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2012 WNA GENERAL EXCELLENCE WINNER
141st year, No. 33
Thursday, August 15, 2013
Keeping you current since 1872
$1.25
INDEX
Editorial .....................1D
Police/Court ...............4C
TV listings .............9-10C
Community .............2-4D
Letters ........................2D
Classieds ..................8B
Jacqueline L. Valinoti, 73, Lake Geneva
Scott L. Leners, 52, Bloomeld
C. Pauline Culp, 86, Lake Geneva
John H. Peacock, 86, Lake Geneva
Ethel J. Siedschlag, 93, Genoa City
Patricia Rosseland, 75, Fontana
Agatha Lanzillotti, 93, Park Ridge, Ill.
Kazou A. Takaya, 86, Lake Geneva
Irene H. White, 90, West Allis
Mary L. Geupel, 69, Fontana
OBITUARIES 3 & 4D
COMING ATTRACTIONS
Yerkes observing nights in August
Yerkes Observatory offers evening
observing sessions, if weather permits.
The programs run from 9:30 until 11:30
p.m. Aug. 16-20 and 24-30. The charge
is $25 per person, payable the night of
the event.
County Fair Aug. 28 to Sept. 2
Live entertainment at the grandstand,
a midway carnival and champion live-
stock, harvests and artwork from all over
the county will be the highlights of the
Walworth County Fair. Visit walworth-
countyfair.com for more information.
Brewers greats visit town
The Grand Geneva was star-studded Monday.
Page 1C
Venetian Fest this week
See the Resorter for complete
coverage of the event.
Inside
TV Guide Listings
Page 9-10B
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
After more than 20 years as executive director of the
Lake Geneva Economic Development Corp., Joe Cardiff,
has announced that he will retire effective Dec. 31.
Cardiff has led the LGEDC since 1992.
Under Cardiffs term as executive director, the LGEDC
has continued to develop the Lake Geneva business park
and has bought another 100 acres for a new business park
on the south side of the city.
The corporation also organizes seminars to help small
business owners cope with marketplace challenges. This
fall the series will feature early-morning seminars called
Business Tools for Success.
Still, the LGEDC has a ways to go to educate locals on
the importance of light industrial manufacturers, Cardiff
said in a telephone interview late last week.
Cardiff said that when Lake Geneva is mentioned,
many people, including natives, think of hospitality and
tourism.
I think the thing thats missing is the lack of under-
standing about the contributions of manufacturing, he
said.
Lake Geneva is home to 16 manufacturing companies,
including Northern Precision Casting Co., Brunk Indus-
tries and R & L Spring.
It is also home to Trostel, a company that began as a
leather works in Milwaukee during the 1800s, Cardiff
said.
Founded as the nonprot Lake
Geneva Development Corp. in 1981, and
since renamed the Lake Geneva Eco-
nomic Development Corp., the LGEDC
has worked with the Lake Geneva City
Council to advance business develop-
ment in the city.
LGEDC is run by an unpaid, 12-
member voluntary board of directors.
The board members represent differ-
ent organizations and individuals, and
no two members may be from the same
private business.
Cardiff has been an ofcer and board member of the
LGEDC since its inception and was also a member of the
board of directors of the corporations for-prot predeces-
sor.
Local economic leader set to retire
Led business development group since 1992
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
EXPLAINING HIS ART at Lake Genevas Art in the Park event Saturday was Loren Corell. The Missouri artist had previously
done work for Walt Disney, M&Ms and the Cartoon Network. Now 77 and retired, he sells his creations at art fairs.
Park becomes art emporium
DA clears deputies in fatal shooting
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN Four Walworth County Sheriffs Depu-
ties who shot and killed a man armed with a sheriffs shot-
gun acted within the scope of the law, according to Wal-
worth County District Attorney Daniel Necci.
On June 13, Jeremiah Krubert, 39, arrived at his moth-
ers home where he brutally attacked his mothers boy-
friend and allegedly set the kitchen on re.
When Walworth County Sheriffs Deputy Todd Neu-
mann arrived at the home, Krubert came at Neumann with
a knife and Neumann red multiple times at Krubert.
Neumann backed away from Krubert and demanded
he get down. Neumanns rearm had a mechanical fail-
ure. Krubert kept approaching Neumann and said, Kill
me, kill me.
As Neumann
backed away, he
tripped over an elec-
trical box. When
Neumann was on the
ground, Krubert ran
past Neumann and
got into Neumanns
squad car and drove
away.
After crashing the
squad in a eld, Kru-
bert exited the squad
car and confronted deputies Wayne Blanchard, Garth
Frami and Jeffrey Shaw with the shotgun that was in the
squad car. Blanchard demanded that Krubert put down
the weapon.
While confronting Krubert, the deputies saw the pres-
sure-switch light, which is installed on all Walworth County
Sheriffs Ofce shotguns, go on. Krubert also attempted to
chamber a round into the shotgun. The deputies then shot
and killed Krubert.
Anytime deadly force is required from our law enforce-
ment personnel and anytime a loss of life is the result, a
tragedy has occurred in our county, Necci wrote in his
report. Furthermore, anytime mental illness is a compo-
nent of such events, I would suggest that the magnitude of
the resulting tragedy is greatly amplied. Many lives were
changed dramatically on June 13, 2013, and I know that
you and the people of Walworth County will join me in
praying for healing for all involved or affected, as well as,
wisdom for the future.
Necci Krubert
PLEASE SEE SHOOTING PAGE 9A
PLEASE SEE PAY PAGE 7A
PLEASE SEE CARDIFF PAGE 3A
Cardiff
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Raises for members of the Lake Geneva City Council
and the mayor will start to kick in after the next round of
municipal elections in 2014.
But its still not the way to get rich.
On a 5-2 vote, with one alderman excused, the coun-
cil voted to raise the mayors annual pay from $6,000
to $7,500, and pay for council members from $3,500 to
$4,000.
Alderwoman Sarah Hill, who chairs the councils
nance, license and regulation committee, moved to
approve pay raises.
I think its a serious job with serious responsibilities,
Hill said.
She said elected ofcials compensation was an issue
that probably should be studied annually, but, she added,
Im sure it wont be studied every year.
The last pay raise for the mayor and council members
was in 2008. Hill said she was sure it would be another ve
years before the council discussed raises again.
Aldermen Jeff Wall and Sturg Taggart voted against
the raise.
This council wont see those pay increases. Those
elected in the 2014 and 2015 municipal elections will
receive the raises
Wall said he didnt think the pay raise was needed.
Were here to give back to the community, Wall said.
Mayor Jim Connors also said he believed the raises
were too much as proposed.
Council gets
pay increase
2A The Regional News August 15, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
Construction has started
on the new concession build-
ing at Dunn Field.
The new building was
approved by the Lake Geneva
City Council on June 24.
Gilbank Construction,
Clinton, was awarded the
contract on a $298,600
bid. The concession stand
and restrooms will have a
metal seam roof and will be
heated.
Its located near the skate
park, the planned location of
the disc golf course and the
proposed location of a dog
park.
The metal seam roof
is expected to last longer
than a shingled roof and a
heated building can be used
throughout the year.
The new building is
being built on the site of the
old concession stand which
was built in the early 1990s,
when baseball was still being
played at Dunn Field.
City Administrator
Dennis Jordan said con-
struction is expected be
completed in September.
Funding is coming from
the Tax Increment Finance
district budget.
The project passed the
city council on a 7-1 vote.
Alderman Jeff Wall opposed
the new building saying he
couldnt see spending nearly
$300,000 for restrooms and
a concession building.
Construction under way on
Dunn Field concession stand
CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS
IN THE TRENCHES, workers for Winkler Masonry, Racine, get started on a foundation wall
for the new concession stand/restrooms at Dunn Field on Sage Street. Winklers is not con-
nected to Lake Geneva Public Works Director Dan Winkler.
SUBMITTED
THE GENEVA LAKE CONSERVANCY presented the Olmsted
Award for Landscape and Conservation to Patrick and Shirley
Ryan at a recent meeting. Pictured are (from left) Robert
Kockars, former chairman of the conservancy, the Ryans and
Charles Colman, chairman of the conservancy.
The Geneva Lake Con-
servancy announced Pat and
Shirley Ryan as the 2013
recipients of its Olmsted
Award which recognizes
excellence in landscape con-
servation. The Ryans were
presented the award at a pri-
vate session in Lake Geneva
on Saturday. They were rec-
ognized for their impact on
conservation landscaping in
the Geneva Lakes area.
Robert Klockars, past
chairman of the Geneva
Lake Conservancy, pre-
sented the award to the
Ryans. Over the past 42
years, the Ryans have cared
for, restored and enhanced
House in the Woods, result-
ing in a landscape architec-
ture that blends wonderfully
with the architecture of the
house, creating an outdoor
landscape that is just as
much a part of their home as
the house is. While the Olm-
sted roots are ever present,
the love and respect that the
Ryans have for the property
is evident, having added to
the landscape vision that
the Olmsteds had, creating
a dynamic, living organism
that reects their commit-
ment and love of the prop-
erty, Klockars said.
The Ryans commented
that the House in the Woods
property is a place where
their family gathers and is
full of landscape inuences,
among them Olmsted. Their
work in maintaining the
wooded area of the property
has been an ongoing project,
in the manner that Thomas
Jefferson embraced, and
their vegetable garden is
in the manner of George
Washington, in which espal-
ier apple trees form the fenc-
ing.
The Olmsted Award is
named after the Olmsted
family, visionary landscape
conservationists. John Olm-
sted was the founder and
rst president of the Ameri-
can Society of Landscape
Architects and a partner of
Olmsted Bros., of Brookline,
Mass. His uncle and adop-
tive father, Frederick Law
Olmsted, designed the land-
scapes of New Yorks Central
Park and the 1893 Chicago
Worlds Fair. Cousin and
half-brother Frederick Law
Olmsted Jr. joined forces
with John in managing the
rm.
The Olmsted brothers
company had an extraor-
dinary long-term impact
on landscape conservation,
including the Geneva Lake
area. Several properties on
the north shore of Geneva
Lake and the grounds of
Yerkes Observatory reect
their landscape designs,
Robert Klockars said.
The Geneva Lake Con-
servancy began in 1977
as the Committee to Save
Geneva Lake by founders
John Anderson, Bill Turner
and Norm Barry. In 1982 the
committee formed another
organization called Geneva
Lake Land Conservancy
to protect the land around
the lake. The two groups
merged in 1992 and became
the Geneva Lake Conser-
vancy. Since then, the GLC
has expanded to protect all
lakes in the area, including
Geneva, Como and Delavan,
woodlands, open spaces,
wetlands and farmland.
Conservancy awards Ryans
Drive Sober or get
pulled over
The city of Lake Geneva
Police Department will be
out in force along with hun-
dreds of other law enforce-
ment agencies throughout
Wisconsin for the annual
Drive Sober or Get Pulled
Over crackdown on
drunken drivers from Aug.
16 through Sept. 2.
Drunken driving is one
of the most prevalent and
deadly crimes in Wisconsin,
according to the Wisconsin
Department of Transporta-
tion. Last year, 223 people
were killed and nearly
3,000 injured in alcohol-
related trafc crashes in
the state. There were nearly
27,000 convictions for
drunken driving in the state
last year.
Drunken driving is
entirely preventable. You
can designate a sober driver
or nd an alternative way
home. But if you make the
irresponsible choice to
drive while impaired, our
ofcers will be on the look-
out, and we will arrest you,
Sgt. Bridgett Way said. The
devastating consequences
of a drunken driving arrest
include major embarrass-
ment, expensive penalties,
mandatory installation of
an ignition interlock device,
and possibly, jail time. Driv-
ing drunk will be a decision
youll regret the rest of your
life, if you are lucky enough
to live.
To help prevent drunken
driving, the Zero in Wis-
consin trafc safety initia-
tive has a free Drive Sober
mobile app, which includes
features like Find a Ride,
blood alcohol estimator and
designated driver selector
to help a person get home
safely and achieve zero pre-
ventable deaths on Wiscon-
sin roadway. The app can
be downloaded by visiting
zeroinwisconsin.gov.
POLICE
LOST DOG
We are missing an 8 year old female black lab
approximately 70 pounds, she is not wearing
a collar. Her name is Bailey and she was last
seen on Sunday 8/4/2013 near Highland
Avenue, Genoa City, WI.
PLEASE CALL KEVIN GATES:
262-203-0240 IF YOU SEE BAILEY!
Wednesday through Sunday
August 14th thru August 18th
Flatiron Park & Seminary Park-Lake Geneva, Wis.
LAKE GENEVA JAYCEES 51ST ANNUAL
VENETIAN FESTIVAL
Official
Radio
Sponsor
GREAT FOOD FIREWORKS
HUGE CARNIVAL WATER SKI SHOW
WRIST BAND RIDE DISCOUNT DAYS FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
ARTS & CRAFT FAIR
AT LIBRARY PARK
Saturday, Aug. 17, 10-6
Sunday, Aug. 18, 10-5
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14th:
Sponsored by Next Door Pub & Pizzeria
Bella Cam 8 p.m.-12 a.m. $3 Cover at door
Wristband discount rides 5-10 p.m. $20
THURSDAY, AUGUST 16th:
Sponsored by Sprechers Restaurant and Pub
The Student Body Band 8 p.m.-12 a.m. $3 Cover at door
Wristband discount rides 5-10 p.m. $20
FRIDAY, AUGUST 16th:
Sponsored by BMO Harris Bank
The Toys 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. - $5 Cover at door
SATURDAY, AUGUST 17th:
Baggo Tournament 12 p.m.-3 p.m.
Fresh Hopps Band (sponsored by Talmer Bank and Trust) 12 p.m.-3 p.m. No Cover
Too White Crew 8 p.m.-Midnight (sponsored by Stinebrinks Piggly Wiggly) $5.00 Cover
Wristband discount rides Noon-5 p.m. $20
SUNDAY, AUGUST 18th:
Lake Geneva House of Music (sponsored by Talmer Bank and Trust) 12 p.m.-3 p.m. No Cover
Petty Thieves 8 p.m. - 12 a.m. $3 Cover at door (sponsored by Tread Head Cycling.)
SUNDAY, AUGUST 18th:
Wonder Lake Ski Show at 6 p.m. (sponsored by Harbor Shores on Lake Geneva)
Lighted Boat Parade sponsored by Gage Marine - (This years theme Mardi Gras)
Fireworks Display on the Lake at Dusk
ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE LOCATED IN THE JAYCEE BEER TENT
Must be 21 to enter - WE ID
LAKE GENEVA
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 3A
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
According to Mike Palmer, his family
originally came to the Geneva Lake area in
1847.
