Strategic Doing: Building Collaborations That Matter

Ed Morrison Linda Fowler Scott Hutcheson

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing: Building Collaborations That Matter
Ed Morrison Linda Fowler Scott Hutcheson

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Today’s Roadmap

‣ Why networks? ‣ Strategic Doing in a Nutshell ‣ What Strategic Doing Delivers ‣ Creating the Hub for Strategic Doing ‣ Practicing Strategic Doing ‣ Applying Strategic Doing to State Action Plans

Saturday, May 30, 2009

We live in a networked world

Internet map of city-to-city connections
Source: chrisharrison.net

Saturday, May 30, 2009

We live in a networked world

Internet map of city-to-city connections
Source: chrisharrison.net

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Question: Who makes the iPhone?

Answer: A network led by Apple

The iPhone production network

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Question: How many companies made the Wizard of Oz?

Answer: One (Metro-Goldwyn Mayer)

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Question: How many companies made the Spider Man 3? Answer: Fifty-six (working in a network)

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Question: How did regions function in a pre-networked world?
State State State Agencies Agencies Agencies Libraries Libraries Libraries
Economic Economic Economic Development Development Development PostPostPostSecondary Secondary Secondary

Answer: Silos

Cities Cities Cities

K-12 K-12 K-12

Counties Counties Counties Federal Federal Federal Federal Agencies Agencies Agencies Agencies

Workforce Workforce Workforce

Social Social Social Service Service Service

Chambers Chambers Chambers

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Question: How do regions function in a networked world?
State State State Agencies Agencies Agencies Libraries Libraries Libraries
Economic Economic Economic Development Development Development PostPostPostSecondary Secondary Secondary

Answer: Still Silos

Cities Cities Cities

K-12 K-12 K-12

Counties Counties Counties Federal Federal Federal Federal Agencies Agencies Agencies Agencies

Workforce Workforce Workforce

Social Social Social Service Service Service

Chambers Chambers Chambers

Saturday, May 30, 2009

We need new approaches to link and leverage assets within our communities and regions

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Today’s Roadmap

‣ Why networks? ‣ Strategic Doing in a Nutshell ‣ What Strategic Doing Delivers ‣ Creating the Hub for Strategic Doing ‣ Practicing Strategic Doing ‣ Applying Strategic Doing to State Action Plans

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic planning evolved to handle the complexities of managing large hierarchies...like the military and Fortune 500 companies

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic planning evolved to handle the complexities of managing large hierarchies...like the military and Fortune 500 companies
A small group at the top did the thinking

A larger group at the bottom did the doing

Saturday, May 30, 2009

As organizations have become more networked, older strategic planning models do not work so well. The reason: There is no top or bottom to a network.

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Dilbert emerged to make fun of strategy in a hierarchical world...

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Organizations have been moving toward teams...where there is no separation of thinking from doing

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is a discipline to enable teams of people to do complex projects in these open networks

Strategic Planning

Strategic Doing

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Most places: People and organizations work in isolation trying their best

Strategic Planning: A few people try to sort it all out (but it often does not work)

Strategic Doing: A continuous process of aligning, linking and leveraging

Saturday, May 30, 2009

With Strategic Doing, leaders guide open conversations to translate ideas in to action...
Strategic Doing involves both open participation and leadership direction
Key Insight: People move in the direction of their conversations
n tio
Le a de r

n pe O

p

ti ar

p ci

a

sh

ip

di

re

ct io

n

Dialogue

Decision

Collaboration

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice to keep focused on four key questions...

Find

Learn

Focus

Plan

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice to keep focused on four key questions...
What could we do together? Find

Learn

Focus

Plan

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice to keep focused on four key questions...
What could we do together? Find

Learn

Focus

What should we do together?

Plan

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice to keep focused on four key questions...
What could we do together? Find

Learn

Focus

What should we do together?

Plan What will we do together?
Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice to keep focused on four key questions...
What could we do together? Find

How will we learn together?

Learn

Focus

What should we do together?

