You are on page 1of 30

The Boston Harbor Association Strategic Plan 2008 2011

Developed in Partnership with Management Consulting Services May, 2008

Table of Contents - "Vital"..........................................................................................................................................16 and Economically Significant"......................................................................................................16

I.

Executive Summary

The Boston Harbor Association (TBHA) conducted a strategic planning process between March and November 2007, with assistance from Management Consulting Services. The underlying impetus for the process was the general knowledge that several long-term organizational goals such as the Boston Harbor clean up and establishment/preservation of public access during a period of significant growth on the edge of the inner most Harbor, had been achieved. This success led to new questions regarding the organizations public identity, future scope of work, funding opportunities, and basic organizational focus. TBHA operates in a complex environment, yet is poised through its stellar reputation and superior efforts on behalf of the Harbor to take leadership on a number of important new issues related to the Harbor. In order to take that leadership position, The Boston Harbor Association needs a strategic approach which responds directly to the organizational challenges TBHA faces. The strategic planning process dealt directly with this need by defining an overarching strategic position for the Association, that of the Harbor expert. This strategic position capitalizes on both the needs of the Harbor region and the capacity of the organization. Although this position derives from the current strength of the organization, it also reflects an awareness of some critical challenges to TBHA, most notably on matters related to historic revenue sources, governance and staffing strategies. The strategic planning document which emerged, details strategies and activities deemed necessary for the success of the organizational vision over the next three years. The planning process for defining this expert position, and the steps necessary to achieve it centered on three major activities: a situational analysis which was conducted through stakeholder interviews, a competitive scan and an organizational analysis which centered on finances over a ten year period, staffing configuration(s) and program-related activities. An assessment of the Associations current identity and mission against the desired strategic position as expert. The identification of broad goals and specific objectives for governance, fundraising, membership and programming, marketing, and policy issue selection that will also serve as barometers for organizational success in achieving the mission.

The TBHA Board made a number of important decisions through the planning process: Mission and Organizational Identity The mission and the tag line of the Association should reflect the Associations current work, identity, and the broad array of issues beyond development on the Harbors edge. The mission reflects a recommitment that emphasizes the Associations balanced perspective on the value of the Harbor as a fundamental asset to the regions economic and environmental health. The Boston Harbor Association will conduct activities that conform to and complement its organizational vision to be the expert on the sustainable Harbor, its use and its environs.

Organizational Strategies The Association will continue as a stand-alone entity but because of its big picture, balanced approach will be a proactive partner to other organizations which may be more limited in their approach to Harbor related issues. The Associations organizational growth will continue to be issues based not geographic. This approach provides an organizational identity which recognizes the regional aspects of the Harbor as an asset, without an organizational commitment to opening additional offices. A revenue diversification plan will include the pursuit of philanthropic foundation dollars and individual giving beyond the annual auction. The use of public processes (testimony, comment letters, opinion pieces and task forces) will remain critical to reinforce the Associations expert status to both respond to the ideal of a balanced Harbor as well as to raise general awareness of the value of the Harbor. The value of this tactic will be enhanced by non-governance mechanisms for broadening and cultivating new generations of Harbor supporters (e.g. advisory board, membership expansion).

Additional strategies will include programming activities consistent with grant-related funding, however these programs and activities will not become ends rather these activities will be used to promote the work of the Association, to broaden awareness of the Harbor, and to promote civic engagement and environmental stewardship, including by youth.

Like any strategic planning document this is a guide for the organization over a period of time; it is based on certain assumptions, facts and external dynamics that were relevant at a particular time but which may also change. The ongoing value of the document is as a tool for the Board and staff of TBHA to consider the best use of resources when responding to opportunities and challenges.

