SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?

Indic Religions
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
17 U.S.C § 107 :: Limitations on exclusive rights: Fair use
Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by
reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criti-
cism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is
not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use
the factors to be considered shall include —

(1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for non-
profit educational purposes;
(2) the nature of the copyrighted work;
(3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
(4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

[ Full text: http://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#07 ]

※※※
The following works is a fair usage compilation of source material excerpts, mostly copyrighted by some entity of
the Church of Scientology corporate empire or other literary sources. The content of this publication is reproduced
herein as copies strictly for nonprofit educational purposes in order to satisfy public interest in further scholarship,
research, critical review and investigative journalism.

Although the following collection of research material may seem extensive at first glance, DMCA Reviewers
should keep in mind that the Church of Scientology goes to great lengths to boast the following statistics in
regards to the teachings and related works of L. Ron Hubbard.

 The top NY Times Best-selling authors write a best-selling book every 1-3 years—writing an average of 30
books tops in a lifetime. [1]
 In his lifetime, L. Ron Hubbard wrote 554 fiction and nonfiction books, an average of 1 published book every
month for 56 years—the equivalent of the lifetime work of 32 New York Times best-selling authors. [1]
 L. Ron Hubbard has been awarded four Guinness World Records in the last three years including Most Pub-
lished Works by a Single Author: 1,084 in 2006. [2]
 Over 4.2 million pages of Hubbard's writings have been translated in the last 11 years alone compared to a total
of 359,459 in the prior 50 years. [2]
 Between the mid-1960s and early 1980s, and following from a greater geopolitical study of what most plagues
this world, L. Ron Hubbard authored an extraordinary series of essays on “cultural inadequacies” of the late
twentieth century. [3]
 In testament to the first stands the full body of his life’s work, including some 12,000 writings and 3,000 tape-
recorded lectures of Dianetics and Scientology. [4]

Therefore, despite the extended length of reproduced sourced material in this compilation of excerpted documenta-
tion, when compared to the overall whole body of L. Ron Hubbard’s Scientology works – this entire series of
publications is merely a small sampling that is well within the constraints of “fair use” as defined under Title 17
of the United States Code.

[1] L. Ron Hubbard Media Resources Statistics. http://mediaresources.lronhubbard.org/statistics/page01.htm
[2] Scientology News Room: Unparalleled Growth Statistics. http://www.scientologynews.org/stats.html
[3] Ron Hubbard The Humanitarian: Freedom Fighter Articles and Essays. http://freedom.lronhubbard.org
[4] Official L. Ron Hubbard Biography: Brief Chronology http://www.lronhubbard.org/biography.html
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
An Independent Research Series of Reference Publications

Project Purpose
The meaning of the word “religion” is entirely subjective, and strictly personalized, opinion of what it means to any
given individual. Therefore, no one can define the answer to “Is Scientology a Religion?” for another person. How-
ever, people of various faiths still seek those answers in regards to the Scientology system of beliefs. Therefore, this
research catalog documentation archive aims to expose the truth about a wide range of L. Ron Hubbard derived
scriptures using a contemporary approach to world religion studies [1].

This series of publications and related works is intended to serve as a public domain archive of source materials for
further research to aid those who seek out such answers for themselves. The fair usage content included spans ex-
amples of the following documentation:

 Propaganda the Church of Scientology promotes to the outside world for encouraging a wider acceptance of
their beliefs and practices, while reinforcing their legitimacy as a New Religious Movement (NRM).
 Propaganda the Church of Scientology promotes internally to their own members that slanders many other ma-
jor religions and contradicts their claims of being compatible with other belief systems.
 Additional documentation outlining the actual teachings and alternative medicine practices of the Church of
Scientology that underscores why their system of beliefs is so controversial.
 Academic analysis summaries from proponent, critical, and comparative sources that reflect a comprehensive
look at all sides of many disputes surrounding the common of questions of Scientology’s religiosity.
 Related media coverage that further examines the finer points of the “applied religious philosophy” that the
Church of Scientology claims is at the heart of its campaign to “clear the planet.”

With the release and ongoing maintenance of this documentation archive of educational booklets and related works,
Project Chanology Anonymous activists from www.whyweprotest.net aims to provide a virtual library of reference
materials for all those seeking answers to the entirely subjective questions that arise when evaluating the nature of
Scientology as a religion.
Series Abstract
The Scientology Religiosity? Series of research catalogs and related works is a collection of materials for support-
ing further research in the vein of comparative religion studies on the subject of Scientology and the teachings of L.
Ron Hubbard. These fair use publications focus on illustrating Scientology beliefs in relation to other religions, tra-
ditional tenets of faith, ancient mythology, and the teachings of other major religious leaders.

The materials included in each volume represent a small sampling of excerpts from the written works by L. Ron
Hubbard in the form of books, essays, and lecture transcripts. Other materials range from official scriptures of the
Church of Scientology in the form of policies and organizational publications, in addition to promotional materials.
This documentation represents the core Scientology teachings and doctrines that is often referred to as
“technology.”

Another central aspect of this series of publications focuses on an assortment of privately distributed Advance!
Magazine feature articles from a long running Spiritual History of Man series that L. Ron Hubbard personally man-
dated [1]. These articles and related Hubbard essays offer a unique view into how the Scientology dogma is pro-
moted internally to adherents that are on an advanced stage of the “The Bridge to Total Freedom” (aka “The
Bridge”), and pursuing the Operating Thetan (“OT”) levels of study.

[1] Why the World Needs Religious Studies by Nathan Schneider. Religion Dispatches, Culture column Nov. 20,
2011. http://www.religiondispatches.org/archive/culture/4636/why_the_world_needs_religious_studies_/
[2] Jeff Hawkins, former Church of Scientology Sea Org executive and Advance! Magazine Editor in his 2010 book
Counterfeit Dreams. http://counterfeitdreams.blogspot.com/2008/06/chapter-seven-land-base.html
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
An Independent Research Series of Reference Publications
http://www.scribd.com/collections/3084764/Scientology-Religiosity-Series

New age theology, mysticism or propaganda: should the abusive
practices of the corporate Scientology empire be exempt from
scrutiny due to their religiosity claims? We cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※
Series Index
No. Theme Title
Vol.
I
Abrahamic
Beliefs
God, Heaven, Hell & The Hope of Mankind
http://scr.bi/n2048s
Vol.
II
Abrahamic
Beliefs
Judeo-Christian, Semitic, Persian & Islamic Beliefs
http://scr.bi/K2D3Yb
Vol.
IV
Abrahamic &
Eastern
The Soul, Past Lives & Other Philosophy Nuances
http://scr.bi/LQCvlT
Vol.
V
Abrahamic &
Alternative
Gnosticism & Applied Religious Philosophy
http://bit.ly/11MdaOm
Vol.
VI
Eastern
Beliefs
Indic Religions
http://bit.ly/1cwb2FQ
Vol.
VII
Eastern &
Alternative
Beliefs
LRH Philosophy, Vedic Hymns & Hymn of Asia
http://bit.ly/1ekTJTt
Vol.
VIII
Alternative
Beliefs
Spiritualism, Mysticism & Indigenous Beliefs
Vol.
IX
Ancient Myths
& Pagan
Beliefs
Classic Greek & Roman Mythology
Vol.
X
Ancient Myths
& Pagan
Beliefs
Neolithic – Bronze Age Cultural Beliefs
Vol.
0
[ Series
Overview ]
Scientology Religiosity? Series :: Materials Index
http://scr.bi/nhzYsw
Vol.
III
Abrahamic
Beliefs
The History of Christianity & Gospel of Jesus
http://scr.bi/zmkqQq
Level
[ ALL ]
Intro-
ductory
Intro-
ductory
Intro-
ductory
Interme-
diate
Interme-
diate
Interme-
diate
Interme-
diate
Ad-
vanced
Ad-
vanced
Ad-
vanced
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※

Table of Contents



Continued...
Section Material Page
- Project Purpose & Series Abstract

3
- Series Index

4
V6.01 Research Materials Catalog :: Volume Summary

8
V6.01.001 Scientology's Relationship With Eastern Religious Traditions by Dr.
Stephen A. Kent (1996 Academic Essay)

11
v6.01.002 The Scientology Religion – Background (1974 L. Ron Hubbard
Publication)

22
v6.01.003 The Creation of Human Ability – Reference Appendix: Scientology.
Its General Background (Outline of Professional Course Lectures,
July 1954 included in a 2007 L. Ron Hubbard Publication)

31
v6.01.004 L. Ron Hubbard on Understanding Your Inner Thetan

46
v6.01.005 Phenomenon of the Thetan (L. Ron Hubbard 1952 Lecture) 56
v6.01.006 L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha &
Eastern Belief Systems (Critical Sources)

75
v6.01.007 Hubbard’s Interpretation of Buddhism, Maitreya and Eastern
Philosophy (1970s Hymn of Asia pre-release promotional series)

95
v6.01.008 Examining Maitreya Prophecies & Related Claims of Godhood
(Comparative Sources)

138
v6.01.009 Scientology, Inc.: Becoming a “Religion” in the 1950s by Hugh B.
Urban (2011 Publication Excerpt, Critical Source)
148
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※

Table of Contents



Continued...
Section Material Page
v6.01.010 L. Ron Hubbard’s Spiritual Teachings & The Bridge to Total
Freedom

165
v6.01.011 Buddha’s Spiritual Teachings & The Noble Eightfold Path

187
v6.01.012 Dhammapada: The Mind & The Path (29 BCE Excerpt from
Theravada Pali Canon)

196
v6.01.013 The History of Brahmanic & Buddhist Mythology

200
v6.01.014 L. Ron Hubbard’s Interpretation of Enlightenment

220
v6.01.015 L. Ron Hubbard vs. Mahayana Buddhism on Achieving Bodhi or
Enlightenment

241
v6.01.016 Scientology’s Position on L. Ron Hubbard’s Teachings in Relation to
Gautama Buddha’s Teachings

250
v6.01.017 L. Ron Hubbard’s Concept of Death

265
v6.01.018 The Concept of Death in Theosophy & Thelema (Comparative
Sources)

285
v6.01.019 Shangri-La (2009 Feature Article) 298
v6.01.020 L. Ron Hubbard’s Basic Concept of Self-Determinism

306
v6.01.021 Scientology Philosophy of Self-Determinism

328
v6.01.022 Self-Determinism in Scientology vs. True Will in Thelema

347
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※

Table of Contents


Section Material Page
v6.01.023 L. Ron Hubbard’s Metaphor of The Bridge of Total Freedom
Crossing The Abyss

363
v6.01.024 The Illusion of the Abyss by Benjamin Rowe (1997 Essay,
Comparative Source)

382
- Further Reading (by subsection)

388
v6.02 Independent Review & Derivative works [ N/A in this edition ]

394
v6.02.00b Material Reuse Considerations 396
- List of Scientology Illustrations

397
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
An Independent Research Series of Reference Publications



Series Section v6.01

Volume Summary

This volume of the Scientology Religiosity? Series of research publications has
been compiled as the third intermediate module for the middle segment in a lar-
ger body of materials. These volumes are assembled for educational purposes
with an aim for supporting further study on basic points of comparison between
Scientology principles of faith and the common beliefs of other religions.

The enclosed subject matter examines the teachings of L. Ron Hubbard and the
Church of Scientology relevant to some of the metaphysical tenets and general
mindset for their spiritual beliefs that Hubbard claimed was the modern day con-
tinuation of Indic religions and the teachings of Gautama Buddha. Upon closer
examination, the relevant comparison points for the basic spiritual beliefs pre-
sented in this volume seemingly correspond to New Age systems of belief that
are derivatives of the teachings of Helena Blavatsky, such as Theosophy and
Thelema, rather than classic forms of Eastern Beliefs.

Featured highlights include the following aspects of this New Religious Move-
ment (NRM) system of beliefs as well as other similar religious beliefs for the
sake of making a comparative analysis:

 L. Ron Hubbard’s superficial claims that the general background of his reli-
gious doctrines are an extension of traditional Eastern Beliefs.
 The Church of Scientology supposition of Hubbard fulfilling the Maitreya
prophecy despite blatant contradictions between his teachings and the teachings
of Buddha.
 Hubbard’s nietzschean form of enlightenment derived from one’s own will-
power or self-determinism, which stands in opposition to the typical Buddhist
interpretation of enlightenment, but corresponds with other New Age derivatives
of Eastern Beliefs that promote similar concepts of the divine self.
 Scientology’s concepts of death and reincarnation as compared to traditional
Buddhist beliefs versus relevant New Age belief systems.
 Hubbard’s allegorical claims of “The Bridge to Total Freedom” crossing the
abyss of human suffering in comparison to similar concepts in Blavatsky in-
spired belief systems.


Continued...
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
An Independent Research Series of Reference Publications



Series Section v6.01

Subsections v6.01.001 through v6.01.003 opens with the classic academic de-
bunking of Scientology’s relationship with eastern religious traditions followed
by examples of those claims from their own publications.

Subsections v6.01.004 and 005 provides excerpts from L. Ron Hubbard’s basic
doctrines of a person’s “Thetan” or soul being capable of supernatural abilities
by applying Scientology philosophy. These introductory concepts lay the foun-
dation for more advanced teachings of self-actualization where the ultimate goal
of the pursuing Hubbard’s “Bridge” is to enable practitioners to regain their
Thetan’s godlike powers. These lost abilities of a Thetan have allegedly been
subverted throughout the course of their lifetimes from playing the “Game” of
reincarnation that enables an immortal Thetan to take possession of multiple hu-
man bodies.

Subsections v6.01.006 provides fully cited examples for many of the contradic-
tory and controversial statements about Eastern Beliefs made by L. Ron Hubbard
and the Church of Scientology. While subsections v6.01.007 through v6.01.009
reflect excerpted materials for examination of Hubbard’s claim to being the
modern reincarnation of Buddha in the form of Maitreya (in Sanskrit) or Met-
tatya (in Pāli). Although modern day claimants for the title of Maitreya are noth-
ing new, what is interesting in Hubbard’s version of making this claim is that the
manner in which it has been portrayed closely parallels the Theosophy inspired
claims of the modern day Maitreya being a “World Teacher” and all-inclusive
messiah figure. These similar claims preceded Hubbard’s Mettaya conjecture by
former Helena Blavatsky followers and Aleister Crowley contemporaries that
adopted their own set of metaphysical beliefs such as Annie Besant, Benjamin
Crème and Rudolf Steiner.

Subsections v6.01.010 through v6.01.012 maps out a comparison of L. Ron
Hubbard’s approach to shaping Scientology spiritual beliefs into a mechanism
for expanding one’s mind geared toward seeking enlightenment via “The Bridge
to Total Freedom” versus similar concepts of Buddhism spirituality and “The
Noble Eightfold Path.”

Subsection v6.01.013 provides a further look at how Scientology misinterprets
traditional eastern theology surrounding the life and teachings of Buddha. While
subsections v6.01.014 through 016 reflects additional materials for comparison
on Hubbard’s approach to Thetan-empowering enlightenment or self-determined
“Beingness” and how it radically differs from Buddhistic pursuits of enlighten-
ment or “Bodhi.”


Continued...
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
An Independent Research Series of Reference Publications



Series Section v6.01

Subsections v6.01.017 and v6.01.018 provides another comparison of L. Ron
Hubbard’s spiritual beliefs surrounding death. Again, readily apparent parallels
appear with other Blavatsky-inspired New Age beliefs underlying Neo-Buddhist
interpretations of reincarnation and the westernized view of the cycle of life-and-
death being something other than a karmic evolution.

Subsection v6.01.019 highlights yet another example of Scientology’s tendency
to misconstrue traditional eastern religious beliefs by adopting the popular fic-
tion account of “Shangri-La” over the actual spiritual mythology of Shambhala
as it is known in Indic traditions.

The concluding subsections v6.01.020 through v6.01.024 returns to the precepts
of L. Ron Hubbard’s teachings regarding spiritual progress being a result of ena-
bling one’s self-determinism as a form of enlightenment. Scientology claims
these beliefs supersedes Buddha’s precepts of Nirvana and will bridge the abyss
of darkness that Buddhists have no means of avoiding. Additional materials are
also presented that shows these tenets of Scientology doctrine have a great deal
of commonality with Thelema’s precepts of True Will and the path to enlighten-
ment involving a personal vision quest through Aleister Crowley’s interpretation
of Blavatsky’s prophetic ramblings on the existence of a spiritual abyss of dark-
ness.

Subsequent volumes in this series will expand further on Scientology’s alleged
connection to eastern religious traditions. However, this volume attempts to out-
line grounds for a basic prima facie classification that Hubbard’s flavor of spiri-
tuality has far more in common with New Age Gnostic Occultism that is a west-
ernized derivative of Indic beliefs than it does with traditional eastern spiritual-
ity.

Proper citations for all the source materials reprinted within this publication for
educational purposes are indexed in the back matter under the “List of Scientol-
ogy Illustrations” subsection. Additional recommended references for each ma-
jor subsection of the v7.01 materials is also included under the “Further Read-
ing” subsection for a progressive continuation of studies on the topics covered
herein.

The extended collection of Scientology Religiosity? publications and supporting
works is available online at:
http://www.scribd.com/collections/3084764/Scientology-Religiosity-Series

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.001

Scientology's Relationship With Eastern Religious
Traditions by Dr. Stephen A. Kent
(1996 Academic Essay Excerpt)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
Page 1 of 10
Scientology's Relationship With Eastern
Religious Traditions

Dr. Stephen A. Kent, University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta, CANADA T6G 2H4
Journal of Contemporary Religion, Vol. 11, No. 1, 1996, page 21
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Library/Shelf/kent/eastern.html
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13537909608580753


Abstract: Scientology's founder, L. Ron Hubbard, frequently made claims that Scientology was
related to or shared significant similarities with Hinduism, Theravada Buddhism and Taoism.
However, careful examination of Hubbard's claims indicates that he had only a superficial
acquaintance with Eastern religions, and most of his attempts to associate Scientology with these
faiths are unwarranted. Moreover, social and political pressures against his organisation's alleged
healing practices probably provided the catalyst for Hubbard's attempt to portray his creation as a
religion with Eastern overtones.

Introduction
Scholars of religion are always interested in questions pertaining to the transmission of ideas
from one faith to another. Transmission helps to explain similarities among basic doctrines of
different belief systems and often researchers can learn about cultural contact between distant
peoples. Much research focuses on key figures in traditions, since these figures formulate the
doctrines and beliefs that become the inspirational sources for followers. Researchers on ancient
faiths and their founders are often hindered in their efforts to identify sources of influence, since
much has been lost over the expanses of time, space and cultures. In contrast, researchers on
modern or "new" religions are sometimes burdened by the amount of information to which
contemporary religious founders have access and that might have influenced their doctrinal
formulations. Audio and visual media, along with the increasing availability of travel, provide
religious founders with ample opportunities to gather sources of inspiration from far and wide, so
the task of identifying the precise origins of particular tenets can be exceedingly difficult.
The founder of Dianetics and Scientology, L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986), presents numerous
problems for researchers who attempt to identify the sources upon which he drew to devise
Dianetics (in 1950) and the Church of Scientology (from late 1953). Most writers would agree
that he drew upon ideas from science fiction, the occult, physics and engineering,
psychoanalysis, philosophy and an eclectic series of major and minor thinkers (see, for example,
Whitehead, 1987: 54). In contrast no serious researchers would ever suggest that Hubbard's
thought was influenced by Christianity,
1
since he published his scornful views about that faith
as early as 1954 (Hubbard, 1954a). Most researchers, however, would probably follow
Hubbard's own lead, and suggest that he was inspired and influenced by various aspects of
Eastern thought.
Page 2 of 10
Of all possible influences upon him, Eastern religions (broadly defined) are among the few that
Hubbard himself mentioned frequently. He was never clear about the nature or extent of the
alleged influence, using such vague terms as "ancestor", "first cousin" and "spiritual ties" to
describe the alleged connections between them and (especially) Scientology. Nevertheless,
scientologists take seriously his claim that their faith shares perspectives with the wisdom of the
East, if only because (they believe) Hubbard discovered them anew for himself.
This article also takes seriously Hubbard's vague but frequent allusions to similarities between
Scientology and Eastern religions. It carefully considers Hubbard's own writings in conjunction
with standard translations of key Eastern texts and concludes that no Eastern influence on either
Dianetics or Scientology is likely to have occurred. Nor are apparent similarities between either
Dianetics or Scientology and major Eastern traditions anything but superficial. Having
established these conclusions, the study then examines why Hubbard made claims about Eastern
religions that appear not to be accurate. It proposes that he did so because, at crucial moments in
Scientology's history, he attempted to shield his organisation's self-asserted healing efforts
behind religious claims. During the first quarter century of Dianetics and Scientology's existence,
Hubbard used religious claims to protect his organisation from governmental and medical
scrutiny over practising medicine without a license and related fraudulent healing claims.
Hinduism
Hubbard exhibited several patterns when discussing Scientology in relation to various Eastern
faiths. First, he made grand claims about Scientology embodying, if not extending, key concepts
from Hinduism, Buddhism and Taoism. Secondly, he never demonstrated that he had more than
superficial knowledge of either the Eastern concepts that he mentioned or the translations of
terms that he provided. Thirdly, and finally, he spent no time or effort expounding upon his
grand, syncretistic statements.
For example, in July, 1954, Hubbard made the impressive statement that "[W]e find
Scientology's earliest known ancestor in the Veda" (Hubbard, 1969b: 10).
2
Typically, however,
he gave almost no evidence to substantiate the claim. Indeed, his knowledge of the Vedas was, at
best, cursory, and it appears that he was merely trying to legitimise Scientology concepts when
he claimed that the term, Vedas, meant "Lookingness [sic] or Knowingness [i.e. 'self-determined
knowledge']" [Hubbard, 1969b: 10; see Hubbard, 1975: 223 (citing a definition from May 20,
1954)]
3
In fact it means "knowledge, true or sacred knowledge or lore, knowledge of ritual..."
(Monier-Williams, 1899: 1015). Likewise, his statement that the Vedas was comprised of "the
Dianetics and Buddhistic written tradition of ten thousand years" (Hubbard, 1969b: 12) grossly
overestimates the dates of the Vedas [the earliest pads of which may go back to about 1500
B.C.E. (Basham, 1954: 232; cf. Hume, 1931: viii)] as well as inappropriately blending Buddhist
texts with the Hindu texts.
Moreover, if by "dhyantic" Hubbard meant the Indian tradition of "meditation" (dhyana)
developed through yoga, then the classic text in this field, the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, was not
pad of the Vedas [even though meditational concepts appear m some of the later hymns (see
Bose, 1966: 55-83,, on jnana yoga, the path of knowledge)]. when the Church of Scientology
World Wide (under Hubbard's control) claimed that the Vedic Hymns "are our earliest debt in
Page 3 of 10
Scientology" (Church of Scientology World Wide, 1970: 8), it only reproduced one Vedic hymn
[which the source failed to identify as the comparatively late poem, Rig Veda X.129 (see Bose,
1966: 302-305)]. The remaining two passages from Indian scriptures that it excerpted were not
Vedic hymns, but two sections from the Katha Upanishad (see Hume, 1931: 341-361) of a later
period (Church Of Scientology World Wide, 1970: 8-10). Nor did the Church describe the
reputed link between Indian philosophy and Scientology in any precise or direct manner. One
wonders, for example, why Hubbard did not draw parallels between "past lives" in Scientology
(Hubbard, 1969a) and transmigration in post-Vedic schools of Hinduism (Zimmer, 1951: 252).
Furthermore, Hubbard was philosophically and linguistically incorrect to say that "we have the
word Dharma almost interchangeable with the word Dhyana. But whatever you use there, you're
using a word which means Knowingness [sic]" (Hubbard, 1969b: 17; see Hubbard, 1975: 112).
Dharma has many meanings in Sanskrit ranging in Hinduism from "law" to "duty; right, justice
(often as a synonym of punishment)" to "the law of doctrine of Buddhism... [or] the ethical
precepts of Buddhism" (Monier-Williams, 1899: 510). It can never mean the same as dhyana -
"meditation, thought, reflection, (esp.) profound and abstract religious meditation" (Monier-
Williams, 1899: 521). Dhyana cannot be translated as "Knowingness and Lookingness [sic]"
(Hubbard, 1969b: 17) in a way that is equivalent to its Indian meaning, since Scientology does
not demand the rigorous physical and mental exercises that yogis and other seekers undergo.
These Sanskrit terms reflect basic concepts in both Hinduism and Buddhism, and Hubbard's
cavalier translation of them fails to sustain his claim that Scientology marches in the footsteps of
these traditions.
Worth pointing out, however, is that not all researchers have shared my skepticism concerning
comparisons between Scientology and meditational Hinduism. Roy Wallis suggested that
[i]n Yoga a number of parallels with Scientology are evident. Yoga offers a system of
metaphysical knowledge leading to 'rebirth to a non-conditioned mode of being.' The aim of the
earliest philosophy of Yoga, samkhya, was to dissociate the spirit from matter. In Yoga the world
is real not illusory, but its endurance is the result of the ignorance of spirit.... The source of the
soul's suffering is held to be man's solidarity with the cosmos, his participation in nature (the
enturbulation of theta and MEST) [i.e., what Scientology calls the physical universe of matter,
energy, space, and time (Hubbard, 1975: 248)] (Wallis, 1976: 112, quoting from Eliade, 1969:
4).

After summarizing Mircea Eliade's description of yoga, Wallis concluded that "impressive
similarities are to be found with the theory and practice of Scientology and Dianetics" (Wallis,
1976: 113). He also indicated that both the Buddha and Hubbard advised their respective
followers against involving themselves with any occult powers that might arise while
progressing along their paths (Wallis, 1976: 112-133 & n. 1). Even Jon Atack, who is among
Scientology's most thoughtful critics, proposed that the TRs (Training Routines) in Scientology's
Communication Course "are similar to meditation" (Atack, 1990: 14).
The classical Samkhya philosophy that Wallis mentioned receives its clearest exposition in the
Samkhyakarika (henceforth S.K.) by Ishvarakrishna [which dates before 557 to 569 (Larson,
1969: 4-5)], although earlier versions of Samkhya were behind the ascetical yoga practices of
Page 4 of 10
Patanjali's Yoga Sutras (see for example, Kent, 1982: 264), which "were written at some time in
the fourth or fifth century of our era" (Woods, 1914: xix; see Larson, 1969: 162). Basic to the
classical Samkhya system is the assertion that two eternal principles exist called prakrti (matter)
and purusha (spirit), and that creation occurs when the inherent, creative properties of matter
activate because of the proximity of a spirit [much like a dancer who performs when she has an
audience (S.K. LIX, in Larson, 1969: 278)].
While Wallis was correct in indicating that Samkhya-yoga holds a view about salvation that
involves the disentanglement of the spirit from matter, he could have mentioned additional
concepts that bore similarities to aspects of Scientology's religious thought. For example, both
systems emphasise that life involves suffering from which their ideologies reputedly offer
salvation (S.K. I, in Larson, 1969: 257). In the Indian philosophical system, purusha is plural
(S.K. XIIIII, in Larson, 1969: 264; see Kent, 1980: 243), as are thetans. Likewise, Scientology
and samkhya-yoga postulate forms of rebirth (S.K. XXXIX, and XL in Larson, 1969: 272, see
218) prior to which the transmigrating entities forget about their previous lives.
4

Irreconcilable differences, however, exist between the two systems. Samkhya rests upon the
premise that spirit and matter are separate entities, while Hubbard stated that his spiritual entities
(thetans) created their own ideal universes (that he called "home universes") which, in turn, were
taken over by a MEST universe. "The spirit, then, is not a thing. It is the creator of things") as
Hubbard tersely stated in 1956 (Hubbard, 1956: 54). The Samkhya Karika is definite in its claim
that "purusa is neither created nor creative" (S.K. III, in Larson, 1969: 258). Moreover, yoga's
insistence that it "is the restriction of the fluctuations of mind-stuff" (Y.S. i.2, in Woods, 1914:
xxxx) has no equivalent in Scientology, whose analytic mind does not receive any attention
regarding the restrictions of its perceptual activities. Hubbard's knowledge, therefore, of
Hinduism appears to have been superficial.
Taoism
A similar superficiality appears in Hubbard's insistence that Taoism's central term, tao, "means
Knowingness. That is again a literal translation" (Hubbard, 1969b: 16), when in fact a literal
translation of it is "path, road, way, extended to mean principle, system, truth, Reality, etc."
(Chan, 1963:136 n. 1). Finally, it is difficult to see how Hubbard saw "self-determiiyism" as
equivalent to the Taoist principal wu-wei, which translates as "non-action" in the sense of '
"taking no action that is contrary to Nature' - in other words, letting Nature take its own course"
(Chan, 1963: 136). No obvious similarities exist between the basic Taoist terms that Hubbard
identified and his discussion in Scientology of what he called the MEST universe. Consequently,
one of Hubbard's organisations, the Church of Scientology of California, was inaccurate when it
proffered that "[a] Scientologist is a first cousin to the Buddhist (and] a distant relative of the
Taoist..." (Church of Scientology of California, 1978: 7).
Hinayana Buddhism
As this statement suggests, of considerable importance to Hubbard's efforts to establish religious
aspects of Scientology were his attempts to connect his ideology with Buddhism. He attempted
to establish these connections on conceptional and personal grounds. Conceptually, he tried to
Page 5 of 10
analogise a bodhi [sattva] and a Dianetic Release. With a somewhat simplistic knowledge of
Buddhism, Hubbard suggested that:
We first find this Buddha called actually Bohdi [sic: bodhi], and a Bohdi is one who has attained
intellectual and ethical perfection by human means. This probably would be a Dianetic Release
(Dianetic Release: One who in Dianetic auditing has attained good case gains, stability and can
enjoy life more. Such a person is 'Keyed out' or in other words released from the stimulus-
response mechanisms of the reactive mind) or something of this level. Another level has been
mentioned to me - Arhat, with which I am not particularly familiar, said to be more comparable
to our idea of Theta Clear [Hubbard, 1969b: 18 (emphasis in original)].

Indeed, Scientologists take these claims seriously. As early as 1958, the "editor" of Scientology's
Ability magazine, whose writing style suggests that it was Hubbard himself, reflected that:
Just now it is enough to say that the State of Clear was envisioned 2,500 years ago by Gautama
Sidhartha and was attained by a very few and -then was seen no more. The state then was known
as 'Bhodi' since it was attained under a bhodi [sic] tree. Since then the tradition has grown dim.
Man has sought to clear Man, first of demons, then of subconscious traumas. Ron, with a whole
new look at this, has brought about a state in Clear higher than that regarded by Gautama
Sidhartha since it is achieved in not only one lifetime but in a few weeks and is available to all
men, not just a few. ... Operating Thetan has not before been known as a state of being on Earth.
Neither Lord Buddha nor Jesus Christ were O.T.'s according to the evidence. They were just a
shade above Clear (Hubbard[?], 1958: 6.)

Apparently, "the editor" saw Scientology as a system that actually surpassed, rather than merely
extended, the achievements of the Buddhist tradition.
At least one researcher has accepted Scientology's self-proclaimed analogies to Buddhism. Frank
Flinn argued that "[t]he central Scientological term 'clear' is roughly equivalent to the Buddhist
concept of bodhi which describes 'the one awake' or 'enlightened one' who has gained
releasement [sic] (moksa) from the entangling threads of existence and illusion" (Flinn, 1983:
93). Indeed, he went so far as to suggest that "the many levels and grades of the auditing process
can be seen as refinement and resignification of the Buddhist Eightfold Path in a space-age
context" Flinn, 1983: 93).
These similarities are superficial, however, and even Flinn realised that Scientology lacks "any
emphasis on meditation and contemplation" Flinn, 1983: 94) as is central to Buddhist practice
and spiritual achievement. Scientology's system claims to work by eliminating the effects of
traumatic events (or engrams), while traditional Buddhism asserts that practitioners can achieve
its spiritual goal by combining moral discipline with methods of concentration.
Moral discipline involves a practitioner impressing knowledge or insight upon (as Edward Conze
says) one's "reluctant body" (Conze, 1951: 96), which involves freeing him or her "from the
illusions of individuality" (Conze, 1951: 97). In essence, Buddhist monks (whom the tradition
considers to be farthest along the path to Enlightenment) live ascetic lives involving deprivations
of sleep, comfort diet and possessions. Despite the fact that some punishments that Hubbard
imposed upon his followers were exceedingly demanding (Atack, 1990: 175-176, 180-181) and
Page 6 of 10
some of the living conditions starkly harsh (Atack, 1990: 275-277), Scientology has no
formalised or systematised ascetic tradition.
Most dramatically, Scientology's design to punish nonconformity appears to contrast with
Buddhist monastic punishments that Hubbard himself tried to offer as "the direct forerunner of
our own Ethics system" (Hubbard, 1966: 459). Offences that led to punishments were ones that
Buddhists deemed to be "not only repugnant to the moral well-being of the community of monks
but also retard the spiritual progress of the monk who succumbs to moral turpitude" (Perera,
1965: 460). The early Buddhist punishments were limited to immediate dismissal, suspension
and probation, censure, removal to another location, recanting and begging pardon from the
aggrieved party, total segregation and placement under surveillance.
Many of these practices resemble Scientology punishments, which can probably be explained in
terms of common responses of ideological groups to doctrinal deviance. Nowhere, however, in
these Buddhist codes is there anything like the Scientology requirement for a person trying to get
out of the "condition of liability" in the group's ethics by having to "[d]eliver an effective blow to
the enemies of the group one has been pretending to be part of despite personal danger"
(Hubbard, 1967a: 237). Nor do these codes have anything like Scientology's infamous "Fair
Game Law" that was in effect formally for a year beginning in mid-October, 1967, which said
that an enemy "[m]ay be deprived of property or injured by any means by any Scientologist
without discipline of the Scientologist. May be tricked, sued or lied to or destroyed" (Hubbard,
1967b).
5

Buddhist morality provided the groundwork for Buddhist concentration exercises - exercises that
occasionally have superficial equivalents in Scientology. Concentration specifically involved
three types of practices - dhyanas [i.e. progression through various mental states (see Ling, 1981:
115)], apramana [i.e. "methods of cultivating the emotions", (Conze, 1951:102)], and the
cultivation of occult powers (Conze, 1951: 10~105). While contemplative practices of these
kinds play no part in Scientology, one may be tempted to see cursory similarities between the
first of at least four dhyanas and the first three TRs [Training Routines] in Scientology's
Communications Course. The initial dhyana involved temporarily suppressing "one's
unwholesome tendenaes - i.e. sense-desire, ill-will, sloth and torpor, excitedness and perplexity"
[Conze, 1951: 100; see Conze (trans.), 1959: 184]. Two TRs involve sitting or sitting and staring
for hours upon end without moving, while the TR about 'bullbaiting' involved remaining
composed amidst insults, jokes, or other provocations (see Atack, 1990: 14). Arguably these
exercises teach rudimentary control over aspects of one's mind and body, but they are not
designed, nor are they used, as "means for transcending the impact of sensory stimuli and our
normal reactions to it" (Conze, 1951: 100). Instead, the TRs (and probably 'bullbaiting' intend to
"train students to confront preclears [without] social tricks of conversation and to overcome
obsessive compulsions to be 'interesting' " (Church of Scientology, 1961, also quoted in Lamont,
1986: 40). In other words, they aspire to eliminate personality factors that would ordinarily
express individuality in social exchanges. They become the first step in molding conformity
among converts.
A few words should be said about the concentrations in the Hinayana tradition involving occult
powers (iddhis), such as "clairvoyance, clairaudience, recollection of former births and
Page 7 of 10
knowledge of the thoughts of others" (Conze, 1951: 104). Additional occult powers allegedly
involved the ability to "pass at will through wall or fence or hill as if through air, pass in and out
of the solid earth, walk on the water's surface or glide through the air" (quoted in Conze, 1951:
104). These alleged powers are similar to the claims that Hubbard made about the powers of a
"clear" who was "a person who can have or not have at will anything in the universe" (Hubbard,
1975: 75, referring to a 1954 lecture). The Buddha, however, feared that these psychic powers
would cause disciples to lose sight of their highest goal (nirvana), and reportedly he announced
that "because I perceive danger in the practice of mystic wonders [i.e. 'psychic powers'] that I
loathe, abhor, and am ashamed thereof" (Dighanikaya i, 213, quoted in Ling, 1981:111).
Hubbard's boldest attempt to legitimise Scientology by associating himself with Buddhism
appears in his 1974 publication, The Hymn of Asia (1974a), which he wrote a number of years
earlier in 1956.
6
He strongly implies that he is Maitreya or Metteya, the Future Buddha, whom
the Buddha himself purportedly discoursed upon. The "editors" to the volume, who may have
been Hubbard himself, made five claims about the "Metteya Legend" which were that:
1. He shall appear in the West.
2. He shall appear at a time when religion shall be waning, when the world is imperiled
[sic] and convulsed in turmoil.
3. He will have golden hair or red hair.
4. He will complete the work of Gautama Buddha and bring in a new golden age of man by
making possible the attainment of spiritual freedom by all beings.
5. Although the date of his advent is variously forecast, the nearest date places it 2,500
years after Gautama Buddha - or roughly 1950.... (Editors in Hubbard, 1974a: [n.p.]).

Hubbard's text explored several of these themes. The first line of Hubbard's extended poetic
hymn asks, "Am I Metteyya? [sic]" Quickly he followed with the statement that "I come to bring
you all that Lord Buddha would have you know of life, Earth, and Man".
7
He made a
fundamental error in Buddhist soteriology when he proclaimed that "What I say has to do With
Self". In line with the editors' initial comments, he asked the rhetorical question, "Do I have
Golden Hair?", which called attention to the fact that his hair was red. Drawing on standard
Scientology themes along with the editors' comments, he announced that "We can make lawful
the criminal[.] We can make sane the insane[.] We can ourselves be free". He pronounced that
we "are the New Men the new spiritual Leaders of Earth" and that they should build "places for
the use Of men, Demanding only That they bow To Buddha". Finally, he claimed that he had to
appear in the "western World.. Because of the Disorders in the East since Vaishakha 2453
(Buddhist date for February 1910)". If any doubt remained that Hubbard was proclaiming
himself Maitreya, then he removed it when he stated that "Even your own prophesies Centuries
Old Said I would appear In the Western World. I appeared" [Hubbard, 1974a: (n. pp., with
original capitalisation)].
8

Fortunately, the Buddha's supposed discourse on Maitreya is available in English translation, as
it was during the time the Hubbard was suggesting his identity with the Buddhist religious
legend. Almost none of the attributions that he (or his "editors") make to the figure are accurate.
Page 8 of 10
The translated passages do not mention anything about Maitreya appearing in the west, nor do
they indicate that the Buddha-of-the-Future will appear in a time of world peril. To the contrary,
the texts state that Maitreya %(like the Buddha himself) will be born to royalty who preside over
a city that is "mighty and prosperous, full of people, crowded and well fed" (Cakkavatti-
Sihanada Suttanta 75.25-26; trans. in Rhys-Davids, 1921: 73). Nothing is said about him having
golden or red hair, nor is a date given for his return (Rhys-Davids, 1921: 73-74).
Likewise, the Maitreyavyakarana fails to mention the attributes of Maitreya that either Hubbard
or the editors had indicated, and one scriptural passage specifically contradicts their claims. Both
Hubbard and the editors emphasised the prophecy about Maitreya having golden or red hair,
whereas the scripture itself makes no direct mention of hair color at all. It does say that
Maitreya's "skin will have a golden hue" (Conze, 1959: 239), and that he will have "the thirty-
two Marks of a superman" (Conze, 1959: 239). These marks supposedly "characterise a great
man; or more properly, a 'superman"' (Ling, 1981:136). The original Buddhist text states that one
mark (that I already have mentioned) was skin or complexion "like bronze, the color of gold"
(Lakkhana Suttanta 143, trans. in Rhys-Davids, 1921: 138). Clearly, this passage did not refer to
hair, since another characteristic was "down [i.e. very soft hair] on [a superman's] body [that]
turns upward, every hair of it blue black in colour like eye-paint, in little curling rings, curling to
the right" [Lakkhana Suttanta 144, trans. in Rhys-Davids, 1921: 138 (my emphasis)]. Maitreya's
hair thus would be curly black, not red.
Based upon an interview that I conducted with a former Scientologist who worked with Hubbard
during the time that he wrote The Hymn of Asia, Hubbard's motive was purely opportunistic. My
informant indicated that two older women who read widely in spiritual literature wrote to
Hubbard and asked him whether he saw similarities between himself and Maitreya Buddha.
Inspired by the question, he penned the Hymn in a spiral-ringed dictation notebook. Initially, the
poem's first line said, "I am Maitreya", but Hubbard changed it to a question "Am I Maitreya?",
before sending it to the publisher (Kent interview with Durston, 1992: 5-9). Beyond the admirers'
letter, no indication existed that he had done any research into Buddhism or the Maitreya
accounts before he wrote the self-serving poem.
Finally, comments must be made on a significant theological difference between Scientology and
Buddhism-a difference that Hubbard apparently did not realise when he stated in Hymn of Asia
that "What I say has to do With Self" (Hubbard, 1974a). Unmistakably, this is an allusion to the
thetan, which Scientology sees as an immortal soul or spirit [see Hubbard, 1975: 432 (referring
to a 1956 source); Church of Scientology of California, 1978: 4, 6]. Fundamental, however, to
Buddhist philosophy is the doctrine of no-soul (anatta [Pali]; anatma [Sanskrit])-a doctrine that
distinguishes Buddhism "from all other relig[ions] and philosoph[ical] schools of anc[ient] India.
Without proper appreciation of [the] meaning of anatta, it is imposs[iblej to understand
Buddh[ist] thought" (Ling, 1981: 17; see Atack, 1990: 374). The Buddha himself reportedly
chided one of his followers for wanting to engage in the debate about the existence of a soul, and
encouraged him instead to remain mindful of emotional fluctuations along with the processes of
feeling, thinking and conceptualising. Doctrines of the soul did not further one's efforts of
reaching nirvana, so the Buddha testily asked the disciple, "I have revealed to you what should
be revealed; shall I then reveal to you what should not be revealed?" [Pasadika Suttanta 39
(14~141) in Rhys Davids, 1921:130]. In essence, "[elverything resembling a doctrine of a soul
Page 9 of 10
has to be abandoned before there will be assurance that liberation from matter will be
permanent" (Kent, 1982: 271).
9

Perhaps Hubbard's truest attitude about Buddhism appeared in a Communications Bulletin that
he wrote in April 6, 1963. Intended for circulation to higher ranking members of Scientology
franchises and central organisations, it was not a document intended for public consumption. In it
he spoke disparagingly of Buddhism's salvation by equating Nirvana with what Hubbard called
"goals- problem-mass" (GPM) - the heaviness caused by conflicting goals. He contrasted the
failure of Nirvana with the glorious nature of Scientology's state of clear:
The Buddhists spoke of Nirvana. Without knowing it, they spoke of vanishing forever into the
GPM (Nirvana). They had become completely overwhelmed, lacking any [e-]meters and a map.
We are Scientologists. We won't fall into the abyss. And we won't join Nirvana. We have meters
and a map. We know the rules and the way.
This the greatest adventure of all time. Clearing. The way is strewn with the skeletons and skulls
of those who have tried over the past trillenia [sic]. The bottom of the Abyss is glutted with
failures. Nirvana is choked with the overwhelmed.... Only the faint hearted will add any bones to
the Abyss or apathy to Nirvana.
We are Scientologists. We have won (Hubbard, 1963: 3).
Hubbard appears to have meant that Buddhists' quest for nirvana simply overwhelmed them and
they fell into emptiness ("the Abyss") or apathy. Scientology clearing, however, was humanity's
greatest goal, and people could achieve it by following the organisation's techniques (the "map")
while working on the E-meter. The Buddhist quest for nirvana merely was a path to failure.
We must conclude, therefore, that Hubbard had only a rudimentary, and largely inaccurate,
understanding of major Eastern religious traditions - traditions about which he claimed
similarities to the faith that he had constructed. His self-proclaimed association, for example,
with Buddhism's Maitreya seems to have been an effort on his part to enhance his image with his
followers, as well as add respectability to his organisation's beliefs by associating them with a
major religious tradition. Aside from superficial similarities between scientology and Hinayana
Buddhism that might have motivated him to draw spurious associations between the two belief
systems, Hubbard may have written about Eastern faiths because his Western members were
unlikely to have sufficient background in them to make informed assessments about his claims.
Allegations Concerning Practicing Medicine Without a License
Hubbard made most of his claims about Eastern similarities to Scientology during periods when
he was attempting to reduce the likelihood of governmental interventions against it for allegedly
practicing medicine without a license. This pattern fits for the first two decades of Dianetics and
Scientology operating, during which Hubbard claimed similarities between Scientology and
Eastern religions-1954, 1960 and 1962. The interesting exception to this pattern (1968) occurred
Page 10 of 10
in relation to a battle with the American Internal Revenue Service (IRS) over the tax status of the
Founding Church of Scientology in Washington, D.C.
While researchers must not minimise financial motives for Hubbard's delusion, to present
Scientology as a religion in the early 1950s (see Miller, 1987: 220), they must also not neglect
the fact that occasionally Hubbard's followers across the United States were being arrested for
practicing medicine without licenses. In the book that remains the cornerstone of both Dianetics
and Scientology, Hubbard proclaimed in 1950 that with the proper application of the techniques
he outlined, "arthritis vanishes, myopia gets better, heart illness decreases, asthma disappears,
stomachs function properly, and the whole catalogue of ills goes away and stays away"
(Hubbard, 1950: 59). Because of claims such as these (to which Scientology still adheres), the
New Jersey State Board of Medical Examiners accused the Hubbard Dianetic Research
Foundation, Inc. of "operating a school for the treatment of disease without a license" in January,
1951 (Elizabeth Daily Journal, 1951a), which contributed to the organisation's departure from
Elizabeth, New Jersey, in April - prior to its pending trial in May (Elizabeth Daily Journal,
1951b). In late March, 1953, two Dianetics and Scientology practitioners were arrested, along
with the confiscation of an E-meter, as part of an investigation into "running an unlicensed
school and practicing medicine without licenses" (Detroit News, 1953a, b; see Pickering, 1953).
Likewise, in late 1953 or early 1954, a Glendale, California, Dianeticist or Scientologist
apparently spent ten days in jail for "practicising medicine without a license" (quoted in Aberree,
1954a: 4).
Reacting to an emerging pattern of arrests, Hubbard (in December, 1953) incorporated three
religious organisations in New Jersey: the Church of American Science, The Church of
Scientology, and The Church of Spiritual Engineering (Aberree, 1954a: 1). A publication by an
independent Scientologist at the time reported that officials of the Hubbard Association of
Scientologists "stated that there is little doubt but [sic] what this stroke will remove Scientology
from the a target area of overt and covert attacks by the medical profession, who see their pills,
scalpels, and appendix-studded incomes threatened" (Aberree, 1954a: 4).

[ Full Article continued at: http://www.scribd.com/doc/57870696/Scientology-Relationship-
With-Eastern-Religious-Traditions-Kent ]
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.002

The Scientology Religion – Background
(1974 L. Ron Hubbard Publication)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.003

The Creation of Human Ability – Reference
Appendix: Scientology, Its General Background
[Outline of Professional Course Lectures, July
1954] (2007 L. Ron Hubbard Publication)


Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.004

L. Ron Hubbard on Understanding Your Inner
Thetan:


The Story of a Static (1957/1978 L. Ron Hubbard
Essay)


Basic Personality and a Thetan's Capabilities
(1975 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


The Phenomenon of the Thetan (1982 L. Ron
Hubbard Essay)
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
[ From Advance! Issue 52, March 1978 ]
Basic Personality and
a Thetan's Capabilities
by L. Ron Hubbard
In this fascinating article (edited from Ron's taped
lecture of 17 December, 1953) Ron reveals what
you find when aberration is stripped off a person.
He also discusses space· opera and what happens
when a live and able thetan collides with a dull
world.
P
EOPLE HAVE BEEN walking down separate
tracks for 76 trillion years. If you took two
of them and they walked side by side through
a hundred thousand years, each would have had a
different viewpoint on what was happening.
So you get a different pattern of experience per-
son by person. People can live in the same family
and live all their lives together on the same farm,
and yet each one will come up at the end of one
lifetime with an entirely different pattern of ex-
perience than anyone else.
But this is not the essential difference amongst
people. That's just amongst experience. The essen-
tial difference amongst people is established in the
basic personality. The basic personality was never
so real as it is today. You can pop a thetan out of
his head and you can put him through enormous
numbers of drills and you can snap him through
this and that and he's still the same guy. You can
knock out engrams and automaticities and chew up
energy and throw it away and give him different
abilities and make him able to haunt ably and do
all sorts of things and so on - and he's still the same
guy as far as his basic personality is concerned.
In other words, his forward push in life is moti-
vated by more or less the same concerns as it was
before.
This will mystify you a little bit. Sometimes
you'll think a person has changed wildly until you
look very closely and you find out they were al-
ready interested in building things, already inte-
rested in .creating things, and in this and that. Their
interest patterns stay pretty much the same.
What happens is they get more intense and be-
come much more vivid. They are able to ac-
complish then the things which they were only
dreaming about before, which makes at first glance
an entirely different person. Once you've stripped
all of the aberration off a person you find a person-
ality. It happens that you find more personality
6
[ From Advance! Issue 26, March 1975 ]
' i l l ! l j O l u ; ) d o ; ) P ! M S ! J I ; ) S P ; ) S l ; ) A ! U n
; ) l j . 1 · S ! ; ) l ; ) l j l l l U J O u u d s A U E 0 l U I o g
u u o ; ) H ' l ; ) P T ! M P o p U E O ; ) l j 1 0 : > ! O E l l
; ) l j l u o ; ) U O P l ; ) A ; ) S U M l E l j l g U ! l [ l A U U
o p U E O U U l ; ) l j l U P U ! ] ; ) M ' l l 0 4 S U I
' p ; ) s d ! ! o ; ) S ! U E l ; ) l j l ; ) l [ l J O l S ; ) q ; ) l [ l
U ; ) 4 l p ; ) s d ! p ; ) S ! l U 4 l U ; ) l j M p u y ' i l l ! 4 U !
S ! ; ) 1 ; ) 4 l l S ; ) q ; ) l j l s J E 4 l ' A l ! T ! q E O q S q l U
S , U U l ; ) l j l E ; ) l U l m q u 4 ; ) 1 n O A U ; ) l j M
. A E p O l l j l l U ; )
u o ; ) l ; ) l [ g U ! S S ! U l A I ; ) l ; ) l d U l O O l S O U l J E
s J ! ; ) s n u o ; ) q l ! d l ; ) l j l , u P l n o o l s n f n O A
' 4 1 1 U ; ) u o ; ) O U E S S ! E U ; ) lU ; ) A U 4 P l n o M n O A
; ) I d o ; ) d u ; ) z o p M ; ) J U A J U O l j l ! M A l q ! S s o d
s I l [ l o p O l ; ) l ; ) M n O A J I ' P ; ) l S ; ) l ; ) l U !
A l ; ) A ' A l ; ) A S l ; ) g ; ) l [ p u y ' : > ! O U l l ; ) l j l U O
S ; ) O P ; ) 4 l E 4 l g U T l j l l S ; ) U ! ] ; ) l j l g U ! O P S , ; ) l [
A l m q u ; ) A q U ; ) l O o q S q l U s T 4 ; ) l U l m q u 4
- ; ) 1 n O A J I · ; ) g U U l j O A I ; ) P U ! ] ; ) P l ; ) l [ l E l
I 1 ! M ; ) 4 i l l ! l j J O l n o U l S ! O q ! l O O q S q l U
; ) : > ! C l n O A U ; ) 4 M ' S P I O M 1 ; ) 4 l 0 u I
' : > ! l O M U M O S ! l j J O A l n U ; ) q ; ) 4 l p U E
A l n e ; ) q U M O S T 4 l n o q E A l U ! E l l ; ) O U n S I l l
J O l I u i l l ! l j J O l n o g U ! : > ! C l A q A l l u o q S q l U
i l l ! l j ; ) l E l m q u 4 ; ) 1 n O A U ; ) l [ M ; ) q I f ! M
P I U M l O J ; ) g m s l S ; ) l U ; ) l g S ! 4 ' p u J U I ' U O ! l
- o u ; ) A q U ; ) l O l U ; ) l g J O ; ) l q u d E O S ! ; ) H ' u o q
- o u ; ) A q o n l l S U O O J O l u n o U l E s n O U l I O U ; )
u u J O ; ) I q u d u o S ! ; ) 4 S ! ; ) 1 ; ) 4 l U ! o d ; ) 4 . 1
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1 ; ) 4 l 0 U U ; ) A U l [ l s n f p , n o A i , U ; ) 4 l ; ) A E 4
n O A P l n o M l U 4 M l n g : ' S E M g U I 4 l A l ; ) A ; )
S n O ! l ; ) S M 0 4 i l l ! l j M 0 4 s p U U ; ) g u l i o A
4 g n o u ; ) l j l ! M i l l ! 4 d o q p U E A p O q 1 ; ) 4 l 0 U U
O l U ! i l l ! l j l ; ) g ; ) s m o o J O P l n o o n o A
' U O ! l E Z
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g U ! o g l o u ; ) l , n o A ' s l ; ) 4 l U ; ) J ] O l n o ; ) g p p q
U 0 1 ! u u P T ! n q O l g U T o g l O U ; ) l , n O A
, : s l ; ) 4 1 U ; ) J ] 0 l n o ; ) g P ! l q U 0 1 ! u u P T ! n q 0 1
g U ! o g ; ) l , ; ) M ' 1 4 g p I I Y " ' g U ! A U S ; ) : > i T 1s , H
' 1 ; ) 4 1 ; ) g o l o g l , U O P l s n f S l O p U J ; ) S ; ) l l . 1
' ; ) O U ; ) l S ! X ; )l j l ! M P ; ) U l ; ) O U O O A l ; ) A A l ; ) A p u u
; ) I q u ' P ; ) Z P O P ; ) l X ; ) S , ; ) 4 ; ) 1 ; ) 4 M l U ! o d E O l
d n A p O q A U U l ; ) g l ; ) A ; ) l , U O M n O A M O N
' g u T 4 1 ; ) U l O S l U : > ! O O l l ; ) P E O l q ; ) I l l ! ! E i l l ! 4
; ) A ! g O l . A I l S O U l l n g : · g u ! u ; ) d d u 4 S A E M
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P T 4 0 S ! U l l ; ) g o l 1 0 N J ; ) T 4 0 S ! U l l n 0 4 1 ! M
P ; ) l S ; ) l ; ) l U T ; ) q l S E ; ) 1 1 U U E O ; ) 4 ; ) 1 ; ) 4 M l U ! o d
U O l d n u o P ; ) l S o o q ; ) q U E O ; ) 4 l n g :
' s g U ! 4 l 1 ; ) 4 l 0 J O s l o l
p u u S ; ) S l ; ) A ! U n 1 ; ) 4 l 0 s u I I ; ) M S E ; ) S l ; ) A ! U n
S T 4 l J O s p u d 1 ; ) 4 1 0 o S l u ; ) l U ; ) l ; ) l j l l U 4 l
n ! ! e ; ) l 1 , U S ; ) O P ; ) 4 1 0 ' s g u T 4 l 4 0 n s g U ! O P
U ! l I u l U I E O g 1 ; ) 4 l m J A U E ; ) ; ) S l , U S ; ) O P
; ) 4 U ; ) 4 . 1 J ; ) ! 4 0 S ! U l 1 0 J U l ; ) l j l s ; ) s n l s n f
; ) l j l n q ' g U ! p ; ) ; ) o O l d P ; ) ! J ! u g ! p u n l ; ) l j l U " M
L
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O l S l l E l S ; ) 1 1 g U ! 4 l l S l ! ] ; ) 4 . 1 ' S ! 4 l ; ) : > i T 1
s g U ! 4 l J O s p O S l I u o p u u o U U l ; ) 4 l Y
' o p A ; ) 4 l l n q P l n 0 4 s A ; ) 4 l
A 4 M M O U : > ! l , U O P 1 ' l ! l n o q E P ; ) l ! O X ; )
l ; ) g ; ) I d o ; ) d ' ; ) I d o ; ) d O l g U l l l ; ) s d n A l ; ) A
l s n f s , l I ' ; ) l ; ) l J M O U U l O I J U l ; ) ~ [ l O l g U ! : > ! I U l
; ) O ! O A E l U ; ) l J A ; ) l J l U ; ) 4 M ' I ; ) A ; ) I l U ; ) l m O
S , A l ; ) ! O O S S ! l J l l E ' I E ; ) P l E ; ) l g E ; ) I d o ; ) d
S ; ) 1 l 1 U 1 S l ! l n q ' x o q ; ) O ! O A E ; ) : > ! ! 1 ' ; ) O U U 1 S U !
l O J ' A l ; ) U ! 4 0 E U l S ! l J l l I u P ; ) ; ) U l , U S ; ) O P ; ) H
' ; ) S l ; ) A ; ) l ; ) 4 l l O U ' n o A O l l E ! ! n o ; ) d l u ; ) d
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o l ; ) l q E ; ) q l O U p u u A p O q S ! 4 J O l n o l ; ) g
o l l U ; ) P ; ) l d U 1 0 J ; ) u q n o l ; ) p n b s , l I
' S ; ) q ! l ! q E
S I l l U ! 4 l ! M I I ; ) M ; ) l U l [ 0 ! 4 M s g u l l [ l l ; ) l j l O
o p p u u ' U M O S ! l j u U l l l 1 ; ) 4 l 0 S ; ) ! p o q
i O l l U O O ' S ; ) l U l n l S o d l n o M 0 1 4 1 ' A l ! O ! l l
- 0 ; ) 1 ; ) l n o l ; ) g ' : > ! C ; ) d s ' l U ; ) l J ' ; ) ; ) S U E O ; ) 4
o s U U l ; ) 4 l ; ) 4 l J O S ; ) q m q u d E o ; ) 4 1 ; ) I E O S
l U ; ) ! P U l g U u o d n I f ! l p A l d U l ! S 4 0 T 4 M
s ; ) n b ! u 4 0 ; ) l P ; ) O U U A P U ; ) l E ; ) l ; ) l J . 1
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J O S p ; ) d S E O q U U l E l p ; ) l O U l ; ) 4 l J O ; ) U l O S
U ! ; ) g E g U ; ) A l d i l l ! s U U O ; ) l [ 1 0 ' l ; ) l ] U ; ) l ; ) l [ l
u o q u l ; ) d s ; ) p l ; ) ! n b J O ; ) J ! \ U ; ) A ! I p u u
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- ; ) l ; ) l [ l S U O q O ; ) l ! P O i \ \ l U ! o g U E O ; ) H
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u ; ) p p n s U J O l I u p u u ' ; ) U O P S g U ! l [ l J O s p O S
f I l l l ; ) g u u o ; ) 1 1 ' U O q O U l p o o g U I S , ; ) l [
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p U ! J O l S ! ; ) U ! ! ; ) l j l d n g U ! A O U l S , O l [ M S l ! l l
U U l ; ) l j l U l E l [ l d U l n l [ ; ) l [ . 1 . A U P A g g O J
l U l [ M ; ) U l O S U U O g u p o u s M O O E S E E U l E l p
J O I ; ) A ; ) I ; ) U l U S ; ) l [ l l n o q E S E l l A l ; ) ! O O S
l U ; ) l l n O S T 4 . 1 ' : > ! O E l l ; ) I O l J M ; ) l j l U O U U l U 1 P
; ) l q U l ; ) P ! S U O O U M O U : > !S E l f U E l ; ) l j l E ' O S
3 N r I 3 H . 1 d f l ~ N I A O W
· U O
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; ) l E s g u T 4 l l U 4 l ; ) ; ) S 1 I , n o A p U E ; ) o u d s
l ; ) l n O O l U ! l ; ) g n O A p U E l U ; ) D U l ; ) l j . 1
P I U M O l d n l ; ) g n o A ' l E ; ) D E l ; ) l [ . 1 P I E M O l
d n u o g U ! U l O O ; ) l U ; ) I d o ; ) d n O A ; ) s n u o ; ) q
S T 4 1 l n o q u n O A g U T I P l d ; ) ; ) : > ! O l U O S E ; ) l
A U U 1 , U S ! ; ) l ; ) l j . 1 ' S l U ; ) P ; ) l d J O l n o S l U ; ) P
- I O U ! g U T 1 S ; ) 1 ; ) l U ! l S O U l ; ) l [ l U n l ; ) A J
' A I S n o ! l ; ) s J O p U T : > ! P ; ) : > ! U l A ; ) l J l ' S P l O M
l ; ) l j l O u I · g u T 4 1 A u u J O ; ) O E l d g U ! P ! l [
; ) l [ l S A E l l ; ) q 1 0 P I O M U S A U S 1 0 l ; ) d i l l ! l j M
U S l ; ) n n l ; ) A ; ) U ; ) l [ l U l [ l U U U l M ; ) l O S T 4 l
U O l U ; ) l g O S S ! l u u l d i l l ! J O l u n o U l E ; ) 4 . 1
' ; ) u o q : > ! o u q S ! 4 J O l l U d l ; ) M O I ; ) l j l l n o
s ; ) ! l d ; ) 4 p U E - l U q M O l O ; ) u q n o l U l s . n f
- l U q M O l O E S ; ) : > ! C lp u u I ; ) S S ; ) A l U U 4 0 1 ; ) U l
; ) l j l U O U ; ) U l M ; ) l O ; ) 4 l J O ; ) U O J O P l o l j U
S l ; ) g M ; ) l O g U ! P I U O q ; ) 4 l u o S A O q ; ) 4 l
J O ; ) U O ' s : > ! I E l A p O q O U l n q ' S ! g U ! A l l U O
; ) q 0 1 p ; ) s o d d n s S ! d T 4 s ; ) 4 l P l o g ; ) 4 l
; ) l ; ) l j M M O U : > ! 0 1 S l U U M A p u d g U ! P I U O q
' U O ! I O W p a p ! p a J d 0 1 U O ! l O W
p a p ! p a J d u n J O 0 ! l e J a 4 1 . : A l ! W O p U e ~ ' 1
E J ! ' ; ) I d U l u x ; ) 1 0 J ' u l ; ) d o ; ) o E d s u I
' l S E l q l ; ) g l E I U p u u u n g l ; ) g g ! q U
l ; ) g O l S U M g E g ; ) 1 0 4 M ; ) 4 . 1 ' u l ; ) d o ; ) o u d s
U ! A p O q ; ) U l O S l O 0 4 s l s n f l , U p ! P n o A
' A U P O l O l A I I U O q E U l u l p ; ) l E d U l O O l , U S ; ) O P
E l ; ) d o ; ) o u d s U ! P U ! ] n O A l E 4 l U O ! S U ; ) l
l J g ! 4 J O l u n O U l E ; ) 4 l ' ; ) O U E l S U I 1 0 . : 1
' l U ; ) P ! O U I ; ) l l l U ! P ; ) U ! E l U O O
U U l U 1 P ; ) 4 1 p U E l U ; ) U l O U l ; ) 4 l J O E U l U 1 P 1 0
1 0 U ; ) 1 ; ) 4 1 U ; ) ; ) M l ; ) q l U ; ) l g O O l S ! ; ) g P ! l q
; ) l [ l ; ) s n u o ; ) q A l ! I U ; ) l J O ; ) o U E l d ; ) o o u U E
; ) : > ! E U l O l ; ) l q E ; ) l ! n b l , U S ! l E ; ) P ; ) l d ; ) 4 . 1
' ; ) m p l d l U ; ) l ; ) J J ! G ' O L 8 1 ; ) : > i T 1U ; ) A ; ) S , l E 4 l
J J n l S O l U ! g U P E O l S l l E 1 S ; ) l [ u ; ) p p n s U
J O l i E U ; ) l J . 1 ' g U ! 4 1 A l ; ) A ; ) l n o q E l U ; ) P ! ] J ! P
l ; ) l [ l U l p m P ; ) l O q l u ; ) d d E l s n U l A l ; ) ! O
- O S S ! l [ . 1 ' I E u o q o U l ; ) 1 , U S ! 4 0 ! 1 1 M A l ; ) ! O
- O S U 4 1 1 M l U ; ) U l ; ) ; ) l g E U E U ! S , ; ) 4 ; ) s n e o
- ; ) q P ; ) s s ; ) o O l d S ! ; ) 4 s u l U ; ) P ; ) l d ; ) 4 1 U !
l n o q E ; ) U l O O S ; ) O U ; ) l ; ) J J ! P p u y ' s p o ! l ; ) d J O
S ; ) O U ; ) l ; ) J J ! P J O U l ; ) l q O l d E ; ) A E 1 1 ; ) M o S
' l [ g n E I P , ; ) 4 S ' A E P O l A p E I E J O ; ) o u ; ) s ; ) l d
; ) l [ l U ! U ; ) : > ! O d S ' ; ) l ; ) M S p l O M J E T ! U l ! S J I
' U O q E S J ; ) A U O O ; ) u q n o " M , , ' l ! S ' P U T : > !
U O U l l l i O O m O A O l : > ! O E q o g ' I I ; ) M i , A P E I E
J O ; ) o u ; ) s ; ) l d ; ) 4 1 U ! P I O M [ n o J U p ; ) l ; ) n n
; ) A E 4 n O A l E 4 1 ; ) Z ! l U ; ) l n O A o p ' l i S ' m o
n O A " ' A E S P I P A f I l l n p u p u u d n P O O l S
U ; ) U l ; ) 4 l p u u ' ; ) S E ; ) l U ; ) l g 4 1 1 M P ; ) U O O M S
U ; ) U l O M ; ) l j . 1 ' J ; ) o n p o l d l S ; ) q U M O
S ! 4 S U M A p O q A J ; ) A ; ) A U S 1 4 g ! U l n O A ' l o d s
; ) 4 l u o u o q o n p o l d O ! l E U l E J p E ; ) p U U l l S n f
A ; ) l j . 1 ' n E l U l U ; ) U l S S U l l E q U l ; ) J O ; ) U l U 4 S
O U l j l ! M ' l ! P I P A n d U l O l d A ; ) 4 1 g U ! 4 1
- ; ) U l O S J O l n o u O l p n p o l d O q E U l U J p J ; ) d n s
U ; ) : > ! U U l 0 1 ; ) o u u l [ o E J I E l [ p U l { A p O q
- A U E J I ' ; ) U O P g U ! ; ) q I f ! l S S U M r e u o q o U l ; )
; ) l { l p U U O q E U l U J p ; ) l { l u o S S ; ) J 1 S ; ) l { l
S I 6 I S E ; ) l E I S E ' p u J J O J ; ) n U U l U s y
' l u u O q o U l ; ) ; ) l [ l p U E O q E U l U J p
; ) l { l u o S S ; ) J 1 S S n O p U ; ) U l ; ) l l ; ) l { l ; ) A ; ) ! ! ; ) q
1 , u P l n o M l s n f n O A ' A p O q ; ) U l O S g U ! P p q
S U M A p O q ; ) U l O S ; ) : > i T 1 n O A O l p ; ) p u n O S
; ) A E l { P I n O M U U U l O M U p U E U E U l U U ; ) ; ) M l
- ; ) q U O q E S J ; ) A U O O O L 8 I l U l { l p U J ; ) l { l
: > ! O O P ; ) A O 1 , U O a ' ; ) U O P g U ! ; ) q S T . g u q p M
; ) l { l l j O ! l { M U ! ; ) g u ; ) l j l s u J O U ; ) l ; ) U l U S
; ) 4 l U ! S ; ) g u J ; ) l j l O ! T e l n o q E ; ) l P M A ; ) l j l
l U l { l - ; ) g E A U U J O ; ) n l l S , l U l { . 1 ' P ; ) l O q
J ; ) l { l U J p u u ' o q u U l U J p U n ' I E U O q O U l ; )
- u n ' P U U 4 - J ] O ' l E U S ! l { O ! l I M ' A U P O l
: > f I U lA ; ) 4 l S U A I p U X ; ) : > ! I U l S J ; ) P U I U l { O S T 4
S E l { p U U S : > ! I U l; ) U O , O L 8 1 J U ; ) A ; ) l j l l n o q u
' ; ) O U U l S U ! J O J ' S ; ) F J M ; ) U O U ; ) l j M l E l { l A U P
- O l J O U O ! l { S U J ; ) l { l S ! l ! ' ; ) l d U l E X ; ) 1 0 . : 1
' : > ! O E 1 l; ) I O l { M ; ) l { l U O s u o q E n l l s l U ; ) l ; ) J J ! P
p U U ; ) g U U l l S M ; ) J U ; ) l ! n b U ; ) ; ) q S , ; ) l ; ) l j l
I ' A l ! U l O P U E l ; ) l E ; ) l O O l l ; ) P l O U ! l S E I q n n J
l U g U ! o g S P U U 4 I I U J O u o q U U ! g U i l l ! ; ) l j l
l { P M ' S l U ; ) A U O ! I I T J l 9 L U ! ' A ! T E n p y
S a O H l 3 d . 1 N 3 1 1 3 i H I G ,
' ; ) J O p q U E l j l
[ From Advance! Magazine Issue No. 74 1982 ]
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.005