Plan What will we do together?
Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing begins when a core team of people agrees to take responsibility for the Strategic Doing process...
The Core Group agrees to use a Strategic Doing process to produce and update a Strategic Action Plan Core Group

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The Core Team identifies focus areas of opportunities to produce dramatically better results....

Focus Area 1

Core Group

Focus Area 2

Focus Area 3

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The Core Team identifies focus areas of opportunities to produce dramatically better results....

Focus Area 1 Focus Area 1

Core Group

Focus Area 2

Focus Area 3

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Within each focus area, teams start with initiatives or projects
Project

Focus Area

Core Group
Project

Project Project

Project Project

Project

Focus Area

Project Project

Focus Area

Project

Project Project Project

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Within each focus area, teams start with initiatives or projects
Project

Focus Area

Core Group
Project

Project Project

Project Project

Project

Focus Area

Project Project

Focus Area

Project

Project Project Project

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The process of shaping a strategy is continuous

Core Group

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Core Group

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Project

Core Group

Project

Project

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Project

Core Group

Project

Core Group

Project

30 Days

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Project

Core Group

Project

Core Group

Project

30 Days

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The team starts with Strategic Action Plan Version 1.0, then 1.1, then 1.2 and so on...
Strategic Doing calls for continuous revisions of a Strategic Action Plan

30-90 days

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The team starts with Strategic Action Plan Version 1.0, then 1.1, then 1.2 and so on...
Strategic Doing calls for continuous revisions of a Strategic Action Plan

1.0

1.1

1.2

1.3

30-90 days

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is not that much different than planning a family vacation

Core Group for Our Florida Vacation

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is not that much different than planning a family vacation

Core Group for Our Florida Vacation

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Relaxation

Core Group for Our Florida Vacation

Other Activities

Transportation

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Research Beach Activities on Web

Gather Good Books, Movies

Relaxation

Core Group for Our Florida Vacation
Research Restauarants

Look at Museum Options

Other Activities

Check out Night Life Explore One Day Side Trips

Transportation

Local Travel

Flying Airport to Hotel

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Today’s Roadmap

‣ Why networks? ‣ Strategic Doing in a Nutshell ‣ What Strategic Doing Delivers ‣ Creating the Hub for Strategic Doing ‣ Practicing Strategic Doing ‣ Applying Strategic Doing to State Action Plans

Saturday, May 30, 2009

In hours, Strategic Doing generates all the components you need for a Strategic Action Plan to guide innovative collaborations. Strategic Doing is fast, flexible, and (surprisingly) fun.
Strategic Doing is a civic discipline to guide open innovation
Create ideas about what we can do together

Find
Commitments to Stay Connected Opportunities

Reconnect to learn and adapt

Learn

Focus

Define what we will do

Action Plans

Outcomes and Initiatives

Plan
Commit to link and leverage
Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing quickly generates “link and leverage” strategies

Strategic Doing produces alignments, links and leverage

A great example...The new Water Council in SE Wisconsin

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Water, Water, Water, …

© 2008, Brian D. Thompson, UWM Research Foundation

28

10/6/08

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Water, Water, Water, …
Public Sector
DNR
City of Milwaukee

CH2MHILL UNDP
Federal Government
• Engineering services

Private Sector
Joy Bucyrus Great Lakes Water
• Water treatment equipment

Siemens

GE
Advanced Chemical Systems

M7/GMC

MMSD

Veolia
• Water utilities

ITT
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Water Council Municipalities

Opportunities
Environmental
• • • • • • • •

Utilities

• Intake quality, output quality • Energy consumption

Miller Coors
• Water reuse & softening • Phosphate & radium removal

• Ind. wastewater treatment

• Filtering & purification

Pentair

Water User

Procorp

AquaSensors
• Wastewater treatment design

UW-Madison

Algae control (& exploitation) Removal of PCBs from lakes & rivers Storm water containment, Road salt Ship’s ballast – policy/enforcement Aquaculture • Ethanol production efficiency Lake Michigan contamination • Tar sands water treatment Policy issues – metering/incentives • Elimination of boiler scaling • Increasing brewing efficiency • Increased efficiency of water heating • Speeding treatment for large volumes • Increasing treatment efficiency