II. 1.

Strategic Plan Process and Analysis Planning Process

The strategic planning process was a multi-phase process that included background research and stakeholder surveys, financial and situational analysis, a series of facilitated board level planning sessions, and ongoing meetings and communication between staff and consultants. The research phase included 35 separate interviews with Board members and other interested parties, including public officials. An electronic survey of membership was conducted but notably, there was little response due to low number of email addresses in the database. Significant research was also conducted regarding the status of a variety of issues relevant to Boston Harbor and to harbor areas in general. Representatives from other Designated Port Areas Gloucester and Baltimore--were also interviewed. Additional data included a retrospective budget analysis (ten years), budgetary and mission-related data from organizations identified as competitors as well as observations and commentary from the consultants. The information, data and commentary from this process were then presented to a group of Board members and the Executive Director on seven separate occasions (two updates at Board meetings and five strategic planning sessions). The intention was to provide the working group with a framework for thinking about the organizations strategic direction for the near future. Each individual presentation was further shaped by information and data from a traditional SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) approach and within the context of the Associations unique organizational development trajectory. 2. Organizational and Situational Context

The Boston Harbor Association (TBHA) was founded in 1973 by the League of Woman Voters and the Boston Shipping Association. Its founding was and remains a unique collaboration between the civic minded and the commercial sectors in Boston. The work of the Association was deemed exceptional by all of those interviewed; however the interviews also revealed some organizational identity challenges. For example, some Board members believed that the Association should do more programming activities, such as the Harborwalk tours; some believed that the organization should expand geographically. Those outside the Association did not see TBHA as a programmatic model, rather as a commercial interest group and still others believed that it should merge with other nonprofits operating in a similar space.

From an organizational development perspective, there were other issues, most notably the dependence on the annual auction and the centrality of the Executive Director to the Associations day-to-day work and overall organizational identity. These two issues, particularly within an organization of 34 years, where a natural assumption would be a deeper infrastructure, raised standard organizational development concerns regarding the Associations long-term viability.1 The consultant was also concerned that the emergence of other advocacy groups on matters related to the Harbor and the waterfront area in general would compromise the Associations status by capturing certain issues and forcing the TBHA into a narrow and decidedly commercial identity. The Association had done a good job of balancing the civic and commercial sector vision that its founders had imagined, but the changing times raised new issues about how that could be done going forward. There was also concern that all the attention focused on the development of the inner Harbor area that borders Boston proper would over shadow the inherent regional nature of the Harbor as an asset. In summary, the organizational issues which prompted this process were based on the Associations success; however there were and remain larger internal and external factors which the Association needs to consider in order to remain successful. These issues are: competition on the public access and harbor/environmental issues leading to potential program redundancy among the myriad of nonprofit groups laying stake to the tremendous asset of the Harbor as a destination point; a generally competitive environment for all small nonprofits, particularly those that derive significant revenue from events, and a Board profile that has made it difficult to raise foundation dollars because it appears to represent a small and commercial constituency.

These changing times also include real opportunity for the Association as well. The renaissance that had occurred on the Inner Harbor and the intentional direction that policy makers, planners and others have made to look to the Harbor as a defining characteristic for the City would lead to a Boston Harbor association if the current Association did not exist.

The viability question is complex because of course the commercial interests would find a way to preserve the organization; but the reality is that there is too much dependence on both the annual auction and the Executive Director.

Of all of the internal and external factors the Association needed to consider, the fundamental strategic challenge for the Association was its identity. What should the Association look like now that the Harbor was clean and the Harborwalk a reality? Thoughtful discussions occurred about the organizations identity and they were framed by such questions as: Was the new work of the Association to develop additional programming and activities to promote public access broadening its identity and visibility? If so, how did this type of activity relate to the mission of preserving and supporting Boston Harbor and the working port? Should the organization continue its current work, but grow the organization by branching out geographically? If the working port remains a primary focus, how can the Association broaden its public support?