Phenomenon of the Thetan (L. Ron Hubbard 1952
Lecture, R&D Series Vol. 11)
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
(click  to  see  full  size)
The Research & Discovery Series by L. Ron Hubbard
Remember  how  you  felt  when  you  first  discovered  Scientology  and  Dianetics  technologies?
The  relief  and  the  joy  of  finally  finding  what  you  had  been  trying  to  find  for  the  longest  time...
And  remember  how  you  didn't  want  to  put  that  first  LRH  book  you  were  reading  down,  for  anything?  Well,  that's  what  happens  all 
over  again  when  you  start  reading  the  Research  &  Discovery  Series.  It's  that  same  sense  of  adventure  and  excitement,  as  you  follow 
LRH's  discoveries  step  by  step,  day  by  day,  as  the  adventure  of  you  unfolds  before  your  eyes!
TRAVEL  THE  PATH  OF  DISCOVERY  WITH  RON
Where  are  you  going  as  a  being?  Who  are  you  really?  And  where  did 
you  come  from?  These  and  all  of  the  other  basic  questions  a  thetan 
has  asked  down  through  the  ages,  are  the  questions  answered  by  LRH 
in  the  Research  &  Discovery  Series.  The  wealth  of  discoveries, 
breakthroughs  and  technology  in  these  volumes  is  astounding.
The  story  told  by  the  Research  &  Discovery  Series  is  the  path  blazed 
to  the  greatest  discoveries  ever  known.
For  example,  in  late  1950  more  and  more  auditors  began  to  run  into  a 
peculiar  and  completely  unexplained  phenomenon.  Preclears,  running 
Book  One  counseling,  collided  into  past  deaths,  and  lives  apparently 
lived  hundreds  and  even  thousands  of  years  ago.  Startling  details  were 
recalled,  little-known  facts  that  when  cross-checked,  proved  out  the 
diabolical  accuracy  of  these  hidden  memories.
But  strangest  of  all,  was  the  fact  that  the  preclears  only  got  well  if  the 
incidents  were  run  in  their  entirety,  and  discharged  of  the  pain  and 
unconsciousness  they  held.  How  these  events  led  to  the  revelation  of 
the  theta  universe  is  as  incredible  as  any  story  told.  And  here  is 
technology  you  can  use  right  now  to  move  up  to  OT  states  faster  and 
with  greater  case  gain.
PRICELESS  KNOWLEDGE  YOU  CAN  USE 
EVERY  DAY
As  LRH's  research  progressed,  his  discoveries  resolved  countless 
“unsolvable”  problems  that  had  plagued  mankind  for  eons.  As  the  true 
nature  of  life  was  revealed  solutions  to  every  aspect  of  life  came  into 
Join Ron on his adventure into terra incognita and beyond
in the Research & Discovery Series!
view,  and  LRH  made  these  breakthroughs  known  to  students  in  lecture  after  lecture.  You  too  need  to  have  this  knowledge  to  make 
it  to  full  OT!
As  LRH  wrote  in  Ron's  Journal  late  December  1963:
“What  I  have  learned  is  that  cases  do  not  progress  beyond  their 
Scientology  education  level.  This  has  made  a  great  difference.  A  case 
hangs  right  at  the  point  to  which  it  has  been  educated  in  Scientology. 
Processing  gains  are  parallel  to  education  gains  and  the  two  balance. 
Fifty  percent  of  a  case  gain  is  from  processing,  fifty  percent  from 
training.  .  .  .
.  .  .“It's  quite  impossible  to  go  to  OT  without  a  full  knowledge  of  OT 
processes  and  an  ability  to  audit  them.  That  was  the  main  point  that 
emerged.  But  similarly,  nobody  gets  past  lower  levels  as  a  case  without  a 
knowledge  of  them.  This  was  the  main  hang  up  in  cases—lack  of 
education  in  Scientology.”  –  LRH
 
LRH  himself  said  that  his  books  were  “actually  summaries  of  conclusions,”  distilled  information  which  was  the  result  of  his  vast 
research  into  the  mind  and  life.  How  did  he  arrive  at  that  technology?  That  story,  with  all  of  his  findings  along  the  way,  is  what 
you  get  in  Ron's  lectures  and  demonstrations.
Impressive  in  appearance,  elegantly  hardbound,  the  Research  and  Discovery  Series  brings  you  an  astonishing  collection  of  never-
before-published  photographs  of  LRH,  telegrams,  handwritten  notes,  charts...  and  the  most  valuable  discoveries  in  the  universe,  a 
wealth  of  knowledge  that  will  benefit  you  for  the  rest  of  eternity.
AVAIL  YOURSELF  OF  RON' S  LEGACY
This  is  the  most  incredible  track  of  discovery  that  has  ever  existed,  in  any  universe.  You'll  become  a  fellow  explorer  with  LRH, 
following  his  trek  closely,  crossing  the  frontier  of  the  mind  and  life.  All  told,  this  series  documents  the  first  three  years  of  intense 
research  and  development.
LRH's  lectures  form  the  very  foundation  of  your  Bridge  to  Total  Freedom.  Only  by  availing  yourself  of  his  tech  will  you  make  it 
all  the  way.  As  LRH  wrote  in  Ron's  Journal  36  ‘YOUR  NEW  YEAR’,  31  December  1982:
“It  is  you  who  choose  your  future,  it  is  you  who  holds  firmly  to  your  goals  or  lets  them  slip.  .  .  .
.  .  .“When  all  is  said  it  is  you  who  will  be  with  yourself  at  the  end.
“And  it  is  you  who  will  ask  yourself,  did  I  do  right  or  did  I  do  wrong?
“And  the  state  you  find  yourself  in  will  be  the  answer.”  –  LRH




L. Ron Hubbard
Volume 11 - Navigating the Infinite Realm of Aesthetics
The mystery of the aesthetic wavelength and why thetans are attracted to anything of beauty is unraveled here. You will discover
how a thetan lost abilities and ceased existing as an all-powerful being and what he needs to do to get these abilities back.
Contains twenty-eight lectures given between June 27th and October 31st 1952.
Your Sensation About Living
AN  ARTICLE  BY  L.  RON  HUBBARD  –  R&D  VOLUME  11
Did  you  ever  see  a  kid  start  playing?  Oh,  just—oh,  they  love  to  play!  They're  playing  cowboy  and 
Indian  or  something  of  the  sort,  and—slurp!—wonderful!  Have  a  terrific  ecstasy.
You  want  to  know  what  sensation  about  living  you  ought  to  have:  It's  the  same  sensation  with  which 
you  used  to  play  cowboy  and  Indian.  You  also  know  that  it  isn't  real  when  you're  playing  cowboys  and 
Indians.
That,  by  the  way,  is  on  the  upper  strata  of  ecstasy.  It  really  becomes  ecstasy  when  you  know  you  have 
to  pretend  that  it's  real  so  that  it  can  be  real.  You're  really  in  command  of  the  situation  then,  and  you 
can  have  a  good  time!  It's  fun.  One  of  the  biggest  control  mechanisms  there  are  is:  “You've  got  to  take 
this  seriously.  You've  really  got  to  be  serious  about  this.  If  you're  serious  enough  about  this—hm-hm-
hm!—you'll  get  somewhere  in  life.”
The  surest  way  to  get  nowhere  in  life  is  to  be  serious  about  it!
 
Read the rest of the lecture excerpt on page 335 in R&D Volume 11
The Artistic Wavelength
Ron  unraveled  the  mystery  of  the  aesthetic  wavelength  and  why  thetans  are  attracted  to  anything  of  beauty.  In  the  lecture  entitled 
“Straightwire—Technique  88”  he  tells  us,  “The  only  reason  that  you  are  alive  today  is  because  you  have  a  hope  that  something 
will  turn  up  that's  aesthetic,  interesting,  pretty,  entertaining  and  so  on.  You  will  hold  that  hope  solidly  and  you'll  go  through 
anything  to  obtain  it.”  Ron  also  discovered  the  double-edged  nature  of  this  aesthetic  wave  and  what  could  keep  you  trapped 
forevermore  in  the  “beauty  of  things.”
“People  are  terribly  interested  in  their  artistic  ability.  What's  happened  to  it?  How  do  they  get  it  back?”  Ron  posed  these  questions 
in  a  lecture  entitled  “Straightwire—Technique  88”  and  then  supplied  the  answers.
The battery-operated Min-E-Meter
(click  image  to  enlarge)
What  separates  certain  artists  from  the  rest?  What  mystical  quality  do  they 
possess  and  how  do  you  obtain  it?  In  Volume  11  these  questions  are 
answered.
The  artist  operates  on  the  highest  aesthetic  wavelengths,  way  up  the  tone 
scale,  but  comes  down  to  a  mest  universe  level  to  express  his  communication. 
It's  like  performing  Vivaldi's  “Four  Seasons”  on  a  ukulele.  It  can  hardly  be 
done  without  a  mountain  of  effort.
Sometimes,  if  but  for  a  few  seconds,  some  of  this  high  tone  level  wavelength 
comes  through  and  people  go  crazy  for  it.  As  Ron  explains,
“They're starved for that wave, utterly starved for it! They'll even go
see B Hollywood pictures, they'll even look at television, in the hopes
that sooner or later somebody is going to put that wave out.”
Ron  gives  you  a  new  understanding  of  the  power  of  artists  and  opens  the  door  to  your  own  discovery  of  that  magical  wavelength.
Resolution of the Second Dynamic
Have  you  ever  wondered  if  your  second  dynamic  problems  started  before  this  lifetime…?
On  page  587  you  will  read  a  one-of-a-kind  LRH  lecture  called  “The  Resolution  of  the  Second  Dynamic”.  This  lecture  can  only  be 
found  in  this  volume.
As  LRH  states  himself  from  the  lecture:
“This talk is ‘The Resolution of the Second Dynamic,’. . . If there are any minors present, they will have to leave. . . .
. . .“Now, this is a horrible fact. The second dynamic has a considerable monopoly on attention.
“If you look on the time track, you'll find many reasons why. And we're going to cover those, and we're also going to try
to cover what I hope you will find to be—but do not guarantee you will find to be—in your preclears, a resolution of the
second dynamic.”
Read  this  and  the  second  dynamic  will  no  longer  appear  to  be  a  such  a  mysterious  and  heart-breaking  subject,  starting  on  page 
587.
THOUGHT POLICE – REPORT IMMEDIATELY!
Are  your  thoughts  your  own  or  is  someone  keeping  tabs  on  you?  In  Volume  11  Ron  reveals  the  startling  discovery  of  the  “thought 
police.”  Somewhere  on  the  track  Big  Brother  wasn't  only  watching  you,  he  was  in  your  mind,  waiting  for  the  moment  you  slipped 
up  and  had  a  bad  thought.  As  Ron  tells  it,
“The guy goes down the street and he's perfectly happy, but he sees all of a sudden that the garbage has not been
collected in front of his house for a number of days and things are very messy around there. And he says, ‘Those
confounded people in the city—oh-oh. I've been detected.’”
A letter from Ron to a Scientology Associate in
London...
(click  to  read)
What  happened  to  the  thought  police?  Think  about  it.  Or  maybe  it's  better  if  you  didn't...  Get  the  full  story  on  page  61  of  Volume 
11.
Technique 8-80
How  much  force  and  electronics  are  needed  to  aberrate  a  theta  being?  Ron  explains 
in  the  lecture  “Standard  Process  of  88,”:  “Well,  it  takes  awful  heavy  force—terrific 
kilowattage—and  it  takes  electronics.  It  takes  electricity.”
It  was  during  this  time  period  that  Ron  developed  Technique  8-80,  a  specialized 
form  of  Scientology  which  he  called,  “the  electronics  of  human  thought  and 
beingness.  It  is  basic  in  answering  the  riddles  of  life  and  its  goals  in  the  MEST 
universe.”
The  entire  subject  of  the  thetan  as  an  energy  production  source,  including  how  to 
increase  this  energy,  is  covered  in  R&D  Volume  11.
Find  the  specific  electronic  incidents  on  the  track  that  have  rendered  a  being 
incapable  of  utilizing  his  full  power  and  what  Ron  developed  to  restore  it.  Volume 
11  is  a  diamond  mine  of  vital  information  that  takes  you  out  of  the  “not  know” 
band  of  your  innate  thetan  power  and  delivers  you  into  the  band  of  “know.”
 
Lectures Found in Volume 11
27  JUNE  1952  -  OCTOBER  1952  |  28  LECTURES


See: http://lrh-books.com/rd/navigating-the-infinite-realm-of-aesthetics
PHENOMENA OF THE THETAN
5210Cxx, SOP- 6B, Oct ober l 952 ( R&D Vol ume 11)
Let ' s t al k nowabout phenomena of t he t het an. The audi t or who t r i es
t o r ehabi l i t at e or r e- educat e a t het an, who doesn' t know what a t het an
can do pot ent i al l y and ul t i mat el y, i s of cour se not goi ng t o do ver y
much i n t he l i ne of educat i on. And so i t ' s necessar y t o know, when
we speak of t he subj ect of r e- educat i ng a t het an, what we' r e t r yi ng
t o educat e t he t het an t o do.
Ther e ar e t wo cat egor i es of t hi s educat i on; one i s act i on and one
i s per cept i on. The per cept i on of a t het an i s al l cat egor i es of
per cept i on unl i mi t ed f or t he uni ver se. Anyt hi ng whi ch you can sense
out of a human body can be sensed di r ect l y by t he t het an, pl us sensi ng
at sel ect i ve dept hs. Somet i mes your t het an wi l l not be abl e t o sel ect
at dept hs and so wi l l become ver y conf used. A t het an' s per cept i on
goes t hr ough wal l s, ear t h, mount ai ns, pl anet s and acr oss ver y wi de
ar eas of space.
I t may seemt o you somet i mes ver y pecul i ar , when you' r e wor ki ng a
t het an, t hat he can per cei ve at such a di st ance and yet seemt o di sobey
Ei nst ei n' s l aws. He however can do so. He can span a l i ght year
i n consi der abl y l ess t han a l i ght year and appar ent l y, and cer t ai nl y
f or our pur poses, t he speed of a par t i cl e i s dependent upon t he dur at i on
of emi ssi on. Gee, doesn' t t hat sound compl i cat ed? You know, I bet
I coul d go on her e and pai nt t hi s t hi ng up so i t , not onl y woul d you
be unabl e t o under st and i t , but I woul d be so conf used about i t t hat
I woul d go home and wr i t e a col l ege t ext book.
We ar e ver y sol i dl y on t he l i ne of physi cs and var i ous phenomena,
but t ake t hi s i n mi nd, i t i s a ver y speci al i zed appl i cat i on and does
not necessar i l y f i t i n wi t h what i s gener al l y accept ed t o be t r ue.
As we, as t he l ady t hat was t ol d t hat she damn wel l bet t er had accept
t he evi dence of t he physi cal uni ver se, so ar e we f aced wi t h t he
necessi t y of accept i ng t he evi dence wi t h whi ch we ar e conf r ont ed.
We ar e wor ki ng wi t h a di f f er ent , evi dent l y i n t he ver y same or der
of magni t ude, but a di f f er ent par t of t he band of mot i on, a hi gher
par t of t he band of mot i on. And t he way t hi s band behaves may or
may not have anyt hi ng i n common wi t h t he l ower l evel s of t hat band.
But i f i t doesn' t have a conf ounded t hi ng i n common wi t h t he l ower
band, we' r e st i l l al l r i ght because we do not need a l i cense t o sur vi ve.
Appr oval , you see, t he seeki ng of appr oval , t he seeki ng of accept ance,
t he seeki ng of agr eement i s act ual l y mer el y t he seeki ng of a l i cense
t o sur vi ve. One want s appr oval f r ommama? That means one i s act ual l y
aski ng mama, "Can I l i ve?" The r educt i o ad nauseamof appr oval i s
a l i cense t o sur vi ve. Now, we don' t have t o ask t hese l ower physi cal
l aws i n a ver y, ver y wel l codi f i ed and ext r emel y wor kabl e sci ence
f or a l i cense t o sur vi ve any mor e t han t hey have t o ask us f or a l i cense
t o sur vi ve. Al l we' r e i nt er est ed i n i s not di scussi on and compar i son,
al l we' r e i nt er est ed i n i s a cl ean cl ear cut subj ect whi ch i s si mpl y
t hi s, t he behavi or of ener gy at t het an l evel , and t he onl y ki nd of
ener gy we' r e r eal l y i nt er est ed i n i s t he ener gy wi t h whi ch a t het an
oper at es. Now, i f t hi s doesn' t obey cer t ai n l aws t hat we ar e l ed
t o bel i eve exi st i n l ower st r at a of t he band of mot i on, t hat i s st i l l
no r eason what soever f or us t o abandon what we can demonst r at e.
Tr ut h i s val uabl e t o t he same degr ee i t i s wor kabl e and t hese t r ut hs
ar e wor kabl e. I n addi t i on t o t hi s, I wi l l not pr et end t o you f or
one moment t hat I have mor e t han begun t o expl or e t he capabi l i t i es
and behavi or of ener gi es at t he band of t he t het an. I cannot t el l
you a bi l l i on dat a t hat I woul d l ove t o know. The i nst r ument s whi ch
ar e manuf act ur ed on Ear t h, sol ar syst em, gal axy, gal axy zer o, i n Ear t h
t i me AD l 952 ar e about t he l evel of chopst i cks. They ar e r eal l y gummy.
We' r e t r yi ng t o measur e a ver y, ver y hi gh, hi gh f r equency by cl i ppi ng
at i t s har moni cs, i t s l owhar moni cs, what ar e evi dent l y i t s har moni cs.
As a consequence, I can' t even swear t hat t hey' r e even har moni cs
or anyt hi ng el se. I know what t he t het an appar ent l y can do, appar ent l y
can do. I have obser ved t he t het an doi ng many of t hese t hi ngs. I
know dat a f r omsome ot her sour ces. But t o pr et end t o you t hat as
we si t her e we ar e i n possessi on of al l t her e i s t o know about t he
t het an, of al l t he l i mi t at i ons of t he t het an, of al l t he t hi ngs whi ch
menace t he t het an, and al l t he t hi ngs whi ch can be made out of a t het an,
woul d be t oo ent i r el y pr of essor i al a pose.
And at no t i me, at no t i me shoul d you f eel your sel f const r i ct ed or
r est r ai ned by t he dat a whi ch I ' mgi vi ng you her e. I f you make up
your mi nd t hat i t ' s j ust t he t het an, j ust , you' ve obser ved a l ot of
t het ans and t hey j ust don' t seemt o do t hi s, t hat ' s al l , wel l , t he
possi bi l i t i es ar e pr et t y good t hey don' t . So your , you have t he wi dest
l evel of t hi s, of sel f det er mi ni smon your own obser vat i on. And qui t e
i n addi t i on t o t hat , what I amt el l i ng you i s si mpl y a ser i es of poi nt s
whi ch may ser ve you as or i ent at i on poi nt s, you can or i ent dat a f r om
t hese poi nt s. And at any t i me t hat t hese poi nt s seemnot t o f i t t he
bi l l , you t el l me and I ' l l be t he f i r st one t o shi f t a coupl e of poi nt s,
even i n my own mi nd.
The t r i umph her e i s havi ng a t het an exi st as a t het an and be out si de
t he body, and per f or mt hi ngs and change t he body. That ' s t he absol ut e,
when we speak of absol ut es; we know t hat happens. The sky i s t he l i mi t
f r om t her e on out . Obser vat i ons, t hen, what I ' m gi vi ng you ar e
obser vat i ons, phenomena, somet hi ng, phenomena obser ved, obser ved
i ndi f f er ent l y, wel l , i nt er pr et ed per haps wel l , per haps badl y. We
know t hat t he t het an can get out si de and we know he can r egener at e
and we know t hat he can get up t he t one scal e and we know how t o get
hi mout si de and hi mhow t o do t hi s, can change f r omdar k t o l i ght
t he behavi or and st at e of mi nd of t he i ndi vi dual . And we' r e sur e
of t hat , but we' r e not sur e of anyt hi ng el se at t hi s moment .
So, I bel i eve t hese t hi ngs t hen t o be t r ue. He per cei ves at a di st ance.
Thi s i s f ai r l y obser vabl e. He per cei ves sel ect i vel y at a di st ance,
he per cei ves i n t hr ee hundr ed and si xt y degr ee spher e. Your pr ecl ear
may have a har d t i me doi ng t hi s at f i r st . I t ' s ver y di f f i cul t
somet i mes f or hi mt o r eal i ze t hat he' s per cei vi ng behi nd and bef or e
hi mat t he same t i me. He can per cei ve t hr ough any known quant i t y
of mat t er and at any di st ance. He' s evi dent l y oper at i ng on a f r equency
t hat i s ver y, ver y t i ny so t hat i t i s not i mpeded by gr osser f or ms
such as t he at omor mol ecul e. He i s evi dent l y most capabl e when he
i s most abl e t o det er mi ne t i me and pl ace f or ener gy, and hi s aber r at i on,
i l l ness and shor t comi ngs, hi s i nhi bi t i ons, st em di r ect l y f r om,
evi dent l y, t he degr ee t o whi ch hi s own act i vi t i es, ener gy emanat i on,
behavi or , t hought , act i on ar e det er mi ned ot her wi se.
Your t het an at f i r st wi l l be one hundr ed per cent det er mi ned,
appar ent l y, by t he ext er i or f or ces. He t r i es t o push t hemar ound,
he f i nds hi msel f bei ng pushed ar ound. He' s i ncapabl e of a pr oper
or i ent at i on.
So your f i r st t hought t hen, i n r e- educat i ng a t het an, i s educat i on
on an or i ent at i on basi s. Wher e i s he? What i s he doi ng? Thi s i s
t he keynot e. What i s he det er mi ni ng? Now, unt i l you get hi mup t o
a poi nt wher e he can sel ect i vel y det er mi ne t hese t hi ngs, you ar e not
l i kel y t o get much ener gy out of hi m, because t he gener at i on of ener gy
i s evi dent l y dependent upon t he abi l i t y t o det er mi ne space and t i me.
You see why t hat i s? I f space and t i me det er mi ne t he t het an t hen
he i s evi dent l y i ncapabl e of det er mi ni ng space and t i me. Unl ess he
can det er mi ne space and t i me he cannot det er mi ne ener gy. Ther ef or e
ot her ener gy can be qui t e ef f ect i ve upon hi m, hi s ener gy i s r el at i vel y
i nef f ect i ve upon ot her s.
Now, t he r e- educat i on of or i ent at i on of t i me and space, cont i nual
pr act i ce, pi cki ng up r easons why he cannot move i t ems, obj ect s or
gener at e ener gy or not gener at e ener gy or per cei ve at a di st ance,
cause act i on at a di st ance, i t ' s al l or i ent at i on. I t ' s a pr obl em
of or i ent at i on. And you mi ght say t hat al l t he educat i on t hat you
gi ve hi mwi l l be a pr obl emof or i ent at i on. He i s at X geogr aphi cal
spot and you wi sh hi mt o see, f eel , hear at Y geogr aphi cal spot .
He i s si t t i ng on t he back of a couch l ooki ng at t he back of hi s head.
Ri ght at t he begi nni ng you wi l l f i nd t hat he i s evi dent l y i ncapabl e
of per cei vi ng anyt hi ng except t he body hi msel f , si nce he' s so devot ed
wi t h such beaut i f ul sadness t o t he body. That ' s al l he can t hi nk
about . He' s t er r i f i cal l y f i xat ed on t hi s body and he sees t he r i dges
i n i t , and evi dent l y he sor t of st i l l par t of t he body and he' s ver y
i nt er est ed i n cl eani ng t he body up, and he get s i nt o bad sags and
apat hi es.
Fur t her mor e, t he body i s a r ef uge. He can r ush i nt o i t i f any mad
t het ans happen t o show up or anyt hi ng of t he sor t , and he' s, he' s
sor t of , he' s sor t of , when he f i r st comes out of t he body, he knows
he' s hi t a home r un. Al r i ght ? But he can' t get hi s t oe of f , qui t e
br i ng hi msel f t o t ake hi s t oe of f of home pl at e t o st ar t out and make
t he r un. He' s i n a ver y badl y undeci ded f r ame of mi nd about t hi ngs.
Or i ent at i on get s hi mget s hi mover t hi s, or i ent at i on of per cept i on.
Let hi mper cei ve at di st ances. Let hi mper cei ve si mpl e t hi ngs, don' t
set up any r ough pr obl ems f or hi m. J ust set up pr obl ems f or hi mand
when you f i nd, when he f i nds he cannot do what you' r e aski ng hi mt o
do, you ask hi mi f he can or i ent i t and change t he post ul at es t hat
per mi t hi mt o do i t . And ever y t i me he f i nds hi msel f i ncapabl e of
doi ng somet hi ng, you ask hi m t o change post ul at es unt i l he f eel s
hi msel f capabl e of doi ng i t . Then i f he st i l l cannot do i t , don' t
ask hi m t o change mor e post ul at es on t hat subj ect . Wor k at t hi s
gent l y. Shi f t of f and ask hi mt o do somet hi ng el se. Var i et y i s t he
keynot e of t hi s t ype of pr ocessi ng, var i et y i s t he keynot e. Ask hi m
t o do t hi s, ask hi mt o do t hat , i f you f i nd out he can' t do somet hi ng,
gl oss i t over , don' t wor r y about i t , don' t i nval i dat e hi m. He' l l
i nval i dat e hi msel f enough.
Af t er he' s f ound al l of a sudden t hat t he can' t do so- and- so and
so- and- so and so- and- so, you di dn' t even t el l hi m he coul d do
so- and- so, he al l of a sudden f i nds out , he al l of a sudden f i nds
out t hat he can' t see wel l t hr ough t he chi f f onni er , and a gr eat sadness
descends over hi m. And you say, " Wel l , t hat ' s al l r i ght . Look
t hr ough t he t abl e, you j ust coul d l ook t hr ough t he t abl e a moment
ago. " "I know, but I can' t see t hr ough t hat chi f f onni er . " He' s sad
about t he whol e t hi ng. What you' r e doi ng i s maki ng hi mdi g up al l
ki nds of t hi ngs. You' ve asked hi m t o do somet hi ng, t her e' s many
r easons why he can' t .
. . .
Now, he f eel s a t er r i f i c r evul si on of sel f . Ther e i s even a t echni que
wher eby you can r un body f eel i ng t hi ngs f or t he t het an and t hen t he
t het an f eel i ng t hi ngs f or t he body. You' r e act ual l y doi ng a sor t
of a concept var i at i on of r i dge r unni ng. Get t he body want i ng t o
hi de f r omt he t het an, t he body want i ng t o hi de t he t het an. The body
doesn' t want anyt hi ng but he' s on such a negat i ve basi s. I f t hi s
t echni que came anypl ace, i t woul d be come at t he end of t wo. The
t echni que I have not expl or ed enough t o gi ve you as a f i ni shed par t
of t he ot her f or mul a, but i t i s qui t e i nt er est i ng what happens. You
can r un t he sub- zer o t one scal e as t he body doi ng t hese t hi ngs t o
and f or t he t het an. Of cour se, i t ' s t he t het an doi ng t hese t hi ngs
t o and f or hi msel f . Then you r un i t t he t het an doi ng i t f or t he body
and you f i nd out t he guy can' t get t hat . So you r un t he body doi ng
i t f or t he t het an. That ' s i n st ep t wo.
Now, her e t hen, her e t hen you have a ver y di sor i ent ed bei ng f or var i ous
r easons. He may have some sor t of a command l i ne i n on some ot her
par t of t he uni ver se. Don' t be shocked t o suddenl y f i nd t hi s
occur r i ng. The t het an may suddenl y f i nd t hat he has a f i nger on
somet hi ng somewher e el se and st ar t l e hi mno end, and he' l l say, " Do
you know, I r un t hat t oo?" Wel l , i f t hi s i s t he case, i f t hi s i s
t he case l et hi mor i ent what he' s doi ng t her e, but don' t l et hi mgo
char gi ng of f t o r un t hat , t oo. You keep hi mwher e you can keep a
good t ab on hi m.
Now, you' l l f i nd, you' l l f i nd t hat hi s mai n concer n i s bei ng hi t by
ener gy f l ows and al t hough you can r un a gr eat deal on t he body, r emember
t her e i s somet hi ng t hat you' r e avoi di ng t hi s whol e t i me: Ot her
t het ans. Ot her t het ans, hat e and f ear and sub- zer o t one scal e on
ot her t het ans. Thi s per son may not want t o st ay out her e i n t he open
at al l . And he may t el l you i t ' s t he body and he want s t o pr ot ect
t he body and you' r e not get t i ng ver y much on t hat . Wel l , you mi ght
not t hi nk of i mmedi at el y, you mi ght st i l l have a l i t t l e f ear and so
f or t h of ot her t het ans, you want t o avoi d i t so you avoi d t hi s subj ect
of ot her t het ans. And you avoi d t he pr ocess now, and so l et me gi ve
t hat t o you qui t e cl ear l y, t hat you can get sub- zer o t one scal e al l
you want on t he body, and your t het an may be qui t e st at i c. He may
be, he' s j ust f i ne, he' l l j ust go on pl ayi ng wi t h you f or t he l ongest
t i me, wher eas what he' s act ual l y ducki ng f r omi s ot her t het ans.
And you ask hi mquest i ons l i ke t hi s, you ask hi m, " Al r i ght . Nowl et ' s
say, l et ' s get hi de now, woul d you be hi di ng f r om ot her t het ans?
Ar e you hi di ng f r omot her bei ngs or anyt hi ng l i ke t hat ?" and he' l l
go on and on about t hi s and, " Yes, yes, yes, " he' l l say, " Oh yes,
I get t hi s, I get t hi s, sur e I get t hi s, you bet cha, I got i t now. "
He' s doi ng f i ne, he r uns t he concept and t he f eel i ng and he r uns
i t back and f or t h and he' s j ust havi ng a wonder f ul t i me about t he
whol e t hi ng. And t hen you ask hi m, " What ar e you r unni ng i t on?"
" Oh, i t ' s al l t hese peopl e. " Peopl e. He' s r unni ng bodi es, he' s not
r unni ng ot her t het ans. And he was havi ng t hi s f ear of ot her bei ngs
and so f or t h and, and i t was peopl e t hat he was hi di ng f r om, t hi s
way and i t was t hat way, not ot her t het ans. And you' r e goi ng t o f i nd,
f i nd i t ver y di f f i cul t wi t h some pr ecl ear s. You' r e goi ng t o have
t o r eal l y sneak up on t hi s i dea of ot her t het ans. So you t ake ot her
t het ans on t he l evel of t her e j ust bei ng ot her t het ans and so f or t h.
Now, he' s commi t t ed enough over t act s agai nst t het ans, he' s commi t t ed
over t act s agai nst t he GE, and t her e comes up your mai n di f f i cul t y,
hi s pr opi t i at i on f or t he GE above t he l evel of j ust pr opi t i at i ng t he
body. "I ' ve done somet hi ng t o t hi s body. " You can act ual l y ask hi m
t o scan t hr ough t he assumpt i on, t he t echni cal t er mf or t aki ng over
a body. The assumpt i on i s done by cappi ng t he exi st i ng ent i t y i n t he
body and hol di ng i t under ver y t hor ough caps, squel chi ng i t . And
t hen maybe f or year s, ever yt hi ng wor ked out f i ne and he got al ong
swel l ' t i l al l of a sudden t he f el l owt hought he f el t somet hi ng st i r r i ng
i n t he body besi des hi msel f , so he r e- est abl i shed t hi s cap, wham,
and i t ' s l i abl e t o be at an exact i nst ant i n hi s l i f et i me. Hi s
per cept i cs go out , ever yt hi ng goes out , boom, j ust l i ke he bl ew f uses
cl ear acr oss t he boar ds.
And he says, " Wel l , t hi s happened, t hi s happened, " he wi l l say, " Al ong
about , yeah. Ther e was a l ot of exci t ement I r emember happeni ng,
and I was i n t hi s t ank i n t he l ast war and al l of a sudden a shel l
hi t t he opposi t e si de of t he t ank and I don' t know what happened,
but t hi ngs changed. " Sur e t hey changed, somet hi ng j ar , some shock,
an oper at i on, an acci dent , somet hi ng of t hi s sor t , or maybe j ust
cont i nual naggi ng, or maybe suddenl y l ooki ng si deways and f i ndi ng
hi msel f out of t he body. You' l l f i nd t hi s i n a l ot of t hem. Al l
of a sudden he' l l l ook si deways and see, see t he body, or see a shadow
t hat he t akes t o be t he body, and i t ' l l scar e hi mhal f t o deat h, and
boy, he' l l get back i n t hat body f ast and he' l l r e- asser t t hat cl amp
on t he GE and he' l l r eal l y hol d on. He i sn' t supposed t o be out t her e,
he t hi nks t o hi msel f .
So now, t he phenomena you encount er i s t he f act t hat your act i on and
per cept i on pot ent i al s of t he t het an ar e pr act i cal l y non- exi st ent i n
most cases. And you wi l l f i nd t hat t her e seems t o be an under - l evel
of consci ousness and act i on goi ng on. He' s doi ng i t , but he doesn' t
l et hi msel f know he' s doi ng i t , and he' l l swear t o Pet e t her e' s anot her
t het an ar ound somepl ace doi ng i t . "Can' t be me, I ' mnot doi ng i t ,
I woul dn' t do t hat t o t he body, I ' mper f ect l y. . . " Ther e' s t he body
get t i ng al l t wi st ed t o pi eces and t ur ned i nsi de out and so f or t h,
and he' s j ust doi ng i t and not - knowi ng he' s doi ng i t .
Now, he hol ds on t o t he body and he l eads t he body and he pul l s t he
body ar ound wi t h t r act or beams and pr essor beams. Act ual l y he t akes
t he communi cat i ons out of t he body wi t h t r act or s; and pr essor beams,
he put s commands i nt o i t . Now, your t r act or / pr essor combi nat i on can
be ext r emel y st r ong and t hi s you want t o t ake not e of . Many peopl e
ar e goi ng ar ound wi t h a t r act or beamar ound t hei r heads and f or war d
par t of t hei r bodi es whi ch i s ver y t hi ck and ver y st r ong, and a pr essor
beampoi nt i ng r i ght st r ai ght i nt o t he smal l of t hei r back much i n
t he or der of a pi st ol or a swor d or somet hi ng of t he sor t , and t hey,
t hey act ual l y ar e hol di ng t hemsel ves wi t h t er r i f i c st r engt h, t hey' r e
pr act i cal l y smashi ng t hemsel ves. You can, you can get somebody t o
get t hi s, you can ver y of t en get somebody t o si t down and t el l t hem,
" Rel ease t he pr essor beami n t he mi ddl e of your back, " or , " Tr y not
t o r el ease t he pr essor beami n t he mi ddl e of your back, and hol d t he
t r act or beamon. " And he' l l dar n near snap hi s spi ne. And he can
hol d ont o t hi s and he can r el ax i t and he can hol d ont o i t .
Now, t he way t o get r i d of one of t hese t hi ngs i s j ust get hi m, wor k
i t l ong enough so t hat he f i nds out al l of a sudden t hat he' s i n cont r ol
of i t . You say, " Now sl ack of f t he t r act or , push t he t r act or f or war d
and pul l t he pr essor back. " Tr act or i n f r ont of t he body and t he
pr essor behi nd t he body. "Nowpush t he t r act or f or war d and pul l t he
pr essor back. Now pul l t he t r act or i n on t he body and push t he pr essor
i n on t he back of t he body. Now smash i t . OK. Nowr el ax i t . Smash
i t . Rel ax i t . Nowmove t he t r act or beamdown t o wher e i t ' s get t i ng
a good sol i d pul l on t he abdomen. Now put t he pr essor i n and push
t he abdomen t oget her . " Al l of a sudden al ong about t hi s t i me he' l l
say, " Look, I ' mdoi ng t hi s t o mysel f , I know t hat . I ' mr el axi ng t hese
t hi ngs and I ' mput t i ng t hemback i n. Yeah, t he di ckens, I don' t have
t o do t hat anymor e, " and he' l l qui t . You' r e gi vi ng hi mand r ecover i ng
f or hi mcommand of hi s own abi l i t i es.
But he does t hi s on t he most backwar ds, cockeyed ci r cui t you ever
want ed t o see i n your l i f e. He r e- est abl i shes t hese ener gy f l ows,
he get s t hemal l est abl i shed and he get s t hemhel d and, one way or
t he ot her . And, he get s t hemi nt o a t er r i f i cal l y compr essed st at e
of mi nd. Anyway, he si mpl y hol ds and r el eases, hol ds and r el eases.
Now, you can get hi mt o do t hat wi t h anyt hi ng. You can get hi mt o
put a t r act or beamdown on t hi s and t hen pi ck i t up. Ver y of t en t he
second he st ar t s t o do t hi s he says, " My god, I ' ma bug, oh, ugh. "
And t hat ' s one of t he f ast est ways I know of t o t ur n on t he nausea
of sel f , sel f - negat i on, sel f - hat e, oh he j ust despi ses hi msel f when
he st ar t s t o come up t o a f ul l r ecogni t i on of what he i s. "Yaach,
ugh, my god. " I n a hor r i bl e condi t i on.
The way you sol ve t hat i s j ust t o get hi mt o r un t he concept a coupl e
t i mes and change hi s concept , change hi s post ul at es, f i nd out wher e
he pi cked i t up on t he t r ack, shi f t i t ar ound. And boy, t hat
degr adat i on, no human bei ng, no human bei ng, homo sapi ens, ever f eel s
t he f ul l l i mi t of t hi s degr adat i on. I t ' s a ver y heavy f eel i ng of
degr adat i on t hat he get s, and you wi l l qui t e or di nar i l y t ur n t hi s
up, I suppose, when you get hi m t o dr i l l i ng put t i ng t r act or s and
pr essor s and pr essor s and t r act or s on hi msel f and of f hi msel f , on
t he wal l , of f t he wal l , and t hat sor t of t hi ng. J ust a dr i l l , j ust
pl acement . You can make hi mput out t r act or s and pr essor s and pul l
hi msel f f or war d and push hi mback and move hi mal l ar ound. Ver y
f asci nat i ng.
. . .
You' l l pr obabl y f i nd out t hat he consi der s hi msel f t o be a pr i soner
of war , capt ur ed i n some f ashi on, pi r at ed out of somet hi ng, pushed
i nt o somet hi ng. You' l l f i nd out t hat he' s got usual l y si xt y t o
sevent y- f our t r i l l i on year s of exper i ence behi nd hi m, but he consi der s
hi s i dent i t y' s di f f er ent t i me t o t i me. And somet i mes he get s hi s
spi r al s mi xed up, so t hat one t i me you' l l be wor ki ng hi mand he' l l
be wor ki ng ver y, ver y wel l and hi s i dent i t y wi l l be so- and- so, and
he' l l be per f ect l y pl eased and happy, and you' ve t r aced hi s spi r al
and you' r e j ust doi ng f i ne and t hat ' s. . . You check i t up on t he E- met er
and you f i nd out you' r e wor ki ng a spi r al t hat ' s. . . These spi r al s,
you see, wer e l ong and t hen not qui t e so l ong, and t hen not qui t e
so l ong, and t hen not qui t e so l ong, and t hen not qui t e so l ong and
t hey' r e get t i ng f ast er and f ast er and f ast er . Fi r st one, maybe a
hundr ed mi l l i on year s, t he next one f i f t y mi l l i on year s, t he next
spi r al l ess, l ess, l ess, l ess, l ess, l ess, l essl essl essl essl essl ess,
unt i l al l of a sudden we' r e down t o t het ans maybe as l i t t l e as a t hr ee
t housand year spi r al i n pr ogr ess.
Now, you' l l be wor ki ng hi m, he' l l be per f ect l y happy, he' l l be
per f ect l y cheer f ul , he' s t el l i ng you about t hi s and t hat , onl y you' r e
not t her e j ust t o have hi mt el l you, but he' s pl aci ng t hi ngs i n t i me
and space and he' s qui t e i nt er est ed i n i t . And boy, by t he way, don' t
cut hi mof f and pr et end t hi s i s not hi ng because hi s pr i de i s al most
gone anyhow, i f not gone. And he al l of a sudden r ecal l s t hat he
was somet hi ng t o somebody somet i me and he has been somet hi ng somewher e,
and don' t j ust suddenl y cut hi mof f and be di si nt er est ed, because
t he f act of t he mat t er i s i t ' s ver y i nt er est i ng. And he' l l be t el l i ng
you about t hi s spi r al and he' s doi ng f i ne and t hen you check i t and
you' l l f i nd out t hi s i s f i ve mi l l i on year s ago, or t en mi l l i on year s
ago t hat he was doi ng t hi s or he was doi ng t hat . And he' s t al ki ng
about one consecut i ve l i f et i me and t hi s one consecut i ve l i f et i me wi t h
f ul l awar eness and knowi ngness down t he whol e t r ack was maybe f i ve
mi l l i on year s l ong and he' s j ust doi ng f i ne on t hi s. And t he next
t i me you pr ocess hi mor maybe i n t he same sessi on, he sor t of does
a swi t ch on you and you can' t qui t e f i gur e out what ' s happened t o
hi m. He' s hi t and opened up anot her spi r al .
Now, i t ' s ver y easy t o move a t het an i n and out of spi r al s, much easi er
t han movi ng hi mi n and out of past l i ves, or anyt hi ng you want t o
cal l t hose t hi ngs. He can shi f t i n and out of a spi r al wi t h gr eat
ease, and you' l l f i nd t hat t he over t act / mot i vat or i s sl i ght l y
di f f er ent f or each spi r al , sl i ght l y di f f er ent . But t her e coul d be
sai d t o be on t he whol e t r ack, f or si xt y- f our , sevent y- f our t r i l l i on
year s, j ust one, i t coul d be sai d st r et chi ng i t j ust a l i t t l e bi t ,
t hat t her e' s onl y one r eal ser vi ce f acsi mi l e f or t hi s t het an f or t he
whol e t r ack. You' l l f i nd out t her e' s a var i at i on of t hat f acsi mi l e
f or each spi r al and t hat most of t he spi r al s ar e not i n r est i mul at i on.
So t he one you want t o sol ve i t out of i s t he l ast spi r al , t hat ' s
t he most i nt i mat e, t hat ' s t he one you' r e par t i cul ar l y i nt er est ed i n,
i s j ust t he l ast spi r al .
You' l l f i nd per i ods when he det est ed hi msel f and per i ods when he
t hought he was al r i ght . You' l l f i nd deat hs wher e, t he l ast i nst ant
of deat h t o hi m, ext i nct i on or somet hi ng, maybe t he bl owup of a pl anet
or somet hi ng, and hi s l ast t hought was t hi s hi gh on t he t one scal e,
" My gol l y, t hi nk of al l t hese peopl e t hat ar e l osi ng a f i ne f r i end
l i ke me. " Now t hat , l ow on t he t one scal e, i s j ust concei t ; but up
hi gh on t he t one scal e, i t ' s j ust t he way t hey f eel . "I ' mval uabl e
t o t hese peopl e and l ook at t he f i ne guy t hese guys ar e al l l osi ng. "
He f eel s sor r y not f or hi msel f at al l , he j ust f eel s sor r y f or t hese
ot her peopl e t hat need hi m, t hese ot her bei ngs.
Now, you wi l l f i nd st r ange somat i cs i n your t het an. Oh, par don me.
Anot her , t he ot her si de of t hi s i s, you' l l f i nd whol e spans when
he was not hi ng but a sl ave and was onl y t oo happy t o di e and wi t h
ever yt hi ng under god' s gr een ear t h bei ng done t o pr event hi mf r om
j ust ki cki ng of f , t he whol e act i vi t y of hi s mast er s bei ng t o keep
hi m al i ve, and hi s whol e act i vi t y bei ng one t hi ng onl y; succumb.
You' l l f i nd f ant ast i c ar r angement s made t o hol d hi mi n chai n, and
t hese check out pr ecl ear t o pr ecl ear . You can get a bop on pr act i cal l y
anybody on t he wor d " Ar sl ycus. " Or you can say, you can say
such- and- such t r i l l i on year s ago or somet hi ng of t he sor t . . . Di d
you ever hear of t hat ? ( What i s t hat ?) I ' l l t el l you. Yeah, you
cur i ous al l of a sudden?
What ki nd of a f eel i ng, what ki nd of a f eel i ng does t he wor d Ar sl ycus
gi ve you her e? ( Wi t hdr awal ) Wi t hdr awal . ( Fear . Fear . Over
t her e, f eel a somat i c. ) Mm- hm, what el se? Si ck i n t he st omach.
Wel l , what do you know. Anybody el se f eel t hat about t he wor d
Ar sl ycus? Or does somebody el se f eel somet hi ng di f f er ent about t he
wor d Ar sl ycus? ( I t makes me want t o cr y sor t of . ) Oh yeah? That
was pr et t y gr i m. That ' s about t en t housand consecut i ve l i f et i mes
doi ng t he same t hi ng. Ever y t i me you came back, t hey knew who you
wer e and t hey knew you wer e t r ai ned t o be a br i ck pol i sher or somet hi ng.
Ar sl ycus was a ci t y bui l t wi t h no pl anet . Roads, r oads, r oads,
r oads, r oads, r oads, t ur r et s, cast l es, so f or t h. Peopl e wer e snaked
i n and t hey wer e put t o wor k t her e and t hey j ust went back and f or t h.
Ever y t i me t hey di ed, t hey f ound t hemsel ves st andi ng back i n t he
same l i ne agai n. They wer e sl i pped back i nt o t he body, t hey wer e
a t r ai ned wor kman, t hey went on t hr ough. And t he r eason why t hey
got sl i pped back i nt o t he body i s ever y t i me t hey wer e gi ven a body,
a sl i ce of t he body was t aken and put i n a vat . So i f t hey t r i ed
t o r un away or t r i ed t o do somet hi ng el se, al l you had t o do was hur t
t hat pi ece of meat and t hey' d come back. I t was ways and means of
a super cont r ol of t he doggondest bi ol ogi cal set - up you ever want
t o r un i nt o, and i t was about t en t housand consecut i ve l i f et i mes up
t o t he moment when Ar sl ycus bl ew up.
And Ar sl ycus onl y caved i n f or one r eason. Enough mass had been
accumul at ed t her e f i nal l y unt i l i t f i nal l y devel oped a gr avi t y, and
i t ' s gr avi t y and mass caved i t i n and dest r oyed i t , and i t f el l al l
t o pi eces and cr umpl ed al l t o pi eces.
And i f you want t o r un a pl easur e moment , you can gener al l y r un t hat
moment , but i t ' s not i mpor t ant t o r un Ar sl ycus. But i f you f i nd
somebody who i s havi ng an awf ul l ot of t r oubl e wor ki ng or i s f i xat ed
on t he subj ect of wor k and he can never pl ay because he has t o wor k
and wor k i s so t i r esome, and he' s obsessed on t he subj ect of not wor ki ng
or wor ki ng or somet hi ng l i ke t hat , gener al l y i t ' s basi s i s way back
t her e i n Ar sl ycus. A- R- S- C- L- Y- C- U- S. ( What about t he peopl e who
woul d be t he super vi sor s?) Oh, t her e' s anot her cr ew.
Now you' l l f i nd t hat , t hat t het ans r espond; and I ' mt al ki ng t o you
nownot about f ai r y t al es, I ' mt al ki ng t o you about E- met er r esponses
and consi st enci es and t hi s i s phenomena, di scover abl e phenomena.
When you ar e wor ki ng out t he ser vi ce f acsi mi l es as you wi l l i n St ep
5, you' l l f i nd t hat l ot s and l ot s and l ot s of t hi s dat a t ur ns up.
But your mai n i nt er est i s t r yi ng t o get hi mt o f i nd a past i dent i t y,
f i nd hi s i dent i t y, f i nd hi s i dent i t y. Now, you know t hat a psycho
has a heck of a t i me r emember i ng somet hi ng t hat ' s absol ut el y r eal
t o hi m. Wel l , unl ess you can get t hi s t het an t o f i nd hi s i dent i t y
her e and t her e on t he t r ack, t hen he' s not goi ng t o get any bet t er ,
he' s j ust goi ng t o f eel wor se and wor se. Who i s he?
Wel l , he' l l st ar t t o get some vague i dea on hi s i dent i t y and he' l l
want t o check i t by t he E- met er and t hi s way and t hat , wel l , j ust
wor k wi t h hi m, j ust est abl i sh hi s i dent i t y at l east f or one spi r al .
Who i s he? What name i s he known by? Wher e di d he, wher e di d he
wor k? What was hi s uni t ? What sor t of an out f i t was he wi t h? Was
he a ci vi l i an her e or a mi l i t ar y per sonnel t her e or somet hi ng of t hi s
sor t ? You know, j ust wor k wi t h hi munt i l he est abl i shes hi s i dent i t y
f or you her e and t her e. And t hen wor k wi t h i t unt i l he get s a ver y,
ver y good i dea of t hat i dent i t y.
And you wor k a ser vi ce f acsi mi l e chai n, you' l l f i nd out t hat at t he
hear t of i t i s no i dent i t y. Al ways, no i dent i t y. How do you ki l l
a per son? I t ' s no i dent i t y. How does i t ; and now t hi s comes i n.
You' l l f i nd out one of t he ways he had of escapi ng was l osi ng hi s
r esponsi bi l i t y. I f you coul dn' t ki l l a t het an, how. . . Deat h, you
see, a t het an woul dn' t be i n a body at al l unl ess t her e was some
advant ages t o i t , and t her e ar e advant ages t o i t . A body can di e.
And we' ve al l agr eed t hat when t he body di es, we' r e dead, and t hat ' s
good, t hat ' s not bad because ot her wi se pai n, t or t ur e, wor k,
ensl avement , i mpr i sonment , a t het a t r ap, somet hi ng of t hi s sor t can
go on f or hundr eds or t housands of year s. Howwoul d you l i ke t o l i ve
a t housand year s i n exqui si t e agony?
Wel l , t he sol ut i on t o t hi s i s, " I ' mno l onger r esponsi bl e. " And how
does he say, " I ' mno l onger r esponsi bl e"? He si mpl y says, he coul d
say t wo t hi ngs, " I don' t exi st , " t hat ' s t he chr oni c one, and t he one
spor adi cal l y l eaps up i n t hi s soci et y i s, " I amno l onger any menace
t o you because I have no f ur t her r esponsi bi l i t y, I can' t make any
t hought s connect t oget her or I can' t do anyt hi ng mor e, and I ' m
compl et el y unabl e. " Now, how can he be unabl e? By bei ng i nsane.
The t het an deat h subst i t ut e i s i nsani t y, and i nsani t y i s t he f i r st
sol ut i on and deat h i s t he second sol ut i on, and you' l l f i nd t het ans
wi l l do t hi s i n t hi s soci et y. You' l l f i nd most i nsane peopl e af t er
t hey' ve been i nsane f or a l i t t l e whi l e, t r yi ng t o di e one way or t he
ot her . The deat h i s i nsani t y, t het an deat h i s i nsani t y, he begs of f ,
he begs of f . He says, " See? I can' t har m you anymor e, I ' m not
danger ous, you needn' t puni sh me, st op puni shi ng me because I ' m
i nsane. " And t hat ' s what he gi ves out , " I ' mi nsane. " That ' s hi s
mechani sm, so r emember t hat .
And t he ot her mechani smi s, " I don' t exi st anymor e, " and he does t hat
by goi ng i nvi si bl e, by not mani f est i ng any ener gy because i f he doesn' t
mani f est any ener gy, he can' t be det ect ed, so he i sn' t t her e anymor e.
So he st ops maki ng ener gy and he st ops maki ng ener gy sol el y f or t he
r eason t o demonst r at e t hat he doesn' t exi st anymor e, and ever y t het an
you' ve got ar ound i n homo sapi ens i s r unni ng non- exi st ence, and t hat
means no ener gy out put so don' t be sur pr i sed t hat bef or e you st ar t
r e- or i ent at i on t hat your t het an can' t handl e ener gy of any shape or
si ze or anyt hi ng el se. He can' t handl e ener gy. Al r i ght .
Your t het an t hen, has a choi ce. He can' t di e. He can cease t o exi st
or he can go i nsane. Now, one of t he ways of ceasi ng t o exi st i s
by becomi ng somet hi ng el se, so he can shi f t hi s i dent i t y, and t hat ' s
what happens on a spi r al ; he shi f t s i dent i t y. So you bet t er f i nd
t hese i dent i t i es f or hi m, because t hese ol d f ear s ar e st i l l haunt i ng
hi m, he' s st i l l badl y haunt ed by t hem. You' l l f i nd some ver y
i nt er est i ng t hi ngs about hi m, you' l l f i nd and he wi l l di scover about
hi msel f a t er r i f i c consi st ency, an awf ul consi st ency al l t he way down
t he l i ne i n what he di d. And ever y once i n a whi l e he wi l l shi f t
over f r omt hi s consi st ency and be somet hi ng el se j ust t o be an opposi t e
pol ar i t y f or a whi l e. He' s t he opposi t e pol ar i t y and, t hat i s t o
say he was a bad guy f or a l ong t i me because he di dn' t get anypl ace
bei ng good f or a whol e spi r al , so he' s a bad guy f or a whol e spi r al .
J ust shi f t s. But t he odd par t of i t i s i s hi s badness and so on
has i n i t t he same ger ms as hi s goodness, t hat i s t o say i t ' s al ong
t he same l i ne.
You' l l di scover t hi s f or hi mand t he second he di scover s t hi s, he
r eal l y di scover s hi s i dent i t y al l t he way al ong t he l i ne on t he si mpl e
t hi ng of t he f act t hat he was consi st ent al l t he way al ong t he l i ne.
You' l l f i nd out hi s basi c educat i on on t he subj ect i n whi ch he i s
most i nt er est ed. You can f i nd al l sor t s of t hi ngs about hi m, but
don' t bot her l ooki ng her e on Ear t h, don' t bot her l ooki ng i n t he l ast
t wo or t hr ee t housand year s ver y much, because t hey' r e not t er r i bl y
i mpor t ant ; except f or t hi s. Now, you' r e not l ooki ng f or hi s i dent i t y
so much i n t he l ast f ewt housand year s, you' r e l ooki ng f or hi s i dent i t y
on t he whol e t r ack. I t ' s j ust l i ke t r yi ng t o f i nd basi c- basi c, you
see?
You want basi c- basi c on i dent i t y and t hen you can keep pi cki ng up
by j ust post ul at e and r ecal l , st r ai ght wi r e you mi ght say, al l t he
way al ong t he l i ne t he t i mes he shi f t ed i dent i t y and why. Eval uat i on
and post ul at e, eval uat i on and post ul at e, eval uat i on and post ul at e.
And you' l l f i nd out t hese ar e ver y st r ong, t hese post ul at es had a
bi g ef f ect i veness on hi m, and he' l l f i nd out hi s consi st ency and al l
of a sudden he' s wi l l i ng t o say; you' r e not t r yi ng t o f or ce hi mt o
say i t , he' l l j ust di scover i t ; " You know, I ' mme. I ' ve been me t he
whol e t i me. What do you know? I have a per sonal i t y, I amme, I do
exi st . " The second he says t hat , why, you' ve done al l you can f or
hi m.
Al l t her apy i s act ual l y l evel ed at t he est abl i shment of i dent i t y,
and t he r emoval of r easons f or no r esponsi bi l i t y. You see, t he
est abl i shment of i dent i t y i s al so no r esponsi bi l i t y. " I wi l l not
be r esponsi bl e f or bei ng me any mor e. I amnowsomebody el se. " Bang.
Now, you wi l l f i nd t hat he i s suf f er i ng f r omvar i ous over t act s and
mot i vat or s agai nst et hi c codes whi ch i t ' l l be ver y di f f i cul t at f i r st
t o under st and how anybody coul d f eel t hi s bad about somet hi ng. You
say a man i n aut hor i t y has t he r i ght s t o do so- and- so and so- and- so,
and he di d so- and- so and so- and- so, but i t was agai nst hi s own bel i ef ,
agai nst hi s own code. And bei ng agai nst hi s own code, i t pr act i cal l y
dest r oyed hi m. And you wi l l f i nd i nci dent s of t er r i bl e f or ce t o hi m
t hat appar ent l y, you woul d say t o your sel f , "My god, we' l l have t o
put i n about ni net y- ni ne t housand hour s of audi t i ng on j ust t hi s one
sequence. " No si r . And you' l l bl ess your st ar s f or Techni que 80.
Techni que 80 i s si mpl y over t act / mot i vat or , over t act / mot i vat or ,
and aest het i c r unni ng. The aest het i cs of havi ng t hese i nci dent s,
t he beaut y and ugl i ness of havi ng t hi s chai n. And t hat ' s what count s.
The beaut y and ugl i ness of havi ng t he chai n, not r unni ng ever yt hi ng
out of t he i nci dent . You' l l f i nd out t he i nci dent i s l ocked i nt o
one hor r endous maybe, and t hi s maybe consi st s of per f or mi ng an act
wi t h no mot i vat or and t hen havi ng i t happen t o hi m; or havi ng somet hi ng
happen t o hi mand so on, and hi mdoi ng i t t o somebody el se.
Nowt her e, t her e i s your combi nat i on al l t he way up and down t he l i ne.
I t ' s l i ke pi cki ng t he l ock of a saf e whi ch i s a t r emendous, bi g saf e
and al l you' ve got , you t hi nk, i s a l i t t l e t i ny hai r pi n. And you
say, " Gee, pi ck t he l ock of sevent y- f our t r i l l i on year s of l ost
i dent i t y, of mi sadvent ur es, of i mpl ant at i ons?" Thi s man, you al l
of a sudden wi l l f i nd somebody t hat ' s been on t he space t r ack. Now
t hat i s, he' s been on space shi ps, he' s been i n mer chant and navi es
and he' s been i n mi l i t ar y space uni t s and so on. He' s been, he' s
been out t her e, maybe he' s been a cr ewman al l t hi s t i me. And you
f i nd out t hat he' s been on hundr eds and hundr eds and hundr eds f or
t en mi l l i on year s, one way or t he ot her he' s ser ved on space wagons.
One way or t he ot her , of one ki nd or anot her , i n t hi s capaci t y or
t hat capaci t y, and ever y si ngl e one he hi t i s an i mpl ant , because
t hey gave hi man i mpl ant . You say, " Good god, t her e' s t en t housand
i mpl ant s, whewwww, and each one t ol d hi mhe was somebody el se and
t hat he had t o do somet hi ng el se. " Oh, no no.
Get t he beaut y and ugl i ness of t hem and t he over t act s and t he
mot i vat or s and f i nd t he t i me he di d t he i mpl ant i ng and a f ew t hi ngs
l i ke t hat , j ust spot t hem, spot t hem, spot t hem, spot t hem. Don' t
spend an awf ul l ot of t i me wi t h t hem, spend t i me on t he chai n not
t i me on t he i nci dent , on t he over t act s and mot i vat or s of t he chai n
and hi s i dent i t y wi l l come up cl ear er and cl ear er and cl ear er and
al l of a sudden he' l l say, "To hel l wi t h t hose i mpl ant s, " and he' l l
par k t hemal l over on t he l ef t or somet hi ng l i ke t hat and use t hem
t o di schar ge i nt o somet hi ng el se. No concer n t o hi m.
You' r e exhumi ng somebody, f or al l i nt ent s and pur poses, t hat has ceased
t o exi st ever y l i t t l e whi l e f or about sevent y- f our t r i l l i on year s.
I t ' s qui t e a j ob, but i t f or t unat el y doesn' t t ake ver y l ong.
. . .
Now, as f ar as st r ai ght phenomena i s concer ned, you' l l f i nd ear l y
on t he t r ack t he t het an, by gol l y, was r eal l y capabl e of pr oduci ng
hor sepower ; r eal el ect r oni c f l ow, good, heavy, sol i d el ect r oni c f l ow;
and he can r ecal l t hi s. He can al so r ecal l howi t st opped. The f i r st
t i me i t ever st opped was on t he basi s of a t het a t r ap and I must t el l
you about a t het a t r ap. Thet a t r aps ar e i mpor t ant t o you i n audi t i ng
because t hey' r e one of t he f i r st t hi ngs t hat you r un i nt o when you' r e
t r yi ng t o t ake t he case apar t . And a t het a t r ap i s an over t act and
a mot i vat or al l wr apped up i n one i nci dent . I t ' s an over t act and
a mot i vat or i n one i nci dent on t he same basi s t hat homo sapi ens get s
i n t he back of t he neck anyt hi ng he put s out of t he f r ont of t he f ace.
Her e' s your t het an, your t het an i s cr ui si ng al ong. Her e' s a post ,
t hi s post has no ener gy i n i t or maybe i t does have ener gy i n i t ,
what ever i t i s, i t doesn' t mat t er . Usual l y, t he most ser i ous ki nd
i s t he post whi ch has no ener gy i n i t . He' s dr i f t i ng by t he t hi ng
and al l of a sudden i t goes t ug. Why does i t go t ug? Because hi s
own ener gy has act i vat ed i t s magnet i sm, and he made t he f at al mi st ake
i nst ead of r eachi ng over and gr abbi ng ont o t he near est t r ee and haul i ng
hi msel f i n t hat di r ect i on, i n ant agoni st i cal l y t aki ng a sl ap at t hi s
t hi ng. Bap! And of cour se t hat sl ap ener gi zes t he post wi t h hi s
own wavel engt h. So he sl aps i t agai n and i t get s f ur t her ener gi zed
and i t j ust dr ags hi mr i ght st r ai ght on up t o i t and t hen he sl aps
i t and he, so on. And anyt hi ng he does, any act i on he t r i es t o ef f ect
wi t h ener gy, ki cks hi mon hi s own wavel engt h. I f he goes zap t he
post goes zap, i f he goes zi p t he post goes zi p. And he' l l f i nal l y
get t o a st at e wher e he can' t even t hi nk, he doesn' t dar e t hi nk.
The r eason he doesn' t dar e t hi nk i s when he t hi nks a t hought an ener gy
st i r s and t he post ki cks back at hi magai n.
So i t t r ai ns hi mnot t o act , i t t r ai ns hi mnot t o t hi nk and i s a col oni al
met hod of subdui ng a pl anet , a col oni zat i on met hod. They' l l j ust
si mpl y set up a f l ock of t hese t het a t r aps al l over t he pl ace and
al l t he t het ans ar ound t he pl ace i nst ead of goi ng by and pl ayi ng a
j oke on somebody by goi ng zi p or zap, t hey' l l say, " Oh, t hi s i s
danger ous and we need t hi s pl anet because we' ve al l got t o wor k, we' ve
al l got t o wor k har d, and i t ' s al l ser i ous and we' ve got t o nai l al l
t hi s down, and besi des we' r e not t het ans anymor e, we' r e somet hi ng
el se. " Some i nvader f or ce wi l l do t hi s, and al l of a sudden bi ng,
t he pl ace get s popul at ed wi t h t het a t r aps.
Now, t hey' l l f i nd a t het an l i ves i n a cer t ai n cave and t hey f i nd he
st ays ar ound a cer t ai n vi ci ni t y and t hey' l l pl ant r i ght on t op of
hi s bed some ki nd of a t het a t r ap. Qui t e i n addi t i on t o t hi s, t hey
wi l l gi ve hi mpi ct ur es, t hey' l l gi ve hi mboxes of pi ct ur es. Be an
ol d man on a r oad; you see, f acsi mi l es wi l l expl ode anyhow; but t hey' l l
gi ve hi m, t hey' l l hand, t her e' l l be an ol d man on t he r oad handi ng
out boxes of pi ct ur es and boy i s i t pr et t y, ni ce boxes of pi ct ur es.
And t het ans wi l l come by and t hey' l l t ake t he box of pi ct ur es. Cut e.
They go of f up t he r oad t o open t he box and l ook at t he pi ct ur es
and i t goes pow, i t ' s a booby t r ap. And t he pi ct ur es ar e al l t he
same pi ct ur e and t hey' r e a pi ct ur e of a box of pi ct ur es. Now, a t het an
who t r i es t o r un out t hi s f acsi mi l e get s i n a hor r i bl e condi t i on.
I t ' s i n a di sper sal and so f or t h, and ever y t i me he t r i es t o r un out
t he pi ct ur e of t he box of pi ct ur es, pi ct ur es of t he box of pi ct ur es
ar e pi ct ur es of boxes of pi ct ur es, and he can' t f i nd anyt hi ng and
he j ust get s l ost . And t hat ' s why when you si t down i n t he mor ni ng
and l ook at t he br eakf ast cer eal box, t he pi ct ur e wi t hi n t he pi ct ur e
wi t hi n t he pi ct ur e wi t hi n t he pi ct ur e wi t hi n t he pi ct ur e wi t hi n t he
uuuuuh. You say, " Gee, t hat ' s no good. " That ' s a r est i mul at i on.
That ' s a common t r i ck.
Now, t her e ar e ot her t r i cks t hat ar e ut i l i zed i n t hi s way, t her e ar e
gr eat bi g beaut i f ul set - ups. The onl y t hi ng t hat ' l l at t r act a t het an
i s somet hi ng aest het i c. So t hese gr eat beaut i f ul ; ar chi t ect ur e,
t het an wi l l come al ong and say, " Gee, I wonder what t hat i s, " and
l ook i n t he door . So- whoosh, t he t hi ng i s ener gi zed and he' l l get
caught i n somet hi ng l i ke t hat . Now, unf or t unat el y he mi ght spend
a year i n t her e, he mi ght spend a day i n t her e, he mi ght spend a cent ur y
i n t her e, and he mi ght spend a t housand year s i n t her e, bei ng
cont i nual l y buf f et ed by ener gy and even t hough he does say, " I ' mi nsane
and I don' t exi st anymor e, " nobody car es enough t o pul l hi mout .
And you' l l f i nd a t het an l ost i n a space shi p somet i me, you' l l f i nd
t heml ost on a pl anet somet i mes, you' l l f i nd some f el l ow' s cr ashed
on a pl anet , a heavy gr avi t y pl anet wi t h heavy mi ner al i zed soi l or
somet hi ng of t hi s sor t and he j ust can' t get of f of i t , t hat ' s al l .
And so he deci des he' l l spend t he r est of hi s l i f e t her e, et c. You' l l
f i nd t het ans, one t het an has somet i mes r ul ed and somet i mes been a
sl ave and he' s somet i mes been a capt ai n of t he guar d or a gener al
of t he ar mi es or somebody' s st ewar d or . . . Ther e' s j ust gr eat var i et y
i n hi ghs and l ows of exi st ence al ong t he t r ack.
Now, hi s power t o command has det er i or at ed i n exact r at i o t hat he
f i nds hi msel f down scal e and her e. Who i s your t het an? Wel l , he
has an act ual i dent i t y.
. . .
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.006

