−1

i=α
a
+1
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
+
x
α
a
y
α
a
_
y −c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=α
a
+1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
_
= x(C −I
C
, y −c
0
).
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 51
This contradicts the definition of p. Hence we can conclude that p + 1 >
x(C, y).
We define i

(C, y

) and x

(C, y

) in a similar way to i(C, y) and x(C, y),
respectively. Concretely, in the case where C.D
1
≥ 1, for an integer y

with
0 ≤ y

<

d+1
i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i
, we define
i

(C, y

) = min
_
j ≤ d + 1
¸
¸
¸ y

<
j

i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i
_
,
x

(C, y

) =
i

(C,y

)−1

i=d
0
+1
x
i
C.D
i
+
x
i

(C,y

)
y
i

(C,y

)
_
y


i

(C,y

)−1

i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i
_
.
Then one can obtain the following lemma by an argument similar to that in the
proof of Lemma 4.12.
Lemma 4.13. Assume that k ≥ 1 and C.D
1
≥ 1. Let y

be an integer with
v
0
≤ y

<

d+1
i=d
0
+2
y
i
C.D
i
, and define p

= max{n ∈ Z | n < x

(C−I
C
, y

−e
0
)}.
Then
p

−1 < x

(C, y

) ≤ x

(C −I
C
, y

−e
0
) −1.
Let us consider the situation that we take auxiliary divisors repeatedly. From
the convex geometrical view point, this means that we reduce the size of the lat-
tice polytope step by step. We put C
0
= C, and define inductively
I
j−1
: the auxiliary divisor of C
j−1
,
C
j
: a nonsingular irreducible curve in |C
j−1
−I
j−1
|,
λ
j
= max{i ≤ d
0
−1 | C
j
.D
i
≥ 1},
μ
j
= min{i ≥ d
0
+ 1 | C
j
.D
i
≥ 1},
c
j
= min{c ∈ Z | cx
λ
j
−y
λ
j
≥ 0},
e
j
= −max{e ∈ Z | ex
μ
j
−y
μ
j
≥ 0}
for an integer 1 ≤ j ≤ k.
Lemma 4.14. Assume that k ≥ 1 and C.D
1
≥ 1. Let y and j be inte-
gers with y ≤

d
0
−1
i=2
y
i
C
0
.D
i
and 1 ≤ j ≤ k. If y ≥ c
0
+ · · · + c
j−1
, then
x(C
j
, y −c
0
−· · · −c
j−1
) + j ≤ x(C
0
, y) and there is no integer in the half-open
interval
_
x(C
j
, y −c
0
−· · · −c
j−1
) + j, x(C
0
, y)
¸
.
Proof. The inequality x(C
j
, y − c
0
− · · · − c
j−1
) + j ≤ x(C
0
, y) follows
immediately from Lemma 4.12. Let j

be an integer with 0 ≤ j

≤ j −1. We have
d
0
−1

i=2
y
i
C
j
.D
i
=
d
0
−1

i=2
y
i
C
0
.D
i
−c
0
−· · · −c
j

−1
52 R. Kawaguchi
by computing, where we define c
0
+· · · +c
j

−1
= 0 in the case where j

= 0. We
thus have c
j
≤ y−c
0
−· · · −c
j

−1

d
0
−1
i=2
y
i
C
j
.D
i
. Then by Lemma 4.12, there
is no integer in the half-open interval
_
x(C
j

+1
, y−c
0
−· · · −c
j
)+j

+1, x(C
j
, y−
c
0
−· · · −c
j

−1
) + j

¸
. Hence the statement of the lemma is obvious.
A similar lemma holds for the opposite side of the lattice polytope.
Lemma 4.15. Assume that k ≥ 1 and C.D
1
≥ 1. Let y

and j be integers
with y



d+1
i=d
0
+2
y
i
C
0
.D
i
and 1 ≤ j ≤ k. If y

≥ e
0
+ · · · + e
j−1
, then
x

(C
j
, y

−e
0
−· · · −e
j−1
) −j ≥ x

(C
0
, y

) and there is no integer in the half-open
interval
_
x

(C
0
, y

), x

(C
j
, y

−e
0
−· · · −e
j−1
) −j
_
.
Lemma 4.16. The equality c
0
+· · · + c
x
λ
0
−1
= y
λ
0
holds.
Proof. Suppose c
0
+· · · + c
x
λ
0
−1
≤ y
λ
0
−1. Then we have
x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
x
λ
0
−1
) =
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
(c
0
+· · · + c
x
λ
0
−1
)

x
λ
0
y
λ
0
(y
λ
0
−1) < x
λ
0
≤ x(C
x
λ
0
, 0) + x
λ
0
,
which contradicts Lemma 4.14. Suppose c
0
+ · · · + c
x
λ
0
−1
≥ y
λ
0
+ 1 and put
s = max{i ≤ x
λ
0
−1 | c
i
≥ 1}. Then we have
x(C
s
, c
s
−1) + s =
x
λ
s
y
λ
s
(c
s
−1) + s < s + 1,
x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
s
−1) = x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
x
λ
0
−1
−1) ≥ x(C
0
, y
λ
0
)
= x
λ
0
≥ s + 1.
They contradict Lemma 4.14. Hence we can conclude that c
0
+ · · · + c
x
λ
0
−1
=
y
λ
0
.
Lemma 4.17. If c
0
≥ 1 and x
λ
0
≥ 2, then c
0
− 1 ≤ y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
≤ y
λ
0
/x
λ
0
for
integers 1 ≤ j ≤ x
λ
0
− 1, especially the equality y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
= c
0
− 1 holds for
j = x
λ
0
−1.
Proof. Let j be an integer with 1 ≤ j ≤ x
λ
0
−1
− 1. We first show the
inequality y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
≥ c
0
−1.
(i) We consider the case where x
λ
j
≥ 2. Since x
j
and y
j
are relatively prime, we
obtain c
j
x
λ
j
> y
λ
j
in this case. Hence
x(C
j
, y
λ
j
−c
j
) + j =
x
λ
j
y
λ
j
(y
λ
j
−c
j
) + j = x
λ
j

x
λ
j
y
λ
j
c
j
+ j < x
λ
j
−1 + j.
On the other hand, we have
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 53
x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
+ y
λ
j
−c
j
) =
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
(c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
+ y
λ
j
) −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
c
j
= x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
+ y
λ
j
) −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
c
j
≥ x(C
j
, y
λ
j
) + j −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
c
j
= x
λ
j
+ j −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
c
j
.
Since (x(C
j
, y
λ
j
−c
j
) +j, x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · +c
j−1
+y
λ
j
−c
j
)] ∩Z = ∅ by Lemma 4.14,
we have c
0
≤ c
j
and y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
> c
j
−1 ≥ c
0
−1.
(ii) We consider the case where x
λ
j
= 1. Note that y
λ
j
= c
j
. We define
s = max{i ≤ j −1 | c
i
≥ 1}. Then we have
x(C
s
, c
s
−1) + s =
x
λ
s
y
λ
s
(c
s
−1) + s < s + 1 ≤ j.
On the other hand, we have
x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
s
−1) = x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
j
−(c
j
+ 1))
≥ x(C
j
, c
j
) + j −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
(c
j
+ 1) ≥ j + 1 −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
(c
j
+ 1).
Then by Lemma 4.14, we have c
0
−1 ≤ c
j
= y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
.
We next show the inequality y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
≤ y
λ
0
/x
λ
0
. If y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
= 0, then the
inequality is obviously holds. Hence we consider the case where y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
> 0.
Suppose y
λ
j
/x
λ
j
> y
λ
0
/x
λ
0
. Then we have
x
_
C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
+
y
λ
0
x
λ
0
_
= x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
) + 1
≥ x(C
j
, 0) + j + 1 = j + 1,
x
_
C
j
,
y
λ
0
x
λ
0
_
+ j =
x
λ
j
y
λ
j
·
y
λ
0
x
λ
0
+ j < j + 1.
They contradict Lemma 4.14.
Lastly, we show y
λ
a
/x
λ
a
= c
0
− 1, where we put a = x
λ
0
− 1 for simplicity.
Because of the above arguments, it is sufficient to verify that y
λ
a
/x
λ
a
≤ c
0
− 1.
Since this is obvious in the case where y
λ
a
/x
λ
a
= 0, we assume y
λ
a
/x
λ
a
> 0.
Then we have x(C
a
, 0) + a = a = x
λ
0
−1. On the other hand, we have
x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
a−1
) = x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
a
) −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
c
a
= x(C
0
, y
λ
0
) −
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
c
a
= x
λ
0

x
λ
0
y
λ
0
c
a
.
54 R. Kawaguchi
Note that c
0
x
λ
0
> y
λ
0
since x
λ
0
≥ 2. Then by Lemma 4.14, we have
x
λ
0
−x
λ
0
c
a
/y
λ
0
≥ x
λ
0
−1, which implies that c
0
> y
λ
0
/x
λ
0
≥ c
a
≥ y
λ
a
/x
λ
a
.
Assertion 3.2 follows immediately from the following proposition. Needless
to say, the integer m
0
in the following proposition coincides with that in Asser-
tion3.2.
Proposition 4.18. Assume that k

> k ≥ 2 and |C−F| is base point free. Then
there exists a positive integer m
0
≤ k such that C
j
.F

= C
j
.F for j = 1, . . . , m
0
−1
and C
m
0
.F

> C
m
0
.F.
Proof. (i) We first consider the case where c
0
≥ 2. Note that x
i
y
λ
0
≤ y
i
x
λ
0
for integers 2 ≤ i ≤ d
0
−1 if C.D
i
≥ 1. Then we have
C
1
.F = k −1 =
λ
0

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
−1
=
λ
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
+ x
λ
0
(C.D
λ
0
−1) + x
λ
0
−1,
C
1
.F

= k

−c
0
−e
0
=
λ
0

i=1
y
i
C.D
i
+
d

i=μ
0
y
i
C.D
i
−c
0
−e
0
≥ C.D
1
+
y
λ
0
x
λ
0
λ
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
+ y
λ
0
C.D
λ
0
+ y
μ
0
−c
0
−e
0
> 1 + (c
0
−1)
λ
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
+ (c
0
−1)x
λ
0
C.D
λ
0
−c
0
= (c
0
−1)
λ
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
+ (c
0
−1)x
λ
0
(C.D
λ
0
−1) + (c
0
−1)(x
λ
0
−1).
Hence we have C
1
.F

> C
1
.F. Namely, the lemma is valid for m
0
= 1 in this
case.
(ii) Similarly, in the case where e
0
≥ 2, one can show that the lemma is valid for
m
0
= 1.
From now on, we assume that c
0
≤ 1 and e
0
≤ 1.
(iii) Assume that c
0
+ e
0
≤ 1 or k

