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The Trinary Tree(s) underlying Primitive Pythagorean Triples

H. Andres Lnnemo June 8 2000


========== FOUNDATION ========== I've known this a long time: Let ( a, b, c ) be a Pythagorean Triple a2 + b2 = c2 Parameterize a,b,c as follows a = q + m b = q + n c = q + m + n Substitute (q + m)2 + (q + n)2 = (q + m + n)2 Expand, cancel common terms, and take square root to get q = sqr(2*m*n) Thus, Pythagorean Triples can be generated by finding m,n such that 2*m*n is a perfect square. The following observations are offered without proof: * If m,n are relatively prime then the Pythagorean Triple will also be relatively prime. This is known as a Primitive Pythagorean Triple, or PPT. * q will always be even. * In PPTs, either m or n must be even and the other odd This is also true for a and b. * q is larger than m or n or both * q is smaller than m + n The reverse equations are easily derived: m = c - b n = c - a q = a + b - c m,n,q > 0 a,b,c > 0

======================== LOOK, THEY COME IN PAIRS ======================== This is the new twist: Traditionally, q is assumed to be the positive root. However if you instead choose the negative root, a different Pythagorean Triple is formed with a or b or both being negative. Discard the sign(s) and you have a perfectly good Pythagorean Triple. Thus each valid combination of m and n produce two Triples. Again, Triples. other sign, One of the triples will have all positive terms, and in the a or b will be negative. The c's will always have the same if m and n are relatively prime so will be a, b and c in both

assumed positive without loss of generality. The odd/even pattern in PPTs will be identical. SPPT. The Signed Primitive Pythagorean Triple will be known as the For example: let m = 25 and n = 8 q = sqr( 2 * 25 * 8 ) = 20 a = q + m = 45 b = q + n = 28 c = q + m + n = 53 a' = -q + m = 5 b' = -q + n = -12 c' = -q + m + n = 13

The PPT is (45,28,53) and the SPPT is (5,-12,13) which corresponds to a PPT of (5,12,13). value The c' value of the SPPT will always be smaller than the c of the PPT. ================= TREE CONSTRUCTION ================= The construction of the trinary tree is based on the observation that PPTs and SPPTs always come in pairs and every valid PPT can generate three, and only three, SPPTs simply by changing the

signs

on a and b. Start with (3,4,5) as the root node called "P". Build a table of values: A === 3 -3 3 -3 B === 4 4 -4 -4 C === 5 5 5 5 M === 1 1 9 9 N === 2 8 2 8 Q === 2 -4 -6 -12 Q' === -2 4 6 12 A' === -1 5 15 21 B' === 0 12 8 20 C' === 1 13 17 29

PPT (later) SPPT PPT SPPT PPT SPPT PPT

You can now read the three child nodes from the table: P3 They are (5,12,13), (15,8,17) and (21,20,29) called P1, P2 and respectively. tree Repeat the process for each child node to build as large a as you want. For example: A === 5 -5 5 -5 B === 12 12 -12 -12 C === 13 13 13 13 M === 1 1 25 25 N === 8 18 8 18 Q === 4 -6 -20 -30 Q' === -4 6 20 30 A' === -3 7 45 55 B' === 4 24 28 48 C' === 5 25 53 73

SPPT PPT PPT PPT

PPT SPPT SPPT SPPT

Notice that the first row points back to the parent PPT when the sign is removed from the PPT. Also the sign pattern will tell which branch was taken. As you build the tree you will notice that the c's are always increasing as you traverse from the root, that is the list of PPTs is 'quasi-sorted' in a heap sort sense. ================================== THE SELF ROOTED NATURE OF THE TREE ================================== Something funny happens at the apparent parent of (3,4,5) which is (1,0,1).

Since one of the values is zero, there is only one signed variation of the node instead of the usual three. A === 1 -1 B === 0 0 C === 1 1 M === 1 1 N === 0 2 Q === 0 -2 Q' === 0 2 A' === 1 3 B' === 0 4 C' === 1 5

~PPT ~PPT PPT ~SPPT

This tree will lead to all PPTs where a is odd and b is even, similarly (0,1,1) will lead to all the PPTs where a is even and b is odd. ========================== CUTTING OUT THE MIDDLE MEN ========================== Now apply the same technique to a node in general. again, assume a,b,c,m,n,q > 0 A === a -a a -a B === b b -b -b C === c c c c M === m m1 m2 m3 N === n n1 n2 n3 Q === q q1 q2 q3 Q' === -q -q1 -q2 -q3 A' === a0 a1 a2 a3 B' === b0 b1 b2 b3 C' === c0 c1 c2 c3 Once

PPT SPPT PPT PPT PPT SPPT SPPT SPPT

Processing the first child shows: m1 = c - b m2 = c - (-a) = c + a q1 = (-a) + b - c a1 = -q1 + b1 = -q1 + c1 = -q1 + = 2*a -

(always < 0)

m1 = (a - b + c) + (c - b) = a - 2*b + 2*c n1 = (a - b + c) + (c + a) = 2*a b + 2*c m1 + n1 = (a - b + c) + (c - b) + (c + a) 2*b + 3*c