Sanitarie

Energy/Efficiency

Treatment/ Processing/ Softening

Analysis/ Measuring/ Control

Badger Meter
• Water meters • Meter reading systems

• pumps

Flygt

Bioscience Fluid Transport/ Civil & Ind. Engr. Detection WATER Inst. Chem & Biosci

Processing/Treatment
•Reverse Osmosis •Softening •Ships ballast - treatment •Treatment targets
–PCBs in sewer pieps –Desalinzation –Radium in ground water –Pharmaceuticals –Phosphate

Pumps/ Valves/ Components

Fall River

•Municipal wastewater treatment
–Storm water treatment –Reduced use of chemicals

•Industrial wastewater treatment •Residential Water Treatment

–Farm manure, food processing waste, metals –Utilizing sewer sludge –Residential water treatment, home filtration –Residential Water softening without salt

AO Smith
• Water heaters

Marquette

Monitoring/Detection Materials
• • • • • Water security Real time monitoring User detection systems Real time sensing for life forms Pharmaceuticals

Consumer Products

Kohler
• Faucets • Materials, coatings, plating • Casting technology

School of Freshwater Science

UWM
Physics

CEAS Funds
Fluid Power

DOE NSF NIH EPA NOAA/DOC
International Partners 28
Greater Milwaukee Foundation

Academic Institutions

MSOE
Rapid Proto Center

Foundations

DoD USDA

Interior World Bank
10/6/08

© 2008, Brian D. Thompson, UWM Research Foundation

Funding Agencies

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Water, Water, Water, …
Public Sector
DNR
City of Milwaukee

CH2MHILL UNDP
Federal Government
• Engineering services

Private Sector
Joy Bucyrus Great Lakes Water
• Water treatment equipment

Siemens

GE
Advanced Chemical Systems

M7/GMC

MMSD

Veolia
• Water utilities

ITT
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Water Council Municipalities

Opportunities
Environmental
• • • • • • • •

Utilities

• Intake quality, output quality • Energy consumption

Miller Coors
• Water reuse & softening • Phosphate & radium removal

• Ind. wastewater treatment

• Filtering & purification

Pentair

Water User

Procorp

AquaSensors
• Wastewater treatment design

UW-Madison

Algae control (& exploitation) Removal of PCBs from lakes & rivers Storm water containment, Road salt Ship’s ballast – policy/enforcement Aquaculture • Ethanol production efficiency Lake Michigan contamination • Tar sands water treatment Policy issues – metering/incentives • Elimination of boiler scaling • Increasing brewing efficiency • Increased efficiency of water heating • Speeding treatment for large volumes • Increasing treatment efficiency

Sanitarie

Energy/Efficiency

Treatment/ Processing/ Softening

Analysis/ Measuring/ Control

Badger Meter
• Water meters • Meter reading systems

• pumps

Flygt

Bioscience Fluid Transport/ Civil & Ind. Engr. Detection WATER Inst. Chem & Biosci

Processing/Treatment
•Reverse Osmosis •Softening •Ships ballast - treatment •Treatment targets
–PCBs in sewer pieps –Desalinzation –Radium in ground water –Pharmaceuticals –Phosphate

Pumps/ Valves/ Components

Fall River

•Municipal wastewater treatment
–Storm water treatment –Reduced use of chemicals

•Industrial wastewater treatment •Residential Water Treatment

–Farm manure, food processing waste, metals –Utilizing sewer sludge –Residential water treatment, home filtration –Residential Water softening without salt

AO Smith
• Water heaters

Marquette

Monitoring/Detection Materials
• • • • • Water security Real time monitoring User detection systems Real time sensing for life forms Pharmaceuticals