The organizational and situational context for TBHA was not unique, but reflective of a predictable trajectory of issues and challenges that healthy organizations commit to deal with openly and strategically, which is what occurred throughout the strategic planning process. 3. Financial Analysis

Although the Association is small, it has successfully managed to live within budget and maintained financial stability over the last 15 years. Its budget is comparatively smaller than some of its sister organizations, due in part to its success in securing in-kind contributions, such as free office space for the past twenty years , pro bono counsel for the past two decades , and a free first-class waterfront venue and donated buffet for its annual fundraiser. Figures 1 and 2 on page 6 provide revenue and expense comparisons (Note: 2003 total revenues for Island Alliance includes a one-time environmental mitigation contribution provided by an energy facility). Such a disparity may say more about the size of the niche that TBHA operates in rather than a disparity in the effectiveness of the organization. For example, Save the Harbor/Save the Bay does considerably more programmatic work in terms of youth tours, etc., while TBHA focuses more on public policy which facilitates access and programs on the Harbor and its edge. Such a public policy focus may in fact require less staff resources.

Total Revenues
7000000 6000000 5000000 4000000 3000000 2000000 1000000 0
s s s s ue ue ue ue R ev en R ev en Re ve n R ev en R ev en ue s

The Boston Harbor Association Charles River Conservancy Charles River Watershed Association Esplanade Association Island Alliance Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay

al

al

al

al to t 04 20 05

to t

to t

to t

02

01

20

20

03

20

20

Figure 1: Revenue Comparison

Total Expense Comparison


3000000 2500000 2000000 1500000 1000000 500000 0
ns es ns es ns es ns es ex pe ex pe ex pe ex pe ex pe ns es

to t

al

The Boston Harbor Association Charles River Conservancy Charles River Watershed Association Esplanade Association Island Alliance Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay

al

al

al

al to t 4 20 0 5

to t

to t

to t

01

20 0

20 0

20 0

20

Figure 2: Expense Comparison

to t

al

The current, relatively small operating budget presents opportunities for growth to further enhance TBHAs programs. Increased budget size for functions such as marketing and fundraising would increase organizational capabilities while allowing the Executive Director to focus on policy development and new programs. Figure 3 details the expenditure on organizational capacity of TBHA and other harbor-related organizations.

Comparison of Other Expenses (Mgmt., General, Fundraising, etc.)


800000 700000 600000 500000 400000 300000 200000 100000 0
ot he 20 re 02 xp en ot he se 20 re s 03 xp en ot he se 20 re s 04 xp en ot he se 20 re s 05 xp en ot he se re s xp en se s

The Boston Harbor Association Island Alliance Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay

20

01

Figure 3: Capacity Expense Comparison

As shown on Figure 4, TBHA is outperforming others in terms of membership revenue. The 1050+ membership base is important for an expert organization in order to demonstrate a constituency to funders and policy makers.

Comparison of Membership Revenue


90000 80000 70000 60000 50000 40000 30000 20000 10000 0
re ve nu e re ve nu e re ve nu e re ve nu e re ve nu e

The Boston Harbor Association Save the Harbor/ Save the Bay

be rs hi p

be rs hi p

be rs hi p

be rs hi p 20 05

m em

m em

m em

m em

20 01

20 02

20 03

Figure 4: Membership Revenue

4. SWOT Analysis The desired strategic position of expert is consistent with much of TBHAs current position; however, this current position is a factor of a decade of very specific activities geared to promoting a cleaner Boston Harbor and increased public access, as opposed to an intentional strategy to be the expert on Boston Harbor. The SWOT Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) sets the stage for the actual strategies and activities TBHA will need to formally claim this position. Strengths Vivien Li TBHA Board of Trustees with institutional knowledge and who are considered experts History of success Financially stable High profile organization Reputation as sophisticated and visionary Governance structure which complements the work to date

20 04

m em

be rs hi p

Focused activities serve to preserve organizational nimbleness Weaknesses Over reliance on Vivien Li Finances too dependent on annual auction No significant recent history of philanthropic funding or individual donor base Havent identified next generation of Board members and corporate supporters Lack of an effective data base infrastructure and membership recruitment and renewal program Board composition is necessary to mission objectives, but limits organizational identity Very limited staff resources, which means Executive Director spends time on non-expert activities Threats There is little to no staff institutional history besides Vivien Li The competition for event based funding is intense and will become more so There are at least 15 organizations working in and around Harbor and tributary issues, and while most are smaller, they do claim issues and resources that could be available to TBHA Other Harbor related organizations want to own the environmental issue and could box in TBHA The demographics of Boston are changing out of state corporations with less attention for local issues and surging numbers of immigrants require that TBHA identify ways to broaden its support Opportunities The success of the last ten years has created a brand