While not among the very rst families
to arrive here, the Palmers were still among
the earliest settlers.
Being here since the mid-1800s is long
enough that a county road is named after
them near where the Palmers rst settled.
And there are still relatives who live along
Palmer Road, Mike Palmer said.
But the centennial Palmer Family Farm,
now owned by Mike and Libby Palmer, isnt
on Palmer Road.
Palmer Road is north of Lake Geneva,
between Como and the town of Delavan.
The Palmer Family Farm is south of
Lake Geneva at W3861 Highway B, town of
Linn.
According to Mike, Avery Palmer, his
great-great-great-grand uncle, bought the
land in 1880. By then, the Palmer family
had been living in Walworth County for a
generation.
A year later, the land was sold to Mikes
great-great grandfather, Byron Palmer, said
Mike, 66.
Mike said he believes Avery bought the
land with the intention of selling it to his
nephew.
When Byron was no longer able to farm,
Averys two sons, one of them Bertram
Palmer, Mikes great-grandfather, took
over.
In the 1950s, the brothers sold the farm
to Allyn Palmer, Mikes father.
Mike was raised on the farm, and he
and Libby bought it in 1991.
Along the way, they also raised three
children on the farm, and now, the Palmers
son and their three granddaughters, ages
4 to 11, also live on the farm that Avery
bought.
The Palmers still run the farm, now at
176 acres, growing wheat and hay and rais-
ing Holstein heifers. Mike said the family
actually farms about 66 acres, and they rent
out 110 acres.
Sometime around the late 1800s, when
railroads began crossing the county from
all directions, a Palmer sold an acre of the
family farm for $1 because he believed the
train trafc would benet the entire area,
Mike said. The creamery is gone, replaced
by the Burlington Feed Store.
The railroad, once the Milwaukee Road,
now the Wisconsin & Southern, is still
there.
The rail line, originally owned by the
Milwaukee Road, still bisects the Palmer
property. Originally, it went to a creamery,
he said. Now, the line goes to a feed store.
While this Palmer farm isnt all that
close to the other Palmers, Mike said that
his past relatives had little difculty or
reluctance to spend a day travelling by
horse and buggy to visit each other.
He said it seems ironic that once the
family farmers switched from horses to
speedier tractors, they actually had less
time to visit one another.
Mike has done more than farm. Hes
participated in local government, serv-
ing on the Linn Town Board. And that is a
family tradition.
Mike said his father, Allyn, grandfather
Bert, and great-grandfathers Byron Palmer
and James Reek served on the Linn Town
Board, as well.
Palmer farm part of family legacy
PHOTO COURTESY MICHAEL PALMER
THREE GENERATIONS OF PALMERS, Alex, left, Michael, right, and from top to bottom, Mia,
Lahni and Emma.
He was modest about his duties and
activities as executive director over the
past 20 years.
I just tried to keep the whole thing
going, he said.
Cardiff and his family moved to Lake
Geneva in 1972, when he was named Presi-
dent of the Chaney Instrument Co.
He was president of the company until
it was purchased by Primex in 1987.
Cooperation between the nonprot
LGEDC and the city resulted in the devel-
opment of the 124-acre business park on
Edwards Boulevard in the 1990s.
With just ve lots left to develop in the
park, the LGEDC has recently purchased
100 acres further south on the Highway
120 by-pass for another business park.
Because the LGEDC is nonprot, it was
able to help the city buy and develop Vet-
erans Park and Fermano Park, which is
within the business park.
The LGEDC has also coordinated
improvements in the downtown and Wrig-
ley Drive areas, and has helped organize the
development of the Highway 120 by-pass.
Cardiff, 85, said he has no plans to slow
down.
Ill do some other things, he said.
Although he conceded hell probably spend
some time at the family cabin in Door
County, as well.
Cardiff said he has no plans to leave
Lake Geneva.
He said he and his late wife, Dorothy,
had six children, four of whom live in Lake
Geneva.
Cardiff said his four grandchildren and
six great-grandchildren also live in Lake
Geneva.
The LGEDC Board of Directors is in the
process of searching for Cardiffs replace-
ment for the part-time position.
Those interested can contact Michael
Ploch at (262) 248-7800, or by email at
plochm@communitybankcbd.com.
Cardiff/Before nonprofit group, he
was President of Chaney Instrument
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
I just tried to keep the whole thing
going, Joe Cardiff said of his time
with the Lake Geneva Economic
Development Corporation.
I NVENTORY OBTAI NED FROM
DRUG DEALER S SEI ZED ASSETS
AUCTION
Jewelry and Fine Art SEIZED by police and federal agencies. Property from seized
and forfeited assets auction. Bankruptcies and liquidation of Rolexes, large
diamonds, fne art, and jewelry together with general order merchandise
which constitutes the majority to be liquidated piece by piece.
All Art and Jewelry Authenticated and Certified. Over 2 Million Dollars!!
Armed Security on Site
Free Registration/ID Required
Terms: Cash, Check, Charge.
Credential No. 2009-52 Dion Abadi
Registered Wisconsin Auctioneer
Credential No. 231-53 DA Auctioneers
Items pictured subject to prior sale and
may not be available at this auction.
18% Buyers Commission
MONDAY
AUGUST 19
AUCTION-11:00AM, PREVIEW-10:30AM
GRAND GENEVA
RESORT & SPA
LAKE GENEVA, WI
7036 GRAND GENEVA WAY
Call (262) 248-8811 for directions
For informationregardingthe auction
call (770) 454-9201 duringnormal business hours.
Ladies 18k Pearlmaster, Diamonds
Salvador Dali Norman Rockwell
12 Ct. Diamond Bracelet
4A The Regional News August 15, 2013
GENOA CITY
Board ofcially rejects citizens petition
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY On Aug. 8 the village
board ofcially rejected a citizens petition
requiring referendum approval for capital
improvement projects that cost more than
$500,000.
The direct legislation petition was
turned over to the village-clerk treasurer
on July 11, the same day as the regular vil-
lage board meeting. A petition must be cer-
tied by the village clerk-treasurer before
its valid. The village had 15 days to certify
the signatures.
On July 11, after the petition was turned
in, but before the signatures on the peti-
tion were certied, the board approved an
ordinance that requires voter approval for
projects costing more than $2 million. Last
month, Village Attorney Linda Gray said a
direct legislation petition cant conict with
an existing ordinance.
The board unanimously rejected the
citizens petition during its August meet-
ing.
The unworkable wording ... makes it
dysfunctional. And it conicts with our
existing ordinance, Trustee Alan Cornue
gave as reasons to reject the ordinance.
Gray said the wording of the ordinance
prohibited the village from spending any
money even for engineering and plan-
ning for projects that cost more than
$500,000.
During the Aug. 8 meeting, Gray said
230 signatures were collected and 225 were
valid. The group only needed 110 signa-
tures.
Board members
argued that the pro-
posed ordinance would
be impractical because
they couldnt receive
bids for projects before
putting them to referen-
dum.
This ordinance was
completely unwork-
able, Village Trustee
Roger Cagann said. We
couldnt even get the
footwork started to get
it done.
Heidi Crow, who
circulated the petition,
said she spoke to her
attorney, Steven Wassel
of Delavan, and believes
the board could get
estimates for projects
before putting the proj-
ect to referendum.
An audience
member asked board
members if they would
support the ordinance if
the questionable word-
ing was eliminated.
Trustee Karen Bull-
ock said she wouldnt
support the ordinance
because it would require
voter approval for road
projects.
Bullock said if a road in the Hunters
Ridge subdivision needs repairs, voters
throughout the village would decide
whether the project has merit.
Crow responded by saying it would be
the boards responsibility to make its case
for the road repairs.
Cagann said that board members are
elected to make decisions.
We have elections every year. If you
dont like whats going on, you vote us out,
he said.
Village President Bill Antti said the
ordinance was modeled after Fontanas
ordinance. Fontanas ordinance originally
required approval for any projects that cost
more than $1.5 million, but that amount
increased annually and is now for projects
that cost more than $2 million.
Residents were critical of the village
modeling the law after Fontanas ordinance.
They said the two communities werent
comparable.
Trustee Philip Traskaski said he also
wouldnt have supported direct legislation
if the questionable wording wasnt included,
and echoed Bullocks concerns about road
repairs.
We have had a referendum for a
$35,000 bug sprayer, Crow responded.
Comments from the public
Last month, the board allowed public
comments at the beginning of the meeting,
but not as it discussed individual items.
Antti changed that procedure during the
Aug. 8 meeting.
At the beginning of the meeting, Antti
asked for public comments on items that
werent on the agenda. He then allowed
people to make comments on agenda items
as the board discussed them.
Most of the comments were directed at
the proposed village hall project and the
citizens petition for a direct referendum
ordinance. The board is investigating its
options with the village hall.
Board members have said the build-
ing is too small and in need of repairs. The
board is looking at upgrading the building,
expanding it, doing nothing except envi-
ronmental improvements or building a new
facility.
Several residents said the board didnt
do an adequate job of informing citizens
about the possible project.
In response, Antti said that several arti-
cles appeared in the Lake Geneva Regional
News, other local papers and information
was sent out with the tax bill.
The village also created a website about
the project at sites.google.com/site/gcvil-
lagehall.
Other criticisms were made because of
the villages tax rate. Village ofcials are
saying the tax rate will go down next year.
The villages Tax Increment District, which
includes about half of the village, is set to
close. When the TID closes the villages por-
tion of the tax rate is expected to decline.
Everyones taxes will come down, I can
promise you that, Cagann said.
Antti
Cagann
Cornue
The village is hosting an informal
open house and tour of the village
hall on Monday, Aug. 19, between 7
and 8:30 p.m. To learn more about
the village hall project visit:
sites.google.com/site/gcvillagehall/home
Village may get rid of impact fees
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY Village President Bill Antti wants
to eliminate impact fees for new homes built in the vil-
lage.
Developers pay impact fees to the village for specic
purposes, and restrictions are placed on the village on
how it spends that money.
For example, park impact fees must be used for park
improvements. The village board discussed eliminating
impact fees during its Aug. 8 meeting.
Village Attorney Linda Gray said that if impact fees
arent used within seven years, the money is refunded.
Antti said the board would be better off attempting
to get impact fees through a developers agreement.
Throughout Walworth County, municipalities have
successfully required developers to donate land for
public services such as a schools, parks or re depart-
ments.
Trustee Alan Cornue was critical of the proposal, and
said the same fees should be applied to everybody.
Thats not a fee thats uniformly applied, Cornue
said. It becomes a negotiation tool and basically a
method of extortion.
Antti argued that with the restrictions placed on
spending impact fees, the village is likely to return the
money after seven years.
Gray said the money for impact fees cant go to main-
tenance or new equipment.
For example, you cant buy a squad car, she said.
Trustee Roger Cagann also questioned eliminating
the impact fees.
If we approve this, someone can build on a lot that
exists and get a free ride, he said.
Cagann asked if a study was done when the village
developed its impact fees. Other trustees responded that
a study had been done.
Cagann suggested tabling the item until more research
was completed. His motion to table was approved on a 6-
1 vote with Antti voting against it.
After the meeting, Antti explained why he voted
against tabling the impact fees.
I thought we should have voted on it and eliminated
it, he said. I dont think they are relevant to the village
anymore.
Other communities have also discussed eliminat-
ing or reducing impact fees. Gray said the city of Lake
Geneva is considering eliminating impact fees.
The village of Walworth recently reduced its sewer
impact fee from $3,730 to $730.
Thats not a fee thats uniformly applied, Trustee
Alan Cornue said about including impact fees in
the developers agreement. It becomes a negotia-
tion tool and basically a method of extortion.
Sheriffs department
investigates open
meetings complaint
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY A Walworth County sheriffs detec-
tive investigated the village for a complaint of an open
meetings law violation.
Det. Robert Sharpe said he completed his investiga-
tion and it was referred to the Walworth County District
Attorneys Ofce for an opinion.
The complaint was made by attorney Steven Wassel,
who represents citizens who circulated a petition to force
the village to have direct legislation for projects that cost
more than $500,000. Wassel said he spoke to District
Attorney Daniel Necci and the sheriffs department.
Necci said he hasnt yet seen the investigative mate-
rials. He also said after he sees the material, it will take
some time to review it.
For strategic purposes, Wassel has declined to state the
specic nature of the complaint.
However, on July 11, Wassels clients handed in a peti-
tion with 230 signatures on it. The petition required direct
legislation, meaning a referendum vote, for projects cost-
ing more than $500,000. Later that night, the village
board approved an ordinance for direct legislation for
projects costing more than $2 million. At that time, Village
Attorney Linda Gray said the petition cant conict with an
existing ordinance, and the petition had not yet been certi-
ed by the village and therefore wasnt ofcial.
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GENEVA LINN TOWNSHIPS
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 5A
Principal says project may be done in September
Construction wont delay start of school
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
LINN Heavy machinery rolls across
the sand outside Reek School.
Bricks pulled from the outside walls
lie in a mountainous heap. Entire rooms
appear gutted by storms, their ceiling tiles
gone, wires hanging down like jungle ser-
pents.
And workers are everywhere on top
of the roof, on scaffolding, painting the
inside walls, or making their way through
corridors cluttered with boxes and class-
room furniture.
People are like, Are you going to be
ready for school? Yes we are, Principal
Samantha Polek said Aug. 7.
She said the current target date for
project completion is end of September.
In the meantime, the desks for Polek
and Administrative Assistant Ronda Davis
are in the schools library, as they
await construction of the new
front entrance, foyer and ofce.
It feels like summer camp,
Polek said. I love the library.
Part of me always wanted to be a
librarian.
She said she nds construc-
tion in general fascinating, and
it has added a new element to
her summer. Polek discussed her
fascination with construction
the trades, the machines and
shared numerous photos she has
taken throughout the process.
It looks worse than it is, she said
about the cluttered hallways and rooms.
A lot of that is supercial, can be cleaned
very quickly. Our custodians are working
very hard every day.
Polek admitted there is a general con-
cern that Reek wont be ready when stu-
dents will begin the 2013-14 school year
Tuesday, Sept. 3.
The concern is understandable. After
all, no one can park in the lot, which for
the moment is a desert ruled by machines
some of which have tires bigger than an
average person.