≥ k + 2. Then, since
C
1
.F

−C
1
.F = k

−I
0
.D
d
0
−k + 1 = k

−k −c
0
−e
0
+ 1 ≥ 1,
the lemma is valid for m
0
= 1.
(iv) For the remaining case where c
0
= e
0
= 1 and k

= k + 1, it is sufficient to
verify the following claim:
ClaimA: Two inequalities 2 ≤ x
λ
0
≤ k, −k ≤ x
μ
0
≤ −2 hold and there
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 55
exists an integer m
0
with 2 ≤ m
0
≤ min{x
λ
0
, −x
μ
0
} such that
I
j
.D
d
0
=
_
1 (1 ≤ j ≤ m
0
−2),
0 (j = m
0
−1).
First we mention the inequalities k =

d
0
−1
i=2
x
i
C.D
i
≥ x
λ
0
and k =

d
i=d
0
+1
x
i
C.D
i
≥ −x
μ
0
. By the definition of λ
0
, x
i
y
λ
0
≤ y
i
x
λ
0
holds if
2 ≤ i ≤ d
0
− 1 and C.D
i
≥ 1. Similarly, x
i
y
μ
0
≥ y
i
x
μ
0
holds if d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ d
and C.D
i
≥ 1. Hence we obtain
k

= C.D
1
+
d
0
−1

i=2
y
i
C.D
i
+
d

i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i
≥ 1 +
y
λ
0
x
λ
0
d
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
+
y
μ
0
x
μ
0
d

i=d
0
+1
x
i
C.D
i
= 1 +
_
y
λ
0
x
λ
0

y
μ
0
x
μ
0
_
k.
It follows that
y
λ
0
x
λ
0

y
μ
0
x
μ
0
≤ 1. (10)
Since c
0
= e
0
= 1, we have y
λ
0
/x
λ
0
< 1 and y
μ
0
/x
μ
0
> −1, which mean that
x
λ
0
≥ 2 and x
μ
0
≤ −2.
From now on, we assume that x
λ
0
≤ −x
μ
0
. The case where x
λ
0
≥ −x
μ
0
can
be shown in a similar way. Let j be an integer with 1 ≤ j ≤ x
λ
0
− 1 such that
I
1
.D
d
0
= · · · = I
j−1
.D
d
0
= 1. We verify that I
j
.D
d
0
≤ 1, especially I
j
.D
d
0
= 0 if
j = x
λ
0
−1. By Lemma 4.14 and 4.15, we have
x(C
0
, c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
) =
x
λ
0
y
λ
0
(c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
) < x(C
j
, 0) + j + 1, (11)
x

(C
0
, e
0
+· · · + e
j−1
) =
x
μ
0
y
μ
0
(e
0
+· · · + e
j−1
) > x

(C
j
, 0) −j −1.
On the other hand, it follows from Lemma 4.17 that c
j
, e
j
≤ 1. If c
j
= e
j
= 1,
then we have x(C
j
, 0) = x

(C
j
, 0) = 0 and
y
λ
0
x
λ
0

y
μ
0
x
μ
0
>
c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
+ e
0
+· · · + e
j−1
j + 1
=
c
0
+ e
0
+ I
1
.D
d
0
+· · · + I
j−1
.D
d
0
j + 1
= 1,
a contradiction. Hence we obtain I
j
.D
d
0
= c
j
+ e
j
≤ 1.
In the case where j = x
λ
0
−1, we have c
j
= 0 by Lemma 4.17 and
c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
j + 1
=
y
λ
0
x
λ
0
56 R. Kawaguchi
by Lemma 4.16. If e
j
= 1, then we have x

(C
j
, 0) = 0. Hence, by noting (11), we
obtain a contradiction
y
λ
0
x
λ
0

y
μ
0
x
μ
0
>
c
0
+· · · + c
j−1
+ e
0
+· · · + e
j−1
j + 1
= 1.
Therefore, we can conclude e
j
= 0, that is, I
j
.D
d
0
= 0 in this case.
Let us show one more lemma needed in the proof of Assertion 3.3.
Lemma 4.19. Assume that k

> k ≥ 2 and |C − F| is base point free, and let
m
0
be a positive integer in Proposition4.18. If c
0
= e
0
= 1, then either of the
inequalities x
λ
j−1
≥ 2 or x
μ
j−1
≤ −2 holds for each integer 1 ≤ j ≤ m
0
−1.
Proof. Note that, in this case, the integer m
0
is equal to that in ClaimA
in the proof of Proposition 4.18. The case where j = 1 is contained in ClaimA.
Hence let j be an integer with 2 ≤ j ≤ m
0
−1, and suppose x
λ
j−1
= −x
μ
j−1
= 1.
Since I
j−1
.D
d
0
= c
j−1
+e
j−1
= 1, either c
j−1
or e
j−1
is equal to one. If c
j−1
= 1,
then we have y
λ
0
/x
λ
0
≥ y
λ
j−1
/x
λ
j−1
= 1 by Lemma 4.17. Hence (10) implies
that y
μ
0
/x
μ
0
= 0. This contradicts the fact that e
0
= 1. We obtain a similar
contradiction in the case where e
j−1
= 1. Therefore, two equalities x
λ
j−1
= 1
and x
μ
j−1
= −1 do not occur at the same time.
Finally, we prove Assertion 3.3.
Proposition 4.20. Assume that k

> k ≥ 2 and |C−F| is base point free, and let
m
0
be a positive integer in Proposition4.18. Then the inequality in Assertion 3.3
holds for each integer 1 ≤ j ≤ m
0
. Besides, if k

= k = 2, then this inequality
holds for j = 1.
Proof. Considering the cohomology long exact sequence similar to (1), we
obtain h
0
(S, C
j
) = h
0
(C
j
, C
j
|
C
j
)+1. On the other hand, the short exact sequence
0 → O
S
(−I
j−1
) → O
S
(C
j
− I
j−1
) → O
C
j
(C
j
− I
j−1
) → 0 and Proposition 4.8
induce the cohomology exact sequence
0 → H
0
(S, C
j
−I
j−1
) → H
0
(C
j
, (C
j
−I
j−1
)|
C
j
) → 0. (12)
Hence it is sufficient to verify the inequality
h
0
(C
j
, C
j
|
C
j
) −h
0
(C
j
, (C
j
−I
j−1
)|
C
j
) ≥ C
j
.F + 1. (13)
The divisor (C
j
−I
j−1
)|
C
j
is nonspecial by Lemma 4.10. By Riemann-Roch the-
orem, we have
degC
j
|
C
j
−2g
j
= −C
j
.K
S
−2 ≥ C
j
.D
1
−2 ≥ −1, (14)
where g
j
denotes the genus of C
j
. Hence also C
j
|
C
j
is nonspecial. Thus (13) is
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 57
equivalent to the inequality
C
j
.I
j−1
≥ C
j
.F + 1. (15)
In the case where c
0
= 1 or e
0
= 1 or k

≥ k + 2, m
0
is equal to one by (i)–(iii)
in the proof of Proposition 4.18. Since C
1
.I
0
≥ C
1
.D
d
0
= C
1
.F

≥ C
1
.F + 1 by
the definition of m
0
, (15) holds in this case.
Let us consider the case where c
0
= 1, e
0
= 1 and k

= k + 1. In the case
where 1 ≤ j ≤ m
0
−1, we have x
λ
j−1
≥ 2 or x
μ
j−1
≤ −2 by Lemma 4.19. Hence
if we divide (x
λ
j−1
, y
λ
j−1
) and (x
μ
j−1
, y
μ
j−1
) as (2) and (4), then either α
a
0
or
β
b
0
exists. If α
a
0
exists, then by (8), we have
C
j
.I
j−1
≥ C
j
.(D
α
a
0
+ D
d
0
) = −I
j−1
.D
α
a
0
+ C
0
.D
d
0
−(I
0
+· · · + I
j−1
).D
d
0
= n
α
a
0
+ C
0
.F

−j −1 ≥ C
0
.F −j + n
α
a
0
= C
j
.F + n
α
a
0
.
A similar computation is carried out in the case where β
b
0
exists to verify
the inequality C
j
.I
j−1
≥ C
j
.F + m
β
b
0
. In the case where j = m
0
, we have
C
m
0
.I
m
0
−1
≥ C
m
0
.D
d
0
= C
m
0
.F

≥ C
m
0
.F + 1.
Lastly, let us show (15) for j = 1 under the assumption that k

= k = 2.
Namely, we will show the inequality C
1
.I
0
≥ 2. If x
λ
0
≥ 2 or x
μ
0
≤ −2, then this
can be proved by the same argument as above. Assume x
λ
0
= 1 and x
μ
0
= −1.
Since k =

d
0
−1
i=2
x
i
C.D
i
≥ 2, C.D
λ
0
≥ 2 or there exists an integer i with
2 ≤ i ≤ d
0
−1 such that i = λ
0
and C.D
i
≥ 1. We thus have
1 = k

−1 ≥
d
0
−1

i=2
y
i
C.D
i

y
λ
0
x
λ
0
d
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
> y
λ
0
.
Hence y
λ
0
must be zero. Similarly, one can obtain y
μ
0
= 0. We thus have
I
0
.D
d
0
= c
0
+ e
0
= 0 and C
1
.I
0
≥ C
1
.D
d
0
= C.D
d
0
= k

= 2.
5. The case where degf
1
|
C
≥ degf
2
|
C
In this section, we consider the case where degf
1
|
C
≥ degf
2
|
C
, that is,
C.F
1
≥ C.F
2
. We put F = F
2
, F