The intense level of business and residential related activity that will occur in the new waterfront neighborhoods provide a new range of possible donors, partners and potential owners of Harborwalk maintenance This business activity and the residential growth will create new demands, transportation chief among them that will provide TBHA with a range of issues to take on as the expert in the Harbor area TBHA has higher membership revenues than other Harbor organizations such as Save the Harbor; this provides a great start to using membership as a strategic tool for cultivating public support and making the TBHA websites and TBHA social networking websites destination sites for information and information sharing, further enhancing the expert identity A tipping point phenomenon is occurring on the issues of sustainability and corporate responsibility, issues which are exemplified by the work of the Association over the last ten years this gives TBHA a new vocabulary for engaging new partners not to mention leapfrogging the competition.

III. 1.

Findings and Conclusions Strategic Positioning Mission and Tag Line

A fundamental step in developing a strategic plan is the identification of a strategic position. The strategic position captures the way in which the organization wants to be perceived and what niche the organization holds vis--vis the competition. The process includes a review of mission, organizational vision and then a realistic scan as to where the organization actually operates today in relation to the desired position. In order to arrive at a strategic position, TBHA reviewed its mission, tag line and underlying operating principles. The overwhelming response to the question of mission was to adjust the original mission: Original Mission An association of corporations, individuals and organizational members allied to enable balanced environmentally sensitive, accessible development. New Mission An association of individuals, corporations and organizational members allied to enable a clean, vital and accessible Boston Harbor and to promote understanding of its relationship to the region. The language of the original mission was changed to broaden the Associations focus on development and capture the wide array of issues it encompasses. This shift recognizes that the majority of development on the Harbors edge is permitted and/or complete, and that new issues such as water transportation and climate change are emerging. This shift has implications for governance in that new issues will require new expertise and guidance. While the existing tag line reflects a key ongoing value of the Association balanced use - the word vital was selected over alive because it was deemed to capture the full range of how central the Harbor is to the economic well-being of the region. Original Tag Line For a clean, alive and accessible Boston Harbor New Tag Line For a clean, vital and accessible Boston Harbor

Together, the new mission and tag line set the parameters for the Association to work towards a strategic position as expert on the economic, environmental and public access matters related to the Harbor. Rationale for Strategic Position The Boston Harbor Association will continue to be the expert on Harbor related issues. This expert identity will include the economic, environmental and public benefit implications of the use of the Harbor; the use of the water sheet, development on the Harbors edge and activities within Harbor areas. The expert perch is not a new attribute for the Association; however, a long-term strategic and tactical plan to intentionally be the expert is a new way of thinking about the work of the organization. This expert identity is more than a desired position; it is a realistic, achievable objective that is exceptionally responsive to known trends, needs and external factors identified in the environmental scan as well as to specific internal or organizational matters that must be addressed. These include: The return to the Harbor theme that has permeated the vision of and for the Citye.g., the Crossroads initiative, the Seaport District, and the Fort Point Channel area as a 24/7 neighborhood The importance of the Harbor and the Working Port to the City in particular and to the regions economy requires an entity which has the capacity and standing to represent a wide constituency. The potential to significantly distinguish TBHA from other Harbor related organizations is critical to its ability to raise money because the expert can capture and own the balanced approach (working port, sustainable port, public access).