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes
on Buddha and Eastern Belief Systems
(2011 Critical Sources)


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L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on
Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems


Index of Passages
[ Ed. Note - adapted from the previous works of other researchers: Caroline Letkeman and The
McClaughry’s Blog ]

Explanations of Traditional Eastern Beliefs and Practices .................................................................. 2
On the religion & methods of Buddhism........................................................................................ 2
Concerning the shortcomings of eastern beliefs .............................................................................. 2
Regarding the failures Catholicism & Buddhism............................................................................ 3
On the Vedas.................................................................................................................................. 4
Concerning Hinduism .................................................................................................................... 4
Regarding Dharma ......................................................................................................................... 4
On Krishna..................................................................................................................................... 5
Concerning Maitreya...................................................................................................................... 5
Regarding the Buddhist Wheel of Life ........................................................................................... 7
On the Buddhist Prayer Wheel ....................................................................................................... 7
Concerning the covert purpose of the quiet philosophies ................................................................ 8
Regarding Dhyana.......................................................................................................................... 8
On Zen Buddhism meditation practices .......................................................................................... 9
Buddhism Beliefs Assimilated into L. Ron Hubbard's Spiritual Teachings ......................................... 9
Concerning Gautama Siddhartha in a neo-buddhism context .......................................................... 9
Regarding Hubbard’s vast knowledge of all things ....................................................................... 12
On Hubbard finishing Buddha's work........................................................................................... 13
Concerning what “clearing” means to a Buddhist ......................................................................... 13
Regarding reaching Bodhi enlightenment vs. the state of Theta Clear........................................... 15
On the promises of Buddha & the goals of Christianity ................................................................ 15
Concerning limitations in eastern belief systems........................................................................... 16
Regarding the truth about the concept of Nirvana ......................................................................... 16

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 2 of 19
Explanations of Traditional Eastern Beliefs and Practices
On the religion & methods of Buddhism
From The Creation of Human Ability, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“The religion of Buddhism, carried by its teachers, brought civilization into the
existing barbarisms of India, China, Japan and the Near East-or about two-thirds of
Earth's population. Here was the first broadcast wisdom which summated into high
cultures.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Concerning the shortcomings of eastern beliefs
From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 9 October 1962 FUTURE ORG TRENDS

“Buddhism went its way, collectively, and actually wound up enslaving people. Bum
show. The East, the paralysis of the East, the fatalism of the East, and so forth, are as
attributable to Buddhism as to any other single item. I don’t know what Gautama
Siddhartha said, but I sure know that people have been saying since, “If you just sat
and regarded your navel for enough years and did nothing, you would become part of
nirvana.” And nirvana, as far as I can figure out, is the GPM. Well, just see a picture of
it. It looks like a human being surrounded with a lot of little valences. Nirvana. Look at pic-
look at a Buddhist picture of nirvana sometime, and you got the GPM-bang.

So, they eventually found out how to put people into the GPM. And all kinds of squirrel,
offbeat offshoots like Zen Buddhism, “If you know the answer, I hit you; if you don’t know
the answer, I hit you; because force is knowingness and never the twain shall be separated.”
Well, isn’t that the way it must be? I don’t know if you’re acquainted with Zen Buddhism,
but after you’ve done a tremendous amount of study on the subject, you finally can make up
your mind that if you’re hit, you know. That’s the end product.

Now, Lamaism, with ghosts and devils and more GPMS, splintered off from Buddhism,
everybody went into apathy, and there it went. Of course, they didn’t have the technology. I
just say that very advisably. The East has never known how to do it. That I can tell you out
of the depths of my own experience.

I can show you an Indian rope trick, the small boy going up the pole. I can do it. Hypnotize
the lot of you; you’d see most anything. Never did anybody any good.

Anybody wants to dramatize Axiom 10, by all means dramatize Axiom 10. But there’s a
point where even that catches up with them. Indian rope trick is mass hypnotism.

The last fun I ever got out of mass hypnotism was hypnotizing the staff of Saint Elizabeth’s
Hospital in Washington. I don’t know if I ever told you that story. I needn’t bother to now.”
— L. Ron Hubbard
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 3 of 19

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 28 November 1963 SEVEN
CLASSIFICATIONS

“That’s a philosophic, see? There must be consequences for every action. The Buddhist ran
up against this same thing and he answered it in an entirely different way. He said, the
Buddhist said, “Well, in view of the fact that you get a consequence for everything you
do,” he dimly understood this was the case, you see, he didn’t articulate it, “why, you
better not cause anything.” And his answer to it is don’t cause. In other words, the only
way to avoid stimulus-response consequences of another stimulus-response occurring,
is of course, start no stimulus-response mechanisms. Push no buttons. Do nothing.
Cause nothing. And that was his answer to the situation.

Well, the world-and believe me, the chaps who are walking up and down the highways and
byways and sitting in the palaces and at the-in the day of Gautama Siddhartha-were as
reasonable, if not more so, at the raw-meat level, you see, than they are today. I mean,
you’ve got the same breed of cat. There’s no reason to downgrade the people he was
talking to, you see. And he came to this conclusion and from that day to this the
Buddhist, you see, tries not to cause anything. That was his solution to a problem.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 23 JULY 1963 BETWEEN LIVES
IMPLANTS [extended passage]

“There’s always some madman, you know, gets some kind of an idea like this, and it all
passes away and so forth. Look at the Buddhist. We let him conquer three quarters of
Asia, and he was trying to end this life-death cycle and keep from coming through our
carefully maintained plant, and he never made it. Never did anything. So there’s your
precedent. Nothing happened. Nothing happened.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Regarding the failures Catholicism & Buddhism
From HCO PL 4 Dec 1966 Admin Know-How Series 9 Expansion Theory of Policy

“The Roman Catholic Church once had a healing product, by actual treatment and by
relics and miracles and was in great demand by the public and eventually even the
barbarians. But she began to fight progress in science and knowledge and her product
turned into exported ignorance backed by autos-da-fe (burning heretics) and thus
ceased to expand and today is rapidly shrinking.

Buddhism, earlier than that, expanded continuously as it never sought new extension
of territory other than that of learning. Buddhism failed in India alone because its
monks became licentious, ceased to deliver true teachings and were swept up, most
likely, in India alone, by the Muslim conquest of that unhappy country sometime
around the seventh century.”
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 4 of 19
— L. Ron Hubbard

On the Vedas
From The Creation of Human Ability – References section, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“Veda: the Vedic Hymns, the earliest recorded philosophic writings. They are the most
ancient sacred literature of the Hindus (the natives of India) comprising over a hundred
books still in existence. They tell about evolution, about Man coming into this universe and
the curve of life, which is birth, growth, degeneration and decay. The word veda means
knowledge”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.

Concerning Hinduism
From The Creation of Human Ability – References section, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“Hindu(s): a member of the Hindu religion of India that emphasizes freedom from the
material world through purification of desires and elimination of personal identity. Hindu
beliefs include reincarnation.”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.

Regarding Dharma
From The Creation of Human Ability – References section, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“Dharma: the moral and religious law of Buddhism and Hinduism, each of which has its
own Dharma. In Buddhism, the Dharma is reflected in the teachings of Buddha, governing
daily life and showing the way to salvation. In Hinduism, the Dharma establishes rules of
duty and ethical conduct for all people.”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 16 August 1966 RELEASES AND CLEARS
[extended passage]

“Now the reason they didn’t get any further than that is they were a little bit too far from the
truth. There were too many vias, you see? There was the via of Buddhism to Socrates, to
Christianity, to organized Christianity, to the various arguments of Christianity to-you see?
And they were weak to that degree. Now compare this, compare this with the Buddhist
spread within living memory, three-quarters of Asia. Very fast. But he was close to
home on the subject of Dharma. You see, he was capitalizing on Dharma, that wisdom
would make you free.

This carries with it some interesting implications. It carries with it the implication that
there is a possibility to be free. You see that itself is a terribly hard thing to teach men.
But Asia knew it. Asia already had then a spiritualism and a religious background. And he
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 5 of 19
capitalized on that and three-quarters of it-zoom, bang! Three-quarters of Asia. That’s on
exteriorization, which is an incidental, but the final result of, Scientology.

Now of course you’re going to walk into everybody you meet practically and they never
heard of Dharma. But somehow or other, the wisdom of Dharma has not come up
through the line.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 18 August 1966 STUDY AND INTENTION
[extended passage]

[Hubbard backpedaling on his mistakes in the previous lecture directly above]

“I want to make a little bit of a-well, I want to make a little bit of a correction. If you, as I
did after the last lecture, go and look up Dharma (D-H-A-R-M-A) to find out what has been
preserved of all that, why, save yourself the trouble. Dharma is anything from “supreme
law” to “the total caste system of India!’ to “fate” and respelled “love” and rephrased some
other way, it is something else some other way, and so forth. And in no authoritative
reference book that I’ve looked at to date that I have around at this particular time, is there
any correct definition for Dharma. Boy, that is really great, you know, it’s really great! And
in Buddhism it means “the way,” see.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

On Krishna
From The Creation of Human Ability – References section, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“Krishna: an important Hindu god who appeared as an incarnation (living being embodying
a deity or spirit) of Vishnu, one of the three main gods of the Hindu religion. In a sacred
Hindu text describing Krishna, it is stated that human life is meant for self-realization
(and eternal life) which is good. However, as long as the soul is encased in a body (which
will go through birth, growth, old age and disease), human life is bad. Thus, one must take
the good with the bad.”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.

Concerning Maitreya
From The Creation of Human Ability – References section, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“Maitreya: in Buddhism, the future Buddha who will be reborn in a period of decline to renew
the doctrine of the founder of Buddhism, the Buddha.”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 6 of 19
From “The Hymn of Asia: An Eastern Poem” first printed by The Church of Scientology of
California in 1974 [full publication]

“Am I Mettyya? [Maitreya]
If you see me dead I will then live forever.
I come to you in Peace
I come to you as a Teacher
I do not come as an officer of Church of Sect
I come to you as a Man.
I come to bring you wisdom
I come to bring you all that Lord Buddha would have you know of life, Earth and
Man.



I give you
Certainty
Of such a kind
That you can doubt.
I ask no faith.
For such I give
is Real enough
To suffer every doubt.
Am I Metteyya? [Maitreya]

Everywhere you are
I can be addressed
But in our temples best
Address me and you address
Lord Buddha.
Address Lord Buddha
And you then address
Metteyya.

A name, Maitreya
Metteyya
A magic name
For which all
Faithful waiting
Then was done.
I am the beginning
I am the end
I am real enough
To be doubted
And you can doubt.

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 7 of 19
No blasphemy
Can mar my name
So blaspheme if you will
So pure it is that
Name that no
Speakingness can soil it.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Regarding the Buddhist Wheel of Life
From HCO Policy Letter of 28 October 1960 NEW TESTING PROMOTION SECTION

“We will take full advantage of the superstitions of people at the level of prediction. The
popularity of astrology is greater than that of psychology even though psychology developed
from astrology. That is because astrology pretends to read future. We can factually estimate
future from meters and graphs without any pretense and a gruesome future it appears (and
would be without us). Pandora’s box flies into the future from a middle or low graph.
Astrology and numerology are popular and slightly factual. We can be popular and
totally factual. The fate of man without processing is measured by the catastrophes of
the past. The Buddhist Wheel of Life shows man how grimly he is tied to a never-
improving circle of birth and death. Use such facts.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

On the Buddhist Prayer Wheel
From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 3 September 1964 CLEARING, WHAT IT IS

“Man doesn’t leap from a state of total aberration to a state of total divinity because of
three flicks of a prayer wheel.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

[Tape Glossary] prayer wheel: a mechanical means for the recitation of mantras (syllables
or verses with mystical efficacy) used by Tibetan Buddhists. The prayer wheel consists of a
hollow, metal cylinder, often beautifully embossed, that is mounted on a rod. The mantra is
written on a roll of paper and inserted in the cylinder after having been properly consecrated
by a lama (priest). Each turning of the wheel by hand is equivalent to the prayer’s oral
recitation. The rationale is that the mantra when properly executed has a metaphysical
power of its own. Its correct recitation, however, is difficult to learn and for the
ordinary Tibetan the turning of the written word is a substitute that must be done
much more frequently to make up for its lesser power.
— Bridge Publications, Inc.

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 8 of 19
Concerning the covert purpose of the quiet philosophies
From Lecture of 23 June 1961: Question and Answer Period: CCHs, Auditing [extended
passage]

“Now, how the Buddhist, the Lamaist, missed this, I don't know. But he patently knows
nothing about it. The mystery of the East has been exploded. Man, anybody who would
be stupid enough to sit still for twenty years and regard his navel so as to exteriorize
should have his thetan examined. You don't have to sit still for twenty years. Get
somebody to say to you something on the order of - the first exteriorization process is “Try
not to be three feet back of your head.” Whammmm! There they go, you know? Well,
Buddhism is accomplished. That was the end of track as far as Buddhism is concerned,
and that one little set of English words took care of everything they were trying to
hand out.

Oh yes, they were also trying to hand out “Peace, peace on you too, brother,” and so
forth. They were trying to hand out various other principles, which got into other
religions, and we had people being quiet. And the whole subject is devoted to how to
keep people quiet. It's a police operation, a whole track police operation.

You're always getting space jockeys and space-opera people who are sailing in, saying,
“Let's see. How are we going to quiet this down? These people are moving. These people
are dangerous. They move. They walk around and they whistle and they sing and they move.
And therefore, they're liable to do things. So the thing we'd better do is introduce some
peaceful philosophy of some kind or another that'll just stop all this tendency toward
motion.” That's a fact.

And you get things like Buddhism, Christianity - the quiet philosophies, I call them,
toward motion. That’s a fact.

And of course, how quiet can you get? Dead. And you might say it's a covert effort to
kill everybody off.

And don’t wonder that the whole Roman criminal population joined the church en masse.
They did.

dare say if you held somebody in straps in a chair or up against a wall or in a bed any
undetermined length of time, you would eventually find he’d gotten religion or he’d become
a Buddhist, or almost anything.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Regarding Dhyana
From The Creation of Human Ability – References section, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“Dhyana: in Buddhism and Hinduism, the practice of achieving spiritual enlightenment
through meditation and yoga (a school of Hindu philosophy advocating and setting forth a
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 9 of 19
course of physical and mental disciplines for attaining freedom from the material world and
union of the self with the Supreme Being).”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.

On Zen Buddhism meditation practices
From The Creation of Human Ability – References section, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“In the field of Zen Buddhism, there is a practice of administering a sudden blow by
which is obtained a feeling of certainty. Here is a relatively false certainty-the certainty of
impact-…”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.


Buddhism Beliefs Assimilated into L. Ron Hubbard's Spiritual
Teachings
Concerning Gautama Siddhartha in a neo-buddhism context
From London Clearing Congress Lecture, The Story of Dianetics and Scientology (1LCC-18)
Oct. 1958

“But actually Commander Thompson had a very open mind on this, and he used to tell me,
“Well, if it’s not true for you, it’s not true.” And I found out that he got this from a
fellow named Gautama Siddhartha. Now, you really don’t know Gautama Siddhartha
as a man (but that’s all he was) because better than two-thirds of the world population
now considers him a god. But the first thing that Gautama Siddhartha ever said about his
own work was that he was just a man. This he tried to make very plain. And the other
lesson, back there about 600 B.C., that he taught everyone is that if it isn’t true for you, it
isn’t true.”.
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 16 August 1966 RELEASES AND CLEARS
[full transcript]

“Now we’re not in bad company in making this mistake [re: understanding past lives]
because about 2500 years ago exactly on this same line of research, the identical mistake
was made. The identical mistake was made by Gautama Siddhartha Buddha, no less. And he
did not appreciate the existence of a bank at all. And that work does not take into account
that there is such a thing as the mind or the bank. That’s what’s missing out of that larry of
work.

Now there was another blunder made 10,000 years ago along the line of philosophic re-
search. And there was a chap called Dharma and he was a monk, legendary and so
forth. And oddly enough his name today means „fate.” In the more esoteric Eastern
philosophies and so on, they speak of somebody’s dharma. And it gets perverted into
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 10 of 19
karma and so forth. But he is so legendary that his name now means something else.
But I think you can still find it recorded. And the mistake there was believing that you
had to – you want to know how I know so much about this, well, I’ll tell you some day.
The mistake there was believing that you didn’t have to do anything but become wise.
All you had to do was become wise and you would instantly become nine feet tall. Do
you see?

Now it’s from Dharma that you get the tradition which most philosophers follow which
is that, if you became wise you would become free. Now, there’s almost – anybody
there is around is grooved in to that basic philosophy. That is part of the woof and
warp (rug terms, that’s how you fix up a rug, don’t want to give you any
misunderstood words). The – it’s in the woof and warp of the entire culture, that you
become wise, you become free. And that’s been going on for 10,000 years on this
planet. Started by Dharma.

Now that work has been totally assimilated. Now that one can exteriorize and that ex-
teriorization brings about freedom, is the premise of Gautama Siddhartha Buddha and
that’s only 2500 years ago. They’ve got 7500 years yet to go before they assimilate that
into the cul-ture the way the philosophy of Dharma was.

Which means, you poor bloke, that you’ve got about 10,000 less sixteen years to go before
Scientology is totally assimilated as the basic thing called philosophy or culture, see. So
don’t feel that you’re going to catch up to this very rapidly if it took Dharma 10,000 years to
get the point across that if you become wise you became free. And if people still don’t know
about exteriorization 2500 years after the most popular and most numerous religion on the
planet, Buddhism. You’ve got 7500 years to go, so sit it out, you know? We’re slightly
ahead of our time.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 16 August 1966 RELEASES AND CLEARS
[extended passage]

“What’s particularly notable about Buddhism is that it was such clear-cut truth that he
advanced, that it spread like wildfire within his lifetime. And in the few succeeding
lifetimes, a very short period of time, he had almost, well he had about three-quarters
of Asia right there-bang!

For instance, he brought the first civil-his people brought the first civilization to Japan.
And those were within living memory of Buddha. And that is an awful long ways for that-
modes of travel of that day from Northern India. Japan is quite a far cry. They brought the
first shreds of culture to Japan. They brought writing and to this day the Japanese use
Chinese writing pronounced with a Japanese vocabulary.

And that was brought to them by the first Buddhist monks who came there. But those
fellows were very industrious and they got it fast. But they had moved from a state of
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 11 of 19
“man is meat” to “he is a spiritual being” and they had manifestations of this, and they
had a rather powerful leader and there it went.

Now in one fell swoop with no pause for breath, we have capitalized upon the idea that a
man who is improved becomes free. We have brought about a twenty-year effort to
exteriorize down to a point where it can be done in about twenty seconds. We have found
what prevented the efforts of Dharma from being perfect, we have found the totality of
what barriered Buddhism. Here we are in a society which in actual fact is only
bolstered in its culture by Dharma and Buddha, with the problem wrapped up.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 13 December 1966 SCIENTOLOGY
DEFINITIONS III [extended passage]

“[in answer to his own posed question of What is Scientology?] Truth of the matter is, is
you are studying an extension of the work of Gautama Siddhartha begun about
twenty-five hundred years ago. He sought to end the endless cycle of birth and death
and birth. And this death-birth cycle led into an effort to show men that they were a
spirit and did not have to be a body and did not have to go on being clay. Gautama
Siddhartha perfected some work that we did in 1952, and we did it better. [how to
exteriorize]

Now, the trouble he had with his work was how to stably exteriorize or continue somebody
in an exterior condition. He did not know how to do this. Actually, Lamaism, which began
in Tibet after Gautama Siddhartha was no longer around. He in actual fact went to
Tibet and worked in Tibet and developed what is called Lamaism in an effort to
produce a methodology to reach the basis of the mind and permit an individual to be
spiritually free.

Now, that work too was relatively unsuccessful. We were more successful in that in
1952 in Scientology. We could more easily and more swiftly exteriorize an individual
and show him that he was a human spirit than had been done.

Yet the work of Gautama Siddhartha, although looked upon [by] him as a failure,
produced the-a sufficiency of wisdom on this planet to bring civilization to three-
quarters of Asia. Buddhism is the oldest and most numerous religion on this planet at
this moment. It is very numerous and it predates Christianity by 500 years. Probably
the shreds of Buddhism, coming into the Middle East with the silk and spice merchants who,
after the contact of Alexander in about 333 B.C., found out there was a Europe. The spice
merchants and silk merchants of India and China followed on back on the trail of his
retreating conquest and made a trade contact with the-with Europe, and from there on
supplied Europe with spices and silks and so on, on an overland route.

Well, along with them undoubtedly came Buddhism. It sparked a religious revival and
a considerable amount of messianic activity in the Middle East. Now, regardless of any
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 12 of 19
truths or prophecies or prophets or anything like that that happened as independent
endeavors, this nevertheless was sparked off by Buddhism.

Buddha predicted that in twenty-five hundred years the entire job would be finished in the
West. That’s in the Pali canons. Well, we finished it. Now, were somebody to claim that
Scientology were not a religion, that religion was a disguise, this would be about the
most erroneous statement that a man could make, because it is an extension, a direct
extension, of the work of Gautama Siddhartha Buddha.

They have different creators, different gods, different altars of worship but in one thing they
hold a common truth and that is that man is a spiritual being. Only in Buddhism was this
ever proven.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Regarding Hubbard’s vast knowledge of all things
From HCO POLICY LETTER OF 31 January 1966 (Reissued as HCO Pol Ltr of 8 August 1966)
COMPILATIONS SECTION, DEPARTMENT 21, OFFICE OF LRH (REFERENCE
MATERIAL Section) [extended passage]

“Now you’re deprived, if you’re not working closely with me, deprived of my intelligence
service, oddly enough. Because promotion is matched against intelligence and I’m on that
intelligence line hot and heavy and I know what they’re howling and what they’re screaming
and what they’re cheering about and so forth before anybody else finds it out. I even know
what’s going on in Tibet. I do conduct quite an intelligence service. I’m the only one in
Scientology who does. Nobody helps me with that hat, because what it requires is
experienced evaluation and you don’t buy that.

You can go to Museums for anything else you want to. Lay off Egyptian. Lay off Chaldean,
Babylonian, Persian, Chinese, Japanese, Buddhistic, because they don’t all work. As far as
I’m concerned those fields are now trite. Trite in the extreme. That’s my feeling about them.
Mind, the Rosicrucians, I think, are using Chaldean or something-I’ve not exactly identified-
it may be they haven’t either. We can do better than that -

And Greek-I was just hitting a field in Greek and we might be right or wrong, but I think
this is a field where it is absolutely boundless, the amount of material and every Art School
starts in in that direction and so forth. You don’t lack the materials. I just thought of the
Discus thrower. Done with one of these dolls, that an artist uses. Take a mannequin.
Streamline him, put him into the position of the Discus thrower. You can take the front of
the Parthenon, simplify the pillars-no end-and put in an entirely modernistic freize. Made
out of mannequins-anything, it doesn’t matter, but I suddenly saw that there’s a bountiful
field of material.

When you are doing something like this, you want to look for an ocean of material.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 13 of 19
On Hubbard finishing Buddha's work
From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 1966 [ Quoted in Advance! Magazine UK Issue
149 ]

“What is Scientology? How does it fit into the framework of man? Truth of the matter
is that you are studying an extension of the work of Gautama Siddhartha, begun about
2,500 years ago. He sought to end the endless cycle of birth and death then birth. And
this death/birth cycle led into an effort to show men that they were spirit and did not
have to be a body and did not have to go on being clay. ... That's in the Pali Canon.
Well, we finished it!”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Concerning what “clearing” means to a Buddhist
From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 13 June 1962 SEMINAR, QUESTION AND
ANSWER PERIOD

“And you say, now, a Clear would always be serene and would never be the effect of
anything. You get the idea? You’ve got the Buddhist definition here. And man, that
was wrong-end-to. That was an absolute guarantee of plowing somebody in.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, August 1961 QUESTION AND ANSWER
PERIOD: GOALS SEARCH

“We’ve been so carefully sold on the idea of Buddhist serenity as a token of altitude
and high state.

And boy, that has been very far from the case in every single one of these Clears…

… everybody gets the idea: Clear, Buddha. Well, you see, he’s supposed to be sitting
there and legs crossed, naked, loin cloth, regarding his navel, you see. That’s what he’s
supposed to be doing. If he’s really Clear, he’s sitting up there doing that, you know. A
bright shade of yellow.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 20 April 1963 WHAT CLEARING IS
[extended passage]

“Maybe this Buddhistic method-maybe this Buddhistic method of sitting there
regarding your navel for twenty years, maybe that’d work better than sweating over
an E-Meter that never found a reliable item, you see.

Well, the mystic had what they call the abyss. The Buddhist had certain things about
all this. But the abyss was very interesting. We had a plateau, a low plateau, and then
there was a higher plateau where man could be happy or more cheerful or more able,
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 14 of 19
freer and so forth, where he could attain his various ambitions. And lying between
these two plateaus was a deep chasm, an enormous chasm, bottomlessly deep. And the
trick was to get across that chasm without dropping into the abyss.

This, actually, is older than Buddhism. The Buddhist not only fell into the abyss but
deified it! That’s nirvana.

You would laugh if it weren’t so sad. Imagine this fellow trying, by meditation, by being
silent, by being good, by never causing anything, by this, by that, by fantastic practices,
imagine his final goal: He can get into the GPM without an auditor. No map! Nothing.

You read the Buddhistic descriptions of nirvana after you’ve been through a GPM-you take
a look at those and you’ll say, “Hey, those characters are talking about a GPM. They’re
talking about these personalities and they’re talking about this and they’re talking about that
and how it’s all this way and how it’s all that way and…” And you look at a Buddhist
picture sometimes-it’s not accurate for an auditing map but you want-clip one out of a book
sometime if the pc wants to know what his GPM looks like, just take Buddhist nirvana and
say, “Well, there, that’s it.” Camels and horses and little men sitting around. Man, a total
reward.

Now there-there is the illusion of the abyss. ln other words, you can get well if you
don’t fall in. And this was the message of the mystic, And that’s a perfectly accurate
message and is perfectly true today.

You had to go through, however, you had to go through and across and over this
chasm. And that chasm still exists and what is it? Well, it’s the reactive bank and it has
a certain number of items and we know exactly what it is and it hurts like the dickens
and -it knocks your head on and off again and on again.

“So, the mystic’s ancient, ancient illusion is still with us, That’s very good- I said at the
end of Book One, I said, “For God’s sakes build a better Bridge.” Remember?

Well, we did. Been working ever since.

You could show Mohammed how you actually could exteriorize, and so forth, and he would
have thought this was pretty interesting.

We could have talked to Buddha-we could have talked to Buddha with the greatest of ease.
Now, Buddha was the first boy to bring this up and popularize it here on Earth. He probably
got it from about ten thousand years ago. The monk Dharma had certain things about it and
they were talking about clearing, and Buddha-if you talk to a Buddhist, talk to him about not
clearing but becoming bodhi and he’ll say, “Oh, yeah, yeah, if you don’t cause anything.. .”
You know there’s where the bank is really stuck; where the individual has said he will cause
nothing. Why, if you want to find a nice big black lump in a bank, find where the individual
decided never to cause anything or to be very wise and to oppose nothing. He’d be stuck
right in nirvana.
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 15 of 19

Anyhow, if we’d talked to Buddha about this, he would have said, “Hey, now. You
mean we aren’t going to have to sit and look at our navels for twenty years? You mean
you sit on that side of that and you go out of your head and these various things and
the cycle of birth and death then cease?” And boy, he would have been right with us,
see? He would have been right with us.

The Buddhist today might regard us with a little more suspicion. But he’d understand
this. What are we communicating to here on Earth? We are communicating to people
who are fixated on things they don’t want to be on. And clearing to them means
becoming unfixated from those things they don’t want to be fixated on. That’s clearing.
That’s what it means to these people.”

— L. Ron Hubbard

Regarding reaching Bodhi enlightenment vs. the state of Theta Clear
From The Creation of Human Ability, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“A Bodhi is one who has attained intellectual and ethical perfection by human means,
comparable to our Theta Clear in Scientology.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From “The Hymn of Asia: An Eastern Poem” first printed by The Church of Scientology of
California in 1974 [full publication]

“Freedom
I come to you with science
I come to teach you
I come to help you.

With complete attention
With arduous study
With interest and love
You will all
In very few years
Some in months
Become Bodhi.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

On the promises of Buddha & the goals of Christianity
From “The Value of Scientology” in The Auditor World Wide, Journal of Scientology No. 44,
1969

“During this period we have our chance to end going down, down, down to illness and
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 16 of 19
perpetual death and swing upward toward the sun.

We are delivering the RESULT, the mere promise or dream of which sustained the
populaces of the orient and occident for thousands of years.

Anything religious teachers said or Buddha promised, even the visions of Christianity,
are all attained in Scientology as RESULT!”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Concerning limitations in eastern belief systems
From Lecture 28 June 1961 on “Raw Meat Trouble-shooting Cases” [extended passage]

“Scientology . . you can use it backwards and upside down and run it wrong and everything
else, and you actually won't commit much of a crime. But improper or incorrect or failure to
disseminate Scientology adds up to one awful overt. Ask yourself for a moment, why? Well,
if Scientology is abroad in a workable state, even though this fellow kicks the bucket, he'll
be picked out of it someday.

All right. So this character gets loused up by processing, and next life, next life, next life, he
has run on him, “You take this book on Suba-ooba-ooba, and you stand in the middle of the
room, and you go around in circles, and then when you fall down you're Clear.” It's no
road out. And that's happened to Buddhism, Lamaism, the original Taoism. Happened
to any development they've had here on Earth. Started out free . . by bad
dissemination . . booby trap. See?”
— L. Ron Hubbard

Regarding the truth about the concept of Nirvana
From HCO Bulletin of 6 April 1963 R3M2, WHAT YOU ARE TRYING TO DO IN CLEARING
[full publication]

“Clearing is not easy on the pc. It's not easy on a new auditor. And there will be times when
both rue the day they ever got into the GPM [Goals Problems Mass]. But if they keep going,
finding goals and their RIs, faint streaks of pre-dawn gray will begin to gleam ahead and
then, with perseverance, day will break upon a higher plateau than man has ever dreamed of
before.

The mystics spoke of the Abyss. They said that in trying to cross it, many fell into the
darkness. Without knowing it, they spoke of the Goals Problem Mass.

The Buddhists spoke of Nirvana. Without knowing it, they spoke of vanishing forever
into the GPM (Nirvana). They had become completely overwhelmed, lacking meters
and a map. We are Scientologists. We won't fall into the abyss. And we won't join
Nirvana. We have meters and a map. We know the rules and the way.

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 17 of 19
This is the greatest adventure of all time. Clearing. The way is strewn with the
skeletons and skulls of those who have tried over the past trillenia. The bottom of the
Abyss is glutted with failures. Nirvana is choked with the overwhelmed.

To say it is not a dangerous way would be false.

But it is not dangerous if you keep going, finding goals and RIs, reducing the charge on the
case, handling the ARC breaks as they occur. Only the fainthearted will add any bones to the
Abyss or apathy to Nirvana.

We are Scientologists. We have won.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From The Creation of Human Ability, Los Angeles, CA 2007

“Randomity comes about when one selects out and gives determinism to another entity
or object. This tells you immediately that the problem of healing at a distance could be
looked upon with some favor. And this would be true if the concept of Nirvana were
true, where all life comes about as a fragmentation of life. But this is no essay or
determination of whether it is bad or good to heal at a distance, or to do healing of the kind
which Christ did. The only thing I would care to say on the subject, at this time, is that if one
does healing of this character, simply, that he should do it well and thoroughly.”
— Bridge Publications, Inc.


From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 9 October 1962 FUTURE ORG TRENDS

“Buddhism went its way, collectively, and actually wound up enslaving people. Bum
show. The East, the paralysis of the East, the fatalism of the East, and so forth, are as
attributable to Buddhism as to any other single item. I don’t know what Gautama
Siddhartha said, but I sure know that people have been saying since, “If you just sat
and regarded your navel for enough years and did nothing, you would become part of
nirvana.” And nirvana, as far as I can figure out, is the GPM. Well, just see a picture of
it. It looks like a human being surrounded with a lot of little valences. Nirvana. Look at pic-
look at a Buddhist picture of nirvana sometime, and you got the GPM-bang.

So, they eventually found out how to put people into the GPM. And all kinds of squirrel,
offbeat offshoots like Zen Buddhism, “If you know the answer, I hit you; if you don’t
know the answer, I hit you; because force is knowingness and never the twain shall be
separated.” Well, isn’t that the way it must be? I don’t know if you’re acquainted with Zen
Buddhism, but after you’ve done a tremendous amount of study on the subject, you finally
can make up your mind that if you’re hit, you know. That’s the end product.

Now, Lamaism, with ghosts and devils and more GPMS, splintered off from
Buddhism, everybody went into apathy, and there it went. Of course, they didn’t have
L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 18 of 19
the technology. I just say that very advisably. The East has never known how to do it.
That I can tell you out of the depths of my own experience.

I can show you an Indian rope trick, the small boy going up the pole. I can do it. Hypnotize
the lot of you; you’d see most anything. Never did anybody any good.

Anybody wants to dramatize Axiom 10, by all means dramatize Axiom 10. But there’s a
point where even that catches up with them. Indian rope trick is mass hypnotism.

The last fun I ever got out of mass hypnotism was hypnotizing the staff of Saint Elizabeth’s
Hospital in Washington. I don’t know if I ever told you that story. I needn’t bother to now.”
— L. Ron Hubbard


From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 4 APRIL 1963 ANATOMY OF THE GPM

“But actually that’s as far as-besides some codes and morals and things like that-that’s
about as far as Buddhism went. You know what they told you to do in Buddhism after
that? Although we’re the inheritors of all the empire of Buddhism, in actual fact-we
should not be blind to what the Buddhist did-he got overwhelmed by the GPM. Oh,
you think so? You don’t think he did, huh? Ha-ha-ha-ha. What do you think nirvana
is?

You’ve seen pictures of nirvana, haven’t you? Populated, totally populated-big circular mass
that you’re supposed to go into and become one of all with everything.

He collided with the GPM, but he didn’t know what it was. He thought it was heaven.

Well, we’re way beyond that.”
— L. Ron Hubbard

From Saint Hill Special Briefings Course lecture, 26 JULY 1966 THE CLASSIFICATION
CHART AND AUDITING

“You see, the one thing that booby-trapped the whole of research in the field of the
mind is that one could produce a temporary state of Clear. Temporary!

Who was this old bird? Jung, I think it was. Jung. Now, thetans can move objects or bust up
objects, I mean, when they’re way upscale, see? All he had to do was sit down near one and
it broke up. I think that was Jung. And this worried him so -this worried the guy so, that it
was really what he wanted out of his studies and researches was not to have bookcases fall
down, plaster crack wide open, armchairs go out, splat, every time he came near them. And
he never achieved that. Well, actually, that would be a thetan ability gone mad. Poltergeist,
or some such thing.

L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha & Eastern Belief Systems
Page 19 of 19
So these lower-scale harmonics include the fact that one can make something that looks
just like something but ain’t. And that’s the big booby trap.

Now listen, it wasn’t just a booby trap in 1950 - it was also a booby trap in 523 B.C.,
on this same subject, in this same line of research. A thetan exterior produced all the
symptoms of total sanity-great, whee, marvelous, and so forth. It’d last two minutes,
two hours, two days, two years. But the one thing that was certain about it: it wouldn’t
go on. And the Buddhists called it a bodhi, and a bodhi has the same stability as any
thetan exterior would have that you made today.
— L. Ron Hubbard

SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.007

Hubbard’s Interpretation of Buddhism,
Maitreya and Eastern Philosophy:


The Message of the Buddha
(1974-75 Hymn of Asia Feature Series, Article 1/5)


The Mystery of Lamaism
(1974-75 Hymn of Asia Feature Series, Article 2/5)


The Way of Knowing
(1974-75 Hymn of Asia Feature Series, Article 3/5)


A Vision of the Future
(1974-75 Hymn of Asia Feature Series, Article 4/5)


The 2,500 Year Old Prophecy
(1974-75 Hymn of Asia Feature Series, Article 5/5)
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.008

Examining Maitreya Prophecies & Related Claims
of Godhood:


The Maitreya Buddha of Tibetan Buddhism vs.
Lord Maitreya, The World Teacher of Theosophy
(Comparative Sources Compilation)


Actual Buddhist Prophecies Regarding Maitreya
(Comparative Source)


Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
The Maitreya Buddha of Tibetan Buddhism
vs.
Lord Maitreya (The World Teacher) of Theosophy

A comparative religion summary of Maitreya (or “Metteyya” according to the teachings of L. Ron
Hubbard) beliefs from Tibetan Buddhism vs. Theosophy vs. Neo-Theosophy compliments of Alan Khoo’s
Fundamentals of Buddhism archive on singnet and Margaret Thomas’ Theosophy versus Neo-Theosophy
study for The Blavatsky Study Center via The Blavatsky Archives.




The Maitreya Buddha of Tibetan Buddhism vs. Lord Maitreya (The World Teacher) of Theosophy
Page 2 of 3
Tibetan Buddhism on Maitreya Theosophy on Maitreya Neo-Theosophy on Maitreya

Buddha Maitreya is the Buddha of the future,
also known as the Laughing Buddha or 'the
loving one', is the one to follow up the historical
Buddha Sakyamuni. He waits in the Tusita
heaven for the moment he is to appear on earth
as the Buddha of the fifth world cycle. In the
future he will be like Sakyamuni, a mortal
manusi Buddha who lives on earth for a while
in order to teach mankind the doctrine.
Shakyamuni Buddha predicted that due to the
inevitable degeneration of the times, his own
teachings would last just five thousand years
before disappearing from this world. People will
grow more and more immoral and their lifespan
will gradually decrease, as will their health,
stature and fortune. While such delusions as
miserliness, hatred and jealousy gain strength,
the world will go through prolonged periods of
famine, disease and continuous warfare until it
eventually resembles a vast battlefield of
graveyard. Thereupon Maitreya will appear, not
in his fully evolved buddha form, but as a
person of regal bearing, very handsome and
taller than those around him. On seeing this
unusual being, people will be filled with wonder
and faith, and will ask how he came to have
such an attractive appearance. Maitreya will
reply that this is due to his practice of patience,
avoiding giving harm to others, and if others
will also abide in love and tolerance, they could
become similar to him.
Maitreya's appearance will mark a great turning

"Far from our thoughts may it ever be to erect a
new hierarchy for the future oppression of a
priest-ridden world." (Mahatma Letters, p. 407,
#87)
"And now, when so many of your sisters have
died; and others still are dying, while the few of
the old survivors, now in their second infancy,
wait but for their Messiah - the sixth race - to
resurrect to a new life and start anew with the
coming stronger along the path of a new
cycle..." (Mahatma Letters, p. 150, #238)
"MAITREYA is the secret name of the Fifth
Buddha, and the Kalki Avatar of the Brahmins -
the last MESSIAH who will come at the
culmination of the Great Cycle." (Secret
Doctrine I, p. 384)
"He will appear as Maitreya Buddha, the last of
the Avatars and Buddhas, in the seventh Race.
Only it is not in the Kali yug, our present
terrifically materialistic age of Darkness, the
'Black Age,' that a new Saviour of Humanity
can ever appear." (Secret Doctrine I, p. 470) [7]
"No Master of Wisdom from the East will
himself appear or send anyone to Europe or
America... until the year 1975." (Blavatsky
Collected Writings XII, p. 492)
[Original Source]

"There is slowly growing up in Europe, silently
but steadily, with its strongest centre perhaps in
Holland, but with its members scattered in other
European Countries, the little known movement
called the Old Catholic with the ancient ritual,
with unchallenged Orders, yet holding itself
aloof from the Papal Obediance. This is a living
Christian Church which will grow and multiply
as the years go on, and which has a great future
before it small as it yet is . It is likely to become
the future Church of Christendom twhen He
comes.'" (Annie Besant, The Theosophist,
Editorial, October, 1916)

"The great purpose of this drawing together is to
prepare the way for the coming of the new
Messiah, or, as we should say in Theosophical
circles, the next advent of the Lord Maitreya, as
a great spiritual teacher, bringing a new
religion. The time is rapidly approaching when
this shall be launched - a teaching which shall
unify the other religions, and compared with
them shall stand upon a broader basis and keep
its purity longer." (C. W. Leadbeater, The Inner
Life I, p. 114)
"And now I have to give to you, by command of
the King, I have to give you His message, and
some of the messages of the Lord Maitreya and
His great Brothers . . . so that what I am saying,
as to matter of announcement, is definitely at
The Maitreya Buddha of Tibetan Buddhism vs. Lord Maitreya (The World Teacher) of Theosophy
Page 3 of 3
Tibetan Buddhism on Maitreya Theosophy on Maitreya Neo-Theosophy on Maitreya
point in the fortunes of this world. As more and
more beings follow his example, their store of
merit, and consequently their lifespan, will
increase. Eventually people will live in health
for such a long time that the sufferings of old
age and death will scarcely be known. ...
Maitreya will be born the son of a Brahmin
priest, and will renounce the world and attain
enlightenment in a single day, not requiring six
long years. The world in this time will be
politically neutralized, and therefore the warrior
class and its martial virtues will be obsolete.
Thus he will be born among the intellectuals,
the priests, and his teaching will bring the
gentler emotions to the fore.
His teachings will not deviate from that of
previous Buddhas, except for an interesting
tradition that he will not teach any esoteric
Tantras (most likely hinting that Maitreya's
mission will in general be more effective than
Shakyamuni's). ...
Shakyamuni Buddha also predicted that those
who followed his teachings would be reborn in
the first circle of Maitreya's entourage and
would be able to complete the spiritual path
under Maitreya's guidance.
[Original Source]

the command of the King who I serve ... our
hope is . . . that very many from the
Theosophical and Star organizations, and the
growing Co-Masonry and the great fellowship
of teachers may recognize their Lord when He
comes , so that we may keep Him with us for
many years, and not make his own world
impossible for Him save in seclusion as was
done on His last coming." (Annie Besant, The
Theosophist, November, 1925, pp. 150, 160)
"As to the approaching advent of the Christ and
the work which He has to do, you cannot do
better than read Mrs. Besant's book on The
Changing World. The time of His advent is not
far distant, and the very body which He will
take is even already born among us." (C. W.
Leadbeater, The Inner Life I, p. 16)
[Original Source]

- 1 -
Actual Buddhist Prophecies Regarding Maitreya

Excerpt from: http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/profecias/esp_profecia01f1.htm





The Buddhist teachings describe the Kalachakra (Wheel of Time), which revolves in
cycles like the Hindu yugas. According to the Maitreyavyankarna (“Prophecy of
Maitreya”), Buddha will incarnate as Lord Maitreya (“The Buddha Who Returns”) at the
end of the present cycle after major geological catastrophes have so changed the face of
the planet that he can walk from continent to continent. During his reign, humanity will
attain salvation, and even the gods will be liberated from their desires.

The last Hindu Avatar explained the job to Bharata Prince Arjuna, as recorded in the
Bhagavad-Gita (4:7-8):

“Whenever there is decay of righteousness... and there is exaltation of
unrighteousness, then I Myself come forth... for the destruction of evil-doers, for
the sake of firmly establishing righteousness, I am born from age to age.”

In the Surangama Sutra, Gautama Buddha told his disciple Sariputta of the signs that
precede the end of the age:

“After my decease, first will occur the five disappearances. And what are the five
disappearances? The disappearance of attainments [to Nirvana], the disappearance
- 2 -
of the method [of doing so], the disappearance of [spiritual] learning, the
disappearance of the symbols [of Buddhism], the disappearance of the relics...

“Then when the Dispensation of the perfect Buddha is 5,000 years old, the relics,
not receiving reverence and honor will go to places where they can receive them...
This, Sariputta, is called the disappearance of relics.”

In another conversation with Ananda, recorded in the text Vinya Pitaka (II: 253), the
Buddha modified this prophecy, reducing the time by half:

“If, Ananda, women had not retired from the household life to the houseless one,
under the doctrine and discipline announced by the Tathagata [another Buddha],
Dharma would long endure; a thousand years would the good Dharma abide. But
since, Ananda, women have now retired from the household life to the houseless
one, under the doctrine and the discipline announced by the Tathagata, not long
Ananada, will Dharma endure; but five hundred years, Ananda, until the Dharma
abide”.

The Chinese Buddhist text Abhidharmakosha (4.12c. III) affords a few more details about
this prophecy:

“The monks and stream-attainers will be strong in their union with Dharma for 500 years
after the Blessed One’s Parinirvana. In the second 500 years they will be strong in
meditation; in the third period of 500 years they will be strong in erudition. In the fourth
500-year period they will only be occupied with gift-giving. The final or fifth period of
500 years will see only fighting and reproving among the monks and followers. The pure
Dharma will then become invisible.”

In Chapter 26 of Digha Nikaya, we are told:

“At that period, brethren, there will arise in the world an Exalted One named
Maitreya, Fully Awakened, abounding in wisdom and goodness, happy, with
knowledge of the worlds, unsurpassed as a guide to mortals willing to be led, a
teacher for gods and men, an Exalted One, a Buddha, even as I am now. He, by
himself, will thoroughly know and see, as it were face to face, this universe, with
Its worlds of the spirits, Its Brahmas and Its Maras, and Its world of recluses and
Brahmins, of princes and peoples, even as I now, by myself, thoroughly know and
see them.”

Elsewhere, the Buddha said of Maitreya:

“Maitreya, the best of men, will then leave the Tushita heavens, and go for his last
rebirth. As soon as he is born he will walk seven steps forward, and where he puts
down his feet a jewel or a lotus will spring up. He will raise his eyes to the ten
directions, and will speak these words, ’This is my last birth. There will be no
- 3 -
rebirth after this one. Never will I come back here, but, all pure, I shall win
Nirvana.”

In recent years, a claimant calling himself Maitreya, with headquarters in England, has
been offering himself to the world. He was born in 1944 in Iran, and claims to be a
descendant of the Iranian king Nader Shad. His apologists offer numerous prophetic
“proofs” of his authenticity, but all of them are dubious. In particular, he forgot to walk
and talk at birth, and lotuses fail to sprout in his footsteps.

The Gautama Buddha also made this prophecy concerning the advent of Maitreya:

“And the Blessed One said to Ananda, I am not the first Buddha, nor shall I be the
last. In due time another Buddha will arise in the world, a Holy One, a supremely
enlightened one, endowed with wisdom, auspicious, embracing the Universe, an
incomparable Leader of Men, a Ruler of Devas and mortals. He will reveal to you
the same eternal truths, which I have taught you. He will establish His Law,
glorious in its spirit and in the letter. He will proclaim a righteous life wholly
perfect and pure, such as I now proclaim. His disciples will number many
thousands while mine number many hundreds.’