Consumer Products

Kohler
• Faucets • Materials, coatings, plating • Casting technology

School of Freshwater Science

UWM
Physics

CEAS Funds
Fluid Power

DOE NSF NIH EPA NOAA/DOC
International Partners 29
Greater Milwaukee Foundation

Academic Institutions

MSOE
Rapid Proto Center

Foundations

DoD USDA

Interior World Bank
10/6/08

© 2008, Brian D. Thompson, UWM Research Foundation

Funding Agencies

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Water, Water, Water, …
Public Sector
DNR
City of Milwaukee

CH2MHILL UNDP
Federal Government
• Engineering services

Private Sector
Joy Bucyrus Great Lakes Water
• Water treatment equipment

Siemens

GE
Advanced Chemical Systems

M7/GMC

MMSD

Veolia
• Water utilities

ITT
Thermo Fisher Scientific

Water Council Municipalities

Opportunities
Environmental
• • • • • • • •

Utilities

• Intake quality, output quality • Energy consumption

Miller Coors
• Water reuse & softening • Phosphate & radium removal

• Ind. wastewater treatment

• Filtering & purification

Pentair

Water User

Procorp

AquaSensors
• Wastewater treatment design

UW-Madison

Algae control (& exploitation) Removal of PCBs from lakes & rivers Storm water containment, Road salt Ship’s ballast – policy/enforcement Aquaculture • Ethanol production efficiency Lake Michigan contamination • Tar sands water treatment Policy issues – metering/incentives • Elimination of boiler scaling • Increasing brewing efficiency • Increased efficiency of water heating • Speeding treatment for large volumes • Increasing treatment efficiency

Sanitarie

Energy/Efficiency

Treatment/ Processing/ Softening

Analysis/ Measuring/ Control

Badger Meter
• Water meters • Meter reading systems

• pumps

Flygt

• Carmen Aguilar – microbiology • David Petering –metal metabolism • Val Klump • Tim Ehlinger – aquatic systems • Burlage – PCR environmental test • Shangping Xu – safe drinking • water • • • • • • •

Bioscience Fluid Transport/ Civil & Ind. Engr.
Li, Jin – pollutant transport modeling Bravo, Hector – hydraulic modeling Christensen, Erik – pollutants in water Amano, Ryoichi - CFD Pillia, Krisna – porous media modeling Kevin Renken- mass transfer Sobolvev – biproducts utilization Doug Cherkauer – groundwater hydrology

Processing/Treatment
•Reverse Osmosis •Softening •Ships ballast - treatment •Treatment targets
–PCBs in sewer pieps –Desalinzation –Radium in ground water –Pharmaceuticals –Phosphate

Pumps/ Valves/ Components

Fall River

•Municipal wastewater treatment
–Storm water treatment –Reduced use of chemicals

•Industrial wastewater treatment •Residential Water Treatment

–Farm manure, food processing waste, metals –Utilizing sewer sludge –Residential water treatment, home filtration –Residential Water softening without salt

AO Smith
• Water heaters

Marquette

Detection

• Joe Aldstadt – analytical methods • Peter Geissinger – detection • Alan Schwabacher– pharmaceuticals in water

Monitoring/Detection
• • • • • Water security Real time monitoring User detection systems Real time sensing for life forms Pharmaceuticals

Consumer Products

WATER Inst. Chem & Biosci
School of Freshwater Science

• Jim Waples – water aging • Tom Consi – aquatic robots • Tom Grundle - harbors • Chen, Junhong – nano materials, sensors

Kohler
• Faucets • Materials, coatings, plating • Casting technology

Materials
• Rohatgi, Pradeep – adv. castings, lightweight, lead-free • Aita, Carolyn – advanced coatings • Gong, Sarah – polymer materials

UWM
Physics

CEAS Funds
Fluid Power

DOE NSF NIH
Foundations

Academic Institutions
Partnerships • Sponsored Research Proj. • Shared equipment • Graduates • Workforce training • Subcontractor/supplier • Extramural grant support • Philanthropic support

MSOE
Rapid Proto Center

DoD
Greater Milwaukee Foundation

Interior USDA World Bank
10/6/08

Cluster Effects • Shared resources/equipment • Collaborative grants • Improved competitiveness • Translational science