It has created minor difculties for
people like Polek just to make it in to
school.
But Polek didnt seem bothered.
This project is something everybody
wanted and it was so needed that to be
slightly inconvenienced, it doesnt even
matter, she said.
The project
It took a couple years and three refer-
endum elections before the Reek district
could reach this point.
Twice in 2011, a $3.9 million renovation
project failed to receive voter approval. On
Nov. 6, 2012, the majority of district voters
approved a $2.8 million project.
Deteriorating bricks and roofs were a
driving factor in the school boards rea-
soning behind the project. Other aspects
of the project include improving technol-
ogy and school safety.
Two important parts of the ongoing
safety work are the parking lot and the
main entrance to the school.
A 180-foot access drive will be
installed east of the lot. Also, 36 parking
stalls will be added, and trafc ow will
be redirected so that the west side of the
L-shaped lot will be for buses only. Motor-
ists dropping off and picking up children
will use the eastern side of the lot.
The main entrance will have a foyer,
ending the days of being buzzed in to enter
the schools main hallway without passing
by the front ofce. Visitors will have to go
through the ofce, once the new entrance
is completed.
Everythings going very well and on
schedule, Polek said. However, this is a
crucial timing toward the end of August.
She said the project itself, headed by
Scherrer Construction, Burlington, con-
sists of multiple smaller projects one
group is working on the brick, another
the roof. There are groups working on
the parking lot, the new entrance, several
inside the school each handling their
tasks and it creates a sort of
domino effect, Polek said.
Were still planning to have
the west entrance ready, she said.
We may just have to use that
west side of the school children
know it as the bus entrance. Were
considering the possibility that
we may need to use that as our
main entrance if the (lot) is not
completely nished by Sept. 3.
The likelihood of that is prob-
able, Polek said.
Different aspects of the proj-
ect are in various stages of completion.
She said the new brick is about three-
quarters installed. The roof installation
is about halfway nished. Footings have
been poured for the new entrance.
The wireless Internet service upgrade,
however, is ready.
Were starting a one-to-one device
program with just a few grades this year,
Polek said. Were starting a one-to-one
iPad program for grades 2, 4 and 5.
As for the main ofce, Polek said she
wasnt sure.
The likely last stage of the project?
The parking lot, she said. Thats the
thing we doubt will be ready highly
doubt will be ready by the start of
school.
School business
With the lot still under construction,
Reek has had to nd other ways to oper-
ate.
For example, registration wont take
place at school this year.
On Tuesday, Aug. 20, it will be at the
Linn Town Hall, W3728 Franklin Walsh
St., Zenda, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
And although parents have frequently
roamed the Reek halls during the summer,
Polek said theyre still happy to show fami-
lies the work thats going on, but just call
rst before showing up.
Will classrooms be ready for children?
Yes, said Polek.
But what about her ofce?
Just getting into the ofce is the only
thing now, she said. We believe we will be
in the ofce (by Sept. 3), but if by chance
we have to stay in the library, it wouldnt
be the worst thing.
STEVE TARGO/REGIONAL NEWS
CONSTRUCTION CREWS ARE tearing up the pavement preventing visitors from parking at
Reek Elementary School, but if visitors can nd a safe spot to store a vehicle they are wel-
comed into the building.
Polek
A special Poker Run
fundraising event will be
held Sunday morning, Aug.
25, from 7 to 11 a.m., to ben-
et the Association for the
Prevention of Family Vio-
lence, a nonprot organiza-
tion in Walworth County.
Participants have the
choice of paddling (kayak,
canoe or paddleboard) or
walking on the Lake Geneva
Shore Path, stopping at
checkpoints to collect play-
ing cards to form a poker
hand. The event begins at
Wesley Woods Conference
Center, 250 Stam St., Wil-
liams Bay, and follows the
Geneva Lake north shore
line. A continental break-
fast will be served from 9 to
11 a.m. in the Wesley Woods
Dining Hall and poker
prizes for the top hands
will be awarded at 11:15
a.m. Registration infor-
mation is available online
through www.active.com
(search: paddle or walk)
and on the APFV website
www.apfvwalworth.com.
For more information call
Jean Henderson at (262)
723-5414. Early registra-
tion is encouraged.
BRIEF HEAD
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Rolex Watches
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Tennis Bracelet
Diamond Earrings
MONDAY
AUGUST 19
AUCTION-11:00 AM
PREVIEW-10:30 AM
HOSTED AT:
GRAND GENEVA
RESORT & SPA
LAKE GENEVA, WI
7036 GRAND GENEVA WAY
CALL (262) 248-8811FOR DIRECTIONS
For informationregardingtheauction, call
(770) 454-9201 duringnormal business hours
Armed Security on Site. Free Registration/ID Required. Items
pictured subject to prior sale and may not be available
at this auction. Terms: Verifed Checks/All Credit Cards.
Credential No. 2009-52 Dion Abadi Registered Wisconsin
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DRUG DEALER S SEI ZED ASSETS
PUBLIC AUCTION
JEWELRY AND FINE ART SEIZED BY POLICE AND FEDERAL AGENCIES.
Property from seized and forfeited assets auction. Bankruptcies and liquidation of Rolexes, large
diamonds, fne art, and jewelry together with general order merchandise which constitutes
the majority to be liquidated piece by piece.
ALL ART AND JEWELRY AUTHENTICATED AND CERTIFIED. OVER 2 MILLION DOLLARS!!
On The Lakefront
Lake Geneva, WI
51st VENETIAN FESTIVAL
WEDNESDAY thru SUNDAY, AUGUST 14th-18th
Sat. Aug. 17 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sun. Aug. 18 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
L
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THE LAKE GENEVA JAYCEES
PRESENT
Arts &
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OVER 100 CRAFTERS!
6A The Regional News August 15, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
Bloomeld ofcials talking chemicals, association for 2014
Seeking a solution for lake weed problem
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
BLOOMFIELD Pell Lakes looking
more like a swamp this summer.
But on Monday, Aug.
19, expect to see Clear
Water Harvesters, Crys-
tal Lake, Ill., removing
weeds from the lake.
Well, part of the
lake.
When I lled out
the permit for the DNR,
I could only ll it out for
a small amount, like 8
acres, said Ken Monroe,
village of Bloomeld
president.
Why has it taken so long for a weed har-
vesting company to come out to the lake?
Monroe said for the past two months,
he has been working with the DNR and
other companies.
Although he started speaking with
companies last spring, it turns out the vil-
lages lake management plan needs to be
updated.
And before anyone can just drop a har-
vester in the lake and start cutting weeds, a
survey of aquatic plants needed to be done,
to make sure that youre not cutting native
weeds, Monroe said.
But he said hes already thinking about
next year, and there are two ideas on the
table using chemicals to manage weeds
and a lake association to take care of Pell
Lake.
Soon, the village will send a survey
out to sanitary district residents, he said.
It will ask if they would be OK with seeing
an extra $2 charge per quarter $8 a year
on the sewer and water bill.
That would be for weed control,
Monroe said. It would also help start a
lake association.
In other words, the village is consid-
ering levying a special assessment to use
chemicals to control the weeds and to
create and maintain the association. The
reason it would be through the sanitary
district is because it covers the Pell Lake
area.
It would be the people in the Pell Lake
area who would benet from it, Monroe
said. He said there are about 1,500 people
in the district.
Have any of them been complaining
about the overgrowth of lake weeds?
Ive received complaints, Monroe
said. Not a lot, but yes, Im getting com-
plaints.
Dj vu?
There are several similarities between
Monroes comments Monday and ones he
made last summer.
People complained about weeds,
Monroe discussed the creation of some
sort of lake management entity and he
also brought up using chemicals before.
But there are some differences. For
one, the Badger State Outboard Associa-
tions Power Boat Days wasnt impeded by
the weed overgrowth this year.
Last year, however, volunteers scram-
bled to remove enough of what some called
the Pell Lake salad to hold the event.
It was delayed, but the boats still raced
despite a group being cited for violating
the weed removal permit granted by the
DNR.
Another difference: Last years
weather. In May 2012, thickets of weeds
crested the waters surface, much as they
did in July this year.
But last year, Monroe talked about
creating a lake management district,
which could levy taxes to cover operating
costs.
On Monday, he said theyre looking
into establishing a lake association.
Whether its an association or a dis-
trict, its something to take over the efforts
of the Pell Lake Mud Hens, a nonprot
group which began voluntarily remov-
ing lake weeds in the 1990s. In 2010, the
group went on hiatus.
Monroe said an association could take
care of the lake, including handling the
removal of lake weeds.
He said hes in favor of using chemi-
cals to control the weeds, too.
I think it would be cheaper and we can
probably control (weeds) better, Monroe
said. Powers Lakes district, Benedict
and Tombeau (lakes) all use chemicals. I
know Lake Benedict is pretty clean.
But before an association or use of
chemicals in Pell Lake can happen, he
said the village needs to update Pell Lakes
management plan.
The plan was created in 2004 and is,
by DNR standards, outdated, Monroe
said, adding that they are supposed to be
updated every ve years.
Despite the outdated plan thats in
place, the DNR allowed Bloomeld to
remove a portion of lake weeds this year.
But Monroe said next year, it needs to
be updated.
Im going to call (the Southeastern
Wisconsin Regional Planning Commis-
sion, or SEWRPC), he said. Wed like to
have a plan no later than February 2014.
Why SEWRPC?
SEWRPC did the last plan (and)
theyre cheaper, he said.
Monroe
Seat opened up when Jeanne Allis moved
Town board appoints
Roy White supervisor
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
LINN Roy White has taken the
place of Jeanne Allis on the town board.
At a special meeting July 30, town
ofcials appointed White on a 4-1 vote to
the supervisor position formerly held by
Allis.
In an Aug. 6 phone interview, White
said he was somewhat surprised that the
board selected him.
There were ve people who
had applied for it, so it wasnt
really cut and dried, he said
about how he saw his chances.
White led a letter of inter-
est with the town after Allis
resigned. She had moved to Fon-
tana and was in the middle of her
third term as supervisor.
Others who sought to be the
next supervisor were Allan Poly-
ock, Tom Jacobs, Bonnie Cornue
and John Larkin.
Voting in favor of White were
Town Chairman Jim Weiss,
Supervisors Chris Jones and
Alex Palmer and Clerk-Treasurer
Sue Polyock. State statutes allow
a clerk-treasurer to vote in town
board appointments.
On the phone Aug. 6, DeYoung
said when he cast his no vote, he
thought Allan Polyock would be
the best candidate.
It wasnt a vote against Roy,
he said. It was a vote for Al, who had more
experience.
Allan Polyock was a town chairman
and Walworth County supervisor. White
has not held an elected position.
In fact, last spring, DeYoung beat
White in the town supervisor race.
But DeYoung said that had nothing
to do with why he voted against him July
30.
I think they were all viable candi-
dates, DeYoung said. Any one of them
could do the job. Im not discrediting any
of them.
He also said he believes White will do
a wonderful job as supervisor.
White said he understands the dif-
culty faced by board members to select a
replacement for Allis.
Im sure it was a hard vote, he said.
There were ve reasonable people (who)
all had pluses.
Jacobs also spent several years as
town supervisor. In September 2010, he
was appointed to ll a supervisor spot that
was vacated by Weiss to ll the open chair-
mans spot after Dave Bollweg resigned.
Cornue, a longtime Reek School Board
member, also serves on the towns
public parks committee.
Larkin had no previous com-
mittee or town political experi-
ence.
Meet the new supervisor
White may not have ever won
an election, but hes no stranger
to government.
For more than seven years, he
has served on the towns protec-
tive services committee.
White said he expects to
remain on that committee. He
also said Weiss probably will
appoint him to at least one other
committee, soon. A phone call to
Weiss wasnt returned by press
time.
In his March candidate ques-
tionnaire response to the Regional
News, White stated he has lived
in The Birches for 24 years. He
worked for 34 years in Morton,
Woodstock, Ill., and retired.
On Aug. 6, he said he has often attended
town board meetings.
Ive never really been involved with
politics, White said. I think its going to
be fun. Im looking forward to it.
Whats he looking forward to the
most?
Learning the job, he said, adding that
the budget process could be the biggest
challenge. Although White said hes famil-
iar with how the emergency services bud-
gets work, hes never worked on the towns
general budget.
Im sure there will be some other sur-
prises that Im not aware of, some deci-
sions that will have to be made, White
said.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
CORN ON THE COB was a staple at the Town of Linn Fire and EMS Pig Roast Sunday,
Aug. 11. Gracie Mae Johnson, 6, eats it up.
Big smiles, tasty ears
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LAKE GENEVA NEWS
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 7A
The new building that will house Immanuel Lutheran
Church, currently at 1229 Park Row, is being completed at
the corner of the Highway 120 bypass and North Bloomeld
Road. The completion date, once set for December, will be
in November, if all goes well.
The congregation of about 1,100 members prayed
and planned for several years to get to this point. Funds
were raised through the sacricial giving of members and
friends, rst raising $675,000 in a capital appeal to pur-
chase the land.
That was accomplished in two years, making it possible
to begin a new campaign for construction of the building. A
three-year appeal raised $1.1 million in contributions and
pledges, with the balance obtained through a loan from
the Mission Involvement Fund of the Evangelical Lutheran
Church of America.
The new sanctuary will seat 400 for worship, while
other needs will be met with administration ofces and
classrooms in the southern wing and a fellowship hall,
kitchen facilities and youth areas in the western wing.
Mechanicals, storage and space on the lower level will be
completed as needed.
The church has formed a partnership with Anchor Cov-
enant Church.
Anchor Covenant has been sharing the building at 1229
Park Row for some time, holding its worship services on
Sunday nights. Anchors purchase of the old building will
continue the presence of a church in the neighborhood, an
added benet from the partnership.
The worship service schedule at Immanuel will remain
the same once the move is made. The Rev. Mark Moller-
Gunderson, one of Immanuels pastors, said church mem-
bers are excited about the move and are happy to serve the
community in a new location.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
A NEW HOME for Immanuel Lutheran Church is being constructed at the corner of the Highway 120 bypass and N.
Bloomeld Road, Lake Geneva.
Church should be open in fall
I think youre asking too much, Connors said.
There were some lighter moments during the debate.
Id really like a raise, said Alderwoman Ellyn Kehoe.
I really would like a seat thats up higher so I can see
whats going on.