“Ananda said, ‘How shall we know Him?’

“The Blessed One said, ‘He will be known as Maitreya.’

In the sacred text Anagatavamsa, the sage Sariputta asked Buddha Arahant about
the future Buddha, and was told:

“I am now the perfect Buddha;
And there will be Maitreya too
Before this same auspicious aeon
Runs to the end of its years.
The perfect Buddha, Maitreya,
By name, supreme of men.”

On another occasion, Sariputta asked after Maitreya again, and the Buddha replied:

“At that time, the ocean will lose much of its water, and there will be much less of
it than now. In consequence a world-ruler will have no difficulties in passing
across it. India, this island of Jambu, will be quite flat everywhere, it will measure
ten thousand leagues, and all men will have the privilege of living on it. It will
have innumerable inhabitants, who will commit no crimes or evil deeds, but will
take pleasure in doing good... Human beings are then without any blemishes,
moral offenses are unknown among them, and they are full of zest and joy. Their
bodies are very large and their skin has a fine hue. Their strength is quite
extraordinary. Three kinds of illness only are known --- people must relieve their
bowels, they must eat, they must get old...
- 4 -

“Maitreya, the best of men, will then leave the Tushita heavens, and go for his last
rebirth into the womb of that woman [Brahmavati]... As soon as he is born he will
walk seven steps forward, and where he puts down his feet a jewel or a lotus will
spring up. He will raise his eyes to the ten directions, and will speak these words:
’This is my last birth. There will be no more rebirth after this one. Never will I
come back here, but, all pure, I shall in Nirvana!’...

“For 60,000 years Maitreya, the best of men, will preach the true Dharma, which
is compassionate towards all living beings. And when he has disciplined in his
true Dharma hundreds and hundreds of millions of living beings, then that leader
will at last enter Nirvana. And after the great sage has entered Nirvana, his true
Dharma still endured for another 10,000 years...”

The Buddha also described the decline of religion in the latter days of this age:

“How will it occur? After my decease there will first be five disappearances.
What five? The disappearance of attainment (in the Dispensation), the
disappearance of proper conduct, the disappearance of learning, the disappearance
of outward form, the disappearance of the relics. There will be these five
disappearances.

“Here attainment means that for a thousand years only after the Lord’s complete
Nirvana will monks be able to practice analytical insights. As time goes on and on
these disciples of mine are non-returners and once-returners and stream-winners.
There will be no disappearance of attainment for these. But with the extinction of
the last stream-winner’s life, attainment will have disappeared....

“The disappearance of proper conduct means that, being unable to practice jhana,
insight, the Ways and the fruits, they will guard no more the four entire purities of
moral habit. As time goes on and on they will only guard the four offenses
entailing defeat. While there are even a hundred or a thousand monks who guard
and bear in mind the four offenses entailing defeat, there will be no disappearance
of proper conduct. With the breaking of moral habit by the last monk or the
extinction of his life, proper conduct will have disappeared...

“The disappearance of learning means that as long as there stand firm the texts
with the commentaries pertaining to the word of the Buddha in the three Pitakas,
for so long there will be no disappearance of learning. As time goes on and on
there will be base-born kings, not Dharma-men; their ministers and so on will not
be Dharma-men, and consequently the inhabitants of the kingdom and so on will
not be Dharma-men. Because they are not Dharma-men it will not rain properly.
Therefore the crops will not flourish well, and in consequence the donors or
requisites to the community of monks will not be able to give them the requisites.
Not receiving the requisites the monks will not receive pupils. As time goes on
and on learning will decay. In this decay the Great Patthana itself will decay
- 5 -
first... While a four-line stanza continues to exist among men, there will not be a
disappearance of learning. When a king who has faith has had a purse containing
a thousand coins placed in a golden casket on an elephant’s back, and has had the
drum sounded in the city up to the third time, to the effect that: ’Whoever knows a
stanza uttered by the Buddhas, let him take these thousand coins together with the
royal elephant’ --- but yet finding no one knowing a four-line stanza, the purse
containing the thousand coins must be taken back into the palace again --- then
will be the disappearance of learning...

“As time goes on and on each of the last monks, carrying his robe, bowl, and
tooth-pick like Jin recluses, having taken a bottle-gourd and turned it into a bowl
for alms food, will wander about with it in his hands, thinking, ’What’s the good
of this yellow robe?’ and cutting off a small piece of one and sticking it on his
nose or ear or in his hair, he will wander about supporting wife and children by
agriculture, trade and the like. Then he will give a gift to the Southern community
for those of bad moral habit. I say that he will then acquire an incalculable fruit of
the gift. As time goes on and on, thinking: ’What’s the good of this to us?’,
having thrown away the piece of yellow robe, he will hurry beasts and birds in the
forest. At this time the outward form will have disappeared...

“Then when the Dispensation of the Perfect Buddha is 5,000 years old, the relics,
not receiving reverence and honor, will go to places where they can receive them.
As time goes on and on there will not be reverence and honour for them in every
place: from the abode of serpents and the deva-world and the Brahma-world,
having gathered together in a space round the great Bo-tree, having made a
Buddha-image, and having performed a ’miracle’ like the Twin-miracle, will
teach Dharma. No human being will be found at that place. All the devas of the
10,000 world system, gathered together, will hear Dharma and many thousands of
them will attain to Dharma. And these will cry aloud, saying: ’Behold, devatas, a
week from today our One of the Ten Powers will attain complete Nirvana.’ They
will weep, saying: ’Henceforth there will be darkness for us.’ Then the relics,
producing the condition of heat, will burn up that image leaving no remainder.

“That, Sariputta, is called the disappearance of the relics.”

The Buddhist sage Nichiren (1222-1282) left these specific notes of the signs of our
times:

“When, at a certain future time, the union of the state law and the Buddhist Truth
shall be established, and the harmony between the two completed, both sovereign
and subjects will faithfully adhere to the Great Mysteries. Then the golden age,
such as were the ages under the reign of the sage kings of old, will be realized in
these days of degeneration and corruption, in the time of the Latter Law. Then the
establishment of the Holy See will be completed, by imperial grant and the edict
of the Dictator, at a spot comparable in its excellence with the Paradise of Vulture
Peak. We have only to wait for the coming of the time. Then the moral law will
- 6 -
be achieved in the actual life of mankind. The Holy See will be the seat where all
men of the three countries [India, China and Japan] and the whole jambudvipa
[world] will be initiated into the mysteries of confession and expiation; and even
the great deities, Brahma and Indra, will come down into the sanctuary and
participate in the initiation.”

Nicholas Roerich, who traveled in Asia during the 1920s, transmitted this Tibetan
prophecy of the end of the present era:

“First will begin an unprecedented war of nations. Afterwards brother will rise
against brother. Oceans of blood shall flow. And the people shall cease to
understand one another. They shall forget the meaning of the word teacher. But
just then shall the Teachers appear and in all the corners of the world shall be
heard the true teaching. To this word of truth shall the people be drawn, but those
who are filled with darkness and ignorance shall set obstacles. As a diamond
glows the light in the tower of the Lord of Shambhala. One stone on his ring is
worth more than all the world’s treasure. Even those who by accident help the
Teachings of Shambhala will receive in return a hundredfold. Already many
warriors of the truth are reincarnated. Only a few years shall elapse before
everyone shall hear the mighty steps of the Lord of the New Era. And one can
already perceive the unusual manifestations and encounter unusual people.
Already they open the gates of knowledge and ripened fruits are falling from the
trees...”

SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.009

The Church of Scientology: A History of a New
Religion — Ch. 2 Excerpt Scientology, Inc.:
Becoming a “Religion” in the 1950s by
Hugh B. Urban (2011 Publication, Critical Source)
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.010

L. Ron Hubbard’s Spiritual Teachings
& The Bridge to Total Freedom:


Scientology 0-8 – The Factors (1970 L. Ron
Hubbard Publication)


The Factors (1996 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


The Factors and Beingness (2003 L. Ron
Hubbard Essay)


PAB-7 Six Steps to Better Beingness (1953 Policy)


A Description of The Bridge (1974 L. Ron
Hubbard Illustration)
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
THE FACTORS
(Summation of the considerations and examinations of the human spirit and the material
universe completed between A.D. 1923 and 1953)
1. Before the beginning was a Cause and the entire purpose of the cause was the creation
of effect.
2. In the beginning and forever is the decision and the decision is TO BE.
3. The first action of beingness is to assume a viewpoint.
4. The second action of beingness is to extend from the viewpoint, points to view, which
are dimension points.
5. Thus there is space created, for the definition of space is: viewpoint of dimension. And
the purpose of a dimension point is space and a point of view.
6. The action of a dimension point is reaching and withdrawing.
7. And from the viewpoint to the dimension points there are connection and interchange.
Thus new dimension points are made. Thus there is communication.
8. And thus there is light.
9. And thus there is energy.
10. And thus there is life.
11. But there are other viewpoints and these viewpoints outthrust points to view. And there
comes about an interchange amongst viewpoints; but the interchange is never otherwise
than in terms of exchanging dimension points.
12. The dimension point can be moved by the viewpoint, for the viewpoint, in addition to
creative ability and consideration, possesses volition and potential independence of
action; and the viewpoint, viewing dimension points, can change in relation to its own
or other dimension points or viewpoints. Thus comes about all the fundamentals there
are to motion.
13. The dimension points are each and every one, whether large or small, SOLID. And
they are solid solely because the viewpoints say they are solid.
14. Many dimension points combine into larges gases, fluids or solids. Thus there is
matter. But the most valued point is admiration, and admiration is so strong its absence
alone permits persistence.
15. The dimension point can be different from other dimension points and thus can possess
an individual quality. And many dimension points can possess a similar quality, and
others can possess a similar quality unto themselves. Thus comes about the quality of
classes of matter.
16. The viewpoint can combine dimension points into forms and the forms can be simple or
complex and can be at different distances from the viewpoints and so there can be
combinations of form. And the forms are capable of motion and the viewpoints are
capable of motion and so there can be motion of forms.
1
17. And the opinion of the viewpoint regulates the consideration of the forms, their stillness
or their motion, and these considerations consist of assignment of beauty or ugliness to
the forms and these considerations alone are art.
18. It is the opinions of the viewpoints that some of these forms should endure. Thus there
is survival.
19. And the viewpoint can never perish; but the form can perish.
20. And the many viewpoints, interacting, become dependent upon one another’s forms
and do not choose to distinguish completely the ownership of dimension points and so
comes about a dependency upon the dimension points and upon the other viewpoints.
21. From this comes a consistency of viewpoint of the interaction of dimension points and
this, regulated, is TIME.
22. And there are universes.
23. The universes, then, are three in number: the universe created by one viewpoint, the
universe created by every other viewpoint, the universe created by the mutual action of
viewpoints which is agreed to be upheld - the physical universe.
24. And the viewpoints are never seen. And the viewpoints consider more and more that
the dimension points are valuable. And the viewpoints try to become the anchor points
and forget that they can create more points and space and forms. Thus comes about
scarcity. And the dimension points can perish and so the viewpoints assume that they,
too, can perish.
25. Thus comes about death.
26. The manifestations of pleasure and pain, of thought, emotion and effort, of thinking, of
sensation, of affinity, reality, communication, of behavior and being are thus derived
and the riddles of our universe are apparently contained and answered herein. There IS
beingness, but Man believes there is only becomingness.
28. The resolution of any problem posed hereby is the establishment of viewpoints
and dimension points. the betterment of condition and concourse amongst
dimension points, and, thereby, viewpoints, and the remedy of abundance or
scarcity in all things, pleasant or ugly, by the rehabilitation of the ability of the
viewpoint to assume points of view and create and uncreate, neglect, start, change
and stop dimension points of any kind at the determinism of the viewpoint.
Certainty in all three universes must be regained, for certainty, not data, is
knowledge.
29. In the opinion of the viewpoint, any beingness, anything, is better than nothing,
any effect is better than no effect, any universe better than no universe, any particle
better than no particle, but the particle of admiration is best of all.
30. And above these things there might be speculation only. And below these things there
is the playing of the game. But these things which are written here Man can
experience and know. And some may care to teach these things and some may care to
use them to assist those in distress and some may desire to employ them to make
individuals and organizations more able and so give to Earth a culture of which we can
be proud.
Humbly tendered as a gift to Man
by L.Ron Hubbard, April 23, 1953
2
[ From Advance! Magazine, AOLA Issue No. 126 1996]
[ From Advance! Magazine AOLA Issue No. 167 2003 ]
P. A. B. No. 7
PROFESSIONAL AUDITOR’S BULLETIN
From L. RON HUBBARD
Via Hubbard Communications Office
4 Marylebone High Street, London W.1
_____________________________________________________________________
[1953, ca. mid-August]
...
SIX STEPS TO BETTER BEINGNESS
Easy to Learn, Quick to Act
With regard to your own case or any case, be advised that as of this writing of
August, 1953, six short easily learned processes exist which, separately or in
combination, markedly and simply alter and improve a case. They solve those problems
encountered in Dianetics as well as in Scientology. These processes are unlimited. They
are not difficult to do. They work fast and they require no more time to learn than it
would take to instruct a preclear.
When I step back and look at them I am a little shocked at myself for not
developing them 25 years ago instead of this year, and I am more than a little shocked
that Man, in 3,500 or 4,500 years of written history, could have remained ignorant of
them.
Of course Man, in many cults and systems, borders on these. But make no
mistake—if you think you know one of these because you saw it in Mysticism or
Capitalism or some other cult, read it again here, for you have missed it. “Taking
nothing” is not denial, for denial implies a shunning of something, and “taking
nothing” doesn’t even imply a something exists. This, for example, is an all technique.
It is a certainty of nothing-in-existence. Hard to do at first, perhaps, but productive.
And so it is with other processes. Read well, for the thing may be so simple you will
miss it.
Now what are these six wonder-workers? SOP 8? No, but they appear there.
Formula H? Takes skill to use that. SOP 8L? No, we aren’t even covering these here.
Our six processes have been around for a while and they are given to you as tested, for
many auditors have worked with them. And they are given to you as self-processing
techniques, for a trained auditor can use them on himself. Any one of these, used
alone, would probably effect a theta clear. But that isn’t our goal just now. Many of
you have no reality in that. Instead, let us use, one after the other, these six just to
become better beings.
In subsequent PABs we will do processes which bring you to know about Life
through your own certainty. In this one we will aim toward the goal of getting you to
know that you are alive. Oh, you do already? Not, I am afraid, to as great a degree as
you could. In this PAB we are going to cover the certainty that something can happen.
Now those of you who exteriorize easily need alter these processes here only to
the extent of doing them while exteriorized. These apply to any case, mock-ups, black
or what-room.
The processes are, by proper name:
(1) Ten Minutes of Nothing.
(2) Duplication (Step E, Short 8).
(3) Spacation (Step III, SOP 8).
(4) Contact (Step VII, SOP 8).
(5) Self Analysis (Step VI, SOP 8).
(6) The Opposite Pole.
424
They rank approximately in the above importance and they can be run in the
above order.
Certainty Processing, Formula H, and SOP 8L are to be the subjects of later
PABs. The above six serve our purpose here. They serve our purpose so well, these
six—that an auditor cannot use them on a preclear without changing markedly the state
of the case. In fact, it is my belief that an auditor, after testing these on himself and a
preclear, could not honestly go back to using off-brand psychotherapy unless he had
something else besides psychotherapy in mind, such as, shall we say, sadism or
coercion. For these six by themselves or with Certainty, SOP 8, Short 8, SOP 8L and
Formula H, produce any beneficial mental result possible according to my experiments,
data and reports. Remember, all these are Scientology, they are not Dianetics. They go
on a 180° vector to Dianetics. I developed these in 1953. I carefully point this out in
order to unstick a few people on the time track. The phenomena in Dianetics are still
there but Dianetics requires too much skill and leaves too wide a margin for
unscrupulous auditing. Dianetics isn’t better—it’s just too difficult, and takes too long.
These six are a backbone of Scientology, Science of Certainty. And they give
you and your preclears all the certainty of recovery you could desire. They undo travail.
They do their job easily without auditor restimulation. And you can self-audit them.
(Read ALL the PAB before Self-Processing.)
To begin the session, if you were here in person I would ask you to double
terminal with certai nty “I can’t make peopl e wel l ” “I can make peopl e
well” in brackets, for it might be standing in your road. You can try it if you like but
you don’t need to. We’ll pick up all that when we learn about LIFE in SOP 8L. Or I
might have you run “Must reach” “Can’t reach,” “Must withdraw” “Can’t
withdraw” on your favorite somatic first. But again, that isn’t necessary.
Let’s go straight to (l) of these processes:
(l) Take Ten Minutes of Nothing. This technique means Oh so literally
what it says. It isn’t ten minutes of “relaxation” or “relief” or “rest.” It isn’t ten minutes
of you, a body. It isn’t ten minutes of somatics. It means ten minutes of no body, no
engrams, no walls, no MEST Universe, no sound, no thought, really nothing. All
one’s life he is trying to get, to work, to be, to perceive SOMETHING. Now for Ten
Minutes let us have utterly NOTHING. The gettingness of something makes a one-way
flow. Also the dwindling spiral. Also, the one thing the analytical mind cannot be, it
thinks, yet all it is is nothing, is in MEST terms: Nothing. Mind you, fear of
NOTHING is enough to make one’s stomach curl for Nothing is death itself. This is
unlimited in running time. It always improves a case in the long run if not instantly, as
it often does. The preclear discovers sooner or later he CAN be nothing, that he doesn’t
have to strive to be. What a relief! Lao-tse was so right about striving.
The MEST Universe itself is mainly nothing even in the science of physics. In
sound, concentrate on the silences between the beats, not the beats, for instance.
You can use NOTHING in Matched Terminal Brackets, you can have Nothing
of particular somethings such as dead kinfolk. But the basic technique and the one used
here is simply “Ten Minutes of Nothing.”
If you or the preclear get too ill the first time (the illness would abate if the
process were kept up and always abates in subsequent periods) use the next-to-the-last
list of Self Analysis (something real, etc.).
Now to (2). This is Duplication. This process appears in Short 8 as Step E.
But it appears so briefly that its use and variation has not been understood.
425
The analytical mind has come to depend entirely for perception upon the body
while, it can be demonstrated easily, it is itself capable of vision.
Further, the body has a nasty and uncontrollable trick of duplicating everything
it sees. This makes engrams. The body perceives continuously as we learned in
Dianetics. Duplication is the action of making mental pictures. Duplication processing
brings the mechanism of taking pictures under the aware control of the analytical mind.
The body “makes pictures” of everything. It is certain of MEST because it has
apparently been punished into agreeing with the solidity of MEST.
The analytical mind is not so “sold” on MEST. Thus, remember this, it doesn’t
make clear pictures or “see” well at first. It dubs in a thing of no consequence in theta
clearing. The process begins by having the preclear (or yourself) look with the body’s
eyes at MEST objects and, one by one, put beside each object selected a mock-up or
duplicate of it. This is done rapidly with far more attention to quantity than quality. This
is done for a couple of minutes. The second, longer step consists of advising the
preclear or yourself to “look” with eyes shut at MEST objects and, eyes still shut, put a
duplicate or mock-up beside each object selected, and perceived. One does not at first
select the preclear’s body. One selects objects in the room, then outside the house. The
last necessitates “seeing through walls.” At no time lead the preclear, if doubtful, to do
more than “pretend to see.” But don’t tell him he must only pretend either, for this is
invalidation. The certainty comes in on the duplicate. The preclear knows he is
duplicating even if he is only pretending to see the actual object. Tell him to see the
house next door and duplicate it with a mock-up beside it. Tell him to see a bush and
duplicate that. Keep this up for many many objects. The preclear may or may not tell
you he feels he is away from his body. If he is, good. Don’t tell him to get back in.
Just keep up the process regardless. You are not interested at this stage or with these
processes in theta clearing, but it happens anyway.
Finally have the preclear view and mock up beside it his own body and parts of
his body from various angles. This process resolves scarcity of engrams and
viewpoints and is intensely useful and valuable.
( 3) Spacati on is Step III of SOP 8. This is a specialized version of
nothingness. It is very murderous to aberration. Its first phase is to have the preclear,
with his eyes closed, “reach” up and find the two corners of the room behind him and
get interested in them and NOT THINK. You can do this for hours. No matter how bad
you feel or from what, you can always improve with this one. This puts the preclear in
present time. And as circuits are never in present time, they key out. This process
resolves all your out-of-present-time Dianetic problems.
The preclear is holding on to both sides of the engram bank, taking
responsibility for one side only—thus he is an effect. This is “Spacation with MEST.”
Your preclear, I am sorry to say, will eventually exteriorize whether he knows about it
or not.
A total spacation is completed by having the preclear put eight anchor points of
his own out, ignoring MEST, to make and use his own space. There are many uses for
this process. All ills are basically lack of one’s own space. This Step III is basically a
nothingness process. People who are afraid of nothingness can’t make space.
(4) Contact is Step VII of SOP 8. More data is needed here. Auditors have been
writing me frantically telling me that their “sane” preclears get big tone rises on this and
that this is not limited to psychotics. The process consists of having the preclear see,
feel or otherwise sense objects in the room, reach for them with hands and then
withdraw from them. It can be repeated theta-wise.
(5) Self Analysis (Step VI of SOP 8) is, of course, the total of Self Analysis in
Scientology, published by the HAS in Philadelphia. It is mock-up processing. It (a)
426
creates space, (b) takes attention off engrams, (c) recovers the use of energy, (d)
improves aesthetics, and several other things. The next-to-the-last list in the book is still
excellent-Recall a time when something was real to you, when you were in good
communication, when you knew some affinity was present. This can be supplemented
by having the preclear mock up an entirely fictitious series of past and future incidents-
for TRUTH when it means MEST Universe is Total Agreement with the past; and that
is death, that is MEST.
(6) Opposite Pole processing is new to you but it is a logical follow-through
on three universes. We have here more than adequate to make one sure of his own
universe, enough to make one sure of the MEST Universe, but not enough to make the
preclear certain of the “other fellow’s universe.” (See Issue 16-G of the Journal of
Scientology, “This is Scientology,” [page 378].) Certainty on three universes is
necessary.
The Opposite Pole is, as I will cover in later PABs, quite important. Here I will
give the rudimentary process:
There are two phases. The first is allied to Certainty Processing. The second is
a resolution of valences. Its name is “Wearing Heads.”
In the first, one puts an imaginary point before, behind, above, below, to each
side of him, one place at a time, and has this point think “I am going to destroy
you”; also have the points saying “I will betray you” and “I won’t reply” and
then the preclear thinks at the point “Nothing there.” This is a simple form. The
point can think all sorts of threatening or cowardly things, and also “Nothing there”
meaning all manner of things at the point. But the primary phase of having the point
think “I am goi ng t o dest roy you, ” “I wi l l bet ray you” and “I won’ t
reply” and having the preclear think “Nothing there” and varying the position of
the point will suffice when Opposite Pole is used with the remaining five processes.
“Wearing Heads” is the second phase of Opposite Pole. One has the preclear, or
himself, make a list of early allies, pets, enemies, current associates, the wife or
husband and objects and then, one after another, put on the head (mocked up over his
own head or around him if exteriorized) of the other person or thing. One does this
rapidly. The preclear gets some insight into the 3rd Universe. “Wearing Heads” is quite
effective. If there are some heads he won’t wear or if he gets one “stuck on” and “can’t
get it off,” recall that this process is the last on the list and one goes from it to “Take
Ten Minutes of Nothing” and around we go again.
Now if you really are serious about your own case or about getting results on
your preclear, you will sit down or lie down for half an hour or an hour or so a day for
the next two weeks and go through each one of these six, giving each a few minutes
and then going on to the next. I won’t tell you you’ll be a clear in two weeks. You will
have to have an insight of some depth into life to be a stable clear and you get that by
getting audited on or auditing yourself on Certainty, Formula H and SOP 8L on the
routine to be given in future PABs. But if you use these six steps as given here and
don’t wander and don’t let your circuits get you into “mazes of philosophy” and don’t
get fascinated by engrams, you’ll be a passable release after a while. You may even
find out you’re alive! Breathing and everything!
Here’s the routine:
SIX STEPS FOR SELF-AUDITING (SSSA):
(1) Ten Minutes of Nothing.
(2) Duplication.
(3) Spacation.
427
(4) Contact.
(5) Self Analysis.
(6) Opposite Pole.
Do each not longer than ten minutes at a time. Do all in one session.
Use for any case, for auditing or self-auditing.
Send in for your membership so I can see you next fortnight.
L. RON HUBBARD
428
[ From Advance! Magazine AOLA Issue 25, October 1974 ]
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.011

Gautama Buddha’s Spiritual Teachings
& The Noble Eightfold Path:


The Teachings of Siddhartha Guatama Illustrations
(Comparative Sources)


Illustrations of The Noble Eightfold Path in
Buddhism (Comparative Sources)


The Noble Eightfold Path Explained by Thomas
Knierim (2001 Essay, Comparative Source)




Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
The Noble Eightfold Path
1. Right View
Wisdom
2. Right Intention
3. Right Speech
Ethical Conduct 4. Right Action
5. Right Livelihood
6. Right Effort
Mental Development 7. Right Mindfulness
8. Right Concentration
The Noble Eightfold Path describes the way to the end of suffering, as it was
laid out by Siddhartha Gautama. It is a practical guideline to ethical and
mental development with the goal of freeing the individual from attachments
and delusions; and it finally leads to understanding the truth about all things.
Together with the Four Noble Truths it constitutes the gist of Buddhism. Great
emphasis is put on the practical aspect, because it is only through practice that
one can attain a higher level of existence and finally reach Nirvana. The eight
aspects of the path are not to be understood as a sequence of single steps,
instead they are highly interdependent principles that have to be seen in
relationship with each other.
1. Right View
Right view is the beginning and the end of the path, it simply means to see and
to understand things as they really are and to realise the Four Noble Truth. As
such, right view is the cognitive aspect of wisdom. It means to see things
through, to grasp the impermanent and imperfect nature of worldly objects
and ideas, and to understand the law of karma and karmic conditioning. Right
view is not necessarily an intellectual capacity, just as wisdom is not just a
matter of intelligence. Instead, right view is attained, sustained, and enhanced
through all capacities of mind. It begins with the intuitive insight that all
beings are subject to suffering and it ends with complete understanding of the
true nature of all things. Since our view of the world forms our thoughts and
our actions, right view yields right thoughts and right actions.
2. Right Intention
While right view refers to the cognitive aspect of wisdom, right intention refers
to the volitional aspect, i.e. the kind of mental energy that controls our actions.
Right intention can be described best as commitment to ethical and mental
self-improvement. Buddha distinguishes three types of right intentions: 1. the
intention of renunciation, which means resistance to the pull of desire, 2. the
intention of good will, meaning resistance to feelings of anger and aversion,
and 3. the intention of harmlessness, meaning not to think or act cruelly,
violently, or aggressively, and to develop compassion.
3. Right Speech
Right speech is the first principle of ethical conduct in the eightfold path.
Ethical conduct is viewed as a guideline to moral discipline, which supports
the other principles of the path. This aspect is not self-sufficient, however,
essential, because mental purification can only be achieved through the
The Eightfold Path
1 of 3
cultivation of ethical conduct. The importance of speech in the context of
Buddhist ethics is obvious: words can break or save lives, make enemies or
friends, start war or create peace. Buddha explained right speech as follows: 1.
to abstain from false speech, especially not to tell deliberate lies and not to
speak deceitfully, 2. to abstain from slanderous speech and not to use words
maliciously against others, 3. to abstain from harsh words that offend or hurt
others, and 4. to abstain from idle chatter that lacks purpose or depth.
Positively phrased, this means to tell the truth, to speak friendly, warm, and
gently and to talk only when necessary.
4. Right Action
The second ethical principle, right action, involves the body as natural means
of expression, as it refers to deeds that involve bodily actions. Unwholesome
actions lead to unsound states of mind, while wholesome actions lead to sound
states of mind. Again, the principle is explained in terms of abstinence: right
action means 1. to abstain from harming sentient beings, especially to abstain
from taking life (including suicide) and doing harm intentionally or
delinquently, 2. to abstain from taking what is not given, which includes
stealing, robbery, fraud, deceitfulness, and dishonesty, and 3. to abstain from
sexual misconduct. Positively formulated, right action means to act kindly and
compassionately, to be honest, to respect the belongings of others, and to keep
sexual relationships harmless to others. Further details regarding the concrete
meaning of right action can be found in the Precepts.
5. Right Livelihood
Right livelihood means that one should earn one's living in a righteous way and
that wealth should be gained legally and peacefully. The Buddha mentions four
specific activities that harm other beings and that one should avoid for this
reason: 1. dealing in weapons, 2. dealing in living beings (including raising
animals for slaughter as well as slave trade and prostitution), 3. working in
meat production and butchery, and 4. selling intoxicants and poisons, such as
alcohol and drugs. Furthermore any other occupation that would violate the
principles of right speech and right action should be avoided.
6. Right Effort
Right effort can be seen as a prerequisite for the other principles of the path.
Without effort, which is in itself an act of will, nothing can be achieved,
whereas misguided effort distracts the mind from its task, and confusion will
be the consequence. Mental energy is the force behind right effort; it can occur
in either wholesome or unwholesome states. The same type of energy that
fuels desire, envy, aggression, and violence can on the other side fuel
self-discipline, honesty, benevolence, and kindness. Right effort is detailed in
four types of endeavours that rank in ascending order of perfection: 1. to
prevent the arising of unarisen unwholesome states, 2. to abandon
unwholesome states that have already arisen, 3. to arouse wholesome states
that have not yet arisen, and 4. to maintain and perfect wholesome states
already arisen.
7. Right Mindfulness
Right mindfulness is the controlled and perfected faculty of cognition. It is the
mental ability to see things as they are, with clear consciousness. Usually, the
cognitive process begins with an impression induced by perception, or by a
thought, but then it does not stay with the mere impression. Instead, we
almost always conceptualise sense impressions and thoughts immediately. We
interpret them and set them in relation to other thoughts and experiences,
which naturally go beyond the facticity of the original impression. The mind
then posits concepts, joins concepts into constructs, and weaves those
constructs into complex interpretative schemes. All this happens only half
consciously, and as a result we often see things obscured. Right mindfulness is
The Eightfold Path
2 of 3
anchored in clear perception and it penetrates impressions without getting
carried away. Right mindfulness enables us to be aware of the process of
conceptualisation in a way that we actively observe and control the way our
thoughts go. Buddha accounted for this as the four foundations of
mindfulness: 1. contemplation of the body, 2. contemplation of feeling
(repulsive, attractive, or neutral), 3. contemplation of the state of mind, and 4.
contemplation of the phenomena.
8. Right Concentration
The eighth principle of the path, right concentration, refers to the
development of a mental force that occurs in natural consciousness, although
at a relatively low level of intensity, namely concentration. Concentration in
this context is described as one-pointedness of mind, meaning a state where
all mental faculties are unified and directed onto one particular object. Right
concentration for the purpose of the eightfold path means wholesome
concentration, i.e. concentration on wholesome thoughts and actions. The
Buddhist method of choice to develop right concentration is through the
practice of meditation. The meditating mind focuses on a selected object. It
first directs itself onto it, then sustains concentration, and finally intensifies
concentration step by step. Through this practice it becomes natural to apply
elevated levels concentration also in everyday situations.
The Eightfold Path
3 of 3
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Subsection v6.01.012

Dhammapada: The Mind & The Path
(29 BCE Excerpts from Theravada Pali Canon)



Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
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Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
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Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
0 1 . P A I R S
0 2 . H E E D F U L N E S S
0 3 . T H E M I N D
0 4 . F L O W E R S
0 5 . T H E F O O L
0 6 . T H E W I S E
0 7 . T H E A R A H A N T
0 8 . T H E T H O U S A N D S
0 9 . E V I L
1 0 . V I O L E N C E
1 1 . O L D A G E
1 2 . T H E S E L F
1 3 . T H E W O R L D
1 4 . T H E B U D D H A
1 5 . H A P P I N E S S
1 6 . A F F E C T I O N
1 7 . A N G E R
1 8 . I M P U R I T Y
1 9 . T H E J U S T
2 0 . T H E P A T H
2 1 . M I S C E L L A N E O U S
2 2 . H E L L
2 3 . T H E E L E P H A N T
2 4 . C R A V I N G
2 5 . T H E M O N K
2 6 . T H E H O L Y M A N
Dhammapada
3. The Mind
Just as a fletcher straightens an arrow shaft,
even so the discerning man straightens his mind —
so fickle and unsteady,
so difficult to guard.
1.
As a fish when pulled out of water
and cast on land throbs and quivers,
even so is this mind agitated.
Hence should one abandon the realm of Mara.
2.
Wonderful, indeed, it is to subdue the mind,
so difficult to subdue,
ever swift, and seizing whatever it desires.
A tamed mind brings happiness.
3.
Let the discerning man guard the mind,
so difficult to detect and extremely subtle,
seizing whatever it desires.
A guarded mind brings happiness.
4.
Dwelling in the cave (of the heart),
the mind, without form, wanders far and alone.
Those who subdue this mind
are liberated from the bonds of Mara.
5.
Wisdom never becomes perfect
in one whose mind is not steadfast,
who knows not the Good Teaching
and whose faith wavers.
6.
There is no fear for an awakened one,
whose mind is not sodden (by lust)
nor afflicted (by hate),
and who has gone beyond both merit and demerit.
7.
Realizing that this body is
as fragile as a clay pot,
and fortifying this mind
like a well-fortified city,
fight out Mara with the sword of wisdom.
Then, guarding the conquest,
remain unattached.
8.
Ere long, alas!
this body will lie upon the earth,
unheeded and lifeless,
like a useless log.
9.
Whatever harm an enemy may do to an enemy,
or a hater to a hater,
an ill-directed mind
inflicts on oneself a greater harm.
10.
Neither mother, father,
nor any other relative
can do one greater good
than one's own well-directed mind.
11.
Dhammapada (3) - The Mind
1 of 1
0 1 . P A I R S
0 2 . H E E D F U L N E S S
0 3 . T H E M I N D
0 4 . F L O W E R S
0 5 . T H E F O O L
0 6 . T H E W I S E
0 7 . T H E A R A H A N T
0 8 . T H E T H O U S A N D S
0 9 . E V I L
1 0 . V I O L E N C E
1 1 . O L D A G E
1 2 . T H E S E L F
1 3 . T H E W O R L D
1 4 . T H E B U D D H A
1 5 . H A P P I N E S S
1 6 . A F F E C T I O N
1 7 . A N G E R
1 8 . I M P U R I T Y
1 9 . T H E J U S T
2 0 . T H E P A T H
2 1 . M I S C E L L A N E O U S
2 2 . H E L L
2 3 . T H E E L E P H A N T
2 4 . C R A V I N G
2 5 . T H E M O N K
2 6 . T H E H O L Y M A N
Dhammapada
20. The Path
Of all the paths
the Eightfold Path is the best;
of all the truths
the Four Noble Truths are the best;
of all things
passionlessness is the best:
of men the Seeing One
(the Buddha) is the best.
1.
This is the only path;
there is none other
for the purification of insight.
Tread this path,
and you will bewilder Mara.
2.
Walking upon this path
you will make an end of suffering.
Having discovered
how to pull out the thorn of lust,
I make known the path.
3.
You yourselves must strive;
the Buddhas only point the way.
Those meditative ones who tread the path
are released from the bonds of Mara.
4.
"All conditioned things are impermanent" —
when one sees this with wisdom,
one turns away from suffering.
This is the path to purification.
5.
"All conditioned things are unsatisfactory" —
when one sees this with wisdom,
one turns away from suffering.
This is the path to purification.
6.
"All things are not-self" —
when one sees this with wisdom,
one turns away from suffering.
This is the path to purification.
7.
The idler who does not exert himself when he should,
who though young and strong is full of sloth,
with a mind full of vain thoughts —
such an indolent man
does not find the path to wisdom.
8.
Let a man be watchful of speech,
well controlled in mind,
and not commit evil in bodily action.
Let him purify these three courses of action,
and win the path made known by the Great Sage.
9.
Wisdom springs from meditation;
without meditation wisdom wanes.
Having known these two paths of progress and decline,
let a man so conduct himself
10.
Dhammapada (20) - The Path
1 of 2
that his wisdom may increase.
Cut down the forest (lust), but not the tree;
from the forest springs fear.
Having cut down the forest
and the underbrush (desire),
be passionless, O monks!
11.
For so long as the underbrush of desire,
even the most subtle,
of a man towards a woman is not cut down,
his mind is in bondage,
like the sucking calf to its mother.
12.
Cut off your affection in the manner of a man
plucks with his hand an autumn lotus.
Cultivate only the path to peace, Nibbana,
as made known by the Exalted One.
13.
"Here shall I live during the rains,
here in winter and summer" —
thus thinks the fool.
He does not realize the danger
(that death might intervene).
14.
As a great flood
carries away a sleeping village,
so death seizes and carries away
the man with a clinging mind,
doting on his children and cattle.
15.
For him who is assailed by death
there is no protection by kinsmen.
None there are to save him —
no sons, nor father, nor relatives.
16.
Realizing this fact, let the wise man,
restrained by morality,
hasten to clear the path leading to Nibbana.
17.
Dhammapada (20) - The Path
2 of 2
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
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※※※





Subsection v6.01.013

The History of Brahmanic & Buddhist Mythology:


Descent from Vulture Peak
(1984 Feature Article)


Angkor – Temples of the God-Kings
(2001 Feature Article)


The Gupta Golden Age
(2005 Feature Article)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
\
\
A
top the peak, a cooling wind
blows. Far below stretches the
green valley, hot and humid. It
is almost deserted.
Some 2,500 years ago, the valley of
Rajagaha bustled with importance. It
boasted a city of the same name, the
capital of one of the two most powerful
slates on the Indian subcontinent. There,
inhillycountry south of the river Ganges.
ruled King Bimbisara of Magadha, a
friend of the Enlightened One who was
born Gautama Siddhartha. And there
the Master often came, ascended Vul-
ture Peak (agift to him and his commu-
nity of followers). and taught.
Buddha's India
The India into whieA the Buddha
came was a spiritual turmoil. Many a
youth, or a man who had fathered
\
OM
children and assured the fu'lure of his
family, forsook home imd friends to
become a recluse ~-@ne who has "shut
off' the world. He would search for en-
lightenment or devote himself to increas-
ing his spiritual powers. Thousands of
such meA lived in forests and caves or
wandered about, beggiAg for their daily
subsistence. 'Phey lived and traveled
alone, or in the company of a guru
(teacher), or inasangha (association) led
by one or more outstanding teachers.
Hope for enlightenment was vital in a
w0Tld struggling to emerge from a
desperate barbarism. Centuries earlier,
sages had Gomposed the famous reglious
hymns called "Vedas". While lacking cor-
rect technology, these hymns included
the idea that if you became wise you
would become free (see "Wisdom on
Planet lE:arth" by L. Ron r.lubbarrll in
(l.dvance! 82). But the priests, Ine
Brahmins, increased tneir worldly power.
by perverting this idea. They alone were
educated in the Vedas. They alone. so
they said, knew what wisdom was. They
alone, they said, by pelfor-ming their
sacrificial rites were the liAkbetween all
other pe@pieand whatever gods existed.
Over hundreds of years, the Branmins
evolved ever more c@mplex systems of
spiritual ideas and formulas. They said
that only a Brahmin, studying and medi-
tating in accordance with his mysterious
significanGes, coulrll hO(:leto attain free-
dom from the suffering that was in-
eVitably Dound up in the endless cycle 0f
rebirth. And one could become a
Brahmin only lilybeing born a male in a
Brahmin family ~ and then only by
studying Brahmanic lore for many years!
[ From Advance! Magazine ANZO Issue No. 84 1984 ]
· I J ! S V ' J O 1 4 6 n a 4 1 p a l l l J : )
u < l a q a : ) u ! s S l J l j < l ) . ; l " 4 1 n 1 . L I I J p a t l l l l l J S I J I , J
0 4 1 1 ' 1 a l j - 0 1 0 6 0 4 1 0 . 1 S I J J O u a ~ o d s u a 1 J O
S I J M 0 l j ( Y I a u o a W I J ; : ) ' u 6 l a l l u a \ ' l l J w l a d
I J p a u a j \ ; ! a l l j l s s a u l l l l J l t ' a l a ! ! j M ' P p O M B u !
- l a l p ! q ' 6 U P < l P U \ ; ! M ' 5 U ! 1 a p U 0 M S ! l j l D I U ]
6 u ! u < J > l e M V l e a J D a q J .
\ l \ ~ :
G
DE~CEl'l1J 1F~OM
VUhmU~E
- P EA¥\
(cantlnuedfrom page 11)
in accordance with the Law for the
spiritual salvation and enlightenment of
the hearer. These were meant, in
Gautama's day, by the ancient word
Dharma, which thus came to signify the
Teaching (Doctrine) of the Buddha.
As he traveled and spoke to the many
who were hungry for wisdom, the Bud-
dha said, "A new doctrine do I teach for
subduing the mental intoxicants thai are
generated even in this life, I teach not a
doctrine for the rooting-oul of intoxicants
in the future lifeonly, but one for subdu-
ingthem now, and also inthe future [lfe."
"By suffering, the emaciated devotee
produces confusion and sickly thoughts
in his mind ... On the other hand, sen-
suality of aUkinds isdebilitating. The sen-
sual man is a slave of his passions, and
pleasure-seeking is degrading and
vulgar. But to satisfy the necessities of life
is not evil. To keep the body in good
health is a duty, for otherwise we shall
not be able to trim the lamp of wisdom,
and keep our mind strong and clear. This
isthe Middle Way, that keeps aloof from
both extremes."
Gautama's way included right con-
duct, knowledge and contemplation. Its
aim was not to set up a complex
philosophical system, but to lead to
enlightenment. "Buddhism, that was
release by exteriorization," said L. Ron
Hubbard, quoted in Advance! 82, "He
thought you exteriorized by becoming
wise, following inthe pattern of Dharma.
That wasn't much information, but he in-
troduced several ideas along with it. One
was that you should be civilized." Thus a
better life for all was included in the
Teaching.
Though the Buddha often made use
of the spiritual concepts of histime inser-
mons and parables, when he was asked
controversial philosophical questions
point-blank he usually answered with
silence (which was atraditional response
to signify that a question was wrongly
put), or he painted out that he had not
taken sides on the question. Was he then
a nihilist, as many later said - one who
denies any basis for knowledge?
In his own words as remembered in
the Buddhist scriptures, "The Exalted
One has thus defined: This isgood; that
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a l O W t i u e w p U E l u a w u o l l j o ! ] U o p o U ] E l I E
p E l . j t i u e w ' I < l j p p n g a l j l J O I \ E M V D U ! S S ! 2 d
l e a l D a l j l J O a W l I a Y I f i S " S l a q w n u l e a l D
U ] p a ! [ d l l ] n w O U ) M O ] [ O } f i l ? ] s , ! 2 l . j p p n g
o l j l P U I < ' f i ] P ! d ! 2 l M a l D E l j D U I < S a l . j . L
" o m d l \ ] a f l l l ! 2 ] a l I d a J i S E M ! 2 W l ! 2 l j O a l j l
' o J i o d s p U ! 2 p o j o f l ! 2 1 1 E l j p p n g a l j l a [ ! l j M
" S a [ q l < l E d 1 0 S U O W l o S S , E l j p p n g
a l j l J O 1 a l j l O U I ? 1 0 a u o u o s u o ! l l < j m a d s
1 1 a l . j 1 D U ] S e q ' S U 1 W l j l ? l g a l j l J O l a U U I < W
a Y I U ! t i y d o s o ] ! l j d [ e n I P ! d s } O s w a l 5 t i S
I S E f \ p n l l S U O : ) 0 1 p a n u ! l u o J a w o s I n g
, , " U ! E U a J S E O U l l j l O U s o u ! J a p O l j M O U O I O U
' I S ! ] ! y ! U O U 5 1 a H " l a u ! J a p E 5 1 a u G p a l [ E x 3
a l j l p l ? q P U I < p o o o 6 u ! u l J a p s ! l j l f i g , " p e q 5 1

DE®CE)'l1j1r~OM
\)(J l:?J lU~E
PEA~
lconrinuedfrom page 13)

Symbol for "universal ruler," also used in Buddhism for the "Wheel of the Teaching" which the Buddha set in motion - as depicted
on apillar at Sarnath, India, where Gautama gave his/irstsermon. Erected by Asoka (3rdcentury B. C.), the pillar bears Gn inscription
warning against schism of the Sangha.
members of his Sangha and said to
them, "Go forth, monks, for the good of
the many, for the benefit of the many,
out of compassion for the world Pro-
claim the Teaching which is good in the
beginning, good in the middle, good in
the end. Inthe spirit as inthe letter, show
a fulfilled, pure lifeof virtue. There are
beings with but little dust of passion on
their eyes who perish through not hear-
ing the Teaching They will understand.
The emperor Asoka. after his con-
version, sent Buddhist missionaries far
and wide - even to Syria, Egypt and
Greece. He sent the monk Mahinda,
who was possibly his own son (the
records are not clear on this) to the great
island of Lanka (later Ceylon, now Sri
Lanka) The King and the Court there
were converted. Mahinda was followed
by his sister, who brought a gift from
Asoka - a cutting from the Bo Tree
under which Gautama sat when he
achieved the Great Awakening. The slip
was planted, and itstree still grows inthe
ruins of the ancient Lankan capital. Cen-
turies after this planting. the original tree
inIndia was destroyed during a persecu-
tion. A descendant of Asoka brought a
cutting back from the tree in Lanka, and
the "grandson" tree may be seen today,
flourishing on the original spot.
More importantly, it was in Lanka. in
the fifthcentury A.D., that the Teaching
handed down by word of mouth from
Ananda was committed to writing, in the
oldest Buddhist texts we have. The script
14 Advance! 84
on the flattened palm leaves isinPalL an
Indian written language very close to the
earlier "Magadhi" dialect that Gautama is
believed to have spoken (of which some-
thing is known from the inscriptions of
Asoka). The contents of the Pali Canon,
as these writings are called, had been
conSiderably altered and added to in the
course of some 900 years of oral trans-
mission. The quotations inthis article are
from passages believed to represent the
oldest and most nearly authentic por-
tions in the Canon
"The work of Gautama Siddhartha,"
L. Ron Hubbard has said, "although
looked upon as afailure. produced asuf-
ficiency of wisdom on this planet to bring
civilization to three-quarters of Asia."
"They didn't have any command to
tell anybody to back out of his head.
They had a lot of failures along this line.
It's very difficult to do this, because it's
booby trapped by the bank. ,.
"We have found the totality of what
barriered Buddhism."
"Gautama Siddhartha Buddha pre-
dicted that in 2500 years the entire job
would be finished in the West. That is
stated in the Pali Canons. Well, we fin-
ished it " (Quotations fromAdvance.' 82.
pp. 9, 19.)
Today, THE BRIDGE To Total
Freedom grade chart by L. Ron Hubbard
isthe exact path tothe fulfillment of those
hopes raised on Vulture Peak 2,500
years ago - and to much more
Gautama Siddhartha spoke of a Path
to an awareness of "the sphere of infinite
space . of infinite consciousness."
Today, at the upper part of THE
BRIDGE grade chart, THE OT LEVELS
DEVELOPED BY L. RON HUBBARD
LEAD TO FULL AWARENESS OF
ONESELF AS A SPIRITUAL BEING
AND TO FULL USE OF ONE'S
ABILITIES - WHICH IN REALITY
PROVE TO BE BEYOND MAN'S
DREAMS.
What's more, the Tech isin permanent
form just as Ron issued it. And the
technology for its duplication is in the
Tech as well!
And let us not forget that out of Ron's
OT research has come the technology
for the third dynamiC, to ensure that -
providing this Tech isused standardly -
The Bridge will remain intact and un-
altered for the future, and all will be able
to travel it as easily and surely as when
the ink was fresh on his page.
As Ron said in 1978, "Working to-
gether as a united group and including as
rapidly as possible the high theta of all
mankind, the New OT Civilization is
assured"
Man's spiritual quest has blossomed
into a gloriOUSsuccess.
Move on up toward full OT now!
,
L- ~.~_
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.014

L. Ron Hubbard’s Interpretation of Enlightenment:


Fundamentals of Thought — Ch. 3 The Conditions
of Existence (1956 L. Ron Hubbard Publication)


Your Universe, the MEST Universe and Illusion
(1980 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


A Higher Plane of Being
(1993 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)




Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY
THE FUNDAMENTALS
OF THOUGHT
by
L. Ron Hubbard
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE VITAL STATISTICS OF SCIENTOLOGY 1
BASIC PRINCIPLES 3
THE CONDITIONS OF EXISTENCE 6
THE EIGHT DYNAMICS 10
THE A-R-C TRIANGLE 12
THE REASON WHY 14
THE PARTS OF MAN 18
CAUSATION OF KNOWLEDGE 25
KNOW AND NOT-KNOW 30
THE GOAL OF SCIENTOLOGY 31
SCIENTOLOGY PROCESSING 32
EXACT PROCESSES 34
CHAPTER THREE
THE CONDITIONS OF EXISTENCE
There are three conditions (circumstances, qualities) of existence (apparency, reality,
livingness).
These three conditions comprise (make up, constitute) life.
They are BE, DO and HAVE.
THE CONDITION OF BEING iS defined as the assumption (choosing) of a category
of identity. It could be said to be the role in a game and an example of beingness could be one’s
own name. Another example would be one’s profession. Another example would be one’s
physical characteristics. Each or all of these things could be called one’s beingness. Beingness
is assumed by oneself or given to one’s self, or is attained. For example, in the playing of a
game each player has his own beingness.
THE SECOND CONDITION OF EXISTENCE IS DOING. By doing we mean action,
function, accomplishment, the attainment of goals, the fulfilling of purpose, or any change of
position in space.
THE THIRD CONDITION IS HAVINGNESS. By havingness we mean owning,
possessing, being capable of commanding, positioning, taking charge of objects, energies or
spaces.
The essential definition of having is to be able to touch or permeate or to direct the
disposition of.
The game of life demands that one assume a beingness in order to accomplish a
doingness in the direction of havingness.
These three conditions are given in an order of seniority (importance) where life is
concerned. The ability to be is more important than the ability to do. The ability to do is more
important than the ability to have. In most people all three conditions are sufficiently confused
(chaotic, baffling) that they are best understood in reverse order. When one has clarified
(brought order into) the idea of possession or havingness, one can then proceed to clarify
doingness for general activity, and when this is done one understands beingness or identity.
It is an essential to a successful existence that each of these three conditions be clarified
and understood. The ability to assume or to grant (give, allow) beingness is probably the
highest of human virtues. It is even more important to be able to permit (allow) other people to
have beingness than to be able oneself to assume it.
Beingness = Identity
If you ask an Auditor how these work in processing, he will tell you that there is a
specialized form of each of these conditions. The Auditing form of Beingness is Identity. To
achieve a betterment of beingness and the granting of beingness, the Auditor remedies with
processing the scarcity of identities of the preclear. The preclear is often found in valences
(other identities): his father’s or mother’s or marital partner’s or any or all of thousands of
possible people. He is unable to achieve or obtain (he thinks) enough identity or an identity of
his own. He decries or criticizes the identities of others (fails to grant beingness to them) .
6
He himself cannot obtain enough identity to feel he has an identity. Identity is so scarce
that it’s too valuable. Nobody must have one. To be with such a person is therefore an
uncomfortable experience since he does not credit our identity—does not grant us beingness.
The “cure” for this is elementary. Let us say he is obviously in father’s valence
(identity). He got into father’s valence when he found he could get no attention from mother.
Observing that father got some of her attention, he took father’s identity. However, let us say
he didn’t like father. The Auditor finds him hating “himself”. “Himself” is really father.
A clever Auditor (see section under Processing) would see that while he was in father’s
valence, it was really mother’s attention that was sought.
The Auditor does not inform his preclear of such a finding. He asks the preclear to lie
about (lowest form of creativity) identities which would attract mother’s attention. Then, when
the preclear can do this, the Auditor would have him invent identities which would attract
mother’s attention.
Suddenly the preclear would be no longer in father’s valence. However, he would have
been not only in father’s but also in mother’s valence so the same process would have to be
done on father. “Lie about,” the Auditor would say, “identities which would attract father’s
attention,” then “invent one,” until the preclear had many and would no longer be in mother’s
valence.
Solving father and mother valences is fundamental, since most people are somewhat “in
them” or revolted from them. But people can be “stuck” in all sorts of identities, even bedposts
when humans are too valuable to be used.
The rule is that the more aperson is “stuck” in avalence or identity, the fewer he
conceives to exist. And the harder he thinks it is to get attention. Thus he can become
exhibitionistic (displaying himself too thoroughly, being too much there at all times) or he can
become dispersed (hiding himself, being vague, not there most of the time).
People err, in identity, in being too apparent or too little apparent. The remedy of either
is the remedy of their scarcity of identity.
Identity and Attention
One “needs” an identity to play the game, as covered later, but mainly to “get attention”.
A being looks at things. To balance the flow of his attention, he feels he must also be
looked at. Thus he becomes attention-hungry.
Unlike yellow and brown people, the white does not usually believe he can get attention
from matter or objects. The yellow and brown believe for the most part (and it is all a matter of
consideration) that rocks, trees, walls, etc., can give them attention. The white man seldom
believes this and so is likely to become anxious about people. Thus the white saves people,
prevents famine, flood, disease and revolution forpeople as the only purveyors of attention are
scarce. The white goes further. He often believes he can get attention only from whites and that
yellow and brown peoples’ attention is worthless. Thus the yellow and brown races are not
very progressive, but, by and large, saner. And the white race is progressive but more frantic.
The yellow and brown races do not understand white concern for “bad conditions” since what
are a few million dead men? There are plenty of identities and there is plenty of attention, they
think. The white can’t understand them. Nor can they understand the white.
Attention and Identity form a group of two. Attention makes space. Identity closes
space.
7
Attention is a method of knowing. Inattention is a method of not-knowing.
Identity is a method of making known. Lack of identity is a method of making
unknown.
Valences
The whole study of valences is a fascinating one. A valence is defined as “a false
identity assumed unwittingly”. An identity is modified by valences. People who can be nobody
may try to be everybody. People who are seeking a way out of scarcity of identity may become
fixed in false valences. Nations can become fixed in valences of countries they have conquered
in war, etc., etc.
A rule is that a person assumes the identity of that which gets attention. Another rule is
that the person assumes the identity of that which makes him fail (for he gave it his attention,
didn’t he?)
There is a basic personality, a person’s own identity. He colors or drowns this with
valences as he loses or wins in life. He can be dug up.
Do =Effect
Doing can be defined as the action of creating an effect. An effect in creation is action.
An Auditor, processing a preclear, would always use “effect processes” to increase
doingness.
“What effect could you create on father?” would be a typical Auditor question.
If a preclear is fixated by books, a machine, a tool or a person, the Auditor asks him to
lie about, then invent effects he could create upon it. At first the preclear may be able to think of
none. Then as the process is continued he may become wildly imaginative or even cruel.
Further running will bring the preclear into a more comfortable frame of mind. Criminals or
maniacs are people who are frantically attempting to create an effect long after they know they
cannot. They cannot then create decent effects, only violent effects. Neither can they work
(do).
Despair of creating an effect brings about aberration and irrational conduct. It also
brings about laziness and carelessness.
Command of attention is necessary to creating an effect. Therefore when one conceives
he cannot easily get attention, he seeks to create stronger effects. He creates effects to get
attention. He gets attention to create effects.
As in Axiom 10 (given later), the creation of an effect is the highest purpose in this
universe. Thus when one cannot create effects, he has no purpose. And thus it works out in
Life. It may be all right to be a stern and unrelenting superior or parent, but such create laziness
and criminals. If one cannot have an effect created upon one. (and one is known to another),
very definitely harmful results will ensue.
As one believes he creates the least effect upon unconscious or dead people, these, as in
hospitals or China, become the subject of much aberrated activity. “What effect could you
create on an unconscious person (or a dead person)?” asked over and over by an Auditor
obtains some astonishing results.
An artist stops his work when he believes he can no longer create an effect.
8
A person actually dies for lack of being able to create an effect.
BUT security often depends on being able to create no effect.
The whole subject of survival is bound up in no-effect. Obviously those things on
which no-effect can be made, survive.
If one is anxious about survival (a foolish thing, for he can’t do anything else) he
becomes anxious to have about him things which resist all effects. But as his only anxiety is
about the survival of a valence or identity, remedy of the scarcity of these can resolve the
matter.
Anot he r c yc l e of a c t i on, c ont a i ni ng a l s o t he c l a s s e s of e f f e c t s , i s
START-CHANGE-and-STOP. This is the definition of control.
Havingness
As there must be a playing field (see Chapter Twelve) for a game to be held, so there
must be havingness. One must be able to possess.
There are millions of methods of possession in life. The obvious one becomes
overlooked. If one can see a thing he can have it—if he thinks he can.
The degree to which one can live is the degree to which one can own. To own is not to
label or cart away. To own is to be able to see or touch or occupy.
One loses to the degree he is forbidden to have. But to play a game one must be able to
believe he can’t have.
Effect and Have
Effect and Have form a pair like Attention and Identity. An effect should be on or
against something. Thus havingness. If one’s attention never meets anything he doesn’t always
like it. Thus he wants objects.
Effect makes distance. Have shortens distance.
Problems
Man or any life form in this universe seems to love problems. A problem is more
important than freedom. Problems keep up interest. When a man has a problem very
thoroughly and can’t solve it, he really has too few problems. He needs more.
The insanity among the idle is a matter of problem scarcity.
A problem is defined as two or more purposes in opposition. Or Intention versus
Intention.
Out of the conditions of existence above can come many complex problems.
If a man had all the attention in the world he would be unhappy. If he had all the
identities possible, he would still be unhappy. If he could blow up Earth or create any other
huge effect he wanted without limit, he would be miserable (or insane). If he could own
everything everywhere he would be dulled to apathy. Or so it seems. For these conditions of
9
existence are all subordinate to the need of problems, by current Scientology reasoning and
results.
Thus to have a person lie about problems or invent problems of the same size as the
ones he has, or the valences he is in, or to invent data of the same or different size as the one he
is fixed upon is to make a well man.
Probably the problem is the antidote to unconsciousness. It is certainly the antidote for
boredom. But in making up the problems of life he consults the conditions of existence: Be,
Do, Have and their necessary partner in every case, Attention.
10
1980
~yL.
I
tprobably would never
occur to somebody who isn't very
facilein getting in and out of his body
thilt there's only one place he conceives he
is permitted to be. He conceives he is
being permitted, which is typici'll of wh<l\
the MEST universe does for you: it per-
mits, It permits you to act or it motiviltes
your actions. That's very fine. II makes
you act, and if you aren't motivated in that
lVay, it punishes you until you do act in
that fashion. It just cuts down self-deter-
minism,
The biggest foeof the MEST universe is
the person who can invent a universe,
because you can invent a universe good
enough (lnd big enough that it would eat
this one up - if you concenlr<lted on it
hilrd enough, if it's worth doing.
II has not occurred to some of these
people, then, that one of the reasons they
can'! get out of their body is because all
the space anywhere around them is
owned by somebody else. They don't dare
move out in that space. It's another's, They
dare not be elsewhere, 50 they can't be out
of their bodics, if they're very Iowan the
Tone Scale. They flrm't when they get out
of their bodies, because they ciln't be
becnusc that isn't "their space." And if it
isn't their space, they can't self-determine
space, they n.1turally cannot be. Because
space is be, and that's all there is to that.
You get a thetan, and you leI! this fel-
low, "All right. Now let's go over ilnd lake
a look in the window across the street."
"Nuh-uh." He says, "No, no. 1 couldn't
do Ih1'lt."
8 Adv,lncc!Issuellli
"Why not?"
"Well, 1just kind of feel like that's pri-
vate. That's somebody else's business and
Ijust couldn't do that."
Much less "We need somebody in this
photograph we're taking here. Why don't
you just go down the street and pick
somebody up and bring them up here and
we'll put them in the picture and take their
picture."
The fellow says, "Oh, Ijust couldn't do
that."
You're asking him to accomplish a
doingness for which he has no permission.
Hebelieves hehas to have permission.
Actually, he has to run on the automilt-
icmoral code of the MEST universe, which
says, "Nothing belongs toyou except what
you are given. And therefore, things can
be taken away from you at any moment
because they've only been loaned to you.
You own nothing. So long as you agree
perfectly with the ME5T universe, you can
own some part of the MEST universe, and
we're permitting you to exist. Your being-
ness is only ME5T beingness."
P
ossiblythis individual who's having
a rough lime getting out of his body
- there aren't many that do, but sup-
posing he's having a rough time getting to
be a Cleared Theta Clear. He is a Theta
Clear; he's trying to get up the line, dear it
up in all directions, develop his potentials
likemad in all directions, and he's just sort
of not making it, Probably wouldn't occur
to him that he is being asked 10 desert
some of the havingness which has been
presented to him, or at least devaluates it-
he can still hold on to it, but there's no
value to it.
Only he's in a bad state. His lillie is
fouled up on him.
YOLIsee, the body acts not as an "ethe-
real" sort of meter; it's a good, solid timer.
It has a lifeof itsown and it acts as atimer,
and it keeps the thetan very much in line.
The thetan is so completely out of practice
balancing himself in present time - he
thinks the body does it all the time - he
steps out of the body and he looks around
and it's yesterday. He says, "This can't be
right." Then he says, "All right. Now, let's
straighten all this space out here. Now,
wail nminutc. That's the ceiling of my lit-
tleroom when Iwas a kid and tllnt is com-
bined with the officedesk where Iworked
as a clerk and Ilook over ill these chairs,
What do you know, these chairs were the
kind which, Idon't know, maybe they
won't be there till tomorrow. All of this is
the composite view which I see. Neow!"
"Something," he will say, "is upset around
here. Something isupset."
Wel!, I'll tell you what's upset about
him: space, be. His beingness as a tlletan is
so upset that his space is upset. He's wor-
ried about being a thetan. There's some-
thing wrong with being athetan. 50 there's
something wrong with space. If you find
he has something wrong with space, then,
there's something wrong with what he is
being. Very simple.
ActLially, if there's something wrong
with space to him as a MEST body, he just
doesn't have his space lined up well as a
[ From ANZO Advance! Magazine Issue No. 116 1993 ]
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forth. He tries to do, do, do. Against all
odds hejust keeps ondoing, dOing,doing.
The next thing you know theviolencelev-
eled against him becomes fabulous in
terms of quantity.
Now, let's take some fellow and he's
very nice, he's very mild, he's very agree-
able. He doesn't try to do anything.
Somebody says to him, "Behere" - he is;
"Bethere" - he is; "Go here" - he is. He
winds up clear as abell. Yousay, "Beout
of your body," and he is. He didn't ever
fight.
There can bereasonable factors behind
this. Yousee, it isn't necessarily true that
he has less power than the other one, for
thegood reason that hemight havegrown
up in a very favorable environment that
didn't even mildly objecttohisrevolution-
ary tendencies. He might have grown up
onafarmor something of thesort.
T
heday when theother kid was hav-
ing to walk down theback alleys in
order toget away fromenemies that
were pursuing him in earnest with clubs
just because heexisted, why, thisother kid
would clamor around and Mama would _
finallysay, "Oh, why don't yougoout and
play in the orchard. Go out and play with
theold plug horse" and he'd go out there.
That's how tough the environment was.
Real big, excitinglife.
Now, you takea person who has been
transplanted a great deal in his CUTTent
lifetime, he'll just keep living life cycles
within his current lifetime cycles. He'll
pick up and get very facilefor along time.
Boy,hecanput together alittleuniverse at
an awful rush. He'll just gather the odds
and ends of this universe together and
he'll sort of hang them together rather
sketchily. He's skeptical after he's done
this a few times, but he'll still hang it
together and it doesn't seem very real to
him. His time factor is quite bad. It'll get
worse as he goes on. He transplants. But
then because it's very hard to makea uni-
verse there and that sort of thing, he'll
become disgusted with it after a while,
and he will try to transplant and move
over again and start another universe. He
gets the ideaafter a whilethat if you kind
of perpetually create a universe you can
havesomekind of astateof havingness.
It's interesting, because hedoesn't have
any continuum of possession. The body
alone, practically, gives him a continuum
10 Adv.,"cc! Issue 1111
of possession. Of course, as he gets older,
he'll look in the mirror and it's not quite
thesame body either. Sohe'll say, "Youth,
boyhood - well, thnt's just completely
unreaL" Or, "vI/henI was a girl I remem-
ber the name of the town where I was
born. I've seen that inthebirth records."
"The biggest
foe of the MEST
universe is the
person who can
invent a universe,
because you can
invent a universe
good enough
and big enough
that it would eat
this one up, if you
concentrated on it
hard enough, if it's
worth doing."
y
ou want toknow why youth disap-
pears so chronically? Every time
you get hold of a preclear you say,
"Remember this inyour youth."
Hesays, "What period of my life?"
Yousay, "Your you/h."
"Oh!Oh, well,after I gotout of schooL
"No," you say, "no, no, no, no. Your
childhood. You know, childhood. Real
early." Veryoftenit hasn't occurred to this
fellow for just years and years and years
that heever hadachildhood.
If you take him in the middle span of
life, this is particularly true. He's just for-
gotten his childhood. Hedoesn't have any
of his possessions of childhood with him.
He doesn't have the family, he doesn't
have thehouse, hedoesn't have any of the
conveyances, none of the toys, the sur-
roundings, that sort of thing, and he
doesn't haveacontinuum. Soheapparent-
ly doesn't go back to childhood. No
"have." He's got a different body really -
it looksdifferent.
You've got to call it to his attention. If
you call this to his attention, start getting
him to remember childhood, he will start
to draw a similarity and he will patch up
the time track. All of a sudden he has a
childhood. If you want toknow how10get
a childhood out, just get this factor of
"have" to work. It's "had," "should have
had," "did not have." That's childhood.
Childhood is actually the story, in most
men, of "did not have." And that develops
into ~'cannothave," whichgoesvery easily
into "·willnever have."

