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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

1.0 Self-directed learning describes a process by which individuals take the initiative, with our
without the assistance of others, in diagnosing their learning needs, formulating learning goals, identify human and material resources for learning, choosing and implement appropriate learning strategies, and evaluating learning outcomes Reference Author Gower Publishing Name of page Self Managed Learning in Action Name of website Self Managed Learning in Action: Putting Sml Into Practice (Google eBook) http://smallbusiness.chron.com/examples-code-ethics-business-4885.html

Approaches to self-managed learning


There may be variety of approaches but im explaining the major technical four approaches to learning, and that often people go through these approaches in stages Dependent In this mode learners may be highly passive, expecting others to teach them everything without them needing to take their own initiatives. Learners may also absorb uncritically what others tell them. This mode can be characterized by laziness and procrastination. It is clearly seen by some as a product of experiences in education. Counter dependent This mode is associated with rebelliousness, a rejection of new ideas, antiauthority behaviors and high levels of criticism of anyone in a teaching role. Counter dependence is also associated with learners playing down the need to learn, not listening to others and often a tendency to passive-aggressive behavioral patterns. A simple way of characterizing it is to compare it with the teenager who says Im not influenced by my parents; I just do the opposite of what they say! Many trainers and developers would recognize both patterns of behavior. Often individuals can flip between these so that they oscillate between dependence and counter dependence. One reason for this is that neither pattern is showing autonomy or independence in learning. Independent In this mode learners are prepared to learn for themselves. They take initiatives, actively seek learning experiences, enjoy the pressure to perform well and welcome feedback on their work. This mode is one that organizations say they increasingly need and it is associated with a more entrepreneurial and empowered style of working. The danger is that an overemphasis on independence can lead to a selfish self centredness. Therefore this mode needs balancing with the next one. Interdependence Interdependent learners are keen to learn from others, to support others in their learning, to share their own learning and to collaborate in teams. They listen to others, question others to find out new ideas and information and they enjoy engaging in dialogue with a wide range of people. They characterize the best of a learning organization approach. In reality the last two modes are also a balanced pair like the first two. Independence and interdependence at best go together. The person who can stand on their own feet and look after themselves is also going to find it easier to be open and sharing with others (since they dont see others as a threat or challenge). So the distinctions are ultimately not showing two separate personalities. Organizations need people who can balance independence and interdependence. Other Approaches can be personal preferences; activist; pragmatist; theorist; reflector, eg reflexivemodernisation theory; Kolbs learning cycle (Dawes, March 2008)

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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

2.0 Self-directed learning comes naturally. An infant is a self-directed learner, choosing the
timing and the direction of his or her learning. Institutional learninginitiated and governed by a teacher or some other governing boardis more unnatural. Instead of recognizing that each learner is an individual, with varying interests, backgrounds, and skills, institutions prepackage instruction by any number of categories: by subject, by the age or the gender of the learner, by disciplinary boundaries, and so on. The result of teacher-directed learning is often students that are dependent on outside factors to initiate or motivate learning. 3.0which competencies are necessary for success in our organization can help us do the following: Ensure that people demonstrate sufficient expertise. Recruit and select new staff more effectively. Evaluate performance more effectively. Identify skill and competency gaps more efficiently. Provide more customized training and professional development. Plan sufficiently for succession. Make change management processes work more efficiently. A competency framework defines the knowledge, skills, and attributes needed for people within an organization. Each individual role will have its own set of competencies needed to perform the job effectively. To develop this framework, our need to have an in-depth understanding of the roles within our business. To do this, we can take a few different approaches: Use a pre-set list of common, standard competencies, and then customize it to the specific needs of our organization. Use outside consultants to develop the framework for us. Create a general organizational framework, and use it as the basis for other frameworks as needed. Developing a competency framework can take considerable effort. To make sure the framework is actually used as needed, it's important to make it relevant to the people who'll be using it and so they can take ownership of it. The following three principles are critical when designing a competency framework: Involve the people doing the work: These frameworks should not be developed solely by HR people, who don't always know what each job actually involves Communicate: People tend to get nervous about performance issues. Let them know why we're developing the framework, how it will be created, and how we'll use it. The more our communicate in advance, the easier implementation will be Use relevant competencies: Ensure that the competencies our include apply to all roles covered by the framework. If we include irrelevant competencies, people will probably have a hard time relating to the framework in general. (Developing a Competency Framework, n.d.) 4.0 An Individual Development Plan: A clear statement of an employee's career goals, A map for attaining goals that specifies immediate and long-range developmental needs,

