Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

  Table of Contents  I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. Introduction  Folding Leaves, Leaflets and Flowers  Perspective of Leaflets  Makigami (Roll‐Paper)  Basic  Assemblies  Painting Techniques  Tapered Makigami Branches  Fiddleheads   Makigami Assemblies  Paper Pots and Makigami Roots  Inspirational Photographs  Mastering Makigami  Subassemblies  182 Performing Makigami Conversions  pages with Depth Enhanced Flora  photos,            

Afterword     

diagrams and videos to

ensure success!

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

Folding the Rose Leaf 
1.  Start with a square of paper.  If it has a leaf‐ colored or painted side, that side should face up.              2.  Fold the square diagonally and unfold it  Then flip it so the  colored side faces down.  

 

 

Click here for a YouTube leaf folding video!

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

      3.  Fold each corner to the center line folded in step 2.            3.  Fold the bottom corners to the center line.                4.  Your paper should look like this.  Now flip it.       

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

      5.  Fold the leaf diagonally on the fold you made in step 1.            6.  Fold “veins” into the leaf by repeatedly folding and  unfolding as shown.  Open the fold made in step 5 and  flip the leaf.                7.  Fold the bottom tip up to a point roughly halfway between the  unpainted areas of the bottom of the leaf.             

then 

Easy to follow step by step instructions

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

    8.  Fold the tip back down, leaving a small gap.             9.  Squeeze the bottom stem of the leaf together and then  “crimp” the stem of the leaf.  See picture below:             

    The completed rose leaf.     

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

XV. Depth Enhanced Flora  
          As discussed in the introduction of this book, depth  enhancement is obtained in the same manner as depth is  conveyed in a painting.  Objects we want the viewer to  perceive as closer, are larger, and objects more distant are  smaller.    This sculpture is depth enhanced and has three leaf and  flower sizes.  The leaves were made using the incremental  squares technique covered in chapter 1.  I number the leaves  according to size, the smallest leaves have little “one”s  written on their reverse sides.  Each of the largest have a  “three” on their reverse side.                         

Any size, shape or color!

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

    I cut, painted and folded a set of six flowers in  three sizes and 48 leaves in three sizes.                  I rolled, molded, dried and assembled a set of makigami stems to  accommodate my sculpture.  I also made two “coils” for  branchlets.            I have 16 leaves per size, which will be assembled in pairs,  therefore I need eight branchlets per size.  I attach the first  set of eight branchlets closest to the work surface.  This  corresponds to the smallest size leaf (size 1).  I typically keep one pair of leaves in each size as a reserve (in  case of painting mistakes, etc.), therefore I will only use  seven branchlets in each size.       

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

  Next I attach eight branchlets for the second leaf size.  These  are attached slightly further from the work surface within the  sculpture.                    Now I attach branchlets for the largest leaf size.   These branchlets are furthest from the work surface.              Here is another view of the assembly.           

Learn how to make branches from newspaper!

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

  I paint and prepare the branch in accordance with the  instructions at the end of chapter 9, and then proceed  with final assembly.                  I assemble the smallest leaves first.  These leaves are attached  to the branchlets closest to the work surface.                And then I attach the second leaf size to the  branchlets.               

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

  And finally the third size.  Notice how the sculpture has  seemed to come “alive.”               

      I perform the final assembly, attaching the  smallest flowers closest to the work  surface, second size flowers further, and  the third sized flower furthest from the  work surface.  I then apply a final coat of  paint and glue in accordance with the  instructions in chapter 9.  Notice that even though this is a fairly  simple sculpture, it has obtained a visual  complexity due to its depth enhancement.       

Paper pots, pebbles, and ROOTS!

Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman 

                                          A photograph of the back side of the sculpture is quite revealing.  The smallest leaves are now closest to  us, the largest furthest.  This is the reverse of depth enhancement.  Notice how flat the sculpture looks.   

The materials for this Origami Bonsai cost 17 cents!

 
Advanced Origami Bonsai e‐book $4  Advanced Origami Bonsai DVD $10  www.OrigamiBonsai.org to order  Copyright 2009, Benjamin John Coleman