= F
1
, k = C.F and k

= C.F

. In order
to simplify the argument, we renumber the T-invariant divisors. Concretely, we
denote by D
1
the T-invariant divisor whose associated cone has the primitive
element (−1, 0), and number other cones in Δ
S
clockwise. In particular, we set
D
d
0
if its primitive element is (0, 1) (see Fig. 2). Note that, in this case, the fiber
F and F

are written as
F ∼ D
d

d−2

i=2
y
i
D
i
58 R. Kawaguchi
F

∼ −
d
0
−1

i=1
x
i
D
i

d−1

i=d
0
+1
x
i
D
i
.
σ(D
1
)
σ(D
2
)
σ(D
d
0
)
σ(D
d−1
)
σ(D
d
)
Figure 2
If k

≥ k ≥ 2, we define
ν = max{i ≤ d
0
| C.D
i
≥ 1},
ξ = min{i ≥ d
0
| C.D
i
≥ 1},
c
0
= −max{c ∈ Z | x
ν
−cy
ν
≥ 0},
e
0
= min{e ∈ Z | x
ξ
−ey
ξ
≤ 0},
f
0
= min{c
0
, e
0
}.
If ν = 1 or ξ = d −1, then C becomes a curve considered in Section 4. We thus
assume that ν ≥ 2 and ξ ≤ d − 2 in this section. Note that the five statements
c
0
= 0, e
0
= 0, f
0
= 0, ν = d
0
and ξ = d
0
are equivalent. By Fact 4.1 and the
argument in Subsection 4.1, we obtain the unique divisions
(x
ν
, y
ν
) = (−c
0
, 1) + n
γ
1
(x
γ
1
, y
γ
1
) +· · · + n
γ
s
0
(x
γ
s
0
, y
γ
s
0
) (16)
(ν < γ
1
< · · · < γ
s
0
≤ d
0
),
(x
ξ
, y
ξ
) = (e
0
, 1) + m
δ
1
(x
δ
1
, y
δ
1
) +· · · + m
δ
t
0
(x
δ
t
0
, y
δ
t
0
)
(d
0
≤ δ
1
< · · · < δ
t
0
< ξ),
where n
γ
i
and m
δ
j
are positive integers. We note that
x
γ
s
_
1 +
s
0

j=s+1
n
γ
j
y
γ
j
_
−y
γ
s
_
−c
0
+
s
0

j=s+1
n
γ
j
x
γ
j
_
= 1 (17)
for each integer 1 ≤ s ≤ s
0
and
_
e
0
+
t−1

j=1
m
δ
j
x
δ
j
_
y
δ
t

_
1 +
t−1

j=1
m
δ
j
y
δ
j
_
x
δ
t
= 1 (18)
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 59
for each integer 1 ≤ t ≤ t
0
. There exists an integer ι such that (x
ι
, y
ι
) =
(e
0
− c
0
, 1). Obviously, we see that ι = d
0
(resp. ν + 1 ≤ ι ≤ ξ − 1) if f
0
= 0
(resp. f
0
≥ 1).
5.1 The auxiliary divisor
In this subsection, we keep the above notation. Let C be a curve on S such
that k ≤ k

, ν ≥ 2 and ξ ≤ d −2.
Definition 5.1. Let C be a curve on S such that k ≥ 2, and set n
i
= 0 for inte-
gers ν+1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
except for i = γ
1
, . . . , γ
s
0
and m
i
= 0 for integers d
0
≤ i ≤ ξ−1
except for i = δ
1
, . . . , δ
t
0
. We define the auxiliary divisor I
C
=

d
i=1
q
i
D
i
+ F

of C as follows :
(i) The case where ι ≤ d
0
(that is, c
0
≥ e
0
).
q
i
=

















x
i
_
1 +
d
0

j=i+1
n
j
y
j
_
+ y
i
_
c
0

d
0

j=i+1
n
j
x
j
_
(ν + 1 ≤ i ≤ ι −1),
e
0
y
i
(ι ≤ i ≤ d
0
),
x
i
_
−1 −
i−1

j=d
0
m
j
y
j
_
+ y
i
_
e
0
+
i−1

j=d
0
m
j
x
j
_
(d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ ξ −1),
0 (otherwise).
(ii) The case where ι ≥ d
0
+ 1 (that is, c
0
< e
0
).
q
i
=

















x
i
_
1 +
d
0

j=i+1
n
j
y
j
_
+ y
i
_
c
0

d
0

j=i+1
n
j
x
j
_
(ν + 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
),
c
0
y
i
(d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ ι),
x
i
_
−1 −
i−1

j=d
0
m
j
y
j
_
+ y
i
_
e
0
+
i−1

j=d
0
m
j
x
j
_
(ι + 1 ≤ i ≤ ξ −1),
0 (otherwise).
It is obvious that I
C
.F = 1 by definition. We remark that I
C
= F

if f
0
= 0.
Besides, by (17) and (18), we have q
i
= 1 for i = γ
1
, . . . , γ
i
0
, δ
1
, . . . , δ
j
0
.
Lemma 5.2. If c
0
≥ e
0
≥ 1, then ι ≥ γ
s
0
.
Proof. If ι < γ
s
0
, then we have x
γ
s
0
/y
γ
s
0
> x
ι
/y
ι
= e
0
− c
0
. By (17),
the inequality y
γ
s
0
e
0
< x
γ
s
0
+ y
γ
s
0
c
0
= 1 holds. This implies that y
γ
s
0
= 0, a
contradiction.
Corollary 5.3. If c
0
≥ e
0
≥ 1, then n
i
= 0 for any integer ι + 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
.
Lemma 5.4. Assume that f
0
≥ 1. If ι = ν + 1 (resp. ι = ξ − 1), then e
0
= 1
(resp. c
0
= 1).
Proof. We note that c
0
and e
0
are positive by assumption. Assume that
60 R. Kawaguchi
ι = ν + 1. Then, since x
ι
y
ν
−y
ι
x
ν
= 1, we have
e
0
= c
0
+
x
ν
y
ν
+
1
y
ν
< c
0
+ (−c
0
+ 1) +
1
y
ν
= 1 +
1
y
ν
≤ 2.
Similarly, if ι = ξ −1, then the equality x
ξ
y
ι
−y
ξ
x
ι
= 1 implies that
c
0
= e
0

x
ξ
y
ξ
+
1
y
ξ
< e
0
−(e
0
−1) +
1
y
ξ
= 1 +
1
y
ξ
≤ 2.

There is no essential difference between the cases where c
0
≥ e
0
and c
0
≤ e
0
.
Hence we will prove all the remaining propositions and lemmas in this subsection
only for the former case.
Proposition 5.5. The divisor I
C
is effective.
This lemma can be shown by a computation similar to that in the proof of
Proposition 4.5. The following Proposition 5.6 and 5.8 correspond to the property
(iii) in Assertion 3.1.
Proposition 5.6. Assume that k ≥ 2. The complete linear system |C − I
C
| is
base point free.
Proof. If f
0
= 0, then C.D
d
0
≥ 1 and I
C
= F

. Hence our lemma is
clear in this case. We thus consider the case where f
0
≥ 1, that is, c
0
and e
0
are positive and ξ ≥ d
0
+ 1. We will compute the intersection number I
C
.D
i
only for i = d
0
, ι. In the other cases, we can compute similarly to the proof of
Proposition 4.6 to verify that (C −I
C
).D
i
is non-negative.
In the case where i = d
0
, we divide the situation into six cases as follows :
(i) ν + 1 = ι = d
0
= ξ −1,
(ii) ν + 2 ≤ ι = d
0
= ξ −1,
(iii) ι + 1 ≤ d
0
= ξ −1,
(iv) ν + 1 = ι = d
0
≤ ξ −2,
(v) ν + 2 ≤ ι = d
0
≤ ξ −2,
(vi) ι + 1 ≤ d
0
≤ ξ −2.
Lemma 5.4 and the assumption c
0
≥ e
0
implies that e
0
= 1 in the case (iv), and
c
0
= e
0
= 1 in the cases (i) and (ii). By definition, n
d
0
= y
d
0
−1
−1 if ν = d
0
−1,
and m
d
0
= y
d
0
+1
−1 if ξ = d
0
+ 1.
(i) Since I
C
= D
d
0
+F

, we have I
C
.D
d
0
= −y
d
0
−1
−y
d
0
+1
+1 = −n
d
0
−m
d
0
−1.
(ii) Since I
C
= (−1 −n
d
0
+ y
d
0
−1
)D
d
0
−1
+ D
d
0
+ F

, we have
I
C
.D
d
0
= −1 −n
d
0
+ y
d
0
−1
−y
d
0
−1
−y
d
0
+1
+ 1 = −n
d
0
−m
d
0
−1.
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 61
(iii) In this case, we have e
0
= 1 by definition. Besides, γ
s
0
≤ d
0
−1 by Lemma 5.2,
which implies that n
d
0
= 0. Hence I
C
.D
d
0
= (y
d
0
−1
D
d
0
−1
+ D
d
0
+ F

).D
d
0
=
−y
d
0
+1
+ 1 = −n
d
0
−m
d
0
.
(iv) Since I
C
= D
d
0
+ (−1 −m
d
0
+ y
d
0
+1
)D
d
0
+1
+ F

, we have
I
C
.D
d
0
= −y
d
0
−1
−y
d
0
+1
−1−m
d
0
+y
d
0
+1
+1 = −y
d
0
−1
−m
d
0
= −n
d
0
−m
d
0
−1.
(v) Note that c
0
= e
0
. Then, since q
d
0
−1
= −1 − n
d
0
+ y
d
0
−1
, q
d
0
= e
0
and
q
d
0
+1
= −1 −m
d
0
+ e
0
y
d
0
+1
, we have
I
C
.D
d
0
= −1 −n
d
0
+ y
d
0
−1
−e
0
(y
d
0
−1
+ y
d
0
+1
) −1 −m
d
0
+ e
0
y
d
0
+1
+ 1
= −n
d
0
−m
d
0
−1.
(vi) In this case, we have n
d
0
= 0 by the same argument as in (iii). Hence
I
C
.D
d
0
= e
0
y
d
0
−1
−e
0
(y
d
0
−1
+ y
d
0
+1
) −1 −m
d
0
+ e
0
y
d
0
+1
+ 1 = −n
d
0
−m
d
0
.
We next compute I
C
.D
ι
under the assumption ι ≤ d
0
−1. If ι ≥ ν + 2, then
we have
I
C
.D
ι
= x
ι−1
(1 + n
ι
y
ι
) + y
ι−1
(c
0
−n
ι
x
ι
) −e
0
(y
ι−1
+ y
ι+1
) + e
0
y
ι+1
= x
ι−1
+ n
ι
(x
ι−1
x
ι
−y
ι−1
x
ι
) + (c
0
−e
0
)y
ι−1
= y
ι
x
ι−1
−x
ι
y
ι−1
−n
ι
= −n
ι
−1.
In the case where ι = ν + 1, since e
0
= 1 by Lemma 5.4, we have I
C
.D
ι
=
−(y
ι−1
+ y
ι+1
) + y
ι+1
= −y
ν
. If y
ν
= 1, then we have n
ι
= 0, that is,
I
C
.D
ι
= −n
ι
− 1. If y
ν
≥ 2, then since γ
s
0
≤ ν + 1 by Lemma 5.2, we have
γ
s
0
= ν + 1 and s
0
= 1. Hence I
C
.D
ι
= −1 −n
γ
1
y
γ
1
= −n
ι
−1.
List 5.7. We list the intersection numbers of I
C
and the T-invariant divisors on
S.
(A) In the case where f
0
= 0,
I
C
.D
i
=
_
1 (i = d
0
, d),
0 (otherwise).
(B) In the case where f
0
≥ 1 and ι = d
0
,
I
C
.D
i
=











−n
d
0
−m
d
0
−1 (i = d
0
),
−n
i
(i = d
0
, i = γ
1
, . . . , γ
s
0
),
1 (i = ν, ξ, d),
−m
i
(i = d
0
, i = δ
1
, . . . , δ
t
0
),
0 (otherwise).
(C) In the case where f
0
≥ 1 and ι ≤ d
0
−1,
62 R. Kawaguchi
I
C
.D
i
=