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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

An individually-tailored action plan to develop specific competencies (knowledge and skills) needed to improve performance in present position or to prepare for new responsibilities, A written plan for scheduling and managing an employee's development, A tool for a supervisor to estimate resources needed for employee development training, An agreement between the employee and supervisor based on funds available to meet the employee's and the organization's goals and A tool for an organization to develop its workforce to meet future needs.

The Following Appraisal can define our Current and Future Development needs The following appraisal, to think about our personal way forward. Here are some key questions to consider: What are your personal strengths, weaknesses, opportunities or threats, and what are your "core competencies"? What are you capable of achieving if you put your mind to it? What are the "big picture" trends in your environment? How can you monitor or adapt to these external factors? Who are the people who are important to your success (your stakeholders)? What options do you have? Which of these should you consider?

(Heaven, n.d.)

5.0 This personal development plan sample uses a simple but powerful tool Below with
Diagram explained the process and activities required to implement the development plan

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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

VISION: Key coaching issue in this part of the personal development plan sample: create the new future first in the imagination; make it vivid and real; bring it to life in the here and now STRATEGY: Personal development plan sample key coaching issue: be completely clear about the means to get from the current post to the future you've just imagined. LEADERSHIP: Key coaching issue: Are you clear that you have the personal resilience to continue to lead yourself and your family through what might be a stressful time? TEAMWORK: Personal development plan sample key coaching issue: Have you made sure that everyone you need to be pulling with you knows what they can do? PROCESSES: Key coaching issue: Have you set up routines and systems to ensure that basic, repetitive tasks are taken care of? MEASURES: Personal development plan sample key coaching issue: are you closing in on your target? How do you know?

6.0 VISION
Questions focus on checking that we create a powerful experience of the new career as if it were happening in the room right now. How clearly do you imagine your new future? Can you experience it as if you are there? Can you see yourself in your new career?

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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006


HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

Describe the journey to work. How do you get there? How do you feel as you travel to work? Describe a day at work Tell me about the conversations you have at work Who are you working with? What kinds of challenges do you face? How do you feel at the end of the day? What causes you to feel that way? In face-to-face, on-line or telephone working, my questions / prompts are guided by the dialogue, the story that is emerging about this aspect of the change ...... and that's true for all the following sections.

STRATEGY
Where does the path to your new job start? Can you find your starting point? What action steps do you need to take: to initiate the process? to maintain it? as you close in on your target? What do you need to know? Do you need new information? How will you create opportunities: job ads, your network, speculative inquiries? Do you need new skills? Can you write an excellent cv / resume? How up to date is your cv / resume? Are you ready to grab an opportunity? Do you know how to tune a cv / resume for different opportunities? Can you write competency statements, describe achievements, tell 'point-reasonevidence-point' stories? When were you last interviewed? Would you like to rehearse some difficult questions? Any barriers? Internal? Anxieties and fears? External? Lack of opportunities? Do you have all the market intelligence you need?

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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

LEADERSHIP: Questions and prompts focus on the ability to bounce back, maintain focus,
keep a balanced perspective, maintain health and vitality, pacing.