,
P
ara long time he sort of could tell
himself, "Well, someday I will have.
There will be time: future time,
future time, future time." Then Ihal word
til/lire gets fainter and fainter and fainter.
When he's lost his hope for the future, he
doesn't have n future, he will not make
himself a future, he will not plnn for a
future, and he won't even think logically.
Why? Because logical thought depends
upon you having afuture.
You're not going to think logically,
unless you're thinking toward a goal. In
order to hnvea goal, you've got to have a
future. Fellow won't have a goal. He
doesn't have any time. His timetr<lckends
at any given moment right where he is.
There's his time track. You'll find most
people that you will help have their time
trnckended either innow, at which they're
neurotic, or tomorrow, at theabsolute out-
side, at which time they're pretty normal.
The next few days, the next few weeks -
that's future. That's a big future, that is.
That brings aperson up.
Actually, if you want to plot future,
you've got toplot immortality and you've
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a s a l l 1 I O l d n o , { J I " s S a U 2 U ! A e t { 1 0 I d 0 - 1 l o g

SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.015

L. Ron Hubbard vs. Mahayana Buddhism on
Achieving Bodhi or Enlightenment:


The Hope of the Ages
(1973 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


The Three Essentials In Practicing the Teaching of
the Buddha (Miao Yun Essay,
Comparative Source Translated 1995)




Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
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Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
 
    The Three Essentials In Practising the Teaching of the Buddha 
1. Faith and Determination, Loving Kindness and Compassion,
Wisdom
The philosophy expounded by the Buddha is very profound and broad. It 
is so broad and profound that sometimes ordinary people have difficulties 
in  finding  a  right  entrance  into  it.  They  do  not  know  where  to  start. 
However, this does not imply that the Buddha’s Teachings are confusing 
or  disorganised.  On  the  contrary,  Buddhism  has  very  logical,  well-
reasoned and practical principles. 
Wise  men  in  the  past  commented  that  all  the  methods  taught  by  the 
Buddha, whether the expedient or ultimate paths, serve the sole purpose 
of leading one to Buddhahood. Whether it is the path that leads one away 
from  evil,  and  towards  the  right  aspirations  (the  principle  of  the  Five
Vehicles) or the  path  that  leads  to  disentanglement from worldly desires 
and to freedom (the principle of the Three Vehicles); or the path that turns 
one  away  from  the  practice  of  the Sravaka  and  Pratyeka-buddhas and 
redirects one to Mahayana thought (the principle of the one Vehicle); 
the  Buddha  explained  the  paths  to  enlightenment  in  all  these  various 
ways for the benefit of sentient beings in all their corresponding variety. It 
is for this great reason that the Buddha appeared in this world. 
From  the  stand  point  of  one  who  wants  to  learn  about  Buddhism,  it  is 
important to understand that all the methods taught by the Buddha are in 
fact  processes  in  the  Bodhisattva’s  practice.  They  are  the  Bodhi  paths 
that  lead  to  Buddhahood.  Due  to  the  differing  conditions,  causes,  times 
and  places  into  which  we  were  born,  the  best  ways  towards  Bodhi 
(Enlightenment) may differ for each of us. But if we try to seek the truth of 
nature through the various methods we will realise that there are no great 
differences in the teachings of the Buddha. Three themes characterize all 
the  teachings  and  encompass  them  as  one  coherent  whole.  These 
themes are as applicable to the practice of "One Vehicle" as they are to 
the "Three vehicles" and "Five vehicles". Thus, we call these themes the 
"The Three Essentials in Practising the Teaching of the Buddha". 
1.1 The Three Essentials of Practice Defined
What are these Three Essentials? As stated in the Sutra of Great Prajna 
they  are;  "To  maintain  mindfulness  of  supreme  Bodhi  (the  mind  of 
enlightenment), to centre oneself on compassion, and to learn the skilful 
means of emptiness (the wisdom of non-grasping or subtle intangibility)". 
The  Great  Prajna  Sutra  emphasizes  the  all-inclusive  practice  of  a 
Bodhisattva. A Bodhisattva must learn all methods of practice, (which are 
in fact nothing more than the ways of cultivating goodness and wisdom). 
All  these  methods  should  comply  with  the  Three  Essentials,  which  are 
[ Excerpt taken from: http://www.buddhanet.net/cbp1_f4.htm ]
their foundation. The ultimate aim of all practices is to attain perfection in 
these three virtues. 
Thus,  these  themes  are  in  fact  the  heart  of  practising  the  Bodhisattva 
way. As the ancients said, "If we did not find the right direction of practice 
we  would  be wandering  blindly around the eight thousand methods  and 
teachings  taught by the  Buddha, just  like  walking  in  the darkness.  If  we 
could  find  the  right  direction  of  practice,  the  twelve  divisions  of  the 
Mahayana Canon, would be as clear as ordinary simple conversation to 
us." 
a) Mindfulness of the heart of wisdom, or the Supreme Bodhi
(wisdom of the Buddha), as the ground of faith and determination.
This  is  the  perfect  and  ultimate  merit  of  the  Buddha  that  was  attained 
through  His  enlightenment.  Practitioners should  contemplate always the 
wisdom  of  the  Supreme  Bodhi.  One  should  have  faith  that  the  Buddha 
has attained the Supreme Bodhi and that the Supreme Bodhi may bring 
us  the  vision  of  splendour  and  boundless  merits.  Belief  in  the  merits  of 
the Supreme Bodhi arouses our determination and joy for it, and further 
inspires us  to  seek it  out.  In  other words,  appreciation  of the  wisdom of 
Supreme  Bodhi  meaningfully  translates  into  our  determination  to  attain 
perfect enlightenment. 
b) Great Compassion.
Great Compassion may refer to sympathy or loving kindness and 
compassion in general, in a wider sense, it refers to loving kindness, 
compassion, appreciative joy and equanimity. To be compassionate is to 
have the mind intent upon relieving living beings from their miseries. To 
have loving kindness is to be intent upon giving living beings enjoyment 
and happiness. 
All  the  practices  of  the  Bodhisattva  begin  with  the  mind  of  loving 
kindness and compassion. The mind of loving kindness and compassion 
is  always  first  and  foremost.  As  stated  in  the  Sutra,  "The  status  of  a 
Bodhisattva  is  attainable  through  the  mind  of  compassion,  it  is  not 
attainable  by  merely  meritorious  deeds".  Without  loving  kindness  and 
compassion, all virtues and wisdom will not comply with the practice of a 
Bodhisattva. Thus, the great mind of loving kindness and compassion is 
indeed the heart of the Bodhisattva’s practice. 
c) Emptiness (The wisdom of non-grasping or subtle intangibility)
as the wisdom of Prajna.
This  is  the  wisdom  of  non-attachment  and  supreme  emptiness.  The 
wisdom  of  emptiness  that  was  cultivated  under  the  guidance  of  the 
compassionate  vow  (i.e.  the  Bodhisattva  vow)  will  not  be  just  a  dull 
emptiness  and  still  silence.  It  is  a  great  skilful  characteristic.  By 
possessing this wisdom, the practice of loving kindness and compassion 
can  be  successful  and  hence  lead  us  to  the  attainment  of  the  fruit  of 
Bodhi. Thus, these three themes, the Bodhi vow, the Great Compassion 
and  the  Wisdom  of  Emptiness  are  the  real  essences  of  the  path  of  the 
Bodhisattva. 
1.2 The Three Essentials in the Superior Practice of the Bodhisattva
The great Bodhi vow, the Great Compassion and the great wisdom of the 
Bodhisattva  are  an  extension  of  the  purest  practices  of  all  humans  and 
devas  as  well  as  the  Two vehicles.  Summarising  the  merits  of  all 
teachings,  in  terms  of  aims,  humans  and  devas  practice  to  become 
saints or to be reborn in heaven. They look forward to the worldly reality, 
beauty and virtue. The practice of the Two Vehicles cultivates the mind to 
the  extinction  of  worldly  desire  and  Nirvana.  It  promotes  the  mind  of 
leaving  the  deluded  world.  And  the  practice  of  the  Bodhisattva 
emphasises the cultivation of the great Bodhi vow. 
Loving kindness to living beings, in the practice of humans and devas, is 
aroused due  to  sympathy  towards  other  living beings.  In  the  practice  of 
the  two  vehicles,  it  is  the  sense  of  universal  altruism  that  gives  rise  to 
loving  kindness.  In  the  practice  of  the  Bodhisattva,  it  is  the  wisdom  of 
emptiness  (the  realisation  of  Dependent  origination,  non-self  and  non-
attachment) that gives rise to loving kindness. 
In terms of the cultivation of wisdom, in the practice of human and devas, 
wisdom refers to worldly knowledge. In the practice of the Two Vehicles, 
wisdom  is  one-sided  dogma  In  the  practice  of  the  Bodhisattva,  it  is  the 
wisdom of non-discrimination in all aspects. 
The response of the mind to the external environment varies among the 
three realms of practice. The mental activities involved are basically the 
activities  of  faith  and  determination,  loving  kindness  and  compassion, 
and wisdom. The distinction among the three realms is that practitioners 
in each realm practise them at different levels. From the above analysis, 
it  can  be  seen  that  the  three  main  themes  of  the  practice  of  the 
Bodhisattva  are  beyond  all  others,  they  encompass  the  practices  of  all 
virtues. 
The Embodiment of Dharma: Faith and Determination; Loving
Kindness and Compassion; Wisdom:
In Human and Devas Practice 
To be a saint and to be reborn in heaven  
Sympathy to living beings  
Worldly knowledge 
In Two Vehicle Practice
To leave the deluded world  
Sense of universal altruism  
one-sided dogma 
In Bodhisattva Practice
The Bodhi vow  
Mind of loving kindness and compassion  
Wisdom of Prajna 
As  we  begin  practising  the  teachings  of  the  Buddha,  either  as  a  lay 
person  or  as  an  ordained  follower,  we  should  learn  the  practice  of  the 
Bodhisattva as this is the only way to Buddhahood. The real merits of the 
Bodhisattva are within these three themes. We should always reflect  on 
ourselves: "Have I practised? Have I put  effort into the practice of these 
three  themes?"  If  not,  how  can  we  call  ourselves  a  Bodhisattva?  We 
should  always  remind  ourselves  to  practice  and  to  look  upon  the 
Bodhisattvas as our example. 
2. A Comparison of the Confucian, Christian and Buddhist
approaches to the Three Essentials
The  main  themes  in  the  practice  of  the  Bodhisattva  way  are  faith  and 
determination,  loving  kindness  and  compassion  and  wisdom.  They 
constitute in fact a process of purification and improvement of the human 
mind according to its natural ability. These have some similarity with the 
other worldly practices such as Confucianism and Christianity. However, 
the worldly practices or ideologies tend to cling to one aspect and regard 
that  as  the whole,  or  adopt  one aspect  and  neglect  the rest.  Hence  the 
practice becomes incomplete. 
Confucianism,  which  represents  the  mainstream  of  Chinese  culture  in 
China,  advocates  the  Three  Virtues,  namely  knowledge,  benevolence 
and bravery. It takes them as they become moral values for dealing with 
people  and  living  life  in  society.  In  brief,  knowledge  may  be  compared 
with  wisdom,  benevolence  with  loving  kindness  and  compassion  and 
bravery with faith and determination. 
There  is  a  saying  in  Buddhism,  "Faith  instils  determination  and 
determination  instils  diligence  (right  effort)".  With  sincere  faith  we  can 
arouse  our  greater  determination.  And  with  sincere  determination,  one 
will  naturally  become  diligent  and  put  right  effort  into  practice.  In  short, 
faith  leads  to  determination  and  determination  will  lead  to  bravery  and 
diligence.  This  is  the  development  of  energy  from  faith.  Diligence  and 
bravery are needed in all meritorious deeds, but it has to begin with faith 
and determination. 
Confucianism  over-emphasises  the  common  relationship among  human 
beings, and lacks inspiration. Hence, it is difficult to arouse sincere faith 
and  determination  in  its  followers.  Without  strong  faith,  the  virtue  of 
bravery cannot be fully expressed. The concepts of "being wise", "being 
the  saintly",  "the  Law  of  Heaven",  "the  conscience",  and  "the  fear  of 
Heavenly commands, fear of the saint and fear of commandments of the 
authority", all weaken the cultivation of faith and determination. The idea 
of  bravery  becomes  "one  who  knows  how  to  feel  ashamed  is  close  to 
being  considered  brave".  This  ideology  is  difficult  to  spread  among  the 
general  population,  and  the faith  that  arises from this  ideology of  "to  be 
reborn in heaven" or "to attain Buddhahood". The Chinese nation  which 
has  long  been  under  the  influence  of  Confucianism  is  withering  and 
becoming weaker each day. It has failed to arouse the virtues of bravery 
from  faith,  and  the  Chinese  lack  strong  motivation  and  enthusiasm  for 
life.  From  the  view  of  promoting  human  nature  or  strengthening  the 
Chinese  nation,  and  cultivating  of  sincere  and  dedicated  faith  and 
bravery, this decline is something that the Confucianists should take note 
of. 
Christianity (Catholic and  Christian) conditions the contemporary culture 
and  spirit  of  the  West.  It  also  has  three  main  themes:  faith,  hope  and 
love. Christians believe in the existence of God and because of their faith 
in God there is hope of a bright  future for them. Because God loves us, 
we  must  in  turn  love  others.  Everything  was  created  by  God.  These 
teachings  are  of  course  very  different  to  the  teachings  of  Buddhism. 
However, in general, we may consider faith and hope to be equivalent to 
faith  and  determination  in  Buddhism,  and  love  equivalent  to  loving 
kindness and compassion in Buddhism. 
Although  Christians  claim  that  they  have  a  rational  belief  in 
righteousness,  it  does  not  emphasise  the  virtue  of  wisdom  in  nature. 
When Adam and Eve ate the forbidden fruit,  their eyes brightened. This 
is  the  beginning  of  self-awareness  and  development  of  human 
knowledge.  However,  for  the  theist,  this  is  a  sin,  and  is  the  source  of 
death. Teaching as such is shaken by the development and achievement 
of modern scientific cultures nowadays. 
The Sravakas (the people who lived in the Buddha’s time and listened to 
his  teachings  personally)  placed  less  emphasis  on  the  cultivation  of 
loving  kindness  and  compassion.  There  were  Sravakas  who  stressed 
faith and wisdom but there were none who stressed compassion. This is 
just  the  opposite  to  Christian  practice.  Christians  emphasise  faith  and 
love  but  lack  wisdom.  The  Sravakas  stressed  faith  and  wisdom,  but 
undervalued  loving  kindness  and  compassion.  Both  modes  of  practice 
are  narrow  and  incomplete.  The  practice  of  the  Mahayana  Bodhisattva, 
which puts great emphasis on the equal practice of all the three themes, 
is  undoubtedly  more  complete.  Although  the  teachings  of  Confucianism 
are  not  complete,  Their  three  virtues  are  closest  to  the  practice  of  the 
Bodhisattva. 
The Pure Land sect in Chinese Mahayana Buddhism (originated in India 
and  completed  in  China)  also  has  three  main  themes.  They  are:  faith, 
determination (dedication) and practice. The order of faith, determination 
and practice delineates the process. From faith determination arises, and 
with determination, effort to practice arises. 
When  we  say  the  words  "to  practice"  most  people  interpret  it  as 
"practicing  diligently"  without  the  concepts  of  loving  kindness  and 
compassion  or  wisdom.  Some  Pure  Land  practitioners  practice  by 
chanting the name of the Amitabha Buddha but  do not cultivate wisdom 
or compassion and loving kindness. This type of person will have to wait 
for  a  long  while  before  they  can  fulfil  their  wish  to  become  enlightened 
and  return  to  this  world  in  order  to  relieve  the  suffering  of  the  worldly 
beings.  This  is  the  result of  the  imbalance  development  and  negligence 
of Mahayana philosophy in practice. 
When  the  Pure  Land  sect  spread  to  Japan,  it  immersed  into  its  theistic 
tradition and changed itself  into the "Truth" sect, promoting the ideology 
of  rebirth  with  faith  and  determination.  Even  the  chanting  of  the  name 
was  not  important  anymore.  This  is  similar  to  the  Christian  doctrine, 
where those who have faith will be saved. 
In short, other religions or ideologies do emphasise the Three Essentials 
in one way or another but not all. It is important for us to remember that, 
the  main  themes  of  the  practice  of  the  Bodhisattva  are  the  completion 
and  perfection  in  the  cultivation  of  faith  determination,  wisdom,  loving 
kindness and compassion. 


SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.016

Scientology’s Position on L. Ron Hubbard’s
Teachings In Relation to Gautama
Buddha’s Teachings:


Wisdom on Planet Earth (1984 L. Ron Hubbard
Essay)


A Teacher for the Gods (1984 Feature Article)


Scientology Tech and Buddhism (1984 L. Ron
Hubbard Essay)


The Tradition of Scientology (1984 L. Ron
Hubbard Essay)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
i t
~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - ~
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, f ! 1 J M " f i l @ l ! i ' 5 u L a q c \ l l ' I ! l ! d s 8 q l ~ 0 W O P e N J
I E I O I U ! E I I E 0 1 P O W 8 W a \ : l l P U E t i W O I E U E
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a l O W a l \ . E L j a M " M e l p a l a s a L j I t i q ~ o J p a d o m
5 u l a q s e M ' 0 5 e S l , ? a t i 0 0 9 ' 2 ' ' l , l P ! t [ M s s a u 5 u ! a g
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l < J E x a a l \ . e L j a M ' ~ O ! I \ E L j e q J O s u O n e u e l Q
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8 M ' a 5 e s s a w e U E W a l O W a M ! l . j a M I n s
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j n q 1 0 U U E o a Q o g w e q l s a l \ . 1 5 I P 1 L j M a l d o a Q - e 0 1
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' P E 1 U O o p U E U o n l ? J e t i a s ' s s a u U l l s p u e u o n o w
: t i l a w e u ' e u a w o u a y a 5 u ! U O ! I ! P U O : l J O s u o l l
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n o t i 1 [ " ' p ' ! E S e w e l n e @ ' E P U E U ' \ ! a u o 0 1 8 s m o o
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p a u l E Y I ? s e y O y M a G O f i l d w l S 5 ! 1 ? 4 P ' p n S
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f l P O M u 1 8 1 s a M e 1 . [ ! l ! ' s e Y R p n s s e U M o u l i s l e n
j l ! l l \ . 1 ! ? U ! f i 9 . . p a 4 Q { i 8 l g U O ] 0 1 [ 8 J e S ! ' e w e l n E 9
) 0 I u a / \ p e a l , l i a 1 0 j a 9 . . a W l ) a w o s O U ! I S ! X a ' e w
- l E l , l @ a 1 d 1 l E w l e 1 d t ! I a l , l l S E U M o u l i u o ! o l l a r o e
J O ) J E d S I ? M 1 : I 1 0 M 5 ! R I " . ! u n w e t i l i e s E W l ? \ n { l ! l J
f i q p a \ : j s ! j o w o £ > : l e 5 e M f u O I S ] ! ; ! U l 1 d I l M a o u e l \ . p e
< " l ! l , l d o s o ! ! 1 . [ d l u e j J o d w l I S O W a I D U ! S I x a u a q m
" f i l , l C l o s o [ ! l , l d 5 n O l o ! l a l I ? 0 1 ~ I ? M s s a u p a l ! i e P U ]
f i p E a 5 , t i D o l 0 l u a p s I I ? 1 . [ I f i U E e [ < " l S a l l ? • • s u o w a p
I I ' n o t i I , [ S j U O I 5 e p . l n o M t i ~ e ' \ m [ ! I ? < " l 0 l ~ n o t i U !
0 8 [ 9 . . l ? n I ? M p u e u a l l ! l l ' l l M O U 8 l E f i a q l s e s u w f i y
a s a Y I J O t i a l \ . l n s I ; ! ' S I S l o ! s f i g d ~ E a l J n u t i q f i l ? p o l
B a 5 n 5 } [ l O M 0 1 ; [ 1 U l l U a / \ a p U I ? U 1 ~ E 0 S 8 j l { i 1 d : f )
t o S } j l O M a q J U 1 p u n o J a q 0 1 S ! ' i e Y I ! I e s u ! e l U O O
! W e q l U l [ I ? y a l e w a Y I @ A ' s u w f i l j S n 0 1 D ! ] a 1
a l e s u w n y < l ! p a ! \ . a l , [ l L ' f i l , [ d o s o [ ! y t l s n o ! 5 1 ]
- a l E W 0 1 J s n 0 1 p a p u a l x a a l a ! J u ] l Q 5 1 4 : b
· a l \ . l n < l t i O ! l s a 0 - a / \ ! / \ l n S - 8 I e a I 9 5 < 1
I , [ I ! I ' I It i o o l 0 l U 8 ! o S p a m l \ . o l d ' W E a p Y I ! M p a p n ! < l
- U O J f i n E U l j p u e t i e : l a p O I U ! p a p a a < J o l d u a W
" ' l e i S 5 u j 5 u e l , l ; ) u n 5 ! I , [ I ' l e Y I p u e a l E I S o U 1 D U E Y ; )
- u n u e O I U ! r P a p ' a e < l o l d Y l f i l o m I E I , [ I ' 1 1 \ 1 ' 1 1 0 . 1 5
0 I U ! p a p a a o o l i : f 1 , [ 1 J ! 9 . . l e Y I U O ! l e M a s \ l o a [ A E n j E / \
- U ! a Y ! l ! ' U 0 1 P I ; ! J O a [ ; ) f i ~ a q l s e . f i 5 0 [ 0 I u a ! " s
u l U I ' I I O U ~ a l a ! J U l l a a l , [ l l o J a l q ! 5 u o t l s a J t i l m a 1 ! P
a l e s a l a o a a < J l p a t . ' i a 4 ! l ! ' s u w t i l , [ : l ! P 8 & . . 9 \ { 1
u l l p - a U l e j U O < l s e l ' l l S l Y 1 ' s a w p o ] l o I S ! y - a l a W O ~
U I ' I I O p p a p u e l A u a a q p e q I , [ J ! I , [ M a D p a
- I M O U } [ a l q e ~ j l o M J O a t r e , ! l e U O t i l u O V
S I ? M C 1 e 1 . [ 1 ' I a u e l i : f S ! Y I u o f u 0 I S ! Y
U a l l ] . l N l m o 1 0 f i U ! U U ! D a S j a l , [ ! I
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.017

L. Ron Hubbard’s Concept of Death:


Death (1974 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


Conquest of Death (1978 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


Death (1957 L. Ron Hubbard ACC Lecture)

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[ From Advance! Issue 24, 1974 ]
[ From Advance! Magazine AOLA Issue No. 52 1978 ]
DEATH
A lecture given on 30 July 1957
I have a little announcement to make here at the beginning hich i!n"t too ha##y an
announcement$ %o!t o& you have hear' thi! on the rumor line$ An' that i! that an ol'(time
D)cn* +eggy ,onay* hom many o& you kno* #a!!e' aay in +retoria* )outh A&rica
ye!ter'ay &rom a !u''en !troke$ )he a! 'oing a great 'eal &or )cientology 'on in )outh
A&rica* a! o#erating 'on there a! my re#re!entative an' a! 'oing -uite a bit o& ork ith
the government an' a! getting thing! !et u#$ )o it a! a lo!! in more ay! than one$ .ut !he
a! / 'on"t kno i& many o& you kne thi!* you might have / !he a! the original 0+eg o" %y
Heart0 in the !tage #lay* an' many other !tage !ucce!!e!$ An' the ar came along an' !he
ent out ith the 1)2$ )he ha' a 3acket that !he collecte' all !ort! o& variou! regimental
in!ignia on an' !he ma'e lecture tour! in the country$ )he &inally came into )cientology an'
!he 'i' an a&ul lot o& goo' ork$ All o& her contact! ere in relatively high #lace!$ %atter o&
&act* it a! 4loria )an!on ho #hone' u# an' gave the in&ormation through here ye!ter'ay$
The occa!ion a! o& !ome intere!t in another line$ )he ill be cremate' an' her bo'y ill be
&lon home to ,onnecticut / cremate'$
5ell anyay* it brought u# another #oint$ There ere to or three #eo#le ho looke'
at me rather 'a6e'ly an' I !u''enly conceive' that I ha' never given a lecture on the !ub3ect
o& 'eath$ Ju!t 'eath a! !uch$ An' in vie o& the &act it i! one o& the larger intere!ting
mechani!m! that )cientology un'er!tan'! an' hat ha##en! an' hat goe! on* I thought it
might be a very goo' thing i& I gave you a lecture on that !ub3ect$
Audience: It's true. Yeah.
2kay* thi! i! the tel&th lecture o& the 17th A,,* July 30th 1957* an' the !ub3ect o&
thi! lecture i! material on 'eath$
The hole !ub3ect o& 'eath ha! been one o& the more my!teriou! !ub3ect! to man an' it
ha! only been in )cientology it!el& / not in Dianetic! / it"! only been in )cientology that the
mechani!m! o& 'eath an' !o &orth have been thoroughly un'er!too'$ An' hen I !ay
thoroughly un'er!too' I mean o& cour!e 3u!t the mechani!m!$
5e kno a great 'eal about 'eath an' e are actually the &ir!t #eo#le that 'o* on thi!
#lanet* kno a great 'eal about 'eath$ It i! one o& the larger in! o& )cientology* an' I rather
on'er that there"! been no earlier lecture! on thi! !ub3ect e8ce#t I or'inarily 'on"t 'ell on
the !ub3ect very much$ I inve!tigate' it* !ai'* 05ell that"! all ra##e' u#*0 an' 'ro##e' it in
the &ile in the 'raer an' &orgot about it$
It"! very ea!y to &orget about 'eath becau!e that"! hat 'eath i!* a &orgettingne!!$
17A,,(19 / DEATH 9 30$7$57
Hoever e 'o have a con!i'erable amount o& in&ormation on thi! !ub3ect* an' you
actually are entitle' to that in&ormation$
In the &ir!t #lace* man i! com#o!e' :a! you ell kno; o& a bo'y* a min' an' hat e
re&er to a! a thetan$ All right$ The be!t e8am#le! o& thi! ere only recently achieve' hen I
tol' #eo#le* 0<o* look at your bo'y= have you got a bo'y there>0 An' #eo#le !ay ye! they
ha' a bo'y there* an'* 0<o get a #icture o& a cat$ Have you got a #icture o& a cat>$ All right*
you"ve got a #icture o& a cat$ All right no* that #icture i! a min' #icture an' thi! i! the min'
an' it"! com#o!e' o& #icture! that intera!!ociate an' act / carry #erce#tion! an' all that !ort o&
thing$0 ?ou coul' get a #er!on to get an actual #icture at that time* an' then hile he"! looking
at thi! actual #icture you can a!k him thi! hea'(ringer hich i! 05hat"! looking at it>0 An'
nobo'y ever a!ke' the -ue!tion be&ore )cientology$
@uite an innocent -ue!tion$ There are !everal -ue!tion! that have never been a!ke'
be&ore )cientology$ 2ne o& them i! 0,an you be three &eet back o& your hea'>0 Thi! #articular
#hra!ing a! unknon$ An' !imilarly* thi! #articular 'emon!tration o& the #art! o& man*
unknon$
<o* that"! / actually give! a #er!on a con!i'erable !ub3ective reality on the i'ea that
he him!el& i! a being that i! in'e#en'ent o& a min' or a bo'y$ An' there i! actually a
!e#aratene!! there$ 2ne 'oe!n"t have to be carrie' along to a #oint o& here he e8teriori6e! in
#roce!!ing in or'er to get a reality on it$ %any #eo#le gra!# thi! rather ea!ily ithout ever
having been e8teriori6e'$ .ut there"! nothing like being e8teriori6e' to give you a rather
a'e-uate reality on thi! !ub3ect* an' #articularly to be e8teriori6e' ith goo' #erce#tion$
%any #eo#le get e8teriori6e'* !ee the te8ture o& their 3acket or 're!! !o vivi'ly that it
&righten! them to 'eath an' they 'ive back in in a hurry$ .ut they have a reality on having
been out$
<o* here i! actually the &ir!t evi'ence that man ha! ha' on the !ub3ect o& the human
!#irit$ %an thought he had a human !#irit$ <o* that i! totally incorrect / man is a human !#irit
hich i! enra##e' more or le!! in a min' hich i! in a bo'y$ An' that i! man* Homo
sapiens, an' he i! a !#irit an' hi! u!ual re!i'ence i! in hi! hea' an' he look! at the #icture!
an' the bo'y carrie! him aroun'$
It"! -uite an intere!ting thing !ince it i! !o ea!ily 'emon!trate'$ An' hen e reali6e
that li&e ha! been !training at thi! !ecret all the!e year!* to come out ith thi! !im#le an
an!er make! it look* i& anything* a little ri'iculou!$ I oul'n"t !ay that it ma'e the great
#hilo!o#her! o& all time ri'iculou! becau!e !ometime! their #oe!y a! e8cellent* !ometime!
their or'ing a! goo'* !ometime! the ay they rote thing! 'on an' !o on a! -uite
&a!cinating in the &iel' o& ae!thetic!$ .ut it certainly ma'e their 'ata look very !illy$
<o* hen e look at the &act that man i! a !#irit hich ha! a min' an' a bo'y* an'
hen e 'e!cribe man in that &a!hion* then it become! e8tremely !im#le to un'er!tan' hat
hi! 'i&&icultie! oul' be$
Hi! 'i&&icultie! oul' be ba!ically ith hi! bo'y or ith hi! min'* an' e !ay* 05ell
no then* there obviou!ly then oul' be 'i&&icultie! ith him a! a being* a !#iritual being$0
Thi! i! / but in vie o& the &act that he ha! to think that he can get in a tra#* ha! to get the i'ea
that he can be en'angere' be&ore he can be en'angere'* it i! !ort o& like the 1nite' )tate!
17A,,(19 / DEATH 3 30$7$57
government / the 1nite' )tate! government can only be !ue' i& it give! you it! #ermi!!ion$
?ou have to have the #ermi!!ion o& the government in or'er to !ue it$ In other
or'!* you have to have #ermi!!ion / the thetan ha! to give #ermi!!ion to be tra##e'
be&ore he can be tra##e'$ There&ore he i! relatively ea!ily untra##e'$ An' the moment he i!
untra##e' he give! birth to all !ort! o& intere!ting #henomena hich e kno a! the
e8teriori6ation #henomena$ An' all o& thi! #henomena i! -uite ea!ily 'emon!trate'$
I even con!tructe' a meter once that I coul' make !omebo'y be on one !i'e o& an' be
on the other !i'e o& an' it oul' rea' 'i&&erently an' he"' a##roach it an' it"' go clang an'
he"' go aay &rom it$ %a'e out o& a little tuning tube that a! manu&acture' in 4reat .ritain /
a very* very !en!itive tube an' an antenna / an' a thetan actually 'oe! have an electrical &iel'$
%o!t #eo#le kno that living thing! 'o have an electrical &iel' aroun' them* but
nobo'y ha' ever mea!ure' it be&ore* in'e#en'ent o& energy* ri'ge!* bo'ie!* !uch combination!
a! that$ In other or'!* you e8#ect that to get an electrical rea'ing on a human being he ha! to
alk over an' #ut hi! han' on !omething$ Thi! i! not true$ ?ou can e8teriori6e him* #ut him
near a little antenna an' he get! a rea'$ @uite ama6ing$
There&ore* thought an' electricity an' other univer!e #henomena are -uite ell :you
might !ay; entangle' an' con&u!e'* an' e get to the &ourth thing on hich a man ha! reality*
but Homo sapiens ha' no reality on thi! thing an' e can 3u!t aban'on it i& e"re 'e!cribing
Homo sapiens, an' that"! the material univer!e$ He ha' no reality on the material univer!e$ I
mean 3u!t none$ I mean* I coul'n"t !ay that more !traightly$ ?ou get an i'ea o& thi! i& you 3u!t
run !ome Aocational +roce!!ing on !omebo'y$ 4rab !omebo'y o&& the !treet an' run !ome
Aocational +roce!!ing on him$ He all o& a !u''en notice! there are all! an' &loor! an'
ceiling!$ ?ou !ay* 0.ut he kne thi! all the time$0 I 'on"t kno that he 'i'$ He take! an
automobile out on )un'ay an' kill! him!el& 'ea' an' that"! hat e"re talking about$ All right$
5hat ha##en! to him hen he 'ie!>
5ell* ba!ically all that ha##en! i! that a !e#aration occur! beteen the thetan an' the
bo'y$ That"! ba!ically all that ha##en!$
He* hoever* take! ith him ol' tin can! an' rattling chain! an' bric(a(brac an' other
energy #henomena that he &eel! he cannot 'o ithout an' !ta!he! thi! in the ne8t bo'y that he
#ick! u#$
<o* he 'oe! not buil' a bo'y$ He 'oe! not buil' a ne bo'y in thi! la6y time o&
manu&acture' item! an' Brigi'aire! an' !o on$ He #ick! one u# o&& the genetic line* an' the
genetic line i! a !erie! o& mocke' u# automaticitie! hich #ro'uce accor'ing to a certain
blue#rint &rom the earlie!t time! o& li&e on thi! #lanet through until no$ An' a! everybo'y /
even #eo#le in biology kno* there i! a 'e&inite !ucce!!ion o& !te#! that li&e take! to'ay$ It"!
har' &or u! to believe that a le!! / a little le!! than a century ago a man a! almo!t hange' &or
here!y &or announcing the theory o& natural !election an' evolution$ An' they actually ha'
trial! a&ter the beginning o& thi! century on the !ub3ect o& evolution an' !o on right here in the
1nite' )tate!$
.ut thi! i! a conce#t hich e kno to'ay &or a very goo' &act$ 5e un'er!tan' thi!
rather thoroughly* that !omething goe! through the!e variou! !te#!$
17A,,(19 / DEATH C 30$7$57
5ell* hat goe! through the !te#!> 5ell* an automaticity goe! through the !te#!$ 5ell*
here 'i' the automaticity come &rom> 5ell* that i! not the !ub3ect o& 'eath$ That i! totally
'i!a!!ociate' &rom it$
Death i! !omething the automaticity 'oe!$ )ee* e 'on"t care here it came &rom$ I
mean thi! i'ea o& let"! backtrack it an' get earlier an' earlier an' earlier an' earlier an' earlier
ill &inally* e ho#e* leave u! !ome#lace at
the beginning o& thing!$ 5ell* there may be a beginning o& thing!* there may be an en'
o& thing! / I 'on"t kno$ .ut I notice all clock! go roun' an' roun' an' roun'$ Anyay D
There i! !uch a thing a! a cycle o& action hoever* an' thi! cycle o& action in
)cientology i! create(!urvive('e!troy$ At the !houl'er o& the curve an in'ivi'ual i! mo!tly
intere!te' in !urviving$ Early on the curve he i! intere!te' in creating$ An' at the en' o& the
curve* hy* he i! intere!te' in the 'i!#o!ition o& the remain!$
<o* thi! ha##en! hether you"re !#eaking o& a buil'ing* a tree* anything el!e$ 5e get
thi! !ame cycle o& action* create(!urvive('e!troy$
5ell* hen e a##ly thi! cycle o& action to thi! / the!e variou! #art! I 'e!cribe'* e
get a 'eath o& the bo'y* a #artial 'eath o& the min'* an' a &orgettingne!! on the #art o& the
!#iritual being$ 5hich i!* in it!el&* again* a ty#e o& 'eath$ )o e get thi!$
<o* actually bo'ie! !tay aroun' &or -uite a hile a&ter 'eath$ @uite or'inarily it take!
them a hile to 'ecom#o!e$ )ometime! a! in Egy#t they ere embalme'$ I ha' the me'ical
e8aminer o& the !tate o& <e ?ork / no* it a! the me'ical e8aminer :that"! hat they call the
coroner; o& <e ?ork ,ity$ He a! a goo' #al o& mine one time$ He taught me a great 'eal
about riting 'etective !torie!$ He u!e' to !ay* 0The morgue i! o#en to you any time*
Hubbar'$0 5e ere #retty goo' &rien'!$
.ut he tol' me a great 'eal about 'ecom#o!ition* ho variou! #art! o& the bo'y
'ecom#o!e be&ore other #art! o& the bo'y* an' actually the cell! in the cuticle evi'ently live
the longe!t* i& not the cell! in the hair$ The!e little cell! actually remain alive &or a very long
time$
5ell* the 'ecaying mechani!m hich i! em#loye' here i! e&&ective !ooner on !ome
#art! o& the bo'y than other!$ 2n the bloo'!tream it"! e&&ective ithin about eight or ten
minute!$ I& you !to# a #er!on"! circulation then the re' an' hite cor#u!cle! an' !o &orth 'ie
in eight or ten minute!$ That"! hat #eo#le !ay$ I"ve been 'ea' &or a hal& an hour my!el& an' I
#robably haven"t ha' my heart beating any longer$
.ut the &ir!t thing one learn! about 'eath i! that it i! not anything o& hich to be very
&rightene'$ I& you"re &rightene' o& lo!ing your #ocketbook* i& you"re &rightene' o& lo!ing your
memory* i& you"re &rightene' o& lo!ing your girl or your boy&rien'* i& you"re &rightene' o&
lo!ing your bo'y* ell* that"! ho &rightene' you ought to be o& 'ying* becau!e it"! all the
!ame or'er o& magnitu'e$
<o* here e !trike the &ir!t ob!ervable #henomena in 'eath hen e &in' out that the
min'* in !#ite o& mechani!m! hich !eek to 'ecay it an' i#e it out* 'oe! maintain an'
#re!erve mental image #icture! o& earlier e8i!tence!$ An' ith #ro#er technology an' an
un'er!tan'ing o& thi!* one can be again #o!!e!!e' o& the mental image #icture! o& earlier
17A,,(19 / DEATH 5 30$7$57
e8i!tence! in or'er to un'er!tan' hat a! going on$ .ut in vie o& the &act that e have not
re!tore' / get thi! very clo!ely / e have not re!tore' remembrance to the being, the mental
image #icture! u!ually 3u!t continue to be #icture!$
)o e !en' !omebo'y into a #a!t li&e an' he look! at a mental image #icture an' you
might a! ell have !ent him to the art gallery$ He him!el& ha! no connection ith thi!$ An'
-uite rightly !o* becau!e the mental image #icture may be the min' o& the bo'y$
<o* the bo'y carrie! aroun' mental image #icture! an' a thetan carrie! aroun'
mental image #icture! an' the!e to combine to &orm the min'$ The min' then i! a bri'ge
beteen the !#irit an' the bo'y* an' the mental image #icture! &orme' by a thetan a''e' to
the mental image / an' con&u!e' ith / the mental image #icture! &orme' by the bo'y i!
u!ually ho a thetan !tay! in a hea'$ It"! -uite an intere!ting mechani!m$ He con&u!e! the!e
to an' !o on$
<o there&ore* 'emon!tration o& #a!t e8i!tence! by running !omebo'y :-uote; back
'on the time track :un-uote; an' having him look at a #icture i! not very convincing$ <ot
really very convincing$ 5ell* hy i!n"t it convincing>
5ell* the &ello alay! ha! !ome unreality about it$ 2nly no an' then 'o you !trike
heavily into !omething a #er!on vivi'ly recall!$ )o you oul'n"t !ay thi! a! great certainty$
.ecau!e hat* in e!!ence* are you a''re!!ing ith )cientology #roce!!ing> ?ou"re a''re!!ing
thi! being that e call a thetan$
<o* he* inci'entally then* being mi8e' u# ith a min'* cau!e! you to al!o a''re!! the
min'* but al!o being inci'entally mi8e' u# ith a bo'y cau!e! you to al!o a''re!! the bo'y$
Don"t you !ee> )o it ork! out thi! ayE unle!! a reality ha! been re!tore' to thi! being* he
him!el& ha! no reality* no recognition o& having ever been anything el!e be&ore$
<o* the re!toration o& memory to one o& the!e being! i! o& great intere!t to u! !ince
all that i! really rong ith him i! that thing! have ha##ene' to him hich he kno! all about
but on"t let him!el& in on$
There&ore the re!toration o& memory i! 'one a! a matter o& cour!e in almo!t any
#roce!!ing$ An' in vie o& the &act that it i! #art o& any #roce!!ing* it i! im#o!!ible to'ay to
#roce!! !omebo'y ell an' e8#ertly ithout having them !ooner or later get !ome !ort o& a
recall on a #a!t e8i!tence ith !ome !mall reality$ It"! very har'$ ?ou #roce!! !omebo'y a&ter a
hile an' then try to tell him he ha! not live' be&ore an' you"ll have an argument on your
han'!$ ?ou can invali'ate him* you coul' che him u#* you coul' cho# him 'on / the!e
thing! are ea!ily invali'ate'$ 5ell* hy are they ea!ily invali'ate' i! becau!e they are !o
tenuou!ly remembere'$ It"! very 'i&&icult to remember them !o they"re very ea!y to knock out$
5ell* an in'ivi'ual"! on ill ha! a great 'eal to 'o ith thi!$ 2ne !houl' not look &or
out!i'e !ource! a! to hy hi! memory i! !hut o&&= 3u!t a! he mu!t grant #ermi!!ion to be
tra##e'* !o mu!t he grant #ermi!!ion to be ma'e to remember$ Thi! i! -uite &a!cinating$
He i! more or le!! convince' that a memory* remembering back #a!t thi! !ub3ect calle'
'eath* oul' cau!e him to ree8#erience the #ain he alrea'y &eel! ha! been too much &or him$
Thu! he i! very reluctant to &ace u# again to thi! mechani!m* an' &acing 'eath* almo!t alay!
goe! into a bit o& an amne!ia$
17A,,(19 / DEATH F 30$7$57
I"m #ointing that u# again becau!e I have no !lighte!t intention! o& having thi! lecture
go into an amne!ia$ Do you un'er!tan' that> It coul' ea!ily 'o !o* 'eleting the!e remark! that
#unch it u#* an' #laying thi! lecture to !ome #eo#le ho kne nothing about )cientology
oul' un'oubte'ly 'emon!trate at the en' o& the lecture that the!e #eo#le* not alrea'y having
!uch a! you 'o* a goo' !ub3ective reality alrea'y / !mall or great* on thi! !ub3ect / you oul'
&in' them blank$ They oul' be the blanke!t #eo#le$ That oul' be the time to make bet!
ith them or !omething o& the !ort or$$$ They oul' be very blank becau!e one ha!
re!timulate' blankne!!$
<o* one !ay!* 05ell* it"! all very ell to take a !cienti&ic attitu'e toar' 'eath* an'*
you kno / but a&ter all* it 'oe! carry ith it a little !hock an' u#!et$0 ?eah* that"! very true*
that"! very true$ 1ntil you"ve been 'ea' a &e time! you oul'n"t really un'er!tan' ho
u#!etting it can be$
5e are actually in'ebte' &or a con!i'erable amount o& our material to the o'' &act that
I have been o&&icially 'ea' tice$ I 'on"t think I"ve ever
mentione' thi! very much be&ore* but I 'ie' in an o#eration one time back in the 30!
an' ent out!i'e above the !treet an' &elt !orry &or my!el&* 'eci'e' they coul'n"t 'o thi! to
me / the heart / bo'y"! heart ha' !to##e' beating$ An' I ent back an' I grabbe' the bo'y by
the !everal / there"! a bunch o& intere!ting mechani!m! in the hea' that re!timulate a bo'y"!
heartbeat! an' !o &orth* an' I 3u!t took hol' o& them an' then !ai' 0,ome on here*0 an'
!na##e' the bo'y back to li&e$
5ell I 'i'n"t vivi'ly remember a&ter that e8actly hat ha' ha##ene'$ It"! -uite amu!ing
that I oul' &og aroun' on thi! !ub3ect a! long a! I 'i'$ All I kne i! that I ha' con&ronte' a
my!tery o& !ome !ort or another that I coul'n"t make anything out o&$
<o* I"' alrea'y been !tu'ying the !ub3ect o& the min' &or !everal year! !ince I"' been
in the univer!ity an' thi! a''e' 3u!t a little &illi# to the !auce$ An' I !hortly a&ter that rote a
book hich ha! never been #ubli!he' calle' 0E8calibur0 an' hich accor'ing to the New
Yorker anybo'y can have a co#y o& &or G1*500$ That"! not true$ I have never #ermitte' it to be
co#ie'* mo!tly becau!e you no have mo!t o& the in&ormation in it an' becau!e it it!el& i!
rather anti-ue an' out o& 'ate$ It a! merely a #lot o& thing!$
.ut thi! a! an imme'iate bout ith 'eath hich I eventually remembere' / one kin'
or another$ An' the only rea!on I mention it i! becau!e it ha##en! to !o many #eo#le an' they
never mention it$ They 3u!t never mention it$ They go an' kick the bucket an' come back to
li&e again an' !omebo'y or other invali'ate! them !lightly* !ay!* 05ell* #eo#le alay! have
!trange 'ream! un'er ga!0 or !omething !tu#i' about thi! thing* an' !o they !hut u# about it
an' they never !ay anything about it again$
5ell* thi! &act that one ha! live' be&ore i! !o re!traine' that it it!el& i! the rea!on hy it
i! &orgotten$ The re!training o& it i! the rea!on hy it i! &orgotten$ The un#o#ularity o& it in
other age! brought about the &orgetter mechani!m it!el& hich cau!e! an occlu!ion on the
!ub3ect o& 'eath$
In other or'!* that one cannot talk about it i! enough all by it!el& to continue to cau!e
the &orgetter mechani!m$ <o* e oul' run a #oor #roce!! over a !hort #erio' o& time i& e
17A,,(19 / DEATH 7 30$7$57
trie' to get a &ello to 'o enough &orgetting to &orget all about 'eath an' there&ore get it into
re!timulation again$
An ea!ier ay to #lot thi! oul' be to a!k !omebo'y to hom he coul' tell the &act
that he ha' been 'ea'$ <o* you coul' 3u!t a!k !omebo'y thi!* hether he"' been 'ea' in thi!
li&e or not$ ?ou coul' !im#ly a!k !omebo'y thi!* you !ee* a! an au'iting -ue!tion$ ?ou coul'
!ay* 0To hom coul' you tell the &act that you have been 'ea'>0
5ell no* that"! a very &a!cinating !ort o& a thing all by it!el&* an' it ork! !omething
like* 0Tell me one #er!on in the orl' ho 'oe! not believe you are in!ane$0 It"! / ha! a
&anta!tically cataly!tic e&&ect u#on a #er!on$ A #er!on* you kno* !ort o& believe! he"! going
og an' !#inning an' !o &orth an' you a!k him that -ue!tion$ I"m telling you thi! !eriou!ly$
0Tell me one #er!on in the orl' ho 'oe! not believe you are in!ane$0 ?ou"ve broken the
agreement chain$
All right* !o you coul' a!k a !imilar -ue!tion* 0Tell me one #er!on in the orl' ho
believe! you live more than once$0 An' you"' get a !imilar concatenation reaction$
<o* e8actly hat ha##en! hen 'eath occur!> I !ay many #eo#le have e8#erience'
thi!$ I"ve gone &urther than that / I have #lumbe' into thi! #retty 'ee#ly$ 5hat ith> 2h* E(
%eter!* checking u# ith #eo#le* checking into chil'ren an' !o on$ It"! been a rather
thoroughgoing re!earch on the matter$ I mean* it a! a rather tremen'ou! e&&ort that a! #ut
out$
<o* on a lie 'etector or E(%eter* you can #ut a #er!on on one o& the!e thing! an' you
get a #eculiar #henomenon* a #eculiar behavior o& the electrical nee'le!$ That"! #eculiar
behavior ob!erve' many time!* by the ay* by #olice 'etective! ho coul' never e8#lain it
but kne they ran into it every no an' then* i! merely talking about a time hen a being a!
!e#arate &rom a min' an' bo'y$ An' it"! a #eculiar little mechani!m / it"! a little hunt o& the
nee'le* an' it 3u!t hunt! back an' &orth over a very !mall area an' -uite &rantically$ <o* that
in'icate! that a #er!on i! !till !itting in one o& the!e e8teriori6ation inci'ent!$ All right$
5e kno a great 'eal about havingne!!* e kno a lot o& other thing!$ 5e kno ho
a #er!on oul' !u''enly run out o& havingne!! i& he 'ie' an' e oul' e8#ect thi! much lo!!
o& #o!!e!!ion an' !o &orth to i#e him out$ 5ell* let me tell you !omething / it 'oe!n"t i#e
him out$
%o!t #eo#le / an' thi!* by the ay* i! not true to you i& it"! not true$ ?ou un'er!tan'
that* I"m not &orcing on you a 0<o I"m !u##o!e' to behave thi! ay0 hen you kick the
bucket or !omething$ I"m not$ It oul' be ea!y to 'o* you !ee* to &orm an agreement* 0<o e
'o !o(an'(!o$0 ,ou#le o& thou!an' year! ago !omebo'y got very active at thi! an' they
became eventually very* very un#o#ular$ They ha' a 0<o I"m !u##o!e' to go !omehere*0
an' that #lace 'i' not e8i!t an' it got a lot o& #eo#le into trouble$
<o* thi! i! hat or'inarily occur!$ An in'ivi'ual back! out thinking o& hi!
re!#on!ibilitie!* knoing ho he i!* here he"! been* hat he"! been 'oing$ 2r'inarily thi!
occur!$ I& he"! in any kin' o& con'ition at all* thi! i! hat occur!$ He back! out at the moment
o& 'eath ith &ull memory$ )omething kill! the bo'y* an automobile* too many court !uit!* too
much over'o!e o& i'ely a'verti!e' !lee#(#ro'ucing agent!* an' the bo'y cea!e! to &unction
an' the moment he conceive! it to be no longer &unctional in any ay* he back! out$
17A,,(19 / DEATH 7 30$7$57
At that moment he kno! ho he i!* here he"! been an' !o &orth$ ?ou e8#ect a total
occlu!ion / min' you* I"m not hanging thi! one on you$ I"m 3u!t telling you hat or'inarily
ha##en!$ 1!ually the / a total occlu!ion 'oe! not occur at thi! #oint$
It i! not true that a being / a thetan in e8cellent con'ition / get! !ome 'i!tance &rom
the bo'y an' then 'oe!n"t care about it anymore$ That i! !im#ly a #henomenon o& havingne!!
an' hen e &ir!t &oun' that* e thought thi! a! alay! the ca!e$ .ut then e ere !triking
here thetan! or'inarily ere on the Tone )cale$ Thi! i! not true that he get! 3u!t !o &ar &rom
hi! 'ea' bo'y an' hi! la!t li&e an' !o &orth* an' then &orget! all about it or care! nothing about
it an' !o &orth$
He"! actually gone into the )ub6ero )cale$ He i! belo a#athy$ In !u##ort o& thi!* you
can #ick u# on the track time! hen a &ello backe' out o& hi! hea' an' a! ma' a! the
'icken!$ An' 3u!t kicke' the !tu&&ing! out o& the &ello ho kille' him$ %a'e !#irit! an' thi!
hole theory o& !#irit! very un#o#ular$ +eo#le trie' to &orget thi!* !o hen they run aroun'
killing #eo#le they oul' get no imme'iate kickback$ .a!ic rea!on hy one oul' ant that
out o& the ay* i!n"t it> 5hen one committe' a crime* hy* one oul'n"t have to !u&&er &or it$
I"m not !aying thi! i! the ba!i! o& ,hri!tianity but it i! true that man ha! ca#itali6e' on thi!
#henomena enormou!ly / the #henomena !urroun'ing 'eath$ He"ll ca#itali6e on it an'
ca#itali6e on it$ ?ou look aroun' in a neighborhoo' an' i& there i! a buil'ing hich i! ell
ke#t* hy* it"! normally an un'ertaking #arlor$ ?ou look at the average #ay o& a me'ico ho
get! #ai' hether the #atient 'ie! or not an' you"ll &in' that #ay i! very* very high$ It i! ea!y to
ca#itali6e on thi!$ 5hy>
.ecau!e #eo#le* hen they think o& 'eath* think o& lo!! an' grab !omething$ Have you
got thi!> Thi! e8#lain! the behavior o& relative! a&ter one o& their number ha! 'ie'$ Everybo'y
get! in there an' tear! a#art all o& the #er!on"! clothe! an' &ight ith each other over the
#o!!e!!ion! an' !o on$












...
17A,,(19 / DEATH 10 30$7$57
<o* oul' the bo'y go on living ithout a thetan #icking it u#> 5ell* that i! be!i'e
the #oint$ That i! be!i'e the #oint$ It"! a ca!e o& ho &a!t can you #ick one u# be&ore
!omebo'y el!e get! it$ )o there"! a certain an8iety connecte' ith thi!$
<o* thetan! o&ten !ay very intere!ting #rayer! at the moment they #ick u# a bo'y$
They 'o$ They 'e'icate them!elve! to it! continue' groing an' they"re !o #lea!e' ith the
hole thing an' they 'e'icate them!elve! to the &amily an' go through all kin'! o& o'' ritual!
o& one kin' or another / they"re !o ha##y to get thi!$ .ut the o'' #art o& it i!* they 'on"t !hut
their memory o&& until they #ick another bo'y u#$ An' the !hut(o&& o& memory actually occur!
ith the #icku# o& the ne bo'y$
<o* there is a #henomena* a !erie!* knon a! the beteen(live! !erie!* an' #eo#le
have !ome !ort o& a thing mocke' u# hereby !omebo'y goe! back through a beteen(live!
area* it i! calle'* an' !o on$ Thi! can be #lotte'$ It i! not unu!ual$ The #henomena connecte'
ith it* hoever* i! !o -ue!tionable an' !o variable an' the #lace! #eo#le go make! one think
that !ome thetan! belong to one club an' !ome belong to another club$ .ut it"! not that
0Everybo'y 'oe! thi!0 an' 0<o I"m !u##o!e' to*0 it"! certainly not a con!tant$





















<o*

until

13

or

1C00

the

beteen(live!

area

o#eration!

eren"t

thriving

at

all$

They

got very &e cu!tomer!$ That"! right$

An' then they !tarte' to
#ick

it

u#

more

an'

more$

They

ha'

to

knock

itchcra&t

totally

out

o&

Euro#e

be&ore

the

beteen(live!

area

club!

or

hatever

they

ere*

!tarte'

thriving$

They

ha'

to

knock

out

any

i'ea

o&

'emon!

an'

!#irit!$

In

other

or'!*

they

ha'

to

make

one

&eel

guilty

&or

hanging

aroun'*

a'miring

the

tree!

ith

no

bo'y

to

look

through$

An'

they

!uccee'e'

in

'oing

thi!$

An'

i&

you

look

it

over

care&ully

you"ll

&in'

out

that

you

coul'

make

a

little

ki'

!ick

3u!t

by

talking

to

him

about

thi!