Thats a different kind of raise, however, replied Con-
nors. Kehoe went on to say that the raise will mean a few
extra bucks for council members, but it should also be a
reminder to council members to do their jobs and come
prepared, she said.
At the Aug. 5 committee of the whole meeting, City
Clerk Mike Hawes presented a study of compensation
for elected ofcials in municipalities with populations
between 5,000 and 15,000.
He found that the median pay for mayors and village
presidents was $7,200 and $3,600 for council members
and trustees.
Pay/Connors thinks
raise is too much
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Volunteer recognized
Local volunteer Bruce Seward, Pell Lake, will be rec-
ognized for his service to the community as a Hometown
Hero by Bloomeld 369 Modern Woodmen of America
Wednesday, Aug. 21, at 5:30 p.m., at Primo Italian Oven,
N1530 Powers Lake Road.
Seward is being honored due to his countless hours as
a regular volunteer for all activities in the community.
He will receive a certicate and a $100 award grant, to
be presented to the charitable organization of his choice.
Former Hometown Heroes recognized by the local
chapter of the organization, beginning in 2005, were
Harold Foreman, Louise Schwandt, the late Kenneth
Walter, Richard Olenoski, Steve Brunow and Tony La
Plant.
COMMUNITY NOTE
LOST DOG
We are missing an 8 year old female black lab
approximately 70 pounds, she is not wearing
a collar. Her name is Bailey and she was last
seen on Sunday 8/4/2013 near Highland
Avenue, Genoa City, WI.
PLEASE CALL KEVIN GATES:
262-203-0240 IF YOU SEE BAILEY!
A Roaring Success!
GENOA CITY DAYS AUGUST 2, 3 & 4, 2013
This years theme, the theme of the Lions International President for 2013, was Follow Your Dream. Thanks to our
many sponsors, volunteer helpers, vendors, exhibitors AND all who with their purchases or donations provided the Lions
Club additional funds to help carry out the Clubs diverse service projects!
And congratulations to the winners of prizes in the parade, the kids fishing derby sponsored by Robinsons Bait and
Mark Katzenberg, the Parkers Third Annual Pauline Parker Memorial Mud Bogs competition, and, of course, the Lions
Clubs 20th annual Harley-Davidson Raffle. Those winners were:
Te Genoa City Lions Clubs key fundraiser of the year!
HARLEY-DAVIDSON RAFFLE
Grand Prize: 2013 Harley-Davidson Heritage Softail Classic FLSTC motorcycle,
Trailer AND $500 Gift Certicate George Kuefner, Arlington Heights, Ill.
1
st
Prize: $500 Jay Kreuscher Kenosha, Wisconsin
2
nd
Prize: $400 Jennie May, Pell Lake, Wisconsin
3
rd
Prize: $300 George Kuefner (Yes, you CAN win two or more prizes!)
4
th
Prize: $200 Denise Miller, Genoa City, Wisconsin
MUD BOGS COMPETITION
Class A 33-34
1
st
Place: Chris Roberts, McHenry, Illinois 54.8 ft.
2
nd
Place: Joel Arnier, Crystal Lake, Illinois 50.4 ft.
3
rd
Place: Shawn Kasten, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 49 ft.
Class B 35-36
1
st
Place: Dean Irvin, Elkhorn, Wisconsin 130 ft.
2
nd
Place: Rodger Schultz Waukegan, Illinois 62.9 ft.
3
rd
Place: Mike Adams, McHenry, Illinois 54.5 ft.
Class C 37-39
1
st
Place: Dean Irvin, Elkhorn, Wisconsin 6.98 seconds
2
nd
Place: Shawn Roberts, Crystal Lake, Illinois 8.15 seconds
3
rd
Place: Kody Kamm, Kenosha, Wisconsin 8.43 seconds
Class D 40-44
1
st
Place: Kody Kamm, Kenosha, Wisconsin 7.87 seconds
2
nd
Place: Cli Kamm, Kenosha, Wisconsin 8.03 seconds
3
rd
Place: Dawn Wallace, Kansasville, Wisconsin 12.30 seconds
Class E 45-Above
1
st
Place: Clayton Larson, Lake Villa, Illinois 7.63 seconds
2
nd
Place: Bronson Bahrs, Racine, Wisconsin 7.67 seconds
3
rd
Place: Seth Rouse, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin 7.74 seconds
PARADE:
Teme Award: Childrens Pre-School of Genoa City
Judges Award: Genoa City Girls Fast Pitch Softball
Most Unique: Genoa City Girl Scout Troop 3020
Most Humorous: Walworth County 4-H Horse/Horseless Ambassadors
KIDS FISHING DERBY (LARGEST CATFISH)
1
st
Place: Will Conrad (5 lb., 12 oz.)
2
nd
Place: Josh Pigazzo (4 lb., 11 oz.)
3
rd
Place: Evan Schindel (4 lb.)
4
th
Place: Tyler Kravantka (3 lb., 10 oz.)
5
th
Place: Chase Koenig (3 lb., 8 oz.)
6
th
Place: Josiah Karmas (3 lb., 8 oz.)
Comments on Genoa City Days 2013 (and suggestions for Genoa City Days 2014)
should be submitted by email to lionewt@charter.net or by traditional mail to P.O. Box 173, Genoa City, WI 53128.
For more information about the Genoa City Lions Club, go to www.genoacitylions.org.
8A The Regional News August 15, 2013
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
Three young men travel cross-country with video cameras, willingness to volunteer
Starsh Project returns to Lake Geneva
By Robert Ireland
RIreland@lakegenevanews.net
It wasnt a typical college-aged cross-country road
trip.
A group of young men recently travelled throughout
the United States where they visited charities and volun-
teered their time.
In Los Angeles Skid Row, Wiley Koehler, Spencer
Hartz and Kai Hovden worked in a food kitchen for the
Midnight Mission an organization that focuses on help-
ing homeless people in one of the worse parts of town.
The three spoke to people who recently found them-
selves without homes and listened to their stories.
As part of their trip they also went to the Equality
House, a rainbow-colored home located across the street
from the Westboro Baptisit Church.
The Westboro Baptist Church is notorious for its anti-
gay rhetoric and protesting the funerals of soldiers who
were killed overseas.
The Equality House works to stop bullying in schools
and raises awareness about discrimination against gays.
The boys who lmed their experience for a documen-
tary, which they will broadcast on YouTube as webisodes,
wanted to talk to members of the controversial church to
get both sides of the story.
The Westboro Baptist Church vetted the Starsh Proj-
ect before giving them the green light to interview some of
their parishioners.
They were really nice about it, Hovden said. They
were nice about it with some of the most distorted views I
have ever heard.
On another stop, the three men watched a man who
suffered from brain trauma and another man who was
seriously injured in the Columbine shooting reach the top
of a rock climbing wall at the Breckenridge Outdoor Edu-
cation Center an organization that takes people who are
disabled rock climbing and zip lining.
The trio also had a few scary moments on their jour-
ney. Koehler of Cedarburg was bringing a meal to people
in the cafeteria of the Midnight Mission when a ght broke
out nearby.
Koehler was holding a tray lled with food and froze
until security could stop the altercation. At the same loca-
tion, a security guard warned Hovden of Lake Geneva to
act normal as the guard conscated a knife from another
man.
About the trip
During the trip the group made stops in Milwaukee,
Pine Ridge, SD; Breckenridge Colo; LA; New Orleans; Ala-
bama and Topeka, Kan.
We felt welcomed by each place, and we wanted to stay
there, Hovden said.
It was the time of our lives, for real, Spencer of Lake
Geneva said.
The mission of the Starsh Project was to volunteer
time at the charities and raise awareness for each organi-
zations that they visited.
The biggest thing was to get a handful of people to
know about each of these organizations, Hovden said.
The goal of the Starsh Project was to get more people
involved with them.
On Aug. 6, the three men discussed their mission/
adventure at Simple Restaurant in Lake Geneva, which is
owned by Spencers father, Tom Hartz.
In front of family and friends, the three showed a high-
light movie to the crowd, discussed their trip and answered
questions.
Hovden said one of the more memorable stops was at
the Equality House in Topeka, Kan. The group also was
able to visit the controversial church across the street for a
Sunday service.
Spencer said as they entered they were given dirty looks
from people passing by Westboro Baptist Church. Inside
the church, they received dirty looks from parishioners.
Surprisingly, the group learned that members of the
Westboro Baptist Church and the Equality House are on
speaking terms and some even exchange text messages.
Hovden said in LAs Skid Row they interviewed people
who recently became homeless.
Hovden said he was shocked by some of the ways people
became homeless.
(Some) cant pay medical bills and they end up losing
their house, he said.
Hovden said in Pine Ridge, S.D. which has the high-
est poverty rate in the country extended families lived
in a small trailer.
It is like a third-world country, and it is in our coun-
try, Spencer said. It is the second most impoverished
place in the Western Hemisphere.
To learn more about the Starsh Project visit their
Facebook page at www.facebook.com/starshproj.
FILE PHOTO/REGIONAL NEWS
KAI HOVDEN, Wiley Koehler and Spencer Hartz have orga-
nized the Starsh Project. The three recently returned from
cross-country trip where they visited different charities.
It is like a third-world country, and it is in our
country, Spencer Hartz of Lake Geneva said
about Pine Ridge, SD. It is the second most
impoverished place in the Western Hemisphere.
Business Tools for Success will be
the series of free monthly Breakfast
and Learn seminars in Lake Geneva
this fall, sponsored by the Lake Geneva
Economic Development Corporation
(LGEDC). The seminars are a part of
the LGEDCs mission to assist start-up
and growth businesses prosper.
Ronald Bud Gayhart, director of
the University of Wisconsin-White-
water Small Business Development
Center will be the presenter for the
series. Gayhart has a wide range of
both private and educational sector
experience giving him the knowledge
to provide ideas to help small and
growing businesses succeed.
He also has the UW-Whitewaters
staffs broad expertise as support
for individual businesses to rely on
if needed. He will be available after
each session to discuss participants
individual concerns.
All sessions will run from 7:30 to 9
a.m. and will be hosted by the Harbor
Shores on Lake Geneva, 300 Wrigley
Drive. Breakfast is included.
Primary sponsors are LGEDC and
the Geneva Lake Area Chamber of
Commerce.
Each session also has an individ-
ual sponsor. Session subjects, dates
and sponsors are:
n Sept. 11, Why Business Plan-
ning is Important (Alliant Energy).
n Oct. 9, Measuring Success,
Understanding Financial Statements
(Dunn Lumber/True Value).
n Nov. 13, Top 10 Must Know
Issues for Small Business (Commu-
nity Bank CBD).
n Dec. 11, Building Bench
Strength in the Organization (Lake
Geneva Regional News).
Reservations for all or individual
sessions may be made by calling the
Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Com-
merce, (262) 248-4416.
Tools for small business success
CHAIRTY EVENT
The Association for
the Prevention of Family
Violence is sponsoring a
Poker Run fundraiser for
7 to 11 a.m. Aug. 25. The
association is a nonprot
organization that provides
free condential services
to victims of domestic vio-
lence and sexual assault.
Participants will have
the choice of paddling
(kayak, canoe or paddle
board) on the lake or walk-
ing on the Lake Geneva
shore path. Participants
will stop at various piers or
checkpoints to collect play-
ing cards to form a winning
poker hand. The Poker
Run will begin at Wesley
Woods Conference Center,
250 Stam St., Williams Bay.
The route will follow the
north shoreline of Geneva
Lake and will take between
an hour and a half to two
hours ro complete.
A continental breakfast
will be served from 9 to 11
a.m. in the Wesley Woods
Dining Hall and poker
prizes for the top hands will
be awarded at 11:15 a.m.
Registration informa-
tion is available on-line at
www.active.com (search:
paddle or walk) and on
the APFV website www.
apfvwalworth.com
For more informa-
tion call Jean Henderson
at (262) 723-5414. Spon-
sors include Wesley Woods
Conference Center, United
Church of Christ, and the
Williams Bay and Lake
Geneva Montessori School.
Early registration is
encouraged.
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WESTENN
LAKE GENEVA NEWS
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 9A
When there is an ofcer-involved shooting fatality,
Necci can order an inquest to determine how the individual
died. During an inquest, a jury can decide whether charges
should be brought against the law enforcement ofcers
involved in the death.
Deputy Neumanns, Deputy Shaws, Deputy Framis
and Deputy Blanchards actions were privileged as acts of
defense of themselves or others, Necci wrote in his opin-
ion.
About the shooting
At about 2 a.m. Kruberts mother, Kathleen, saw her
son standing outside on her porch, and she heard scream-
ing. Kathleen asked Michael Boyd to arm himself with a
rearm because she feared for her safety because of her
sons past issues with mental illness.
Kathleen Krubert attempted to call 911, but she didnt
have cell phone service. Jeremiah Krubert broke into the
residence and attacked Boyd with a pipe, causing him
serious injuries. Kathleen Krubert escaped the home and
called 911.
Neumann was the rst on the scene, and after his con-
frontation with Jeremiah Krubert, in which Jeremiah Kru-
bert stole his squad car, he put out the re in the kitchen,
which was presumably started by Jeremiah Krubert.
Shaw, Frami and Blanchard were involved in the chase
with Jeremiah Krubert, which ended when Jeremiah Kru-
bert crashed into farm equipment in a eld.
An autopsy showed Jeremiah Krubert had multiple
lacerations to his scalp, thought to be caused by the end of
a metal pipe or a similar object, a graze wound to the shoul-
der possibly caused by a bullet and severe internal injuries
to the heart, lungs, liver, spine and esophagus, apparently
caused by the single .223 caliber round found near his
spine, according to Neccis letter.
The autopsy revealed that cocaine was present in Jer-
emiah Kruberts system.
Previous shootings
The last ofcer-involved shooting occurred on Jan.
21, when Deputy Robert Lagle was guarding 18-year-old
Alfredo Villarreal as he was receiving treatment at Aurora
Lakeland Medical Center, Elkhorn. When Lagle unshack-
led Villarreal to use the rest room, Villarreal attacked the
deputy. Fearing Villarreal would continue to attack him,
disarm him and exit the hospital, Lagle shot and killed Vil-
larreal.
Necci determined Lagle acted in self-defense.
Blanchard has been involved in two previous ofcer-
involved shootings. On May 5, 2012, in a trailer in a home in
the town of Lyons, Blanchard shot and killed John Brown,
22. Brown allegedly charged at Blanchard while armed
with a knife. Then-District Attorney Philip Koss ruled the
shooting legal. Browns mother, Nancy, has publicly called
the shooting murder. She has led a federal lawsuit
against the county and Blanchard for her sons death.