−n
d
0
−m
d
0
(i = d
0
),
−n
i
−1 (i = ι),
−n
i
(i = ι, i = γ
1
, . . . , γ
s
0
),
1 (i = ν, ξ, d),
−m
i
(i = d
0
, i = δ
1
, . . . , δ
t
0
),
0 (otherwise).
Proposition 5.8. If |C − F| is base point free, then also |C − I
C
− F| is base
point free.
We can easily show the above proposition by using List 5.7. We next check
the property (ii) in Assertion 3.1.
Proposition 5.9. The vanishing H
1
(S, −I
C
) = 0 holds.
Proof. We write the linear equivalence class of F

as F

∼ −

d
0
−1
i=1
x
i
D
i
.
Clearly the coefficients of D
1
and D
d−1
in I
C
are one and zero, respectively. It
follows from Theorem2.4 that H
0
(S, K
S
+ I
C
) = 0. Hence, by the same compu-
tation as that in Proposition 4.8, it is enough to show I
C
.(K
S
+ I
C
) = −2.
In the case (A) in List 5.7, since I
C
= F

, we have I
C
.(K
S
+ I
C
) = F

.K
S
=
F

.(−D
d
0
− D
d
) = −2. Recall that q
i
= 1 for i = γ
1
, . . . , γ
s
0
, δ
1
, . . . , δ
t
0
. In the
case (B), we have
I
C
.(K
S
+ I
C
) = I
C
.((q
ν
−1)D
ν
+ (q
d
0
−1)D
d
0
+ (q
ξ
−1)D
ξ
+ (q
d
−1)D
d
+ F

)
= −1 + (q
d
0
−1)(−n
d
0
−m
d
0
−1) −1 −1 + q
d
0
= (e
0
−1)(−n
d
0
−m
d
0
) −2.
This value is clearly equal to minus two if e
0
= 1. In the case where e
0
≥ 2, since
n
d
0
= m
d
0
= 0 by definition, we have I
C
.(K
S
+I
C
) = −2. Lastly, we consider the
case (C). By computing, we have I
C
.(K
S
+I
C
) = (e
0
−1)(−n
d
0
−m
d
0
−n
ι
) −2.
This value is equal to minus two if e
0
= 1. Consider the case where e
0
≥ 2. Note
that m
d
0
= 0 in this case. Let us show that n
ι
= n
d
0
= 0. This is obvious if
y
ν
= 1 by definition. We assume y
ν
≥ 2, and prove the inequality ι > γ
s
0
. The
inequality ι ≥ γ
s
0
follows from Lemma 5.2. Suppose that x
γ
s
0
≥ −c
0
+ 2. Then
by (17), we have the inequality 1 = x
γ
s
0
+c
0
y
γ
s
0
≥ −c
0
+2+c
0
y
γ
s
0
, which implies
a contradiction c
0
(y
γ
s
0
−1) ≤ −1. Hence we have x
ι
= e
0
−c
0
≥ 2 − c
0
> x
γ
s
0
.
It follows that n
ι
= n
d
0
= 0 and I
C
.(K
S
+ I
C
) = −2.
Proposition 5.10. Assume that k ≥ 2 and |C −F| is base point free. Then the
divisor C −I
C
satisfies the properties (iv)–(vi) in Assertion 3.1.
Proof. (iv) We put H = C − I
C
. Since |H| has no base points, we can
write H ∼

d−1
i=2
h
i
D
i
with non-negative integers h
i
. Then we have h
d−1
=
H.D
d
= C.D
d
−I
C
.D
d
= C.F −1 ≥ 1. By assumption, we have (C −F).D
d−1
=
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 63
C.D
d−1
−1 ≥ 0. It follows that H
2
≥ H.D
d−1
= C.D
d−1
−I
C
.D
d−1
≥ 1. Recall
that H
2
(S, −I
C
) = 0 as mentioned at the beginning of the proof of Proposi-
tion5.9. Then (v) and (vi) can be shown by the same argument as that in the
proof of Proposition 4.9.
We next aim to show the lemma similar to Lemma 4.10. Although it is ideal
that (C −2I
C
)|
C
1
is nonspecial for a curve C
1
∈ |C −I
C
| in any case, in fact, we
need a certain condition (see Lemma 5.12).
Lemma 5.11. Assume that k ≥ 2, f
0
≥ 1 and |C−F| is base point free. Besides,
we assume that C satisfies neither of the following conditions (a) nor (b) :
(a) y
ν
= 1, C.D
ν
= 1 and C.D
i
= 0 for any integer 2 ≤ i ≤ ν −1.
(b) y
ξ
= 1, C.D
ξ
= 1 and C.D
i
= 0 for any integer ξ ≤ i ≤ d −2.
Then there exists an effective divisor E on S such that |C−2I
C
−E| is base point
free, h
0
(S, C −2I
C
−E) = h
0
(S, C −2I
C
) and E.(E + K
S
) ≤ 2E.(C −2I
C
).
Proof. We first aim to prove the existence of an effective divisor E
1
satis-
fying the following properties (i)–(iii) :
(i) (C −2I
C
−E
1
).D
i
≥ 0 for 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
and i = d,
(ii) h
0
(S, C −2I
C
−E
1
) = h
0
(S, C −2I
C
),
(iii) E
1
.(E
1
+ K
S
) ≤ 2E
1
.(C −2I
C
).
If C.D
ν
≥ 2, the zero divisor satisfies (i)–(iii). We thus assume that C.D
ν
= 1,
and define
ν

= max{i ≤ ν −1 | C.D
i
≥ 1},
γ

= min{i ≥ ν + 1 | (C −2I
C
).D
i
≥ 1} =
_
γ
1
(y
ν
≥ 2),
ι (y
ν
= 1).
By the information of the intersection numbers
(C −2I
C
).D
i







≥ 1 (i = ν

),
= −1 (i = ν),
≥ 1 (i = γ

),
= 0 (ν

+ 1 ≤ i ≤ ν −1, ν + 1 ≤ i ≤ γ

−1),
we can see the partial shape of
C−2I
C
around the line l
ν
(C − 2I
C
) (see Fig. 3
(1)).
Let us verify the following two claims (see Fig. 3 (2)) :
Claim1 : The intersection point P
0
= l
ν

−1
(C − 2I
C
) ∩ l
ν
(C − 2I
C
) lies on the
half-line L
1
= {R −a(y
γ
, −x
γ
) | a ≥ 0}.
Claim2 : The intersection point Q
0
= l
γ
(C − 2I
C
) ∩ l
γ

+1
(C − 2I
C
) lies on the
half-line L
2
= {R + a(y
ν
, −x
ν
) | a ≥ 0}.
If we put P = (p
1
, p
2
), then the X-coordinate of R is greater than or equal to
p
1
−y
ν
(see Fig. 4). Since the X-coordinate of P
0
is less than or equal to p
1
−y
ν
,
64 R. Kawaguchi
l
ν
(C −2I
C
)
l
ν
(C −2I
C
)
l
γ
(C −2I
C
)
Q = l
ν
(C −2I
C
) ∩ l
γ
(C −2I
C
)
P = l
ν
(C −2I
C
) ∩ l
ν
(C −2I
C
)
R = l
ν
(C −2I
C
) ∩ l
γ
(C −2I
C
)
L
1
L
2
l
ν −1
(C −2I
C
)
C−2I
C
l
γ +1
(C −2I
C
)
(1) (2)
Figure 3
L
1
l
ν −1
(C −2I
C
)
P
P
0
R
−x
ν
y
ν
Figure 4
Claim1 is true if y
ν
< y
ν
. Let us consider the case where y
ν
> y
ν
. It is sufficient
to show the inequality
x
γ
(y
ν
−y
ν
) ≤ y
γ
(x
ν
−x
ν
). (19)
In the case where y
ν
= 1, we have x
ν
= −c
0
and γ

= ι. On the other hand,
ν

≥ 2 since C does not satisfies the condition (a). We thus have
y
γ
(x
ν
−x
ν
) −x
γ
(y
ν
−y
ν
) = e
0
(y
ν
−1) −x
ν
−c
0
y
ν
> 0.
Assume that y
ν
≥ 2. Since γ

= γ
1
and x
γ
1
y
ν
−y
γ
1
x
ν
= 1 by (17), the inequality
(19) is obvious. We next show Claim2. Since
Q
0
= Q + (C −2I
C
).D
γ
(y
γ
, −x
γ
) = Q−2I
C
.D
γ
(y
γ
, −x
γ
),
it is sufficient for Claim2 to verify the inequality −2y
γ
I
C
.D
γ
≥ y
ν
. This is
obvious if y
ν
= 1. We thus consider the case where y
ν
≥ 2. Note that γ

= γ
1
in
this case. If s
0
= 1, then since (x
ν
, y
ν
) = (−c
0
, 1) + n
γ
1
(x
γ
1
, y
γ
1
), we have
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 65
y
ν
= 1 + n
γ
1
y
γ
1
≤ 2n
γ
1
y
γ
1
≤ −2y
γ
1
I
C
.D
γ
1
.
If s
0
≥ 2, then we have x
γ
2
(y
ν
−n
γ
1
y
γ
1
) −y
γ
2
(x
ν
− n
γ
1
x
γ
1
) = 1 by (17). Hence
we can write (x
γ
1
, y
γ
1
) = ε(x
γ
2
, y
γ
2
) +ζ(x
ν
−n
γ
1
x
γ
1
, y
ν
−n
γ
1
y
γ
1
) with integers ε
and ζ. Since x
γ
2
y
γ
1
−y
γ
2
x
γ
1
= x
γ
1
y
ν
−y
γ
1
x
ν
= 1, we have ε = ζ = 1. It follows
that (n
γ
1
+1)y
γ
1
> y
ν
. Since the inequality I
C
.D
γ
1
≤ −n
γ
1
holds by List 5.7, we
have −2y
γ
1
I
C
.D
γ
1
> y
ν
. Hence Claim2 is true. Besides, we remark that
−I
C
.D
γ
≥ y
ν
(20)
if γ

= ι. This is obvious in the case where y
ν
= 1. If y
ν
≥ 2, then we have
γ
1
= ι, that is, y
γ
1
= 1. Hence the above two inequalities I
C
.D
γ
1
≤ −n
γ
1
and
(n
γ
1
+ 1)y
γ
1
> y
ν
implies that −I
C
.D
γ
≥ y
ν
.
We denote by Q
γ
= (z
γ
, w
γ
) the lattice point in l
γ
(C − 2I
C
) ∩
C−2I
C
which is closest to L
1
. Note that the line l
i
(C − 2I
C
) passes through the point
P (resp. Q) for any integer ν