Putting these equations into matrix form: (a1 b1 c1) = (a b c)( 1 2 2 ) = (a b c)*T1 ( -2 -1 -2 ) ( 2 2 3 ) Similar calculations yield:

(a2 b2 c2) = (a b c)( -1 -2 -2 ) = (a b c)*T2 ( 2 1 2 ) ( 2 2 3 ) (a3 b3 c3) = (a b c)( ( ( 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 ) = (a b c)*T3 2 ) 3 )

(a0 b0 c0) = (a b c)( -1 -2 -2 ) = (a b c)*T0 ( -2 -1 -2 ) ( 2 2 3 ) And this is a remarkable result. It means that any Pythagorean Triple can generate three new Triples by means of matrix multiplications with T1, T2 and T3 with larger c's, and can generate a signed version of a smaller c triple with a matrix multiplication with T0. If the triple is a PPT the child nodes will be PPTs and the T0 transform will yield a SPPT corresponding to the parent. ================= SPANNING THE PPTS ================= The trinary tree covers the entire set of PPTs completely and uniquely. The unique part is inherent from the construction of the tree. Each node has only one unique SPPT 'mnq-twin' and thus has only one parent. The completely part requires a proof by contradiction. Suppose you have a PPT which is not spanned by the tree. It would still have a 'mnq-twin' SPPT with a smaller c. And the absolute values of those numbers would form another PPT. be, zero, This PPT can't be on the tree either or the original one would and so on. Since the c's are decreasing, and are bounded by

this sequence must terminate in a different 'self-parent' than (1,0,1) or (0,1,1). Since everything is relatively prime these two are the only two triples where q = 0, since q = 0 implies m = 0 or n = 0 (Remember q = sqr(2*m*n)). ================================ MNQ-TWINS IN LINEAR ALGEBRA FORM ================================

T ------------------------------------> (a b c) -----> (m n q) -----> (m n -q) -----> (a' b' c') InvP U4 P InvP = ( 0 -1 1 ) ( -1 0 1 ) ( 1 1 -1 ) U4 * U4 = I T = InvP * U4 * P = ( -1 -2 -2 ) ( -2 -1 -2 ) ( 2 2 3 ) Note, T * T = I Proof: * P = InvP * P = I Thus the T transform will find the 'mnq-twin' of any triple. ======================================== TREE CONSTRUCTION IN LINEAR ALGEBRA FORM ======================================== Parent -------------------------> Child Signed Variation MNQ-Twin T * T = InvP * U4 * P * InvP * U4 * P = InvP * U4 * U4 U4 = ( 1 ( 0 ( 0 0 0 ) 1 0 ) 0 -1 ) P = ( 1 0 1 ) ( 0 1 1 ) ( 1 1 1 )

PPT SPPT PPT (a b c) -----> ( a' b' c ) -----> ( a" b" c" ) Ui T i = 1,2,3 U1 = ( -1 0 0 ) ( 0 1 0 ) ( 0 0 1 ) U2 = ( 1 0 ( 0 -1 ( 0 0 0 ) 0 ) 1 ) U3 = ( -1 0 ( 0 -1 ( 0 0 0 ) 0 ) 1 )

T1 = U1 * T = ( 1 2 2 ) ( -2 -1 -2 ) ( 2 2 3 ) T2 and T3 multiply out identically to the results in the previous section.

================================ EIGENVECTORS AND SELF ROOTEDNESS

================================ The Eigenvectors of T are also interesting. The characteristic equation of T is -x3 + x2 + x - 1 = 0 Which yields roots of 1, 1, and -1. Since there is a double root at one the eigenvectors require two parameters. A set of corresponding eigenvectors are: ( s1, s2, s1+s2 ) and ( s3, s3, s3 ) Since (1,1,1) can never be a Pythagorean triple when multiplied by any length (except the trivial zero), it can be discarded. Applying the Pythagorean constraint to the first family of vectors: (s1)2 + (s2)2 = (s1 + s2)2 s12 + s22 = s12 + 2*s1*s2 + s22 0 = 2*s1*s2 Therefore s1 = 0 or s2 = 0 or both. Both is again the trivial solution and can be discarded. That leaves two vectors: ( s1, 0, s1 ) and ( 0, s2, s2 ) which reduce to ( 1, 0, 1 ) and ( 0, 1, 1 ) when relative primeness is introduced. These are precisely the two self rooted triplets that lead to all the odd/even/odd and even/odd/odd PPTs respectively. ==================== AN INTERESTING TWIST ==================== Reversing the first two rows of T has the effect of swapping the odd/even pattern of a and b. This has the effect of making (1 0 1) the parent of (0 1 1) and vice versa. So instead even/odd of two separate self rooted trees, you get sort of 'Siamese' trees joined at the head where the tiers alternate between and odd/even triples. The eigenvalues of this matrix are -1, -1, and 1 with eigenvectors: ( s1, s2, (s1+s2)/2 ) and (1,1,2) Applying the Pythagorean constraint to these shows no real solutions possible. Therefore there can be no other

self-rooted trees based on this matrix.