On Jan. 29, 2010, Blanchard shot Mark Beaver of La
Grange. Beaver red multiple shots toward another deputy.
Beaver survived the shooting and was sentenced to 10 years
in prison.
Blanchard is a more than 10 year-veteran of the Sher-
iffs Department, and in 2012 he earned a Distinguished
Service Award for his involvement with the rearms train-
ing team.
Shooting/Deputy involved in 2012 fatal shooting
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
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Will Be Wrist Band Night. Wrist Bands will cost $20.00 each
THURSDAY AUG. 15 FROM 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Will Be Wrist Band Night. Wrist Bands will cost $20.00 each
SATURDAY AUG. 16 FROM 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Will Be Wrist Band Day. Wrist Bands will cost $20.00 each
H H H H H H H H H H H H
H H H H H H H H H H H H
The Lake Geneva Jaycees,
and Eds Magical Midway
are happy to announce
the following
Discounted Carnival Tickets
LAKE
GENEVA
JAYCEES
51ST ANNUAL
VENETIAN FESTIVAL
10A The Regional News August 15, 2013
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Serving Walworth, Fontana, Williams Bay and Walworth County
Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, August 15, 2013
JewelryandFineArt SEIZEDbypoliceandfederal agencies.
Propertyfromseizedandforfeitedassets auction. Bankruptcies
andliquidationof Rolexes, largediamonds, fneart, and
jewelrytogether withgeneral order merchandisewhich
constitutes themajoritytobeliquidatedpiecebypiece.
I1 raa4 eaea Ua, - Ca|| () 1-11 fcr 4lrectlcas ca|,.
I N V E N T O R Y O B T A I N E D F R O M
MONDAY AUGUST 19
AUCTION-11:00 AM, PREVIEW-10:30 AM
GRAND GENEVA RESORT & SPA
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DRUG DEALER S SEI ZED ASSETS
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By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
WILLIAMS BAY As an educator,
William White has experienced all kinds of
weather.
Ive missed school for fog, Ive missed
school for snow. Ive missed school for trop-
ical storms, said White, who is now the
principal at the Williams Bay Junior/Senior
High School, 500 W. Geneva St.
Indeed, the northern Kentucky native
has taught at and administered schools
in California, Florida, Massachusetts and
Wisconsin.
White, who lives in Mukwonago, was
most recently the principal in the Brighton
K-8 district in western Kenosha County.
The 200-student district, in the town of
Brighton, feeds into the Westosha High
School District, White said in an interview
earlier this month.
White ofcially started his duties in
Williams Bay on Aug. 1, but he really started
his work before then.
He said he sat down with former prin-
cipal Barry Butters on July 30 and they
talked for two hours about the school, the
staff and the student body.
He is a wealth of information, White
said of Butters. Ill certainly work with
Barry. In school districts like this, everyone
is willing to help.
As if on cue, during the interview,
Dianna Woss, school board president,
stopped by Whites ofce, rst to extend a
welcome, and then to see if she could help
White in any way.
White said that his current plans are to
meet with staff and learn their goals.
And while Aug. 1 was ofcially Whites
rst day of work in Williams Bay, he said
he was still in the process of closing things
down at Brighton.
. I was there for three years, said
White. Just packing up and leaving was out
of the question, he said.
The Brighton district is committed to
educational excellence, and about half of
the students there are through open enroll-
ment.
The schools commitment to educational
excellence and its size appeal to families, he
said.
Parents value that small community
feel, White said.
White grew up in small-town America.
He grew up in Brooksville, Ky. He
attended Bracken County High School.
There are no large cities in that part of
Kentucky, White said. The big city in that
part of the country isnt even in Kentucky.
Cincinnati is the closest major metro-
politan area to where he was growing up,
so he identied more with Cincinnati than
other Kentucky cities, he said.
White is a graduate of the University of
Kentucky with a Bachelor of Science degree
in secondary education.
His desire for a masters degree took
him from the heartland to Fresno Pacic
College, where he earned a masters in cur-
riculum and instruction.
His rst teaching job was as a seventh-
grade teacher in Parlier, Calif., in the heart
of migrant farm country. White said he
taught all subjects.
White said he met a woman there from
Milwaukee and they married. But before
coming to the Badger state, they moved
from California to Miami to follow her post-
graduate work.
He said he taught for several years in
the Miami-Dade County Public School dis-
trict and then they moved to Boston, where
he taught as well.
They nally moved to Wisconsin about
17 years ago, where he was assistant princi-
pal at Sheboygan Urban Middle School for
two years, and then assistant principal at
Wisconsin Hills Middle School in the Elm-
brook School District. Meanwhile, he was
working toward his doctorate at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
William White hired as Bay principal
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
THE WILLIAMS BAY CORN and Brat fest had perfect weather over the weekend. Ashley
Lipka added a little salt to her lunch.
A summer
tradition in the Bay
Who will become
Fairest of the Fair?
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
ELKHORN The Walworth County
Fair is the largest county fair in the state,
and the job of Fairest is no easy task.
The woman crowned Fairest of the Fair
serves in a publicity role for all-things fair-
related, including attending events across
the county and the state.
This summer, seven county residents
seek the title, ve from the Geneva Lake
area. In 2012, Abigail Jensen, Delavan, was
crowned Fairest.
J
illian Cline has trouble deciding
her favorite part of the Walworth
County Fair.
The fair offers so much to the commu-
nity, Cline, Lake Geneva, said. It would
be an amazing opportunity to be crowned
Fairest and be able to give back to the
fair.
Cline is a sophomore at Ripon College,
studying accounting and business manage-
ment. Even after she graduates, she wants
to be around horses and the agricultural
community.
Id like to be an accountant and a certi-
ed horse judge, she said. Id like to vol-
unteer with the Horse and Pony Project
and keep giving back.
Cline was the driving force behind cre-
ating Badger High Schools horse riding
club. She has three horses of her own and
does multiple types of showings.
I ride English pleasure, trail riding
and cart driving, she said. My favorite
competition is the barrel racing. Theres
just so much adrenaline and excitement
during that event.
Though horses are her passion, Cline
showed goats at last years county fair.
Horses are what I do best, she said.
PLEASE SEE FAIR PAGE 4B
PLEASE SEE WHITE PAGE 4B
Google creates confusion
between two Fontanas
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA The famous search
engine Google is helping the Fontana Police
Department connect with residents.
Barb Dorsey, police administrative
assistant, said she gets six to 10 calls every
day from residents of Fontana, Calif.
The problem is Googles search results
for Fontana Police Department.
When you search for Fontana Police
Department, theres this posting, Chief
Steve Olson said. It says Fontana Califor-
nia Police Department, but it shows a map
of our village, a photo from our website and
it shows our number.
Olson said the different area code doesnt
faze callers. See page 2B for a screen shot.
We have the California number posted
up by our phones so we can tell them who
to actually call, Dorsey said. Thankfully,
we havent had someone call in an actual
emergency. The area code for the Fontana,
Calif., area is 909. Fontana, Wis., is 262.
We get these calls all the time, some of
them asking which jail someone who was
arrested yesterday is in, he said. What?
Which jail? Then we ask them who theyre
trying to call.
Theyve tried to have the search posting
changed, but Google isnt responding.
We have called Google, Olson said.
They said theyre working on it. They said it
could take weeks for it to change. We never
asked to have that posting. We have nothing
to do with it. We just want the number to be
for the correct department.
Olson said hes spoken with the Califor-
nia department, and they laugh about it.
They just got a helicopter at their
department, he said. I was joking and said,
wouldnt that be nice to have. They actu-
ally sent me the whole proposal and what
they did to get the helicopter. I dont think
they realize how small we are compared to
them.
The California city has a population of
199,028. The Wisconsin village has 1,678.
We dont need a helicopter, Olson said.
We just need to stop getting calls from Cal-
ifornia.
2B The Regional News August 15, 2013
GENEVA LAKE WEST
Rambatt led schools Fuel Food for Families
Big Foot graduate earns Kohls scholarship
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH Brittany Rambatt,
a 2013 graduate of Big Foot High School,
wants to go places.
This week, shes off to Mexico to build
homes and volunteer in an orphanage and
an AIDS clinic.
I really want to go to Africa someday,
Rambatt said. Im going to study agricul-
tural education. Id like to be a teacher, in
underdeveloped countries.
Rambatt was recently honored with the
Kohls Cares Scholarship. She was one of
35,000 selected from the rst level of win-
ners.
The criteria for the scholarship was to
impact the community in someway, Ram-
batt said. The main reason for my nomi-
nation was because of the Fuel Foods for
Families program at Big Foot.
Rambatt and her classmates developed
a program to raise crops and meat animals
to donate to local food pantries.
The students are taking over the proj-
ect now, she said. Its integrated into
the classrooms. Agricultural students are
taking on different parts of the project.
Big Foots FFA program is also respon-
sible for caring for the plants and animals
when school isnt in session.
Shes received other scholarships as
well, including the Thomas E. Reynolds
Environmental Scholarship, a Rotary Club
scholarship and a Fontana Garden Club
Scholarship.
Even more noteworthy is her dedication
to others, in her community and around
the world.
I was in Honduras
in September 2012,
Rambatt said. We were
there to help with build-
ing projects for families.
Ill be going back again
this September.
Rambatts grasp of
Spanish helps her when
she travels to Central
and South America.
My family has been
really supportive of
what I do, she said. I would like to con-
tinue going to other countries. I hope I can
study abroad while Im in college.
Rambatt will study at the University of
Wisconsin-River Falls, one of the two UW
System schools with agricultural education
programs.
I really like the campus there, Ram-
batt said. I like the department. I was on
the campus last year for a conference, and
I just like being there. Before deciding to
become a teacher, she wanted to be a vet-
erinarian.
I just became more aware of agricul-
tural education, Rambatt said. I became
more aware of the international aspect of
it, how I can help more people. I can help
people and still stay within the agricultural
eld.
Though shes leaving for college this fall,
shell still return to Big Foot frequently.
Ill be president of the 4-H Club until
October, Rambatt said. And Ill be in
the FFA for three years. Ill try to stay as
involved as I can in the program.
This year she isnt showing any animals
at the Walworth County Fair, but shell be
at the fair.
I didnt have the time this summer,
Rambatt said. Theres so much going on,
but Ill still be at the fair. I was at the State
Fair, and Ill be at the county fair. Thats
something I dont want to miss.
Rambatt
School hires rm
for energy efciency
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA The Fontana Elemen-
tary School Board agreed to pay for an
$8,500 engineering study this fall.
The study, contracted by McKinstry
Co., will examine the entire school to pro-
duce a list of ways to make it more energy
efcient.
McKinstry Co. has ofces around the
United States, including in Milwaukee
and Madison, and has worked on simi-
lar energy efciency projects at public
schools in Madison and Oshkosh.
After the study is completed and
a project list compiled, the board will
decide which projects it wants to pursue.
School Board Vice President Joe
McHugh said the company will begin the
study soon.
As soon as we approve it, theyll be
on the ground doing it, McHugh said.
When we get the report back, thats when
we sign the contract, if we want, and pick
and choose how many projects that we
want done.
Money for the projects will be secured
through low-interest loans created for
public school energy-savings projects.
If we decide to go forward (with any
of the proposed projects in the engineer-
ing study), that $8,500 is absorbed as
part of the total proj-
ect, McHugh said.
Well decide on those
projects sometime in
October.
McHugh said McK-
instry had the most
experience of the per-
formance contractors
the board contacted.
We had to look at
three elements, experi-
ence, quality and cost, he said. McKin-
stry has the experience hands down.
Included with the engineering study,
McKinstry must submit to the school
guaranteed cost-savings for each project.
For example, if the schools boiler is
replaced, the company will say how much
energy the school will save with a new
boiler. If the schools energy costs arent
reduced by that amount, McKinstry will
pay the difference.
McHugh said the board has been wor-
ried about the boiler for a few years, and
they need to tackle large projects while
the board has nancing options.
My only caution here is that I want
the roof done. I want the boiler xed, he
said. When we look at the project list,
we dont want to pick the small projects
because theyre easy. We want to get the
big projects done.
McHugh
THIS IMAGE appears on the right hand side of the Internet browser after a Google search of
Fontana Police Department. The map, address and phone number all lead to the Fontana,
Wis., Police Department, though its under a headline for the California department.
California confusion
GATEWAY COLLEGE NOTE
Tech school offering
barbering program
Gateway Technical Col-
lege has opened enrollment
for its Barbering Technolo-
gist diploma program, a
high-quality, intense yet
quick path to the career of
barbering.
Gateway is one of a
handful of technical colleges
in the state to begin offering
this stand-alone barbering
diploma.
Students can qualify
within a year to take the
state barbering test and
receive the state-required
licensing needed to work in
Wisconsin.
State barbering license
requirements have changed,
paving the way for Gateway
to separate and intensify the
barbering part of its cosme-
tology diploma program.
The program is offered on
the Kenosha Campus.
In the second semester
of their program, students
will have the opportunity to
work with actual clients on
their haircutting needs.
Students will become
qualied to take the state
licensing test upon success-
ful completion of the pro-
gram.
Sign-up for the Barber
Technologist diploma, 30-
502-5, has begun at the
Kenosha Campus, 3520 30th
Ave. Go to Student Services
or to gtc.edu/webadvisor.
Venetian Night at
Lake Lawn
Lake Lawn Resort, Dela-
van, will host its rst Vene-
tian Night on Saturday, Aug.
24. Musical entertainment
begins at 5 p.m., followed by
a lakeside cookout at 5:30
p.m. An island paradise-
themed boat parade begins
at 8 p.m. Participating
boats will be adorned with
lights and decorations, with
the best-decorated vessel
chosen as the winner follow-
ing the procession.
Communities around
the nation have modeled
boat parades after those fea-
tured during the annual car-
nival celebration in Venice,
Italy. With similar parades
springing up all over, we
thought it was time to bring
the fun and excitement to
Delavan Lake, adding our
own little twist, said Dave
Sekeres, general manager
of Lake Lawn Resort. Its
the perfect opportunity to
celebrate our beautiful lake-
front and become better
acquainted with the local
boating community.
The island party cook-
out beside the lake will fea-
ture island greens, tropical
fruit salad, island-spiced
red chile teriyaki glazed
chicken, rum runners roast
pork and more.
