You are on page 1of 3

SOCIAL STUDIES 11

WORLD WAR I

Lesson Five: Canadians at War


Historical Understandings
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Establish Historical Signicance Evidence and Interpretation Identify Continuity and Change Analyze Cause and Consequence Take an Historical Perspective Understand the Moral Dimensions of History

Rationale
The aim of this lesson is to examine the role that the Canadian forces played in Europe, and to what degree this impacted an emerging Canadian identity. Students will gain a brief understanding of some of the most important battles that Canadians fought in, while engaging with the following questions:
1. 2.

What role did the Canadian forces play in the war? To what degree did that role shape Canadian identity?

Prescribed Learning Outcome(s): Students will begin to...


- Assess Canadas role in World War One and the impact of the war on Canada - Demonstrate eective written, oral, and graphic communication skills - Apply critical thinking--including questioning, comparing, summarizing, drawing conclusions, and defending a position--to make reasoned judgments about a range of issues, situations, and topics

Assessment
Formative
Entry and exit slips Class Discussion Battle Analysis Worksheet

Summative

Materials
A/V Equipment Access to Youtube
PAGE 1 OF 3

DURATION: 75 MINUTES

SOCIAL STUDIES 11

WORLD WAR I

Battle Analysis Worksheet (x30) Primary Account of Somme and Vimy Ridge: Letter Home (x6) Account of Vimy Ridge from historian Will Ferguson (x6)

Procedures
1.

(5 minutes) Entry Slip: How does Canadas role in the First World War impact Canadian identity today?
The aim of this task is to get students thinking about the historical signicance of the

First World War and what is required for an event to be historically signicant.

2.

(10 minutes) Teacher led explanation of the Schlieen Plan and the nature of trench warfare, using map on page 35 of Counterpoints textbook. The aim here is to give a brief context for looking at the battles that Canadian troops fought in. (10 minutes) Introduction of the days inquiry-based activity. Explain that the claim is often made that WWI made Canada into a nation. We want to examine this claim. Show video of Stephen Harpers speech at Vimy Ridge in 2007: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=m6373IRqSeU
The aim of this activity is to encourage students to begin to see how others can use

3.

evidence and interpretation to read historical signicance onto the past. Whether or not he is correct or not, Harper makes some big claims about what Vimy Ridge did for the creation of a Canadian nation--these should be examined.

4.

(30-40 minutes) Jig-saw: In 6 groups, students will read about one of the following and ll out the Battle analysis worksheet. The aim of the battle analysis is twofold: students will be introduced to the battles themselves, and they will be encouraged to look for bias and unfounded claims about the creation of a nation through battle:
Account of Ypres in the textbook (pg. 37). Account of Somme in the textbook (pg. 38) Account of Vimy Ridge in the textbook (pg. 38) Account of Passchendaele in the textbook (pg. 39) Primary Account of Somme and Vimy Ridge: Letter home from hospital (with

questions)

Account of Vimy Ridge from historian Will Ferguson, with quote from veteran.

After the six groups have met, they will break up and meet with members from other groups to share what they have learned. Everyone will ll out the Battle Analysis worksheet.
5.

(10 minutes) Teacher-led class debrief: This is a good opportunity to discuss what students found, to reinforce what they have learned, and to ask some probing questions about the conclusions that they came to. The aim is not to simply shoot down the notion that Vimy Ridge created a Canadian identity, but to examine the fact that the idea is out there, and ask why it is.

DURATION: 75 MINUTES

PAGE 2 OF 3

SOCIAL STUDIES 11

WORLD WAR I

6.

(5 minutes) Exit slip: Do we tend to create myths around war and battles? Why?
The aim is to add some closure to the lesson and to have students reect on the moral

dimensions of history; if the war was unnecessary (see lesson 2), why do we ascribe meaning to the battles?

PAGE 3 OF 3

DURATION: 75 MINUTES