!ort

o&

thing$

?ou

coul'

have

'one

it

more

ea!ily

a

&e

/

cou#le*

three

hun're'

year!

ago

than

you

coul'

'o

it

no$

.ut

3u!t

!tart

talking

to

him

about

gho!t!

an'

!#irit!

an'

ho

ba'

they

are

an'

ho

&ear&ul

they

are

an'

the

ki'

'oe!n"t

like

it$

He

get!

u#!et$

He

can

be

!care'

very

ea!ily$

5hy

can

he

be

!care'

very

ea!ily>

2ne*

you"re

re!timulating

time!

hen

he"!

e8teriori6e'*

an'

to*

you

are

invali'ating

him

an'

throing

him

'on

tone

like

ma'$

He

i!

a

gho!t*

he

i!

a

!#irit*

he

i!

a

'emon$

4ot

it>

I

mean

he

i!

all

the!e ba' thing! they"ve mocke' u#$
<o*

in

vie

o&

the

&act

that

to

e8teriori6ation!

take

#lace*

thi!

coul'

get

very

com#licate'

a!

one

looke'

at

it

/

becau!e

the

"#

e8teriori6e!$

An'

I

have

never

&olloe'

a

17A,,(19 / DEATH 11 30$7$57
4E here he goe! to go !ome#lace el!e* to 'o !omething el!e* to #ick u# !omething el!e an'
!o &orth$ I 'on"t kno anything about it$
There i! !omething that mock! u# bo'ie! that e call a genetic entity* an' it !ki#! &rom
li&e to li&e$ Incre'ible* but it 'oe!$ It !ki#! &rom li&e to li&e a! neat a! you #lea!e$ In other
or'!* a bo'y 'oe!n"t even live once / 3u!t once$
<o* it"! a &unny thing hat I"m !aying to you becau!e it i! !o obviou! once you look
at it$ I& a bo'y live' only once it oul' never have learne' ho$ I mean* it"! 3u!t one o& the!e
!ee#ingly !tu#i' thing! to tell #eo#le that a bo'y 3u!t live! once$ It 3u!t coul'n"t be$ I meanD
Hery eir'$ )omebo'y oul' have to be !tan'ing aroun' mocking them u# all the time an'
teaching them* an' they"' have to have a &ull college e'ucation an' more than that be&ore they
ere ever &it to cry an' et their 'ia#er!$ That"! right* i!n"t it> They"' have to have a terri&ic
amount o& kno(ho$ The intricacy o& a bo'y it!el& i! !omething that ha! 'evelo#e' over a
long #erio' o& time$ .o'ie! learn ho$
5ell no* hat 'o you mean* 0learn ho0> 5ell they become !torage #lace! &or 'ata*
an' e have to a!!ume the !im#le!t e8#lanation / there are !everal e8#lanation! &or thi! / e
have to a!!ume one* that a bo'y i! a collection o& little thing! calle' cell!* each one o& hich
i! a !#irit$ That"! kin' o& goo&y* i!n"t it> 2r it i! !omething hich !ome !#irit !omehere
continue! to imbue ith li&e$ An' i& you"ve ever !een an army o& ant! on the march an' !een
their coor'inate' behavior* an' then i& you"ve ever taken a micro!co#e an' looke' &or
anything in an ant that coul' ever have 'one any thinking or anything el!e* you have to
a!!ume there / they can"t even communicate ith each other$ I have be'evile' ant! in one ay
or the other$ I have even got in their hea'! an' trie' to run them$ )omething get! a&ully ma'
at you hen you !tart monkeying aroun' ith an ant$ It"! -uite intere!ting$ ?ou on"t let him
alk along in hi! machine &a!hion an' certain ay* an' !omething get! a&ul ma' !ome#lace
or another an' it i!n"t the ant$
)o hen a bo'y 'ie! then hatever ma'e the bo'y* 'evelo#e' it* o#erate' it
mechanically an' ke#t it going otheri!e* evi'ently 'oe! it all over again$
...
17A,,(19 / DEATH 15 30$7$57
The !ub3ect o& 'eath i! never a very !eriou! one to a )cientologi!t beyon' the &act that
he &eel! kin' o& !orry &or him!el& !ometime!$ There a! !omebo'y
o& !uch terri&ic elan* !omebo'y ho ma'e him real ha##y to be aroun' an' !o &orth*
an' thi! #er!on a! thoughtle!! enough to 'i!#o!e o& a mock(u# an' go out o&
communication$ An' a #er!on &eel! #retty unha##y about it$ It"! a thoughtle!! thing &or a
&rien' to 'o$
<o thi!* by the ay* a! a very early conce#t o& 'eath$ ?ou"ve no more nor le!! than
you"ve #rogre!!e' back to 'eath a! it a! regar'e' very early on thi! #articular track in thi!
univer!e / a #er!on 'i'n"t regar' it very !eriou!ly$ The Joman never regar'e' 'eath very
!eriou!ly$ He #robably ha' a very accurate i'ea o& more or le!! o& hat ha##ene' to him* then
he ent into i'olatry an' then he ke#t going an' he &inally hit bottom$ Anyay D
Death i!* in it!el&* a technical !ub3ect$ ?ou can* ith con!i'erable con&i'ence* rea!!ure
!ome hu!ban' ho!e i&e i! 'ying or ha! 3u!t 'ie'* that !he got out all right an' !he i! going
!ome#lace an' #ick u# a mock(u#$ I& you got there hile that #er!on coul' !till talk* !till
communicate %E)Ti!e ith you* in the la!t moment! they u!ually have !omething !#otte'*
!omething #lanne'$
<o* the #er!on 'oe!n"t 3u!t back out or'inarily an' &orget all about it$ They back out
o& it ith &ull i'entity* they hang aroun' &or -uite a hile* they"re u!ually there &or the &uneral*
certainly$ They very o&ten hang aroun' their #o!!e!!ion! an' !o &orth to !ee that they"re not
abu!e'$ An' they can be given con!i'erable 'ro#! in tone an' given u#!et! i& their i!he!
aren"t carrie' out ith regar' to certain thing!$ I oul'n"t go !o &ar a! to !ay that any thetan!
in thi! 'ay an' age out!i'e o& )cientology ha' any &orce or ability to #uni!h #eo#le &or not
carrying out their i!he! a&ter 'eath$ .ut certainly it u!e' to ha##en* an' #eo#le then !ai' thi!
a! !u#er!tition* an' !cience a! again!t !u#er!tition$ 5ell* it"! -uite intere!ting that e have
turne' aroun' the other ay an' e &in' out hat"! !cience an' hat"! !u#er!tition an' e
&in' out that a being i! ca#able o& almo!t anything* #rovi'ing it i! ithin hi! ability to e8ecute$
<o* !ometime! a thetan get! !o &uriou! that he get! hallucinatory$ He goe! roun'
killing hi! enemie! in all 'irection! an' they 'on"t even e8i!t$ %ottoE have your reality in goo'
con'ition be&ore you 'ie$
There are many #roce!!e! hich e8teriori6e #eo#le an' give them a high level o&
reality on thi!$ Among!t tho!e #roce!!e! / the key #roce!! that #ro'uce! the #henomena
ithout any great !hock i! ol' )to#* ,hange an' )tart / #ro'uce! the #henomenon o&
e8teriori6ation rather ea!ily$ Even on !omebo'y ho a! terribly 'ea' in hi! hea' you can a!k
him to kee# hi! hea' &rom going aay an' he"! liable to blo out$ <e8t time you run it on him
he"! liable not to$ .ut I"ve taken #eo#le ho ere terribly 'ea' in the hea' / thi! i! the
clincher / thetan! 'o not become bo'y cell!$ Thetan! 'o not become all!$ Thetan! can get
out o& any tra# they"re in but !ometime! it"! better to be in a tra# than nohere$ That"! true o&
mo!t #eo#le$
An' a thetan 'oe! back out$ He very o&ten carrie! ith him a theta bo'yE he"! got !ome
!ort o& a mocke' u# bo'y on the #a!t track hich i! a number o& &ac!imile! o& ol' bo'ie! he
ha! mi!one' an' he i! carrying along ith him an' hich / control mechan! Kmechani!m!L
o& hich he u!e! to control the bo'y he i! u!ing$ That"! all there i! to a theta bo'y$ It"!
17A,,(19 / DEATH 1F 30$7$57
&ac!imile! o& ol' bo'ie! he"! ha' an' controlle' an' he u!e! the!e !ame !et! o& control! on any
ne bo'y he #ick! u#* an' he eventually 'evelo#! -uite a heavy* thick automatic control theta
bo'y$ They"re -uite intere!ting$ %any time! they have electronic cla! an' all !ort! o& thing!$
1!ually the theta bo'y !tructure ha!$ an electronic beam that goe! 'on each o& the &inger!
an' he o#en! an' clo!e! hi! han' ith !ort o& beam!$ Thi! i! going o&& into !tructure$ .ut he
!ometime! #ull! out ith thi! theta bo'y com#lete an' !im#ly take! it along$
He can al!o #ull out o& the theta bo'y but he ha!n"t got a #rayer o& ever becoming a
cell$ <ot a #rayer$ ?ou can ho#e* but it on"t 'o you very much goo'$
<o* I have ma'e an actual te!t o& thi! an' I can a!!ure you thi! i! the ca!e$ I have
taken #eo#le ho ere totally 'ea' in the hea'* ha' no #erce#tion o& any kin'* coul' not
#o!!ibly have gotten out o& their hea'!* oul' have been the #eo#le* a! eak a! they ere*
that oul' have gotten !tuck in bo'ie! an' gone on the genetic line! an' ha' very many
'i!a!trou! thing! ha##en to them* an' I have &e' them !uch thing! a! i#ecac* hich i! very
vile material hich ma'e them !o ill that they thoroughly ho#e' they oul' 'ie$ An' in each
an' every ca!e hen they oul' get very* very lo an' very clo!e to the bor'erline* hy* they
oul' go out / one &ello ent out an' !at on a bell buoy an' 3u!t !at there &or a long time
&eeling very !a' about the hole thing* an' then came back an' notice' the bo'y a! getting
better !o he #icke' it u# again$
Thi! a! 'one to him again an' he 'i' more or le!! the !ame thing* but he kne he
a! being &oole' thi! time !o he 'i'n"t go !o &ar an' he came back rather ra#i'ly$
.ut one ay or another I"ve manage' to e8teriori6e anybo'y ha' anything to 'o ith*
an' they have knon ho they ere an' hat they ere 'oing a&ter they got out o& their
hea'!* an' thi! rather 'emon!trate! conclu!ively that a #er!on 'oe! not get tra##e' an' that
'eath i! 3u!t another #henomenon an' it"! about a! 'angerou! an' u#!etting a! lo!ing your
&amily or your #ocketbook or !ome other #o!!e!!ion$ An' a #er!on lo!e! hi! bo'y an' a&ter
that behave! accor'ingly an' out o& thi! a great my!tery i! ma'e$ .ut that i! 'eath* the
#henomena o&$ An' I ho#e !ometime or another you may have no u!e &or thi! hat!oever$
Thank you$
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.018

The Concept of Death in
Theosophy & Thelema:


Death, a Gateway to New Life by the Indian Section
of the Theosophical Society (1990-91 Essay,
Comparative Source)


Death in Thelema by Frater IAO131
(2012 Essay, Comparative Source)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
Death, a Gateway to New Life
Death is a subject which at once engages the attention of everyone,
since one thing which is absolutely certain in human life is that one day
one must die. Yet man cannot be reconciled to death as long as he thinks of it
as an ending. We regard death with fear and repulsion because it seems to
break the continuity in our lives. The meaning of death can be comprehended
in the realm of consciousness, for death is a shift of the focus of
consciousness, a veritable jump.
Yet if we consider it simply and quietly is it not actually a phenomenon which
is as natural as birth? It is taking place all the time around us. So universal,
natural and apparently necessary a phenomenon cannot be devoid of a deep
significance. Life exists in the midst of death.
A thorough comprehension of this Theosophical truth brings about an entire
change in our attitude towards death. We begin to view death with equanimity
and a calm serenity for we then know that after death there is life and the
gateway of death is but an entrance into other realms of existence wherein we
may dwell awhile during an immortal pilgrimage. The vast amount of utterly
unnecessary sorrow and terror and misery which mankind has suffered simply
from its ignorance and superstition is replaced by a refreshing knowledge
which robs death forthwith of its terror and much of its sorrow. It enables us
to understand its place in the scheme of our evolution.
Man a Complex Being
The meaning of death can be understood with the help of the basic tenets of
Theosophy. Theosophy tells us that man is a far more complex being than to
physical sight he appears to be. The real truth is that man is a soul and has a
body. By this body we mean the physical body. This body is not the man, it is
only the clothing of the man. What one calls death is laying aside of a worn-
[ Theosophy-based views on reincarnation and the afterlife. ]
out garment, like the removal of an overcoat. Within and without this gross
physical body there is an etheric counterpart known as the etheric double. It is
through this etheric body that we derive our life-force and vitality from the
sun.
Interpenetrating the physical and etheric bodies and extending a little beyond
their periphery is the astral body or the desire body which is the store-house
of our emotions and feelings. Interpenetrating all these bodies and extending a
little further is the mental body or the thought body. It is with this body that
all our thinking process goes on. Owing to this four-fold structure of his
personality man feels that he is more than flesh and blood, more than a mere
creature living to eat, sleep and perpetuate his species. He asks deeply and
sincerely "Who am I inside this body?" The very nature of such questioning
and the depth of consciousness from which it arises together supply the
beginning of the answer.
Post-Mortem Life: (a) The Astral World
As we lay aside the physical body we are surrounded by etheric matter. But
after a time this etheric matter slowly slips away and we become more and
more aware of the emotional world in which we are now conscious inhabitants,
or in other words we go to a world of starry light and experience, increasing
freedom, as consciousness is progressively released from the heavier
vibrations of the gross physical matter. What sort of life one will lead in one's
astral body and what will its duration entirely depend upon the type of life one
has led in the physical world. If one has had a relatively pure life based on
ethical principles and had allowed himself to be surrounded by altruistic and
sympathetic thoughts, he will lead a happy period during a comparatively
short stay in the astral world. He discovers that life away from the dense body
has a vividness and brilliancy to which all earthly enjoyment is as moonlight
unto sunlight and that through his clear knowledge and calm confidence he
can help all those who need help in the astral plane. He may become a center
of peace and joy unspeakable to hundreds of his fellowmen and may do more
good in a few years of that astral existence than ever he could have done in
the longest physical life.
But if unfortunately the man had led a sensual earthly life with all undesirable
feelings like envy, hatred, anger and violence then his astral life will be longer
and full of trouble for quite some time. For example, if he had been a
drunkard, his thirst for drinks would intensify, but as he no longer possesses a
physical tongue and lips he would acutely suffer from the intense thirst for
wine. This is the fire of the hell which is described in mythologies. There is no
geographical location of hell. Hell is a state of mind conditioned by the desires
of the past which cannot be satiated for want of a physical body. But time is a
great healer and gradually as the desires get weaker and weaker the refining
process takes place and the soul prepares itself for the more radiant world -
the mental plane, swarga or heaven, also known as devachan in Theosophical
literature. So one thing is obvious. Life after death entirely depends upon
oneself. The golden rule is: as here so there. We carry beyond the grave all
our virtues and vices, and overnight a saint does not become a sinner nor a
sinner a saint after he leaves the physical body and enters the astral plane.
Post Mortem Life (b) The Mental World
After life on the astral plane comes to a close, there lies before man's soul
another and still grander stage of the wonderful post-mortem life. The grosser
elements of his personal nature cannot enter the heavenly realm. So these
exhaust themselves out before heaven life begins. Here also the duration of
mental-world existence and the intensity of joy that the soul experiences
depend wholly upon the sort of life that the man had spent during his earthly
existence. All the noble aspirations that he had made for himself, love,
affection and devotion that he had imbibed in his nature, the intellectual and
spiritual pursuits that he had undertaken stand him in good stead in his
heavenly abode. For heaven is not a dream, but a living and glorious reality. It
is not a city far away beyond the stars with streets of gold reserved for the
habitation of a favored few, but a state of consciousness into which every man
will pass during the interval between his lives on earth. Here the self will
review the experiences of existence and will mould them into new capacities
and powers. Purified and refined he spends a period of substantial duration in
the mental world and pursues the refinement of his life's experiences.
Beyond the Mental World
But even this glorious heaven life is finite and the idea of eternal heaven
(akhanda swarga) is not correct. After the man exhausts his period of rest and
refreshment his mental-world life comes to a close and the mental body in its
turn drops away as others have done and the man's life in his causal body
begins. Here the man needs no windows, for this is his true home and all his
walls have fallen away. A majority of men have as yet but very little
consciousness at such a height as this; they rest dreamily unobservant and
are scarcely awake. Only very advanced souls have one continuous
consciousness and even in post-mental-world-life they are fully conscious. So
at this stage the soul of man awaits its fresh journey to the physical world. It
takes a new body in new surroundings. This brings us to the process of
reincarnation which will be discussed below.
Scientific Evidence of Post-Mortem Life
It is interesting to note that what Theosophy has told us about the mystery of
death and after-death-life is being corroborated by modern scientific
investigations. In recent years the testimony of hundreds of people who have
experienced "clinical death" have been collected and published by medical
researchers the best known being Dr. Raymond Moody (author of Life after
Life) and Dr. Kubler-Ross (author of On Death and Dying). The experiences of
these people who were revived and lived to tell what happened to them when
they were "dead" bear a striking similarity to those described in Theosophical
literature. For most, the experience is the passing through a dark enclosure
before their consciousness refocuses and they become aware or themselves in
a hard-to-define subtler body from which they watch in a detached way their
physical body being revived on the operating table or rescued from a wrecked
car. Many then found themselves in a world of light and freedom (a degree of
freedom they never enjoyed in their earthly life). They met there a "Being of
light" which epitomized perfect understanding and perfect love. Often they
experienced a kaleidoscopic and an incredibly vivid instant review or replay of
their lives' main events (a fact repeatedly mentioned in Theosophical books).
Then they came to know from that Being that their earthly life-span had not
ended and they must return to their earthly home for completing the
unfinished business of this incarnation. Many were reluctant to do so as this
brief astral experience was far more pleasant and glorious than their earthly
experience. All of them testified that this new experience completely changed
their lives. They no longer had any fear of death and understood that from this
time on their mission was to cultivate love for others and to go on learning to
the very end of life.
The foregoing scientific evidences are adduced as they corroborate some of
the statements in Theosophical literature relating to life immediately following
clinical death. These evidences have nothing to do with reincarnation which is
a different matter altogether.
Reincarnation
So far we have discussed death and after death life. But the process of death
is closely and indissolubly linked with rebirth or reincarnation. For death is
indeed a gateway to new life. Theosophy tells us in no uncertain terms how
there is a great Rhythm of life to be seen at macrocosmic as well as
microcosmic levels of existence. Our evolving self has alternating periods of
rest and action, inbreathing and outbreathing of the pulse of life. The soul of
man takes a vesture of flesh and blood many times during its evolution. The
physical body houses a pilgrim soul, shaped by its past and it has a future
which is "the future of a thing whose growth and splendor have no limit". An
infant is not a blank sheet of paper, nor is it a mere cohesion of atomic forces
- it comes as poet Wordsworth said "Not in entire forgetfulness/And not in
This material was taken almost in its entirety from the brochure: "Death - A
Gateway to New Life," published by the Indian Section of the Theosophical
utter nakedness". All the qualities that we possess of body, mind and soul are
the result of our use of opportunities in the previous existences, and the use
we make of our present opportunities will determine our future character and
capacity. Reincarnation is thus a cycle of activity and rest, and death is the
necessary connecting link between the two. Death provides the opportunity for
each of us to travel the way according to our own uniqueness. Death comes
then as only the laying aside of a physical instrument for rest and the
assimilation of experiences into capacities and maturer wisdom with which the
soul may begin another incarnation. So life proceeds in cyclic pattern,
existence on earth for gathering of experience being followed by existence in
other realms of living. Our eternal purposes reflect themselves in time and the
transitory vehicles we use - mental, emotional and physical - gather the
experiences by which we become conscious of our divine nature and purpose.
In the journey of life, the great journey of evolution, the distance we travel is
the same for all, but each one can choose the rate of progress. One can
choose the easy way of hundreds of births and deaths, learning slowly in each
incarnation or one can go on the steep, shorter but more difficult route
learning fast and reach the summit sooner. In the earlier stages of evolution
we commit mistakes and learn through suffering but as we grow in knowledge
and wisdom we throw away much baggage of Karma - the accumulation of
action and reaction that we had created through our thoughts, desires and
actions. Then we make rapid strides and reach the summit. That is the end of
the long journey when that which is called in the Christian Bible "the stature of
the fullness of Christ" is attained. That is what the Bhagavad Gita also says.
This is the real purpose of the cycle of birth and death.


Society in its Centenary Year: 1990-1991.
to return to teosofia.com


Death in Thelema
January 17, 2012 · by IAO131 · in Aleister Crowley, Philosophy, Thelema. · 
Do what thou wilt

shall be the whole of the Law.
Thelema is an all-encompassing paradigm, and therefore it deals with all aspects of life. A universal 
experience of all people – and all living things – is death. What then is the view of death and the 
afterlife in Thelema?
We may examine this question first by understanding what Thelemites do not believe. Thelema does 
not have a conception of death like that of the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam). 
There is no notion of a heaven or hell that is beyond this world. There is no notion of Judgment for 
our moral actions or beliefs. This much is clear to anyone who has performed even a cursory review of 
the Thelemic literary corpus.
Thelema also does not have a conception of death like that of the Dharmic religions (Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism). There is no notion of a desire to escape Samsara, the wheel of birth, 
death, and rebirth. There is also no notion of reincarnating in order to perfect the soul or achieve 
By Frater IAO131 :: a Thelemite, author of Naturalistic Occultism, creator & editor of
The Journal of Thelemic Studies, and author of many other essays on the subjects
of the Philosophy & Psychology of Thelema, Occultism, Mysticism & Magick.
enlightenment throughout several lifetimes. This topic has been treated in a previous essay entitled 
“New Aeon Initiation (http://iao131.wordpress.com/2010/11/14/new-aeon-initiation-no-perfection-of-
the-soul/)” and Crowley has written, “The idea of incarnations ‘perfecting’ a thing originally perfect 
by definition is imbecile.” Thelemites see life and the world of duality as providing the opportunity 
for the “chance of union” (Liber AL I:29), to experience the joy of “love under will.”
Several questions still remain: Does Thelema hold the belief that we have only one life (like 
Abrahamic religions) or that we have many lives (like Dharmic religions)? Is there anything that 
survives death? If there are many lives, is there something that travels from life to life or are they all 
distinct in some way?
The first difficulty in figuring out Thelema’s approach to death is that the term “death” is used in at 
least two ways: firstly, it refers to the physical death of the body and, secondly, it refers to the spiritual 
experience of the death of the sense of self which is called “Crossing the Abyss” in this system. We 
may see the distinction in many places, and Crowley himself often differentiates the two ideas such as 
when he writes, “The death of the individual is his awakening to the impersonal immortality of Hadit. 
This applies less to physical death than to the Crossing of the Abyss.”
The “soul” in Thelema is understood to be something that is eternal and without quality – it is 
something beyond space and beyond time and identical with God or Godhead Itself. In the above 
quotation, Crowley explains that the death of the individual – what is often called the ego-self – 
causes an identity with Hadit which is “impersonal” – that is, not having anything to do with what we 
might ascribe to the personality or any personal qualities whatsoever – and “immortal” – that is, it 
does not ever die. What Crowley is describing is “the Crossing of the Abyss” which is an experience 
that one has while physically alive. Initiation or the process of “spiritual progress” essentially involves 
coming to conscious awareness and identity with this Self or Soul. When describing this Soul in a 
Three-in-One fashion, composed of Jechidah, Chiah, and Neshamah, Crowley writes, “It is the work 
of Initiation to journey inwards to them” (emphasis in the original).
This is a very basic understanding of the “death” that is involved in the Crossing of the Abyss. But 
what of the death of the physical body? Again, it is difficult to determine which references to death 
and dying are speaking about physical or spiritual death. There are many mentions of death in the 
Holy Books of Thelema, but there is one clear mention of the death of the body in The Book of the Law: 
“Think not, o king, upon that lie: That Thou Must Die: verily thou shalt not die, but live. Now let it be 
understood: If the body of the King dissolve, he shall remain in pure ecstasy for ever” (Liber AL II:21). 
The line itself, specifically “If the body of the King dissolve, he shall remain in pure ecstasy for ever”, 
is not particularly clear. Does this mean that when the body dies, we enter into an eternal ecstasy 
rather than incarnating ever again? Does it mean that we enter into the ecstasy that is beyond time (so 
to speak) and then enter back into space and time with every new incarnation? Is it simply a metaphor 
for the Crossing of the Abyss that happens to use the image of the body? Crowley comments on this 
line,
“One’s ‘immortal soul’ is a different kind of thing altogether from one’s mortal vesture. This Soul is a particular
Star, with its own peculiar qualities, of course; but these qualities are all ‘eternal,’ and part of the nature of the
Soul. This Soul being a monistic consciousness, it is unable to appreciate itself and its qualities, as explained in a
previous entry; so it realizes itself by the device of duality, with the limitations of time, space and causality.”
Here we see the clear understanding that the immortal soul is not the same as the “mortal vesture,” 
which presumably refers to the mind (including the personality) and body of the individual. Also, 
Crowley contrasts the “eternal” Soul or Star with duality, which includes “time, space, and causality.” 
This re-affirms the notion that the Soul is beyond these things.
In his “Djeridensis Comment” (or “The Comment Called D”), Crowley writes on this line:
“The root of all such error is the belief of Kings that they are mortal. This is confuse their essence with that basis
of a certain class of events which refers to the kind of life which includes death. Aiwass insists that if the body
dissolve its King remains in timeless rapture. For his events have ceased; and he stands in a single state of joy as
made one with Nuit. Should he wish further knowledge of himself, he must choose some other means by which to
measure it, by which to set in motion a fresh series of events.”
Here we have a little more information. The idea that the Soul is eternal and the true essence and 
identity of everyone is re-affirmed, and it is once again contrasted with impermanent things (“a 
certain class of events which refers to the kind of life which includes death”) such as the “mortal 
vesture” mentioned previously. More importantly, we have a clarification to the line “If the body of 
the King dissolve, he shall remain in pure ecstasy for ever.” After death, “events have ceased” and the 
Soul is in ecstasy or joy. If the Soul desires “further knowledge of himself” (which we know to mean 
experience in the world of duality), there needs to be “some other means” to “set in motion a fresh 
series of events” – that is, a new incarnation.
We now have the basic conception of death in Thelema. The true essence and identity of every person, 
the Soul or Star, is perfect and beyond space, time, and causality. It is essentially a “monistic 
consciousess” (the Zero/0 of the Thelemic ontology) so it has to incarnate into a specific mind and 
body in order to have experience (the Two/2 of the Thelemic ontology). When the person’s body dies, 
the Soul remains in formless, timeless ecstasy or joy when not incarnated.
This is a consistent and satisfactory answer to the question of death, yet some questions remain 
unanswered. Specifically, is there any thread temporally tying together the lives of a Soul? That is, is 
there any notion of reincarnation or metempsychosis (transmigration of the soul)? After all, didn’t 
Crowley himself claim to have “past lives”? It is indeed logically possible that we may not believe in 
the notion of escaping Samsara or perfecting our souls yet still believe in some form of connection 
between lives.
If we look, the official website of U.S. Grand Lodge O.T.O. explicitly states (http://oto-
usa.org/theology.html) a belief in metempsychosis. That being said, on this website it is said that the 
“Body of Light” is subject to metempsychosis and not necessarily the Soul of which we have been 
speaking. Let’s look at what Crowley himself said about the idea of metempsychosis.
In a chapter in Liber Aleph entitled “De Morte” (“On Death”), Crowley begins with this sentence, 
“Thou hast made Question of me concerning Death, and this is my Opinion, of which I say not: this is 
the Truth.” This disclaimer is not given for any other chapter, nor is it typical of his writing on 
Thelema to write in such a skeptical or reticent fashion. Interestingly, he begins his short treatise 
“Liber ThIShARB” (a document that details the practice of going backwards in one’s memory 
including back to past lives) in a similar way. He starts the document with these words, “May be. It 
has not been possible to construct this book on a basis of pure Scepticism. This matters less, as the 
practice leads to Scepticism, and it may be through it.” In “Liber ThIShARB,” Crowley is extremely 
explicit about the validity of these “memories,” saying repeatedly that they must be viewed 
skeptically and be checked with facts to ascertain if they are valid. He writes, “But let him not trust his 
memory to assert its conclusions as fact, and act thereupon, without most adequate confirmation.” It 
should be clear that Crowley treated this subject of the afterlife with great caution and critical 
thinking.
Coming back to the chapter “De Morte” from Liber Aleph, keeping Crowley’s disclaimer in mind, we 
can continue to examine the rest of what he says. Crowley then explains the idea of the Soul 
incarnating into a mind and body. He writes that the soul “inhabiteth a Tabernacle of Illusion, a Body 
and Mind. And this Tabernacle is Subject to the Law of Change, for it is complex, and diffuse reacting 
to every Stimulus or Impression.” This affirms the previously mentioned idea that the mind and body 
are impermanent vehicles of the immortal Soul. He continues:
“If then the mind be attached constantly to the Body, Death hath no Power to decompose it wholly, but a
decaying Shell of the dead Man, his Mind holding together for a little his Body of Light, haunteth the Earth,
seeking a new Tabernacle (in its Error that feareth Change) in some other Body. These Shells are broken away
utterly from the Star that did enlighten them, and they are Vampires, obsessing them that adventure themselves
into the Astral World without Magical Protection, or invoke them, as do the Spiritists. For by Death is Man
released only from the Gross Body, at the first, and is complete otherwise upon the Astral Plane, as he was in his
Life. But this Wholeness suffereth Stress, and its Girders are loosened, the weaker first and after that the
stronger.”
Here is one possibility that Crowley expounds: if your mind is attached to the body, the mind will 
hold together and “haunt the Earth” but it has “broken away utterly from the Star.” The idea being 
that the mind can, in some way, persist beyond death but it is no longer connected to the Star or Soul. 
These “Shells” can account for some of what is seen in the “astral world,” what Spiritists 
communicate with, and potentially for other phenomena such as ghosts. Crowley then continues in 
the next chapter, contrasting this notion with what happens to Adepts after death (I apologize for the 
long quotation but it is all pertinent):
“Consider now in this Light what shall come to the Adept, to him that hath aspired constantly and firmly to his
Star, attuning the Mind unto the Musick of its Will. In him, if his Mind be knit perfectly together is itself, and
conjoined with the Star, is so strong a Confection that it breaketh away easily not only from the Gross Body, but
the fine. It is this Fine Body which bindeth it to the Astral, as did the Gross to the Material World so then it
accomplisheth willingly the Sacrament of a second Death and leaveth the Body of Light. But the Mind, cleaveth
closely, by Right of its Harmony, and Might of its Love, to its Star, resisteth the Ministers of Disruption, for a
Season, according to its Strength. Now, if this Star be of those that are bound by the Great Oath, incarnating
without Remission because of Delight in the Cosmic Sacrament, it seeketh a new Vehicle in the appointed Way,
and indwelleth the Fœtus of a Child, and quickeneth it. And if at this Time the mind of its Former Tabernacle yet
cling to it, then is there Continuity of Character, and it may be Memory, between the two Vehicles. This is,
briefly and without Elaboration, is the Way of Asar in Amennti, according to mine Opinion, of which I say not:
This is the Truth.”
The basic idea is that Adepts spend their lives attuning their minds to the Will and so the mind can 
“cleave closely… to its Star” and incarnate into a new body. This allows for “Continuity of Character, 
and it may be Memory, between the two Vehicles,” which is the basic understanding of reincarnation 
and the basis for the belief in past lives. It is interesting, though, that Crowley appears to believe the 
continuity between lives is only possible for Adepts who have trained their minds thoroughly. Also of 
note is that Crowley, in ending this chapter on death, says once again “according to mine Opinion, of 
which I say not: This is the Truth.”
We can see that Crowley did indeed entertain a notion of metempsychosis, but one that is limited in a 
way to Adepts. We can also see that Crowley was especially careful to be skeptical and encourage 
skepticism around this issue. No other chapter in Liber Aleph contains such a disclaimer, let alone one 
both at the beginning and end of the discussion. The Holy Books themselves are not explicitly clear 
about this issue. Though there is an identification between Aleister Crowley and Ankh-af-na-khonsu 
in Liber AL (such as I:14 and I:36), it is not explicit whether this is a literal or symbolic statement (the 
latter of which Liber AL is clearly full of).
In conclusion, Thelema is a system where we believe each individual has a Soul or Star which is 
perfect, impersonal, and also beyond space, time, causality, and any form of duality. The Soul 
incarnates into the world of duality through a mind and body. When the physical body dies, and 
when not incarnated in general, the Soul remains in a timeless, formless ecstasy. All of this can be 
agreed upon, being that it is consistently affirmed and re-affirmed throughout Thelemic Holy Books 
as well as in Crowley’s commentaries to these texts. Beyond this, Crowley maintained that it is 
possible for the mind to “cleave” to a Star if one is an Adept, and this can lead to a “continuity of 
character” as well as the memory of past lives. That being said, Crowley had an atypical skepticism 
and cautiousness around this issue. This idea of some kind of continuity of character through lives 
remains to be explored by each Thelemite, confirmed or rejected based on experience, checking the 
facts, and utility.
I want to end this essay by very briefly touching upon the last of the criteria just mentioned: utility. I 
encourage Thelemites – and magicians in general – to consider the usefulness of believing in past 
lives. Supposing for a moment that it is true that you have past lives, each life presents an entirely 
unique situation: you are born in a different place, with a different family, a different physiology 
(including genetic predispositions), possibly a different language, a different culture, a different 
experience being raised, a different peer group, exposure to different ideas at different times, etc. It is 
my personal opinion that, for example, the fact you are interested in trains as a child doesn’t mean 
you should be a train conductor or engineer as an adult. If one’s own childhood may not necessarily 
supply the necessary information to discover and accomplish your Will, how much less pertinent 
would information about a previous life? Further, we may so easily fall victim to that demon that 
appears to plague occultists of all stripes: the demon of Glamor. It is plain that there is a large 
possibility of an “ego trip” were one to think that you were Buddha, Caesar, or any figure of 
importance. There is a glamor in the claim to past lives, especially the glamor in possessing some kind 
of strange or powerful access to memories across lifetimes. Crowley himself warned about this in 
Magick Without Tears (http://hermetic.com/crowley/magick-without-tears/mwt_41.html) when he wrote,  
“You ask if we, meaning, I suppose, the English, are now reincarnating the Egyptians. When I was a 
boy it was the Romans, while the French undertook the same thankless office for the Greeks.  I say 
‘deadly poison’ because when you analyse you see at once that this is a device for flattering yourself.  
You have a great reverence for the people who produced Luxor and the Pyramids; and it makes you 
feel nice and comfortable inside if you think that you were running around in those days as Rameses 
II or a high priest in Thebes or something equally congenial.” I am not discouraging the belief in or 
the practice of obtaining memories of past lives, but I encourage any readers of this essay to think 
very critically about the utility of memories of past lives. I hope that you seriously consider the 
possibility and consequences of falling prey to the glamor of the idea and remember that Crowley 
himself was very skeptical, repeating “this is my Opinion, of which I say not: this is the Truth.”
Love is the law, love under will.
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.019

Shangri-La
(2009 Feature Article)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.020

L. Ron Hubbard’s Basic Concept of
Self-Determinism:


Specific Parts of Self-Determinism
(1973 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


Postulates and Self-Determinism
(1978 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


Power of Choice (1979 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)


Truth and Self-Determinism
(1984 L. Ron Hubbard Essay)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
[ From Advance! Magazine AOLA Issue No. 21 1973 ]
[ From Advance! Magazine AOLA Issue 55, 1978 ]
[ From Advance! Magazine AOLA Issue No. 57 1978 ]
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"--~~~~~~~.-~~~~-------
TRUTH
there and then, going to become
common to all of them. Andthey
think that's grand, andthat's agood
game, and"we can play this game
with impunity"."
Well, they can play it just so long
andthen the randomity starts toset
up. Thepostulate, then, islosing its
value as single truth, andbecomes
relative to those agreements which
havebeenmadeamongst them.
This fellow one days says, "I'm
nowgoingtopostulatethat I'mgoing
to have a new palace." And the
otherssay, "That's out of agreement.
Youknowverywell that weinvented
a labor union, andthe labor union
getsjustsomuchmoneyanhour and
all that sortof thing, andthey haveto
go over it. Andwe've got to have a
quarry, andyou'll have to own the
landof thequarry, andyou'll haveto
get apermit inorder toquarry stone,
andyou'll have to get an interstate
trucking licenseinorder tohaul that
stone over here, andwe'll have to
hiremasons, andthere's unemploy-
ment taxandthere's social security,
andeverybody know that yOIl can't
payanything likethat foranything of
the sort. Andyou don't have any
chips"."
And the fellow says, "Well, I'll
makeastack of money, andpay all
those things with it." "No," they
say, "we've agreedthat theonlycur-
rency is that currency on which
we've agreed." And he'll say, "I
didn't agreetothat currency. I wasn't
there." Andtheysay, "Youagreedto
an army to protect our property,
didn't you?" Andthe fellow says,
"Well, yes, I did." And they say,
"They protect the currency now.
Let's haveno moreof that."
Andsoyou've got acyclegoingin
which the postulate is actually as
validasitisrelatedtotheagreedsub-
ject. (Andafter awhile, hispostulate
gets very weak indeed. He says, "I
think I will haveaglassof water, pro-
vidingnobodyobjects." Andtohave
aglass of water, you walk over to a
tap, andturn the tap on, and- im-
agille it - you have aglass there to
catch the water in, andyou have to
haveastomach, andamouthtodrink
it with, andso forth. Andyou're all
set then!)
Self-detem1inismby L. Ron Hubbard (cmltj"u~dfromp"ge7)
never makes a statement to himself wlJQt
goal he's trying to acllieve, what he's try-
ing to do. Hejust goeson.
One day he suddenly mixes up a
Las Vegas* anda little bit of faro"
withablondeinNewYork,andtakes
atrain. Hesays, "We'llieave itall to
chance. AndI guessI'vegotthisjob. I
don't knowwhat I'mdOing,butI can
hope." Andhe's amember of Alco-
holicsAnonymous because they tell
himhecan livefor the minute. This
guy's interribleshape. He's become
Homo sapiens!
Now this fellowhears one day -
andsays- "All I'vegot todoisjust
postulate that I'mself-determined."
Of course, he doesn't know what
self-determinismis!Hehasnodefini-
tion of that, or anything of the sort.
Hemerelypostulates, "It isastatein
whichI candowhat I pleasewithout
incurring anypenalty. Therefore, if I
sayI'mself-determined, then I don't
havetotakeanyresponsibilitywhat-
soever for anything badthat I do,
becauseit's onmyself-determinism.
That's well workedout; that equates
perfectly;" he says, "that's a won-
derful stateof affairs." Andof course
people keep hitting himwith axes,
throwing himintogutters, throwing
himthis wayandthat way; andit's
all backwards.
Youget the difference, then, be-
tween a clearcut series of postulates
which couldbecome truths, anda
clearcut chunk of chaos, which most
men consider their lives shouldbe
(not "could" be, but "should" be!).
There's abig differencethere. We're
talking about another level of truth
when wesay, "postulates".
"Truth" intheMEST Universe
Let's take another level of truth
now. Let'stakethetruthcalledMEST
universe. This "truth" iscomposited
out of aseriesof agreements.
After this fellow has made afew
postulates he gets hold of a few
friends, and for the sake of ran-
domity" theyall agreethat such-and-
such isgoing totakeplace, andthat
when so-and-so makes a postulate
andwhen they all agree upon this
postulate, then this postulate is,
Las Vegas: la city in the stnle of Nevada in weslern
U.S.;knuwn for ilSgambling caSinos.]
faro: [agambling game pt~yedWilhcards.]
randomity: theamountof predicted andunpredicted
mutiun a person has. inr~lio.
I
,
impunily: lexemption from punishment; freedom
fromunplcasani consequences.)
chips: IAmericnn slang for "mooey".1
1
J
&TRUTH
Self-determinism
J OIN
the fight for
And this big agreement becomes
what? "Natural law," or "truth",
What istruth for this J and?They have
a standing army and trade unions
and all the rest of this. That's
"truth"!
Atn/til is something which would
exist without much contest,
something which is triumphant. A
champion who stands up after abat-
tle with bloodied shield and sword
andyet has won, is himself truth in
the force universe. A datum which
itself sweeps all data before it, in
another universe, is truth. It is that
which works, andthat which works
mostly broadly to that to which it is
applied.
Relative trutits, then, would have to
do with their relative workability. What
could be true in any fieldcould be
true for fllat field, but it's not
necessarily true for another field.
What's true for one universe is not
true for another.
What we have scouted in Scien-
tology - what we've lookedover -
is the MEST-universe parade of
agreement stemming fromthe first
capability, the first "Q"*that we can
discover, which describes the capa-
bilities of theta as we can view them
fromthis point.

...
"
n
('(1
and the rights of all men!
The International Association of
Scientologists has been formed!
Throughout the history of this
planet anduniverse,suppression of
the individual's freedom has im-
pededtheattainment of sanityand
the survival of individuals and
groups. Religion has been sup-
pressed to prevent spiritual
freedom.
The aims of Scientology must
come true. This planet and the
universeare at stake.
TheInternational Association of
Scientologists has been formedto:
- gather anduniteall Scientol-
ogis15on this planet andcreate a
worldwide, strong. true group
through the contribution andpar-
ticipation of aJ i Scientologists,
- support andfurther the dis-
semination and expansion of
Scientology throughout the world,
to bring about a cleared planet
swiftly.
- ensurethat, without question,
Scientology wiJ l be delivered
despite any effort to halt or slow
Scientology delivery or dissemina-
tion inany nation, on any contin-
ent, of the world.
It wiJ l guarantee that THE
BRIDGEToTotal Freedomwill be
open to you asamember, forever.
andto your family andfriends as
well.
Itisyour activeinvolvement and
contribution that will ensure that
we, as a group, wiJ l be able to
change conditions on this planet
andreversethedownwardspiral of
individuals andcivilizations.
J oin the International Associa-
tion of Scientologists today! One
year membership: $300. lifetime
membership: $2000. (U.S., or
equivalent in other currencies.)
These are minimum fees. The
Association accepts higher dona-
tions to help forwarditspurposes.
See the Membership Officer at
this AdvancedOrganization, who
will provide an application form
and assist you in becoming a
member.
Or contact the Association
directly:
International Association of
Scientologists
Saint Hill Manor, East Grinstead
Sussex, EnglandRH194BR
Processing TowardSelf-Detennism
The trick inprocessing wouldbeto
keep your preclear there, in this uni-
verse, andyet let himslide sideways
into the creation of his own. That's
quite atrick, because he's insisting on
acontinued havingness in the MEST
universe andyou're trying to knock
out postulates which are contrary to
the MEST universe.
But asyou work itout, you will find
that asyou're attaining recognition in
himof ahigher-level truth towardhis
true capabilities - when you're get-
ting himup toward the higher truth
of his own self-determinism and
what makes his being tick" - he's be-
coming freer andfreer, andmore and
more of an individual.
A lot of people think that in pro-
cessing, the more you process an in-
dividual the less individual he be-
Qs: thcr~isaseries. numbering about five. abovethe
level of logic anda!J .oveIhe level uf a~ium. I .~a~~
b""n calling these things Ihe Qs, Lusl the leuer Q,
the mathematical symool. IThe(J s J Ppenr In S[l""-
lology 0-8: Ti,e Book of Basicsby L. RonHubbard.]
tick: [10makenclicking sound, asaduck; extended
meaning, "10 beinuperatiun," "to work".]
[
J oin the International Associa-
tion of Scientologists today!
I
J
© 19114Inteln.,ion.1 ""ociation of >cientologi"'. "II
lightsre.e•.•. ed
18 Aduance! 84
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SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.021

Scientology Philosophy of Self-Determinism:


Creation and The Reason “Why” (Anatomy of
Universes Part 1of2, L. Ron Hubbard Essay 1985)


Self-Determinism and Action (Anatomy of
Universes Part 2of2, L. Ron Hubbard Essay 1986)


Self-Determinism On The Dynamics (1951
Foundation Auditors Course L. Ron Hubbard
Lecture, R&D Series Vol. 8)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
[ From Advance! Magazine ANZO Issue No. 88 1985 ]
I want to talk to you about the anatomy of
universes'. How a universe comes about
and why, and what occurs when it has
come about.
l can answer the last question first and
tell you that what occurs when it comes
about is you, right where you are, doing
what you are doing, thinking what you are
thinking. That's what comes about.
Now let's go into how it came about. We
will discover that the process is extremely
simple. There are two sides to this picture:
one is the mechanical side, and the other is
the consideration
2

The consideration actually precedes the
mechanical. So we have to take up the first
postulate
3
, which brings about a universe.
The first postulate one would have to
make to make a universe would be, "I
don't know." The next postulate he'd have
to make would be, "There is something out
there." And the next postulate he' d have to
make would be, "What is it?"
This is the consecutive sequence of
beginning a universe. He has to assume
that there is something he doesn' t know,
then he has to place something or nothing
out there, and then he has to ask of it,
" What is it?" And he gets the mechanics of
perception.
The mechanics of perception, then, con-
sist of putting something out there and
then wondering what it is.
The gradual sequence of this brings
about a condition whereby he continues to
postulate," I do not know," and continues
to put nothingnesses out there which he
says are somethingnesses, and continues to
bring in things. And he gradually builds
up, and out, space.
He has space out there, and he' s pulling
in things through the space. You get a con-
densing effect.
Each time he said, " I don't know, " put
something out there, and brought it in, he
of course cut down the fact of his own
knowingness anew. So, consecutively, the
more he postulates "I don' t know, " and
the more .he brings in, the less he knows,
and the more he thinks he has around him
to know about.
'univers .. : " a universe is defined os a 'whole system of
created things.' There could be and are, many uni·
verses, and there could be many kinds of universes . ..
LRH (Dia .. etics and Scie .. tology Teclmical Dictim1ary,
e> L975 LRH.)
'consideration: " a consideration is a continuing pos·
tulate." LRH (Teclt. Diet.)
' postulate: 1. " that self-determined thought which
starts, stops or changes past, present or future
efforts." 2. " It is a specially applied word and is
defined as causative thinkingness. " LRH (Teclt. Diet.)
He has become a preclear after a few
trillion years of this idiocy. The preclear, at
length,believes himself surrounded by
things he doesn't know about. And that is
the end product of it.
THE FIRST REASON
Now he expects an auditor to permit him
to know about these things! The question
is, is there anything there to know?
Yes, there is. There' s the sequer1ce of
postulates which bring about this un-
knowing state. That's really all there Is
there to know!
Naturally, in view of the fact that he
kept putting things out and then saying he
didn't know about them, a condition came
about whereby he had to believe that there
was some significance• in these items
which he was bringing in on himself:
"There must be some reason to look!"
The first reason to look is: "It is beauti-
ful. " This is the first introduction into
reason. "It is beautiful. I am looking at it
because it is beautiful."
When he has exhausted that, the next
thing he gets into is, " It is significant."
And we have a condition whereby the pre-
dear is sold, utterly, on the fact that all
these that he has brought in had a
significance in them.
But let me tell you something: he ne-
glected, from first to last, to put any
significance in them. And if he didn't put
any significance in them, there isrz't any
significance in them!
CYCLE OF ACTION
To create is simply to put something
out. The first condition of creation is
space. " Now that it' s out there,let's look at
it. Bring it in so we can look at it. "
The next step is, "It's surviving," which
is simply another statement of, "I am look-
ing at it. " " It is surviving"- " I am look-
ing at it": same thing.
And finally, destruction occurs when he
has brought it all the way in. When it
comes all the way in there is no space, so of
course it disappears, and that is destruction.
When he fails to bring them all the way
in but just brings them closer, the cycle of
action• is incomplete. The preclear is hung
'significance: I. "a word which is used in the special
sense to denote any thought, decision, concept, or
meaning in the rnind in distinction to its masse-s." 2. " .1
thetan can postulate or say or reason anything. Thus
there is an infinity of significances. " LRH (Teclr.
Diet.)
$cycle of action: "the growth,
decay .md death or destruction of energy and matter in
a space." LRH (Tee/:. Diet.)
with all of his compounded incomplete
cycles of action. Every cycle of action
which he ever started and didn't com-
pletely finish stayed there because the cen-
ter of this cycle is, of course, "I am looking
at it. It is surviving."
If he brought it all the way in, he would
have taken all of the space out of it,
because space is made by the fact that he
has put it out - space being a viewpoint of
dimension. The space was created by the
fact that he put it out; therefore, the space
would disappear on the fact that he had
pulled it all the way in.
What's giving him trouble are those
things which he didn't pull all the way in.
They are not totally destroyed.
Now an auditor comes along, and he
asks the auditor to finish these things:
"Let's destroy all this stuff that I don't
know about and is driving me mad." How
would you destroy it all? Well, there'd be
two systems of destroying it. One would
simply be to restore his ability to create and
go through the cycle again, and the other
one would be simply to bring it all the way
in.
There's the cycle of action. There's
lookingness, there's perceptio·n, there's
space, there' s your primary postulate, and
so forth.
The consideration that lies above this is
the consideration that one must put some-
thing out in order to consider. That's a
mechanical operation. Nobody would ever
have any space if he had never put any-
thing out to look at.
THE "SURPRISE" GAME
Now let' s get down to the first and
foremost game which a thetan
6
plays. It 's a
game called "surprise". I've just told you
the mechanics of the game.
One of the more complex ways of doing
it is for the thetan to mock up a small box
with something in it. And then he forgets
what he put in it, and he opens the box and
he is surprised.
This gives him the sensation of not hav-
ing known, and having found out some-
thing. What did he find out? He found out
something that he knew before. The only
way he could experience the sensation of
finding out was to postulate that he had
•the tan: l. " the living unit we call, in Scientology, a
thetar:, thot being taken from the Greek letter theta".
2. " (spirit) is described in Scientology as having no
mass, no wave-length, no energy and no time or loca-
tion in space except by consideration or postulate. The
spirit is not a thing. It is the creator of things. "LRH
(Tech. Diet.)
  on next page)
Advance! 88 5
FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF
WITH THE ABILITIES
OFATHETAN
in the textbook
for Ron's famous
Philadelphia Doctorate Course.
"The original definition of Scientology
8-8008 was the attainment of infinity by
the reduction of the apparent infinity
and power of the MEST universe to a
zero for himself. and the increase of the
apparent zero of one's own universe to
an infinity {or oneself." said Ron in
1952, in this thetan·stretching book.
"It can be seen that infinity stood
upright makes the number eight: thus,
Scientology 8-8008 Is notjust another
number, but seroes to fix into the mind
of the indiuidual, a route by which he
can rehabilitate himself. his abilities,
his ethics and his goals."
Answer your questions on OT states
and abilities, with the text on the subject!
Find out how you can be able to per·
ceive differences between your universe
and the physical universe!
Learn how you can contribute to creat·
ing things!
Buy and read SCIENTOLOGY: 8-8008
by L RON HUBBARD!
Get it now from the Advanced Org
Bookstore In person or order by mall.
Price: as shown on the Jist with this issue
of Advance!, or ask the Bookstore
Officer.
If unovallllble, order from Bridge Publk:otlons, Inc .. 1414 N.
C.tallno St., Los Angeles, C.lifomlo 90027 U.S.A or New Ero
Publicotlons ApS., Store Kongensgede 55. 1264 Copenhagen
K. Denmcrk
6 Advance! 88
C R EATION
&
"The Reason    
L . RON HUBBhR\J (contin11ed from preceding page)
found out! So we get this dizzy
7
little
game.
You wouldn't think a game like this
would become serious enough to wind up
on torture stakes, under the grinding
treads of giant tanks, and under the high
plume of atom bombs. You wouldn't think
it would amount to diphtheria and
infidelity. You wouldn't think this would
ever amount to such an end product. It
does.
THE BIGGEST SCARCITY
His foe is boredom. He feels that if he
gave up any part of the game which he has,
he wouldn't have any game at all. And if
he had no game at all, there would be noth-
ing for him to be interested in, there would
be no further responsibility, there would
be no further interest, and- this one most
of all - no reason for existence.
His biggest scarcity- it doesn' t
happen to exist at all! - is a reason for
existence. If you want to know what scar-
city is, just say "reason for existence," and
you have it.
Those two phrases interchange. Scarcity
interchanges with reason for existence. An
individual begins to have things. Why
does he have them? A reason for existence.
An individual begins to take on form
and shape, to compound universes, enter
universes and exit from universes, and so
forth.
(A universe is simply a point to view
from, plus the space and objects which are
put up there to view. )
UNIVERSE MIX-UP
Interpersonal relations seem to be, to a
thetan taking a shallow look at this, the
trouble. If he looks a little harder, he'll find
out that " really" the trouble is the physical
universe. That actually is a little closer to
what the trouble is. But most of the people
that you have anything to do with will pick
on first the third dynamic• interpersonal
relationships as being responsible for all of
their trouble.
It gets into a situation of mix-up on the
basis of agreement. The first agreement is
" I don' t know." Two people agree they
don't know; two people- two beings -
are agreed, then, on this first basis.
Their first point of association has space
in it. And so we get into ARC' after space.
' dizzy: $lang for 'silly,' 'foolish'.
• third dynamic: group dynamic (see Definitions, p.
20).
• ARC: "a word from the initial letters of Affinity,
Reality, Communication which together equate to
When he agrees with some other thetan,
the agreement may overbalance, and he
may begin to see the other thetan's mock-
ups10 better than his own. When this has
advanced considerably, and when he is on
a basic agreement with an awful lot of
thetans, you have a universe such as the
physical universe, which is a very, very
strong illusion - it's very solid. He's on
good common meeting ground there.
Everybody agrees that it exists, and that
it's perfectly all right to see it.
Here we have Thetan A and Thetan B.
They put out something to know about,
which they "don't know about". Then
they say, "What is it?", and they bring it
in.
Thetan B and Thetan A can then con-
ceive that 8 has brought in A's, and A has
brought in B's. So they've got somebody
else' s "don' t know about."
They' ve got their own, really. But
they' ve said, " I have somebody else' s,"
and so we get the interweave of interper-
sonal relations; it goes from that point.
"You' ve got something of mine; I' ve got
something of yours. You put something
out and then I took it, and I put something
out and you took it." We don' t have just
interpersonal relations: we have business,
we have games, we have almost anything
you want to derive, from that particular
echelon.
But remember, basically, that there was
nothing put out but an idea that there was
something put out.
HOW COMPLEX CAN NOTHING GET?
Many a philosopher in many an age has
gone on this track and has looked for this
deep, deep, deep significance. The fact that
philosophic books are quite commonly
written in the most authoritatively pedan-
tic language imaginable is simply a
demonstration of how much we can try to
add significance into insignificant things.
If you were to open A Critique of Pure
Reason by Emmanuel Kant", you would
know exactly what I am talking about at
this moment. Never has so little been said
at such length and complexity!
His first book demonstrates con-
clusively that there is an innate morality to
Man, for which he is not recompensed
whatsoever. It's an inherent factor, like the
weight in a stone. It's just there. He is
Understanding. It is pronounced by stating its letters,
A-R-C." LRH (Tech. Diet.)
" mock-up: "something which a person makes up
himself." LRH (Tec/1. Diet.)
"Emmanuel Kant: German phiiosopher (1724-1804).
innately moral. And his second book
demonstrates conclusively, all the way
through, that he gets paid for it, and that
this is why he does it - because he gets
paid for it!
This was in 1790, and the whole field of
philosophy has been so overshadowed
with this profundity, on the subject of
nothing, that nobody has done anything,
really, since.
If you could see a preclear as somebody
who had several thousand copies of
Emmanuel Kant's A Critique of Pure
Reason strapped intimately to every part
of his bank, you would have a very clear
picture. It's a weighty tome, and there' s
nothing in it -except his total conviction
that there is something in it, that it does
have significance, and that somebody else
put it there.
BASIC POSTULATE AND
BASIC PURPOSE
The basic postulate is simply, " there
must be a reason why. " No reason is
stated. And the greatest scarcity, of course,
is the resulting reason.
This is the anatomy which precedes
space: "I must cut down my knowingness
and produce some random action so that I
will have a game. " Must there be, then,
some kind of a compulsion to have a game?
No, it' s totally self-determined, just as
you'll find the core of any thetan is con-
tinually self-determined. He says, " I must
have some action, some randomness, some
games, some space. This is a good thing,
space." And sure enough, it is. So he
enters into this game very wholeheartedly.
And every time he puts out something to
view, he of course has put out nothing to
view. And when somebody else put out
something to view, he put out nothing to
view.
But he believed that there was somebody
else more powerful than he. Therefore, he
believed that there was something there to
see. Therefore, he saw it. On neither side
of this was there actually a reason why we
had to put something out until, in despera-
tion, he began to add reasons why. But in
the basic operation, he put something out
and said,"Now I don't know about it and
so therefore I've got to add the reason
why." He will add the reason why, sooner
or later.
The ,.eason why is, of course, his basic
purpose.
The failures of Man are simply those
points on his track when he has suddenly
observed that his purpose, his postulated
purpose, was nonexistent now. Somebody
has pointed this out to him, or he has poi n-
ted it out, or something of the sort. His
postulated purpose, his straight course,
can no longer exist and that itself is failure
(which is merely a postulate).
The preclear's got everything partly
pulled in and looked at, and he's held it
there unexplained. The reason he pulls it
in and it's unexplained is because there
was no explanation in it. And there won' t
be any until he adds one to it.
People, by looking for significances,
find other universes more significant than
their own, more powerful, more full of
reason, more full of action, more capable
of producing action. And they'll slide over
into the "winning valence," you might say
- the other universe. They'll borrow this
universe and that one, abandoning their
own the while, and giving up their own
reasons.
And what is the final analysis of it? You
get somebody who doesn' t know where he
is or who he is or what he is doing, but he' s
sure of this: he' s sure got an awful lot of
energy masses or something around him,
and there's something devilling him, and
he' s not sure what. He knows that if he
could just get the significance of this, if he
could just get the button'
2
within the but-
ton within the button, he'd be well and
happy and go back into action again, and
all would be well.
Of course, in searching for it he simply
runs out the existing significances he has.
He winds up a significance- pauper. He
will find more things wrong with his case,
and wrong with himself, than you can add
up.
The only reason why he will ever have is
the one which he states exists. That's the
only reason why a preclear will ever have:
one he states exists.
Therefore, his self-determinism is essen-
  ' ~ - -
---
Edittd from the- lecture titled " Anatomy of Universes.' ' givt"n at
the 51h American Advanced Clinical Course in Phoe-nix,
ArizonA on th• 6th of May, 1954.
~ n the conclusion of this two·part series. to be printed in
Advanu! 89, Ron discusses se!f-<hterminism in detail and
shows how it can be regained with Scientology technology.
"button: "things in particular that each human being
finds aberrative and has in common. " LRH (Tech.
Diet.)
5 urpassing Man's earlier techno-
logy, the Hubbard Professional Mark
VI stands above the products of the
computer age. Its use can enable us
to reach OT states and total spiritual
freedom.
Designed and built to Ron's own
specifications, this super-sensitive
E-Meter"' pastoral
counselling device is used in auditing
sessions to register mental state and
change of state, as an aid to auditing
precision a11d speed. The incredibly
swift and accurate reads obtainable
on the Mark VI make it the required
meter for the New Hubbard Solo
Auditor Course and all levels above
Clear. It is also the recommended
meter for use in professional auditor
training.
The Mark VI comes wit h its own
shockproof carrying case in a match-
ing color. Choose from Beige, Grey,
Steel Blue or Peacock Blue- or, for a
slight additional charge, you can
choose black with a regular case or a
leather case. Prices are shown on the
list with this issue of Advance/, or ask
the AO Bookstore Officer.
Order your Mark VI today, in person
or by mail, from the Advanced Org
Bookstore!
Note: when you order a meter, a conlract of purchase will
be given or sent to you for filling out. If the contract Is
found not acceptable to the Church, any payment made
tor the meter will be refunded. tt the meter you desire is
not obtainable from your Advanced Org, order from
Bridge Pubicatlons, Inc .. 1414 N. Catalina St., Los
Angeles, CA 90027 U.S.A. or New Era Publications ApS ..
Store Kongensgade 55, 1264 Copenhagen K. Denmark.
Advance! 88 7
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' j l ! n p ! l I ! p u !
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s u o ! p a J ! p p U l ! s l a p l O u a p p ! 1 . { a l l l ! 1 . { n O A
a J a l . { O S · l . { p o : J o s p U l ! ' s s a j ! w ! s J l ! : J 1 n o q l !
M O U ) [ a M P u y ' l I a M A J a l l 1 l ! 1 . { 1 M O U ) [ a M
' t ) [ U l ! q a l . { l U ! a p ! 1 . { U l ! J s u o ! p a J ! p p U l ! s J a p J O
S } l 3 0 } l O N 3 0 0 I H
( g g j a J u l ! l I p y W O J ; J p a n u p u o J )
O M . l p e d , , ' S a S l a A ! U n J O A W O l e U V "
p l l ? q q n H U D H - 7 A q
p u e
[ From Advance! Magazine ANZO Issue No. 89 1986 ]
That's totally unreal. Maybe the fellow
spent five million years in space opera, and
he's not only forgotten that he's in it, it's
gotten unreal on the second echelon: it
couldn't possibly exist. He knows that the
only place there's any life is Earth! Of
course, he can look up there and see all
those stars, and he realizes that the Sun is
just one such star. Yet he sort of had figured
out a few decades ago that Earth was the
only planet in the entire firmament
9
.
(The geography books of the first part
of this century state that, over and over
and over. By some strange fluke, Earth
happens to be a habitable planet which is
going around one of these suns. Without
any proof whatsoever, they immediately
subtracted an actuarial
'
° impossibility.
It's impossible that all those stars up in the
sky do not have planets, because we can
see the mechanical formation of planets
and see the remains of others very certainly
gyrating around the Sun here. But Earth
was the "only one"!)
So this fellow sort of pulls out of life to
that degree. His friends become scarce, and
so friendship becomes unreal, so friends
don't exist, so he has to reject everybody.
His past was scarce. He didn't have enough
incident, enough purpose, enough signif-
icance, enough drive, enough explanation
why he was living in his past, and so he
lived a "few" lives. Not enough signif-
icance. Finally, it became very unreal to
him that he was living life after life. That's
avery unreal thought to people. "We don't
do that. We know that!"
SPACE OPERA AND ASSEMBLY LINE
One of the reasons why somebody would
leave space opera, in spite of the high
, firmament: the sky; the heavens.
10 actuarial: of statistical calculation, as by an actuary (a person
who calculates risks, premiums, etc. for insurance).
6 Advance! 89
adventure in space opera, is that standing a
watch on a spaceship bridge and looking
out into the blackness of this universe week
after week, while hurtling at amad rate of
speed through space, is week after week of
standing with exactly the same viewpoint.
Week after week of the same viewpoint,
asking the continuously tense question:
"What is it? What is it? What is it? What is
it?" - with adependency upon the velocity
of the spaceship itself to bring in the objects
which one can identify. That's madness
itself.
The assembly line production, which
was invented by Henry" America First"
Ford", was the curse of labor. It was
actually the death of labor, and may well be
the cave-in point of this society. Assembly
line production makes aworkman stand in
one place and handle the same item, over
and over and over and over, going through
exactly the same motions. Talk to one of
those boys that's come out of Dearborn
row
12
- he's gone mad with the idea, or
he's turned himself into arobot. All he can
think of is the second dynamic
13
and" get
drunk". In other words, he's what you and
I would classify normally as abum - just
so that he can tolerate this idea of standing
in one place. Now that's what I mean by a
scarcity of significance.
Action isalower grade significance. Action
is lower grade purpose. The first purpose
is a thought purpose, a thought-direction
purpose.
Down on a lower echelon, thought is a
result of not having enough action. That's
the" figure-figure-figure" brand of think-
ing. A person can't have any action: it's too
" Henry" America Fi,,~' Ford: Henry Ford (1863-1947), American
automobile manufacturer, founder of Ford Motor Company.
"America First": a slogan associated with Henry Ford.
12 Dearborn row: refers to the line-up of automobile manufac-
turing establishments in Dearborn (near Detroit), Michigan,
U.s.A.
13 second dynamic: see Definitions, p. 20.
scarce. He can't have any effort: it's too
scarce. So he's got to figure-figure-figure.
Most of his figuring ishow he can get some
action, so he'll be thinking up goals all
the time.
The fellow who is involved in fighting
man-eating tigers from morning till night
never has athought regarding the amount
of action he's engaged in. He doesn't do
any thinking at all; as amatter of fact, he
gets agood systematic way of knocking off
tigers, and he has afine time. Action! Ran-
domity! Different kinds of tigers, dif-
ferent places to knock them off, places
where tigers are liable to knock him off,
places where they have knocked him off ...
boy, there's a lot of significance there!
Now we take this boy who's just got
through fighting tigers and we put him on
aDearborn assembly line. He stands in one
place, in one square foot of concrete, and
he picks up one radiator cap and he screws
it on the nose of a Ford. That Ford rolls
down the line on an endless belt, and he
picks up another radiator cap and he puts it
on the next Ford. There's no difference in
these two Fords, by the way. As far as he
can see, it's the same Ford. Life is getting
scarcer and scarcer and scarcer. "Reasons
why" are getting scarcer and scarcer and
scarcer.
If anybody wanted to make assembly
line work tolerable, even vaguely tolerable,
they would at least throw in some music
and action and so forth, so that there's
some amusement going on in the joint. But
management wouldn't like that. That would
be pampering the workers. There might be
some of them who would finish five years
of service without going crazy. Manage-
ment would never tolerate that!
This single-unchanging-viewpoint-for-
ever idea is the one thing that'll drive the
preclear right off of his pins14. Here
I. off his pins: slang for "insane; crazy".
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6 J / O O / U P : : J a u o a . l O W a l l l
n
Volume 8 - The Vast Technology of Postulates
Groundbreaking discoveries of the Service Facsimile and how a thetan makes postulates, all explained in detailed and simple terms.
Further, Ron reveals how to become cause over one's own postulates and why sometimes they do not work. Contains thirty-nine
lectures given between October 13th and December 31st 1951.
Faith  and the Eighth Dynamic
AN  ARTICLE  BY  L.  RON  HUBBARD  –  R&D  VOLUME  8
You  see,  the  eighth  dynamic  is  faith.  It  is  not  even  knowledge,  and  it  is  certainly  not  ARC  or 
understanding.  It's  faith.  It's  a  static.  And  in  a  complete  static  there  is  no  understanding.  And  the 
individual  is  taught,“You  have  to  understand  things  in  life,”  so  he  goes  ahead  and  tries  to  understand  the 
eighth.  But  you  can't  understand  the  eighth—that's  faith!  You  accept  it!  You  don't  try  to  wonder  about  it.
And  you'll  find,  then,  some  peasant  over  in  the  middle  of  France  is  probably  very,  very  happy  about 
God,  has  never  thought  for  a  moment:  “Is  he  there  or  isn't  he  there,”  or  anything.  Very  happy;  he's  got 
faith  on  the  subject.
And  you'll  find  some  learned  scholar,  grinding  away  at  his  books—Spinoza.  Study,  study,  suppose, 
postulate,  think,  think,  think,  think;  spin,  spin,  spin,  spin;  think,  spin,  spin—no  faith!
Now  faith,  however,  is  an  automatic  proposition,  and 
the  reason  the  guy  tries  to  think  on  the  subject  is 
because  people  try  to  use  it  as  a  control  mechanism. 
And  what  this  individual  is  trying  to  do  is  understand  what  is  trying  to  control 
him  in  his  own  race—and  blames  it  on  God,  you  see?  People  are  trying  to 
control  his  actions  and  cut  down  his  self-determinism  by  using  the  threat  and 
potential  of  God,  you  see?  And  then  he  is  upset  on  this  subject,  so  he  bypasses 
trying  to  understand  because  he  didn't  understand  what  people  were  trying  to  do 
to  him,  so  he  turns  around  and  starts  (quote)  “understanding”  on  the  subject  of  a 
Supreme  Being.  Well,  he  can't  do  it!  And  the  second  he  does,  why,  it'll  spin.
The  way  you  undo  it  is  to  find  out  who  was  trying  to  control  him  with  the  eighth 
dynamic;  what  human  being  was  trying  to  control  him  with  the  8th  dynamic; 
what  human  beings  were  associated  with  him  on  the  subject  of  the  eighth 
dynamic.  And  unburden  his  contest  and  conclusions  with  regard  to  these  human 
beings.  And  all  of  a  sudden  the  eighth  dynamic  will  go  right  on  up  in  beautiful 
shape—bang.
 
