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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 306
WILDFIRE GROWS
STATE PAGE 5
NINERS FALL
IN PRESEASON
SPORTS PAGE 11
GET READY FOR
OUTSIDE LANDS
WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FIRE DESTROYS AT LEAST 10
HOMES
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The California Department of
Education released the annual
Standardized Testing and
Reporting results yesterday,
showing dips in scores for the first
time since 2003.
Scores are based on California
Standards Tests given to students
in spring 2013.
San Mateo County scores also
dipped slightly but continued the
trend of remaining higher than the
state average. County education
officials contend it shows an over-
all positive trend here while
schools prep for new state curricu-
lum standards.
“Schools in San Mateo County,
as throughout the state, are in a
transitional period as they make
the shift to the Common Core
State Standards and prepare for a
new generation of assessments,”
Gary Waddell, deputy superintend-
ent of the San Mateo County
Office of Education, said in a press
release. “While transitional times
are difficult and sometimes come
with what is commonly referred to
as an ‘implementation dip,’ the
shift to more rigorous, interna-
tionally-benchmarked standards
that address students’ readiness for
college and career is a good thing
for our students.”
The California Standards Tests,
the major component of the STAR
program, were given to about 4.7
million students in grades two
through 11 in 2013. Statewide,
51.2 percent of students posted a
score of proficient and above in
mathematics, which was 0.3 of a
percentage point lower than last
year. In English-language arts,
School STAR scores tick down
County officials attribute STAR results decline to cuts, Common Core implementation
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Shakespeare in the Park is pre-
senting a free showing of
Macbeth, starting this weekend at
Sequoia High School in Redwood
City.
The play is part of San
Francisco Shakespeare Festival’s
31st year of production.
Emily Jordan plays Lady
Macbeth and said she has done
about 30 Shakespeare plays in
total. This is her fifth or sixth
play with the San Francisco
Shakespeare Festival. This is her
first performance in Macbeth.
“It’s very slick,” Jordan said.
“It’s been cut down to 100 min-
utes. It’s very fast moving and
violent. It’s pretty creepy and
scary, but we have had really good
reception so far. It’s hopefully
family friendly, as well as being
scary. It’s an absolute classic play
that cannot be seen too many
times.”
How did Jordan feel about play-
ing the part?
“Lady Macbeth is bad woman,”
Jordan said. “But it’s a really good
role.”
Meanwhile, Michael Ray
Free Shakespeare comes to Redwood City
Insanity plea
for doctor in
office arson
AP score invalidations
court date canceled
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A doctor who allegedly vandal-
ized and torched his San Carlos
electronic ciga-
rette business
multiple times
after a mental
breakdown in
December was
insane at the
time, according
to his defense
attorney.
Dr. Noah
Mark Minskoff, 34, of Palo Alto,
entered a plea yesterday of not
guilty by reason of insanity.
“We got reports from his treat-
ing psychiatrists that raised the
possibility and along with some
other things like the crimes as
they’re alleged involving weird
behavior about his own property, ”
said defense attorney Geoff Carr of
what sparked the secondary not
guilty plea.
The new plea vacated his Sept. 3
jury trial and requires two court-
appointed doctors to complete
evaluations of his mental state at
the time of the Dec. 15 and 17 inci-
dents. Regardless of the doctors’
findings, he will first be tried on
charges of arson, vandalism,
resisting arrest, possessing metal
knuckles and committing a new
offense while out of custody for the
earlier case. If convicted, he then
has a secondary trial on sanity.
Minskoff, who is also an ex-
Army ranger, is co-owner of
Thermo Essence Technologies in
San Carlos. Thermo Essence
Technologies is billed on its web-
site as providing “the most
Students protest legal proceedings
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The court hearing for the lawsuit
brought by the San Mateo Union
High School District over 641
invalidated Advanced Placement
test scores at Mills High School
was canceled yesterday due to con-
cerns by the College Board and
Educational Testing Service about
an unfair trial in California.
College Board and ETS requested
to move the case to federal court
over fear of bias against New York
corporations in a California court
of law.
“We believe that is where the
case belongs,” said Thomas
Ewing, director of external com-
munications for ETS. “As we have
indicated throughout this case, our
primary concern is ensuring that
the impacted students are able to
retest as soon as possible and earn
valid AP exam scores that can be
reported to colleges and universi-
ties. Because of the ongoing
ERIK OEVERNDIEK/DAILY JOURNAL
Charles Zhu, left, led a crowd of about 25 students in a chant to protest the College Board and to get the word
out about their invalidated AP scores yesterday at the county courthouse in Redwood City.
JOHN
WESTERN
Emily Jordan
plays Lady
Macbeth,
while Michael
Ray Wisely
plays
Macbeth in
the San
Francisco
Shakespeare
Festival.
See MILLS, Page 23
See STAR, Page 23
See PLAY, Page 22
Noah Minskoff
See MINSKOFF, Page 22
Mr. South San
Francisco, Joe Fernekes, dies
Joe Fernekes, the man referred to as
Mr. South San Francisco for his com-
munity service efforts, died from a
heart attack the week of Aug. 9, 2008
in Las Vegas. He was 58.
Fernekes was in Las Vegas for a
Sierra Point Credit Union Board of
Directors meeting
with his wife Denise
and her parents, Roy
and Rose Bava, when
he suffered a heart
attack Tuesday night of that
week. He died at 8 a.m.
Wednesday of that week, according to
the Clark County Coroner’s Office.
“He loved his community so much
that that the community named him
Mr. South San Francisco,” said Mayor
Pedro Gonzalez.
Fernekes had 26 years of public
service when he decided to take a
break and focus on his family rather
than run for re-election in 2007.
At the time, he predicted it would
not be the end of his work in commu-
nity service — just a hiatus.
County creates ethics committee
Elected county officials suspected of
wrongdoing or unbecoming conduct
can be investigated by a five-member
ethics committee with the authority
to recommend their removal, accord-
ing to an ordinance unanimously
endorsed the week of Aug. 9, 2008 by
the Board of Supervisors.
The board created the independent
citizens review panel on Tuesday of
that week after revisiting an earlier
proposal by supervisors Jerry Hill
and Adrienne Tissier. At its July 22,
2008 meeting, the board cautiously
backed the idea but asked for
some fine-tuning of lan-
guage to avoid the panel
embarking on what
Supervisor Mark Church
characterized as a “witch hunt”
against officials.
Foster City’s 11-acre
site plans moving forward
The all-encompassing environmen-
tal study of the proposed Mirabella
project on Foster City’s 11-acre site
near City Hall was set to begin the
week of Aug. 9, 2008 with a public
meeting seeking comments.
The Environmental Impact Report
was required by state law to examine
large developments and their poten-
tial impact on the area around them. It
kicked off with a scoping meeting in
which the public could make com-
ments and ask questions to be includ-
ed in the final report.
Pacific Retirement Services, PRS,
asked the city to change its legal
agreement with the city to allow for
94 more residential units and a
reduced ground lease term. PRS cited
financing challenges, increased con-
struction costs, inflation and decline
in real estate values in San Mateo
County as factors for its request to the
City Council.
China starts Olympics
spectacularly
China didn’t just walk onto the
world stage. It soared over it.
At last playing its long-
sought role as Olympic host,
China opened the Summer
Games in spectacular fashion the
week of Aug. 9, 2008 with an extrava-
ganza of fireworks and pageantry
dramatizing its ascendance as a glob-
al power.
Disasters, environmental problems
and human-rights disputes preceded
the games, and questions abounded
about how they would unfold. But for
an evening, at least for the 91,000
people packed into the new National
Stadium, it was an interlude of fervor
and magic — capped by the spell-
binding sight of a skywalking, torch-
bearing gymnast floating around the
stadium’s top rim before sending a
torrent of fire upward to light the
Olympic flame.
From the archives highlights stories origi-
nally printed five years ago this week. It
appears in the Friday edition of the Daily
Journal.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actress Melanie
Griffith is 56.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1974
Vice President Gerald R. Ford became
the nation’s 38th chief executive as
President Richard Nixon’s resigna-
tion took effect.
“The man who makes no mistakes
does not usually make anything.”
— Edward John Phelps, American lawyer (1822-1900)
Director David
Steinberg is 71.
Rapper Mack 10 is
42.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A couple rides a motorcycle along a flooded road from heavy rains caused by tropical storm Mangkhut in Hanoi,Vietnam.
Friday: Cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle
in the morning. Highs in the lower
60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Fri day ni ght : Cloudy. Patchy fog and
drizzle after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog
and drizzle in the morning. Highs in
the lower 60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday ni ght: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after mid-
night. Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the lower
60s.
Sunday ni ght through Thursday: Mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the mid
60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1842, the United States and Canada resolved a border
dispute by signing the Webster-Ashburton Treaty.
I n 1854, Henry David Thoreau’s “Walden,” which
described Thoreau’s experiences while living near Walden
Pond in Massachusetts, was first published.
I n 1862, during the Civil War, Confederate forces drove
back Union troops in the Battle of Cedar Mountain in
Culpeper County, Va.
I n 1902, Edward VII was crowned king of Britain following
the death of his mother, Queen Victoria.
I n 1936, Jesse Owens won his fourth gold medal at the
Berlin Olympics as the United States took first place in the
400-meter relay.
I n 1942, Britain arrested Indian nationalist Mohandas K.
Gandhi; he was released in 1944.
I n 1944, 258 African-American sailors based at Port
Chicago refused to load a munitions ship following an
explosion on another ship that killed 320 men, many of
them black. (Fifty of the sailors were convicted of mutiny,
fined and imprisoned.)
I n 1945, three days after the atomic bombing of
Hiroshima, Japan, the United States exploded a nuclear
device over Nagasaki, killing an estimated 74,000 people.
I n 1969, actress Sharon Tate and four other people were
found brutally slain at Tate’s Los Angeles home; cult leader
Charles Manson and a group of his followers were later con-
victed of the crime.
I n 1982, a federal judge in Washington ordered John W.
Hinckley Jr., who’d been acquitted of shooting President
Ronald Reagan and three others by reason of insanity, com-
mitted to a mental hospital.
I n 1988, President Ronald Reagan nominated Lauro
Cavazos to be secretary of education; Cavazos became the
first Hispanic to serve in the Cabinet.
(Answers tomorrow)
REBEL STASH PARADE PIGLET
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The weightlifter’s new world record —
RAISED THE BAR
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PONIA
DEEUL
BLADLA
YONWAH
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners Gorgeous George,
No. 8, in first place; Solid Gold, No. 10, in second
place; and Gold Rush, No. 1, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:41.14.
7 3 9
1 11 16 51 55 41
Mega number
Aug. 6 Mega Millions
5 25 30 58 59 32
Powerball
Aug. 7 Powerball
2 6 7 21 34
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 3 9 7
Daily Four
7 3 1
Daily three evening
21 29 31 35 45 2
Mega number
Aug. 7 Super Lotto Plus
Basketball Hall of Famer Bob Cousy is 85. Actress Cynthia
Harris is 79. Tennis Hall of Famer Rod Laver is 75. Jazz musi-
cian Jack DeJohnette is 71. Boxing Hall-of-Famer Ken
Norton is 70. Actor Sam Elliott is 69. Singer Barbara Mason
is 66. Former MLB All-Star pitcher Bill Campbell is 65.
College Football Hall of Famer and former NFL player John
Cappelletti is 61. College Football Hall of Famer and former
NFL player Doug Williams is 58. Actress Amanda Bearse is
55. Rapper Kurtis Blow is 54. Hockey Hall of Famer Brett Hull
is 49. TVhost Hoda Kotb is 49. Actor Pat Petersen is 47. Pro
and College Football Hall of Famer Deion Sanders is 46.
3
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
The Golden Years are the best years!
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Free Services include*
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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
SAN BRUNO
Suspi ci ous person. A man wearing a
white dress shirt and tie was looking around
suspiciously on the 600 block of Pine Street
before 6:26 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6.
Suspi ci ous person. A drunk man was
shouting and yelling obscenities at passers-
by at the intersection of El Camino Real and
San Felipe Avenue before 4:56 p.m. Tuesday,
Aug. 6.
Hit-and-run. A driver of a dark-colored
Toyota Corolla was involved in a hit-and-
run on the 700 block of Mills Avenue before
3:02 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6.
Suspi ci ous person. A man wearing a
green jacket and blue jeans walked to the rear
of a building and left a bag on the 700 block
of Masson Avenue before 12:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Aug. 6.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Burglary. A gun was stolen from under-
neath a woman’s bed on Eighth Lane before
9:04 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1.
Arre s t. A man was arrested for having an
outstanding warrant on Cypress Avenue
before 7:44 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1.
Burglary. A vehicle window was smashed
and items were stolen from a hotel parking
lot on South Airport Boulevard before 4:44
p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1.
Arre s t . Aperson was arrested for disorderly
conduct at a hotel on Hickey Boulevard
before 3:32 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1.
Burglary. $20,000 worth of cooling equip-
ment was stolen from a commercial property
on Mayfair Avenue before 12:04 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 1.
Police reports
That’s low
A person reported gas had been
siphoned from their vehicle for the
third time on South Maple Avenue in
South San Francisco before 3:51 p.m.
Wednesday, July 31.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Agas leak at 1354 Burlingame Ave. yes-
terday around 4:30 a.m. shut down busi-
nesses along the main avenue until it was
capped at 8:41 a.m.
At around 4:37 a.m., Pacific Gas &
Electric heard from a third party who
apparently punctured a 4-inch diameter gas
main during construction on the street,
according to PG&E spokeswoman
Brittany Chord. PG&E crews arrived
around 5 a.m. to work on the leak and can-
vass the area.
PG&E and fire crews shut down a one-
block radius around the site, closing
Burlingame Avenue between El Camino
Real and Park Road, and Primrose Road
was closed between Donnelly Avenue and
City Hall Lane.
Central County Fire Chief Mark Ladas
said there was no fire on the scene, but that
the department sent two engines and a
truck. He said the fire department arrived at
around 5:47 a.m.
Administrative Police Sgt. Don Shepley
said contractors called police around 5:30
a.m.
“PG&E is most important to get there
first,” Shepley said. “They’re the people
who shut off the gas.”
Chord said she’s not sure what the cir-
cumstances of the puncture were. She said
main gas line markings were present.
The street is under construction as part
of the beautification of Burlingame
Streetscape redesign. Construction is set
to wrap up next summer.
Gas leak forces temporary street closures
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Workers gather at the site of a gas leak early yesterday morning on Burlingame Avenue.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 26-year-old Half Moon Bay man
accused of having a sexual relationship
with a 13-year-old girl he’d met at a dance
the previous year pleaded not guilty yester-
day to three counts of child molestation.
Gregorio Padilla-Luis did not waive his
right to a speedy prosecution and returns to
court Sept. 30 for a jury trial if the case
does not first resolve at an Aug. 26 confer-
ence.
Padilla-Luis was 25 when he reportedly
met the girl, then 12, in
July 2012 and they dated
for a year before the rela-
tionship was discovered
in June. The girl alleged-
ly snuck out of her home
at 1 a.m. June 24, wak-
ing her father with the
shutting door and send-
ing the family searching
for a half hour before
they found her partially
undressed in the back seat of Padilla-Luis’
truck. He told the girl’s father that he loved
her, according to prosecutors.
Defense attorney Geoff Carr said his
client and the victim’s family are from dif-
ferent parts of Mexico and the situation is
“more frankly a cultural thing” because the
vast age difference is more acceptable in
that country. The girl’s family was “not in
love with the idea” of her dating someone
so much older but also believes his prose-
cution is going overboard, Carr said.
Padilla-Luis remains in custody on
$300,000 bail.
Man pleads not guilty to relationship with teen
Gregorio
Padilla-Luis
4
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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Mountain biker rescued from ravine
A37-year-old San Carlos man was rescued
from a ravine Thursday after falling while
mountain biking in the Belmont hills,
according to fire officials.
At approximately 11:45 a.m., Belmont fire
and police units responded to the open space
east of the 2600 block of Somerset Drive on
a report of a mountain biker who had fallen
off a trail and approximately 20 feet down
into a ravine. The incident was reported by
another mountain biker who had witnessed
the fall, according to Belmont fire officials.
The man was found off the Chaparral Trail,
approximately one mile in from the gate in
the 2600 block of Somerset Drive. Due to the
remote location and steep terrain, Belmont
firefighters were assisted by firefighters from
the Foster City, Woodside and Cal Fire,
according to Belmont fire officials.
It took firefighters approximately an hour
to rescue the victim, who was transported to a
the hospital with moderate non-life threaten-
ing injuries. The victim had been riding his
mountain bike along with three friends, from
Hidden Canyon Park on Carlmont Drive, to
Somerset Drive in the Hallmark neighbor-
hood. The victim’s friends were not injured
and all were wearing helmets and safety gear,
according to Belmont fire officials.
Takeover robbery
of San Mateo Taco Bell
Police are on the lookout for two men
involved in a brazen takeover robbery of the
Taco Bell at 500 E. Fourth Ave. in San Mateo
Wednesday night.
At approximately 9:50 p.m., it was report-
ed that two men, described as black and in
their 20s, contained several customers and
staff and robbed the restaurant at gunpoint.
There were nine customers and two staff
inside at the time. The two men fled on foot
south on Claremont Street with an undis-
closed amount of cash, according to police.
No one was injured, according to police.
The men were further described as thin and
between 5 feet 9 inches and 6 feet tall, wear-
ing hoodies (one black, one gray) with white
bandannas covering their face, according to
police.
Anyone with information on this crime is
asked to call 522-7650 or the secret witness
hotline at 522-7676. Anonymous texts can
also be sent to 262-3473.
Woman, 84, dies in Foster City crash
A San Mateo woman was killed when she
crashed into a tree in Foster City on
Wednesday afternoon, according to authori-
ties.
The San Mateo County Coroner’s Office
identified the woman as 84-year-old Johanna
Von Eitzen.
Von Eitzen was driving east in the 1000
block of Metro Center Boulevard when her
car veered off the road and crashed in front of
the Orchard Supply Hardware store around
3:50 p.m., according to police.
Paramedics pulled her from the car and she
was pronounced dead at the scene, according
to police.
The cause of the crash is still under investi-
gation.
Anyone who witnessed the crash is asked
to call Foster City police at 286-3300.
Woman visiting from India killed in
head-on crash on Skyline Boulevard
Awoman visiting from India was killed in
a head-on crash on Skyline Boulevard near
Woodside Wednesday evening, a California
Highway Patrol officer said.
The woman, Sarani Banerjee, 49, from
Howrah, India, was in the back seat of a
Toyota Camry just before 7 p.m. on Skyline
Boulevard, a quarter-mile south of Old La
Honda Road, CHP Officer Art Montiel said.
The car was driven by her son, Shamik
Banerjee, 31, of Mountain View and her hus-
band, Kalyan Banerjee, 61, was in the pas-
senger seat, Montiel said.
The car was heading north on Skyline
Boulevard on a curvy part of the road when it
was driven off the road, Montiel said.
Once the driver returned to the road he col-
lided with a Chevy Monte Carlo driven by a
58-year-old woman from Nice, Calif., near
Clear Lake.
The Camry flipped and came to rest on its
roof.
Sarani Banerjee was pronounced dead at the
scene. Her husband was transported by heli-
copter to Stanford Hospital with major
injuries.
Her son was also taken to the hospital. He
suffered only minor injuries, Montiel said.