EPA NOAA/DOC
29 International Partners

© 2008, Brian D. Thompson, UWM Research Foundation

Funding Agencies

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing produces a swarm of innovations
Gorilla innovation Swarm innovation

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Today’s Roadmap

‣ Why networks? ‣ Strategic Doing in a Nutshell ‣ What Strategic Doing Delivers ‣ Creating the Hub for Strategic Doing ‣ Practicing Strategic Doing ‣ Applying Strategic Doing to State Action Plans

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing needs: A “safe, creative space” for creativity to take place Simple rules of civility to promote “deep conversations”

Saturday, May 30, 2009

To be innovative, we need “safe, creative” places

‣ ‣ ‣

Camp Fires Watering Holes The Kitchen Table

Civic forums create safe places to stretch our minds...
Civic forums provide the venue to define new opportunities and practice new civic behaviors

Source: Nead Brand Partners

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The Innovation Cafe at Memorial Hospital in South Bend serves no food, but offers a place “where staffers and outsiders can learn to craft new ideas."

Saturday, May 30, 2009

‣ Civility represents "the sacrifices that we make for
the sake of living together."

‣ Civility recognizes our inter-dependence. ‣ Without civility, we cannot do the complex thinking
and experimentation that workforce development requires...
The Thrive region of 8 counties around Madison, Wisconsin has adopted Principles of Collaboration

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Today’s Roadmap

‣ Why networks? ‣ Strategic Doing in a Nutshell ‣ What Strategic Doing Delivers ‣ Creating the Hub for Strategic Doing ‣ Practicing Strategic Doing ‣ Applying Strategic Doing to State Action Plans

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice...
What could we do together? Find

How will we learn together?

Learn

Focus

What should we do together?

Plan What will we do together?
Saturday, May 30, 2009

What could we do together? 1. Explore the assets at the table 2. Watch for patterns and possible connections 3. Find opportunities by connecting assets (What if?)

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Here’s an example of a worksheet to connect assets to opportunities from a Strategic Doing Pack
What are the assets you can contribute or share? Example: Network of professionals committed to youth initiatives What are the opportunities we see when we connect these assets? Who are the partners that could be engaged in this opportunity?

Example Opportunity 1: We WIB, 3 key service providers, the could conduct monthly webinars community college to inform us of the innovations taking place in the region. Opportunity 2: We could create WIB, library system, community weekly forums to keep people college informed and build our networks...

Saturday, May 30, 2009

As we connect assets, we notice something strange starts to happen... The “network effect” takes hold...

High Inflection Point Opportunities

Low Low Trust and collaboration High

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Op

po

rtu

ni

ty

Zo

ne

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice...
What could we do together? Find

How will we learn together?

Learn

Focus

What should we do together?

Plan What will we do together?
Saturday, May 30, 2009

What should we do together?
Pick something transformative..not just something you are already doing...Pick something that you can do together that you cannot just do alone

Where do you want to be in 3 years? What will people be doing? And how will they be doing it?

1. Pick an opportunity

2. Define an outcome with 3 characteristics 3. Describe one initiative using 3 SMART Goals
An initiative is a project SMART = Simple + Measurable +Achievable + Relevant + Time Sensitive

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Here’s a worksheet for defining characteristics of an outcome...As we define outcomes clearly, sensible metrics emerge
What does success look Define 3 characteristics like? of your Outcome Example: Creating a nationally Characteristic 1: Active on-line recognized workforce summit community of innovators that regularly pushes innovative initiatives to address the challenges of at-risk youth. Characteristic 2: Strategy teams that engage at-risk youth as members Characteristic 3: Example: Regular webcasts Define a way to measure this characteristic Metric 1: Number of people engaged in our on-line network

Metric 2: Number of at-risk youth participating in our strategy sessions Metric 3: Number of webcasts; total number of webcast participants

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Here’s a worksheet for SMART Goals to define an initiative
Describe your initiative: Define 3 SMART Goals For this project by this date.... What are you going to do Example: to achieve your outcome? September 2009 We convene a core team of professionals in the region engaged with at-risk youth to complete budget and agenda for summit We will do this....