+1 ≤ i ≤ ν −1 (resp. ν +1 ≤ i ≤ γ

−1). Thus we
can inductively define positive integers τ
i
for ν

+ 1 ≤ i ≤ γ

− 1 as follows (see
Fig. 5) :
τ
i
: the positive integer such that the line l
i
(C−2I
C
−τ
i
D
i
) passes through Q
i+1
,
Q
i
=(z
i
, w
i
): the lattice point in l
i
(C−2I
C
−τ
i
D
i
)∩
C−2I
C
which is closest to L
1
.
By definition, we have
l
γ
(C −2I
C
)
Q
γ
Q
γ −1
Q
γ −2
L
1
Figure 5
τ
i
=
_
x
i
(z
0
−z
i
+ y
ν
) + y
i
(w
0
−w
i
−x
ν
) (ν

+ 1 ≤ i ≤ ν −1),
x
i
(z
0
−z
i
) + y
i
(w
0
−w
i
) (ν ≤ i ≤ γ

−1),
(21)
where we set Q = (z
0
, w
0
). We put E
1
=

γ

−1
i=ν

+1
τ
i
D
i
. By definition, it
is obvious that E
1
satisfies the property (i). Besides, for an integer i with
ν

+ 1 ≤ i ≤ γ

− 1, the lattice points contained in the domain surrounded by
l
i−1
(C−2I
C
−E
1
), l
i
(C−2I
C
−E
1
) and L
1
must lie on the line l
i
(C−2I
C
−E
1
).
This means that E
1
satisfies the property (ii). For the later use, we note that
66 R. Kawaguchi
τ
γ

−1
≤ −I
C
.D
γ
(22)
holds if γ

= ι. Indeed, if we suppose that γ

= ι and τ
γ

−1
> −I
C
.D
γ
,
then the point Q

= Q + y
ν
(y
γ
, −x
γ
) lies on L
2
since the X-coordinate of R
(resp. Q

) is less (resp. greater) than or equal to that of P. Namely, Q

lies on
l
γ
(C −2I
C
) ∩
C−2I
C
. On the other hand, by (20), we deduce that Q

is nearer
to L
1
than Q
γ
= Q + τ
γ

−1
(y
γ
, −x
γ
), which contradicts the definition of Q
γ
.
Let us show that E
1
satisfies (iii). By computing, we have (C − 2I
C
).E
1
=
τ
ν
(C − 2I
C
).D
ν
= −τ
ν
. Hence it is sufficient to verify E
1
.(E
1
+ K
S
) ≤ −2τ
ν
.
We first consider the case where y
ν
≥ 2. Since γ

= γ
1
in this case, we have
x
γ
y
ν
− y
γ
x
ν
= 1 by (17). Hence the lattice point P − (y
ν
, −x
ν
) lies on the
half-line L
1
. We thus see that Q
ν

+1
= P −(y
ν
, −x
ν
) by the property (ii), which
implies that
τ
ν

+1
= x
ν

+1
(z
0
−z
ν

+1
+ y
ν
) + y
ν

+1
(w
0
−w
ν

+1
−x
ν
)
= x
ν

+1
y
ν
+ y
ν

+1
(−x
ν
) = 1.
On the other hand, we can write
Q
γ
= Q + s(y
γ
, −x
γ
),
Q
γ

−1
= Q
γ
+ t(y
γ

−1
, −x
γ

−1
),
Q
ν
= Q
γ
+ (a, b)
with integers s, t, a, and b. We note that ax
ν
+by
ν
≥ 0. Then, by (21), we have
τ
γ

−1
= x
γ

−1
(z
0
−z
γ

−1
) + y
γ

−1
(w
0
−w
γ

−1
)
= x
γ

−1
(−sy
γ
−ty
γ

−1
) + y
γ

−1
(sx
γ
+ tx
γ

−1
) = s,
τ
ν
= x
ν
(z
0
−z
ν
) + y
ν
(w
0
−w
ν
) = x
ν
(−sy
γ
−a) + y
ν
(sx
γ
−b)
= τ
γ

−1
−(ax
ν
+ by
ν
) ≤ τ
γ

−1
.
In sum, we obtain
E
1
.(E
1
+ K
S
) = E
1
.
_
−D
ν
+
γ
1
−1

i=ν

+1

i
−1)D
i
−D
γ
1
_
≤ E
1
.(−D
ν
+ (τ
ν
−1)D
ν
−D
γ
1
)
= −τ
ν

+1
+ (τ
ν
−1)E
1
.D
ν
−τ
γ
1
−1
≤ −τ
ν

+1
−τ
ν
+ 1 −τ
γ
1
−1
≤ −2τ
ν
.
Let us consider the case where y
ν
= 1. We note that x
ν
= −c
0
and γ

= ι
in this case. If (C − 2I
C
− E
1
).D
i
= 0 for integers ν

+ 1 ≤ i ≤ γ

− 1, then
we have Q
γ
= Q
ν

−1
. Namely, R must be a lattice point. Then, since the
X-coordinate of R is greater than (resp. less than or equal to) that of Q (resp.
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 67
P), we have ν

= 1, which contradicts the condition (a). Hence we can take an
integer κ = max{n | ν

+1 ≤ n ≤ γ

−1, (C −2I
C
−E
1
).D
n
≥ 1}. If κ > ν, then
by computing, we have
τ
κ
= x
κ
(−y
γ
) + y
κ
x
γ
= −x
κ
+ (e
0
−c
0
)y
κ
,
τ
ν
≤ x
ν
(−y
γ
+ y
κ
) + y
ν
(x
γ
−x
κ
) = −c
0
y
κ
+ e
0
−x
κ
≤ τ
κ
.
We thus have
E
1
.(E
1
+ K
S
) = E
1
.
_
−D
ν
+
γ

−1

i=ν

+1

i
−1)D
i
−D
γ

_
(23)
≤ −E
1
.D
ν
+ (τ
κ
−1)E
1
.D
κ
+ (τ
ν
−1)E
1
.D
ν
−E
1
.D
γ

≤ −τ
ν

+1
−τ
κ
−τ
ν
+ 2 −τ
γ

−1
≤ −τ
κ
−τ
ν
≤ −2τ
ν
.
In the case where κ = ν, we have E
1
.D
ν
≤ −2 and
E
1
.(E
1
+K
S
)≤−E
1
.D
ν
+(τ
ν
−1)E
1
.D
ν
−E
1
.D
γ
≤−τ
ν

+1
−2τ
ν
+2−τ
γ

−1
≤−2τ
ν
.
In the case where κ < ν, we have
τ
κ
= x
κ
(y
ν
−y
γ
) + y
κ
(−x
ν
+ x
γ
) = e
0
y
κ
,
τ
ν
≤ x
ν
(−y
γ
) + y
ν
x
γ
= e
0
≤ τ
κ
.
Hence the inequality (23) holds in this case also. Therefore, E
1
satisfies the
property (iii).
We define
δ

= max{i ≤ ξ −1 | (C −2I
C
).D
i
≥ 1} =
_
δ
t
0
(y
ξ
≥ 2),
ι (y
ξ
= 1),
ξ

= min{i ≥ ξ + 1 | C.D
i
≥ 1}.
Then, by a similar way to that in the case of E
1
, we can construct the effective
divisor E
2
=

ξ

−1
i=δ

+1
ω
i
D
i
satisfying the following properties (i)

–(iii)

:
(i)

(C −2I
C
−E
2
).D
i
≥ 0 for d
0
≤ i ≤ d,
(ii)

h
0
(S, C −2I
C
−E
2
) = h
0
(S, C −2I
C
),
(iii)

E
2
.(E
2
+ K
S
) ≤ 2E
2
.(C −2I
C
).
Note that E
2
= 0 in the case where C.D
ξ
≥ 2. In sum, we obtain the effective
divisors
E
1
=





0 (C.D
ν
≥ 2),
γ

−1

i=ν

+1
τ
i
D
i
(C.D
ν
= 1),
γ

=
_
γ
1
(y
ν
≥ 2),
ι (y
ν
= 1),
68 R. Kawaguchi
E
2
=





0 (C.D
ξ
≥ 2),
ξ

−1

i=δ

+1
ω
i
D
i
(C.D
ξ
= 1),
δ

=
_
δ
t
0
(y
ξ
≥ 2),
ι (y
ξ
= 1)
which satisfy the properties (i)–(iii) and (i)

–(iii)

.
We put E = E
1
+ E
2
. Let us check that (C − 2I
C
− E).D
i
≥ 0 holds for
any integer 1 ≤ i ≤ d. This is obvious if either E
1
or E
2
is equal to zero.
Hence we consider the case where C.D
ν
= C.D
ξ
= 1. By noting γ

≤ ι ≤ δ

,
(C−2I
C
−E).D
i
is non-negative if i = ι. Since (C−2I
C
−E).D
ι
is non-negative
if γ

< ι or δ

> ι, we consider the case where γ

= δ

= ι. Then we have
(C −2I
C
−E).D
ι
≥ −2I
C
.D
ι
−τ
γ

−1
−ω
δ

+1
.
Similarly to (22), one can show the inequality ω
δ

+1
≤ −I
C
.D
δ
in the case where
δ

= ι. We thus have (C − 2I
C
− E).D
ι
≥ 0. In sum, we can conclude that
Bs|C −2I
C
−E| = ∅. Since

C−2I
C
\
C−2I
C
−E
=
C−2I
C
\ (
C−2I
C
−E
1

C−2I
C
−E
1
)
= (
C−2I
C
\
C−2I
C
−E
1
) ∪ (
C−2I
C
\
C−2I
C
−E
2
),
the properties (ii) and (ii)

imply that (
C−2I
C
\
C−2I
C
−E
) ∩ Z = ∅. Namely,
we obtain h
0
(S, C −2I
C
−E) = h
0
(S, C −2I
C
). Lastly, we have
E.(E + K
S
) −2E.(C −2I
C
)
= E
1
.(E
1
+ K
S
) −2E
1
.(C −2I
C
) + E
2
.(E
2
+ K
S
) −2E
2
.(C −2I
C
) + 2E
1
.E
2
≤ 2E
1
.E
2
= 0
by the properties (iii) and (iii)