Tickets are $20 for
adults, $10 for children ages
4 to 11, and free for children
three and under. Reserva-
tions are encouraged.
There also will be free
beverage tastings and drink
specials offered throughout
the evening.
To purchase tickets, call
(262) 725-9155 or visit lake-
lawnresort.com.
THINGS TO DO
Notice to the Electors of the
Fontana Jt. 8 School District
Due to a recent resignation, the Fontana Board
of Education is seeking an applicant to fill a posi-
tion on the school board. A person living in the
Village of Fontana is eligible for this vacancy.
Persons interested in serving on the school board
should send a letter of application to the attention
of the Fontana Jt. 8 School Board Vice-President,
Joe McHugh: Fontana Jt. 8 School District; 450 S.
Main Street; Fontana, WI 53125 no later than
3:00 P.M. on Friday, August 23, 2013. The letter
should include a statement of why he/she wishes
to serve on the school board.
On behalf of the Fontana Jt. 8 School District
Joe McHugh, Vice-President
TWO TONS of SALT *EVERYDAY*
Does that sound like a lot of salt to you? It does to us! It also
sounds like a lot of money going down the drain. That's how
much salt the Fontana/Walworth Wastewater Treatment Plant
receives every day of the year for the last two years, on average,
and we need your help.
That much chloride (salt) goes into the environment every day
from household drains, industrial discharges and commercial
enterprises because we have no way to remove it at the treatment
plant. The Department of Natural Resources has set limits on how
much chlorides can be released to our streams, rivers, lakes and
ground waters to protect our health and environment. It sounds
like the easy solution would be to just remove the chlorides from
the treated wastewater before it is released to the receiving waters
but that gets expensive. Desalinating that much water requires
that our facility spend enormous amounts of money on plant
upgrades to remove, collect, store and dispose of all that salt.
We, at the wastewater treatment plant are asking you to help us
reduce this problem by reviewing your water softeners settings
and operating condition. Some water softeners are preset at the
factory for the highest hardness setting which may be costing you
more than you need to treat your water. Please be sure your sof-
tener is calibrated for the proper hardness in your area. Softening
your household water except for the cold water to the kitchen,
bathroom sinks and outside faucets will help and most people
generally prefer the taste of hard over softened water. Also check
your softeners timer (if equipped) to ensure it is properly adjust-
ed. Children move out or other factors arise that effect water
usage and your system may allow for an adjustment that may save
you money. If you have a vacation home in the area you might try
turning the softener off for the months you are away (helpful for
older timer initiated units). Talk to your local softener company
representatives for assistance with your system or ideas to
improve your softeners performance. An efficiently operating
softener uses less salt and less water, plain and simple.
Our goal is to reduce the chlorides entering our environment
and your help is the key to our goal!
Douglas York, Superintendent
Fontana-Walworth Water Pollution Control Commission
GENEVA LAKE WEST
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 3B
Churches ll backpacks for needy kids
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA As parishioners left
Mass at St. Benedict Catholic Church over
the past few Sundays, they were greeted
with tables full of empty backpacks.
Mary Jeanne Lindinger-Olsen, human
concerns minister at St. Benedict, helps
organize the school supply donation drive
with the Inter-Church Backpack Commit-
tee.
The committee includes representa-
tives from area churches, including Fon-
tana Community Church, Immanuel
United Church of Christ in Walworth,
Triune Lutheran Church in Sharon and
Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church in
Sharon.
The committee works with area schools,
generating a list of eligible students in need
of school supplies for the coming year.
Lindinger-Olsen said the number of
students in need has
grown by at least 10
percent in the last
three years.
We were at 200
to 250 in the mid-
2000s, she said.
Now, this year we have 368 backpacks to
ll. Last year, we had 330 bags. It was our
rst year over 300.
The list is generated from students in
the free lunch program at schools in the
Big Foot Area Schools Association.
The committee buys a backpack for
each student on the list. Parishioners at St.
Benedict and other involved churches can
pick up a bag and buy the supplies needed
for the bag.
Its become quite a commitment, with
the cost of school supplies and the amount
needed, even for the younger grades,
Lindinger-Olsen said. Weve had some
cash donations, and some families bring in
just bulk school sup-
plies for us to nish
lling the bags that
come back. We said
to our parishioners
this year to take a
bag and donate sup-
plies if your means permit.
Lindinger-Olsen said it can cost up to
$80 to ll a backpack with all the required
supplies.
The list of in-need students continues
to grow, she said.
Of the 368 bags needing supplies this
year, 90 were taken by other churches in
the area. A group of volunteers has been
running the backpack donation drive at
St. Benedict for about 15 years, Lindinger-
Olsen said, and it grew so quickly that she
wanted to get other churches involved.
I dont even remember how it hap-
pened. Two of the Sharon churches were
interested in helping, she said. Between
the two churches, they took 55 backpacks
(last year). We had not recruited them at
all. That plus the other (backpacks) was
70 backpacks taken by other churches last
year. I just thought, why dont we try invit-
ing other churches and see if theyd like to
sit on a committee.
Lindinger-Olsen said a committee
would formalize the process and bring
in new ideas for the backpack donation
drive.
It would give us more folks to help us
prepare the bags, she said. Its a lot of
work. Wed have more people to help trans-
port bags. Several of the churches were
interested. They joined us formally on a
committee. We met and worked through
some great ideas others brought to us about
how we would run the backpack project.
This year, there were 18 backpacks left
at the Aug. 11 Mass at St. Benedict.
Afterward, all the bags were taken,
Lindinger-Olsen said. It was great.
This year we have 368 backpacks
to ll. Last year, we had 330 bags.
It was our rst year over 300, said
Mary Jeanne Lindinger-Olsen, who
is the human concerns minister.
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
COOKING IT UP at the Williams Bay Lions Clubs Corn and Brat Roast Saturday, Aug. 10,
was Tom Yakes. Music and reworks were also part of the weekend festivities.
Yakes husks for Lions
COUNTY NOTES
DA hires new
prosecutor
Walworth County Dis-
trict Attorney Dan Necci
announced that his office
has received an accepted
offer of employment from
Attorney T.C. Makaya,
to fill a recently vacated
assistant district attorney
position.
T.C. is an experienced
and dedicated prosecutor
with the right tempera-
ment and judgment for the
job. I believe the people
of Walworth County are
extremely well served with
him in our office, Necci
said.
Makaya is a graduate
of the University of Florida
and the University of Geor-
gia School of Law.
He has served as an
assistant district attor-
ney in the Dublin Judicial
District in Georgia since
August 2008.
Golf outing benets
SMILES
Early fall excitement
can be found at a golfing
fundraiser in September
which benefits the SMILES
organization.
The event will take
place at the Evergreen Golf
Club, Elkhorn, on Wednes-
day, Sept. 11.
SMILES, located in
Darien Township, provides
therapeutic riding and
equine assisted activities
to people of all ages who
have special needs.
Lives and living skills
are improved through
classes and programs.
SMILES is accredited
through PATH Interna-
tional as a Premier Center,
assuring clients of the
highest standards in the
industry.
Smiles is a non-profit
organization holding
501(c)(3) status, and relies
upon the generosity and
support of the community
to continue its mission.
The event will be high-
lighted by 18 rounds of golf.
Lunch will be provided and
there will be many special
events to test every level of
golfing enthusiasm.
A silent auction will be
open throughout the day
and several special items
will be auctioned during
the dinner hour.
There are many oppor-
tunities to support SMILES
that day, including a Hole
Sponsor or a variety of
unique donation opportu-
nities such as the Four-
most Friend.
To become involved, or
for more information on
the SMILES program, visit
their website at www.smil-
estherapeuticriding.org or
call (262) 882-3470.
Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews
Facebook.com/RegionalNewsSportsCheck
News
You Can
Share
OPEN Monday-Saturday
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GENEVA LAKE WEST
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But I was given that opportunity to show the goats,
and I did it. I had a dairy goat. It was judged on its milk
producing capabilities.
Her diversity in horse showing helps her nd her way
around the fair.
Being Fairest would help me further that community
networking, she said. Were so privileged to have such a
great fair in our community. I spent 10 years in 4-H, and
its so great that we have such an opportunity to show our
exhibits. The junior exhibitors at the fair are incredible.
You just look at what theyre creating and you see that these
are future professionals in the eld.
R
iding horses is in Shelby Petelers blood.
Her mother, her grandparents, her great-grand-
parents all rode horses.
My mom showed horses her whole life, Peteler, Lake
Geneva, said. I started riding as a little kid. When you
start young, you kind of grow into it. Its like dancing.
Her mom was a state champion horse shower, and now
Peteler is following those footsteps.
I was reserve champion at the state 4-H expo a few
years ago, Peteler said. Ive been in the top 10 for a lot of
competitions. Because of the age of her horses, all three of
them are around 20 years old, she competes in showman-
ship competitions.
My horses dont do a lot of the jumping or trail riding
shows, Peteler said.
My horses are judged on how well they look, on their
posture and on my posture while I ride.
Because of all the competitions she enters, shes been at
the county fair a lot.
I just love it, she said. I just love being there and
seeing at the exhibitions. Ive always wanted to be Fairest,
too. I had a role model when I was younger, she was about
six years older than me, and she was Fairest. Since then,
Ive just wanted to do that same thing.
Right now, shes adjusting to transferring to DePaul Uni-
versity in Chicago and trying to decide on what to study.
At (the University of Wisconsin)-Whitewater, I was
studying music, but now Im kind of undecided , Peteler
said. I think I might want to go into biology. Whitewater
was just too small and too close to home. I wanted a bigger
change than that. Im really excited to be in Chicago. Thats
where everything is happening right now.
She has no fears about the public relations role of being
crowned Fairest, either.
Im so used to talking to strangers because of my host-
ing job (at Popeyes in Lake Geneva), she said. Its easy to
just go up to someone now, even if they look grumpy, and
start talking.

E
milie Cerny of Sharon wasnt crowned last year, but
she was chosen as fair royalty. The royalty position
is similar to the Fairest. Cerny was often asked to repre-
sent the fair along with Jensen and produce publicity for
the fair.
Cerny said this past year gave her taste of what being
Fairest would be like.
I keep wanting to do more for the community, she
said.
Cerny will repeat the selection process again this year,
with less nervousness than 2012.
I have been to the interviews before, and going in the
rst time, its scary, she said. But I like the interview pro-
cess. I think its necessary for the program. You get to know
who youre running against.
Last year, Cerny already knew several of the other com-
petitors. Not so this year.
I dont know a lot of the girls that are running, she
said. Most of them are over in the horse part of the fair.
I dont usually venture over there. There will probably be
some lasting friendships made this year.
As part of the competition, Cerny has already written
a radio commercial promoting the fair, spent a night with
the current Fairest of the Fair and started preparing for
interviews this month. During the fair, she and the other
competitors will answer questions on stage.
Right now, Cerny is working for Reproduction Provi-
sions, an agricultural supply store, in Walworth.
I do product-testing, I work with customers and I help
with some of the research thats going on, she said. Right
now were doing a feeding trial.
Her long-term plan is to continue her work in agricul-
ture.
I want to go back to school, she said. I want to study
microbiology and research. Ive always done research. I
want to stay where I know Im good at what I do. I was just
recently announced as an American Star Finalist in FFA
for my research.
B
randy Sheppard said she isnt nervous to compete
against the other Fairest contestants.
Im actually well-prepared, and I keep preparing, she
said. I have nothing to worry about. I feel that were all
good people. Everyone needs to be the best she can be. All
the girls are nice, but Im not saying I cant beat them.
Her lack of nerves is surprising because this is her rst
competition.
The Fairest is the rst competition Ive done for a
public relations position, Sheppard said. Im working on
me, on being the best person I can be.
A Genoa City native, Sheppard is studying agri-busi-
ness engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Plateville.
Once I get my degree, I want to apply for upper man-
agement at John Deere, Sheppard said. I was part of the
ag-mechanization in FFA. Thats how I choose my major.
When I rst started in FFA, I realized it was something I
really liked.
Sheppard said she built and studied different types of
engines while in FFA.
After joining FFA at Badger High School, she started
raising chickens.
I got chickens, and it enhanced my love for agricul-
ture, Sheppard said. The chickens are at a farm about
ve minutes from where I live.
Besides the chickens, Sheppard is crew chief for her
grandfathers modied dirt racing team.
The modied is the type of car used, she said. Its
done on a dirt track. Its a lot of fun. I love it.
Sheppard preps the car in the garage before the race
and checks the car during pit stops in the race.
Im waiting to pursue racing on my own, she said. My
grandpa is my main focus right now.
K
ayla Decker, Sharon, could not be reached for com-
ment on her run for Fairest of the Fair.
These ve women will also compete against Emily
Watson, Elkhorn, and Megan Rasmussen, Delavan.
Commission claries rules for parks
By Jade Bolack
JBolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA Its more of a common sense approach,
Trustee Cindy Wilson said. These changes just more
clearly dene our regulation. It certainly does not create
more rules.
Wilson and the village parks commission, which
Wilson chairs, will submit a revised ordinance to the vil-
lage board redening park usage in September.
It all started with (Police) Chief (Steve) Olson coming
to us, she said. He told us the only thing in the (village)
ordinance about the parks is that the language was singu-
lar, for one park, not the multiple parks like we have now.
We intend to make the change that the ordinance says
parks are dened in the park and open space plan and also
the master plan.
The unrevised ordinance says no one is allowed in the
park from 11 p.m. until 6 a.m. Wilson said that rule wasnt
realistic.
We have no way
of enforcing that,
she said. Especially
with Reid Park, it
just isnt possible.
The only park that
we limited hours on
is the Duck Pond
Recreation Area. It
already has hours
posted.
A sign is posted
at Duck Pond saying
it closes at dusk.
Wilson said that was too ambiguous.
We changed it to be closed from 10 p.m. until 7 a.m.,
she said. What were doing is not so much changing
(the ordinance) as dening how we want our parks to be
used.
No dogs allowed? Not the case in Fontana parks.
Dogs can be on leashes under the control of the
owner and walk through any park that we have, Wilson
said. There should be no confusion about that. Dogs are
allowed in the lake. If theyre there early in the morning
and no one else is there, dogs can go in the water (from
the south beach), of course.
The only park thats kept dog-free is the north beach
during the summer.
On that beach, dogs are allowed from October to
April or May, Wilson said. And on the south side of the
channel, of course dogs can go through. Thats the only
way to get off the Lake Shore Path.