December 2009

Complete funding

March 2010

Launch summit

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice...
What could we do together? Find

How will we learn together?

Learn

Focus

What should we do together?

Plan What will we do together?
Saturday, May 30, 2009

What will we do together? 1. Write an Action Plan of who does what by when 2. Make personal commitments

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Here’s a worksheet for an Action Plan
Action Steps: To move our project forward over the next 30 days, we will take these action steps: Responsible: By When:

Date: Questions? Contact:

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is simple, but not easy. It takes practice...
What could we do together? Find

How will we learn together?

Learn

Focus

What should we do together?

Plan What will we do together?
Saturday, May 30, 2009

How will we learn together? 1. Capture your conversation on the web 2. Plan the next face-to-face meeting for revisions
Strategic Doing calls for continuous revisions of a Strategic Action Plan

30-90 days

Saturday, May 30, 2009

How will we learn together? 1. Capture your conversation on the web 2. Plan the next face-to-face meeting for revisions
Strategic Doing calls for continuous revisions of a Strategic Action Plan

1.0

1.1

1.2

1.3

30-90 days

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Here’s a worksheet for the Learning Process
Key elements of our Learning Process: Answers:

Who will compile notes from the Strategic Doing session? Who will post these notes to the web? Where, how and by when? What is the plan for the group to come back together to revise the Strategic Action Plan and continue the learning process? What other steps can we take to keep connected and expand our network?

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Strategic Doing is like paddling a kayak in the ocean

The task requires quick strategic assessments and continuous “doing”

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Today’s Roadmap

‣ Why networks? ‣ Strategic Doing in a Nutshell ‣ What Strategic Doing Delivers ‣ Creating the Hub for Strategic Doing ‣ Practicing Strategic Doing ‣ Applying Strategic Doing to State Action Plans

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The framework for your Strategic Action Plan starts with 6 focus areas: 1. “Transformed” Intake 2. “Transformed” Process 3. “Transformed” Services 4. “Transformed” Analysis 5. “Transformed” Tools 6. Effective Policy Guidance

Saturday, May 30, 2009

You can start drawing your strategy map this way: :

Transformed Intake

Effective Policy Guidance

Core Group
A core team takes responsibility for overseeing the strategic doing process: the team compiles and updates the Strategic Action Plan.

A Strategic Action Plan is organized in Focus Areas. These are the big buckets of related activities.

Transformed Process

Transformed Tools (Technology)

Transformed Services

Transformed Analysis

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Within each focus areas, you have a set of promising initiatives to start. Pick one or more initiatives and organize a 1-2 hour Strategic Doing workshop to start...
1. Transformed Intake 1.1 Skill Assessments 1.2 Triage Models 1.3 Early Warning Systems 2. Transformed Process 2.1 One Stop Redesign 2.2 UI/WIA Integration 2.3 Priority of Service Chances are, you will not do everything all at once. Your Strategic Action Plan will focus on a more limited set of priority of focus areas and initiatives.

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Preliminary Checklist for a Strategic Doing Workshop
✓ Prepare Strategic Doing Pack of workshop exercises (use a template
to start)

✓ Provide copies of Strategic Doing Packs to participants ✓ Make table arrangements: 6-8 people for a round table ✓ Record names and e-mails of people at the table ✓ Appoint at least one Knowledge Keeper who will summarize and
draw connections to what is being said in the Strategic Doing Pack

✓ Appoint at least one Web Keeper who will agree to post a summary
to the Web.

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The Strategic Doing workshop will generate the components of a Strategic Action Plan for that initiative:
1.1 Skill Assessments Outcome for Skill Assessments: SMART Goals for Skill Assessments: Skill Assessment Action Plan: Schedule for Revision:
How will we learn together? What should we do together? What could we do together?