Public Access "Accessible"

Working Port "Vital" - "Alive"

Sustainability and Economically Significant" - "Clean"


Figure 5: The Expert Model - A Balanced View

This distinguishing characteristic also capitalizes on the emerging sustainability zeitgeist, with the Harbor area as a prime example of how to incorporate sustainability practices, including both economic and environmentally sustainable measures. This connection with sustainable practices will be significant to a range of funders. The expert identity is already an attribute of the Executive Director and TBHAs Board of Trustees, so as an intentional strategy to organizing future activities, it builds on strength and is not a stretch for the organization. As an organizational model the expert model provides for multiple funding options and does not require significant infrastructure that needs to be maintained. For example, the expert performs activities such as convening and issuing reports, activities which are episodic and can be activated when funding is available, or be contracted out. This is in contrast to a programmatic identity, which can be compromised if there is insufficient funding for programs. 3. Organization Implications for New Strategic Position

The Association is a unique and important organization. Its work to preserve the working port, improve water quality in the Boston Harbor, maintain environmental integrity, and promote public access have contributed to an extraordinary renaissance in the Harbor area. The Association faces two sets of entwined challenges, those that are typical organizational development issues common to smaller nonprofits such as: need to encourage revenue diversification, broaden leadership at the staff and trustee levels, and continue to demonstrate relevance, core competencies and unique niche relationship in a crowded field.

and those which are idiosyncratic to the way in which the Association has evolved and responded to external factors, including: : the need to establish new relevance in the inner Harbor where the bulk of the Associations public identity rests, now that the main activities of improving water quality and promoting public access have seen significant progress but much still remains to be done and monitored over time; how best to position the Association to extend and create relevance on broader issues such as water transportation and sustainable green waterfront development; how best to capture the regional nature of the Harbor asset, particularly given the obvious focus on Boston proper, and the need to build an organizational infrastructure that supports an expert identity. There are a number of ways in which the Association can move into this position. In order to help focus how the Association thinks about which strategies and tactics to pursue, the following set of principles was developed. These Underlying Principles provide the Association with a conceptual framework for decision-making. Underlying Principles The strong representation of commercial, harbor, community, and government interests on the Board and amongst the membership is consistent with TBHAs mission and should continue. However, the Association will be intentional in its pursuit of new Board members

who represent the diverse constituencies and users of the Harbor and strive for a balanced governance structure which represents the wide range of Harbor stakeholders. TBHA will strategically address development and infrastructure issues which extend to Mass Bay, Outer Harbor, Inner Harbor, and its tributaries and engage on all issues which affect the sustainability of Boston Harbor, regardless of geography. TBHA will grow in a financially sustainable manner through decreased reliance on the annual auction and increase solicitation of more project-based funding for expert related activities such as convening and preparing white papers. TBHA will provide programming activity that is strategic to its expert status, raises public awareness, and/or promotes civic engagement. TBHA will collaborate with other organizations and institutions on programming and activities which meet these principles.

IV.

Strategic Goals, and Objectives

The analysis, related data, and implications based on new strategic position lead to the emergence of two overarching strategic themes about how the Association will be known (strategic position) and how this position will be achieved (strategic plan) . Those strategic themes are: the expert on a sustainable Boston Harbor which embraces both environmental and economic factors, and TBHA will be a collaborative and proactive partner with other nonprofits and institutions, the business community and the general public on matters which relate to sustainable practices in, on and around Boston Harbor and the working port. These strategic themes have implications in five broad operational areas listed below. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Fundraising Governance Issues Constituency Building Marketing and Greater Visibility and Public Understanding of Boston Harbor Issues

Each operational area contains strategic goals, specific objectives, a rationale for why the organization is pursuing such goals, and a prioritized list of activities to achieve the desired strategic objective. High priority activities will be achieved within six to twelve months following adoption of the strategic plan, with low priority activities to be completed within three years.