L. Ron Hubbard
LRH writes about the ongoing Professional Course
and promotes Foundation auditor positions.
This excerpt is taken from the lecture “Self-Determinism on the Dynamics” and can be found
on page 111 in Volume 8
What's in R&D  Volume 8?
Ever  notice  how  some  postulates  work  and  some 
don't?  Why  is  that?
The  trick  of  making  ALL  your  postulates  work, 
is  understanding  the  subject  fully  and  having 
tools  that  you  can  use—wherever  you  are—to 
undo  the  earlier  postulates  blocking  your 
intention.
Now,  the  way  postulates  snarl  up  is  insidious.  For 
example,  let's  say  when  you  were  a  child,  your 
mother  was  mean  to  you,  but  your  teacher  was 
nice.  One  fine  day  when  you  were  especially  mad 
at  your  mother,  you  decided  you  would  like  to  be 
like  your  teacher  when  you  grew  up.
By  the  way,  your  teacher  also  wore  glasses... 
Now  you  wear  glasses.
The  postulate,  because  it's  not  directly  on  the 
subject  of  bad  eyesight,  is  obscured  from 
memory.  You  can  postulate  better  eyesight,  but 
it's  like  trying  to  move  the  earth  by  pulling 
weeds:  nothing  changes...  until  you  locate  the 
original  postulate  holding  everything  in  place! 
Suddenly  a  miracle  will  occur.  In  the  Hubbard 
Dianetics  Research  Foundation  in  Wichita,  they 
had  a  barrel  filled  with  glasses  people  discarded  after  recovering  their  eyesight.  And  crutches  after  people  were  able  to  walk  again.
And  that's  some  of  the  technology  you'll  learn  in  Research  &  Discovery  Volume  8.  Having  the  technology  of  postulates  will  give 
you  insight  and  perception  into  the  subject  of  postulates,  and  can  bring  your  life  into  an  orderly  arrangement  that  works.
A Black Enchantment
Remember  when  you  were  very,  very  young  and  how  you  looked  at  all  the  fuddy-duddies  (old  people)  around  you  that  couldn't 
understand  you?  They  were  moving  too  slowly,  and  you  wanted  to  change  them.  You  condemned  them,  you  said  they  were  in  the 
road,  you  said  they  were  old!
Now  looking  back,  you  may  recall  that  some  of  these  old,  OLD,  OLD  people  were  only  in  their  twenties  and  thirties...  What  then 
do  you  suppose  happens  to  you,  when  you  reach  that  age?
You  become  the  product  of  your  own,  perhaps  rash,  pessimisms  for  the  future,  the  second  you  reach  that  future!
“And it's an enchantment, a black enchantment, that a person lays upon himself quite unwittingly and unknowingly, but it's
awfully easily undone! And what I'm talking to you about tonight is how to undo it.”  –  LRH
The full Hubbard Chart of Attitudes appears
in this volume
Are  the  first  signs  of  “old  age”  starting  to  creep  up  on  you  like  demons  in  the  night?  You'd  better  read  Volume  8  fast  before  the 
Black  Enchantment  works  it's  full  spell  upon  you!
Nine Postulates
One  of  the  most  useful  bits  of  knowledge  any  new  Scientologist  learns  is  the  principle  of 
making  postulates.  You  want  something?  Postulate  it!
This  one  datum,  newly  introduced  into  a  person's  life  can  make  a  terrific  change.  But  a 
postulate  is  only  one  type  of  a  family  of  mental  actions  that  a  thetan  creates,  which  then 
guide  and  control  his  future  for  the  better—or  for  the  worse.  There  are  a  total  of  nine 
varieties,  some  you  might  not  even  think  of  as  postulates,  yet  each  one  is  diabolically 
effective  in  making  your  life  go  right—or  wrong.
And  there's  one  other  factor  you  must  know.  Once  you've  created  a  postulate,  you  can't  get 
rid  of  it,  unless  you  know  what  locks  it  in  place.  This  last  factor  is  something  that  gets 
hidden.
Without  a  full  understanding  of  the  subject,  a  thetan  is  planting  land  mines  in  his  own  future  track!  Especially  when  he  gets  up  in 
horse-power,  or  moves  up  toward  Clear  and  OT  states!  In  Volume  8,  Ron  will  bring  you  through  the  full  range  of  discovery  of 
postulate  technology,  and  you'll  be  free  to  field  test  all  nine  types.
The  best  part  is  that  postulates  are  so  easy  to  change  when  you  know  what  they  are  and  what  holds  them  in  place.
Some Questions Answered  In R&D  Volume 8:
At  what  age  does  a  person  postulate  his  future  and  goals?
What  causes  life  continuum?
What  is  the  prime  postulate?
What  is  directly  proportional  to  the  insanity  a  pc  is  demonstrating?
How  does  an  individual  become  effect  of  his  own  postulated  causes?
What  happens  when  you  make  a  postulate  against  an  earlier  postulate?
 
Lectures Found in Volume 8
15  OCTOBER  1951  -  31  DECEMBER  1951  |   39  LECTURES

See: http://lrh-books.com/rd/the-vast-technology-of-postulates
SELF-DETERMINISM ON THE DYNAMICS
A Foundation Auditors Course lecture given on
23 October 1951 (R&D Volume 8)
Looking Beyond the First Dynamic
I have given you a very brief resume of what an auditor ought to be able to do. In view of
the fact that we have a relatively new target, I think I had better now devote some time to
the outlining of that target.
Self-determinism is the phrase we are using. There should be a better phrase for it. It ought
to be a phrase which says “self-determinism on all dynamics,” which would be, really,
pan-determinism or something of the sort, because when a fellow says self-determinism,
he is to the greatest degree trying to think of himself. Therefore he is doing self-
determinism on the first dynamic.
First things come first, and the first dynamic comes first. But at the same time, there are
dynamics two, three, four, five, six, seven and infinity on top of that. Therefore, when we
say self-determinism, we should understand exactly what we mean by self-determinism—
exactly what we mean by it. It is the person’s own command or control on each one of the
dynamics.
One of the early axioms says that the mission of theta is the conquest of MEST; that is a
very valid axiom, you will find. That embraces self-determinism as far as the goal of self-
determinism is concerned.
Self-determinism says, “It is I who . . .” and then there is what. What is the person going
to do? What is his goal? His goal is the conquest of MEST, oddly enough, along each
dynamic.
You will find that individuals have to cooperate on the third dynamic so that the group, the
third dynamic, can engage in a conquest of MEST. But you will find that an individual is
only really well off when he feels that he himself would be able to command a group in the
direction of a conquest of MEST. If he feels that he would be able to do this, you will find,
oddly enough, that he is also able to cooperate. But he cannot cooperate wholly unless he
himself could control.
Now, that isn’t a paradox, as it might appear, because when an individual is on an
enforced-cooperation basis, what has been injured—what has been forced or warped on the
third dynamic—is his ability to control a group engaged in a conquest of MEST. When that
gets warped enough the individual will go into apathy on the third dynamic.
People then say, “Well, he is now a part of a group which is engaged in a conquest of
MEST.” This fellow is not. Just look at your tone scale. This fellow is not a good unit of a
group. When his self-determinism on the third dynamic is high enough so that he actually
has a belief, self-confidence, with regard to the third dynamic and his ability to handle
people in the direction of a conquest of MEST, you have an individual who isn’t aberrated
on the subject. He can be rational, and cooperation is only possible in the lineup of
rationality.
So, what you shudder away from is the person who is doing a manic control— “I’ve got to
control this.” This fellow is so inhibited in his self-determinism on the third dynamic that it
is pitiful. The fact that he has got to control demonstrates that he has a fear that he won’t be
able to.
Have you ever had somebody stand around you when you were busy fixing a flashlight or
something and you couldn’t quite get it together, and they wanted to take it away and do it?
There is an anxiety on their part about fixing a flashlight. If this person were in good shape
on the third dynamic, he would be able to have enough confidence in himself to have
confidence in you to fix the flashlight. Because when you aberrate the third dynamic, what
gets aberrated is a person’s confidence in others. Having no confidence in others, the
individual starts to take weird shortcuts— completely irrational shortcuts—and he will
wind up with a screaming necessity to control other people.
Now, an individual who is very relaxed on the subject can walk in on a third dynamic, find
out that this group is engaged in a certain angle of the conquest of MEST, look over what
their problem is and decide that either he can help them or he can’t. If he decides he can
help them he wants to know who is doing the best job there, who is in control of it, who
knows the most about the subject. He is perfectly willing to drive the tractor, if the tractor
has got to be driven and if that is what he can do in that group.
But an individual who has to control that group will walk in and although his only skill is
driving a tractor, the second that you put him to driving the tractor he starts backfiring into
the control of the group by introducing entheta, cutting off the communication lines and
doing all sorts of weird things. He goes around and says, “Well, the boss doesn’t really
know what he’s talking about; I mean, it’s an awful mess and so forth. And this project
isn’t being done right. If I were doing it . . . And your job there, it’s too bad that you’re
doing that sort of work...” This is murder. Yet this manifestation passes itself off for self-
determinism on the third dynamic, and it is not. It is domination because of aberration on
the third dynamic.
...
Self-determinism on the fourth dynamic follows right straight on through. You find
somebody who has an overweening desire to change this whole human race and you have
found somebody who is basically scared of it. That is perfectly true.
I have knocked around the world to an enormous extent, and I have gotten my head beat in
a lot of times. Things didn’t run right. But it wasn’t until I got involved in a war that I
decided once and for all that man just didn’t know what he was doing. Having decided that
one afternoon, sitting at a typewriter, I made a big conclusion: “People get the government
they deserve.” I said, “Well, boy, they sure don’t deserve much, then, do they?” I thought
something ought to be done about it.
In 1936 I was writing articles on “the United States is going to go to war with Japan.” In
1941 I found myself involved in fighting this same war which had been predicted. I had
said, “The United States has either got to go along with the Japanese imperial policy of the
conquest of Asia and assist that policy and pat Japan on the back and so wind up with an
orderly Asia, or she has got to say no right now to Japan—tell Japan to cut its army to
pieces, cut its navy to pieces and stop right there”—because Japan would have come up to
a basis where she would have made a formidable enemy.
I wrote all this down, it appeared in a magazine and so forth, and then all of a sudden I got
involved in a shooting war. They are very nasty things to get involved with. So I felt a
terrific outrage. The fourth dynamic had put upon me more than I had intended to be put
upon ever again in my life.
The very funny part of it is that a lot of this feeling sort of went by the boards in getting
processed. And we are not moving as rapidly right now on the fourth dynamic because I
had stopped feeling that we were this badly put upon, until, not very long ago, President
Truman issued a statement that said, “Well, we now have weapons which can wipe out all
of civilization.” That was also a statement that we could use them too. So right away we
had a lot of people getting awfully interested in the fourth dynamic.
Now, the wrong way to get interested in the fourth dynamic would be to set up a revolution
and so on. That would be all wrong.
But our necks are in it right now along with everybody else’s, so if there is any possible
alignment that can be put into the problem at this time, all of a sudden we have a
responsibility to put it in—not to destroy or knock apart governments, not to get class
conscious about certain segments of man or anything of the sort, but certainly to make
information available to man so that he doesn’t drop those bombs.
Maybe a little aberration, a little mania, would help us out. “A government gets the people it
deserves and people get the government they deserve”—that conclusion could have been
left in place.
The point is that there is an apathy strata whereby a person says, “Well, I’m not much of
anybody and my vote wouldn’t change anything. Why vote?” “Well, men will get along by
themselves,” and so on.
There was a fellow by the name of Hitler who really had aberrations on the fourth dynamic.
He had been a corporal and he had been pushed around by Junkerl officers, which
aberration eventually licked him; he would not take the orders of the general staff. He
wanted to give them orders, but they knew best—he didn’t. So we got a man who said he
was all out on the fourth dynamic, and there are thirty million human beings dead. He did a
little bit “better” than Napoleon. That is not a fourth-dynamic self-determinism.
Right now, as a result of processing, for instance, I feel and people here in the Foundation
feel perfectly competent to do something. But what do you do? You offer information and
you make it possible for organizations to pick up and use this information by restoring self-
determinism wherever possible on the fourth dynamic. That is a good solution.
The wrong solution is to get a terrific anxiety on the subject and then go around shooting
certain strata of the populace in order to “help” the populace. That is aberrated.
So there are optimum solutions on each one of these.
Now let’s take the fifth dynamic, life—self-determinism on the subject of life. I don’t
know anything that helps a man in this category like a belief in his control of animals. You
take somebody who is frightened of dogs, for instance, and you are going to find him
badly off on the fifth dynamic. Being that badly off on the fifth, it will go just straight
across the line. A man must have a belief in the fact that he is a very superior quantity on
the subject of the fifth dynamic. He is top dog.
He has a perfect right to kill game. You get these people who are afraid to kill for food,
who think of “dear, poor little Bambi,” or “We’re all out for Pekingese dogs because men
are no good.” Bambi is cute, but deer are good eating. It is very, very nonsurvival not to
feel, as a human being at the top end of life, that one has the right to control and command
life organisms. One should have that feeling. You will find that the lack of this feeling is
not a mild aberration. You will find that most of your preclears that walk in are loused up
on the fifth dynamic, and it takes some unlousing.
...
So, there is the fifth dynamic. And this is something for an auditor to remember: With each
one of these you can start shooting on a preclear, and you will find all sorts of data if you
remember that it is self-determinism on each one, that it is the self-confidence of an
individual in handling things on each dynamic—to handle himself, children, future, sex,
group, man, life.
So now we get to number six, and that is a very interesting one— dynamic six. Self
Analysis is devoted wholly in its impact to the sixth dynamic—an attempt to rehabilitate on
the sixth dynamic. The sixth dynamic is a very, very important one.
You will find out that people who have kleptomania (as most children have) get it simply
because somebody upset their self-confidence about their ability to control, or to be part of
a group to control, MEST. They haven’t any confidence in it. They don’t want to own
things.
Beware of an individual who doesn’t want things, because that person is bad off. Greed
definitely has its part—not greed of other human beings, however, but greed for MEST. A
person who likes the idea of getting ahold of a nice, big chunk of MEST—he likes this, it
is satisfying to him and so on—is in a good frame of mind. He is pretty well off.
But it goes over on to an aberrated basis of where a person has just got to have it but as
soon as he gets it, it will fall apart and he isn’t sure that he wants it; a person will start
negating against things that he has. Look at how somebody treats his own possessions and
you will find immediately about where he sits on the sixth dynamic. It is a very, very
important dynamic.
Now, as far as dynamic seven is concerned, you can draw yourself a great, big question
mark as to just what. But you will find that the seventh is aberrated, badly. As an auditor
you should know this, very definitely—how badly the seventh dynamic can be aberrated.
Every few preclears, you are going to get hold of one who has monkeyed around with
spiritualism, mysticism, yoga, Hinduism and all the rest of it, right down the line. And
self-confidence in handling the seventh dynamic depends on not having tampered with it.
That is a fact.
Look at the gorgeous louse-up that this dynamic can occasion. Let us take an individual
who takes up Rosicrucianism when he is fifteen years of age. He is sent a little folder and it
tells him that he should sit in a dark closet, gazing at a lighted candle for fifteen minutes
every day, until he finally sees something. And believe me, he will eventually see
something. If he can just get relaxed enough, one of these counter-efforts will hit him—
bong! Now is he convinced! Of course, it was probably Mama’s broom handle or
something of the sort, but it is much easier to assign this to a spirit world, and he says,
“Gee, there’s something here—maybe.” And there is where the seventh dynamic starts
falling to pieces: on that confounded maybe.
Now, let’s look at this. This boy is saying, “Do I have any affinity with something that has
gone beyond, or with spiritual guidance? Do I? Well, do they have any for me? Well, I
can’t nail that down, but I have a feeling like there’s something there. Do I agree with
anything that this spiritual guidance is trying to do or not? Or is it there to agree with? Does
it exist? Is there any reality to it? Well, I don’t know. Now, can I talk to spirits or can’t I?
And if I talk to them, do they listen?” A-R-C—question mark, question mark, question
mark. Is there any A, is there any R. is there any C on it?
And that is how a fellow gets himself into a beautiful state on the seventh dynamic. He just
gets himself completely loused up if he keeps this up.
I speak with a great deal of experience. I know lots of people in various parts of the world ,
men who are very holy—who de m onstrate it—an d there is no accounting for the things
that these individuals can do. I have seen the poltergeist phenomena. Very interesting—
matter moves without being touched. Fascinating. I know people that started in telling
fortunes and were excellent at it, just expert, and in about a year or so they were all off the
groove on the subject of telling fortunes. I know people that have followed and studied
magic, mysticism and so on as philosophies, and I know that every single one of them
started out in pretty good shape and wound up in horrible shape.
I studied this off and on, I guess, for about five years in my life, because it is the most
beautiful field in which to find phenomena. And can you find some choice and lovely
phenomena! But if you can’t get the phenomena and bring it back to MEST and pin it down
in its association with MEST, it is just a blur and you get worse and worse and worse on it.
I am telling you all this, not autobiographically, but so you can appreciate some of these
people when you run into them.
Let’s take the fellow who practices yoga: He sits down and contemplates his navel and he
has various positions and so on. This is a fascinating field. But every time he sits still and
trains himself to sit still, he is also training himself to receive a lot of counter-efforts. In
fact, a person can sit still enough so that the counter-efforts-really start knocking him to
pieces. He can feel them.
People practicing yoga don’t realize that they are always hanging, without quite nerve
enough—because they don’t realize why they haven’t quite got the nerve—just on the edge
of letting themselves into an utter relaxation. They hold themselves above that.
In other words, they are out of valence. They don’t actually relax as themselves. If they
went into a state of unbeingness, really into it, in valence, they would really get those
counter-efforts—bang! I can show you how to do it any time you want.
They also get cold. They are receding toward the static, and a person who starts to recede
toward the static naturally gets ESP. Why not? He is backing up into the body of static
where it exists. We know that theta doesn’t have any wavelength or distance or anything of
the sort, so naturally if one gets in toward a source of theta, he starts picking up ESP and
the rest of this stuff. There is no monkey business about ESP; it exists. But the state an
individual has to be in with regard to MEST and motion in order to pick up ESP is horrible.
How one attains that balance is a study for somebody else. There are at least a couple of
good signposts which haven’t been there in the past. So if anybody wants to play with this,
that is up to him; that is his self-determinism. But let him be warned that his self-
determinism can be very easily upset for the good reason that there is no positive ARC
available on the seventh dynamic. He will get into bad shape.
Now, you may notice that psychotics will come in to you talking about ESP; this is
inevitable. A person doesn’t have to be psychotic to talk about ESP, but being psychotic
sure helps. What have they done? They have gone skidding down or up the tone scale
toward a point which is a static, and they haven’t got enough motion. Life has arrested
motion—or they have arrested it in themselves—to a point where they are approaching a
static, and they act very loopy.
What do you do as an auditor? Look for an engram about ESP? Encourage them to go on
practicing so that they closer and closer approach that static? If you wanted to really start
encouraging them to do so, you might just as well take a gun to them and do it quickly,
because you can drive them all the way off with this on the seventh dynamic. The thing for
you to do is to try to speed the fellow up, because you have to speed him up to get him into
an optimum range on the tone scale so that he can function.
This fellow obviously started playing around with theta though he had insufficient stability.
I don’t think anybody has really got enough stability to start sliding into these statics very
solidly without getting pretty flimsy in the upper story. It can be a nerve-shaking
proposition to play around with the seventh dynamic.
So what do you do when you encounter somebody like this? Do you sit down and discuss
with him, endlessly, his opinions on the subject of mysticism, ESP, and all the rest of it?
No. Don’t validate it, because the person is running too slow to be here amongst human
beings.
It isn’t whether he is holy or bad or good or anything else—that has nothing to do with it.
It is just that you as an auditor want to see him function as a human being.
...
If you don’t believe this, any time you want to try it out, just try to assume a state of
unbeingness. Slow all of your processes down; concentrate on be ing n othing , complete
ly. If you c an re al ly let go you wi ll sli de into valence and you will start to get counter-
efforts. If you can just let yourself take those counter-efforts and still stay in that state of
unbeingness, if you can just get yourself to that point, a lot of somatics will exhaust. This
is true, but you won’t be running very fast. You will get cold—you start down toward
minus 270 degrees centigrade.
You can play around with this and see how loopy you are after about two weeks; you will
get pretty loopy. That is essentially the experiment which they are trying to get people to
make in yoga, only this is its anatomy.
I am telling you about this because you have to know it; too many people who come to you
will be suffering from this malady of running too slow. They have skidded back toward
static.
What is a person doing when he is going down the tone scale? He is sliding toward the
static of death. What is he doing when he goes way up the tone scale—too high up the tone
scale—way out of sight? He is also going to that same zero. This is a circular tone scale—it
starts and ends at the same zero. So a person can stop by going up too high or he can stop
by going down too low. There is a tolerance band of life, and if you want this preclear to
start functioning, thinking, being and so forth as he should, put him in motion.
You don’t put him in motion by heavy processing because this slows him down more.
What you do is start picking up, with Validation MEST Processing, his disassociation with
the sixth dynamic. You rehabilitate him on the sixth dynamic in every way you possibly
can, with conclusions about the sixth dynamic and everything else. You get this fellow
back in contact with MEST and he will speed up. He will go to a better position on the tone
scale and he will be healthier and less wild-eyed. I assure you this is what will take place; I
have had quite a bit of experience with it.
You should be getting in some experience, because you have, in your midst, people who
are going to read those axioms and climb a pole. It is quite a desperate undertaking, by the
way. The fellow all of a sudden starts to say to himself, “Let’s see, now, agreement...
agreement is really complete obedience or something. There really isn’t any ARC. The
worst way in the world that you could possibly fix up people on the tone scale would be to
show them some sympathy, or to give them any ARC. So therefore ARC doesn’t exist. So
therefore one shouldn’t love his fellow man. I wonder what theta really is? Let’s see . . .
You know, I’ve got this idea—it just came to me in a flash that at night when I lie down, if
I lie very motionless, I can pass into a sort of a coma state....”
This is a weird business. You are going to get people doing this. Somebody is going to
read those axioms and start out like a shot gun. You don’t let them go on spinning. What
you do is speed them up by the simple expedient of rehabilitating them on the sixth
dynamic and taking their point of concentration off the seventh, and not by arguing with
them on the subject of it. Just get them down off the pole by pointing out to them that a
physical universe exists, and do it very adroitly. Don’t just bluntly say “You’re wrong,”
because what do they do then? They flop over and unspin at such a rate that they go
completely to the opposite end of the tone scale with no pause in the middle. The fellow has
been invalidated and he will fold up on you. So you just rehabilitate his MEST—sixth
dynamic.
As far as the eighth dynamic is concerned, you will find that your preclears have an
enormous number of aberrations on the eighth dynamic. In various parts of the world you
will find that almost any manifestation of the deity has been brought forward as the
manifestation. There are terrific arguments amongst cults. Does God exist or doesn’t he
exist? And the ARC situation obtains there.
A little child gets into this kind of a state, and almost any child in this society has gotten
into this kind of a state: “Does God love me? Do I love God? Is he there? Does he listen to
my prayers? Do I receive any messages from him? Where is he? He’s everyplace. Well,
that’s not possible—but he is.”
This, fed to a little child, is ARC across the field. A little child has stability enough to stand
up to the conclusions he makes. But let him get beaten around by life, and sitting back there
are these conclusions, just ready to fix him some day.
This has nothing to do with religion. It has to do with a society which is on a very low
band of the tone scale. It is just the fact that a society, when it tries to teach, enforces or
inhibits. It doesn’t try to give anybody data and let him make up his own mind; it does it on
the basis of “you’ve got to!”
This applies on the third dynamic and the second dynamic and the first dynamic, as well as
the eighth, so it isn’t anything peculiar to religion. It is just the fact that this fellow has been
given an enforced setup on something which is relatively indefinite, because the eighth
dynamic is faith. It is not even knowledge, and it is certainly not ARC or understanding. It
is faith; it is a static, and in a complete static there is no understanding. The individual is
taught “You have to understand things in life,” so he goes ahead and tries to understand the
eighth dynamic. But you can’t understand the eighth— that is faith! You accept it. You
don’t try to wonder about it.
You will find some peasant over in the middle of France who is probably very, very happy
about God, who has never thought for a moment “Is he there or isn’t he there?” or
anything. He is very happy; he has faith on the subject. And you wi l l f i nd s ome
learned scholar, grinding away at his books—like Spinoza:l study, study, suppose,
postulate, think, think, think, think; spin, spin, spin, spin; think, spin, spin. No faith!
Faith, however, is an automatic proposition, and the reason a person tries to think on the
subject is that people try to use it as a control mechanism. And what this individual is trying
to do is understand what is trying to control him in his own race—and he blames it on
God. People are trying to control his actions and cut down his self-determinism by using
the threat and potential of God. He gets upset on this subject so he bypasses trying to
understand, because he didn’t understand what people were trying to do to him. He turns
around and starts “understanding” on the subject of a Supreme Being—but he can’t do it!
And the second he does, he will spin.
The way you undo it is find out who was trying to control him with the eighth dynamic.
What human being was trying to control him with the eighth dynamic? What human beings
were associated with him on the subject of the eighth dynamic? Unburden his contest and
conclusions with regard to these human beings and all of a sudden the eighth dynamic will
go right on up and be in beautiful shape.
...
But there is faith as it can be used. The reason why it keeps coming downhill (this is very
simple) is that people try to control others with it.
This is awfully important, because a large percentage of the individuals who are neurotic or
insane are neurotic or insane because of this eighth dynamic louse-up. So you can put that
down as important.
If you take a look at the Minnesota Multiphasic as an intelligence test, you will find that an
enormous number of its questions apply to religious aberration. And you will find out that
the people who got that together took it empirically from insane asylums. This was not
somebody’s figure-out; this was all the kinds of questions that they assembled and found
as the most common points of trouble. You will find that maybe 30, 40 or 50 percent of the
insane are insane mainly because of the eighth dynamic. They have been controlled on the
subject of the eighth dynamic till you find them in continual attitudes of prayer and so on.
How do you rehabilitate this? First, you probably have to reorient an individual with regard
to other people—just anybody. Get him in contact with other people, and then finally carve
it down to a point where you undo the efforts of other people to control him through a
warping of the eighth dynamic.
So you are not throwing the eighth dynamic in question. You are not paying any attention
to the eighth dynamic, actually, to do this; you are just picking up the aberration. You don’t
try to convince a person about the eighth dynamic any more than on the third dynamic you
would sit and convince the fellow that he had to be friendly with groups. You give no sales
argument. What you are doing is trying to pick up the control factors: When have groups
controlled him? When has he concluded he had to be controlled by groups? And that
resolves the eighth dynamic for him.
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.022

Self-Determinism in Scientology vs.
True Will in Thelema:


SELF-DETERMINISM AND CREATION OF
UNIVERSES (1952 L. Ron Hubbard Lecture)


Thelema, True Will & The Abyss As Defined By
Crowley (Comparative Sources)

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
The relationship to space, time and energy to be,
have and do are discussed by Ron in this Journal
of Scientology and in the lecture.
(click  to  read)
Volume 12 - Creation of Universes
Ron discovers the power of illusion and the importance it plays in regaining your ultimate powers as a thetan. This is the ultimate in
thetan education. The information collected here is the woof and warp of existence itself, the very essence of the spirit of man. Contains
twenty-eight lectures given between 1 and 30 November 1952.
Rehabilitation of Illusion
AN  ARTICLE  BY  L.  RON  HUBBARD  –  R&D  VOLUME  12
And  if  you're  examining  the  central  core  of  any  being,  you're  examining  a  bunch  of  contracts  made  with  self. 
He's  made  a  contract  with  himself  he's  going  to  be  this  way  and  he's  going  to  be  that  way  and  he's  going  to 
do  so-and-so  and  he's  going  to  do  so-and-so.  He's  made  these  contracts  with  himself.
Now,  he  can  break  contracts  with  Mama  and  Papa  and  God  and  the  Devil,  and  he  can  make  and  break 
contracts  all  the  way  up  and  down  the  line  in  all  directions,  and  we  find  one  contract  which  he  mustn't  break: 
the  contract  with  himself.  .  .  .
.  .  .Man  is  his  own  high  executioner.  He's  his  own  court  of  justice,  and  he  is  the  toughest,  harshest,  meanest, 
orneriest  court  of  justice  with  regard  to  himself—meaner  and  ornerier  than  has  ever  been  executed  across  a 
bench.  .  .  .
.  .  .These  people  out  here  on  the  street—they  find  themselves  at 
fault,  they  have  lost  some  self-respect,  they  have  done  something 
that  they  said  they  wouldn't  do.  Now,  they  can  be  vicious  and 
mean  and  a  lot  of  other  things  in  life,  but  they  never  said  they  wouldn't  be.  Now  one  day 
they  suddenly  say—they've  made  up  their  mind  this  way  and  that  way—that  to  be  a  good 
person  or  to  be  good  this  way  or  that,  they're  going  to  be  this  way  or  that,  and  they've 
decided  this.  Then  a  few  days  later  they  find  they  aren't  and  they  can't  hold  that  level,  and—
broken  trust  with  themselves.  .  .  .
.  .  .All  right.  We  have  this  person  make  this  bargain  with  himself—his  belief  in  himself,  his 
trust  in  himself—and  then  all  of  a  sudden  he  breaks  the  bargain  by  finding  he  can't  be  what 
he  has  postulated  that  he  can  be,  and  we're  right  back  to  illusion,  aren't  we?
He's  made  an  illusion  that  he's  going  to  be  so-and-so,  and  then  he  can't  keep  up  to  that 
illusion.
Well,  how  do  you  solve  it?  How  do  you  solve  self-respect?  You  solve  it  by  a  rehabilitation 
of  illusion,  because  he's  got  to  rehabilitate  and  have  a  better  illusion  about  himself,  hasn't 
he?
 
L. Ron Hubbard
(click  image  to  see  more)
Find more about how to rehabilitate your own power of illusion by reading the lecture “Illusion
Processing” in R&D Volume 12!
What's in R&D Volume 12?
If  things  appear  to  be  right,  they're  dead  wrong…
If  something's  absolutely  wrong  in  the  MEST  universe  – 
then  it's  totally  right…
If  you  agree  to  disagree  then  you're  on  your  way  to 
truth…
In  R&D  Volume  12,  Ron  uncovers  the  insidious  traps  of 
the  MEST  universe  –  how  it  forces  you  to  agree  with  it 
and  become  more  a  part  of  it.  By  revealing  the  truth  of 
illusion,  Ron  opens  the  doors  of  this  self-created  prison 
and  shows  the  way  to  recovering  your  true  OT  abilities.
As  he  tells  us  in  the  lecture  “Illusion  Processing  and 
Therapy,”  “It  is  more  important  for  a  man  to  know  that 
his  illusions  are  illusions  than  it  is  for  him  to  know  that 
the  MEST  universe  is  real.”
Learn  the  data  on  illusions  and  the  MEST  universe  so  you  can  use  this  to  put  yourself  at  cause  in  life!
Thetan Education
“What's a universe? How does it get that way? How does it go off the rails? What are the basic laws behind them? What do
you have to do as an individual with a universe? … The data is all here. When I say ‘all here,’ I mean all here. I mean, we've
got the information. Works!”  –  LRH
Ron  tells  it  like  it  is  and  explains  in  great  detail  the  ultimate  secrets  of  the  universe  –  the  Qs  and  the  Logics.  He  not  only  tells  you  each 
Q  and  Logic,  but  explains  each  one  and  how  you  can  use  this  incredible  data  to  handle  life.
From  this  data  you  can  evaluate  any  and  all  data  in  the  universe!
Now  that  would  be  a  skill  worth  having,  right?
THE ROLE OF EARTH
Invader  forces…  prison  planets…  space  stations…
Sounds  like  science  fiction,  right?  Not  quite!
As  Ron  put  it  himself:
“Well now, as far as reality of this stuff is concerned, it has not generally been accepted here on Earth that such things existed.
But I notice that we have what's known as science fiction here on Earth. I notice we have that. . . .
. . .“You wouldn't dare write real science fiction—not real science fiction. Nobody's guts could take it, that's all there is to
that.”
Find

out what LRH means by making Excalibur “scarce”...

(click  image  to  enlarge)
Starting  on  page  261,  your  eyes  will  be  GLUED  to  this  lecture  as  you  read  about  what  has  been  really  going  on  in  this  sector.  (Not
available anywhere

else)
Some  of  the  subjects  covered  in  this  volume  include:
Bodies  in  pawn
Fourth  and  Fifth  Invader  Forces
The  Martian  operation
Earth  as  a  prison  planet
Space  stations
Doll  bodies
Entities  and  ridges  in  the  body
Theta  traps,  etc.
Read  this  lecture  and  you'll  get  a  whole  new  viewpoint  as  to  the  state  of  this  planet  and  the  people  on  it!
Excalibur
L.  Ron  Hubbard  never  published  his  1938  manuscript,  ‘Excalibur’,  but  news  of  its 
existence  caused  quite  a  stir  with  requests  to  read  and  buy  the  manuscript.  As  Ron 
tells  us  in  the  lecture,  “Introduction:  The  Q  List  and  Beginning  of  Logics,”
“So just as a joke one time I said, why, sure,

I would give anybody a copy
of ‘Excalibur’ for fifteen hundred dollars. . .

unfortunately netted two
replies—demands for ‘Excalibur’—and this was quite

interesting.”
Just  as  a  comparison,  $1,500  back  in  1951  would  be  worth  $12,500  today!
In  Volume  12  Ron  gives  you  a  glimpse  into  this  unpublished  manuscript  where  the 
material  called  “Scientology”  first  began—12  years  before  the  release  of  Dianetics 
in  1950.
Some Questions Answered In R&D Volume 12:
How  do  you  un-hypnotize  a  thetan?
Who  is  the  biggest  foe  of  the  MEST  universe?
What  is  the  first  and  only  mistake  you  made  on  the  whole  track?
What  was  the  only  way  a  thetan  back  on  the  track  could  die?
What  is  the  “realest  universe”  a  man  could  have?
How  free  is  a  being?
What  is  a  Theta  Clear?
How  do  you  capture  a  MEST  being?
What  are  the  worst  incidents  on  the  track?
How  does  a  thetan  regulate  the  body?
 
Lectures Found in Volume 12
NOVEMBER  1952  -  20  NOVEMBER  1952  |  28  LECTURES
See: http://lrh-books.com/rd/creation-of-universes

SELF-DETERMINISM AND CREATION OF UNIVERSES
A LECTURE GIVEN ON 17 NOVEMBER 1952
Today, I'd like to take up with you in a little more detail the whole problem of "have" with
relationship to time; with ARC with relationship to space, time and energy. And we're going to go
into a bit of a flight of fancy with regard to the composition of the material universe.
Now, you're going to find something very peculiar here. You're studying something—you're
studying something in order to be able to defeat it, not to be able to use it. You should be able to
know—you should be able to know so well what happens to a perception recorded by
theMEST body, you should be able to know so thoroughly the various activities of the energy after
it has been recorded, and you should know so well the various types of aberrative incidents which
have occurred on the whole track, that you need no notes. And you should take notes so that you
can study your notes on this, but you should need no notes when you're auditing.
And the time for you to learn this information, the time for you to learn this data, is right
now. Just make up your mind, postulate that you need this information. Because you are not going
to use this information except to defeat it. That's quite important. You are employing this data in a
brand-new way, brand-new way in Scientology. You have all of the terrible liabilities of the
MEST universe. You should have them at your fingertips and know how you can defeat them with
Creative Processing, because you don't address them directly. You no longer address engrams,
secondaries, facsimiles of any kind, including locks, or the ridges and flows, directly.
You address them indirectly, and actually, you should never have to specifically address and
reduce, from here on, an engram or a secondary, except in this instance: the assist. A preclear very
often becomes injured, and by directly addressing and running out that injury, he gets well. He's
been injured, that's a specific type of recent injury.
Now, actually, any one of you, expert in this line, could actually stand outside the receiving
ward of a big emergency hospital, and you could raise the recovery rate by some undetermined
percentage, but it would be raised possibly even 80 percent. It's just way up, what you could do.
And that is the value of the assist: somebody burns his hand; somebody has been thrown out of a
car, he has a concussion; somebody has just been operated on; there has just been a delivery, you
want the mother to recover, you want her not to have the various liabilities (the postpartum
liabilities, physiological or psychological) which attend a delivery—many of these things.
Or this fellow has just been through a shocking experience, let us say, in the line of
business, which has reduced him to practically nothing. Anything which is fresh—fresh, new. And
that term fresh or new is quite relative, but I would say that it would come within the span of thirty
days, and anything older than thirty days—that's quite an arbitrary figure there—anything older
than thirty days, hit it with Creative Processing and Creative Processing only, no matter what your
temptation is to hit it directly.
Now, let me emphasize that. There is a terrific tendency, an enormous tendency on the part
of every mortal alive to address these things directly— address them directly. "Let's rush back in
and conquer the physical universe!" That's just exactly how the preclear got into trouble: the
conquest of MEST. That axiom that has to do with the conquest of MEST was never more valid.
And he has to be restrained in the conquest of MEST until his ability to conquer MEST is, I would
say off hand, maybe a hundred thousand times better than it is, or maybe a hundred million times
better.
He will get to a point where he can—he knows that an electric light is on, and he can see the
electric light on, outside of his body or inside of his body, and he will say, "Fine. My perceptics
are in wonderful condition. Let's go out and conquer some more MEST!" And then you'll get
ahold of your preclear the next session and he can't get out of his body.
And you'll say, "My goodness. What's the matter with this preclear?" or "What's the matter
with my processing?" And you set him down and you coax him this way and you work with him
that way and you work with him, and he's getting harder to get out of his body than he was the
first time.
What's he done? He's gone out and he's hit the physical universe one way or the other, and
he has said, "Oh, my! I failed." Now he's failed with magnitude, because he's being invalidated on
the most invalidatable line, which is as a thetan directly. He can't blame it on the body; this is he
that's failing.
And so, don't worry about it. Your preclear is going to be able to perceive the MEST
universe. He's going to be able to perceive it and find it and know what he is looking at and have
horsepower to handle it, and all the rest of this. He's going to do very, very well, but not for quite a
while, not for quite a while.
This person is so startled to find himself out of his body and find out he's actually free and
that his activities are not censurable by Earth police, that he's perfectly willing to go in and change
empires. Oh, he feels about 185 yards tall. And then about—oh, usually in less than an hour, he is
about a millimeter tall—maybe a milli-millimeter. Does he feel small. He feels very tiny. And the
reason for this is very simple: He's invalidated himself and by that invalidation he has keyed in the
exact incidents which tell him he can't. Now he's keyed them in directly.
In the first place, flying around outside the body he immediately keys in all the reasons why
he shouldn't fly around outside the body. Just that, you see? It also keys in all the conditions in
which he's found himself outside before—namely, dead. He is dead. That's when he found himself
out before, he's very dead.
Furthermore, he's going up against possibly his last set of instructions, which were "When
you get out, you report back here. You report back right here! Not an inch either side, you report
right to this spot. And this is the spot where we relieve you of all your woe and burdens, you poor
fellow. And we're going to fix you up veeeery nicely and make you forget eeeeuerything and even
forget to remeeeember, and we're all so nice . . ."
Well, he knows by the time you've processed him a short time this is a lot of bunk, but he's
flying in the teeth of tremendous horsepower. And so he gets out and what he discovers is not only
that he is invalidated but that he is evidently liable for all of the monkey business which he's
gotten in the past. He's liable for all this again, and it keys him in.
Now, therefore, the goal is—as outlined in Scientology 8-8008—is the attainment of a
theoretical (unattainable) infinity by the reduction of the apparent power of the MEST universe
from infinity to a zero of apparent power. That doesn't mean you make theMEST universe
disappear, you see? I mean, you just reduce its authority from infinity to zero. And you increase
the power of the thetan as a thetan from zero to his infinity. It's a very simple statement, actually.
It doesn't have anything in it that is quibbling. The reason I say theoretical, it's obviously not the
goal of 8008 to actually smash all the planets together and blow them up. That's not its goal. But
that is not what is meant by the infinity of the MEST universe. An infinity of the power, an
infinity of the conviction the MEST universe carries. It is, right now, carrying an infinity of
conviction. Now, as long as it carries that infinity of conviction, your preclear is going to try to
hasten to agree with it again, and that's how he got bad off.
He's going to get in there in an awful hurry and try to agree with it all over again, and he's in
no condition to agree with the MEST universe—no condition at all to agree with it. He's not even
in a condition to disagree with it. And we have found the bypassed circuit. Now, there was a
method of bypassing the circuit.
Now, you'll just have to take my word for it. Or if you care to lay out, yourself, a two- or
three-months' research program and work on it for twelve or fifteen hours a day, you can get this
data. But you will find out that maybe a minute's worth of Creative Processing is worth dozens
and dozens of hours of direct processing.
Now, we'll call any process we have had in the past up to Standard Operating Procedure
Issue 1, Theta Clearing—we will call those "direct processing." That whole span is direct
processing.
And starting with Scientology 8-8008, we approach—not indirect processing—we approach
Creative Processing. And it is an indirect approach, however, and attains the same thing as though
it were indirect processing. But its goal is not indirection; its goal is actually what it says its goal
is, and that is simply the increase of the thetan from a zero of his own universe to an infinity of his
own universe. That's the goal of it.
Now, it doesn't do that in order to get back at the MEST universe again! It is aimed toward
the same goal, the identical goal of Advanced Procedure and Axioms. We have not changed our
goal but we just know more about this goal. And naturally, when we knew a great deal about this
goal, we had to change the modus operand! to get to that goal better, and what is that? To
rehabilitate the self-determinism of the preclear. The duty of the auditor is the rehabilitation of the
self-determinism of the preclear.
And what do we find the self-determinism of the preclear is? We find that it is the location
of matter and energy in space and time, and the creation, conservation, alteration and destruction
of time, space, matter and energy. And that is his self-determinism.
And a person's self-determinism is as good as he can create, conserve, alter or destroy
energy, matter, space and time. Get that: destroy time, alter time, conserve time, start time;
conserve space, alter space, destroy space, create space. That's self-determinism. And that consists
also of, of course: destroy energy, create energy, alter energy, conserve energy; create matter,
conserve matter, alter matter, destroy matter. There's his self-determinism.
Now, what's the broad definition of self-determinism? Now, it's just that, that I've been
saying: create, conserve, alter or destroy matter, energy, space and time of any universe. And that
matter, energy, space and time—do not even for an instant get it into your heads that the only
matter, energy, space and time there is, is MEST. When we've used the word MEST it is a coined
word: it means matter, energy, space and time—the material universe. It says so in all the texts; we
can't alter it at this time.
So, now, let's say that there are other mests, but each one of these we will write parenthesis
(mest) unparenthesis, designation letter. Whose mest? Whose universe? So when we just say
capital M, capital E, capital S, capital T, we mean the material universe in which we are sitting at
this moment. And when we talk about somebody else's universe—well, let's say we talk about
Joe's universe—all right, we'll have parenthesis (small m-e-s-t) unparenthesis, Joe. That means
that.
Now, we have to have this as a communications method, so in the future you'll occasionally
hear me saying "(mest) self." That would mean your own universe. But when it's just MEST that
means the material universe, because you're meeting on a common ground of the material
universe. All right.

Now, somewhere up the line you get out enough efforts and counter-efforts so that your
being is in pretty good shape. He's in wonderful shape for a MEST being, just gorgeous. But
you've gotten up to a point where if you process him from there on, he's going to get into worse
shape. And the reason he's going to get into worse shape is because essential parts of him is going
to start disappearing. And I don't mean that that is just theoretical! That has been done on the
couch! That has occurred. The saturation point lies somewhere between five hundred and two
thousand hours. That's a pretty close bracket, by the way, that's a fairly accurate statement. I mean,
you could say—when you take in terms of the number of lives a person has lived, you say you
reach a saturation point somewhere between five thousand—five hundred and two thousand hours,
that's an interesting datum for you.
Why? Because it has been tested. That datum isn't just a guess. I know when they start
reaching the saturation point. Of course, five hundred hours is a ghastly number of hours of
processing. That is terrific.
I don't know, there was some joker . . . There's always a lunatic fringe hanging around
Dianetics or Scientology, around any field. There's a lunatic fringe around physics, for instance;
there's one around chemistry.
Now, one of this lunatic fringe wrote in a book, a great authoritative book, which he ... He
was modifying everything. I think his big change for the whole subject was you didn't say "Come
up to present time." You said, "Be aware of your environment," which, by the way, was standard
procedure that he had nothing to do about whatsoever at the time he left the Foundation. So that he
had invented this, and this was his claim to fame. He's really a crackpot, this guy. I won't mention
any names, but gee, he's nuts.
Anyway, he says he has had eighteen hundred hours of processing and he's going on being
processed. Well, you add it up, by the way, and between the time he heard of Dianetics and the
time he wrote the book and the book was published, and if you added this up, you'd have found
out that he would have been on the couch something like eight hours a day, seven days a week, to
have gotten eighteen hundred hours of processing. That's an awful lot of hours of processing. It's
just too many, by an awful long ways.
And he doesn't bother to say what kind of processing, but it happened to his . . . He had a
girl who was very weak in the wits. And this girl would sit there and say, "Well, what do you want
to run, dear?"
And he would say, "Oh, I think I will run so-and-so."
And she would say, "Well, all right, dear. Go ahead and run it."
And he would lie there and philosophize and think about it for a while and so forth, and a
few hours later, why, he would say, "Well, I've finally run that."
And she would say, "Well, that's fine, dear."
And this was "processing."
Well, if he'd only keep this up, if he'd only keep this up, if he would really process efforts
and counter-efforts for that length of time—not just a few engrams, but if he'd process efforts and
counter-efforts for eighteen hundred hours—he wouldn't be able to function, probably, as a body.
Now, that is the liability which is up the line.
This data is quite new, simply because it takes such a tremendous number of hours—it's a
tremendous number of months and years to run up a total of processing that high—that it is not
data that is readily available.
We find here and there that enough results are in to show that there's an optimum point of
processing, and at that point you stop—when you're using effort or facsimile direct processing. So
there's a finite limit, and that is why— completely aside from the invention of the technique itself
and a further understanding of it—that is why we're junking direct processing, except in use in an
assist. That's why we're junking it. It's not that you would ever process anybody two or three
hundred hours!
Once in a while around here in England there is somebody that's had two hundred hours on
the couch, some of them had two-fifty, some of them had three hundred in the last couple of years.
And that's not very many hours of processing, and they're not even close up to the danger zone.
There is no danger zone there, really, because there isn't any danger zone, really, for the thetan just
because he's gotten killed off or something. It's whether or not this individual is better off and has
a clearer understanding.
All right. Now, let's look at this, then, as a process and find out what we're doing. We're
trying to cross the time-honored, well-known abyss. You know the abyss? Well, the abyss is
something that people have been talking about for an awful long time, and everybody is very well
aware of the fact that there's an abyss.
Actually, the abyss can fit almost any analogy of accomplishment. It's very nice, it's a very
neat thing, and it refers specifically to a whole track incident. There is a whole track incident
known as the Abyss. If you throw the people into the darkness—you invent yourself a chasm or
you have a chasm or something of the sort, and people you don't like, you pitch them in. That's on
the whole track. You'll find that with an E-Meter. Preclears get very upset. There's probably more
overt acts performed in the Abyss than in anything else. There's masses of them. Real volume!
Two, three thousand beings have been pitched over into a dark chasm someplace or another; it was
the favorite method of getting rid of one's enemies. Well, that's way back, way back on the track.
All right.
But we'll use again the analogy of the abyss. We find out that people are trying to get from
a—one state to another state, a better state, and we find out that intervening between the two is a
black abyss. All right.
Gee, it'd be dreadful, it would just be gruesomely dreadful if we had to actually cross this
abyss. But I'll give you a technique—I'll give you a technique for directly crossing the abyss.
Where is the abyss in the first place? The abyss is at 40.0. The only connecting point, really.
The only real connecting point between MEST universe and mest universe self is at 40.0. The
matter which you would make and the matter which the MEST universe would make—entirely
different.
Now, somebody somewhere along the line got the wavelength of any universe you might
have had and blew it. You collided, in other words, with the MEST universe, but that doesn't say
there was a bridge between those two points. It said there's some kind of an artificial step up or
conduit or something of the sort was done there in order to make a clash between these two
universes.
Well, the point of that clash is chaos and confusion. And if you want to take it apart vector
by vector, you've got lots of time. There is no end to the amount of time you would have if you
started taking it apart erg by erg of energy, taking that smash apart, because you've laid locks on it
ever since.
Every time you've had a dream or a hope or a desire or a plan in the MEST universe, you've
laid a lock on the smash of your own universe. Horrible, huh? And every time the MEST universe
has kicked you in the teeth and has smashed your dreams, hopes and plans, and hasn't done exactly
what you thought it should do, it laid a lock on this one. So, is that a tangled mess!
Well, there's no real bridge between those two points so far as processing is concerned.
There's a collision between the two points and it's way down about 0.0. And you could say that
there is a connector across on the 0.0 circuit, but it's not a bridge; it can't be crossed there. I say "it
can't be crossed there"—that's a very forthright statement and I shouldn't make a forthright
statement because there's only been a couple, three attempts to cross there at that point.
And of course, it's something like somebody trying to discover—to sail to Asia, and we
could pull a Columbus and keep writing everybody and say, "We're in Asia. We're in Asia. We're
in Asia," meantime with two of the doggonedest biggest continents and the golblamedest biggest
ocean standing between us and Asia. We could go on saying that and pretending that that 0.0 to
0.0 bridge here—pretending it wasn't there and that it was crossable. But it's a mess of confusion.
It's an awful mess of confusion. Until we get a MEST cutter and maybe a couple of MEST torches
invented or something of the sort, it's not crossable at that point.
But it is crossable at 40.0. But again at 40.0, and nearabouts to 40.0, you have a terrific
liability. They're both the same thing at 40.0. That says, "What is all space for the MEST universe
and what is all space for your own universe is an all-space thing." And you try to go through that
and you try to shift over to be sure of what is all-space MEST, all-space self-mest, and rrrrr!
Because space is space. And if there is nothing in it to identify it, you have an awful time.
Now, if you do this little process, you'll see what I'm talking about. Cook up your own black
space that is empty and has no sensation in it, and be sure it's your own space.
Now, very possibly there is a way to solve that, but it's making space identify itself by space
without any havingness and without any doingness. It's just space. And you will get the
doggonedest sensation of beingness. For a little while, boy, you'll just be like mad, and then you'll
say, "Well, is this really my space?" And then, of course, you'll not-be like mad, because you'll
say, "Here I am, lost in MEST universe space." And then you'll say, "Well, this is my space," and
that gives you a tremendous power of beingness and untouchableness, and you can feel very
detached and very nice and so on, and then that "Well, is it my space?" The whole truth of the
matter is, it's nonidentifiable space. And the fact that it fluctuates from one to the other should tell
you something: It is your space only by definition.
And if you define it and simply say, "Now, this is my space"—you rig up this space which
has no light in it, no matter in it, no perception in it, and by definition you say, "This is my
space"—why, you're all set. I mean, you did it by definition, you see? It's not very satisfactory
though.
So, it's the theoretical bridge. But it's by definition. You see, your space can exist
concurrently with MEST universe space, and you're so tuned up to the MEST universe that
naturally the space you'd create would be, again, concurrent against the space.
Now, there'll be more to say about this in times to come, as more is known about it, but
there is one of the big question marks, is just exactly how you can identify that bridge and tell the
difference between an all-MEST universe space and an all-self space. Of course, you can tell the
difference by definition.
Well, the best way to do this is by identification—by doingness and havingness. And that is
Creative Processing. You say, by definition—you say, "This is my space," and then you know it's
your space simply because of the doingness and havingness in it are not MEST universe
doingnesses and havingnesses. You know you have never reigned as a dragon; you know that
never happened in the MEST universe. You never reigned as a dragon with the best possible
attendants, and so forth. And the way you are sure of this is you have the people change in
appearance; and you find out you can change their appearance around with great ease—why, all of
a sudden, they become yours.
And you move over directly at 20.0. There is no bridge between there;
you're actually going all the way over the top and down, back down to 20.0 again, but you
do it instantaneously. You mock up. You mock up doingness and havingness and it's your own
space by definition, and you have Creative Processing. And you are immediately on the left side
of the parabola.
And the more certain you are that this could only be the left side of the parabola, only be
your own universe, the better the processing.


Thelema, True Will & The Abyss As Defined By Crowley

Adapted and mirrored from: http://www.choosethelema.com/


"For know, that all things are masks or symbols of the One Truth"
-- Aleister Crowley, De Lege Libellum

What is Thelema?
Thelema is a philosophy and method of securing individual liberty through a paradigm of human
strength, joy, and beauty. It begins with two basic principles. One of these is the realm of infinite
possibilities. We call this principle Nuit. The other is the concept of the individual experience,
which we call Hadit. Each individual event flows from and is a manifestation of the infinite sea of
possible outcomes.