.
Lemma 5.12. Assume that k ≥ 2 and |C − F| is base point free. By Proposi-
tion5.10, we can take a nonsingular irreducible curve C
1
∈ |C − I
C
|. If f
0
≥ 1
and C satisfies neither of the conditions (a) nor (b) in Lemma 5.11, then the
divisor (C
1
−I
C
)|
C
1
is nonspecial.
Proof. Since |C−F
1
| has no base points, we have (C−F
1
).D
1
= C.D
1
−1 ≥
0. Hence, by Riemann-Roch theorem and List 5.7, we have
degC
1
|
C
1
−2g
1
= −C
1
.K
S
−2 ≥ C
1
.D
1
−2 = C.D
1
−2 ≥ −1,
where g
1
denotes the genus of C
1
. Hence also C
1
|
C
1
is nonspecial.
Assume that C satisfies neither of (a) nor (b). Since H
1
(S, −I
C
) =
H
2
(S, −I
C
) = 0, the cohomology exact sequence similar to (12) implies that
h
1
(C
1
, (C − 2I
C
)|
C
1
) = h
1
(S, C − 2I
C
). We take the effective divisor E as in
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 69
Lemma 5.11. Then we have
h
1
(S, C −2I
C
)
= h
0
(S, C −2I
C
) +
1
2
(C −2I
C
).(K
S
−C + 2I
C
) −1
= h
0
(S, C −2I
C
−E) +
1
2
(C −2I
C
−E).(K
S
−C + 2I
C
+ E) −1
+
1
2
E.(E + K
S
) −E.(C −2I
C
)
= h
1
(S, C −2I
C
−E) +
1
2
E.(E + K
S
) −E.(C −2I
C
) ≤ 0.
We need Lemma 5.12 in the proof of Assertion 3.3. Hence we must show
Assertion 3.3 independently for the cases excluded in Lemma 5.12.
Lemma 5.13. Assume that k ≥ 2, f
0
≥ 1 and |C−F| is base point free. If either
of the conditions (a) or (b) in Lemma 5.11 holds, then h
0
(S, C −I
C
) −h
0
(S, C −
2I
C
) ≥ (C −I
C
).F + 2.
1
C.F
C.F
C
f
0
1
C−I
C
C.F −f
0
C−2I
C
1
P
Figure 6
Proof. We prove the case of (a). By Theorem2.4, the statement of the
lemma is equivalent to the inequality (
C−I
C
∩Z
2
) −(
C−2I
C
∩Z
2
) ≥ C.F +1.
Comparing the two lattice polytope
C
and
C−I
C
, by the definition of I
C
, we
see that the horizontal distance between l
i
(C) and l
i
(C−I
C
) (similarly, l
i
(C−I
C
)
and l
i
(C − 2I
C
)) is at least one for each integer d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ d − 1 (see Fig. 6).
Indeed, if we write the linear equivalence class of F

as F



d−1
d
0
+1
x
i
D
i
, then
the coefficient of D
i
in the linear equivalence class of I
C
is at least x
i
for each
integer d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ d − 1. By noting the existence of the point P, we see that
there exist at least C.F

− f
0
+ 2 lattice points in
C−I
C
\
C−2I
C
. Hence the
lemma is clear if f
0
= 1. Let us consider the case where f
0
≥ 2. In this case, we
have
C.F =
d−2

i=2
y
i
C.D
i
= 1 +
d−2

i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i
,
70 R. Kawaguchi
C.F

=
d−1

i=d
0
+1
x
i
C.D
i
≥ C.D
d−1
+
x
ξ
y
ξ
d−2

i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i
> 1 + (e
0
−1)(C.F −1)
≥ 1 + (f
0
−1)(C.F −1) = C.F + (f
0
−2)(C.F −1) ≥ C.F + f
0
−2.
Hence the lemma is true in this case also.
Lemma 5.14. Assume that k ≥ 2 and f
0
= 0. Then h
0
(S, C −I
C
) −h
0
(S, C −
2I
C
) ≥ (C −I
C
).F + 2.
Proof. Since I
C
= F

in this case, the vertical distance between l
i
(C)
and l
i
(C − I
C
) (similarly, l
i
(C − I
C
) and l
i
(C − 2I
C
)) is just one for each inte-
ger d
0
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ d − 1. Hence, by a similar argument to that in the proof of
Lemma 5.13, we have (
C−I
C
∩ Z
2
) −(
C−2I
C
∩ Z
2
) ≥ C.F + 1.
5.2 Proof of Assertion 3.2 and 3.3
In this subsection, we will prove Assertion 3.2 and 3.3. Let D be a divisor on
S such that D.D
1
≥ 1. For an integer x with 0 ≤ x ≤ D.F

, we define
i(D, x) = max
_
j ≥ 1
¸
¸
¸ x < −
d
0
−1

i=j
x
i
D.D
i
_
,
y(D, x) =
d
0
−1

i=i(D,x)+1
y
i
D.D
i

y
i(D,x)
x
i(D,x)
_
x +
d
0
−1

i=i(D,x)+1
x
i
D.D
i
_
.
Let C be a curve on S such as at the beginning of this section and I
C
the aux-
iliary divisor of C. In this subsection, we write the linear equivalence class of F

as F

d−1
d
0
+1
x
i
D
i
. Then I
C
is written as
I
C
=
d
0

i=0
q
i
D
i
+
d−1

d
0
+1
(q
i
+ x
i
)D
i
,
where we formally set q
0
= q
d
and D
0
= D
d
.
Remark 5.15. By definition, we have y(C, 0) = 0. Besides, y(C, x) = −y
ν
x/x
ν
if i(C, x) = ν.
Lemma 5.16. Assume that k ≥ 2 and C.D
1
≥ 1. Let x be an integer with
f
0
≤ x ≤ C.F

, and define q = min{n ∈ Z | n > y(C −I
C
, x −f
0
)}. Then
y(C −I
C
, x −f
0
) + n
d
0
≤ y(C, x) < q + n
d
0
(c
0
> e
0
),
y(C −I
C
, x −f
0
) + n
d
0
+ 1 ≤ y(C, x) < q + n
d
0
+ 1 (c
0
< e
0
).
Proof. We prove only the former case. The latter case can be proved
by a similar procedure. Since c
0
> e
0
, we have ν, ι ≤ d
0
− 1. Let us compute

d
0
−1
i=i(C,x)
x
i
I
C
.D
i
. Recall (C) in List 5.7. If ι = γ
s
0
, then by noting x
γ
s
0
= e
0
−c
0
,
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 71
we have
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)
x
i
I
C
.D
i
= x
ν
−n
γ
1
x
γ
1
−· · · −n
γ
s
0
−1
x
γ
s
0
−1
−(n
γ
s
0
+ 1)x
γ
s
0
= −c
0
−x
γ
s
0
= −e
0
.
If ι ≥ γ
s
0
+ 1, then by noting n
ι
= 0, we have
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)
x
i
I
C
.D
i
= x
ν
−n
γ
1
x
γ
1
−· · · −n
γ
s
0
x
γ
s
0
−x
ι
= −c
0
−x
ι
= −e
0
.
We thus obtain
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
x
i
I
C
.D
i
=
_
−e
0
−x
ν
(i(C, x) = ν),
−e
0
(i(C, x) ≤ ν −1).
(24)
Similarly, we can obtain
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
y
i
I
C
.D
i
=
_
n
d
0
−y
ν
(i(C, x) = ν),
n
d
0
(i(C, x) ≤ ν −1).
(i) Consider the case where x ≥ −x
ν
. If i(C, x) = ν, then we have
y(C −I
C
, x −e
0
) = −
d
0
−1

i=ν+1
y
i
I
C
.D
i
+
y
ν
x
ν
_
x −e
0

d
0
−1

i=ν+1
x
i
I
C
.D
i
_
= y
ν
−n
d
0

y
ν
x
ν
x −y
ν
= y(C, x) −n
d
0
.
On the other hand, if i(C, x) ≤ ν −1, then we have

d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
x
i
C.D
i
≤ x < −
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)
x
i
C.D
i

d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
≤ x −e
0
< −
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
by (24). This means that i(C −I
C
, x −e
0
) = i(C, x). Hence
y(C −I
C
, x −e
0
)
=
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i

y
i(C,x)
x
i(C,x)
_
x −e
0
+
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
_
=
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
y
i
C.D
i
−n
d
0

y
i(C,x)
x
i(C,x)
_
x +
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
x
i
C.D
i
_
= y(C, x) −n
d
0
.
72 R. Kawaguchi
Consequently, our lemma is true in any case.
(ii) We next consider the case where x < −x
ν
. Note that i(C, x) = ν and
y(C, x) = −y
ν
x/x
ν
in this case. Since C.D
i
= 0 for i(C, x) + 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
− 1, we
have
x −e
0
< −x
ν
−e
0
=
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
x
i
I
C
.D
i
= −
d
0
−1

i=i(C,x)+1
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
by (24). Hence there exists an integer s with 1 ≤ s ≤ s
0
such that
i(C −I
C
, x −e
0
) = γ
s
. Then
y(C −I
C
, x −e
0
) =
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i

y
γ
s
x
γ
s
_
x −e
0
+
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
_
=
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i

y
γ
s
x
γ
s
_
x −e
0
+
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
_

d
0
−1

i=γ
s
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i

y
ν
x
ν
_
x −e
0
+
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
_
= −
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
y
i
I
C
.D
i

y
ν
x
ν
_
x −e
0

d
0
−1

i=γ
s
x
i
I
C
.D
i
_
= −n
d
0
+ y
ν
+
γ
s
−1

i=ν+1
y
i
I
C
.D
i

y
ν
x
ν
_
x + x
ν
+
γ
s
−1

i=ν+1
x
i
I
C
.D
i
_
= −n
d
0

y
ν
x
ν
x +
γ
s
−1

i=ν+1
_
y
i

y
ν
x
ν
x
i
_
I
C
.D
i
≤ −n
d
0

y
ν
x
ν
x = y(C, x) −n
d
0
.
We next show the inequality y(C, x) < q +n
d
0
. Suppose that q +n
d
0
= y(C, x) =
−y
ν
x/x
ν
. Note that q + n
d
0
is the integer. Then we have x = 0 by the in-
equality x < −x
ν
and the fact that x
ν
and y
ν
are relatively prime. This implies
that q is nonpositive, a contradiction. Suppose that q + n
d
0
< −y
ν
x/x
ν
. Since
y
ν
/x
ν
> y
γ
s
/x
γ
s
, we have
−(q + n
d
0
)x
γ
s
−xy
γ
s
≤ −1 = −x
γ
s
_
1 +
d
0

i=γ
s
+1
n
i
y
i
_
+ y
γ
s
_
−c
0
+
d
0

i=γ
s
+1
n
i
x
i
_
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 73
q ≤ 1 +
d
0

i=γ
s
+1
n
i
y
i
−n
d
0

y
γ
s
x
γ
s
_
x −c
0
+
d
0

i=γ
s
+1
n
i
x
i
_
= 1 +
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
n
i
y
i

y
γ
s
x
γ
s
_
x −c
0
+
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
n
i
x
i
_
· · · (∗).
If ι ≥ γ
s
+ 1, then by List 5.7, we have
(∗) = −
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
y
i
I
C
.D
i

y
γ
s
x
γ
s
_
x −e
0

d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
x
i
I
C
.D
i
_
=
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i

y
γ
s
x
γ
s
_
x −e
0
+
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
_
= x(C −I
C
, x −e
0
).
If ι = γ
s
, then since (C −I
C
).D
i
= 0 for γ
s
+ 1 ≤ i ≤ d
0
−1, we have
(∗) = 1 −
y
γ
s
x
γ
s
(x −c
0
) = −
y
γ
s
x
γ
s
(x −e
0
)
=
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
y
i
(C −I
C
).D
i

y
γ
s
x
γ
s
_
x −e
0
+
d
0
−1

i=γ
s
+1
x
i
(C −I
C
).D
i
_
= x(C −I
C
, x −e
0
).
Obviously, they contradict the definition of q. Consequently, we can conclude
that y(C, x) < q + n
d
0
.
We define i