Wilson said the changes to the ordinance ease police
interaction with park users.
Prior to these changes, a person who doesnt like
dogs (could) see someone walking a dog through the fen
and insist that the police ticket that person, Wilson said.
Thats how it would be read in the village ordinance.
That was not the intention of the ordinance. Were just
making it clear.
Wilson Olson
Fair/Contestants hope to become face of the Walworth County Fair
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
He earned a doctoral degree there in Educational Lead-
ership in 2003.
He then became principal at Whittier Elementary
School in Waukesha before moving on to Brighton.
White said he applied for the superintendents position
at Williams Bay. However, he said he believes the school
boards selection of Wayne Anderson for that position was
the right move. He said the board then approached him
about taking the junior-senior high school principals posi-
tion, and he agreed.
He said he fell in love with the school district from the
time two students gave him a tour of the building.
They seemed to love their teachers and their school,
he said of the students.
He said what the school board shared with him about
the school district impressed him also.
It felt like a school district that I could be excited to be
a part of, White said.
His immediate tasks, he said, are to meet with the staff
and to nd out where the school is at in relation to state and
federal educational initiatives.
White said hes also eager to get involved in the discus-
sion over whether the district should build a new elemen-
tary school next to the junior-senior high school building.
Such a project would impact the junior-senior high
school, he said.
White said hes also impressed with Williams Bay.
Its a community that supports education, he said.
White/Its a community that supports education
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
I have been to the interviews before, and going
in the rst time, its scary, Fairest of the Fair
contestant Emilie Cerny said.
Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews
News You Can Share
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 5B
PUBLIC NOTICES
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
LEGAL NOTICES
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE UPCOMING ISSUE HE UPCOMING ISSUE
PUBLIC
NOTICES
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment,
10% of the successful bid must be paid to
the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified
funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (per-
sonal checks cannot and will not be accept-
ed). The balance of the successful bid must
be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances and subject to tenants rights, if
any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and
recording fees and costs of any title evi-
dence.
PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth
County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co.
Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
Unit 5, together with said units undivided
percentage interest in the common ele-
ments (and the exclusive use of the limited
common elements appurtenant to said unit)
all in Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a
condominium declared and existing under
and by virtue of the Condominium
Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and
recorded by a Declaration as such condo-
minium in the Office of the Register of
Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on
March 14, 2008 as Document No. 731849,
and First Amendment to Declaration of
Condominium Ownership and of
Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for
Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded
June16, 2009 as Document No. 766152,
and Second Amendment to Declaration of
Condominium Ownership and of
Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for
Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded
June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152
said condominium being located in the City
of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State
of Wisconsin on the real estate described in
said Declaration and incorporated herein by
this reference thereto.
Tax Key No. ZUN 00005
Property Address: Generally Described as
800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake
Geneva, WI 53147
DATED: August 7, 2013
Attorney Edward F. Thompson
State Bar No. 1013187
CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C.
617 E. Walworth Ave.
P.O. Box 445
Delavan, WI 53115-0445
Phone: (262) 728-9196
Facsimile: (262) 728-1012
E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com
www.clairlawoffices.com
Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting
to collect a debt on our clients behalf and
any information obtained will be used for
that purpose. If you have previously
received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy case, this communication should not
be construed as an attempt to hold you per-
sonally liable for the debt.
August 15, 22, 29, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Amended
Order Setting Deadline
for Filing a Claim
(Formal Administration)
Case No. 2013PR123
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
CHARLOTTE W. SALUS
A petition for formal administration was filed.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The decedent, with date of birth
August 17, 1930 and date of death July 4,
2013, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of N3130 Tamarack Road, Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
2. All interested persons waived
notice.
THE COURT ORDERS:
1. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is November
13, 2013.
2. A claim must be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
BY THE COURT:
Kristina M., Secord
Circuit Court Commissioner
August 9, 2013
Nicholas A. Egert
McCormack & Egert, S.C.
835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-6600
Bar Number; 1056736
August 15, 22, 29, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Case No. 13CV00154
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK
Plaintiff,
v.
HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a
HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C.,
ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI,
DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI,
UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE
PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC., and
LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK
PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3,
2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Case No. 13CV00154
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK
Plaintiff,
v.
HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a
HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C.,
ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI,
DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI,
UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE
PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC., and
LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK
PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3,
2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment,
10% of the successful bid must be paid to
the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified
funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (per-
sonal checks cannot and will not be accept-
ed). The balance of the successful bid must
be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances and subject to tenants rights, if
any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and
recording fees and costs of any title evi-
dence.
PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth
County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co.
Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
Unit 1, together with said units undivided
percentage interest in the common ele-
ments (and the exclusive use of the limited
common elements appurtenant to said unit)
all in Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a
condominium declared and existing under
and by virtue of the Condominium
Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and
recorded by a Declaration of Condominium
Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions,
Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office
Park, as such condominium in the Office of
the Register of Deeds for Walworth County,
Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document
No. 731849, and First Amendment to
Declaration of Condominium Ownership
and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants
for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park record-
ed June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152,
and Second Amendment to Declaration of
Condominium Ownership and of
Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for
Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded
June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152,
said condominium being located in the City
of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State
of Wisconsin on the real estate described in
said Declaration and incorporated herein by
this reference thereto.
Tax Key No.: ZUN 00001
Property Address: Generally
Described as 800 and 820 North Geneva
Parkway, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
DATED: August 7, 2013
Attorney Edward F. Thompson
State Bar No. 1013187
CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C.
617 E. Walworth Ave.
P.O. Box 445
Delavan, WI 53115-0445
Phone: (262) 728-9196
Facsimile: (262) 728-1012
E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com
www.clairlawoffices.com
Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting
to collect a debt on our clients behalf and
any information obtained will be used for
that purpose. If you have previously
received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy case, this communication should not
be construed as an attempt to hold you per-
sonally liable for the debt.
August 15, 22, 29, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Amended
Notice Setting Time to Hear
Application and Deadline
for Filing claims
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 13PR113
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ALBERT HINZPETER
D.O.D. 4-25-2013
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
June 13, 1923 and date of death April 25,
2013 was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 898 Sauganash Drive, Fontana, WI
53125.
3. The application will be heard at the
Walworth County Probate, 1800 County
Road NN-Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085,
before Sheila T. Reiff, Probate Registrar, on
July 30, 2013 at 10:30 a.m.
You do not need to appear unless you
object. The application may be granted if
there is no objection.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is November
6, 2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
6. This publication is notice to any
persons whose names or address are
unknown.
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7014
at least 10 working days prior to the sched-
uled court date. Please note that the court
does not provide transportation.
Please check with person named
below for exact time and date.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
July 29, 2013
Attorney Lindsey M. White
1624 Hobbs Drive
Delavan, WI 53115
262-740-1971
Bar Number: 1088716
August 15, 22, 29, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
Case No. 12 CV 01171
Case Code No. 30404
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.
Plaintiff
Vs.
DELLA FAYE WILLS;
Defendants
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on January
14, 2013, in the amount of $180,542.32, the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: September 12, 2013 at 10:00 am
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to
pay balance due will result in forfeit of
deposit to plaintiff.
2. Sold as is and subject to all legal
liens and encumbrances.
3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin
Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds
of the sale upon confirmation of the court.
PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHER-
IFFS DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCE-
MENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD
NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121
Property description:
LOT 1 OF CERTIFIED SURVEY MAP NO.
1737, ACCORDING TO THE RECORDED
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN VOL. 8
OF CERTIFIED SURVEYS ON PAGE 149
AS DOCUMENT NO. 169630, LOCATED
IN SECTION 8, T2N, R17E, CITY OF
ELKHORN, WALWORTH COUNTY, WIS-
CONSIN.
Tax Key No.: YA173700001
Property Address: 1102 HICKORY LANE,
ELKHORN, WISCONSIN 53121
Lauren L. Tobiason
State Bar No. 1092310
Attorney for Plaintiff
230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-541-9710
Johnson, Blumberg & Associates,
LLC is the creditors attorney and is attempt-
ing to collect a debt on its behalf. Any infor-
mation obtained will be used for that pur-
pose.
August 1, 8, 15, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants
for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park record-
ed June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152,
and Second Amendment to Declaration of
Condominium Ownership and of
Easements, Restrictions,
Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office
Park recorded June 16, 2009 as Document
No. 766152.
Tax Key Nos.: ZUN 00007A and ZUN
00007B
Property Address: Generally Described as
800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake
Geneva, WI 53147
DATED: August 7, 2013
Attorney Edward F. Thompson
State Bar No. 1013187
CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C.
617 E. Walworth Ave.
P.O. Box 445
Delavan, WI 53115-0445
Phone: (262) 728-9196
Facsimile: (262) 728-1012
E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com
www.clairlawoffices.com
Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting
to collect a debt on our clients behalf and
any information obtained will be used for
that purpose. If you have previously
received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy case, this communication should not
be construed as an attempt to hold you per-
sonally liable for the debt.
August 15, 22, 29, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 2013PR117
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
DIANE D. LASPISA
D.O.D. 04/28/2012
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
March 3, 1938 and date of death April 28,
2012, was domiciled in DuPage County,
State of Illinois, with a mailing address of
447 E. Park Ave., Elmhurst, IL 60126.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is October 9,
2013.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Registrar in Probate
July 2, 2013
Mary A. Mazurk
100 S. York Rd., Suite 204
Elmhurst, IL 60126
630-617-5700
Bar Number: 1014353
Aug. 8, 15, 22, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
for Summary Assignment
(Formal Administration)
Case No. 2013PR133
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
BARBARA A. BOEKHAUS
D/O/D: 05/07/13
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. A petition for summary assignment
was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
06/14/1933 and date of death 05/07/2013
was domiciled in Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin with a mailing address of 92
Sterling Parkway, Genoa City, WI 53128
3. The right of a creditor to bring an
action terminates three months after the
date of publication of this order. Creditors
may bring an action by
A. filing a claim in the Walworth
County Circuit Court before the property is
assigned.
B. bringing a suit against the
assignee(s) after the property is assigned.
4. The property may be assigned to
the creditors and interested persons after 30
days have elapsed following the publication
of this notice.
BY THE COURT:
Sheila T. Reiff
Circuit Court Commissioner
August 2, 2013
Daniel S. Draper
PO Box 940
716 Wisconsin Street
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
(262) 248-6636
Bar Number: 1031580
Aug. 15, 22, 29, 2013
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Case No. 13CV00154
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK
Plaintiff,
v.
HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a
HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C.,
ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI,
DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI,
UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE
PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC., and
LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK
PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3,
2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment,
10% of the successful bid must be paid to
the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified
funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (per-
sonal checks cannot and will not be accept-
ed). The balance of the successful bid must
be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances and subject to tenants rights, if
any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and
recording fees and costs of any title evi-
dence.
PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth
County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co.
Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
PARCEL 1: Units 6 and 7, together with
said units undivided percentage interest in
the common elements (and the exclusive
use of the limited common elements appur-
tenant to said unit) all in Unique Lake
Geneva Office Park, a condominium
declared and existing under and by virtue of
the Condominium Ownership Act of the
State of Wisconsin and recorded by a
Declaration as such condominium in the
Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth
County, Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as
Document No. 731849, and First
Amendment to Declaration of Condominium
Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions,
Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office
Park recorded June16, 2009 as Document
No. 766152, and Second Amendment to
Declaration of Condominium Ownership
and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants
for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park record-
ed June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152
said condominium being located in the City
of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State
of Wisconsin on the real estate described in
said Declaration and incorporated herein by
this reference thereto.
Tax Key Nos. ZUN 00006 and
ZUN 00007
Property Address: Generally Described as
800 and 820 North Geneva Parkway, Lake
Geneva, WI 53147
PARCEL 2: A part of Lots 11, 12, 13, 14 and
15 of Lake Geneva Business Park, a subdi-
vision being located in part of Southeast
of the Northwest , the Southwest , of the
Northeast , the Northwest of the
Southeast , the Northeast of the
Southeast , and the Southwest of the
Southeast of Section 31, Town 2 North,
Range 18 East, City of Lake Geneva,
Walworth County, Wisconsin, more particu-
larly described as follows:
Beginning at the Southwest corner of said
Lot 15; thence along the West line of said
Lot 15, N 35DEG 05MIN 23SEC W, 215.00
feet; thence N 54DEG 54MIN 33SEC E,
136.68 feet; thence N 35DEG 05MIN
24SEC W, 251.90 feet to the Southerly right
of way line of Geneva Parkway; thence
along said right of way line, 104.22 feet
along the arc of a curve to the right with a
radius of 954.00 feet and a chord which
bears N 71DEG 09MIN 50SEC E, 104.22
feet to an iron pipe stake; thence S 35DEG
05MIN 24SEC E, 437.75 feet to an iron pipe
stake; thence S 54DEG 54MIN 33SEC W,
236.68 feet to the point of beginning.
EXCEPTING THEREFROM unique Lake
Geneva Office Park, a condominium
declared and existing under and by virtue of
the Condominium Ownership Act of the
State of Wisconsin and recorded by a
Declaration of Condominium Ownership
and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants
for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, as
such condominium in the Office of the
Register of Deeds for Walworth County,
Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document
No. 731849, and First Amendment to
Declaration of Condominium Ownership
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
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6B The Regional News August 15, 2013
PUBLIC NOTICES
VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD
Village of Bloomfield.
SECTION III ADOPTION
OF ORDINANCE
This ordinance, adopted by a majority of the
village board on a roll call vote with a quo-
rum present and voting and proper notice
having been given, authorizes the powers
and establishes the duties of the village offi-
cers of the Village of Bloomfield to manage
and destroy obsolete public records in the
possession of the Village of Bloomfield.
THE VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE
OF BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY,
WISCONSIN, DOES HEREBY REPEAL
SECTION 3.07 AND CREATE CHAPTER
30 OF THE VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD
MUNICIPAL CODE, AS FOLLOWS:
CHAPTER 30
PUBLIC RECORDS
30.01 PURPOSE
The purpose of this chapter is to establish a
Village records retention schedule and
authorize destruction of Village records pur-
suant to the schedule on an annual basis.
This chapter shall not be construed to
authorize the destruction of any public
record after a period less than prescribed by
statute or state administrative rules.