Find

Learn

Focus

Plan
What will we do together?

Saturday, May 30, 2009

You will not start by trying to do everything at once. You might start with 6 initiatives:
Skills Assessment and Transferability

Transformed Intake

Effective Policy Guidance

Triage Models

Core Group

A core team takes responsibility for overseeing the strategic doing process: the team compiles and updates the Strategic Action Plan.

Transformed Process

Transformed Tools (Technology)

A Strategic Action Plan is organized in Focus Areas. These are the big buckets of related activities.

UI/WIA Integration

Transformed Services

Transformed Analysis

Strategic initiatives or projects bring partners together to work on clear "deliverables"; it's where the rubber meets the road.

Applying TORQ, Auto Coder, WPRS

LMI Services and Support Flexible Service Options

Saturday, May 30, 2009

To keep organized, you start numbering your initiatives as they emerge... 1.0
Transformed Intake

1.1

Skills Assessment and Transferability

6.0
Effective Policy Guidance

1.2

Triage Models

Core Group

2.0
A core team takes responsibility for overseeing the strategic doing process: the team compiles and updates the Strategic Action Plan. Transformed Process

3.0
Transformed Services

5.0 4.0
Transformed Analysis

Transformed Tools (Technology)

A Strategic Action Plan is organized in Focus Areas. These are the big buckets of related activities.

UI/WIA Integration

Strategic initiatives or projects bring partners together to work on clear "deliverables"; it's where the rubber meets the road.

Applying TORQ, Auto Coder, WPRS

2,1
Flexible Service Options

LMI Services and Support

5,1

3,1

4,1

Saturday, May 30, 2009

In the next months, you conduct more Strategic Doing workshops and add other initiatives, so your strategy map looks something like this:
Trade Adjustment Assistance Guidance

Skills Assessment and Transferability

Transformed Intake

Effective Policy Guidance

Triage Models

Core Group
Youth Guidance

Early Warning Systems

ARRA

A core team takes responsibility for overseeing the strategic doing process: the team compiles and updates the Strategic Action Plan.

Transformed Process

Transformed Tools (Technology)

A Strategic Action Plan is organized in Focus Areas. These are the big buckets of related activities.

Improved Information Sharing UI/WIA Integration Priority of Service

Transformed Services

Transformed Analysis

Data-driven Youth Services

Strategic initiatives or projects bring partners together to work on clear "deliverables"; it's where the rubber meets the road.

Applying TORQ, Auto Coder, WPRS

Greening Service Delivery Flexible Service Options

LMI Services and Support

Career Intelligence Real Time Actionable Information

Saturday, May 30, 2009

The Strategy Map is flexible. There is no one right way to draw it. The key point that you focus on doing something...
Skills Assessment and Transferability Trade Adjustment Assistance Guidance

Transformed Intake

Effective Policy Guidance

Triage Models

Core Group
Youth Guidance

Early Warning Systems

ARRA Stronger Networks

A core team takes responsibility for overseeing the strategic doing process: the team compiles and updates the Strategic Action Plan.

One Stop Redesign

Transformed Process

Transformed Tools (Technology)

Improved Virtual Delivery

A Strategic Action Plan is organized in Focus Areas. These are the big buckets of related activities.

Improved Information Sharing UI/WIA Integration Priority of Service

Transformed Services

Transformed Analysis

Data-driven Youth Services

Strategic initiatives or projects bring partners together to work on clear "deliverables"; it's where the rubber meets the road. In Baltimore, the RAD group identified 7 areas of strategic focus. In Atlanta, the 7 areas become 6 by combining skills assessments and transferability.

Applying TORQ, Auto Coder, WPRS

Greening Service Delivery Flexible Service Options Diverse E&T Models

LMI Services and Support

Career Intelligence Real Time Actionable Information

The Atlanta Region has modified the strategy framework developed in at the national reemployment summit in Baltimore

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Thank you! Questions? Ed Morrison edmorrison@purdue.edu Linda Fowler lfowler@regionerate.com

Saturday, May 30, 2009

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