Local briefs
5
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
A concert by
Redwood Symphony and
White Album Ensemble
featuring original Beatles arrangements
of your favorite Fab Four songs.
8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10,
at the
Fox Theatre,
2215 Broadway, Redwood City.
For tickets at $25-$45:
FoxRWC.com or 650-369-7770
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 36-year-old man accused of
savagely beating a friend with a
large bicycle U-lock because the
man is bisexual will learn late
next month if he will stand trial
for several crimes including the
allegation the brutal assault was a
hate crime.
Santos Manuel Marquez-
Montiagudo is also charged with
assault with a deadly weapon,
assault by means of force causing
great bodily injury and battery
causing serious bodily injury in
the attack that
left the 55-
year-old victim
with a fractured
skull, jaw,
orbital bone
and rib. He has
pleaded not
guilty and will
be back in
court Sept. 24
for a prelimi-
nary hearing
on the evidence.
Prosecutors contend Marquez-
Montiagudo and another friend
met up with the victim on July 20
at a San Mateo taqueria where the
victim shared his bisexuality.
After the trio left the business to
drink elsewhere, Marquez-
Montiagudo told the victim not to
walk by him because he didn’t
want others to mistake him as
gay.
When the man refused to leave,
Marquez-Montiagudo grabbed the
lock from his bike and began beat-
ing his head and body, according
to the District Attorney’s Office.
San Mateo police found the badly
injured man near the 700 block of
Santa Inez Avenue.
The following Wednesday
police arrived at Marquez-
Montiagudo’s home on the 300
block of North Humboldt Street
but he fled out a window. He was
caught after a short chase. Police
reported finding the U-lock used in
the attack.
Marquez-Montiagudo remains in
custody on a $1 million bail bond
and, if freed, is prohibited from
contacting his alleged victim.
He has prior convictions for
domestic violence and disturbing
the peace.
Man gets hearing for allegedly gay bashing friend
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Acancer patient who reportedly
set a fire in his county hospital
room and threatened a nurse with a
knife before a two-hour standoff
with police waived a preliminary
hearing on the evidence, instead
moving directly toward a jury trial.
Zavtcho Stanonor Stoyanov,
51, sidestepped the hearing sched-
uled for yesterday after prosecu-
tors first added another count of
arson to those already charged in
the March 6
fire. He is now
facing four
felonies. He
will enter a
Superior Court
plea Aug. 23
and possible set
a jury trial date.
Stoyanov, of
Hi l l sborough,
was a patient at
San Mateo Medical Center when he
reportedly began the first floor
blaze just before 11 p.m. After
hospital staff extinguished the
small fire, Stoyanov reportedly
blocked himself in a hospital
room with a chair and hamper.
When a nurse kicked the door
open, she reported seeing the bed
and floor on fire and Stoyanov
walking toward her swinging a
knife. Responding officers needed
nearly two hours and a Taser to
negotiate and eventually appre-
hend him.
The fire caused the evacuation of
29 rooms and chaos but little other
damage to the hospital.
Prosecutors say Stoyanov has
terminal cancer and was generally
frustrated with life but hospital
officials have not released any for-
mal explanation for his hospital-
ization or agitation that night.
Stoyanov remains free in the
custody of his friends as long as
they transport him to and form
medical appointments and he
maintains contact with the court
five times a week.
Hospital arson suspect heading straight to trial
Santos
Marquez-
Montiagudo
Zavtcho
Stoyanov
By Julie Watson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEAUMONT — A rapidly
spreading wildfire chewed through
a rugged Southern California
mountain range on Thursday,
destroying at least 10 homes,
threatening more than 500 other
residences and forcing some
1,500 people to flee.
Five people were injured, while
more than 1,000 firefighters, 13
helicopters and six air tankers bat-
tled the flames as they pushed east-
ward along the San Jacinto
Mountains, a desert range 90
miles east of Los Angeles, Cal
Fire Riverside Chief John R.
Hawkins said.
Aman near the origin of the fire
suffered serious burns, Hawkins
said. Four firefighters were also
injured, including two who suf-
fered heat exhaustion. Officials did
not have details to release on the
other two.
At least 10 homes have been
destroyed and Hawkins said that
number would likely triple as
authorities make their way into
the charred areas to assess the
damage.
Hawkins said the wind-fed fire
that sparked at 2:05 p.m.
Wednesday is one of the “most
rapidly spreading, dangerous fires
that I’ve seen” in his 50 years as a
firefighter.
The fire was estimated at 17
square miles Thursday, with 10
percent containment, but it was
growing, causing concern that the
direction could change in the area,
which is known as a wind tunnel.
“The conditions at the front
right now are very dangerous,”
Hawkins said.
Wildfire destroys at least 10 homes
Bill allows background
checks for youth coaches
SACRAMENTO — Youth sports
programs would be allowed to run
criminal background checks on
potential volunteer coaches under
legislation that cleared a final vote
Thursday and now goes to Gov.
Jerry Brown.
The bill’s authors,
Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla,
D-Concord, and Assemblyman
Brian Maienschein, R-San Diego,
said AB465 will help ensure that
children who participate in com-
munity sports leagues are protect-
ed from abusive or violent individ-
uals.
Obama to sign
student loan bill Friday
WASHINGTON — The White
House says President Barack
Obama will sign a bill Friday to
lower the costs of borrowing for
millions of students.
The bipartisan bill has been
awaiting Obama’s signature since
earlier this month, when the
House gave it final congressional
approval after a drawn-out process
to reach a compromise in the
Senate.
News briefs
REUTERS
A firefighter works to keep the fire from spreading as the Silver Fire moves into the foothills in Cabazon.
6
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION 7
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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BART management,
unions resume contract talks
SAN FRANCISCO — Contract negotia-
tions between Bay Area Rapid Transit’s
management and employee unions have
resumed as Gov. Jerry Brown awaits a report
on the labor dispute.
The two sides restarted talks Thursday but
remained tens of millions of dollars apart on
wages, pensions and medical benefit s.
A board appointed by Brown is expected
to present a report to the governor by
Sunday night. Brown can then petition a
court to call a 60-day cooling-off period,
when BARTtrains could continue to run.
Bill would ease land
use for high-speed rail
SACRAMENTO — The California High-
Speed Rail Authority could manage property
it has bought for the bullet train without
extra oversight under legislation now head-
ing to the governor.
The bill by Democratic Assemblywoman
Bonnie Lowenthal, of Long Beach, allows
rail officials to negotiate property access
rights and sell excess land without getting
approval from the state Department of
General Services.
Man with rifle not found,
Skyline College lockdown lifted
San Bruno police searched the area around
Skyline College and the San Francisco Jail
looking for a man spotted holding a rifle
Thursday afternoon but did not locate him,
police said.
The San Francisco Sheriff’s Department
received a report of a man with a rifle in the
area around the jail at 3:55 p.m., San Bruno
police said.
Around 4:20 p.m., authorities alerted
school personnel that the man might be
heading toward the campus, located at 3300
College Drive, spokeswoman Barbara
Christensen said. The community college is
adjacent to the jail facility.
A lieutenant at the San Mateo County
Office of Emergency Services said he received
an alert advising people on campus to stay
away from windows and lock all doors.
Police and sheriff’s deputies searched the
area including on the campus but did not find
the man with a rifle, described as a white man
in his early 40s wearing blue jeans, a blue
plaid shirt and a baseball cap worn back-
wards, police said.
The lockdown was lifted by about 6:30
p.m. but the campus was closed for the night,
Christensen said. Yesterday was scheduled to
be the last night of summer courses and it was
unclear if those classes would be rescheduled.
Around the state
Fort Hood trial resumes
as lawyers demand removal
FORT HOOD, Texas — The soldier on trial
for the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood
was allowed to continue
representing himself on
Thursday after the judge
ordered his standby attor-
neys to stay on as advis-
ers, despite their claims
that the Army psychiatrist
was trying to secure his
own death sentence.
The military lawyers
ordered to help Maj. Nidal
Hasan had asked the judge to either scale back
their advisory duties or allow them to take
over his defense. They believe Hasan is try-
ing to convince jurors to convict him and
sentence him to death for the attack that
killed 13 people and wounded more than 30
others at the Texas military base.
Vote suppression alleged
in close Florida election
SOPCHOPPY, Fla. — A small Florida
Panhandle town best known for its annual
Worm Grunting Festival is at the center of an
investigation into charges the white city clerk
suppressed the black vote in an election where
the black mayor lost by a single vote and a
black city commissioner was also ousted.
Both losing candidates and three black vot-
ers have filed complaints, now being investi-
gated by the Florida Department of Law
Enforcement, that City Clerk Jackie Lawhon
made it more difficult for blacks to cast bal-
lots by questioning their residency.
Around the nation
Nidal Hasan
By Paul Wiseman
and Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Americans who have a
job may take comfort in knowing that com-
panies are laying off fewer people than at
any time since before the Great Recession.
The government said Thursday that week-
ly applications for U.S. unemployment
benefits have averaged 335,500 over the
past month. That’s the lowest level since
November 2007, which was one month
before the recession began.
But while most companies have stopped
cutting jobs, many remain reluctant to hire.
That’s bad news for the roughly 11.5 mil-
lion Americans who are unemployed and a
major reason the unemployment rate is still
so high four years after the recession offi-
cially ended.
“We have seen a disconnect between the
level of hiring and firing,” said Bricklin
Dwyer, an economist at BNP Paribas.
Unemployment applications are a proxy
for layoffs. At the depths of the recession,
in March 2009, weekly claims surged to
670,000. They have fallen steadily ever
since and are now half that level.
The number of first-time applications did
rise slightly last week, to a seasonally
adjusted 330,000. But that’s just 5,000
higher than the 5 1/2-year low reached two
weeks ago.
Most economists say small shifts like
that are normal and applications are essen-
tially at a point where they may not fall
much further.
“Readings below 300K are rare and rarely
sustained,” Jonathan Basile, director of
U.S. economics at Credit Suisse, wrote in a
note to clients.
The drop in layoffs helps explain why
job growth has increased this year to an
average of 192,000 net jobs a month, even
while overall economic growth has stayed
sluggish.
Net job gains show the number of people
hired minus those who lose or quit their
jobs. And when companies cut fewer jobs,
it doesn’t take many new hires to create a
high net gain.
Unemployment claims at
six-year low, hiring lags
REUTERS
A job-seeker completes an application at a career fair held by civil rights organization National
Urban League as part of its annual conference, in Philadelphia.
Local brief
LOCAL 8
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
T
he unveiling of the “Name
Redwood City’s New Fireboat
contest” has been moved from
Aug. 10 to 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22. The
location is still the Port of Redwood
Ci t y on Seaport Boulevard. The unveiling
is also the public’s first chance to see the
new MetalCraft Marine FireStorm 36
fireboat purchased for nearly $1 million
with a federal homeland security/port secu-
rity grant.
***
Tuesday, a San Bruno man pulled an
allegedly intoxicated man from his burn-
ing car on Huntington Avenue near Herman
Park. The passerby, Ron Cerri, saw
flames shooting out the window and then
pulled the man out of the car to safety. He
even put out the fire before fire crews were
called to the scene. Cerrie even offered to
drive the victim home but police officials
said the gesture was unnecessary. The vic-
tim suffered some minor injuries.
***
The San Francisco-based Foundation
for Youth Investment has announced a
$10.7 million grant from the Paci fic
Forest and Watershed Lands
Stewardship Council to expand its out-
door youth education programs and strate-
gic initiatives. The Stewardship Council, a
nonprofit agency, was established in 2004
as part of a Paci fic Gas and Electric
Company settlement and is located in
San Mateo. With the grant, the foundation
will formally separate from the
Stewardship Council and begin operating
as a standalone grantmaking and fundrais-
ing public charity. Created in 2010 to con-
tinue the Stewardship Council’s grantmak-
ing legacy as a sustainable funding source
for youth development in California, FYI
works to improve academic achievement,
reduce obesity, teach teamwork and coop-
eration, prepare youth for the workforce
and provide the environmental stewards of
tomorrow with transformative outdoor
experiences.
***
AcquaPazza may have shut its doors in
downtown San Mateo, but it is moving to
San Carlos. The new restaurant will be
named Locanda Positano, translated by
Googl e as Posi tano Inn. AcquaPazza
translated to Crazy Water. Taking its
place on the corner of Third Avenue and
Ellsworth Avenue in San Mateo is Rot i
Indian Bistro, which moved from
Burlingame.
***
The California Resource Recovery
Associ at i on awarded RethinkWast e
with its 2013 “Outstanding Recycling
Program Award” for its programs and
services to reduce waste and educate its
customers. CRRAis California’s statewide
recycling association and one of the
largest nonprofit recycling organizations
in the United States.
***
Forget the dog days of summer. Snow is
on its way! At 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 24 the
parking lot of Unleashed by Petco i n
Daly City will be transformed into a win-
ter wonderland for canines with 20 tons of
snow. Dogs can play in the fenced-in area
and chomp on ice cream treats while their
human companions enjoy local food
trucks or peruse other animals up for adop-
tion. The Daly City event is one of only
eight held nationwide by the company and
will last until the snow melts.
***
Picture this — your photography on tel-
evision. Use your photographic talents as
a volunteer to capture the spirit of San
Mateo at special programs, events or
activities and share your work with the
San Mateo community through SMTV
community television and more. The city
currently needs a one-day commitment to
cover the Si ster Ci t y 50t h
Anniversary Celebration i n San
Mateo Central Park Aug. 17.
Celebration includes: Festi val i n the
Park from 11a.m.-2 p.m.; Friendship
Game (boys baseball) from 2 p.m.-3 p.m.
Interested? Visit and apply at
VolunteerSource at
www.cityofsanmateo.org/volunteer. In the
Assignment Preference choose:
Special Event Photographer in the
pull down menu [Additional information
about the Sister City Celebration is at
www.cityofsanmateo.org/toyonaka].
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection of
facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
Patricia Veronica Duffy
Patricia Veronica Duffy (Chandler) died at
Kaiser Hospital, in Redwood City Aug. 2,
2013, after several years of declining
health.
She was born in San Francisco Dec. 10,
1939 and lived there until moving to
Redwood City in her early teens. She gradu-
ated from Sequoia High School and worked
many years in local medical offices where
her skill in bookkeeping and knowledge of
medical insurance procedures were always
in demand.
Patricia was preceded in death by her
mother Helen (Firpo) Chandler and her
father Harold Chandler who as a fighter
pilot in World War II was killed in action
over Germany when she was only 5 years
old
She is survived by her husband of 43
years, Franklin, and devoted caregiver
Nancy Barajas as well as cousins John,
Steven, David and Robert Rusconi.
A rosary will be held at St Matthias at 8
p.m. Friday, Aug. 9 and a Mass of Christian
Burial will be at St. Matthias Catholic
Church (1685 Cordilleras Road, Redwood
City) 11 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 10. Interment
at Skylawn Memorial Park 2 p.m. Monday,
Aug. 5.
Christine Arden Ferrari
Christine Arden Ferrari, late of Millbrae
and San Mateo County resident for 62
years, died in San Mateo Aug. 7, 2013.
Wife of the late Ernest Ferrari Jr., mother
of Ernest Ferrari III, Karen Hansen-
Northnagel and Teresa Ferrari-Lewis.
Grandmother of 10 grandchildren and eight
great-grandchildren.
Anative of Sacramento age 77 years.
A memorial service will be celebrated 2
p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14 at the Chapel of
the Highlands, El Camino Real at 194
Millwood Drive in Millbrae.
Her family appreciates donations to
Sveadal Memorial Fund or to Daughters of
the Nile Memorial Fund.
• Bail bonds company
owner Corrin Rankin quali-
fied for the Redwood City
Council race Nov. 5. She
joins councilmen Jeff Gee
and John Seybert ,
Planning Commissioner
Ernie Schmidt and former
councilwoman Di ane
Howard as qualified candidates for three seats.
• In San Bruno, John Mart y qualified for
the city treasurer race.
• Mark Addiego has filed nomination
papers for one of the three four-year seats on
the South San Francisco City Council.
So far, the candidacies of Rick Ochsenhirt ,
Pradeep Gupta, Liza Normandy and
John Harry Prouty have qualified.
Carlos Martin, Mark
Nagal es and Wi l l i am
(Bill) Lock have filed papers
for the same four-year seat.
Kate MacKay and Kary l
Matsumoto have pulled
papers for the one open two-
year term seats on City
Council.
• In Burlingame, Andrew Peceimer filed
his nomination papers for the City Council
race. So far, Ricardo Ort i z has also filed
papers, while former councilman Russ
Cohen, incumbents Ann Keighran and
Michael Brownri gg have qualified for the
race. Robert Schinagl, Steve Duncan,
Nirmala Bandrapalli and Alex Kent have
all pulled papers for the election.
Obituaries
OPINION 9
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Heartfelt but wrong
Editor,
Supervisor Warren Slocum’s call to
the public to subsidize a rental unit
for the public is certainly well-inten-
tioned (“Just One” guest perspective
in the Aug. 6 edition of the Daily
Journal). Our hearts go out to those
who lost their homes and posses-
sions in the fire.
Unfortunately, his request shows a
lack of understanding of what a rental
unit represents to the owner. It often
represents their job, their business
and their income. Rental units come
with significant expense to the owner
and in this area the expenses often
exceeds the rent. I did not hear the
supervisor ask the banks to reduce the
mortgage payment or Pacific Gas and
Electric to reduce the utility costs for
any owner providing a subsidized
unit.
When one looks past the supervi-
sor’s plea, he is basically asking one
person or company to subsidize a fire
victim. If subsidies should occur they
should be borne by the entire commu-
nity — they should come out of the
general fund. If we are to be a compas-
sionate people, the entire county
should chip in and it is up to our
political leaders to decide what trade-
offs need occur to make the funds
available. Before he asks others to
reach into their wallets, he should
reach into his own. I did not see any-
thing in his guest perspective where
he, the other supervisors and all
county employees were taking an
indefinite reduction in pay to help
subsidize the fire victims.
It is always easier to ask others to
provide the economic solution to
your problems but it is seldom the
right thing to do.
Steven Howard
Redwood City
Our post office
Editor,
The post office, its property and art-
work are our common wealth
(“Burlingame Post Office officially on
the market” in the Aug. 8 edition of
the Daily Journal). We, the people,
own the post office and benefit great-
ly form the work of the postal work-
ers. There is a false claim that the
post office is no longer needed and
cannot pay its expenses. This is not
true.
Congress voted a mandate that the
U.S. Postal Service must fund pen-
sion benefits for 75 years into the
future. It must fund the pension bene-
fits for people not born yet. The cost
of this means the cutting of services
and the opportunity for greedy vul-
tures to shut down the post office and
replace it with a for-profit corpora-
tion.
There is a national movement of
the rich people to privatize every-
thing owned by the people. They can
make massive profits by taking over
public schools, the postal service,
the prison system and public hospi-
tals. As our public services are taken
over by corporations, the services
deteriorate and the wages of workers
decline. We must not allow this to
happen. We need to protect our com-
mon wealth.
If our Burlingame main post office
has extra space, the building could be
shared with other public services,
maybe an unemployment office, or
some services for our retuning troops
suffering with PTSD or an agency to
help our homeless people survive in
these hard times. We don’t need more
high-priced condos.
Patricia Gray
Burlingame
Great columns
Editor,
Michelle Durand’s Tuesday and
Thursday columns are topically cur-
rent, pithy, humorous, well-written
and are a joy to read.