1. Fundraising Strategic Goal Strategic Objectives

Diversify and expand funding base Grow annual budget to 500K by 2012 Broaden public support for the mission of TBHA

Rationale

While the annual auction serves the organization well as a means to raise the profile of the organization and as a source for unrestricted dollars, TBHA will decrease its reliance on the auction as a percentage of the annual budget through project-based funding and expanded individual donor base . High Priority Lower Priority Hire a part time development person or consultant Create a development plan that includes individual giving and grant support Establish a minimum, sliding scale contribution from corporate Board Members Define and implement a membership fundraising program Create corporate scholarship model to provide educational and training opportunities for area youth

Activities

Medium Priority

2. Governance Strategic Goal Strategic Objectives

Maintain an effective and representative Board. Create mechanisms which extend the influence of the governing board Demonstrate representative and balanced decision making to policy makers and funders Insure the fiscal stability and mission integrity of the organization

Rationale

The strong representation of commercial interests on the Board is consistent with the organizations mission, but the board also needs to reflect the diverse constituencies in the Harbor area to a greater degree. High Priority Medium Priority Maintain at least one board seat for a resident of the Harbor neighborhood and one for a maritime worker. Seek board members in the 25-40 year old range. Establish functioning subcommittees of the Board, including a development sub-committee. Examine schedule and duties of Executive Committee.

Activities

Establish an honorary board. Convene expert professional advisory boards as needed .

Lower Priority Establish a Youth Council (under 21) that meets at least annually and commits to volunteer regularly

3. Issues Strategic Goal Strategic Objectives Rationale

Preserve and support a sustainable Boston Harbor and port Raise awareness of the vitality and the economic, environmental, and cultural value of Boston Harbor to the region. TBHA will continue and broaden its current expert approach to policy development and infrastructure issues in the Inner Harbor, Outer Harbor, and tributaries, and will strategically engage on all issues which affect the sustainability of the working port and the waterfront. Given the changes that TBHA has helped to shepherd on the Harbor, the organization will continue to be an active, prominent voice on land use matters in the waterfront neighborhoods and will have as a major focus water transportation of people and goods. High Priority Consistent with TBHAs expert status, convene and collaborate on annual forums, white papers, and/or annual scheduled luncheon briefings to staff of relevant legislative committees on issues such as : Working Port and Designated Port Areas; Vitality of Boston Harbor, including public access and economic development; Environmental quality and sustainability; and Water Transportation of people and goods. In conjunction with another expert organization, convene a symposium on the potential effects of climate change to Boston Harbor.. Conduct a campaign in conjunction with others to assign portions of the Harborwalk upkeep to commercial property owners, condominium associations, and neighborhood associations. Monitor and report on the new drainage system in the 100 acres Fort Point Channel area.

Activities

Medium Priority

Lower Priority

Remain an active participant in connecting the Emerald and Sapphire Necklaces and the Rose Kennedy Greenway with the waterfront in an effort to increase public awareness of Boston Harbor. Create a safe Harbor as a convener for issues which may create conflict in the new neighborhood e.g., the design and maintenance of new parks and general streetscapes.

4. Constituency Building Strategic Goal Build the case that TBHA is the place for civic engagement on Harbor related matters Strategic Objectives Develop programming that will broaden support for Boston Harbor Create active linkages to a wide and diverse constituency Create mechanisms for reaching younger audiences. TBHA will only provide programming activity that is strategic to its expert status or its need to raise public awareness, increase membership, or promote civic engagement. The organization will not create programming that requires ongoing fund raising or which cannot be easily managed by volunteers. As the central node on the network of organizations and individuals concerned with the Harbor, TBHA will continue to promote other Harbor related programming on its web site and collaborate with other organizations on programming which meets its goals. High Priority Build in follow-up mechanisms for program participants to capture their sense of the experience and to keep them engaged with TBHA Conduct surveys of membership on matters related to the Harbor and use the information to craft opinion pieces that demonstrate the Associations finger on the pulse Send email alerts, when strategic, to encourage members to promote or support specific issues and alert members to TBHA in the news Continue to involve members and stakeholders in order to promote and support TBHAs goals on Harbor-related matters. Incorporate a sustainability theme and promote

Rationale

Activities

Medium

Priority

environmental stewardship in public education and volunteer efforts Incorporate new technologies (Web 2.0) in an effort to reach a broader constituency Convene a Boston Harbor Charrette in two years. Engage young people with TBHA, potentially through a Young Professionals group, including social, fundraising, and educational activities. Create opportunities for greater youth participation in Boston Harbor issues, including such communities as Everett, Chelsea, Boston, and Quincy.