(D, x

) and y

(D, x

) in a way similar to i(D, x) and y(D, x),
respectively. Concretely, in the case where D.D
d−1
≥ 1, for an integer x

with
0 ≤ x

≤ D.F

, we define
i

(D, x

) = min
_
j ≤ d −1
¸
¸
¸ x

<
j

i=d
0
+1
x
i
D.D
i
_
,
y

(D, x

) =
i

(D,x

)−1

i=d
0
+1
y
i
D.D
i
+
y
i

(D,x

)
x
i

(D,x

)
_
x


i

(D,x

)−1

i=d
0
+1
x
i
D.D
i
_
.
Then we can obtain the following lemma by an argument similar to that in the
proof of Lemma 5.16.
Lemma 5.17. Assume that k ≥ 2 and C.D
d−1
≥ 1. Let x

be an integer with
f
0
≤ x

≤ C.F

, and define q

= min{n ∈ Z | n > y

(C −I
C
, x

−f
0
)}. Then
y

(C −I
C
, x

−f
0
) + m
d
0
+ 1 ≤ y

(C, x

) < q

+ m
d
0
+ 1 (c
0
> e
0
),
y

(C −I
C
, x

−f
0
) + m
d
0
≤ y

(C, x

) < q

+ m
d
0
(c
0
< e
0
).
74 R. Kawaguchi
Similar to Section4, we next consider the operation to take auxiliary divisors
repeatedly. We put C
0
= C and I
0
= I
C
, and take a nonsingular irreducible
curve C
1
∈ |C
0
−I
0
|. For an integer n ≥ 2, if C
j
.F ≥ 2, C
j
.F

≥ 2 and
ν
j
= max{i ≤ d
0
| C
j
.D
i
≥ 1} ≥ 2,
ξ
j
= min{i ≥ d
0
| C
j
.D
i
≥ 1} ≤ d −2
for any integer j with 1 ≤ j ≤ n −1, then we can take the auxiliary divisor I
n−1
of C
n−1
and a nonsingular irreducible curve C
n
∈ |C
n−1
−I
n−1
| inductively. Note
that n ≤ C.F −1 by the condition C
n−1
.F ≥ 2. We define
c
j
= −max{c ∈ Z | x
ν
j
−cy
ν
j
≥ 0},
e
j
= min{e ∈ Z | x
ξ
j
−ey
ξ
j
≤ 0},
f
j
= min{c
j
, e
j
},
α
j
: the cardinality of the set {l | 0 ≤ l ≤ j, c
l
< e
l
}
for an integer j with 0 ≤ j ≤ n − 1. We divide each (x
ν
j
, y
ν
j
) and (x
ξ
j
, y
ξ
j
) in
ways similar to (16) as
(x
ν
j
, y
ν
j
) = (−c
j
, 1) +
d
0

i=ν
j
+1
n
j
i
(x
i
, y
i
),
(x
ξ
j
, y
ξ
j
) = (e
j
, 1) +
ξ
j
−1

i=d
0
m
j
i
(x
i
, y
i
).
In the following Lemma 5.18–5.20, we assume that we can take nonsingular irre-
ducible curves C
1
, . . . , C
n
in the above way.
Lemma 5.18. Assume that C.D
1
≥ 1. Let x be an integer with x ≤

d
0
−1
i=1
x
i
C
0
.D
i
. If x ≥ f
0
+ · · · + f
n−1
and C
j
.D
d
0
= 0 for j = 0, . . . , n,
then y(C
n
, x −f
0
−· · · −f
n−1
) + α
n−1
≤ y(C
0
, x) and there is no integer in the
half-open interval
_
y(C
n
, x −f
0
−· · · −f
n−1
) + α
n−1
, y(C
0
, x)
¸
.
Proof. Let j be an integer with 0 ≤ j ≤ n − 1. By assumption, we have
c
j
= e
j
and n
j
d
0
= m
j
d
0
= 0. Besides, by computing, we have
d
0
−1

i=1
x
i
C
j
.D
i
=
d
0
−1

i=1
x
i
C
0
.D
i
+ f
0
+· · · + f
j−1
,
where we define f
0
+ · · · + f
j−1
= 0 in the case where j = 0. We thus have
f
j
≤ x−f
0
−· · ·−f
j−1
≤ −

d
0
−1
i=1
x
i
C
j
.D
i
. In the case where c
j
> e
j
, Lemma 5.16
implies that y(C
j+1
, x−f
0
−· · ·−f
j
) ≤ y(C
j
, x−f
0
−· · ·−f
j−1
) and there exists no
integer in the half-open interval
_
y(C
j+1
, x−f
0
−· · ·−f
j
), y(C
j
, x−f
0
−· · ·−f
j−1
)
¸
.
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 75
Similarly, if c
j
< e
j
, then there exists no integer in the half-open interval
_
y(C
j+1
, x −f
0
−· · · −f
j
) +1, y(C
j
, x −f
0
−· · · −f
j−1
)
¸
. Therefore, our lemma
is clear.
A similar lemma holds for the opposite side of the lattice polytope.
Lemma 5.19. Assume that C.D
d−1
≥ 1. Let x

be an integer with x

d−1
i=d
0
+1
x
i
C
0
.D
i
. If x

≥ f
0
+ · · · + f
n−1
and C
j
.D
d
0
= 0 for j = 0, . . . , n,
then y

(C
n
, x

−f
0
−· · · −f
n−1
) + n −α
n−1
≤ y

(C
0
, x

) and there is no integer
in the half-open interval
_
y

(C
n
, x

−f
0
−· · · −f
n−1
) + n −α
n−1
, y

(C
0
, x

)
¸
.
Lemma 5.20. Assume that k

− k = f
0
− 1 ≥ 1 and |C − F| is base point free.
If n ≤ k −2 and f
1
= · · · = f
n−1
= 1, then ν
n
≥ 2 and ξ
n
≤ d −2.
Proof. An easy computation shows that C
n−1
.F

= C.F

−f
0
−· · ·−f
n−2
=
C.F − n + 1 = C
n−1
.F. Suppose that ν
n
= 1. Since C
n
.D
i
= 0 for any inte-
ger 2 ≤ i ≤ d
0
, by List 5.7, C
n−1
must satisfy the properties c
n−1
< e
n−1
,
y
ν
n−1
= 1, C
n−1
.D
ν
n−1
= 1 and C
n−1
.D
i
= 0 for any integer 2 ≤ i ≤ ν
n−1
− 1.
Since e
n−1
≥ 2, by the same computation as that at the last of the proof of
Lemma 5.13, we have C
n−1
.F

> C
n−1
.F, a contradiction. One can induce the
same contradiction under the assumption that ξ
n
= d −1.
Let us consider Assertion 3.2 with respect to a special case :
Lemma 5.21. Assume k

= k+1 ≥ 3, f
0
= 2 and |C−F| is base point free. Then
x
ν
0
≤ −2, x
ξ
0
≥ 2 and there exists an integer m with 2 ≤ m ≤ min{−x
ν
0
, x
ξ
0
}
such that f
1
= · · · = f
m−2
= 1 and f
m−1
= 0.
Proof. Since f
0
= 2, we have C.D
d
0
= 0, x
ν
0
< −y
ν
0
and x
ξ
0
> y
ξ
0
. It
follows that x
ν
0
≤ −2 and x
ξ
0
≥ 2. As we saw in the proof of Proposition 5.10
and Lemma 5.12, C.D
1
and C.D
d−1
are positive. By the inequality
k =
d−2

i=2
y
i
C.D
i
(25)
=
d
0
−1

i=2
y
i
C.D
i
+
d−2

i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i

y
ν
0
x
ν
0
d
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
+
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
d−2

i=d
0
+1
x
i
C.D
i
=
y
ν
0
x
ν
0
(−C.F

+ C.D
1
) +
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
(C.F

−C.D
d−1
) ≤
_

y
ν
0
x
ν
0
+
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
_
(k

−1),
we obtain

y
ν
0
x
ν
0
+
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
≥ 1. (26)
Consider the case where min{−x
ν
0
, x
ξ
0
} = 2. If x
ν
0
= −2, we have
y
ν
0
= 1, that is, c
0
= 2 by the assumption f
0
= 2. Hence, by (26), we have
76 R. Kawaguchi
1/2 ≤ y
ξ
0
/x
ξ
0
< 1/(e
0
−1), that is, e
0
= 2. Similarly, one can show c
0
= e
0
= 2
in the case where x
ξ
0
= 2. Therefore, by (B) in List 5.7, we have C
1
.D
d
0
≥ 1 in
this case. Hence the lemma is valid for m = 2.
We assume that m
0
= min{−x
ν
0
, x
ξ
0
} ≥ 3. Let us consider the following
operation:
We can take C
1
. →





f
1
= 0. → We can finish our proof.
f
1
= 1. → We can take C
2
by Lemma 5.20 if k ≥ 3. −−

f
1
≥ 2.






f
2
= 0. → We can finish our proof.
f
2
= 1. → We can take C
2
by Lemma 5.20 if k ≥ 4. −−

f
2
≥ 2.
→ · · · .
Then, since k = k

−1 ≥ −x
1
C.D
1
−x
ν
0
C.D
ν
0
−1 ≥ m
0
, it is sufficient to check
that
(i) f
j
≤ 1 if f
1
= · · · = f
j−1
= 1 for an integer j with 1 ≤ j ≤ m
0
−1,
(ii) especially f
m
0
−1
= 0 if f
1
= · · · = f
m
0
−2
= 1.
(i) Let j be an integer with 1 ≤ j ≤ m
0
− 1 such that f
1
= · · · = f
j−1
= 1. By
Lemma 5.20, we can take the auxiliary divisor I
j−1
of C
j−1
and a nonsingular
irreducible curve C
j
∈ |C
j−1
− I
j−1
|. Suppose that f
j
≥ 2. Since x
ν
j
≤ −2
and x
ξ
j
≥ 2, we have y(C
j
, 1) = −y
ν
j
/x
ν
j
and y