Arthur Collom
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
Contra Costa Times
E
arly August signals the
approach of a new school
year, another football season
and the stretch drive toward baseball’s
playoffs. It is an exciting time. But
make no mistake, there also is danger
in the air, especially in Sacramento.
You see, this is that special time of
year when our representatives in
Sacramento begin to display their true
colors as well as utter contempt for
the public process.
The Legislature is set to adjourn for
the year on Sept. 13. Having done rel-
atively little all year there will now
be a flurry of activity requiring legis-
lators to work late into the night.
Some of the activity is caused by high
volume or procrastination, but much
of it is by design. The chaos creates
cover to use a practice known as “gut
and amend” for nefarious purpose.
The concept is fairly simple. It
allows a bill to be called to the floor,
have its contents gutted and entirely
replaced with amendments likely hav-
ing nothing to do with the original
bill and then passed without true leg-
islative process.
The practice was originally
designed to make emergency fixes to
unexpected matters that need immedi-
ate attention, but it is seldom used for
that purpose. Instead, it is the tool of
special interests who can’t get what
they want in any kind of fair and
deliberative process in the light of
day, so they have their minions in the
Legislature employ the gut and
amend.
The bill that emerges is nearly
always a disaster. The list of last-
night messes is a long one, but the
poster child is probably the so-called
energy deregulation bill in the late
’90s that was the breeding ground for
parts of the Enron scandal. There have
been dozens of others.
We now hear persistent chatter that
many such efforts may be on the hori-
zon. Everything from special-interest
pension legislation to more runs at
thwarting public records access have
been bandied about.
These rumors are disturbing, but we
are particularly bothered by efforts
that could severely damage Contra
Costa County’s landmark Industrial
Safety Ordinance.
There are those who would cynical-
ly use last year’s fire at Richmond’s
Chevron Refinery to damage an ordi-
nance that for 10 years has been a
model for industrial operations by
amending it to essentially make it a
jobs program for union workers. The
Legislature should summarily reject
any such attempt.
Yes, there was a fire at Chevron. No
ordinance is perfect and some safety
changes to it are necessary, but this
ordinance has dramatically changed
the culture of how industrial work is
done in the county because its focus
has always been on safety, safety,
safety. That is where it should stay.
Legislature should keep hands off safety Just how heavy is the
lifting in Sacramento?
N
o one could contest that there has been some
heavy lifting in Sacramento in the past year. The
push for Proposition 30 to help raise $6 billion a
year for the next four years was a mighty task, then there
was balancing the budget on time
while also reconfiguring the state’s
educational funding system — all
while keeping most people happy. So
now that this year’s legislative ses-
sion is nearly over and legislators and
Gov. Jerry Brown prep for re-election
and pending leadership change in both
the state Senate and Assembly, is the
heavy lifting over? Depends on your
interpretation of heavy. Significant
pension and tax reform? Not going to
happen right now. Shifts in patient
care, the minimum wage and realign-
ment? Probably. Changes to the California Environmental
Quality Act and a ballot proposal for a water bond? Maybe.
Though the state Senate is not back in session until next
week, the Assembly got busy this week. On the agenda were
changes to patient care as preparation for the federal Patient
Protection and Affordable Care Act set to begin rollout in
mere weeks. Legislation that would have expanded the scope
of practices for medical professionals who are not doctors
was heard in the Assembly Committee on Business,
Professions and Consumer Protection this week. One bill,
which could expand the duties of pharmacists passed the
committee and was referred to the Health Committee.
Another more controversial bill, which would have broad-
ened the medical ability of nurse practitioners and allow
them to work outside the supervision of a physician, was
defeated but reconsideration was granted. Another, which
would have broadened the medical ability of optometrists,
was pulled from the agenda and will be heard next week. The
first one may come up again in a hearing next week, and the
second one will also likely come up again. The idea behind
the bills is to accommodate the need for more medical pro-
fessionals with the pending implementation of the
Affordable Care Act and expansion of Medi-Cal. Is this
progress in that there will be more access to care, just not
doctors? Or is an indication that our overall health care is
being diminished? I see the pull for broadening care, but
there is something to be said for a doctor’s care. This is a
slippery slope.
Also coming soon will be a serious discussion on raising
the state’s minimum wage from $8 an hour in small incre-
ments to $10 an hour by 2018. Originally, the proposal was
based on the rate of inflation but that portion has been taken
out, according to the office of Assemblyman Luis A. Alejo,
D-Salinas, the bill’s author. This issue has a philosophical
split. Do entry level workers deserve more pay? And can
businesses still feeling the effects of the Great Recession
absorb an increase without laying off workers or not hiring
new ones? Hard to say. But raising the minimum wage in
small increments is a solid path and it’s good the inflation
adjustment requirement was amended out. That’s what merit
raises are for. The bill will be heard in the Senate
Appropriations Committee Monday.
This will lead us to September and the end of the legisla-
tive session. And the budget cycle and the ramp up to the
June primary will be here before we know it. Amulti-billion
dollar water bond has been pushed off for years, and though
Brown is serious about changes to the Bay/Delta and how
water is delivered, popular opinion may not be ready for it
in 2014. With Brown up for re-election, there may be some
tweaks to realignment, according to Assemblyman Rich
Gordon, D-Menlo Park. Realignment was the shift of state
prisoners to local jails and there have been some reports
about increases in crime that may cause state officials to
rethink portions of that, Gordon said. As far as any changes
to the state’s tax structure? That’s not something to cam-
paign on, Gordon said.
So any significant changes may come if and when Brown
is re-elected and likely only in the first two years of his new
term, said Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-South San
Francisco. And that is the time period about which Mullin is
excited. There might be a discussion about creating a sales
tax on services but definitely a comprehensive conversation
on budget and tax reform, Mullin said. Part of that may
entail a lower threshold for local revenue measures and a
serious discussion on the state’s pension obligations, he
added.
“[Brown] can act as a truth teller to public sector unions,”
Mullin said, adding that the governor has the keen ability to
say no to people.
Gordon also sees the possibility for heavy lifting by
Brown after the November 2014 election.
“He’s looking for legacy,” Gordon said.
***
Gordon is the new chair of the Assembly Rules
Committee, a power position for sure. The committee is in
charge of office space, staffing and expenses — all items
that hold great importance to those who regularly walk the
halls of the state Capitol.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can
be reached at jon@smdailyjournal.com. Follow Jon on
Twitter @jonmays.
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BUSINESS 10
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow ??? ??? 10-Yr Bond ??? ???
Nasdaq ??? ??? Oil (per barrel) ???
S&P 500 ??? ??? Gold ???
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
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Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
CenturyLink Inc., down $2.03 to $34.36
The telecommunications company cut its outlook for the entire year,
citing slower growth.
Lowe’s Cos., up $1.86 to $46.16
The home improvement retailer hit a new high for the year on an upgrade
from J.P. Morgan, which expects improving execution to drive more
consistent results.
Yingli Green Energy Holding Co. Ltd., up 23 cents to $3.87
The Chinese solar company announced a surge in shipments during the
second quarter and fattening profit margins as well.
Orbitz Worldwid Inc., up $3.39 to $12.62
Investors snapped up shares of the online travel agency, sending the
stock to a six-year high after it reported revenue from hotel bookings
are rising.Orbitz beat Wall Street expectations for profits during its most
recent quarter.
Nasdaq
Groupon Inc., up $1.88 to $10.60
The online deals company named its co-founder as CEO and topped
Wall Street’s expectations for the second quarter.Eric Lefkofsky replaces
Andrew Mason, who was fired earlier this year.
Tesla Motors Inc., up $19.25 to $153.48
The electric car company announced that it paid off a loan from the
Department of Energy nine years early. Removing that one-time cost,
Tesla turned a profit in its latest quarter and easily surpassed Wall Street
projections.
Crocs Inc., down 78 cents to $13.23
The funky shoemaker’s stock was downgraded by Sterne Agee,which said
there is a lack of leadership at the company after the departure of some
key executives.
Costco Wholesale Corp., down $1.95 to $117.39
Comparable-store sales rose 4 percent last month, but that was more
than a percentage point shy of what Wall Street had expected.However,
shares in wholesale club operator hit an all-time high just this week and
shares fell less than 2 percent on the sales report.
Big movers
By Matthew Craft
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Miners and other
companies dealing in commodities
helped pull the stock market out of a
three-day slump on Thursday.
News that China’s trade rebounded
last month signaled the end of a six-
month slowdown for the world’s
biggest buyer of raw materials. The
report drove prices up for copper and
other commodities, and that helped
lift Newmont Mining, Freeport-
McMoRan and other stocks in the
materials industry.
“The one thing that stands out today
is the better news out of China,” said
David Joy, the chief market strategist
at Ameriprise Financial. “It comes as a
pleasant surprise.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
edged up 6.57 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 1,697.48.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 27.65 points, or 0.2 percent, to
15, 498. 32. The Nasdaq composite
gained 15.12 points, or 0.4 percent,
to 3,669.12.
With little other news to drive trad-
ing, the stock market had meandered
lower this week. The S&P 500 index
fell three days straight and remains
down 0.7 for the week. It’s still up 19
percent this year.
Brad McMillan, chief investment
officer for Commonwealth Financial
Network in Waltham, Mass., said a
number of concerns have weighed on
the market this week. Comments from
Federal Reserve officials have con-
vinced many investors that the bank
will begin pulling back its support for
the economy in the coming months.
In an interview on CNBC after the
market closed, Richard Fisher, head of
the Fed’s Dallas branch, reaffirmed his
view that it’s time to wind down the
bank’s stimulus effort.
At the same time, companies are
warning of slower sales and turning in
tepid second-quarter results.
McMillan said it’s starting to look
like corporate earnings haven’t kept
up with the stock market’s strong
pace this year.
“I think people are realizing that
stock values are getting disconnected
from earnings growth,” McMillan
said. “For the rally to continue, peo-
ple will have to pay more for earnings
that aren’t growing that much.”
Investors are paying more for prof-
its. A year ago, the price-earnings
ratio for the S&P 500 was 13.4,
according to the data provider FactSet.
Now it’s 15.6, which is still near the
long-run average.
Among companies reporting earn-
ings, the maker of Oreo cookies,
Mondelez International, turned in bet-
ter results than Wall Street had expect-
ed late Wednesday. The company also
announced plans to spend another $5
billion buying its own stock.
Mondelez International gained $1.44,
or 5 percent, to $32.70.
Tesla Motors jumped 14 percent fol-
lowing news that the maker of electric
cars blew past Wall Street’s profit fore-
casts for its most recent quarter.
Revenue soared thanks to stronger
sales of its Model S. Tesla gained
$19.25 to $153.48.
In economic news, the government
reported that the average number of
people who applied for unemploy-
ment benefits over the past four weeks
dropped 6,250 to 335,500. That’s the
lowest level since November 2007, a
month before the Great Recession got
underway.
Gradual but steady gains for the U.S.
economy and corporate profits have
lifted the stock market to record terri-
tory this year. The S&P 500 index
closed at an all-time high of 1,709.67
on Friday.
In other Thursday trading, the better
economic news out of China sent cop-
per, widely used for electronics and to
wire buildings, up 10 cents, or 3 per-
cent, to $3.27 a pound. Gold rose
$24.60, or 2 percent, to $1,309.90 an
ounce.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury
note fell to 2.58 percent from 2.60
percent late Wednesday.
Surging mining stocks end Wall Street slump
“I think people are realizing that stock
values are getting disconnected from earnings
growth. ... For the rally to continue, people will have
to pay more for earnings that aren’t growing that much.”
—Brad McMillan, chief investment officer for Commonwealth Financial Network
Retailers see slow start
to back-to-school season
NEW YORK — Shoppers are hold-
ing off on back-to-school shopping,
and those who delay long enough
might be rewarded with some steep
discounts from desperate retailers.
Revenue at stores open at least a
year — an industry measure of a retail-
er’s health— rose 3.5 percent in July,
the slowest pace since March, accord-
ing to a tally of 11 retailers by the
International Council of Shopping
Centers.
The figure, which excludes drug-
stores, was below a 5.5 percent
increase in June.
Costco Wholesale Corp., typically
a strong performer, was among the
retailers reporting disappointing fig-
ures.
Many stores were already offering
discounts and other come-ons to get
shoppers to spend on the new ship-
ments of fall clothing that started
flowing in mid-July.
JPMorgan faces criminal
probe over mortgage bonds
NEW YORK — The U.S. Justice
Department is investigating
JPMorgan Chase over mortgage-
backed investments the bank sold in
the run-up to the financial crisis.
The New York-based bank said in a
regulatory filing that it is responding
to investigations by the civil and
criminal divisions of the U.S.
Attorney’s office for the Eastern
District of California. In May, the
civil division informed JPMorgan
that it had “preliminarily concluded”
that the bank had violated federal
securities laws in connection with
certain mortgage-backed investments
it sold from 2005 to 2007.
AJPMorgan spokeswoman declined
to comment.
The disclosure is just the latest in a
swirl of mortgage-related lawsuits and
investigations that have hammered
big U.S. banks in the aftermath of the
financial crisis.
Business briefs
<< Team Oracle forfeits championships, page 13
• NCAA getting out of jersey-selling business, page 12
Friday, Aug. 9, 2013
NEW ERA IN OAKLAND: RAIDERS’ NEW QB MATT FLYNN READY FOR HIS DEBUT >> PAGE 12
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSFORD, N.Y. — Adam Scott began the
final major of the year with a tee shot deep
into the trees. He ended the opening round of
the PGA Championship by having to gouge
out of deep rough. It was the golf in between
that was some of the best he has ever played,
even for an Australian with a green jacket.
Showing that he’s not satisfied as only
being a Masters champion, Scott ran off five
straight birdies early in his round Thursday on
soft and vulnerable Oak Hill, and a 15-foot par
putt at the end gave him a 5-under 65 and a
share of the lead with Jim Furyk.
“Probably the best run I’ve ever had,” Scott
said of his five straight birdies. “I just hit real-
ly nice shots and didn’t leave myself too much
work. You have to take advantage of that if
you’re feeling that. It was a dream start after
kind of a nervous first couple of holes.”
It felt like an easy start to so many others.
Oak Hill has such a strong reputation that it
has yielded only 10 scores under par over 72
holes in five previous major championships.
The last time the PGAChampionship was held
on this Donald Ross design in 2003, there
were only 12 rounds under par on the first day.
But with overnight rain, humid conditions
and a 71-minute delay for storms in the after-
noon, Thursday might be as easy as it gets.
Scott and Furyk had plenty of company, two
of 35 players who broke par.
Tiger Woods was not among them.
The world’s No. 1 player made only two
birdies despite playing in the still of the
morning, and he watched his round fall apart
with a bogey on par-5 fourth and a double
bogey on his final hole when his flop shot out
of a deep rough floated into a bunker. Woods
had a 71, not a bad start at Oak Hill, except on
this day.
“The round realistically could have been
under par easily,” Woods said.
Furyk, who won his lone major at the U.S.
Furyk, Scott lead PGA Championship, Tiger struggles
Kap, defense look good
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Tim Lincecum
pitched another gem, allowing only one hit
over eight shutout innings and leading the
San Francisco Giants past the Milwaukee
Brewers 4-1 Thursday.
Lincecum, who threw his first career no-
hitter on July 13 at San Diego, permitted
just a double to Juan Francisco leading off
the third inning.
Lincecum (6-11) struck out eight and
walked one in eight innings before getting
pulled for a pinch-hitter. The two-time NL
Cy Young Award winner had been 0-2 in
three starts since throw-
ing 148 pitches in his
no-hitter.
Brandon Belt hit a
three-run homer in the
first inning off Donovan
Hand (0-4). Marco
Scutaro and Brandon
Crawford each added three
hits.
Khris Davis doubled
off reliever Sandy
Rosario in the ninth and scored on Jean
Segura’s single against Sergio Romo, who
recorded the final two outs for his 28th save.
San Francisco had lost four of its previous
five games in the latest skid during a sum-
mer-long slide from World Series champi-
ons to last place in the NL West.
With a postcard-like day along the bay,
San Francisco showed some heart and hustle
at the start. And Lincecum provided the rest
in a rare reprieve from a frustration season.
Scutaro singled on the 11th pitch leading
off the first and Crawford followed by diving
head-first into second for a double. After
Pablo Sandoval flied out, Belt hit his 12th
Lincecum
dominant
Giants 4, Brewer 1
Tim Lincecum
See GIANTS, Page 14
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEVERLYHILLS — Manny Pacquiao will
be coming off the longest layoff of his
incredible career when he steps back into
the ring in Macau in November.
It’ll also be two years since the former
pound-for-pound champion’s last victory.
There’s no reason to worry about any of
those ominous signs, according to the
genial Filipino congressman. His bout with
Brandon Rios will just be the start of his
comeback, not a retirement party.
“I want to prove that I
can still fight, and my
boxing career is not done
yet,” Pacquiao said
Thursday in a ballroom
jam-packed with interna-
tional media at the
Beverly Hills Hotel.
Pacquiao (54-5-2, 38
KOs) was his usual
serene, joking self in his
last public appearance in
North America before heading back to the
Philippines, where he’ll start training camp
in October. Pacquiao is training with
Freddie Roach for only six weeks, not the
usual eight, because Roach doesn’t want to
burn out his fighter.
And for the first time in the 34-year-old
Pacquiao’s career, that’s a legitimate con-
cern. The eight-division champion is com-
ing off losses to Timothy Bradley and Juan
Manuel Marquez, followed by roughly 11
months of inactivity.
“I have confidence in my ability, ”
Pacquiao said. “If you really look at my last
fight, my conditioning, my killer instinct
was still there. Everything was happening
until that punch.”
Indeed, while Pacquiao’s loss to Bradley
has been widely lampooned as a poor judg-
ing decision, his one-punch knockout loss
to Marquez was much more persuasive.
Seeing Pacquiao facedown and motionless
on the Las Vegas canvas was sobering, but
Roach remains publicly confident Marquez’s
devastating punch is a hazard of their pro-
fession.
“Manny is a realist,” Roach said. “If you
don’t think you can get knocked out in this
Pacquiao: My comeback starts in fight with Rios
Manny
Pacquiao
See FIGHT, Page 14
See GOLF, Page 13
REUTERS
SanFrancisco cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha brings down a Denver ballcarrier during the 49ers’ 10-6 loss in their preseason opener.
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — On this first night of
the exhibition season, Denver displayed the
opportunistic defense the 49ers lived by the
last two years, something that carried San
Francisco back to the Super Bowl in
February, 18 years after capturing their fifth
championship.
The NFC champion Niners? They looked
sloppy in all phases in 10-6 loss Thursday
night.
A Super Bowl preview in August? Hardly
looked that way.
Shaun Phillips scooped up D.J. Harper’s
second-quarter fumble and returned it 9 yards
for the game’s lone touchdown. Mike Adams
added a timely interception as the Broncos
began anew following that stunning double-
overtime loss to the eventual Super Bowl
champion Baltimore Ravens back in
January’s AFC divisional playoffs.
Executive John Elway has vowed the play-
off disappointment will fuel his team.
With the star quarterbacks on either side —
Broncos veteran Peyton Manning and third-
year pro Colin Kaepernick — playing all of
one series each, it was impossible to gauge
just how good their given offenses will be.
Broncos 10, 49ers 6
See 49ERS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAPA — Ever since arriving in Oakland in April, Matt
Flynn has proven on the practice field and in the meeting
rooms that he is the most capable candidate to start at quar-
terback for the Raiders.