Lower Priority

5. Marketing and Greater Visibility and Public Understanding of Boston Harbor Issues Strategic Goal Greater recognition of TBHAs expert status on Harbor issues related to environmental and economic sustainability, public access, and water transportation of people and goods Strategic Objectives Leverage status of Executive Director and Board of Trustees to promote the organizations expert role Leverage organizational network that Board represents to create positive media coverage of TBHA and its partners Distinguish TBHA from other Harbor organizations in the public eye. Rationale Local media currently looks to TBHA as source of expertise on Harbor related development projects, a fact which affirms its strategic position, but TBHA needs to both broaden and deepen its ownership especially on environmental and public access issues with the general public. Activities High Priority Medium Priority Develop marketing and outreach plan, including use of Web 2.0 technology, with flexibility to respond to issues as they arise. Collaborate with other groups on Boston Harbor issues. Craft a staged public relations effort to raise the issue of water transportation and the need for infra structure investment Utilize and update new technologies, including social networking websites, to increase public understanding and involvement in Boston Harbor issues. Seek a board member with marketing expertise to assist TBHA in increasing its visibility on Boston Harbor issues and in fostering a greater public understanding and support of harbor issues.

Lower Priority

Section V.

Organizational Milestones

The timeline for the activities associated with the strategic plan vary and are best set by the Executive Director; however the activities and strategies identified in the body of this report should yield the following accomplishments over time:

Expert Identity Year 1 Accomplishme nts Utilize existing trustees to assist in white papers and/or legislative briefings, and determine appropriate staffing needs to reinforce expert status.

Diversified Infrastructure Part-time staff or consultant is hired and creates plan that decreases reliance on annual auction

Broader Support Board seats are designated for at least one Harbor area resident and one maritime worker. Encourage board members in the 2540 year old range.

Institute trustees Development sub-committee. Potential trustees with desired expertise, governance, and/or fundraising experience are identified, cultivated, and asked to join the Board at the appropriate time. Development sub-committee actively works with staff on broader funding opportunities Young people participating in TBHA programs and/or student interns provide input and suggestions to trustees and staff on programs and outreach There is an annual increase of 5% in the general membership category and a 70% retention rate.

Year 2 Accomplishme nts

A Boston Harbor charrette is convened and a report produced which sets the agenda for the Harbor TBHA partners with other institutions or non-profits to host a regional forum.

Year 3 Accomplishme nts

The organizational budget reaches 500 K, with more than 50% from non auction sources.

Appendix A: List of Interviewees


Board and Staff Rick Dimino Jamie Fay Robert Kenney Vivien Li Katie Mastriani Alden Raine Darnell Williams Funders Ashley Lanfer Strategic Grant Partners Milton Little CEO, United Way Geeta Pradhan The Boston Foundation Robert Pratt Kendall Foundation Mariella Tan Puerto Barr Foundation Prentiss Zinn Grants Management Associates Government Richard Armstrong Executive Secretary, Seaport Commission Ian Bowles Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Bill Lear Port of Maryland Wyndom Lewis Chief of Staff, Office of Economic Development Meg Lusardi Chief Analyst, Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources Brad Swing Office of the Mayor, City of Boston Environmental Barbara Bathshalom Executive Director, Green Roundtable Roseanne Bongiovanni

Director, Chelsea Green Space Alliance Fara Courtney Good Harbor Consulting Paul Lipke Executive Director, Sustainable Step New England Dan Sosland, Executive Director Sam Krasnow, Staff Attorney Environment Northeast Thaleia Schlesinger Board Member Conservation Law Foundation Carol Wasserman, Esq. ESS Group (also Port of Fall River) Jack Wiggin Executive Director, Urban Harbors Institute at UMASS Civic Perspectives Abdul Kadir Hussein Executive Director, East African Alliance Gloria Larson Partner, Foley Hoag Paul Levy CEO Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Jerri Robinson Vice President, Boston Childrens Museum Marie St Fleur State Representative