In the same way, every human being is a manifestation of the eternal and the infinite. We are an
inseparable part of the cosmos. It is because of this that each of us has a True Will which is a
perfect expression of our deepest nature. According to Thelema, the sole duty of every human being
is to do their True Will. In fact, Thelema is the Greek word meaning "will."


The Nature of the True Will
The True Will stems from the sum of all forces in your life. Some of these you share with other
things in the Universe. For instance, you live on Earth and are subject to the same gravity as other
things on Earth. Other things, such as your specific DNA or your particular experiences are fairly
unique.

To use a simple object as an example, the true will of a sunflower seed is to grow under certain
conditions. Some seeds will not grow into sunflowers because they do not encounter the experience
of being planted in the proper environment. Other seeds may be eaten instead. Further still, some
seeds may be the start of an entirely new species of plant through genetic mutation.

Humans are more complex than sunflower seeds. We have personalities and reasoning minds. We
also encounter a much wider array of experiences during our lifetime. It is many times more
difficult for us to discover and do our True Will. At the same time, it is infinitely more rewarding.
Whereas a sunflower seed goes about the course of its existence completely unconscious of its
actions, we experience complex and wonderful thoughts and feelings.

By discovering our True Will and acting in accordance with it, we act in perfect harmony with
Nature. As an expression of our truest self, this Will empowers us to live a life of joy and
fulfillment. We only live for a brief period of time. Why waste it?

Discovering the True Will
Besides merely positing that a True Will exists, Thelema offers instruction in discovering it. This
instruction can be found in Thelemic texts called "libers," or alternately "libri." The recommended
methods include yogic meditation, daily ritual, and various techniques for cultivating discipline and
self knowledge. One excellent example includes Liber Jugorum.

Thelemites may work independently and there is absolutely no requirement to join an organization.
In spite of this, many Thelemites find their efforts greatly enhanced by membership in a Thelemic
organization. Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO) is one popular choice because it provides Thelemites
with a community of like-minded individuals.

OTO also provides a service called initiation. During an initiation, the candidate experiences a
sequence of events which impart teachings about the mysteries of the universe and the Self. By
studying these teachings carefully, initiates gain valuable insight into the nature of the Law of
Thelema and how to best conduct themselves to be strong, free individuals.

Skepticism and Scientific Illuminism
In studying Thelemic literature, you will notice that skepticism and the scientific method are
strongly advocated. Thelema holds that there is no need for blind faith in its teachings. By earnestly
doing the prescribed practices, you can and will have spiritual experiences. Each practice can be
tested and confirmed. This method is called "scientific illuminism," or "the method of science, the
aim of religion."

Skepticism, in this context, means that a Thelemite will suspend both belief and disbelief in an idea
until they have either experienced or observed its veracity. As such, there is a significant number of
atheistic Thelemites. Superstition and charlatanism have no place in Thelema.

Liberty and the Nature of the Individual
Thelema does not teach that there is a god in the Judeo-Christian sense. Instead, each human being
is his or her own god and the center of his or her own universe. Thelema teaches that all beauty, joy,
and strength comes from within. A rose does not have beauty on its own. It is only beautiful when it
is observed. By the very act of observation and experience, we create meaning.

As implied in previous sections, each one of us bears within us a shard of the universal will. Your
True Will is completely unique and is the sole course of "right" conduct in your life. Nobody else
can tell you what your True Will is: you have to experience it for yourself. In order to be able to do
this and be your authentic self, you must have the freedom to act without unnecessary inhibitions
and restrictions.

Liber Oz is the Thelemic declaration of the rights of Man. In a nutshell, it states that every man and
every woman is absolutely free to act in accordance with his or her True Will. By accepting Oz, you
acknowledge that others have these rights as well. As a result, the freedom granted by this liber does
not excuse the violation of the rights of others.

History of Thelema
The philosophy of Thelema dates back to 1904 when a
man named Aleister Crowley wrote The Book of the Law
in Cairo, Egypt. On April 8-10 of 1904, Crowley had a
series of spiritual experiences during which the book was
dictated to him by an entity named Aiwass. Whether
Aiwass was really a separate being or just a manifestation
of Crowley's subconscious is irrelevant. The Book of the
Law bears a stunning degree of beauty and sophistication
which has led to its lifelong study by thousands of
Thelemites across the globe.

Thelema is Inseparable From Crowley.
Some people claim that Thelema actually existed prior to
Crowley. While it is true that Thelema has a number of
historical antecedents, none of them represent a coherent
philosophical system. For instance, the Benedictine monk
François Rabelais wrote of "Thelema" as a philosophy not very much different from anarchism. It
was seen as more of a social and political thing and in a sense wasn't a new idea at all. Additionally,
Rabelais' Abbey of Thélème was intended as both fiction and satire.

For Rabelais, the concept of will was not different from that of whims and desires. On the other
hand, Crowley's system is an elaborate mystical tradition focused on discovery of a True Will that
may not always correspond to what one desires in the current moment. To distinguish between
"Rabelaisian Thelema" and so-called "Aleisterian Thelema" or "Crowleyan Thelema" is an exercise
in pedantry.

Even though Thelema is inseparable from Aleister Crowley, it is not "Crowleyanity." There is no
worship of Crowley and he is not revered in the way figures such as Jesus are. In fact, this was
something he feared and adamantly opposed. While it is true that some Thelemites are big fans of
the man Aleister Crowley, this seems to be a growing trend outside of Thelema as well. It is very
easy to appreciate the fascinating life he led. It is also very easy to recognize his many flaws and
shortcomings.

Thelema's historical antecedents provide the benefit of producing an eclectic and many-faceted
system. Thelema draws from many rich traditions, both Eastern and Western. No matter what your
interest, there is sure to be an aspect of Thelema that appeals to you.

Aleister Crowley Regarding The Abyss

“The Abyss of Hallucinations has Law and Reason;
but in Truth there is no bond between the Toys of
the Gods.
This Reason and Law is the Bond of the Great Lie.
Truth! Truth! Truth! crieth the Lord of the Abyss
of Hallucinations.
There is no silence in that Abyss: for all that men
call Silence is Its Speech.
This Abyss is also called "Hell", and "The Many".
Its name is "Consciousness", and "The Universe",
among men.
But THAT which neither is silent, nor speaks, re-
joices therein.”
-- The Book of Lies Chapter 10


Further Reading
 Duty - A note on the chief rules of practical conduct to be observed by those who accept the
Law of Thelema.
 Liber II - Explains the essence of the new Law in a very simple manner.
 Liber CL: De Lege Libellum - A further explanation of the Book of the Law, with special
reference to the Powers and Privileges conferred by its acceptance.
 Liber Tzaddi - An account of Initiation, and an indication as to those who are suitable for the
same.
 The New Comment - Crowley's in depth commentary on The Book of the Law



SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.023

L. Ron Hubbard’s Metaphor of The Bridge of Total
Freedom Crossing The Abyss:

The Abyss (1963 L. Ron Hubbard Confidential
Policy Quotation – featured as a poem in 1974 )


The Abyss (1963 L. Ron Hubbard Confidential
Policy Quotation – un-sourced blurb featured in
1982)


The Abyss (1963 L. Ron Hubbard Confidential
Policy Quotation – fully cited excerpt featured in
1992)


Little Essays Toward Truth: Man by Aleister
Crowley (Comparative Source)


The Confessions of Aleister Crowley, Part Four
Magickal Workings (Comparative Source)
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
[ From Advance! Magazine AOLA Issue 23, April/May 1974 ]
[ From UK Advance! Magazine Issue No. 73 1982]
[ From UK Advance! Magazine Issue No. 111 1992]
What is man, that thou art mindful of him?
Man being the subject of these Essays, it is first proper to explain what will be meant therein by the
word.
Man is a microcosm: that is, an image (concentrated around the point of consciousness) of the
macrocosm, or Universe. This Theorem is guaranteed by the hylo-idealistic demonstration that the
perceptible Universe is an extension, or phantasm, of the nervous system.
It follows that all phenomena, internal and external, may be classified for the purpose of discussing
their observed relations, in any manner which experience may show to be the most convenient.
(Examples: the elaborate classifications of science, chemical, physical, etc. , etc. There is no essential
truth in any of these aids to thinking: convenience is the sole measure.) Now for the purposes of
analysing the spiritual nature of man, of recording and measuring his experiences in this kind, of
planning his progress to loier heights of attainment, several systems have been devised. That of the
Abhidhamma is on the surface alike the most practical, the most scientific, and the most real; but for
European students it is certainly far too unwieldly, to say nothing of other lines of criticism.
Therefore, despite the danger of vagueness involved in the use of a system whose terms are largely
symbolic, I have, for many reasons, preferred to present to the world as an international basis for
classification, the classico-mathematical system which is vulgarly and erroneously (though
conveniently) called the Qabalah.
The Qabalah, that is, the Jewish Tradition concerning the initiated interpretation of their Scriptures,
is mostly either unintelligible or nonsense. But it contains as it ground-plan the most precious jewel
of human thought, that geometrical arrangement of names and numbers which is called the Tree of
Life. I call it the most precious, because I have found it the most convenient method hitherto
discovered of classifying the phenomena of the Universe, and recording their relations. Whereof the
proof is the amazing fertility of thought which has followed my adoption of this scheme.
Since all phenomena soever may be referred to the Tree of Life (which may be multiplied or
subdivided at will for convenience' sake) it is evidently useless to attempt any complete account of it.
The correspondences of each unit—the Ten Sephiroth and the Two-and-Twenty Paths—are infinite.
The art of using it consists principally in referring all our ideas to it, discovering thus the common
nature of certain things and the essential differences between others, so that ultimately one obtains a
simple view of the incalculably vast complexity of the Universe.
The whole subject must be studied in the Book 777, and the main attributions committed to memory:
then when by constant use the system is at last understood—as opposed to being merely
memorised—the student will find fresh light break in on him at every turn as he continues to
measure every item of new knowledge that he attains by this Standard. For to him the Universe will
then begin to appear as a coherent and a necessary Whole.
For the purpose of studying these Little Essays, it will be sufficient if a bare outline of the Cosmic
Theory which they imply be given: but it may be added that, the fuller the comprehension of the Tree
of Life which the reader brings to them, the clearer will their thought appear, and the more cogent
their conclusions.
Man - Little Essays Towards Truth by Aleister Crowley
(1) Jechidah
This is the quintessential principle of the Soul, that which makes man at the same time identical with
every other spark of Godhead, and different (as regards his point-of-view, and the Universe of which
it is the centre) from all others. It is a Point, possessing only position; and that position is only
definable by reference to co-ordinate exes, to secondary principles, which only pertain to it per
accidents, and must be postulated as our conception grows.
(2) Chiah.
This is the Creative Impulse or Will of Jechidah, the energy which demands the formulation of the
co-ordinate axes aforesaid, so that Jechidah may obtain self-realisation, a formal understanding of
what is implicit in its nature, of its possible qualities.
(3) Neschamah.
This is the faculty of understanding the Word of Chiah. It is the intelligence or intuition of what
Jechidah wishes to discover about itself.
These three principles constitute a Trinity; they are one, because they represent the being, and
apparatus which will make the manifestation possible, of a God, in manhood. But they are only, so to
speak, the mathematical structure of man's nature. One might compare them with the laws of physics
as they are before they are discovered. There are as yet no data by whose examination they may be
discerned.
A conscious man, according, cannot possibly know anything of these three principles, although they
constitute his essence. It is the work of Initiation to journey inwards to them. See, in the Oath of a
Probationer of A∴A∴ "I pledge myself to discover the nature and powers of my own Being."
this triune principle being wholly spiritual, all that can be said about it is really negative. And it is
complete in itself. Beyond it stretches what is called The Abyss. This doctrine is extremely difficult to
explain; but it corresponds more or less to the gap in thought between the Real, which is ideal, and the
Unreal, which is actual. In the Abyss all things exist, indeed, at least in posse, but are without any
possible meaning; for they lack the substratum of spiritual Reality. They are appearances without
Law. They are thus Insane Delusions.
Now the Abyss being thus the great storehouse of Phenomena, it is the source of all impressions. And
the Triune Principle has intended a machine for investigating the Universe; and this machine is the
fourth Principle of Man.
(4) Ruach
This may be translated Mind, Spirit, or Intellect: none of these is satisfactory, the connotation varying
with every writer. The Ruach is a closely-knitted group of Five Moral and Intellectual principles,
concentrated on their core, Tiphareth, the Principle of Harmony, the Human Consciousness and Will
of which the four other Sephiroth are (so to speak) the feelers. And these five principles culminate in a
sixth, Daäth, Knowledge. But this is not really a principle; it contains in itself the germ of
self-contradiction and so of self-destruction. It is a false principle: for. as soon as Knowledge is
analysed, it breaks up into the irrational dust of the Abyss.
Man's aspiration to Knowledge is thus simply a false road: it is to spin ropes of sand.
We cannot here enter into the doctrine of the "Fall of Adam," invented to explain in parable how it is
that the Universe is so unfortunately constituted. We are concerned only with the observed facts.
Man - Little Essays Towards Truth by Aleister Crowley
All these mental and moral faculties of the Ruach, while not purely spiritual like the Supernal Triad,
are still, as it were, "in the air." To be of use, they need a basis through which to receive impressions,
much as a machine requires fuel and fodder before it can manufacture the article which it is designed
to produce.
(5) Nephesch.
This is usually translated the "Animal Soul." It is the vehicle of the Ruach, the instrument by which the
Mind is brought into contact with the dust of Matter in the Abyss, that it may feel it, judge it, and react
to it. This is itself a principle still spiritual, in a sense; the actual body of man os composed of the dust
of Matter, temporarily held together by the Principles which inform it, for their own purposes, and
ultimately for the supreme purposes of self-realisation of Jechidah.
But Nephesch, devised as it is with no other object that the direct traffic with Matter, tends to partake
of its incoherence. Its faculties of perceiving pain and pleasure lure it into paying undue attention to
one set of phenomena, into shunning another. Hence, for the Nephesch to do its work as it should, it
requires to be dominated by the severest discipline. Nor is the Ruach itself to be trusted in this matter.
It has its own tendencies to weakness and injustice. It tries every trick—and it is diabolically
clever—to arrange its business with Matter in the sense most convenient to its inertia, without the
smallest consideration of its duty to the Supernal Triad, cut off as that is from its comprehension;
indeed, unsuspecting as it normally is of its existence.
...
The Quest of the Holy Grail, the Search for the Stone of the Philosophers—by whatever name we
choose to call the Great Work—is therefore endless. Success only opens up new avenues of brilliant
possibility. Yea, verily, and Amen! the task is tireless and its joys without bounds; for the whole
Universe, and all that in it is, what is it but the infinite playground of the Crowned and Conquering
Man - Little Essays Towards Truth by Aleister Crowley
Child, of the insatiable, the innocent, the ever-rejoicing Heir of Space and Eternity, whose name is
MAN?
Hosted by Hermetic.com
P A R T F O U R
MAGICAL WORKINGS
58
November 18th, 1905 was my seventh birthday in the Order, I wrote: "About now I may
count my Speculative Criticism of the Reason as not only proved and understood, but
realized." And on the ninteenth: "The misery of this is simply sickening --- I can write no
more."
I must explain. All these seven years, especially when in the East, I had discussed religion
and philosophy with all sorts and conditions of men. Further, I had studied the sacred books
of all religions of antiquity. My experiences all tended to the uniform conclusion that one
could go all round the circle in any argument. Christian philosophers have seized on this fact
to urge that our only hope of arriving at truth is through faith; but it is the bankruptcy of
faith that originally drove us to test it by reason. I saw that the true solution was, on the
contrary, that of the mystic. In Cabbalistic and scientific language, we possess a faculty of
apprehension independent of reason, which informs us directly of the truth.
I wrote in my Magical Diary on November 19th, 1905:
I realize in myself the perfect impossibility of reason; suffering great misery. I
am as one who should have plumed himself for years upon the speed and
strength of a favourite horse, only to find not only that its the speed and
strength were illusory, but that it was not a real horse at all, but a clothes-horse.
There being no way --- no conceivable way --- out of this awful trouble gives
that hideous despair which is only tolerable because in the past it has ever been
the Darkness of the Threshold. But this is far worse than ever before; I wish to
go from A to B; and I am not only a cripple, but there is no such thing as space.
I have to keep an appointment at midnight; and not only is my watch stopped,
but there is no such thing as time ... But surely I am not a dead man at thirty!
From this date till the first week in February, I was intellectually insane. The actual ordeal is
described with intense simplicity and passion in "Aha!" I call it "the Order of the Veil, the
Second Veil" and the "Veil of the Abyss". The complete destruction of reason left me
without other means of apprehension than Neschamah.
I have already explained briefly what are meant by Neschamah, Ruach and Nephesch. I
must now go a little more deeply into the doctrines of the Cabbala. The human
consciousness is represented as the centre of a hexagon
{509}
whose points are the various faculties of the mind; but the uppermost point, which should
link the human consciousness with the divine, is missing. Its name is Daäth, Knowledge.
The Babylonian legend of the "fall" is a parable of the shutting out of man from Paradise by
the destruction of this Daäth and the establishment of this Abyss. Regeneration, redemption,
atonement and similar terms mean alike the reunion of the human with the divine
consciousness. Arrived at the highest possible point of human attainment by regular steps,
one finds oneself on the brink of the Abyss, and to cross this one must abandon utterly and
for ever all that one has and is. (In unscientific mysticism the act is represented
sentimentally as the complete surrender of the self to God.) In unsectarian English, the act
implies first of all the silencing of the human intellect so that one may hear the voice of the
Neschamah.
We may now consider further what is meant by Neschamah. It is the human faculty
corresponding to the idea Binah. Understanding; which is that aspect of the divine
consciousness which corresponds to the Female Idea. It receives, formulates and transmits
the pure divine consciousness, which is represented by a triangle (for the Trinity) whose
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley
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apex is the essence of the true self (corresponding to Brahman, Atman, Allah etc. --- not to
Jehovah, who is the Demiurge) and whose other angle is Chiah, the Masculine aspect of the
self, which creates. (Chiah corresponds to Chokmah: Wisdom, the Word.) This divine
consciousness is triune. In its essence it is absolute and therefore contains all things in itself,
but has no means of discriminating between them. It apprehends itself by formulating itself
through the postulation of itself as male and female, active and passive, positive and
negative, etc.
The idea of separateness, of imperfection, of sorrow, is realized by it as an illusion created
by itself for the purpose of self-expression. The method is precisely that of the painter who
plays off one colour against another in order to represent some particular idea of himself
which pleases him. He knows perfectly well that each colour is in itself imperfect, a partial
presentation of the general idea of light.
The "Attainment of Unity" would be, theoretically, to mix up all the paints and produce a
surface without colour, form or meaning; yet those philosophers who insist on symbolizing
God by Unity reduce Him to a nonentity. The more logical of these, indeed, carry their
thesis a little further and describe the Deity as "without quantity or quality". Even the
Prayer Book describes Him as "without body, parts or passion", though it continues
cheerfully by describing His parts and His passions in detail. The Hindus actually realize
that their Parabrahman thus defined, by negating all propositions soever about him, is not a
being at all in any intelligible sense of the word. Their aspiration to be absorbed in his
essence depends on the thesis that "Everything is Sorrow."
{510}
The Buddha took the last logical step, rejected Brahman as a mere metaphysical figment
and replaced the idea of union with him by that of absorption in Nibbana, a state of
cessation pure and simple. This is certainly a step forward; but it still throws no light on the
subject of how things came to be such that only cessation can relieve their intolerable
sorrow; though it is clear enough that the nature of any separate existence must be
imperfection. The Buddha impudently postulates "Mara" as the maker of the whole illusion,
without attempting to assign a motive for his malice or a means by which he could gratify it.
Incidentally, his "existence in itself" is the whole of the evil Mara, which is just as
impertinent a postulate as any of the uncreated creators and uncaused causes of other
religions. Buddhism does not destroy the philosophical dilemma. Buddha's statement that
the fundamental error is ignorance is as arbitrary, after all, as Milton's that it was pride.
Either quality implies a host of others, all equally inconceivable as arising in a homogeneous
state either of bliss or nonentity.
In eighty days I went round the world of thought and, like Phineas Fogg and Omar
Khayyam, came out by the same door as in I went. The solution must be practical, not
theoretical; real not rational. Tyndall says somewhere that it is evidently possible for men to
acquire at any moment the use of a new faculty which would reveal a new universe, as
completely as the development of sight has done, or as the invention of the spectroscope,
the electroscope, etc., has done, and shown us unsuspected material universes. It is to be
carefully observed that we unhesitatingly class as "material" all sorts of ideas which are not
directly appreciable by any of our senses. I was in no way apostasizing from my agnosticism
in looking for a universe of beings endowed with such qualities that earlier observers, with
few facts and fewer methods of investigation and criticism at their disposal, called "gods",
"archangels", "spirits" and he like.
I began to remember that I was myself an initiate, that the Great Order had given me the
Cabbala as my working hypothesis. I now found that this doctrine satisfied perfectly my
science, my scepticism and my soul. It made no pretence to lay down the law about the
universe. On the contrary, it declared positively the agnostic conclusion of Huxley. It
declared reason incompetent to create a science from nothing and restricted it to its evident
function of criticizing facts, so far as those facts were comprehensible by it.
But the Cabbala did not leave me in despair; it asserted the existence of a faculty such as
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley
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that suggested by Tyndall, by the use of which I could appreciate truth directly. I may here
refer to the historic claim of mystics that their truth is incomprehensible to human reason
and inexpressible in human language. The arrogance of the proposition was less repugnant
to me than its confession of incompetence and its denial of the continuity of
{511}
nature. I have devoted countless days and nights to forcing myself to formulate the
intuitions of trance in intelligible ideas, and conveying those ideas by means of well defined
symbols and terms. At the period I am describing, such an effort would have been bricks
without straw. My truly mystical experiences were extremely few. I have subsequently
developed a complete system, based on the Cabbala, by which any expression may be
rendered cognizable through the language of intellect, exactly as mathematicians have done:
exactly, too, as they have been obliged to recognize the existence of a new logic. I found it
necessary to create a new code of the laws of thought.
One example pertinent to this period will illustrate the strangeness of the world revealed by
the development of Neschamah. The human consciousness is primarily distinguishable from
the divine by the fact of its dependence on duality. The divine consciousness distinguishes a
peach from a pear, but is aware all the time that the difference is being made for its own
convenience. The human accepts the difference as real. It also fails to accept the fact that it
knows nothing of the object as it is in itself. It is confined to an awareness that its
consciousness has been modified by its tendency to perceive its sensations, which it refers
to its existence. One must be expert in Pratyahara to apprehend intuitively the data of
Berkeleyian idealism. In other words, the condition of human consciousness is the sense of
separateness; that is, of imperfection; that is, of sorrow.
Now then for our illustration. I aspire to the good, the beautiful and the true. I define my
Holy Guardian Angel as a being possessing these qualities in perfection and aspire to His
Knowledge and Conversation. I propose therefore to perform the Sacred Magick of
Abra-Melin the Mage. But what is my first postulate! That there exists a real difference
between those qualities and their opposites, between Him and myself. It is true that I aim at
the identification of myself with Him, but I have already defined Him as imperfect, maugre
my gaudy phraseology, by admitting that He is separate from me. I define truth as imperfect
by distinguishing it from untruth. (When one has crossed the Abyss, these considerations ---
fantastic to the point of comicality as they appear on the surface --- become the most
formidable foes in practical life. For example, one has to resolve the antithesis between
action and inaction, and one removes one's motive with deft surgery by destroying the
dividuality of joy and sorrow.) My aspiration in itself affirms the very idea which it is its
sole object to deny.
Thus, then, all Magick is based on the illusion inherent in the reason itself. Since all things
soever are separate; since their separateness is the essential element of their existence; and
since all are equally illusions, why aspire to the Holy Guardian Angel? --- why not to the
Dweller on the Threshold? To the man who has not passed entirely through the Abyss
thoughts of this kind are positively frightful. There is no rational answer possible, from the
nature of
{512}
the case; and I was tormented indescribably by these thoughts, thousands after thousands,
each a terrific thunderbolt blasting its way through my brain during these frightful months.
Of course The Book of the Law makes mincemeat of all such dragons, but I am convinced
that the gods deliberately kept me away from seeking the solution in its pages, though I was
their chosen confidant. They were determined that I should drain the last dregs of the
vitriol. (Visita Interiora Terrae, Rectificado Invenies Occultum Lapidem.)
It was essential that I should learn the technique of crossing the Abyss with absolute
thoroughness for they had it in mind to entrust me with the task of teaching others exactly
how to do it. Thus, though I crossed the Abyss at this period, underwent one particular
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley
3 of 12
phase of the ordeal, I was restricted to that particular experience which sufficed for their
immediate purpose in regard to me. I had to work out its problems in many other ways on
many other occasions, as will appear from the sequel. The Book of the Law was to my hand,
but the gods themselves had hardened my heart against it. I had hardened my own heart; I
had tried to go round the Boyg. They answered, "Thou hast said."
I know now from the experience of others that The Book of the Law is veritably a Golden
bough. It is the only thing that one is allowed to take with one through Hades and it is an
absolute passport. In fact, one cannot go through Hades at all; there is no "one" to go. But
the Law itself bridges the Abyss, for "Love is the law, love under will." One's will-to-cross
is to disintegrate all things soever into soulless dust, love is the one force which can bind
them together into a coherent causeway. There, where torn thoughts sank through the
starless space, aching and impotent, into what was not even nothingness, each alive for ever
because reduced to its ultimate atoms so that there was no possibility of change, no hope of
any alleviation of its anguish, each exquisitely mindful that its captain had slain himself in
despair; there may men pass today in peace. What with The Book of the Law to guide them,
and my experience to warn them, they can prepare themselves for the passage; and it is
their own fault if the process of self-annihilation involves suffering.
I cannot even say that I crossed the Abyss deliberately. I was hurled into it by the
momentum of the forces which I had called up. For three years, save for spasmodic and
half-hearted incidents, and the great moment in Cairo which took place in direct opposition
to the united efforts of my scepticism, my cynicism, my disgust with everything, my idleness
and my prejudices, I had been fighting against my destiny. I had been building up a great
dam. My occasional return to Magick had been more in the nature of occasional sprees than
anything else, as a man consumed by an over-mastering passion for a woman and
determined to trample her under foot, might seek relief in occasional flirtations.
{513}
A magical oath is the most irresistible of all moral forces. It is an affirmation of the true will;
that is to say, it is a link between the conscious human and the unconscious divine nature of
the man who takes it. A magical oath which does not express the true will sets these forces
in opposition and therefore weakens the man the more gravely as the oath is more seriously
meant and taken. But given that the oath is a true expression of the true will, its effect is to
affirm that very union between the insignificant force of the conscious being and the
irresistible might of that which is "one, eternal and individual", that which is inexpugnably
immune to all forces soever; which when accomplished constitutes it supreme.
My position was this. In 1897 I had unconsciously discovered my true will and devoted
myself to find the means of carrying it out. In 1898 Ifound the means and had had
concentrated all my resources of any kind onhad swept aside every making the most of it. I
obstacle, internal andyears; the dam, my external. The reaction of 1902 had lasted just three
carnal mind, had begun to leak; a moment later, it was swept away by theavenging tides;
they swept away the last remnant of my reason.
There is a feeble rattle of the rifles of the rearguard, some ineffectual foppishness about
discipline between November the nineteenth and twenty-fifth, then absolute silence till the
eighth of February, when I write, "About this full moon consciousness began to break
through Ruach into Neschamah. Intend to stick to Augoeides."
I found myself in a truly surprising state.
As I trod the trackless way
Through sunless gorges of Cathay,
I became a little child,
By nameless rivers, swirling through
Chasms, a fantastic blue,
Month by month, on barren hills,
In burning heat, in bitter chills,
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley
4 of 12
Tropic forest, Tartar snow,
Smaragdine archipelago,
See me --- led by some wise hand
That I did not understand.
Morn and noon and eve and night
I, the forlorn eremite,
Called on Him with mild devotion,
As the dewdrop woos the ocean.
I had all the innocence and helplessness if a child at the period when it gropes instinctively
for someone to love it, someone whom it knows and trusts, who is infinitely strong,
infinitely wise and infinitely kind.
{514}
I am not quite sure why I chose the word "Augoeides" to represent my thought. It may well
be because it was not spoilt for me by any personal association with the past. I have been
carried away by the necessity of simplifying (to the utmost of my ability) the story of my
passage through the Abyss. I must now explain why I issued from it with this particular idea
of Augoeides rather than another, for every idea in my mind had been shattered in
fragments and brayed in a mortar, reduced to impalpable dust and scattered to the four
winds of heaven. Sir Isaac Newton to the rescue! His first law of motion is sufficient to
make the point clear.
A body either keeps its course (or else remains at rest)
Unless by some external force its motion is impressed.
The effect of my ordeal had been to remove all forces soever which had impinged on my
normal direction. My star had been diverted from its proper orbit by, had been held back by,
the attraction of other heavenly bodies. Their influence had been removed. For the first time
in my life I was really free. I had no personality left. To take a concrete case: I found myself
in the middle of China with a wife and child. I was no longer influenced by love for them,
no longer interested in protecting them as I had been; but there was a man, Aleister
Crowley, husband and father, of a certain caste, of certain experience, of travel in remote
parts of the world; and it was his business to give them his undivided love, care and
protection. He could do this very much more efficiently than before when I was aware of
what he was doing, and consequently inclined to overplay the part.
But with regard to my magical future --- why did I "intend to stick to Augoeides"? The
reason becomes clear if we consider the nature of the meditation --- Sammasati --- which
had constituted the essence of my success in passing through the ordeal.
I determined on this at Allan's suggestion and one of my main objects in going to stay with
him at the choung was to do it. I thought it could be done in three days! There must be a lot
of silly young asses knocking about the world, but I think I can give most of them a couple
of strokes a hole.
The method of the meditation is described (1911) in Liber Thisharb, and I have outlined it
in an earlier chapter. I quote from The Temple of Solomon the King (The Equinox, vol. I,
No. VIII).
... he found his old comrade, I.A, now a member of the Buddhist Sangha, under
the name of Bhikku Ananda Metteya.
It was from him that he received the instructions which were to help him to
reach the great and terrible pinnacle of the mind whence the adept must plunge
into the Abyss, to emerge naked, a babe --- the Babe of the Abyss.
{515}
"Explore the River of the Soul," said Ananda Metteya, "Whence and in what
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley
5 of 12
order you have come."
For three days --- the longest period allowed by the Buddhist law --- he
remained in the choung, meditating on this matter; but nothing seems to have
come of it. He set his teeth and settled down doggedly to this consideration of
the eternal why. Here is a being in Rangoon. Why? Because he wanted to see
Bhikku A. M. Why? Because --- and so on to the half-forgotten past, dark seas
that phosphoresced as the clean keel of his thought divided them.
I had eliminated a vast number of possible replies to the question of Zoroaster above quoted
by Allan. I might even have discovered my true will, as indeed the meditation should enable
me to do, had it not been interfered with by the larger question with its smashing academic
scepticism. The question posed by the meditation assumes a casual connection between
events and even to some extent a purposeful connection. Now in the Abyss these are the
very two ideas which are torn from under the bridge of continuity which they should
support.
The practical point was that I had no proof whatever that there was any purpose in my past
life or could be in my future. I again quote from "The Temple of Solomon the King":
Baffled again and again, the fall with his horse supplied the one factor missing
in his calculations. He had repeatedly escaped death in matters almost
miraculous. "Then I am some use after all!" was his conclusion. "I am indeed
SENT to do something." For whom? For the universe; no partial good could
possibly satisfy his equation. I am, then, the "Chosen Priest and Apostle of
Infinite Space". Very good: and what is the message? What shall I teach men?
And like lightning from heaven fell upon him these words: "THE
KNOWLEDGE AND CONVERSATION OF THE HOLY GUARDIAN
ANGEL."
So again we read (in the diary) on February 11th: "Made many resolutions of a G. R. (Great
Retirement). In dream flew to me an angel, bearing an ankh, to comfort me."
We may now transcribe the diary. We find the great mind, the complex man, purged through
and through of thought, stripped of all things human and divine, centred upon one single
aspiration, as simple as the love of a child for its father.
Like lightning from heaven? Not lest swift flashed back the obvious question of the
practical man, how? The answer was immediate: "INVOKING OFTEN". I need not have
asked. They were the words of Zoroaster indeed, but they were also my own. I had used
them in my paraphrase of
{516}
Zoroaster in Tannh„user's song. And after all, there is nothing specially magical about them
except that they are in the plain common sense of psychology. Huxley said that science was
organized common sense, and Frazer that science was successful Magick. The syllogism
presents no difficulties.
Only one point remained for consideration. I had said how almost insanely anxious I had
always been about economizing time. My mind is, perhaps, the most infernally active on the
globe. I cannot bear to eat a meal except as a deliberate debauch. I like to play a game of
chess and read a book "while fortifying my body thereby" and engaging in conversation
with the other guests. I was constantly devising dodges for making the most of every
moment. I hate to shut a door behind me, on the ground that I might have to open it again. I
detest changing my clothes. I keep my head shaved if there is any risk of being called upon
to brush my hair. On the other hand, I like shaving myself because, as many men know, the
operation tends to produce fertility of ideas.
...
The Confessions of Aleister Crowley
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
explore the truth and decide for yourself.
※※※





Subsection v6.01.024

The Illusion of the Abyss by Benjamin Rowe
(1997 Essay, Comparative Source)

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The Illusion of the Abyss
by Benjamin Rowe, copyright 1997
This piece was written for an English occult magazine. I forget the title I originally put on
it -- something cleverly pompous.
The word "abyss" has seen widespread use in the occult community, with many different
meanings. In various times and places it has been used to represent everything from the
Christian Hell to existential angst. In this century, among the many occultists influenced
by Aleister Crowley, the term has taken on a specific reference to the process of
transcendence, the events by which a person's awareness transforms from an
individualized state into a transcendental or "enlightened" state. Crowley called this
process "Crossing the Abyss".
Crowley's description of the process is highly dramatic and equally idiosyncratic. It is also
extremely vague, consisting of a few symbols and metaphors that he used throughout his
life, without ever attempting to expand or explain them, or to explain in detail
relationship between the transcendental and human levels of being. Perhaps
vagueness is the reason for it popularity; it provides a simple, easily-grasped image,
however mistaken it might be.
Crowley perceived the "Abyss" as a literal gap in the stuff of creation, separating the
human levels of existence from the transcendental or divine levels. He describes this gap
as a region of nullity and terror, in which anything that enters is torn asunder. (In this
much, he was following a long-established theme in Hebrew cabalistic lore.) In order to
attain to enlightenment, the magician must "leap" into this Abyss, where his human self is
ripped apart and destroyed. If he has established enough momentum in his climb
towards the divine levels, then the divine spark in himself (freed from its bindings to his
human self) will be carried over to the other side of the gap to become a Master of the
Temple, the magickal grade equivalent to the basic enlightened state.
Somewhere along the way from one side to the other, Crowley says, the magician must
also confront and temporarily become the "Demon of the Abyss", whose nature is
Dispersion. Crowley named this demon Choronzon, a name for Satan from the works of
Dr. John Dee; but the characteristics he assigns to the demon owe more to the "Dweller
on the Threshold" from Bulwer-Lytton's Zanoni novels. It is unclear how this
confrontation relates to the destruction of the magician's human self.
Hermetic.com » Norton's Imperium » The Illusion of the Abyss
1
Crowley's description of his own "crossing of the Abyss" is recorded in his book
Vision and the Voice. The record conforms closely to his metaphor of the process.
However, his depiction disagrees in many ways with those provided by other enlightened
people across the years; it also disagrees with my own experience of that process, which
was achieved through the same means Crowley used: John Dee's "Enochian" magickal
system, coupled with the system of lore from the Western traditions of ceremonial
magick and the cabala.
From the perspective of my own experience, the whole "Abyss" concept is nonsense.
There is no gap between the divine and human levels of existence; the transcendent
being is already constantly present and active in every person. Since this is the case,
there is nothing to "cross" or "jump". The discontinuity, to the extent there is one, is
entirely a matter of perspective; the transcendent view is dramatically different from the
Self-centered view common to the lower levels. But there is a constant connection and
interaction between the divine and the human; they make up a single, undivided system.
Rather than a separation, our normal lack of awareness of the divine aspect of ourselves
is a matter of ignorance. Through ignorance, reinforced by a lifetime of conditioning and
habit -- and reinforced even more by magickal disciplines -- the transcendent being in a
person is deluded into believing it is something that it is not: an individualized "self"
"soul", operating in the mundane world through the medium of a personality mask. In its
ignorance, it becomes so thoroughly identified with this self (which is a constructed
thing) that it becomes unaware that it is anything other than that self. You might think of
it as a weird sort of dharana or deep meditation; a concentration on an object of
meditation (the self, in this case) so intent that the difference between the perceiver and
the perceived disappears.
Achieving transcendence therefore is not a matter of creating a bridge over a gap, or of
leaping a gap, or anything of that sort. Rather, it is a matter of awakening the already
present transcendent being from its state of identification with the self, getting it to
realize and act from its natural state.
What it takes to do this can vary widely. It might require something a catastrophic as the
complete destruction of the "self", as in the typical Abyss myth; but it could equally be as
subtle and gentle as a breath of air slipping out through an open window, leaving the self
completely intact. In my own case, it was somewhere between these extremes. There
were some long and rather painful steps leading up to it, but the final event was quick,
undramatic, and utterly simple.
To put the event in context, there are two main thrusts to the magickal/cabalistic
approach to initiation. First, through invocations, astral explorations, meditation, etc., it
seeks to open up the hidden portions of the mind (both sub- and superconscious), to
bring their activity under conscious direction, and to make use of them to explore and
perceive the corresponding aspects of the universe at large. The scope and control
Hermetic.com » Norton's Imperium » The Illusion of the Abyss
2
exercised by the individual is constantly increased, and the various parts brought into a
state of tight coordination.
At the same time, the cabalistic side of the work seeks to bring about an ever-increasing
synthesis in the _contents_ of the mind. Through the use of correspondences, the chaos
of raw experience is gradually reduced. Ideas and experiences get organized into
hierarchies, each level abstracting something from the lower ones, so that ever-greater
numbers of events become instances of ever-simpler ideas. Eventually things coordinate
into an elegant system of archetypes, energies, and relationships.
By the time the person has achieved and absorbed the highest purely human level and
become an "Exempt Adept", both these processes have pretty much been exhausted.
Those parts of the person's being that are capable of being controlled and coordinated by
the individual self are as integrated as they are ever going to be. The contents of the
mind have been reduced to an integrated scheme and an encompassing philosophy. He is
the Compleat Individual, so to speak. Such people -- as Crowley notes -- tend to become
leaders of "schools of thought" for spreading their philosophy; or they become priests or
social leaders of some sort.
Crowley talks about the next stage of the process as if it were something to be
consciously decided; but in fact, if it happens out of anything except necessity, the
person is probably jumping the gun. (I should note that the description that follows is
from my own experience, coordinated with a very few other people's; your mileage may
vary. And this applies only to the magickal/cabalistic approach; it doesn't seem to occur
- at least not with the same severity -- in the more mystical approaches of the Eastern
systems.)
The Exempt Adept now enters into a period of increasing "dryness", what I call
"wandering in the wasteland", following the myth of the Grail Knights . I don't know how
this associates with the so-called "dark night of the soul" -- descriptions of that never
resonate for me. He has reached a point of diminishing returns in both his magickal and
cabalistic endeavors.
His magickal work still raises his consciousness above its normal level; but instead of
staying at that higher level, he always seems to fall back to the point where he started, or
advances only the most minute increment -- far too little for the amount of effort
expended. And such advances as he makes eventually turn out to be only variations on
what he has already accomplished, not something truly new. There seems to be some
sort of asymptotic principle in effect. Each increment he moves above his current level
requires substantially larger amounts of effort; he can expend all the energy at
command without getting to a stable higher level.
A similar state exists with respect to his cabalistic work. He continues to make
elaborations on his synthetic scheme, but finds that new additions and expansions
Hermetic.com » Norton's Imperium » The Illusion of the Abyss
3
decrease in frequency. At the same time he becomes aware that there are aspects of
existence that cannot be fit into his present scheme without destroying it utterly and
starting over from scratch; he doesn't know what these aspects are, exactly, but he can
sense them looming over the horizon.
And his finely coordinated Self seems to be spinning its wheels in most of its endeavors.
He can still act out the functions of the Exempt Adept, but gets less pleasure and
fulfillment out of doing so. He can't get a grip on things, on a way to use this great Self
his; he feels like he is trying to act in a frictionless environment.
The reason for all this is that the Adept is looking for something that isn't there -- that
is, a continuation of the path as he has experienced it so far, with its blinding revelations,
ecstatic highs, encompassing archetypes, etc. There just isn't any more of that, above his
current level; such things are characteristic of the human-accessible magickal realms, not
the transcendent realms. But he doesn't know that.
Needless to say, the Adept in this situation is a pretty miserable character. Not all the
time; usually he can go about his business in the character of the Adept without any
difficulty. But periodically the futility of it all hits, and the despair and desperation can
reach incredible levels of intensity. What he wants, more than anything, is to get OUT,
without seeing any way of doing so. Like the mythical Christ on his cross, he calls out to
his god, and gets no answer. All he can do is suffer alone.
But even despair has its limits; when nothing one does can have any effect on the
situation, one eventually just gives it up. He gets beyond hope of anything happening,
beyond despair that nothing is happening, and just lives life as it comes, without any
particular plans or expectations, without any desire beyond the moment. He goes on
because that is what he does, and for no purpose. This whole process can go on for a
long time. In my own case, the period of increasing despair lasted over five years, the
period of "just living" lasted another five.
The actual awakening of transcendent being seems an anticlimax after the wasteland
period. Even now, four years after the fact, I am uncertain exactly what triggered the
moment when it awoke. All I recall is that some chance remark by a person in an online
discussion group caused me to make an assessment, and the being noted that it was no
longer identical with the self, but was aware without dependence upon the facilities of the
individualized "soul". It was now the no-thing-ness of Binah, instead of identifying with
the differentiated activities of the lower spheres. It could put the self on, like a set of
clothes, and off again at will.
What happened then is another story. But a few things to note:
-- Despite being very unpleasant, there was no destruction of the individualized self
involved; the transcendent being simply "stepped out" of it, leaving it more or less intact,
Hermetic.com » Norton's Imperium » The Illusion of the Abyss
4
for the moment. A rather substantial re-orientation of it took place later, but it was still
undamaged.
-- There was no "jumping into the Abyss"; in fact, no Abyss as such.
-- There was no confrontation with the Demon Choronzon, or any other supposed
"denizen" of the "Abyss". No apparently external horrors of any sort, not even Chthulhu.
-- No particular invocations were involved in triggering the event. It took place during an
hiatus in my Enochian work, and that work was directed to other purposes in any case.
 


Hermetic.com » Norton's Imperium » The Illusion of the Abyss
5
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Further Reading



Continued...
Subsection Additional Reference(s)
v6.01.001 What the Cults Believe: Sunday School Series. By Professor Christoph
Kreitz, 1999. Tabernacle Baptist Church, Ithaca, NY. (See Chapter 8
Scientology and Chapter 9 The New Age Movement.)
http://www.cs.cornell.edu/home/kreitz/Christian/Cults/all.pdf
http://www.cs.cornell.edu/home/kreitz/Christian/Cults/handouts.pdf

v6.01.002

Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume I, Subsection v1.01.015, 2013.
http://scr.bi/n2048s

Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume V, Subsection v5.01.004, 2013.
http://bit.ly/11MdaOm

Out of Scientology's Labyrinth. By Karen Schless Pressley, 2005. North
American Mission Board, SBC.
http://www.4truth.net/fourtruthpbnew.aspx?pageid=8589952831

v6.01.003 Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume IV, Subsection v5.01.003, 2012.
http://scr.bi/LQCvlT

Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume V, Subsection v5.01.021, 2013.
http://bit.ly/11MdaOm

Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume VII, Subsection v7.01.007, 2013.
http://bit.ly/11MdaOm

The Virtues of Godlessness: The least religious nations are also the most
healthy and successful by Phil Zuckerman, Pitzer College 2009.
http://www.psychwww.com/psyrelig/zuckerman.htm
v6.01.004 Humanity's Spiritual Future: The Evolutionary Ideals of Aurobindo Ghose.
By Eric R. Dorman, 2011. Zygon Center for Religion and Science, Third
Annual Student Symposium on Science and Spirituality.
http://bit.ly/16F4rDX

Starting at the End: New Age Global Civilization. By Brad Alles, 2013.
http://www.bradalles.com/starting-at-the-end-new-age-global-civilization/

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Further Reading









Continued...
Subsection Additional Reference(s)
v6.01.005 Patheos Religion Library: New Age - Ultimate Reality and Divine Beings.
By Professor Benjamin E. Zeller, 2010.
http://bit.ly/14eY5X2

The Ocean of Theosophy — Ch. 5 Body and Astral Body. By William Q.
Judge, 1893 Second Edition. Theosophical University Press, Online Edition.
http://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/ocean/oce-5.htm

v6.01.006 Reflections on the Interaction of Buddhist Philosophy and Other
Philosophies. By Dr. Alexander Berzin, 2009.
http://bit.ly/9ROYes

Approaching Buddhism – Introduction to Buddhism. The Buddhist Archives
of Dr. Alexander Berzin.
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/x/nav/n.html_1206826570.html

v6.01.007 Wikipedia, Maitreya (Theosophy), (as of Aug. 9, 2013, 23:06 GMT).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maitreya_(Theosophy)

Esoteric Buddhism, Third Edition 1884. By Alfred Percy Sinnett, President
of the Simla Eclectic Theosophy Society. Trübner & Co., London, England.
http://archive.org/details/esotericbuddhis01sinngoog

v6.01.008 Wikipedia, List of Buddha claimants, (as of Aug. 10, 2013, 17:48 GMT).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Buddha_claimants

Buddha-Nature, Day One of a Discourse on Uttaratantra. By His Holiness
the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, 1982. Translated by Dr. Alexander Berzin and
revised, January 2008.
http://bit.ly/16FX3Iu

Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
relation to other
religious leaders,
belief systems,
common tenets of
faith and ancient
mythology.
Project Chanology
WhyWeProtest.net
Xenu-directory.net
CarolineLetkeman.org
ExposeScientology.com
SolitaryTrees.net
bit.ly/SciSecrets
Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Further Reading





Continued...
Subsection Additional Reference(s)
v6.01.009 Patheos Religion Library: New Age - Beginnings. By Professor Benjamin E.
Zeller, 2010.
http://bit.ly/1998Lfc

What is the New Age Movement? By Matt Slick, 2009. Christian
Apologetics & Research Ministries.
http://carm.org/new-age-what

The Occult Roots of Scientology?: L. Ron Hubbard, Aleister Crowley, and
the Origins of a Controversial New Religion. By Hugh B. Urban, 2012.
Nova Religio Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions, Vol. 15, No. 3.
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/nr.2012.15.3.91

v6.01.010
v6.01.011
Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume I, Subsection v1.01.021, 2013.
http://scr.bi/n2048s

Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume IV, Subsection v4.01.012, 2012.
http://scr.bi/LQCvlT

Scientology Religiosity? Series, Volume VII, Subsection v7.01.010, 2013.
http://bit.ly/11MdaOm

Buddhism in the West: Self Realization or Self Indulgence? by Maria Reis
Habito, 2010. Maria Kannon Zen Center.
http://bit.ly/UYSi5T

Buddhism and Its Impact on Asia: Survey of the Basic Forms of Buddhism.
By Dr. Alexander Berzin, 1996.
http://bit.ly/f2u5X0
v6.01.012 Treasury of Truth – Illustrated Dhammapada. By Ven. Weragoda Sarada
Maha Thero of the Singapore Buddhist Meditation Centre, 1993. The Corpo-
rate Body of the Buddha Educational Foundation, Taiwan.
http://www.buddhanet.net/pdf_file/dhammapadatxt1.pdf
http://www.buddhanet.net/dhammapada/

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Indic Religions
Further Reading




Continued...
Subsection Additional Reference(s)
v6.01.013 The Life of the Buddha As Pieced Together from the Pali Canon. By Dr.
Alexander Berzin, August 2010.
http://bit.ly/cYWviK

Who Was Shakyamuni Buddha? By Dr. Alexander Berzin, 2010.
http://bit.ly/17dBHQS

A Brief History of Buddhism in India before the Thirteenth-Century Inva-
sions. By Dr. Alexander Berzin, 2002/2007.
http://bit.ly/pcsWA1
v6.01.014
v6.01.015
The Training of the Mind. By Ven. Ananda Metteya [aka Allan Bennett, an
early a member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn who became a
Buddhist Monk in 1901], 1991. The Equinox Volume I No. V.
http://hermetic.com/crowley/equinox/i/v/eqi05005.html

Fundamentals of Tibetan Buddhism – Level 5: Analysis of the Mind and
Reality. The Buddhist Archives of Dr. Alexander Berzin.
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/x/nav/n.html_1474539638.html

v6.01.016 Theosophy and Buddhism. By David Reigle, 2000. Fohat Magazine, Edmon-
ton Theosophical Society.
http://www.blavatskyarchives.com/theobudd.htm

Thelema & Buddhism. By Frater IAO131, 2007. Journal of Thelemic
Studies, Vol. 1, No. 1.
http://bit.ly/1cSxeI5

v6.01.017 Patheos Religion Library: New Age - Afterlife and Salvation. By Professor
Benjamin E. Zeller, 2011.
http://bit.ly/1cSdZhJ

Patheos Religion Library: Scientology - Afterlife and Salvation. By Dr. J.
Gordon Melton, 2009.
http://bit.ly/199fR3l

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Hubbard & his
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Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Further Reading




Continued...
Subsection Additional Reference(s)
v6.01.019 Wikipedia, Shangri-La (as of Aug. 10, 2013, 02:56 GMT). [ “A fictional
place… Many scholars believe that Shangri-La is Shambhala, a mythical
kingdom in Tibetan Buddhist tradition, which was sought by Eastern and
Western explorers.” ]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shangri-La

Mistaken Foreign Myths about Shambhala. By Dr. Alexander Berzin,
1996/2003.
http://bit.ly/xepbnG

v6.01.020
v6.01.021
Patheos Religion Library: New Age - Influences. By Professor Benjamin E.
Zeller, 2010.
http://bit.ly/1bjmwJ1

Abraham Maslow and the All-American Self. By Algis Valiunas, 2011. The
New Atlantis, Number 33.
http://bit.ly/w2P7K5

Maslow’s Theory of Self-Actualization, More or Less Actualized. By Ann
Reitan, PsyD. 2013.
http://bit.ly/ShJFX5

v6.01.022 Wikipedia, True Will (as of Aug. 10, 2013, 03:46 GMT).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/True_Will

True Will: The Radical Re-orientation Towards Becoming Who We Are
(Parts 1-4). By Frater IA0131, 2012.
http://bit.ly/17EVLL5

v6.01.018 Life And Death: A Conversation Between A Great Eastern Teacher, H. P.
B., Colonel Olcott And An Indian. By H. P. Blavatsky, 1892.
http://www.blavatsky.net/blavatsky/arts/LifeAndDeath.htm

Introduction to Crowley (in Five Voices): Spiritual Practice. By Tim
Maroney, 1997.
http://tim.maroney.org/CrowleyIntro/Spiritual_Practice.html

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Hubbard & his
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Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
Further Reading


Subsection Additional Reference(s)
v6.01.024 Red Book: Abyss, give birth to the unredeemed. By Carl Gustav Jung, 1914-
30. The Philemon Foundation, W.W. Norton & Company, New York City,
USA 2009.
http://bit.ly/AvuV0S

v6.01.023 The Secret Doctrine, vol 1, pt 1, Stanzas of Dzyan - Cosmic Evolution (pgs
26-32). By H. P. Blavatsky, 1888. Theosophical University Press Online
Edition.
http://www.sacred-texts.com/atl/dzyan/dzyan.htm

The Secret Doctrine, vol 2, pt 2, ch 18: The Myth of Bel and Merodach (pgs
503-04). By H. P. Blavatsky, 1888. Theosophical University Press Online
Edition.
http://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/sd/sd2-2-05.htm

Rudolf Steiner on HPB, White Lotus Day Talk, May 8, 1912. Blavatsky
News.
http://blavatskynews.blogspot.com/2010/03/rudolf-steiner-on-hpb.html

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Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
An Independent Research Series of Reference Publications


Series Section v6.02

Independent Review & Derivative Works



[ Ed. note — An additional catalog of related works derived from the research
materials contained in this volume of the series, will hopefully be added into this
chapter in a later edition. For more information, please see the Material Reuse
Statement at the end of this section. ]

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[ Ed. note — This page left blank intentionally. ]
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Material Reuse Considerations


To Whom It May Concern:

If you have found the SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY? series of publications useful for formal study or authorship, we
respectfully ask that you honor the spirit of free exchange in which these compilations were crafted.

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Indic Religions
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
List of Scientology Illustrations
© Church of Scientology or its subsidiaries unless noted otherwise












Subsection Publication / Source Page
v6.01.001 Scientology's Relationship With Eastern Religious Traditions by
Dr. Stephen A. Kent, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Vol. 11,
No. 1, 1996.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13537909608580753

11
v6.01.002 The Scientology Religion by L. Ron Hubbard. Church of
Scientology World Wide, Sussex, England 1974.

22
v6.01.003 The Creation of Human Ability: A Handbook for Scientologists.
By The L. Ron Hubbard. Bridge Publications: Los Angeles, CA,
2007.
http://www.matrixfiles.com/Scientology%20Materials/Books/BO
OKS%20PDF/COHA.PDF
31
v6.01.004 Advance! Magazine Issue 52; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1978.

Advance! Magazine Issue 26; AOSHUK Sussex, England 1975.

Advance! Magazine Issue 74; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1982.

46
v6.01.005 Research & Discovery Series Volume 11; Phenomena of the
Thetan lecture transcript. By L. Ron Hubbard (1952), Bridge
Publications, Los Angeles, CA. 1994.

56
v6.01.006 L. Ron Hubbard & Church of Scientology Quotes on Buddha and
Eastern Belief Systems.
[ N/A – Released on the Internet / Public Domain in this volume ]

75
Fair Usage Catalog
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For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
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promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
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v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
List of Scientology Illustrations
© Church of Scientology or its subsidiaries unless noted otherwise









Continued...
Subsection Publication / Source Page
v6.01.007 Advance! Magazine Issue 23; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1974.

Advance! Magazine Issue 24; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1974.

Advance! Magazine Issue 25; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1974.

Advance! Magazine Issue 26; AOSHUK Sussex, England 1975.

Advance! Magazine Issue 27; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1974.

95
v6.01.008 Buddhism Fundamentals: Maitreya Buddha. By Alan Khoo, 1999.
http://web.singnet.com.sg/~alankhoo/Maitreya.htm

Theosophy Versus Neo-Theosophy:The "Coming" Messiah or
Lord Maitreya or World Teacher. Compiled by Margaret Thomas
and reprinted by Blavatsky Study Center, 2003.
http://blavatskyarchives.com/thomas/thomasmessiah.htm

Prophecy - A History of the Future By Robert A. Nelson, Internet
Edition 2000.
http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/profecias/esp_profecia01f1.htm
138
v6.01.009 The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion. By Hugh
B. Urban, 2011. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New
Jersey, USA.

148
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analysis on how
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promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
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Eastern
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v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
List of Scientology Illustrations
© Church of Scientology or its subsidiaries unless noted otherwise







Continued...
Subsection Publication / Source Page
v6.01.010 Scientology 0-8: The Book Of Basics by L. Ron Hubbard.
Copenhagen, Denmark, 1970.
http://www.matrixfiles.com/Scientology%20Materials/Books/BO
OKS%20PDF/0_8.PDF

Advance! Magazine Issue 126; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1996.

Advance! Magazine Issue 167; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 2003.

The Technical Bulletins of Dianetics and Scientology Vol. I by L.
Ron Hubbard. Church of Scientology of California, Los
Angeles CA. 1976 ed.

Advance! Magazine Issue 25; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1974.
165
v6.01.011 [ Ed. note—illustrations via various sources found via Google
Image Search. ]

187
v6.01.012
The Dhammapada: The Buddha's Path of Wisdom. Translated
from the Theravada Pali Canon by Acharya Buddharakkhita,
Buddhist Publication Society, 1985
http://www.thebigview.com/buddhism/dhammapada.html

196
v6.01.013 Advance! Magazine Issue 84; AOSHA ANZO Sydney, Australia
1984.

Advance! Magazine Issue 153; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 2001.

Advance! Magazine Issue 182; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 2005.

200
Fair Usage Catalog
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For Intermediate
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analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
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Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
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v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
List of Scientology Illustrations
© Church of Scientology or its subsidiaries unless noted otherwise




Continued...
Subsection Publication / Source Page
v6.01.014 SCIENTOLOGY Fundamentals of Thought: The Basic Book of the
Theory & Practice of Scientology for Beginners. By L. Ron
Hubbard, C.E., Ph.D. 1956. Hubbard Association of Scientologists
International, Silver Spring, Maryland.
http://www.lermanet.com/exit/manney/sfot_1956/fundamentals_of
_thought.html

Advance! Magazine Issue 66; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1980.

Advance! Magazine Issue 116; AOSHA ANZO Sydney, Australia
1993.

220
v6.01.015 Advance! Magazine Issue 21; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1973.

Teachings in Chinese Buddhism: The Miao Yun Collection. Trans-
lated by Neng Rong, edited by Mick Kiddle, 1995. Buddha
Dharma Education Association.
http://www.buddhanet.net/cbp1_f4.htm

241
v6.01.016 Advance! Magazine Issue 82; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1984.

250
v6.01.017 Advance! Magazine Issue 24; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1974.

Advance! Magazine Issue 52; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1978.

Death 18ACC-12 American Clinical Course Lecture by L. Ron
Hubbard 30 July 1957.

265
v6.01.018 Death, a Gateway to New Life. By the Indian Section of the
Theosophical Society, 1990-1991.
http://www.teosofia.com/Theosophy2.html

Death in Thelema. By Frater IAO131, 2012. The Philosophy &
Psychology of Thelema, Occultism, O.T.O., and Magick.
http://iao131.com/2012/01/17/death-in-thelema/

285
Fair Usage Catalog
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For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
doctrines in
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Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
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Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
List of Scientology Illustrations
© Church of Scientology or its subsidiaries unless noted otherwise










Continued...
Subsection Publication / Source Page
v6.01.020 Advance! Magazine Issue 21; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1973.

Advance! Magazine Issue 55; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1978.

Advance! Magazine Issue 57; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1978.

Advance! Magazine Issue 84; AOSHA ANZO Sydney, Australia
1984.

306
v6.01.021 Advance! Magazine Issue 88; AOSHA ANZO Sydney, Australia
1985.

Advance! Magazine Issue 89; AOSHA ANZO Sydney, Australia
1986.

Research & Discovery Series Volume 8; Self-Determinism On
The Dynamics, The Foundation Auditors Course lecture transcript.
By L. Ron Hubbard (1951), Bridge Publications, Los Angeles,
CA. 1994.

328
v6.01.022 Research & Discovery Series Volume 12; Self-Determinism and
Creation Of Universes lecture transcript. By L. Ron Hubbard
(1952), Bridge Publications, Los Angeles, CA. 1994.

Choose Thelema: Thelema, True Will, Aleister Crowley. By
Sacha Moufarrege, 2011.
http://www.choosethelema.com

347
v6.01.019 Advance! Magazine Issue 195; AOSHUK Sussex, England 2009.

298
Fair Usage Catalog
of Source Materials

For Intermediate
Level comparative
analysis on how
the Church of
Scientology
promotes L. Ron
Hubbard & his
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Scientology Theology
Research Volume VI
Eastern
Beliefs
v6.10AUG2013 Edition
SCIENTOLOGY RELIGIOSITY?
Indic Religions
List of Scientology Illustrations
© Church of Scientology or its subsidiaries unless noted otherwise

Subsection Publication / Source Page
v6.01.023 Advance! Magazine Issue 23; AOLA Los Angeles, USA 1974.

Advance! Magazine Issue 73; AOSHUK Sussex, England 1982.

Advance! Magazine Issue 111; AOSHUK Sussex, England 1992.

Little Essays Toward Truth. By Aleister Crowley, 1938. O.T.O
London, England.
http://hermetic.com/crowley/little-essays-towards-truth/man.html

The Confessions of Aleister Crowley. By Aleister Crowley, 1929.
The Mandrake Press, London, England.
http://www.thelema.ca/156/Confessions/chapter58.html
363
v6.01.024 The Illusion of the Abyss. By Benjamin Rowe, 1997.
http://hermetic.com/norton/abyss2.htm

382
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For Intermediate
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Theology, mysticism or propaganda — we cordially invite you to
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An Independent Research Series of Reference Publications by Project Chanology
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