Unless that changes in the exhibition games that start
Friday night at home against Dallas, Flynn will be under
center when the regular season begins Sept. 8 in
Indianapolis.
Flynn will start against the Cowboys and will likely play
the first quarter. Terrelle Pryor will follow and could play the
bulk of the next two quarters before rook-
ies Matt McGloin and Tyler Wilson finish
up the preseason opener for Oakland.
But the job is Flynn’s to lose.
“He’s gotten a better grasp of what
we’re trying to do offensively,” coach
Dennis Allen said. “I think he’s more in
command of what we’re doing. I think
obviously, from the process through
OTAs, through minicamp and now into
training camp, he’s really progressed
well. It’ll be good to put him in live action and see what he
does against another opponent.”
This is the second straight year Flynn started the presea-
son opener. His hold on the starting job didn’t last long in
Seattle last summer. An elbow injury and the emergence of
Russell Wilson relegated Flynn to a backup role before the
end of the preseason and led to his eventual trade to Oakland
in April to replace Carson Palmer.
After also serving as Aaron Rodgers’ backup for four sea-
sons in Green Bay, Flynn knows this could be his last shot
to seize a starting job in the NFL.
“The mindset as a competitor, as a professional athlete, as
a football player, the mindset always has to be to improve
yourself, better yourself on the field,” he said. “That’s kind
of the approach I’m taking.”
Dallas has no questions about who will start at quarter-
back this season after giving Tony Romo a six-year, $108
million contract with $55 million guaranteed in the offsea-
son.
Romo did not play in the Hall of Fame game against
Miami last Sunday as he is working his way back from sur-
gery in April to remove a cyst in his back. But he is expect-
ed to play briefly against the Raiders as he works in a game
for the first time under new offensive coordinator Bill
Callahan.
“More than anything you just want to have good execu-
tion,” Romo said. “You want to be able to do things. You’re
not game planning per se and having the stuff that you’re
really going to attack certain coverages and certain teams a
certain way. So you get a little vanilla with what you may
call. You’d like to get into a rhythm, but I just think we need
to go out there and execute the right way and do things that
we feel good about as far as doing our assignments right and
getting through stuff quickly and just not having any men-
tal errors.”
Romo’s most trusted receiver, Jason Witten, is hoping for
a better trip to Oakland this preseason than the one he had
last year. Witten sustained a “slightly lacerated” spleen
when he was hit by Rolando McClain after catching a pass
in the first quarter.
Witten remained in the game before the injury was diag-
nosed and missed the rest of the preseason before coming
back for the season opener. Witten recovered to catch a
career-high 110 passes last season.
“That was just a situation that happened when you play, ”
Witten said. “I don’t think you worry about that. It’s just an
unfortunate situation. But we’ve run that play a lot of times
and never had that come up. I can’t really think about it. It
was a long three weeks. I know that. But I’m a better person,
a better player because of it for sure.”
Allen also isn’t overly concerned about injuries, knowing
he needs to see his young team play games against an oppo-
nent to get a proper handle on what he has on his overhauled
roster.
Injury-prone running back Darren McFadden will play in
the preseason as will veteran Charles Woodson. Among the
key injured players who could miss the game are projected
starting defensive linemen Lamarr Houston and Pat Sims,
first-round pick cornerback D.J. Hayden and receiver Jacoby
Ford.
“There are a lot of young guys that we’ve got to get an
evaluation on, and really, there are a lot of veteran players
that we’ve got to get a good feel for,” Allen said. “We’ve got
a lot of change, a lot of turnover on this football team.
We’ve never been to battle with a lot of these guys, so we
want to put them in situations and see how they respond. So
this, for our football team, this preseason, is a big deal as
far as the evaluation process.”
Flynn ready for Raiders debut
Matt Flynn
A’s reaquire 2B Rosales from Rangers
OAKLAND, — The Oakland Athletics have reacquired
infielder Adam Rosales in a waiver deal with the Texas
Rangers.
The A’s made the move Thursday. Texas and Oakland are in
a virtual tie for the AL West lead.
Rosales hit .193 with four home runs and eight RBIs in 50
games with Oakland before he was cut on July 31. Texas
claimed him last week and he spent three days with the
Rangers but didn’t get into a game.
Texas designated Rosales for assignment on Monday.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The NCAAis getting out of the memorabilia business.
NCAAPresident Mark Emmert said Thursday it would stop
the practice immediately after reports this week that team
jerseys and other items linked to individual schools could be
found on its own website by searching for specific player
names.
“I think seeing the NCAAsell those kinds of goods is a
mistake,” Emmert said during a conference call with
reporters. “It’s not what the NCAA is about. So we’re not
going to be doing that any longer.”
The NCAAis being sued by former players and a handful of
current college players in federal court over the use of athlete
images and likenesses. And just this past week, ESPN report-
ed that the NCAAis investigating Heisman Trophy-winner
Johnny Manziel for allegedly being paid to sign memora-
bilia, which if true could jeopardize eligibility as a violation
of NCAAamateurism rules.
Emmert said the commercial site won’t be completely
removed because there is still a market for generic NCAA
apparel. He said the NCAAhad hired another company to run
the site, ShopNCAASports.com.
Mark Lewis, the NCAA’s executive vice president for
championships and alliances, also released a statement,
saying university merchandise would not be offered, either.
“In the coming days, the store’s website will be shut down
temporarily and reopen in a few weeks as a marketplace for
NCAAchampionship merchandise only,” Lewis said. “After
becoming aware of issues with the site, we determined the
NCAA getting out of
jersey-selling business
Sports brief
See NCAA, Page 14
SPORTS 13
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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America’s Cup champion Oracle Team
USA forfeited its overall championships
from the first two seasons of the America’s
Cup World Series on Thursday after it was
determined that its yachts were modified
without the permission of the Measurement
Committee.
The violation occurred when America’s
Cup teams were sailing 45-foot training
yachts, before they launched the 72-footers
that are being used in this
summer’s competition
on San Francisco Bay.
While seemingly
insignificant in the big
picture, the violations
are another smudge on an
already troubled regatta.
At the very least, it’s
an embarrassing mistake
by the powerhouse syn-
dicate, which is owned
by software billionaire Larry Ellison.
While it won’t affect the America’s Cup tro-
phy itself, Oracle will turn in some trophies
won during four ACWS training regattas last
year and earlier this year.
Syndicate CEO Russell Coutts, a four-time
America’s Cup winner, called the violations
— adding about five pounds of extra ballast
to each boat— a “ridiculous” mistake that
didn’t affect the boats’ performance.
“This is a serious issue for us,” Coutts
said in a conference call with reporters. “It
may have had little effect on the perform-
ance, but it’s breaking the rules and the
international jury may be obligated to con-
duct an investigation as to how it happened
and establish whether people intentionally
broke the rule.”
Oracle turned itself in after discovering
the violations while preparing the AC45
catamarans for teams that will sail in the
inaugural Red Bull Youth America’s Cup
later this month.
Coutts said he couldn’t disclose who made
the illegal modifications. The syndicate
said in a news release that they were made
“by a small number of team members
involved in the AC45 circuit, without the
knowledge of management or the skippers,
and without having followed standard inter-
nal procedures.”
Coutts said the international jury could
penalize Oracle Team USA, but doesn’t
think that’s likely.
Late last year, Oracle was found guilty of
spying on Italy’s Luna Rossa Challenge
while it trained in New Zealand. Besides a
small fine, Oracle was docked five days of
testing its 72-foot catamaran.
Coutts said the extra ballast was put into
struts near the front of the gennaker poles
in Oracle’s two AC45s, and in a boat skip-
pered by British star Ben Ainslie, who is
sailing with Oracle in this Cup campaign.
“It was in some ways a ridiculous mistake
because it really didn’t affect the perform-
ance,” Coutts said. “It was a ridiculous mis-
take to take the boat out of compliance any-
way. ”
He said a quick analysis showed that the
change affected the boat’s trim by one-hun-
dredth of a degree, “and actually had a nega-
tive impact on the performance of the
boat.”
“The fact is, we didn’t comply with the
rules,” Coutts said. “It doesn’t matter
whether it helps you or not. If it doesn’t
comply with the rules, your boat’s out of
measurement and you have to withdraw. ”
The Oracle boat skippered by Jimmy
Spithill won the 2011-12 and 2012-13 sea-
son championships. Additionally, Oracle’s
two boats, including the one helmed by
Coutts, won several match racing and fleet
racing championships at the regattas.
“We certainly don’t condone breaking
rules,” Coutts said. “And even though the
event’s gone and past, if you do break the
rules, and you make a mistake, then we may
have to take some disciplinary action.”
Oracle Team USAwill begin defense of the
oldest trophy in international sports on
Sept. 7.
In the challenger trials, Luna Rossa holds
a 2-0 lead over Artemis Racing of Sweden in
the best-of-seven Louis Vuitton Cup semifi-
nals. Race 3 is Friday. The winner advances
to face Emirates Team New Zealand. The
winner of that series moves on to face
Oracle in the 34th America’s Cup.
The regatta was marred by the death of
British Olympic medalist Andrew “Bart”
Simpson when Artemis’ first 72-foot cata-
maran capsized on May 9. That led regatta
director Iain Murray to recommend 37 safe-
ty changes, two of which were challenged
by Team New Zealand and Luna Rossa. The
Italians were so incensed that they boy-
cotted the opening race of the Louis Vuitton
Cup round-robins, forcing Team New
Zealand to sail around the course alone to
collect the point.
America’s Cup champion
Oracle forfeits ACWS titles
Larry Ellison
REUTERS
Jim Furyk fired a 5-under 65 and is tied with AdamScott for the first-round lead at the PGA
Championship at Oak Hill in upstate New York.
Open in 2003 at Olympia Fields, has gone
nearly three years since his last win at the Tour
Championship to capture the FedEx Cup and
win PGATour player of the year. Still fresh are
the four close calls from a year ago, including
the U.S. Open.
He was as steady as Scott, rarely putting
himself in trouble until the end of the round.
Furyk missed the fairway to the right and had
to pitch out because of thick rough and trees
blocking his way to the green. That led to his
only bogey, but still his lowest first-round
score in 19 appearances at the PGA
Championship.
“Usually disappointed with ending the day
on a bogey,” Furyk said. “But you know, 65,
PGA, is not so bad.”
David Hearn of Canada, an alternate until a
week ago, had a 66 in the morning. Also at 66
was Lee Westwood, who had his best score
ever in the PGAand offered evidence that there
was no hangover from losing a 54-hole lead in
the British Open last month.
There were no record scores at Oak Hill
despite the soft conditions, just a lot of low
rounds.
“If you don’t hit it in the fairways, then you
won’t score well,” Westwood said. “These
guys are good. There are a lot of good players
playing in the tournament. Somebody is
going to hit it straight, and somebody is
going to shoot a good score.”
Scott certainly didn’t start out that way. He
had to pitch out from the trees on No. 1, but
managed to get up-and-down from about 85
yards in front of the green, and after two more
pars, he began his big run of birdies.
Continued from page 11
GOLF
SPORTS 14
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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core function of the NCAA.com fan shop
should not be to offer merchandise licensed by
our member schools.”
The move overshadowed a news conference
that was intended to update reporters about
possible changes to the NCAA’s governance
structure. Members of the board of directors
and executive had a preliminary discussion on
potential changes, though no vote is expected
until next August.
Instead, the hot topics became Manziel,
NCAArules and the website fiasco.
Board chairman Nathan Hatch was asked
whether some of the NCAA rules regarding
payments to college athletes should be modi-
fied.
“I stand by the NCAA’s commitment to ama-
teurism, and I believe the way we’ve done that
is the correct way,” the Wake Forest president
said. “So I believe the rules we have, we agree
with.”
The NCAA’s new enforcement chief,
Jonathan Duncan, later told The Associated
Press he does not anticipate modifications to
those rules, either.
“Based on my experience before coming to
the national office, I know that lots of member
groups, cabinets and committees have looked
over the years and that lots of changes have
been proposed and have not been approved,”
he said. “It’s up to the membership and if they
change the rules, the enforcement staff will
follow their lead.”
And, of course, back to more memorabilia
questions.
“We’re exiting it as soon as we feasibly
can,” Emmert said. “Again, I think it was inap-
propriate for us to be in that business, and we
won’t be in the future.”
Continued from page 12
NCAA
home run of the season.
The Giants hadn’t hit a home run at AT&T
Park since Buster Posey’s long ball on July
20.
In the second, Scutaro scored on
Crawford’s two-out single. Hand, who
allowed seven hits and four walks in five
innings, had not given up more than three
runs in any of his previous six starts this
season.
Brewers center fielder Carlos Gomez had a
pair of sensational catches in center field.
He ran to his right, made a dive and tumbled
twice on the ground afterward on Belt’s
looping liner in the fourth. Gomez also ran
down Sandoval’s fly near the 421-foot
marker in right-center to end the second.
One big swing from Belt was all Lincecum
needed.
The lanky right-hander, who walked four
in his no-hitter against the Padres,
might’ve been even more efficient against
Milwaukee. He only walked one and tossed
108 pitches before getting lifted for pinch-
hitter Andres Torres in the bottom of the
eighth.
Lincecum faced just three hitters in six of
his eight innings. Francisco hit a liner that
skipped to the wall in right.
Lincecum even got Gomez to lose his hel-
met striking out on a breaking ball in the
seventh, and he received a standing ovation
from the announced sellout crowd of 41,219
after pitching the eighth.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
sport, you picked the wrong sport. He
knows it can happen. It happened twice
before I met Manny Pacquiao. He showed me
those tapes. He wasn’t embarrassed by it.
He knows it’s part of life in boxing. That’s
why he deals with it so well. It doesn’t both-
er him.”
Although Pacquiao is unshakably confi-
dent, Roach acknowledges he’ll have to dis-
cuss retirement with Pacquiao if the brawl-
ing Rios (31-1-1, 22 KOs) pulls an upset at
the Venetian casino, the world’s newest
boxing hotbed after a series of fight cards in
its arena this year.
“I’ll even go so far as to say if I see flaws
in training camp, I’ll tell Manny, ‘It’s
over,”’ Roach said. “The thing is, until we
get there, we really don’t know. We can’t
really guess. If he doesn’t respond to train-
ing camp, my No. 1 priority is to take care
of my fighter, no matter what.”
Pacquiao also will train without longtime
strength coach Alex Ariza, who was recent-
ly fired by Roach. Despite the upheaval in
camp and his typically chaotic personal
life, Pacquiao seems confident he can focus
on the fight long enough to take care of
Rios and his ferocious, defense-deficient
style.
“I didn’t choose an easy opponent,”
Pacquiao said. “I didn’t choose a tuneup
fight. I chose to fight a good fighter. ... I
love to fight. I love to throw a lot of punch-
es. I have to make sure I’m in 100 percent
condition and the killer instinct is still
there.”
Rios dispensed his usual happy-go-lucky,
profane personality to the Beverly Hills
gathering, jokingly holding up his name-
plate while posing for photos with Pacquiao
and Zou Shiming, the Chinese Olympic
gold medalist who will fight on the under-
card. While Rios is among the sport’s most
likable guys, Roach is more interested in
the challenger’s crowd-pleasing style.
“He comes to fight. He wants to
exchange,” Roach said. “I think it’s a fight
that he’ll make us look great in. He’s the
perfect style for Manny Pacquiao.”
After crossing the globe on a promotion-
al tour that included stops in China,
Singapore and the U.S., Rios is happy to be
home. Pacquiao will check in at Roach’s
Wild Card gym only briefly before heading
home, where he’ll get to work on revitaliz-
ing his career.
“It’s really important to win this fight,”
Pacquiao said. “Not just win, but to win con-
vincingly, either knockout or decision, as
long as the fans are satisfied.”
Continued from page 11
FIGHT
This truly was a typical preseason opener
for what many consider the best two teams
in the NFL; San Francisco and Denver are 1-
2 in the AP Pro32 NFL power rankings.
Now, everybody realizes that if they were
to play a meaningful matchup it could really
be something.
Kaepernick completed all four of his pass-
es, two to Anquan Boldin in his 49ers debut
after being acquired in a trade from the
Ravens. Manning was 2 for 4 for 13 yards.
The 49ers kicked off their “Farewell to
Candlestick” season before they move into
their new stadium next to team headquarters
in Santa Clara in 2014. Fittingly for nostal-
gia’s sake, sprinkled among those suddenly
top-selling No. 7 Kaepernick jerseys were
some tributes to the old-school favorites:
Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Ronnie Lott.
New 49ers kicker Phil Dawson made field
goals of 32 and 38 yards, but missed wide
left on the final play before halftime with
the flags whipping on a cool summer
evening by the bay.
Kaepernick begins his first full season as
the starter after taking the job from Alex
Smith last November and leading San
Francisco to the Super Bowl. And the Niners
head to Kansas City for next Friday’s game
— against the Chiefs’ new play caller,
Smith.
A.J. Jenkins, one of Kaepernick’s key tar-
gets, had a forgettable preseason debut.
Jenkins faces high expectations after the
first-round pick went without a catch in his
highly scrutinized rookie season. The 49ers
are depending on him to produce while top
2012 wideout Michael Crabtree spends much
of the season recovering from surgery on his
torn Achilles’ tendon, and Mario
Manningham works back from knee surgery.
Only two plays after Phillips scored mid-
way through the second quarter, Jenkins
caught an 11-yard pass from Scott Tolzien
and fumbled. Denver’s Rahim Moore recov-
ered.
A pass by Colt McCoy intended for
Jenkins late in the first half was well over-
thrown and strong safety Adams easily
grabbed the interception against his former
team.
49ers first-round draft pick Eric Reid had
six tackles in his professional debut.
Broncos backup quarterback Brock
Osweiler completed his first six passes and
went 13 for 18 for 105 yards.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
SPORTS 15
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 70 45 .609 —
Washington 54 60 .474 15 1/2
New York 52 60 .464 16 1/2
Philadelphia 52 62 .456 17 1/2
Miami 43 70 .381 26
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Pittsburgh 70 44 .614 —
St. Louis 66 48 .579 4
Cincinnati 63 51 .553 7
Chicago 50 64 .439 20
Milwaukee 49 66 .426 21 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 64 50 .561 —
Arizona 58 55 .513 5 1/2
San Diego 52 62 .456 12
Colorado 52 64 .448 13
San Francisco 51 63 .447 13
Thursday’sGames
N.Y. Mets 2, Colorado 1
Pittsburgh 5, Miami 4, 10 innings
Philadelphia 12, Chicago Cubs 1
San Francisco 4, Milwaukee 1
L.A. Dodgers 5, St. Louis 1
Friday’sGames
Philadelphia (Lannan 3-4) at Washington (Haren
6-11), 4:05 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 8-5) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 9-9),
4:10 p.m.
Miami (Ja.Turner 3-3) at Atlanta (Beachy 0-0), 4:30
p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Rusin 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 13-5),
5:15 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 12-4) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa
10-6), 5:40 p.m.
N.Y.Mets (Hefner 4-8) at Arizona (Corbin 12-3),6:40
p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 7-7) at Seattle (J.Saunders 10-
10), 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 6-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 4-
6), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 14-3) at San Francisco (Vogel-
song 2-4), 7:15 p.m.
Saturday’sGames
Baltimore at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Dodgers, 1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Miami at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
San Diego at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 70 47 .598 —
Tampa Bay 66 47 .584 2
Baltimore 63 51 .553 5 1/2
New York 57 56 .504 11
Toronto 53 61 .465 15 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 68 45 .602 —
Cleveland 62 53 .539 7
Kansas City 59 53 .527 8 1/2
Minnesota 49 62 .441 18
Chicago 43 69 .384 24 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 64 49 .566 —
Texas 65 50 .565 —
Seattle 53 61 .465 11 1/2
Los Angeles 51 62 .451 13
Houston 37 76 .327 27
Thursday’sGames
Detroit 10, Cleveland 3
Kansas City 5, Boston 1
Friday’sGames
Minnesota (Gibson 2-3) at Chicago White Sox
(Joh.Danks 2-9), 11:10 a.m., 1st game
Detroit (Porcello 8-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 5-4),
4:05 p.m.
L.A.Angels (Weaver 6-5) at Cleveland (Kazmir 7-4),
4:05 p.m.
Oakland (J.Parker 7-6) at Toronto (Rogers 3-6),4:07
p.m.
Boston (Peavy 9-4) at Kansas City (E.Santana 8-6),
5:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Hendriks 0-1) at Chicago White Sox
(Leesman 0-0), 5:10 p.m., 2nd game
Texas(Garza1-1) at Houston(Bedard3-8),5:10p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 7-7) at Seattle (J.Saunders 10-
10), 7:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 6-5) at L.A.Dodgers (Capuano 4-
6), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 14-3) at San Francisco (Vogel-
song 2-4), 7:15 p.m.
Saturday’sGames
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees, 10:05 a.m.
Oakland at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
Baltimore at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m.
Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Dodgers, 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Boston at Kansas City, 4:10 p.m.
Texas at Houston, 4:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 11 7 5 38 36 29
Kansas City 10 7 6 36 33 24
Montreal 10 6 5 35 33 32
Philadelphia 9 7 7 34 34 32
Houston 9 6 6 33 26 21
New England 8 8 6 30 27 20
Chicago 8 9 4 28 27 31
Columbus 6 11 5 23 25 30
Toronto FC 4 10 8 20 20 29
D.C. 3 15 4 13 13 36
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 7 5 38 38 26
Portland 8 3 11 35 32 21
Colorado 9 7 8 35 30 26
Vancouver 9 7 6 33 34 30
Los Angeles 10 9 3 33 32 27
FC Dallas 8 6 8 32 27 30
Seattle 9 7 4 31 27 22
San Jose 8 9 6 30 25 33
Chivas USA 4 13 5 17 19 39
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
Seattle FC at Toronto FC, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
D.C. United at Philadelphia, 8 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
New England at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Houston at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Chivas USA, 11 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 17
D.C. United at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Toronto FC at Columbus, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at New England, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 8 p.m.
Seattle FC at Houston, 9 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 9:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Portland, 11 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 18
Sporting Kansas City at San Jose, 10 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
vs. Orioles
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/11 8/10
@Nats
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/13
vs. Brewers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/7
vs. Brewers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/6
vs. Brewers
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/8
vs.Orioles
7:15p.m.
NBC
8/9
at Reds
4:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/6
vs.Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/13
@Reds
9:35a.m.
8/7
@Toronto
4:07p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/9
@Toronto
9:37a.m.
8/12
@Toronto
10:07a.m.
CSN-CAL
8/10
@Toronto
10:07a.m.
CSN-CAL
8/111
@Montreal
5p.m.
8/7
@ Vancouver
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/10
vs.K.C.
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/18
@Dallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/24
@Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
8/31
vs.Philly
8p.m.
ESPN2
9/8
vs.Vancouver
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/14
vs. Orioles
1:05p.m.
FOX
BASEBALL
AmericanLeague
BOSTON RED SOX—Activated OF Danel Nava
from the paternity leave list.Optioned RHP Steven
Wright to Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS—Designated 1B Mark
Reynolds for assignment. Recalled RHP Preston
Guilmet from Columbus (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Optioned LHP Danny
Duffy to Omaha (PCL). Purchased the contract of
LHPFrancisleyBuenofromOmaha.WaivedCAdam
Moore.
NEWYORKYANKEES—Sent INF Brent Lillibridge
outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
OAKLANDATHLETICS—Claimed INF Adam Ros-
ales off waivers from Texas.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS—Placed RHP Matt Guerrier on
the 60-day DL and OF Thomas Neal on the 15-day
DL.RecalledRHPEduardoSanchezfromIowa(PCL).
Selected the contract of C J.C. Boscan from Iowa.
COLORADOROCKIES—Purchased the contract
of RHP Jeff Manship from Colorado Springs (PCL).
Recalled LHP Christian Friedrich from Colorado
Springs and placed him on the 60-day DL.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Agreed to terms on
a two-year contract extension with 2B Chase Utley,
through the 2015 season.
ST.LOUISCARDINALS—RecalledRHPCarlosMar-
tinez and LHP Sam Freeman from Memphis (PCL).
SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Recalled C Hector
SanchezfromFresno(PCL).DesignatedCGuillermo
Quiroz for assignment.
NFL
ARIZONACARDINALS—Claimed DE Cordian Ha-
gans from Pittsburgh. Released CB Josh Hill.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Signed LB Shawn
Loiseau and S Ashante Williams.Waived-injured G
Justin Anderson.Waived WR Rodrick Rumble.
KANSASCITYCHIEFS—Signed OL Hutch Ecker-
son.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERS—Waived CB Myron
Lewis. Waived-injured LB Marvin Booker. Signed
CB Mason Robinson.
NBA
NEWYORKKNICKS—Signed G Beno Udrih.
PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS—Signed G Mo
Williams.
COLLEGE
AUBURN—Named Tyler McGill assistant swim-
ming coach.
BERRY—Named Travis Glennon men’s assistant
lacrosse coach.
CENTRAL OKLAHOMA—Announced the resig-
nation of softball coach Genny Stidham. Named
Cody White interim softball coach.
GEORGIASOUTHERN—Named Gleen Hart asso-
ciate athletics director for external operations,
LaurenBuckbusinessdirector andAlisonRuff head
of student-athlete services.
MONTANASTATE—Named Chris Haslam men’s
assistant basketball coach
NORTHDAKOTASTATE—Suspended senior DT
Leevon Perry from the football team for the sea-
son-opener at KansasStatefor violatingteamrules.
RANDOLPH-MACON—Named MK Geratowski
women’s lacrosse coach.
SAINTMARY’S(CAL)—NamedMartyClarkemen’s
assistant basketball coach.
ST.JOSEPH’S(LI)—Announced the retirement of
director of athletics, Donald Lizak, effective Nov. 1.
ST.NORBERT—NamedMeganBetzassistant track
and field coach,Amanda Trunzo assistant women’s
ice hockey coach and Chase Emnott strength and
performance coach.
TEXAS-PANAMERICAN—Named Brandon Hen-
nessey assistant baseball coach and Ashlie
Christenson assistant volleyball coach.
TROY—Named Scott Kidd men’s tennis coach.
WASHINGTON&JEFFERSON—NamedKatieRihn
assistant sportsinformationdirector,BrandonEisen-
hart men’sassistant soccer coach,MarissaMcDaniel
assistant softball coach, Andrew Booth assistant
football coach and Ryan Verlihay assistant base-
ball coach.
TRANSACTIONS
Howard says Everton
starting spot not in question
LONDON — Tim Howard has no
doubts. He’s Everton’s No. 1 goal-
keeper, and he doesn’t feel threat-
ened by the arrival of Joel Robles.
Robles was one of new manager
Roberto Martinez’s first signings
at Goodison Park, with the pair
reunited after winning the FACup
with Wigan in May.
Howard, though, has three years
remaining on his Everton contract
and expressed confidence that his
starting spot won’t be taken by
Robles. The 23-year-old Spaniard
joined the club from Atletico
Madrid after spending part of last
season on loan at Wigan.
“I don’t think that’s ever been in
question. ... I have never asked for
assurances (about my status),”
Howard said Thursday during a
conference call launching NBC’s
Premier League coverage in the
United States.
“I know where I stand. I think
my performances over the last 450
games have merited my place
where I am right now. Unless I
have been asleep for a few months
and forgotten something I think
all is pretty well in my camp.”
The 34-year-old U.S. interna-
tional described preseason train-
ing as “intense” under Martinez,
with fatigue setting in during
exhibition games.
That, though, is to be expected
and the team is now focused on the
Aug. 17 league opener at Norwich
— Martinez’s first competitive
game since filling the void left by
David Moyes going to Manchester
United.
Sports brief
16
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AUTO
New Nissan Sentra looks like Altima
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Restyled for a new, upscale look,
Nissan’s Sentra small sedan for 2013 is
more fuel efficient than ever and so roomy
inside the government no longer ranks it
as a compact sedan.
Some people even confuse the new, mid-
size Sentra with the larger, 2013 Nissan
Altima because from the outside, the
Sentra looks a lot like the more-expensive
Altima.
In fact, though the 15.2-foot-long
Sentra still handles like a small car and is
9.4 inches shorter in overall length than
the Altima, the Sentra has more rear-seat
legroom — a surprising 37.4 inches. This
is more than the back-seat legroom of the
typical small-car competitors such as the
2013 Honda Civic and 2013 Toyot a
Corolla.
Add in affordable pricing and the
Sentra’s top 34 miles-per-gallon federal
government fuel economy rating for com-
bined city/highway travel, and it’s easy to
see why the Sentra is a noteworthy new
model.
And don’t think that 34 mpg is an unat-
tainable figure. The test 2013 Sentra SL
averaged 34 mpg, even though the car was
driven in normal fashion and the travel
included a highway in the mountains and
foothill roads. The fuel economy was
enough to give the test car an impressive
range of 440 miles on a single tank of reg-
ular unleaded.
Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail
The 2013 Sentra earned four out of five stars in overall crash testing by the federal government.The side crash test was good for the top, five
stars, but the overall rating was pulled down by a four-out-of-five-stars rating in frontal testing. See SENTRA, Page 17
By Linda Deutsch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Alawyer for plaintiffs
in a wrongful death lawsuit against Toyota
Motor Corp. told a jury on Thursday he will
ask for $20 million in damages for the fam-
ily of a woman who died when her Camry
suddenly accelerated and crashed despite her
efforts to stop.
The case involving the 2009 death of
Noriko Uno is the first involving the issue
to go to trial in state court.
Toyota recalled millions of vehicles
worldwide after drivers reported that some
of its vehicles were surging unexpectedly.
The company agreed to pay $1 billion in
other suits.
In his opening statement, attorney Garo
Mardirossian said Toyota was at fault for the
death of Uno because it failed to install an
override safety system in the 2006 model
she was driving.
“Toyota made a decision to leave out the
brake override system in the 2006 Camry, ”
he said.
Witnesses will testify that they saw
Uno’s car traveling at speeds up to 100 mph
as it careened the wrong way down a one-
way street, he said.
Toyota issued a statement at the court-
room saying the 2006 Camry had a state of
the art braking system and had earned top
safety and quality honors. It said an override
system would not have prevented the crash.
In his opening statement, Toyota attor-
ney Vincent Galvin told jurors the accident
was not caused by any problem with the
vehicle and instead was the result of driver
error. He said Uno had health problems
including diabetes that may have hampered
her judgment after she was hit by another
driver at an intersection before the crash.
“She became hypersensitive to what was
going on and took off at 80 mph,” Galvin
said.
He contended that Uno never hit the
brake, but he did not address the question of
whether she tried to use the hand brake.
In his opening statement, Mardirossian
showed photos of the hand brake in the
“on” position.
The 2009 accident occurred in Upland,
east of Los Angeles, when another driver
went through a stop sign and broadsided
Uno’s car at slow speed. Mardirossian said
the Camry spun around and started accelerat-
ing.
Uno was in control of the car and managed
to avoid other drivers, including a woman
with six children in her vehicle, the lawyer
said, but she was unable to stop before the
car hit a tree and light pole, killing her.
The trial is expected to last two months.
Lawyer to seek $20 million in case against Toyota
AUTO 17
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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price, including destination charge, is $16,780 for a
base, 2013 Sentra S with 130-horsepower, four-cylinder
engine and six-speed, manual transmission. The lowest
starting retail price for a 2013 Sentra with a continuous-
ly variable transmission that drivers operate like an auto-
matic is $17,380. No regular automatic is available on
the 2013 Sentra, and only the base S model is offered with
a choice of manual or CVT for 2013.
All 2013 Sentras come with the 130-horsepower four
cylinder that produces a maximum 128 foot-pounds of
torque at 3,600 rpm.
In comparison, the starting retail price for a 2013
Altima, which comes with a 182-horsepower four cylin-
der, is $22,550.
Meantime, the 2013 Honda Civic sedan has a starting
MSRP, including destination charge, of $18,955 with
manual transmission and $19,755 with automatic, while
the 2013 Toyota Corolla with manual transmission starts
at $17,040 and with automatic starts at $18,990. The
Civic is powered by a 140-horsepower four cylinder,
while the Corolla has a 132-horsepower, four-cylinder
engine.
The new Sentra is upscale feeling, inside and out.
Even light-emitting diodes accent headlights and tail-
lamps on all 2013 Sentras, and chrome-look door handles
are standard on all models.
The dashboard has soft-touch plastic with a pleasant
appearance, and the center armrest between front seats in
the test Sentra SL was cushioned.
While leather-trimmed seats are available, the premi-
um, gray-colored, cloth-covered seats in the SL tester
provided good support and were cooler to the skin on hot
summer days.
The optional navigation package, which added voice
recognition control, hands-free text messaging, a
rearview monitor and colorful, 5.8-inch display and touch
screen, was only $650. This is an amazing price com-
pared with other carmakers’ pricing.
The Sentra’s electroluminescent gauges also were a
nice, upscale touch.
Nissan didn’t scrimp on the front-seat legroom to add
space to the back seat. Front-seat passengers get a full
42.5 inches of legroom, and the front seat tracks are long
to accommodate many sizes of passengers.
The 15.1-cubic-foot trunk also is generously sized and
is 18 percent bigger than the Corolla’s trunk.
All this comes from a 2.3-inch longer car than last
year’s Sentra. The 2013 Sentra is a bit shorter in height
than last year’s model, but at 58.9 inches is still taller
than a 2013 Civic sedan and a 2013 Corolla.
In fact, the Sentra’s front headroom of 39.4 inches is
better than the Corolla’s and Civic sedan’s .
Intriguingly, while the Sentra has grown a bit larger,
it’s some 150 pounds lighter. The reduced weight, plus
improved aerodynamics, help account for the fuel econo-
my.
So does the smaller-displacement engine and the CVT,
which in the Sentra test car wasn’t as onerous and fun-sap-
ping as some earlier Nissan CVTs have been.
The engine now is a 1.8-liter, double overhead cam four
cylinder that develops 10 less horsepower than last
year’s 2-liter unit.
Still, the test Sentra SL felt light, yet solid, and had
decent throttle response.
While not a sporty car, the Sentra moved well with traf-
fic. It seemed that Nissan engineers have found the right
combination to deliver adequate power and better-than-
expected, real-world fuel economy.
Certainly, with the “eco” button activated just a couple
times during the test drive to conserve fuel and the car
driven without a focus on gas mileage, the range was
impressive.
The suspension softened most road bumps for a com-
fortable ride, but the Sentra tester still handled mountain
curves at decent speed with poise.
The Sentra doesn’t have the kind of sound deadening
and noise isolation that’s found in more upscale cars, and
sounds from nearby trucks and engine droning came
through to the passenger compartment.
The 2013 Sentra earned four out of five stars in overall
crash testing by the federal government. The side crash
test was good for the top, five stars, but the overall rating
was pulled down by a four-out-of-five-stars rating in
frontal testing.
In contrast, the 2013 Civic earned an overall five out of
five stars.
The 2013 Sentra has been involved in two safety
recalls.
In one, Sentras were recalled because a sensor that
detected whether a passenger was sitting in the front pas-
senger seat had not been built to specification and might
suppress deployment of an air bag.
The other safety recall involved Sentra gas tanks that
might not have been fully sealed, resulting in potential
fuel leakage when the tank is full. This might cause a fire.
Continued from page 16
SENTRA
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
There is no doubt about it. When it
comes to Outside Lands, San Francisco’s
premiere music, art, food and wine festi-
val, the ante is always high.
Having figuratively tore the roof off
Golden Gate Park last summer with the
likes of Neil Young, the Foo Fighters
and Metallica, organizers know the only
way to properly and successfully keep
Outside Lands at the level they’ve estab-
lished throughout its now six-year run in
the city is to continuously raise the bar
every year. So to do that in 2013, they
reached for rock ’n’ roll royalty.
Sir Paul McCartney headlines an eclec-
tic new lineup of music acts that are the
highlight of three days worth of music,
art and always sensational cuisine in San
Francisco starting Friday Aug. 9 and cul-
minating Sunday.
But as is accustomed with Outside
Lands, a glance at the three-day lineup
can prove intimidating with the musical
prospects. So here’s five can’t-miss acts
if you’re wondering where the Daily
Journal will be during Outside Lands.
5. LoCura — Saturday, Panhandle
Stage, noon
Every year, Outside Lands organizers
See MUSIC Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: August 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
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Cracking a not-so-perfect world
Action, strong directing
provide ‘Elysium’ power
By Jerry Lee
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
In “Elysium,” it’s the year 2154, and the 1
percenters have come up with a foolproof
solution in separating themselves from the
riffraff. Money and blue bloodlines are no
longer the only gaps separating them and
the rest of us.
Elysium is the name of a giant space sta-
tion where the super duper, “I’d-use-hundred-
dollar-bills-to-light-my-Weber-grill-if-I-
actually-did something-as-plebeian-as-barbe-
cue” rich live. Everyone else remains on a pollut-
ed, overcrowded Earth reminiscent of the worst that
third world slums have to offer. Imagine a dismal
mashup of slums in India, Brazil, Africa and Detroit
(Sorry, Motown, bad joke).
On Elysium, life is all champagne, manicured
lawns and idyllic weather. Folks can change hair
color or cure cancer instantly using advanced tech-
nology. Down on earth, not so much. The majority of
humans are no longer individuals, but rather treated as
a necessary evil needed to make life good for those on
Elysium.
To add insult to injury, they won’t even let a few of the
Earthlings come over to do all the jobs the residents wouldn’t
do (e.g. serve food, pick fruit, write movie reviews). Those
jobs have been droidsourced by robots. The only way onto
Elysium is to sneak in.
Matt Damon plays an ex-con and former street urchin named
See ELYSIUM, Page 22
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
SEEKING CONTINUITY WITH THE
PAST: PASADENA’S NORTON SIMON
MUSEUM REFLECTS ONE COLLEC-
TOR’S PERSONAL PASSION FOR
ART. Over a 30-year period, 20th-century
industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993)
amassed European art from the Renaissance
to the 20th century, and South and
Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years.
Among the most celebrated works he
assembled are a bronze sculptures Buddha
Shakyamuni, c. 550; Madonna and Child
with Book, c. 1502-03, by Raphael;
Portrait of a Boy, c. 1655-60, by
Rembrandt van Rijn; Mulberry Tree, 1889,
by Vincent van Gogh; Little Dancer Aged
Fourteen, 1878-81, by Edgar Degas; and
Woman with a Book, 1932, by Pablo
Picasso. These are among the 12,000 items
that now comprise the collection of the
Norton Simon Museum in the urbane, art-
loving city of Pasadena.
WHO WAS NORTON SIMON? Norton
Simon, born in 1907, graduated from
Lowell High School in San Francisco at the
age of 16. In 1925, at his father’s insis-
tence, Simon enrolled in the University of
California at Berkeley, but left his pre-law
studies within six weeks. In 1929, he
invested $7,000 in a floundering juice bot-
tling company, which he turned into Hunt
Foods, Inc., eventually building a multina-
tional corporation that included McCall’s
Publishing, Canada Dry Corporation, Max
Factor cosmetics and Avis Car Rental. His
commitment to art was lifelong and heart-
felt. In 1974, when Simon formed the muse-
um that now bears his name, he said, “I am
not essentially a religious person, but my
feeling about a museum is that it can serve
as a substitute for a house of worship. It is a
place to respect man’s creativity and to
sense continuity with the past. It is a place
to give us a feeling of the dignity of man
and to help us to strive towards our own cre-
ativity and fulfillment.”
THE BUILDING AND THE
GROUNDS. The 1969 structure, which ini-
tially housed the Pasadena Art Museum, was
designed by Pasadena architects Thornton
Ladd and John Kelsey. The curved exterior
walls are covered with earth-toned tiles by
noted Sausalito ceramicist Edith Heath. The
museum’s 79,000-square-foot garden, with
more than 180 species of trees, shrubs,
vines, ground cover and perennials, has a
meandering pond and a small waterfall.
Sculptures are integrated into the landscape
and monumental bronzes by Auguste Rodin
are displayed in the Museum’s front garden.
THE COLLECTION. The filtered natural
light of the galleries creates an inviting set-
ting for works by Claude Monet, Pierre-
Auguste Renoir and Edgar Degas, Vincent
van Gogh, Paul Cézanne and Paul Gauguin.
Paintings by Jean-Auguste-Dominique
Ingres and Francisco de Goya hang near
Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Gustave
Courbet and Édouard Manet. Modern and
Contemporary Artists Pablo Picasso,
Georges Braque, Henri Matisse and Diego
Rivera are represented, as are Pop Art and
Minimal Artists Roy Lichtenstein and Andy
Warhol. Californian artists from the 1950s
through the 1970s include Sam Francis,
Richard Diebenkorn and Edward Ruscha.
Works by major sculptors of the early 20th
century, including Aristide Maillol,
Constantin Brancusi, Henry Moore and
Isamu Noguchi, are in the galleries and the
gardens.
ADVICE FOR FIRST TIME VISI-
TORS. Museum Educator Caroline Jones,
who regularly takes groups through the gal-
leries, said, “I would tell a new visitor that
it’s a museum with a collection that runs the
gamut from 14th-century Italy to 20th-cen-
tury Europe and the United States AND to
Southeast Asia. I’d recommend sitting with
a layout map to locate favorite kinds of art
and maybe taking a mid-visit break at 2:30
p.m. to check out a video of Norton
Simon’s life to learn how one man could
assemble a 12,000-piece collection in 40
years. And plan to come back! This is only
one-twelfth of the collection. My favorite
pieces are Cezanne’s “Uncle Dominique”
with its 3-D palette knife application of
paint; Pizzarro’s “Landscape with a Flock of
Sheep,” in pristine close-to-original shape,
never relined or varnished; and “The
Aldrovandi Dog” by Guercino, called the
best-known portrait of a dog from the 17th
century. ”
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW? The
Norton Simon Museum is at the intersec-
tion of Orange Grove and Colorado boule-
vards in Pasadena. This corner is the official
start of the Tournament of Roses Parade
route and the museum can be seen during the
parade television broadcast.
MUSEUM PARTICULARS. The
Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W.
Colorado Blvd. in Pasadena. The Museum is
open every day except Tuesday, from noon
to 6 p.m., and Friday until 9 p.m. The
Museum offers several tours, including
Audio Tours and Friday Evening Public
Tours. Parking is free. For more informa-
tion visit www.nortonsimon.org or call
(626) 449-6840.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjour-
nal.com or www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
GRACE KALLIS
The Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena holds treasures that reflect one collector’s lifelong
passion for art.Here,museum educator Caroline Jones,right,shares details about ‘The Aldrovandi
Dog’by Guercino.Although the mastiff’s name is unknown,his collar bears the coat of arms of a
noble family,the scars on his face evidence a rugged life and the white hairs on his muzzle suggest
his age.The grandeur of the painting tells of his owner’s high regard for this wonderful animal.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
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By W. Wayt Gibbs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Something about fine wine invites mys-
tique, ritual — and more than a little preten-
sion.
If you have ever ordered an old and expen-
sive bottle of red from a master sommelier,
you may have seen the ostentatious produc-
tion that goes into decanting the stuff. The
wine steward rolls out a gueridon (a little
table) on which the bottle is cradled gently
in a cloth-lined basket. Alit candle flickers
nearby. The sommelier tips the neck of the
bottle over the candle while pouring the
wine with the delicacy of a surgeon into a
broad-bottomed decanter so as not to dis-
turb the sediment that has fallen out of the
wine during years of aging and character
development.
Thus aerated, the wine is then allowed
to “breathe” for a while before it is
served. Oenophiles — even those back in
Roman times — have observed that wine
of many vintages and varieties improves
perceptibly when aerated for as little as a
few minutes or for as long as a day.
Oenologists have debated the chemistry
that might account for this shift in fla-
vor. Do the tannins change in ways that
soften their distinctive flavors? Or does
aeration simply allow stinky sulfides
enough time to evaporate away?
Whatever the science behind it, the tradi-
tional ritual makes for a fine show. But
when you’re at home pouring wine for your-
self or guests, you can save time and gener-
ate entertainment of a different kind by tak-
ing a shortcut: dump the bottle in a blender,
and frappe it into a froth. (Sediment is less
common in wines today than it used to be,
but if you are concerned about that, pour the
wine very slowly into the blender, and stop
before you get to the last couple ounces.)
Less than a minute of hyperdecanting, as
we at The Cooking Lab have taken to call-
ing this modern method, exposes the wine
to as much air as it would see in an hour or
more of traditional decanting, and does so
far more uniformly. Wine aficionados may
recoil in fear that such a violent treatment
will “break” the wine, but the proof is in the
tasting.
In carefully controlled, double-blind taste
tests conducted at our lab, we presented 14
experienced wine tasters — seven somme-
liers, three vintners, two oenologists and
two wine writers — with unlabeled samples
of hyperdecanted wine. The tasters also
received samples taken from the same bot-
tles but decanted the old-fashioned way. The
order of presentation was varied from one
trial to the next.
When we asked them which samples they
preferred, only two of the 14 judges were
able to distinguish a difference repeatedly,
and both of those tasters consistently pre-
ferred the wine that had gone through the
blender.
So the next time you uncork a well-mus-
cled syrah — or even a rambunctious ries-
ling — for your connoisseur friends, bring
a blender to the table, and have a camera
ready. The foam will subside within sec-
onds. But you’ll cherish that memory of the
look on their faces for the rest of your days.
Improve red wine with just a push of a button
Oenophiles — even those back in Roman times — have observed that wine of many vintages
and varieties improves perceptibly when aerated for as little as a few minutes or for as long
as a day.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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San Carlos
Max, who, while trying to go on the
straight and narrow, gets into a horrible
accident and is left with just five days to
live.
He determines that his only hope of sur-
vival is to get to Elysium and heal himself
in one of the miraculous machines to which
the rich are privy. He enlists the help of his
former criminal cohorts to find a way onto
the space station.
Standing in his way is of course, the outer
space version of the Rio Grande and, if that
weren’t challenging enough, Elysium’s
bulldog secretary of defense.
The take-no-prisoners defense secretary,
Delacourt, is played by Jodie Foster who
makes Dick Cheney look like Rachel
Maddow. Her job is to keep undesirables off
of Elysium to sustain a certain way of life.
She wants to keep Elysium safe from mortal
danger but, more importantly, safe from the
philosophical and political seepage of com-
passion and socialism.
Representing Delacourt in executing her
vision is an amoral, hyper-violent and com-
pletely psycho black ops henchman named
Kruger, played with maniacal verve by
Sharlto Copley (“District 9”). Max and
Kruger butt heads and many other body parts
throughout the film, providing most of the
action scenes.
Meanwhile, those ex-con cohorts assist-
ing his passage to paradise have their own
agenda. While at first, their desires seem
merely criminal, they evolve into some-
thing more along the lines of revolutionary.
They see Max (Marx?) as a means to level-
ing the playing field.
It’s a highly enjoyable setup. If you can
ignore the massive sledgehammer of a mes-
sage being pounded into you, it’s easy to
admire the utter competence and skill of the
filmmaking.
Director Neil Blomkamp knows how to
leverage special effects and combine them
with frenetic action sequences. The docu-
mentary style, hand-held feel works very
well, and Blomkamp generally avoids the
queasy, overly-cut editing style of many of
his contemporaries. More importantly, he
understands the need to leaven the superb
action with multiple dimensions of story
and character development.
The script has no wasteful moments. The
dialogue is sharp, with good use of incorpo-
rating Spanish into the conversations, as
you might expect in Los Angeles 141 years
from now.
Blomkamp is definitely a new director to
watch. After watching “District 9,” and now
this film, I have not been as excited for a
new director since I noticed Christopher
Nolan doing incredible things in his early
years, with “Memento” and “Insomnia.”
While the story and perhaps casting
appear to have been influenced a little bit by
heavy-handed Hollywood producers protect-
ing their financial investments, overall,
Blomkamp’s vision seems to remain intact.
If Blomkamp can show he isn’t just a one
trick pony (“District 9” was, too, a science
fiction movie with overt socio-political
themes), he has the potential to enjoy a
career as “the next” Nolan. And he may yet
get the chance to earn the trust of film finan-
ciers to have full creative control.
Continued from page 19
ELYSIUM
have provided Latino American fans with a
Spanish-speaking band. And while LoCura
doesn’t fit the marquee bill, they have plen-
ty of Español funk to fill up San Francisco.
Hailing from the city by the Bay, LoCura
is an intoxicating mix of flamenco, ska,
cumbia and reggae. The result is a blend of
music tailor-made for Outside Lands.
4. CHIC featuring Nile Rogers — Friday,
Sutro Stage, 6:05 p.m.
Call us crazy, but maybe D’Angelo get-
ting sick is a good thing.
On Wednesday, the R&B crooner
announced that, due to a medical emergency,
he wouldn’t fulfill his Outside Lands obliga-
tion. The festival didn’t panic and instead
called on the legendary CHIC and Nile
Rogers to fill D’Angelo’s spot Friday
evening.
CHIC is a party band and one of the finest
purveyors of uptown disco and downtown
funk around. Rogers is the co-founder and
has an extraordinary history of collabora-
tions as producer and performer with many
artists including Madonna and David Bowie.
His most recent collaboration with Daft
Punk has the Outside Lands rumor boards
swirling with the possibility of an appear-
ance by the red-hot Punk.
3. Kaskade — Sunday, Twin Peaks Stage,
8:25 p.m.
Outside Lands has always embraced the
monster that is EDM by welcoming major
electronic dance music acts to Golden Gate
Park. This summer is no exception. In fact,
it’s a step in a local direction with the city’s
own Kascade on Sunday night.
Sunday at the TP stage is actually lining
up to be quite the party. Along with
Kaskade, Matt and Kim, plus the U.K.’s
Rudimental and Emile Sande will be on hand
throughout the day.
2. Jurassic 5 — Saturday, Lands End Stage,
5 p.m.
Where have you been, J5?
It’s taken the hip hop innovators and leg-
ends seven long years to venture in and out
of solo careers and finally get back to rap-
ping as a quintet.
And, as is the case with all great things,
Jurassic 5’s return to the stage will be well
worth the wait. No one throws a hip hop
party like the Jurassic 5.
1. Red Hot Chili Peppers — Sunday, Lands
End Stage, 7:45 p.m.
In a word: Finally.
The Red Hot Chili Peppers have been
everyone’s favorite rumor every year the
Internet gets to throwing around names for
Outside Lands. And come last May, more
than a couple of people took the credit for
“calling” RHCP’s presence at Outside Lands.
But the truth is, who cares who called it?
The Chili Peppers will most definitely cap
off the 2013 version of the festival with a
huge, beautiful, red bow.
If reviews and social media posts from
other recent music festivals are any indica-
tion, San Francisco is in for one heck of a
Sunday night.
Honorable mentions: Dawes, Wild
Feathers, Bombino and The Soft White
Sixties.
Continued from page 18
MUSIC
advanced portable convection vaporizer
system available.” Minskoff holds a patent
for personal vaporizer inhalers.
Minskoff was in the midst of a divorce and
had a court order prohibiting him from hav-
ing weapons. However, in December,
deputies removed weapons from the scenes
of two separate incidents at the San Carlos
business. On Dec. 15, deputies reported
finding $10,000 worth of vandalism to the
building and the property burned. Deputies
took Minskoff into custody for his bizarre
behavior and confiscated a loaded gun.
Two days later, according to prosecutors,
deputies again responded to the business
and found it ransacked with the floor burned
and Minskoff, who was at the scene, asked
them if they were there seeking employ-
ment. They took him once more into psy-
chiatric custody and searched the business
with the co-owner. Inside, they reported
finding four assault weapons and high-
capacity ammunition magazines. They also
reported finding a pair of brass knuckles in
his car.
Carr said his client has some diagnosed
issues that he declined to specify but has
been in serious therapy at a psychiatric
facility since his last arrest and is in a better
mental place. Carr has no current concerns
about Minskoff’s ability to aid in his own
defense.
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said the
insanity defense is a logical step.
“It is certainly a reasonable plea to enter
and to have doctors appointed to see if he
meets the legal standard,” Wagstaffe said.
Minskoff remains free from custody on a
$150,000 bail bond as long as he remains
in a residential psychiatric treatment facili-
t y.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
‘The Real,’‘Exhale,’ take
new approach to TV talk
LOS ANGELES — Five women sitting
around talking has become a TV staple. Five
women talking, each of whom is either
black, Asian or Latino, is something differ-
ent.
It’s the approach tested by two shows:
“The Real,” airing on a handful of Fox-owned
stations, and the Aspire channel’s “Exhale.”
For “The Real,” concluding an experimen-
tal run Friday, the multi-ethnic panel of
Tamar Braxton, Loni Love, Adrienne Bailon,
Jeannie Mai and Tamera Mowry-Housley
isn’t the point, said executive producer
SallyAnn Salsano.
“It’s something we don’t really talk about.
... We just picked who’s best for the show. We
didn’t say, ‘Where’s our white one?”’ Salsano
said.
The difference in “The Real,” she said, is
generational. Other female-centric talk
shows like “The View,” the genre ground-
breaker when Barbara Walters launched it in
1997, tend toward older hosts with more set-
tled lives and perspectives.
As a 39-year-old woman with friends who
are single like her or dealing with the ups and
downs of married life, Salsano said, “There’s
no one who represents me on any of those”
other shows.
Relationships, child-rearing and other
challenges “are topics these girls are living,”
she said of “The Real” hosts.
Exactly, said Braxton, an R&B singer and
star of the WE channel’s reality show “Tamar
& Vince.”
“I’m a big fan of ‘The View’ and ‘The Talk,’
but with ‘The Real,’ it’s my generation,”
whether the topic is pop culture or a candid
take on daily life, she said. In a discussion of
childbirth, “We really got honest with the
audience. I didn’t have the best experience.
... You only hear the good side” elsewhere on
TV.
Continued from page 1
MINSKOFF
Wisely plays the lead role as Macbeth. He
notes that this is one of Shakespeare’s later
plays and one of his shortest.
“It’s the best poetry in Shakespeare,”
Wisely said. “It’s a mature writer writing at
his best. What’s not to like about it? It’s an
iconic role that requires quite a bit of the per-
son that plays it. Actors want to play great
roles and Macbeth certainly is one of the
great roles.”
Wisely notes that there’s no intermission,
so the show moves at a locomotive-like pace.
Kenneth Kelleher directs the play. Free
Shakespeare in the Park began in 1983, with
its debut production of The Tempest in Golden
Gate Park, San Francisco. This is the first
time SF Shakes has produced Macbeth for
Shakespeare in the Park.
Redwood City Parks, Recreation and
Community Services is sponsoring the play.
The city is also hosting other summer
evening events, including Movies on the
Square on Thursdays, Music on the Square on
Fridays, Classical Concerts, the Sunday kids
concert series Kidchella and Art on the
Square.
The show runs Aug. 10, 17 and 24 at 7:30
p.m. and Aug. 11, 18 and 25 at 2 p.m. at 1201
Brewster Ave. in Redwood City.
For more information go to sfshakes.org.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
PLAY
People in the news
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, AUG. 9
Are You Protected from a Home
Break-In? 7:30 a.m. Crystal Springs
Golf Course. 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. $15 includes breakfast.
For more information call 515-5891.
Found Colors: New Photographs
and Paintings Opening Reception.
5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Coastal Arts
League Museum, 300 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. The gallery runs until
Sept. 1. Friday through Monday,
Noon to 5:00 p.m. Free admission.
For more information call 726-6519
or go to coastalartsleague.com.
Brisbane Concerts in the Park:
California Cowboys in the Park.
5:45 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Brisbane
Community Park Gazebo, 11 Old
County Road, Brisbane. Free. For
more information call (415) 657-
4320 or go to ci.brisbane.ca.us.
Summer Concert: Fil Lorenz
Orchestra. 6 p.m. to 8 pm. Burton
Park, 1070 Cedar St., San Carlos. Free.
For more information go to
www.cityofsancarlos.org.
Foster City Summer Concert
Series: Lost Dog Found. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Leo Ryan Park, Foster City. Free.
For more information call 286-3380.
Music on the Square: Foreigner
UnAuthorized. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more infor-
mation go to
redwoodcity.org/events.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Coastal Rep Presents ‘HAIR.’ 8 p.m.
Coastal Reperatory Theatre, 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. $27. For
more information call 569-3266 or
go to www.coastalrep.com.
SATURDAY, AUG. 10
Free Health Forum. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Community
Center, 725 Monte Diablo Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 349-2200.
South San Francisco Walking Tour.
10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. South San
Francisco City Hall, 400 Grand Ave.,
South San Francisco. Meet in the
parking lot of City Hall. Former
Mayor Gene Mullin will lead the
walking tour.
Harley Motorcycle Riders Donate
School Supplies to Children in
Need. 10 a.m. San Mateo Medical
Center Hospital Lobby, corner of
37th Avenue and Edison Street, San
Mateo. Free. For more information
call 573-3935.
‘You’ve Got Talent’ Community
Celebration and Awards. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Ravenswood Family Health
Center, 1798 Bay Road, East Palo Alto.
Awards and performances. For more
information call 289-7675.
Celebrate the Summer Reading
Program with Daffy Dave. 1:30
p.m. Oak Room of the San Mateo
Main Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Crafts will be provided and
refreshments will be served. Free. For
more information call 522-7802 or
go to www.smplibrary.org.
ArtzFest. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Howard
Avenue, Burlingame. The event will
offer live music, art, festival foods,
kids’ entertainment and more. Free.
For more information go to
www.burlingamechamber.org.
Sacred Play with the Motherpeace
Cards: A Two-Day Workshop with
Vicki Noble. 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Sofia University, 1069 E. Meadow
Circle, Palo Alto. Continues to Aug.
11. Free. For more information email
events.sofia.edu.
Millbrae Historical Society
Rummage Sale. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Millbrae Civic Center Plaza, 1 Library
Ave., Millbrae. $5 for a bag of books.
For more information call 697-7607.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. Book Nook, 1
Cottage Lane, Twin Pines Park,
Belmont. Proceeds benefit the
Belmont Library. Paperbacks are
three for $1. Trade paperbacks are
$1. Hardbacks start at $2. Children’s
books start at 25 cents. For more
information call 593-5650 or go to
www.thefobl.org.
Pacifica: Milagra Ridge Walking
Tour. 1 p.m. To get to the walk, from
Sharp Park Road turn north on
College Drive and continue about
1/4 mile to roadside parking at the
Milagra Ridge gate. Parking is limit-
ed, carpools are encouraged.
Walking shoes are recommended.
Wool Spinning Workshop with
Kira Dulaney. 1p.m. to 4 p.m. 2200
Broadway, Redwood City.
Participants will learn how to use a
small wooden spindle and un-dyed
wool to spin their own two-ply yarn.
They will leave with a small ball of
yarn which can be readily woven,
knitted or crocheted. Material fee of
$15. For more information call 299-
0104 or got www.historysmc.org.
Colma: Cypress Lawn Walking
Tour. 1:30 p.m. Meet at Cypress
Lawn’s Noble Chapel,1370 El Camino
Real, Colma. Tour one of Colma’s
most beautiful cemeteries which
boasts of the permanent addresses
of some of the most outstanding
movers and shakers of San Mateo
County and the Golden State of
California. Wear comfortable walking
shoes and be prepared for unpre-
dictable weather.
Summer Reading Club Party
Featuring the Fratello
Marionettes. 2 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free. For more information
call 591-8286.
‘Food for Thought’ Reception. 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. The Main Gallery, 1018
Main St., Redwood City. The recep-
tion is open to the public and the
show will run from Aug. 5 to Sept. 8
at the gallery. Free. For more infor-
mation go to themaingallery.org.
Pacifica Walking Tour. 7 p.m. Tour
begins at the corner of Montecito
Avenue and Beach Boulevard. Tour
will cover historic buildings of the
central Sharp Park area, the Little
Brown Church and the promenade.
Tour will conclude at sunset with a
view from the Pacifica Pier. For more
information call 738-2332.
Shakespeare in the Park presents
‘Macbeth.’ 7:30 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information
email hopeinsite@gmail.com.
Here Comes the Sun! 8 p.m. Fox
Theatre, 2215 Broadway, Redwood
City. The White Album Ensemble of
Santa Cruz will join Redwood
Symphony in a performance of live
Beatles’ music. Tickets are available
at FoxRWC.com and start at $25. For
more information, email micki-
cartr@aol.com.
Coastal Rep Presents ‘HAIR.’ 8 p.m.
Coastal Reperatory Theatre, 1167
Main St., Half Moon Bay. $27. For
more information call 569-3266 or
go to www.coastalrep.com.
A Musical Romance: CUBAMOR. 8
p.m. TheatreWorks at Lecie Stern
Theatre, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo
Alto. Based on the independent film
Cubamor by Joshua Bee Alafia. $19.
For more information or other per-
formance dates visit
theatreworks.org.
SUNDAY, AUG. 11
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
Jenevein and Sylvan avenues, San
Bruno. For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
The Burlingame Chamber of
Commerce. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Howard
Avenue, Burlingame. The event will
offer live music, art, festival foods,
kids’ entertainment and more. Free.
For more information go to
www.burlingamechamber.org.
Redwood City Walking Tour. 10:30
a.m. Lathrop House, 627 Hamilton
St., Redwood City. The tour will last
approximately 90 minutes and will
cover historic sites including the
place where Wyatt Earp used to
drink. Free.
Shakespeare in the Park presents
‘Macbeth.’ 2 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. Free. For more information
email hopeinsite@gmail.com.
Bay Area Bigfoot Meeting. 3 p.m.
to 6 p.m. Round Table Pizza, 61 43rd
Ave., San Mateo. The latest news
about bigfoot/sasquatch will be dis-
cussed. Free. For more information
call 504-1782.
Frank Tusa — Remembering Chet
Baker. 4:30 p.m. Douglas Beach
House, 307 Mirada Road, Half Moon
Bay. $35, $30 for youth under 21. For
more information go to
www.bachddsoc.org.
A Bittersweet Comedy: THE GREAT
PRETENDER. 2 p.m. TheatreWorks at
Lecie Stern Theatre, 1305 Middlefield
Road, Palo Alto. $19. For more infor-
mation or other performance dates
visit theatreworks.org.
A Sensational Musical Drama:
MRS. HUGHES. 8 p.m. TheatreWorks
at Lecie Stern Theatre, 1305
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. $19. For
more information or other perform-
ance dates visit theatreworks.org.
MONDAY, AUG. 12
New Leaf Community Markets. 150
San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Looking for some easy meal solution
ideas? A member of the New Leaf
culinary team will provide you with a
new recipe and samples every
Monday. Free. For more information
call 650-726-3110 ext. 101.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
56.4 percent of students scored profi-
cient and above, 0.8 of a percentage
point lower than in 2012. In science,
59.1 percent scored proficient and
above, 0.4 of a percentage point lower
than the 59.5 percent achieved in
2012. Students showed gains in histo-
ry-social science, with 49.4 percent
scoring at least proficient, an increase
of 0.6 of a percentage point over last
year’s 48.8 percent.
“On a state level, scores on the annu-
al STAR assessments slipped by a frac-
tion of a percentage point this year as
schools dealt with ongoing budget
reductions and the transition to the
Common Core State Standards,” State
Superintendent Tom Torlakson said in
a press release.
The STAR program assigns
California students one of five per-
formance levels in each tested subject:
advanced, proficient, basic, below
basic and far below basic. California’s
target is for all students to score at the
proficient or advanced levels. The test
is one of three used to compile the
Academic Performance Index, which
measures whether schools and districts
are meeting the requirements of the
federal No Child Left Behind Act.
In San Mateo County, 65.3 percent
of students scored proficient or
advanced in English-Language Arts
tests, while 58.7 percent scored profi-
cient on history tests this year. In
mathematics, 59.5 percent scored pro-
ficient or advanced in tests. For sci-
ence tests, 65.3 percent of students
tested proficient or advanced. Students
showed a slight improvement in histo-
ry scores while the percentage of stu-
dents scoring at the advanced or profi-
cient level in English-Language Arts
and mathematics scores remained rela-
tively flat reflecting decreases of 0.7
percent and 0.3 percent, respectively.
Science scores dipped slightly.
Compared to 2009-10 test results,
the four-year trend continues to show
overall progress for all students in the
San Mateo Union High School
District’s seven schools,
Superintendent Scott Laurence said in a
press release.
Laurence noted that the four-year
trend is positive.
“Everyone has worked diligently to
make sure our programs, including
staff development, are designed to
encourage and assist all students,” he
said in the release. “The test scores
over four years indicate that those
mechanisms are producing some
strong results.”
Nancy Magee, administrator for
Board Support and Community
Relations at San Mateo County Office
of Education, said you see a trend of
slight dips in scores across the state.
She said the county is pleased it still
continues to outperform the state in its
test score numbers.
“It’s so consistent, it’s fascinating,”
Magee said. “Typically it’s a little
more varied. It’s interesting and it val-
idates the amount of effort and energy
going into Common Core implemen-
tation. It’s also probably a response to
so many years that districts have had
cut after cut after cut to their budgets.”
The new Common Core standards
shift to more project-based and team
collaborative learning, with less time
spent on lectures and more of an
emphasis on students using technolo-
gy in classrooms. New Smarter
Balance testing, which aligns with
these new standards, will go into effect
during the 2014-15 school year. Since
1998, California school districts
spent a significant amount of time
preparing for STAR tests, which were
unpopular among some for a variety of
reasons.
“We understand that we’re shifting
our focus to the Common Core, so it
makes sense it would impact the way
students perform in STAR testing,”
Magee said. “We have more intensive
priorities too, like working with com-
munity partners on third grade reading
proficiency and continuing to focus on
achievement gap issues.”
For county, district or individual
school scores visit
http://star.cde.ca.gov/.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
STAR
California Standards Tests were
completely aligned to state standards
in 2003. Since then, the goal for all
students was to score proficient or
above on the various subjects.Below
are the percentage of students to
meet that requirement statewide,first
number, followed by in San Mateo
County. The county numbers are
weighted to include significant
subgroups.
English-language arts 56.4 / 65.3
Mathematics 51.2 / 59.5
History 49.4 / 58.7
Science 59.1 / 65.3
Source: California
Department of Education
Test scores
nature of these legal proceedings we
are not able to comment further.”
A crowd of about 25 students, each
holding signs and chanting, came out
to protest the College Board’s request
and to get the word out about their
invalidated scores from 1:30 p.m. to
3:30 p.m. yesterday at the county
courthouse in Redwood City.
Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, the
firm representing the San Mateo
Union High School District, filed a
lawsuit against College Board and
ETS, their test security provider that
administers the AP Exams, on Aug. 5.
The suit, filed in the San Mateo
County Superior Court, states that
there is no evidence of misconduct by
the students and no evidence that the
testing irregularities materially
affected the test scores. The main
objective of the suit is to get the
scores returned to the students.
Back on July 17, the district report-
ed that ETS invalidated tests in 11 AP
subjects taken by 286 students this
past May because of seating irregu-
larities.
ETS contends a thorough investi-
gation was initiated in response to
information voluntarily provided by
a Mills student who complained
school personnel failed to comply
with specific seating guidelines.
Both ETS and the College Board
expressed understanding of the frus-
tration and offered retests.
Nancy Fineman of Cotchett Pitre &
McCarthy and the district’s counsel
Gregory Wedner of Lozano Smith
Attorneys are representing the dis-
trict. Christopher Casamassima,
Jonathan Paikin and Bruce Berman of
Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and
Dorr are defending College Board and
ETS.
The first set of AP Exam retests, in
English literature and physics, are
scheduled for today. AP chemistry and
AP English language are scheduled
for Monday.
As of press time, a federal court date
had yet to be set.
Continued from page 1
MILLS
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15 View from Giza
16 Weasel relatives
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20 Horse’s carriage
21 Elevate
23 Dawn goddess
24 Zig’s opposite
25 Wax-coated cheese
27 Ship’s bottom
31 Pollution org.
32 Melt, as an icicle
33 Sp. miss
34 Hayworth or Rudner
36 Garfeld dog
38 Unit of resistance
39 Lyric poems
40 Joker or ace
41 Society newbie
42 Gross!
44 Duck down
46 Rice feld
49 Como — usted?
50 Uses a compass
52 Of the past
56 Bullring yell
57 Ice cream serving
58 All set
59 Parking —
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61 Footwear
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2 Open meadow
3 Kimono fastener
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5 Wife, to a lawyer
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7 “Anna Karenina” star
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10 Promising
12 Balanced
17 Walrus teeth
19 Foundation
21 Fast
22 Banded stone
23 Dominions
24 Aught or naught
26 Verdi princess
28 Wear away
29 Early anesthetic
30 Gentle one
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37 Newspaper staffer
43 Singer Lauper
45 Wide valleys
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friday, auGust 9, 2013
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your prospects for material
acquisition look to be especially encouraging,
especially in situations where you are doing
business with someone of the opposite gender.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- It could be a mistake to
delegate a critical assignment to someone who has
yet to be tested. If you can’t give the job to anyone
else, you’d be better off doing it yourself.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you feel compelled
to do something for another without any thought of
what’s in it for you, it could turn out to be a beautiful
experience. Follow your instincts.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Go out of your way to
express your gratitude to someone who has been
quite kind to you lately. Everyone likes to know that
he or she is appreciated. It’ll mean a lot.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Situations that
have strong elements of friendly competition are
always your cup of tea, and today could offer you
just such an arrangement. Win or lose, do it with
grace, and everyone benefts.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Don’t get upset
if your ears start burning, because it’s likely that if
you could hear all the things being said about you, it
would make you happy, not upset.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- If you haven’t been
as considerate as you should be toward a loved one
lately, go out of your way to make amends. Hugs
and kisses have a magic that works every time.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Make your needs and
wants secondary to those of your special someone,
especially if the relationship has gotten a bit stale
lately. It’s a great way to get it stirred up again.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) -- You should take
advantage of today’s trends, which will have an
especially good effect on your work situation. Things
won’t just happen, however; you’ll need to go after
what you want.
taurus (April 20-May 20) -- If you’re an unattached
Taurus who would like to fnd a special someone,
it might be a better-than-average day in terms of
meeting promising new prospects.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) -- There’s a good chance
that you’ll have a knack for fnalizing contentious
matters to the satisfaction of everyone. Speak up to
get your ideas across.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) -- Be sure to compliment
someone who deserves praise for a job well
done. As long as you’re sincere, it will be far more
important to that person than you might realize.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
COOK -
COOK
Atria Hillsdale in San Mateo is seeking experi-
enced Cooks to join our food service
department. Responsibilities include preparing
and cooking our residents’ meals while following
strict sanitation guidelines. You will put on first
class events for our residents, their families, po-
tential residents, and professional referral sour-
ces.
Requirements:
• 3-5 years cooking experience
• Serve Safe Certification
• Knowledge of local and state health and sanita-
tion and safety codes.
• Knowledge of food handling, preparation, cook-
ing, service and operation of all kitchen equip-
ment.
DRUG SCREEN AND BACKGROUND CHECK
ARE REQUIRED
We offer:
* Competitive pay and Sign On Bonus
* Excellent internal support and training;
Send resumes to
eliana.king@atriaseniorliving.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
UBER AND Limo and Taxi Driver
Wanted, Living from San Mateo to San
Jose making $600 to $900 a week,
Fulltime, (650)766-9878
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA,
CNA’S
needed immediately.
Please apply in person at:
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue,
Suite 200, San Mateo, CA
or call (650)206-5200
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
26 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL -
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stores offer you numerous and varied
career paths. From beauty advisor to
management trainee and photo tech
to opportunities in Pharmacy, we de-
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face of Walgreens. In return, each job
offers you the potential for growth and
a clear path to advancement – both
within the store environment and be-
yond. It’s a diverse atmosphere in
which you’ll find supportive co-work-
ers, a positive environment and the
tools you need to pursue your inter-
ests and grow your skills.
We are currently hiring for part time
and full time positions for Daly City,
San Mateo, Palo Alto, Mountain View
and the general Peninsula area
stores. To apply, visit www.wal-
greens.jobs.
Walgreens is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and welcomes individuals of
diverse talent and backgrounds. Wal-
greens promotes and supports a
smoke-free and drug-free workplace.
Walgreens. There’s a way.
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jobs@jewleryexchange.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522076
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Roobik Sadeghi
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Roobik Sadeghi filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
a. Present name: Roobik Sadeghi
a. Proposed name: Rubik derAshotian
b. Present name: Donna Ann Gonzales
b. Proposed name: Donna Ann derAsho-
tian
c. Present name: Gregory Scott Sadeghi
c. Proposed name: Gregory Scott
derAshotian
d. Present name: Sophie Christine Sade-
ghi
d. Proposed name: Sophie Christine
derAshotian
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 28,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/15/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/05/2013
(Published, 07/19/13, 07/26/2013,
08/02/2013, 08/09/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 522859
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Robert John Nuti and Rina Mireya Nuti
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Robert John Nuti and Rina
Mireya Nuti filed a petition with this court
for a decree changing name as follows:
Present name:Alexis Rian Winn
Proposed name: Alexis Rian Nuti
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 28,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 07/17/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 07/17/2013
(Published, 07/19/13, 07/26/2013,
08/02/2013, 08/09/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256811
The following person is doing business
as: Red Pepper Mexican Grill, 408 El Ca-
mino Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Gabriel Khoury and Evlin Khou-
ry, 423 Compass Dr., Redwood City, CA
94065. The business is conducted by a
Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Gabriel Khoury /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/13, 07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256809
The following person is doing business
as: SSA Capital Consultants, 12 Wood-
leaf Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Dean Delis and Nancy M. Delis, same
address. The business is conducted by a
married couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Nero Chualong/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/13, 07/25613, 08/02/13, 08/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256824
The following person is doing business
as: Forex Cargo of San Francisco, 3930
Kent Way, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Rey T. Canciller, same
address, Gilberto L. Corpuz, 66 Lake
Meadow Dr, Daly City Ca 94015. The
business is conducted by a a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A
/s/ Gilberto L. Corpuz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/13, 07/25613, 08/02/13, 08/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256724
The following person is doing business
as: L & S Plumbing, 833 Mahler Rd. #11,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Ledezma
& Sons, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 11/14/2012
/s/ German Ledezma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/13, 07/25613, 08/02/13, 08/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256790
The following person is doing business
as: Estrella Smog Check, 2627B Middle-
field Rd. REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ding Lian Tu, 10 Vista Del Grande, San
Carlos, CA 94070. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Ding Lian Tu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/19/13, 07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256624
The following person is doing business
as: VIP Express, 100 Produce Ave., Ste.
G, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Shin Ling Yau, 2250 Gellert
Blvd., Unit 2103, South San Francisco,
CA 94080. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 07/01/2013.
/s/ Shin Ling Yau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256909
The following person is doing business
as: Scubalytics, 1125 El Camino Real,
Apt. 3, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Steven Hoglund, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Steven Hoglund /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256908
The following person is doing business
as: Nerrys Cleaning Services, 316 N.
Delaware St. Apt. 1, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Nery Vasquez Rubio, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Nery Vasquez Rubio /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256821
The following person is doing business
as: J. Vapor, 40 W. 3rd Ave., Unit 203,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: J.P. Bears,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Masanori Kimizuka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256904
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Gateway Global, 2)Gateway Lim-
ousines, 3)Gateway Executive Services,
4)Gateway Worldwide, 1550 Gilbreth
Road, BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Amato Industries, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 1994 to Present.
/s/ Richard Azzolino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256917
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pacific Investments and Coins, 2)
San Francisco Billiards Sports, 1170 Hel-
en Dr. MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jo-
seph Mejia, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Joseph Mejia /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256921
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Design Studio, 24 Baytree
Way, #1, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Paul Giomi & Cynthia Sloan, same
address. The business is conducted by
Co-Partners. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Paul Giomi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/26/13, 08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256974
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Aecho Systems, 2) AEcho
Research, 1789 Yorktown Rd., San Ma-
teo, CA 94402 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Douglas Oliver
Hammed and Gail Susan Hammed,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Married Couple. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Douglas O. Hammed /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13, 08/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256937
The following person is doing business
as: OnTheGoPublicServices, 727 Matso-
nia Dr., FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Alborz Ahourai, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Alborz Ahourai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13, 08/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256928
The following person is doing business
as: IFido, 1444 Bel Aire Rd., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Raymond W. Yu,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 07/10/2013.
/s/ Raymond W. Yu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/02/13, 08/09/13, 08/16/13, 08/23/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257035
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Stretch, 90 Gleen Way Ste.
7, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Ri-
chard Kinder, 507 Ruby St. Redwood
City, CA 94062. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Richard Kinder /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/08/13, 08/15/13, 08/22/13, 08/29/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257128
The following person is doing business
as: Dollar Warehouse, 116 E. 25th Ave.
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Esmeralda
Jildeh, 179 Gramercy Dr., San Mateo CA
94402 The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/01/2013.
/s/ Esmeralda Jildeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/09/13, 08/16/13, 08/23/13, 08/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256967
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Laurel Properties, 623 California
Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Georgianna Lipa, same address The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Georgianna Lipa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/09/13, 08/16/13, 08/23/13, 08/30/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, SOLD!
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new. SOLD!
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
296 Appliances
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25.SOLD!
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
1990’S UPPER DECK LIFESIZE CUT-
OUTS - Aikman, Marino, Jordan, $20.
each, SOLD!
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHINESE STAMPS - (90) all different,
early 20th century, $6.for all, SOLD!
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PEACE dollar circulated $30
firm 415 333-8540 Daly City
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA Truck great cond,
$25, 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, SOLD!
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF SOLD!
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, SOLD!
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
27 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
SAN MATEO UNION HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT
DISTRICTWIDE MULTIFUNCTION DEVICE COPIERS AND SERVICE
August 1, 2013
The San Mateo Union High School District (“District”) invites proposals from qualified firms,
partnerships, corporations, associations, or professional organizations (“Proposers”) to provide a
contract for the Districtwide Multifunction Device Copiers and Service.
Proposers are invited to submit their proposals in response to this Request for Proposals (“RFP”)
as provided herein to:
Elizabeth McManus
Deputy Superintendent
Business Services
San Mateo Union High School District
650 N. Delaware
San Mateo, CA 94401
650-558-2204
emcmanus@smuhsd.org
For FULL PROPOSAL REQUIREMENT PACKAGE contact Pam Chavez at 650-558-2204 or
email pchavez@smuhsd.org
All responses are must be received in the District’s offices by no later than 2:00 p.m. August 22,
2013.
FAX OR EMAIL RESPONSES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
If you have questions regarding the RFP, submit in writing via fax on or before August 14, 2013
at 2:00 PM to Elizabeth McManus.
This is a request for proposals and is not an offer by the District to contract with any party re-
sponding to this RFP. The District reserves the right to cancel or withdraw this RFP or to reject all
proposals and issue a new request for proposals.
Sincerely,
Elizabeth McManus, Deputy Superintendent
San Mateo Union High School District
Publication Dates: August 9, 2013
August 16, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
Regular Meeting of the City Council of the City of Half Moon Bay
August 20, 2013- 7:00 PM
www.hmbcity.com
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Half Moon Bay will hold a public
hearing at 7:00 PM on Tuesday, August 20, 2013, at the Ted Adcock Senior/Community Center,
535 Kelly Avenue, to consider the following:
City File: PDP-046-12, Zoning Ordinance Amendments
Location:City-wide
APN: City-wide
Applicant: City of Half Moon Bay
Description: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HALF MOON BAY AMENDING TITLE
18 “ZONING” OF THE HALF MOON BAY MUNICIPAL CODE BY: (1) AMENDING CHAPTER
18.02 “DEFINITIONS” AT SECTION 18.02.040 TO DELETE THE “PROPORTIONALITY RULE”;
(2) AMENDING CHAPTER 18.06 “RESIDENTIAL LAND USE (R-1, R-2, R-3)” TO ADD
SECTION 18.06.035 “R-1-B-3 DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS”; AND (3) AMENDING CHAPTER
18.22 “USE PERMITS” OF THE CITY OF HALF MOON BAY MUNICPAL CODE TO ADD
SECTION 18.22.055 “ON-SALE ALCOHOL OUTLETS” AND SECTIONS 18.22.240 THROUGH
18.22.370 “WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATION FACILITIES”
The ordinance is intended to: (1) clarify restrictions on development of single-family residential
lots classified as “substandard” or “severely substandard” under existing zoning regulations; (2)
establish minimum development standards for parcels identified on the City’s certified zoning
maps as located in the R-1-B-3 zoning classification, for which there are no currently applicable
zoning standards; and (3) establish procedures and standards for processing use permits for the
locations of new businesses classified under California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Con-
trol regulations as “on-sale alcohol outlets” and for construction and operation of wireless tele-
communications facilities.
An environmental review checklist is being prepared for this project, and it is anticipated that a
Categorical Exemption from further environmental review under the California Environmental
Quality Act will be issued. Once issued, a copy of this exemption will be available for public in-
spection at the City of Half Moon Bay Planning Department, located at 501 Main Street, Half
Moon Bay. A copy of this document will also be available for at the Planning Department for the
price of reproduction.
All persons in favor of, opposed to, or in any manner interested in this request for a Zoning Ordi-
nance Amendment are invited to attend this public hearing or forward written comments to:
Planning Director
City of Half Moon Bay
501 Main Street
Half Moon Bay, CA 94019
If you challenge the decision of the City Council in court, you may be limited to raising only those
issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written cor-
respondence delivered to the City of Half Moon Bay at, or prior to, the public hearing.
For More Information: More information is on file at City Hall, 501 Main Street, and may be ex-
amined during regular business hours. Comments, written or oral, must be received before the
decision date. Please send comments to: City of Half Moon Bay Planning Department, 501 Main
Street, Half Moon Bay, CA 94019.
End
San Mateo Daily Journal Publication Date: August 9, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO ADOPT A MITIGATED NEGATIVE DECLARATION
CITY OF HALF MOON BAY
File No. and Project Name/Description: File No. PDP-19-13. Coastal Development Permit
and Stream Alteration Agreement (Notification No. 1600-2012-0173-R3, Routine Ditch Mainte-
nance, Half Moon Bay) to allow routine ditch maintenance at” B” and “C” drainage facilities and
emergency clearing and clean-up at “A” drainage facilities located throughout Half Moon Bay .
The Citywide program would consist of : 1) Routine maintenance activities at seventeen “B” and
“C” drainages, including trimming of vegetation; removal of vegetation, debris and sediment;
bank stabilization; and in-kind replacement of culverts and other stormwater facilities to restore
drainage features to their originally constructed conditions to prevent flooding; and 2) Emergency
clearing and clean-up to prevent flooding at five “A” drainages, including removal of trash and de-
bris, removal of vegetation and fallen trees or limbs resulting in non-emergency steam flow re-
strictions, and removal of fallen trees that would cause flooding, bank erosion or other public
safety hazards.
The City has performed environmental review on the project in conformance with the require-
ments of the California Environmental Quality Act. Environmental review consisted of prepara-
tion of an Initial Study to examine the nature and extent of any adverse effects on the environ-
ment that could occur if the project is approved and implemented. Based on the review, the City
has prepared a draft Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND) for this project. An MND is a state-
ment by the City that the project will not have a significant effect on the environment based on
protective measures (mitigation measures) included in the project.
The public is welcome to review this draft Mitigated Negative Declaration and Initial Study.
The Public comment period for this draft Mitigated Negative Declaration begins on August 9,
2013 and ends at 5:00 p.m. on September 9, 2013.
The draft Mitigated Negative Declaration and Initial Study and reference documents are available
on the City’s website at http://www.hmbcity.com.
The documents area also available for review from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday
at the City of Half Moon Bay Planning Department at 501 Main Street, Half Moon Bay.
For additional information, please contact Carol Hamilton at (650) 712-5836 or by email at
chamilton@hmbcity.com.
Circulated on August 9, 2013 ___________________________________
Carol Hamilton, Senior Planner
304 Furniture
1 COFFEE table - 15" high x 24" wide x
50 1/2 " long. Dk walnut with 3 sections
of glass inset. SOLD!
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END tables - 18" x 21" Dk brown wood
with glass tops & open bottoms. SOLD!
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 LAMPS. 25" high. Cream ceramic With
white shades. SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
7 FOOT couch with recliners & massag-
ers on ends. Brown. $100., SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
304 Furniture
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
304 Furniture
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK DINING TABLE
with dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions.
48/88" long x 32" wide x 30" high.
SOLD!
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GLIDE ROCKER with foot stool. Dk
brown walnut with brown cushions. $75.,
SOLD!
GRANDMA ROCKING CHAIR - beauti-
ful white with gold trim, $100.,
(650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE , UMBRELLA & 6
CHAIRS - metal/vinyl, $35.,
SOLD!
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
304 Furniture
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR & HASSOCK - light
wood, gold cushions. SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, (650)345-5502
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, SOLD!
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
ELECTRIC MEAT slicer $30
650 315-5902
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
306 Housewares
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $60
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO SOLD!
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" Hedge Trimmer pro model,
sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CIRCULAR SAW-BLACK & DECKER -
2 1/8 hp. 7 1/4 inch blade. Good condi-
tion. Extra blades. $20., SOLD!
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 1 1/2 HP ROUTER & TA-
BLE - Excellent condition, case, acces-
sories & extra cutters included. $60.,
SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3D SANDER - Brand new
never used-still in box. Great for sanding
furniture or round surfaces. Extra sand-
ing disks. $25., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN 3X21" BELT SANDER - 1
hp w/ dust bag. $50., SOLD!
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
28 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Beachgoer’s
download
6 “Saving Private
Ryan” setting
10 Oz. sextet
14 Does a
Photoshop task
15 Became frayed
16 Heaps
17 Crash
20 Cut off
21 “The Book of __”:
Denzel
Washington film
22 Cook’s aid
23 Crash
28 Garden tools
29 Modern joke
response
30 Eagerly accept,
as praise
32 __ flakes
34 Angle iron
38 Crash
41 Some code tones
42 A line may be
drawn in it
43 Gift __
44 Handle clumsily
45 Bibliog. term
46 Crash
53 Reagan’s second
attorney general
54 __ gratia
55 Road service org.
57 Crash
62 Acronymic
French artist
63 Caboose
64 One never seen
in “Peanuts”
65 French __
66 Its Old World
Style label has a
gondola on it
67 Art of verse
DOWN
1 “To every thing
there is a
season” Bible bk.
2 Cleaning tool
3 Rhythmic song
from “Oliver!”
4 Something for
nothing?: Abbr.
5 Sch. near Topeka
6 Resided
7 Greek column
style
8 Sound from a
shelter
9 Pro vote
10 She was Adrian
in “Rocky”
11 Batter’s rough
patch
12 Skin features
13 Cordwood
measure
18 Casual shirts
19 “__ take a
miracle!”
24 Big wins
25 Continued, with
“up”
26 Chan portrayer
27 Like most
Michener novels
30 ’60s hallucinogen
31 “Caught ya!”
32 Strength
33 __ Tin Tin
34 Lite
35 Foremost
36 Mad-hatter
connection
37 Hardly a Yankee
fan?
39 Old Testament
twin
40 “You’ve got the
wrong person”
44 Bk. intro
45 Songwriter
Sands
46 Add to a
website, as a
video clip
47 Prefix with
ophthalmology
48 A bit before the
hour
49 Glacial ridge
50 Conference
attendee’s wear
51 Indian
independence
leader
52 Writer Roald and
others
56 Court fig.
58 “Catch-22” pilot
59 Belfast-born
actor Stephen
60 Day break?
61 Words often said
in front of a
priest
By Matt Skoczen
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
08/09/13
08/09/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
308 Tools
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DENIM JACKET, faded but in good con-
dition, man's XL, $19, 650-595-3933
ELECTRIC BLOWER. Plenty of power.
Clean your leaves. Adjustable tube
length/direction. $20 Cash 650-654-9252
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
GARDEN CLAW. Excellent for tilling
you soil for planting flowers/vegetables.
$20. Cash 650-654-9252
LAWN AERATOR. Irrigate your lawn at
the roots. Hose attachment. $15 Cash.
650-654-9252
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, 650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., SOLD!
NEW NEWTONE Door Bell factory pack,
complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NEW PRO Torque Wrench 20-150 lbs,
warranty and case $29, 650-595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
ROSS ROOT feeder. Excellent for
feeding trees/shrubs. $15 Cash.
650-654-9252
RYOBI DETAIL SANDER - Pointed tip
can sand small area, good for
furniture/chairs, good condition, $25.,
SOLD!
RYOBI RECIPROCATING Saw electric
little used w/ new blade $30,
650-595-3933
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well, SOLD!
308 Tools
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, SOLD!
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
SAFE - Sentry Fireproof, new, black,
15” x 16” x 18”, capacity 1.7CF, pur-
chased for $400., will sell for $195.,
(650)464-0042
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, (650)678-1989
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
310 Misc. For Sale
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRAND NEWTarp, 7' X 5' sealed factory
package Only $9 650-595-3933
BUBBLE GUM MACHINE - Commercial,
$50., (650)726-1037
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI Mkr elec. heat
top & bottom only $9 650-595-3933
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model",SOLD!
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RALPH LAUREN TWIN SIZE COM-
FORTER - sheets & bedskirt, blue/white
pattern, perfect condition, $60., SOLD!
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 SOLD!
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 SOLD!
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
316 Clothes
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., SOLD!
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees, SOLD!
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
29 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE - SOLD!
SPECIALIZED CROSSROADS bike. 20"
frame/18 speed. Needs tires.Great com-
mute bike. $99. Cash 650-654-9252.
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
SOLD!
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $100 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
HUGE ESTATE
SALE
Lifetime Collection
Entire House
Packed to the
BRIM!!
608 Cypress Ave
Millbrae CA 94030
1 Block North of
Capuchino High School
Friday 8/9,
Saturday 8/10,
Sunday 8/11,
10am to 4pm
322 Garage Sales
RUMMAGE SALE
SAN MATEO PRO LIFE
Corner of Alameda
de las Pulgas
& Ralston Avenue
Sat., Aug. 10
9 am - 3 pm
YARD SALE
August 10th
9am to 1pm
&
August 11th
9am to 11am
231 W. 5th Ave.,
San Mateo
Household items, home
decor, collectibles, baby
clothes, and Much More!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER - 48 volt Craftman elec-
tric lawn mower, SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SHOWER CHAIR, WALKER, WHEEL-
CHAIR, POTTY - $25. each obo,
(650)766-9998
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, SOLD!
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT - $1250.
month, $800. deposit, close to Downtown
RWC, Call Rented!
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1997 BMW 540I sport sedan with 120k
miles loaded and powerfull clean car with
clean Car Fax more info or pictures
atwww.autotradecentercars.com #5044
on sale for $5500 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
1999 PORSCHE Boxster Cabriolet with
117k miles sporty with great mpg this
car drives great and everything works
fine www.autotradecentercars.com#4530
on sale for $10995.00 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
1999 AUDI A6 SEDAN QUARTO auto-
matic with 166k miles in excellent run-
ning and driving conditions more info at
www.autotradecentercars.com #4447
priced at $6995 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2001 MERCEDES Benz ML 320 Luxu-
ry mid size SUV with 133k miles all
wheel drive automatic with third row
seating all power and winter packag-
ewww.autotradecentercars.com #4430
on sale for $6995 plus fees.
(650)637-3900
2002 HONDA Civic EX Coupe automatic
with 161k miles clean car fax looks runs
and drives great very good on gas and
reliablewww.autotradecentercars.com
#5047 on sale for $5750 plus fee.
(650)637-3900
2002 TOYOTA RAV4 small SUV with
149k miles automatic two wheel drive in
excellent conditions clean Car Fax
www.autotradecentercars.com #4528 on
sale for $6950 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2003 JEEP Grand Cherokee Limited
SUV with 100k miles in new conditions
one owner clean local automatic 4x4
which looks awesomewww.autotrade-
centercars.com #4520 on sale for only
$8994 plus fees. (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer SUV Eddie Bauer
Edition automatic 4x4 with 146k miles in
new conditions fully optioned from fac-
torywww.autotradecentercars.com #4330
on sale for low price of $7995.00 plus
fees. (650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
2004 TOYOTA SEQUOIA full size SUV
with 163k mile excellent conditions and
room for the whole family two wheel
drive automatic SR5www.autotradecen-
tercars.com #5035 on sale for $9350
plus fees (650)637-3900
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACURA ‘97 - 3.0 CL CP, Black, Auto-
matic, $2800., (650)630-3216
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excellent Condition $1,500
(650)342-8510
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1998 SUBARU Impreza Outback sports
wagon with 170k miles she runs great
nice small all wheel drive automatic
www.autotrdecentercars.com on sale for
$3750 plus fees. (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HONDA 90 - 1966 excellent, 165 mpg,
can deliver, $850., (831)462-9836
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., SOLD!
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
30 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Housecleaning
MY ERRAND & HOUSE
CLEANING SERVICES
• House Keeping • Janitorial
Services • Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
• House & Pet Sitting
Back to School Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Gutters
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Cleaning service.
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FERNANDO’S HANDYMAN
Painting - Exterior/Interior,
Stucco, Floors, Demos,
Lawns, Pavers, etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Lic.& Bonded
(650)834-4824
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WORLD 31
Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50.,
(415)298-0645
By Jason Straziuso and Tom Odula
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAIROBI, Kenya — Officials in Kenya
investigating the massive airport fire that
gutted the arrival hall at Nairobi’s main air-
port said Thursday that first responders
looted electronics, a bank and an ATM dur-
ing and after the blaze.
The officials said first responders stole
electronics and money from an ATM.
Another official said that police guarding
the site overnight attempted to a take a safe
from a bank in the burned-out arrivals hall,
which also houses several foreign currency
exchange shops.
All four officials who described the
alleged looting are close to the investiga-
tion. They insisted on anonymity because
they weren’t authorized to share the infor-
mation before the investigation is com-
plete.
The fire-fighting response to Wednesday’s
inferno was criticized as slow and inade-
quate, but the officials could not definitely
say the looting was carried out by firefight-
ers. One official said there was now behind-
the-scenes finger pointing taking place
between the police, fire department and
army. Another official said specialized
police units had attempted to steal the safe
overnight.
The criminal investigations policeman
for the airport, Joseph Ngisa, said he hasn’t
received formal complaints of theft and that
police are waiting for affected institutions
to report what they lost in the fire.
All public servants in Kenya, including
police, firefighters and soldiers, are poorly
paid and frequently accused of corruption.
Police officers who guard the entrance to
Jomo Kenyatta International Airport are
well known in Nairobi for demanding
bribes from taxi drivers and other vehicles
with Kenyan drivers.
International flights, meanwhile, resumed
Thursday as officials improvised immigra-
tion and luggage routines.
Kenyan officials, assisted by members of
the FBI, investigated the cause of the fire.
One of the security officials who spoke to
AP said the investigation had ruled out ter-
rorism and was now trying to determine if
the fire was intentional or accidental.
Banks looted in Kenya airport fire
REUTERS
Workers salvage items after a fire razed the entire arrival area at the Jomo Kenyatta International
Airport in Kenya's capital Nairobi
By Ahmed Al-Haj and Maggie Michael
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANAA, Yemen — The U.S. has sharply
escalated its drone war in Yemen, with mili-
tary officials in the Arab country reporting
34 suspected al-Qaida militants killed in
less than two weeks, including three strikes
on Thursday alone in which a dozen died.
The action against al-Qaida in the Arabian
Peninsula, as the Yemen branch is known,
comes amid a global terror alert issued by
Washington. One Mideast official says the
uptick is due to its leaders leaving them-
selves more vulnerable by moving from
their normal hideouts toward areas where
they could carry out attacks.
The U.S. and Britain evacuated diplomatic
staff from the capital of Sanaa this week after
learning of a threatened attack that prompted
Washington to close temporarily 19 diplo-
matic posts in the Middle East and Africa.
Thursday’s first reported drone attack hit a
car carrying suspected militants in the dis-
trict of Wadi Ubaidah, about 175 kilometers
(109 miles) east of Sanaa, and killed six, a
security official said.
Badly burned bodies lay beside their vehi-
cle, according to the official. Five of the
dead were Yemenis, while the sixth was
believed to be of another Arab nationality,
he said.
Yemen official says U.S. drones kill 12 in three airstrikes
32 Friday • Aug. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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