(C
j
, 1) = y
ξ
j
/x
ξ
j
. Hence, by
Lemma 5.18 and 5.19,
y(C
0
, j + 2) = −
y
ν
0
x
ν
0
(j + 2) < min{l ∈ Z | l > y(C
j
, 1) + α
j−1
}
= min
_
l ∈ Z
¸
¸
¸ l > −
y
ν
j
x
ν
j
+ α
j−1
_
= α
j−1
+ 1,
y

(C
0
, j + 2) =
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
(j + 2) < min{l ∈ Z | l > y

(C
j
, 1) + j −α
j−1
}
= min
_
l ∈ Z
¸
¸
¸ l >
y
ξ
j
x
ξ
j
+ j −α
j−1
_
= j −α
j−1
+ 1.
These inequalities imply that −y
ν
0
/x
ν
0
+ y
ξ
0
/x
ξ
0
< 1, a contradiction. We thus
obtain f
j
≤ 1.
(ii) Considering y(C
0
, m
0
− 1), y(C
m
0
−2
, 0), y

(C
0
, m
0
− 1) and y

(C
m
0
−2
, 0),
Lemma 5.18 and 5.19 implies that
_
α
m
0
−3
, −
y
ν
0
x
ν
0
(m
0
−1)
_
∩ Z = ∅, (27)
_
m
0
−2 −α
m
0
−3
,
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
(m
0
−1)
_
∩ Z = ∅.
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 77
Note that x
ν
0
< −y
ν
0
and x
ξ
0
> y
ξ
0
by the assumption f
0
= 2. In the case where
m
0
= −x
ν
0
, we obtain α
m
0
−3
= y
ν
0
−1 by the first equality of (27). Since
(y(C
m
0
−2
, 1) + α
m
0
−3
, y(C
0
, m
0
)] ∩ Z =
_

y
ν
m
0
−2
x
ν
m
0
−2
+ y
ν
0
−1, y
ν
0
_
∩ Z = ∅,
we have y
ν
m
0
−2
/x
ν
m
0
−2
= −1, that is, c
m
0
−2
= 1. On the other hand, since
(y

(C
m
0
−2
, 1) + m
0
−2 −α
m
0
−3
, y

(C
0
, m
0
)] ∩ Z
=
_
y
ξ
m
0
−2
x
ξ
m
0
−2
−x
ν
0
−y
ν
0
−1, −
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
x
ν
0
_
∩ Z = ∅,
we have y
ξ
m
0
−2
/x
ξ
m
0
−2
≥ 1. Indeed, if y
ξ
m
0
−2
/x
ξ
m
0
−2
< 1, then we have
−y
ξ
0
x
ν
0
/x
ξ
0
< −x
ν
0
−y
ν
0
, which contradicts (26). Hence we obtain e
m
0
−2
= 1.
Therefore, we can conclude that C
m
0
−1
.D
d
0
≥ 1 by (B) in List 5.7, which means
that f
m
0
−1
= 0. In the case where m
0
= x
ξ
0
, we obtain α
m
0
−3
= x
ξ
0
− y
ξ
0
− 1
by the second equality of (27). Since
(y(C
m
0
−2
, 1)+α
m
0
−3
, y(C
0
, m
0
)]∩Z =
_

y
ν
m
0
−2
x
ν
m
0
−2
+x
ξ
0
−y
ξ
0
−1, −
y
ν
0
x
ν
0
x
ξ
0
_
∩Z = ∅,
we have y
ν
m
0
−2
/x
ν
m
0
−2
≥ −1. Indeed, if y
ν
m
0
−2
/x
ν
m
0
−2
< −1, then we have
−y
ν
0
x
ξ
0
/x
ν
0
< x
ξ
0
− y
ξ
0
, which contradicts (26). We thus have c
m
0
−2
= 1. On
the other hand, since
(y

(C
m
0
−2
, 1)+m
0
−2−α
m
0
−3
, y

(C
0
, m
0
)] ∩Z =
_
y
ξ
m
0
−2
x
ξ
m
0
−2
+y
ξ
0
−1, y
ξ
0
_
∩Z = ∅,
we have y
ξ
m
0
−2
/x
ξ
m
0
−2
= 1, that is, e
m
0
−2
= 1. Consequently, we have f
m
0
−1
= 0
in this case also.
In keeping with the Lemma 5.21, let us show Assertion 3.2.
Proposition 5.22. For the curve C, Assertion 3.2 is true.
Proof. First, if k = 2 and C
1
.F

> C
1
.F (resp. C
1
.F

= C
1
.F), then the
statement is obviously true for m
0
= 1 (resp. m
0
= 2). Hence we assume that
k ≥ 3.
Consider the case where f
0
≤ 1. Since
C
1
.F

−C
1
.F = C.F

−I
0
.F

−C.F + I
0
.F = k

−f
0
−k + 1 ≥ 2 −f
0
≥ 1,
the lemma is valid for m
0
= 1 in this case.
Let us consider the case where f
0
= 2. If k

≥ k + 2, then we have
C
1
.F

≥ C
1
.F + 1, and can finish the proof. On the other hand, in the case
where k

= k + 1, the lemma is valid for m
0
= m, where m is the integer in
78 R. Kawaguchi
Lemma 5.21. Indeed, this is clear in the case where C
m−1
.F = 1. If C
m−1
.F ≥ 2,
then we can take the auxiliary divisor I
m−1
of C
m−1
and a nonsingular irre-
ducible curve C
m
∈ |C
m−1
− I
m−1
| by Lemma 5.20. Since f
m−1
= 0, we obtain
C
m
.F

≥ C
m
.F + 1.
From now on, we assume that f
0
≥ 3. Since x
ν
0
< −2y
ν
0
and x
ξ
0
> 2y
ξ
0
,
we have k

≥ k +2 by the same computation as (25). We put a =

d
0
−1
i=2
y
i
C.D
i
and b =

d−2
i=d
0
+1
y
i
C.D
i
.
(i) Consider the case where f
0
≥ 3 and k

= k + 2. Then we have
a ≤
y
ν
0
x
ν
0
d
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
< −
1
c
0
−1
d
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
=
k

−C.D
1
c
0
−1
=
k + 2 −C.D
1
c
0
−1
,
b ≤
y
ξ
0
x
ξ
0
d−2

i=d
0
+1
x
i
C.D
i
<
1
e
0
−1
d
0
−1

i=2
x
i
C.D
i
=
k

−C.D
d−1
e
0
−1
=
k + 2 −C.D
d−1
e
0
−1
.
Here we note that C.D
1
= 1. Indeed, if C.D
1
≥ 2 and k is even (resp. odd), then
we have a < k/2 and b ≤ k/2 (resp. a ≤ (k − 1)/2 and b < (k + 1)/2), which
contradicts the equality k = a + b. Similarly, one can obtain C.D
d−1
= 1. If
c
0
≥ 4, then we have
a



≤ 1 (k = 3, 4),
<
k + 1
3
(k ≥ 5),
which contradicts that k = a + b and b ≤ (k + 1)/2. We thus have c
0
= 3.
Similarly, one can obtain e
0
= 3. In sum, we have f
1
= 0 by (B) in List 5.7, and
moreover
C
1
.F

= C.F

−I
0
.F

= C.F + 2 −f
0
= C.F −1 = C
1
.F.
Since C
1
.F = k−1 ≥ 2, we can take the auxiliary divisor I
1
of C
1
and a nonsingu-
lar irreducible curve C
2
∈ |C
1
−I
1
| by Lemma 5.20. Then we obtain C
2
.F

> C
2
.F
by f
1
= 0. Therefore, the lemma is valid for m
0
= 2 in this case.
(ii) Consider the case where f
0
≥ 3 and k

≥ k + 3. If f
0
= 3, then we have
C
1
.F

= C.F

−3 ≥ C.F = C
1
.F + 1.
Assume that f
0
≥ 4 and a ≥ b. Then we have
C
1
.F = C.F −1 = a + b −1 ≤ 2a −1
= 2
ν
0
−1

i=2
y
i
C.D
i
+ 2y
ν
0
(C.D
ν
0
−1) + 2y
ν
0
−1,
C
1
.F

= C.F

−f
0
THE GONALITY CONJECTURE FOR CURVES ON TORIC SURFACES WITH TWO P
1
-FIBRATIONS 79
= −
d
0
−1

i=1
x
i
C.D
i
−f
0
≥ C.D
1

x
ν
0
y
ν
0
a −f
0
> 1 + (f
0
−1)a −f
0
= (f
0
−1)
ν
0
−1

i=2
y
i
C.D
i
+ (f
0
−1)y
ν
0
(C.D
ν
0
−1) + (f
0
−1)(y
ν
0
−1).
We thus obtain C
1
.F

> C
1
.F if y
ν
0
≥ 2. If y
ν
0
= 1, then by noting k ≥ 3, we have
the inequality

ν
0
i=2
y
i
C.D
i
≥ 2. Hence, in this case, either

ν
0
−1
i=2
y
i
C.D
i
≥ 1
or C.D
ν
0
≥ 2 holds, which implies that C
1
.F

> C
1
.F. Similarly, one can obtain
the same inequality in the case where f
0
≥ 4 and a ≤ b. Therefore, the lemma is
valid for m
0
= 1 in this case.
Proposition 5.23. For the curve C, Assertion 3.3 is true.
Proof. Let j be an integer with 1 ≤ j ≤ min{m
0
, k−1}. If f
j−1
= 0 (resp.
f
j−1
≥ 1 and C
j−1
satisfies (a) or (b) in Lemma 5.11), then the statement follows
from Lemma 5.14 (resp. Lemma 5.13).
Consider the case where f
j−1
≥ 1 and C
j−1
satisfies neither (a) nor (b).
Note that H
1
(S, −I
j−1
) = 0 by Proposition 5.9 and (C
j
−I
j−1
)|
C
j
is nonspecial
by Lemma 5.12. Besides, a similar computation to (14) shows that also C
j
|
C
j
is nonspecial. Hence we see that the statement of our lemma is equivalent to
the inequality C
j
.I
j−1
≥ C
j
.F + 1 by the same argument as that in the proof of
Proposition 4.20. Let ι
j−1
be an integer such that (x
ι
j−1
, y
ι
j−1
) = (e
j−1
−c
j−1
, 1).
For the auxiliary divisor I
j−1
=

d
i=1
q
i
D
i
+F

, we have q
ι
j−1
= f
j−1
≥ 1. Since
C
j
.D
ι
j−1
≥ 1 by List 5.7, we have
C
j
.I
j−1
≥ C
j
.(q
ι
j−1
D
ι
j−1
+ F

) ≥ C
j
.F

+ 1 ≥ C
j
.F + 1.
The above argument all goes through for j = 1 if C.F

= C.F = 2.
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Department of Mathematics
Graduate School of Science
Osaka University
Toyonaka, Osaka 560–0043, Japan
e-mail: kawaguchir@cr.math.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp