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Employment Monthly

August 2013 845-624-0400

Unlimited Vacation Policy: Recipe for Success or Disaster?


policy. It is unlikely that we The summer is winding down, and many of us are tallying up the vacation time we have left to see if we can squeeze in some last minute personal time off before the warm will go from being the only developed nation that doesnt require paid time off to one that wholly embraces a vacation free-for-all, but here is the gist of the debate.

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Employers adopting unlimited vacation policies believe it is more important to them what is actually accomplished by their employees, not how, where, or when they accomplish it.

Chris Rock-Waiter at Red Lobster AmyAdams-Hostess at Hoooters Beyonce-Hair Dresser at a

weather runs out. But what if we didnt have to? What if we had an unlimited number of vacation days to be taken anytime at our discretion, rather than a pre-determined amount only to be used with permission? This is a debate mounting amidst the working world as a small but growing number major corporations like Netflix, Hotspot and others have adopted such a

This idea has grown out of a new perspective on productivity in the work place. For some organizations where the physical presence of a person isnt necessarily an imperative, the focus has moved from an emphasis on a workers time investment to a more results driven state of mind. In other words, employers adopting

Salon Barack Obama-Server at Baskin Robbins Ellen DeGeneres-Retail Associate at a Department Store Harrison Ford-Construction Worker Hugh Jackman-Magician Christopher Walken-Lion Tamer in the Circus

unlimited vacation policies believe it is more important to them what is actually accomplished by their employees, not how, where, or when they accomplish it. Here are 3 benefits of such a program according to trending AOL jobs writer Laura Vanderkam. 1. Trust is a great motivator. In the absence of real reasons to require someone to be onsite at

for doing? What's a challenging but achievable goal for each employee for each week, month, year? Communicating expectations, and holding people accountable to them, is part of good management. It's also less prevalent than it should be. 3. An unlimited vacation (and sick day) policy removes problems that don't have to be problems. I remember reading an HR

concern is that people will take advantage of the system. Our initial instinct when confronted with such a policy

Working Hard

The most obvious concern is that people will take advantage of the system. Our initial instinct when confronted with such a policy is that if you tell people they can take off whenever they want that they will never show up to work.

Hardly Working

certain times, limited vacation and sick day policies signify a belief that you think people will behave like truant children if not carefully policed. Sure, some people can't be trusted not to claim to have the flu 365 days a year...but maybe you shouldn't hire people like that. You can also have ways to weed out anyone who doesn't meet expectations. 2. An unlimited vacation policy requires an emphasis on expectations and results. Why, exactly, do you need this number of people in your department? What should they be accountable

publication's Q&A, in which a manager wrote in asking if he should count an employee's absence as a sick day - the father didn't come in because his kid had been up sick all night - vs. a vacation day. This struck me as a lot of beancounting and bureaucracy. In a different world, that father might be trusted to make up his work after he'd taken a nap. No one would worry about how to attribute the day. Now there are without question some obvious downsides and administrative nightmares to a policy like this. The most obvious fear

Rockland County Unemployment Rate: 6.1% (0.2%) NY State Average: 7.5% ( 0.1%)

Bergen County Unemployment Rate: 8.0% (0.7%) NJ State Average: 8.7% (0.1%)

is that if you tell people they can take off whenever they want that they will never show up to work. However, an interesting statistic suggests that may not necessarily be the case. In

November of 2011 CNN ran a report that indicated on average American workers will leave 2 of their 14 vacation days on the table at the end of the year. This added up to a whopping total of $34.3 billion in vacation time left unclaimed. This

statistic sheds new light on the give em an inch, theyll take your arm mentality, and suggests that there is a real possibility that an unlimited time-off policy is not doomed to fail. It is in no way, shape, or form a realistic idea for all companies. However, as a

recruiting tool, job perk, and overall company culture enhancer it is at the very least an interesting concept to think about!

We hope you enjoyed this monthly dose of employment related news provided by RJ-Staffing. For comments, questions, or employment related needs call 845-624-0400 to talk to your RJ-Staffing representative today.
Shane Rizzotti (Account Executive/Editor in Chief)Shane@rjstaffing.com
August 2013 257 South Middletown Rd. Nanuet, NY 10954

*All information included in this publication is based on independent research and is not intended as legal advice.