TEAMWORK: If you've left or are leaving work, your team is your immediate family,
friends, neighbors, fellow members of sports clubs, faith and community organizations and other social groups. A great place to practice telling your career change story, especially if you've been through a job loss with closure or downsizing. As you talk about your situation and need for help, you check in with yourself about your mood, level of optimism and so on ... great practice for interview!

PROCESSES:
Timetables for follow first and follow up letters Papers and professional magazines delivered Diary time to make/return calls Ensure family (especially sleepy or worse, grunting teens!) take phone messages Systematic records of jobs, letters, responses Organize files of similar letters and updated, 'tweaked' cvs /resumes on the hard drive

6.6 MEASURES:
Number of speculative letters or cv / resumes 'out there' Number of unsolicited offers of leads from your network Ratio of applications made to interview offers received

(Learning and teaching, n.d.) 7.0 To provide the best solution it depends on the circumstances, two models can be applied for
good solution to work based problems and communicates in variety of style these are SMART OBJETIVES and SWOT analysis This is where S.M.A.R.T. comes in solutions to work based problems and goal-setting effectively to work towards meeting or exceeding the objective. It sounds quite simple, but using S.M.A.R.T. forces you to think broader and effectively ask the right questions that will later turn into result-driven action items.

be S.M.A.R.T when planning or goal setting at any level


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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

Specific: For example, a quality problem identified with poor performance coming from a
factory abroad isnt solved by simply acknowledging there is some problem and then throwing different solutions at it to see if things get better. By starting out specific, you lay out a roadmap for resolution. In order to be specific, data collection is often required. Measurable: Part of being specific is to help identify what metrics can be employed so that theres reliable and valid data available to determine progress and further action. In the example above, use the trends identified to place values on improvement.

Attainable (Achievable): Can the quality issue here be resolved? How can the goal be
accomplished? Is that achievable based on the data gathered? It may turn out the problem has a deeper root-cause, such as issues at the factory management level or raw material supplier inconsistency

Realistic (Relevant): Is it realistic to focus on the actual quality defects noted or the process
creating the defects? Is it something that fits in with the existing goals of the organization? Based on the information gathered, is it realistic to believe the problem can be resolved to an acceptable degree?

Timely (Or Tangible): Especially when youre dealing with issues that affect customers,
timeliness is critical. Gantt charts are excellent for determining the time requirements of a specific issue. Using measurements as checkpoints often ensures timely execution.

8.0 The term Time Management is a misnomer. You cannot manage time; you manage the
events in your life in relation to time. You may often wish for more time but you only get 24 hours, 1,440 minutes or 86,400 seconds each day. How you use that time depends on skills learned through self-analysis, planning, evaluation, and self-control.

Set Priorities: Set Priorities One of the easiest ways to prioritize is to make a to do list.
Whether you need a daily, weekly or monthly list depends on your lifestyle. Just be careful not to allow the list-asking to get out of control and do not keep multiple lists at the same time. Rank the items on your to do list in order of priority (both important and urgent). You may choose to group items in categories such as high, medium and low, number them in order, or use a color coding ystem.

Use a Planning Tool: Time management experts recommend using a personal planning tool
to improve your ductility. Examples of personal planning tools include electronic planners, pocket diaries, calendars, computer programs, wall charts, index cards and notebooks.

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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

Schedule Your Time Appropriately: Even the busiest people find time for what they
want to do and feel is important. Scheduling is not just recording what you have to do (e.g., meetings and appointments), it is also making a time commitment to the things you want to do

References Reference Author Gower Publishing Name of page Self Managed Learning in Action Name of website Self Managed Learning in Action: Putting Sml Into Practice (Google eBook) http://smallbusiness.chron.com/examples-code-ethics-business-4885.html Oxford College of London
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Zeeshan Gull Rg no OXF 8006

HDA UNIT Unit 06 Task Work

(Self Managed Learning College, The South Downs Learning Centre, March 2008) (Developing a Competency Framework, n.d.) (Developing a Plan for Assessing Local Needs and Resources, n.d.) (Learning and teaching, n.d.)

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