30.02 RESERVED FOR RECORD RETEN-
TION
30.03 DESTRUCTION OF OBSOLETE
RECORDS
1) FINANCIAL RECORDS
The following Village of Bloomfield village
officers, pursuant to s. 19.21 (5), Wis. stats.,
may destroy the financial records, except
utility records, of which they are the legal
custodians and that are considered obso-
lete after completion of any required audit
by the Bureau of Municipal Audit or an audi-
tor licensed under Chapter 442 of the
Wisconsin Statutes, but not less than seven
years after payment or receipt of any sum
involved in the particular transaction, unless
a shorter period has been fixed by the State
Public Records Board pursuant to s. 16.61
(3) (e), and then after such shorter period,
as provided below, except that bonds and
coupons after maturity may be destroyed
after two years:
a) Bank statements, deposit books, slips
and stubs.
b) Bonds and coupons after maturity.
c) Canceled checks, duplicates and
check stubs.
d) License and permit applications,
stubs and duplicates.
e) Payrolls and other time and employ-
ment records of personnel included under
the Wisconsin Retirement Fund.
f) Receipt Forms.
g) Special assessment records.
h) Vouchers, requisitions, purchase
orders and all other supporting documents
pertaining thereto.
2) UTILITY RECORDS
The Village of Bloomfield village officers,
pursuant to s. 19.21 (5), Wis. stats., may
destroy the following utility records of which
they are the legal custodians and that are
considered obsolete, after completion of
any required audit by the Bureau of
Municipal Audit or an auditor licensed under
Chapter 442 of the Wisconsin Statutes, sub-
ject to state Public Service Commission reg-
ulations, but not less than seven years after
the record was effective unless a shorter
period has been fixed by the state Public
Records Board pursuant to s.16.61 (3) (e),
and then after such a shorter period, except
that water stubs, receipts of current billings
and customers ledgers may be destroyed
after 2 years:
a) Contracts and papers relating thereto.
b) Excavation permits.
c) Inspection records.
3) OTHER RECORDS
The Village of Bloomfield village officers,
pursuant to s. 19.21 (5), Wis. stats., may
destroy the following records of which they
are the legal custodians and that are con-
sidered obsolete, but not less than 7 years
after the record was effective unless anoth-
er period has been set by statute, and then
after such a period, or unless a shorter peri-
od has been fixed by the state Public
Records Board pursuant to s. 16.61(3)(3)
and then after such a shorter period:
a) Assessment rolls and related records,
including board of review minutes.
b) Contracts and papers relating to con-
tracts.
c) Correspondence and communica-
tions.
d) Financial reports other than annual
financial reports.
e) Insurance policies.
f) Justice dockets.
g) Oaths of office.
h) Reports of boards, commissions,
committees and officials duplicated in the
council minutes.
i) Resolutions and petitions, provided
the text of the same appears in the official
minutes.
j) Election notices and proofs of publi-
cation, canceled voter registration cards,
and Election materials as governed by State
Statutes.
k) Official bonds.
l) Police records other than investiga-
tive records.
4) TAPE RECORDINGS
Any tape recordings of a governmental
meeting of the City may be destroyed,
erased or reused no sooner than 90 days
after the minutes of the meeting have been
approved and published, if the purpose of
the recording was to make minutes of the
meeting.
5) DESTRUCTION AFTER REQUEST FOR
INSPECTION
No requested records may be destroyed
until after the request is granted or 60 days
after the request is denied. If an action is
commenced under W.S.A. 19.37, the
requested record may not be destroyed until
after a court order is issued and all appeals
have been completed. See W.S.A.
19.35(5).
6) DESTRUCTION PENDING
LITIGATION
No record subject to pending litigation shall
be destroyed until the litigation is resolved.
7) REVIEW AND APPROVAL BY PUBLIC
RECORDS AND FORMS BOARD.
This section and the retention periods of
less than seven years have been reviewed
and approved by the Wisconsin Public
Records and Forms Board.
a) Records Retention Schedules
(RESERVED)
b) Records Disposition Authorizations
(RESERVED)
8) HISTORICAL SOCIETY NOTIFICATION
Prior to the destruction of any public record
described in Sections IV, V, or VI at least 60
days notice in writing shall be given to the
State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD
THE VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE
OF BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY,
WISCONSIN,DOES HEREBY REPEAL
AND RECREATE SECTIONS 27-21 (2)
AND 27-20(2i) OF THE VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD TO READ AS FOLLOWS:
27-21(2) Only one principal struc-
ture shall be located, erected, or moved
onto a lot, except as provided for in this ordi-
nance. Unless otherwise dictated in a subdi-
vision/condominium covenants, the princi-
pal structure shall have a minimum square
footage footprint of 800 square feet, with a
minimum total residence square footage of
1,000 square feet. Basements are not allow-
able square footage.
27-20(2i) No pole barn type accesso-
ry structure shall be allowed in any residen-
tial zoning district, unless with a conditional
use permit approved by the Planning and
Zoning Commission.
Pursuant to Sec. 66.0103, 61.50, and
985.02, Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be
effective the day after its publication subse-
quent to its adoption.
Adopted this 4th day of March, 2013.
Ken Monroe, Village President
Attest: Cynthia L. Howard, Village Clerk
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. C-4
Date: April 8, 2013
An ordinance to repeal 1.06(3) and
recreate 1.06(3) of the Municipal Code of
the Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County,
Wisconsin. The Village Board of the Village
of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin,
does hereby ordain as follows:
Section One: Section 1.06(3) of
the Municipal Code of the Village of
Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin is
hereby repealed and recreated as follows:
1.06(3) ELECTIONS
3) Elections
(a) Term: The Municipal Judge shall
be elected at large in the spring election for
a term of four (4) years, consistent with sec.
755.02, Wis. Stat., or as hereafter amended,
or until his or her successor is elected and
qualifies, commencing immediately after
receiving the oath of office. All candidates
for the position of Municipal Judge shall be
nominated by nomination papers as provid-
ed in 8.11, Wis. Stats. The Walworth
County Clerk shall serve as filing officer for
the candidates.
(b) Electors: Electors in all
Municipalities that are parties to the agree-
ment shall vote for Judge.
(c) The presently sitting and elected
Town of Bloomfield Municipal Court Judge
shall be the joint Court judge for the remain-
der of his term.
Section Two: All ordinances or parts
of ordinances contravening or inconsistent
with provisions of this ordinance be and are
hereby repealed.
Section Three: Pursuant to sec.
66.0103 and sec. 61.50(1) and (3), Wis.
Stats., this ordinance shall be effective the
day after its publication subsequent to its
adoption.
Adopted this 8th day of April, 2013.
Ken Monroe
Village President
Attest: Cynthia Howard
Village Clerk
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
MARCH 4, 2013
ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-03
An ordinance to repeal and recreate
Sections 27-22(7) and (8), 27-30(2), 27-77
and Division 14 Sections 1.1, 21, 23.1, 85.1,
115.1, 150.1, 154.1 and 200.1 of the Village
of Bloomfield Municipal Code, regarding the
adoption of a shoreland zoning ordinance.
THE VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE
OF BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY,
WISCONSIN, DOES HEREBY REPEAL
AND RECREATE SECTIONS 27-22(7) AND
(8), 27-30(2), 27-77 AND DIVISION 14
SECTIONS 1.1, 21, 23.1, 85.1, 115.1,
150.1, 154.1 and 200.1 OF THE VILLAGE
OF BLOOMFIELD MUNICIPAL CODE IS
SUMMARIZED AS FOLLOWS:
Shoreland Zoning Ordinance.
The full text of the Village of
Bloomfield Shoreland Zoning Ordinance
can be found at the Village Clerks office
located at N1100 Town Hall Road, Pell
Lake, Wisconsin between normal office
hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday. The Clerk can be contacted
at phone number is 262-279-6039
The Shoreland Zoning Ordinance are
state mandated added restrictions to lands
that are within a specific distance from wet-
lands or waterways. These restrictions are
most often setback distances to already
established use districts in the Village and
are intended to help protect the natural
resourced of the State from contamination
and over use. The Ordinance will operate
much like an overlay to the normal and
already existing zoning districts by applying
both the normal restriction to the districts
and the additional restrictions because they
fall within the Shoreland Zoning area.
Pursuant to Sec. 66.0103, 61.50, and
985.02, Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be
effective the day after its publication subse-
quent to its adoption.
Adopted this 4th day of March, 2013.
Ken Monroe, Village President
Daniel Schoonover, Town Chairperson
Attest: Cynthia L. Howard, Village Clerk
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
Village of Bloomfield
Walworth County
ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-06
JULY 1, 2013
An Ordinance repealing Section 3.07 and
creating Chapter 30 of the Village of
Bloomfield Municipal Code
RE: Ordinance for the destruction of obso-
lete records authorized per Wis. Stats.
19.21 *.
SECTION I TITLE AND PURPOSE
This ordinance is entitled the Village of
Bloomfield Destruction of Obsolete Records
Ordinance. The purpose of this ordinance is
to provide the village officers of the Village
of Bloomfield with the authority to destroy
certain obsolete public records in posses-
sion of the Village of Bloomfield.
SECTION II AUTHORITY
The Village Board of the Village of
Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin,
has the specific authority under s. 19.21 (4),
Wis. stats., to manage and destroy obsolete
public records in the possession of the
TOWN OF
BLOOMFIELD
port. The prehospital and interfacility emer-
gency medical care consisting of basic life
support procedures and invasive lifesaving
procedures including the placement of
advance airway adjuncts, intravenous infu-
sions, manual defibrillation, electrocardio-
gram interpretation, administration of
approved drugs and other advanced skills
identified in the Wisconsin scopes of prac-
tice as provided by DHS 110.04 Admin
Code.
(b) ALS Assessment is an assess-
ment performed by an ALS crew as part of
an emergency response that was necessary
because the patients reported condition at
the time of dispatch was such that only an
ALS crew was qualified to perform the
assessment. An ALS assessment does not
necessarily result in a determination that the
patient requires an ALS level of service.
(c) ALS Intervention is a procedure
that is in accordance with State and local
laws, required to be done by an emergency
medical technician-intermediate (EMT-
Intermediate) or EMT-Paramedic.
(d) ALS level 1 is the transporta-
tion by ground ambulance vehicle and the
provision of medically necessary supplies
and services including the provision of an
ALS assessment or at least one ALS inter-
vention which can include invasive tech-
niques such as IV therapy, intubation and/or
other drug administration, defibrillation, and
airway management.
(e) ALS level 2 includes the trans-
portation by ground ambulance vehicle and
the provision of medically necessary sup-
plies and services including (1) at least
three separate administrations of one or
more medications by intravenous
push/bolus or by continuous infusion
(excluding crystalloid fluids) or (2) ground
ambulance transport, medically necessary
supplies and services, and the provision of
at least one of the ALS2 procedures listed
below:
1. Manual defibrillation/caridover-
sion;
2. Endotracheal intubation;
3. Central venous line;
4. Cardiac pacing;
5. Chest decompression;
6. Surgical airway; or
7. Intraosseous line
(f) BLS means basic life support.
The emergency medical care that is ren-
dered to a sick, disabled or injured individ-
ual, based on signs, symptoms or com-
plaints, prior to the individuals hospitaliza-
tion or while transporting the individual
between health care facilities and that is lim-
ited to use of the knowledge, skills and tech-
niques received from training required for
licensure as an emergency medical techni-
cian basic, or for certification as a first
responder as defined by 256.15 Wis. Stat.
(g) Standby Service means an
ambulance with two medical technicians,
will locate themselves at a function or event
and will remain dedicated to that event, and
will not be available for other routine EMS
calls in the area. Dedicated standbys are
subject to the availability of EMS crews
and resources, however, are subject to
removal at the discretion of the acting chief
for immediate life-threatening emergencies.
(h) Treat/non-transport means any
treatment performed by emergency medical
technicians but no transportation is provided
to a medical facility. On rare occasion these
services will not be billed as the services
provided were nominal.
(3) RATES FOR SERVICES. The
rates for medical/rescue services provided
by the Bloomfield Genoa City Fire and
Rescue shall be as follows:
Service Resident Non-Resident
Fee Fee
BLS $550 $650
ALS level 1 $675 $800
ALS level 2 $800 $925
Mileage Charge
(per mile) $15 $15
Treat/non-transport $100 $125
Standby service $75 $75
Section Two: Pursuant to Sec. 66.0103 and
60.80(1) and (3), Wis. Stats., this Ordinance
shall be effective the day after its publication
subsequent to its adoption.
Adopted this 4th day of February, 2012.
Kenneth H. Monroe
Village President
Attest: Cynthia Howard, Village Clerk
August 1, 2013
WNAXLP
VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD
STATE OF WISCONSIN
Village of Bloomfield
Walworth County
ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-05
JULY 1, 2013
An ordinance to create Chapter 31 of the
Village of Bloomfield Municipal Code, adopt-
ing the Pell Lake Sanitary District
Ordinances.
THE VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE
OF BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY,
WISCONSIN, DOES HEREBY CREATE
CHAPTER 31 OF THE VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD MUNICIPAL CODE IS SUM-
MARIZED AS FOLLOWS:Water & Sewer
Utility (former Pell Lake Sanitary District
Ordinances).
The full text of the Village of
Bloomfield Water and Sewer Utility
Ordinance can be found at the Village
Clerks office located at N1100 Town Hall
Road, Pell Lake, Wisconsin between normal
office hours of 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday. The Clerk can be
contacted at phone number is 262-279-
6039.
Pursuant to Sec. 66.0103, 61.50, and
985.02, Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be
effective the day after its publication subse-
quent to its adoption.
Adopted this 1st day of July, 2013.
Ken Monroe, Village President
Daniel Schoonover, Town Chairperson
Attest: Cynthia L. Howard, Village Clerk
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-04
APRIL 8,2013
An ordinance to repeal and recreate
Sections 27-21(2) and 27-20(2i) of the
Village of Bloomfield Municipal Code,
regarding changes to minimum size of resi-
dence and accessory structures.
PUBLIC
NOTICES
common elements appurtenant to said unit)
all in Unique Lake Geneva Office Park, a
condominium declared and existing under
and by virtue of the Condominium
Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and
recorded by a Declaration of Condominium
Ownership and of Easements, Restrictions,
Covenants for Unique Lake Geneva Office
Park, as such condominium in the Office of
the Register of Deeds for Walworth County,
Wisconsin, on March 14, 2008 as Document
No. 731849, and First Amendment to
Declaration of Condominium Ownership
and of Easements, Restrictions, Covenants
for Unique Lake Geneva Office Park record-
ed June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152,
and Second Amendment to Declaration of
Condominium Ownership and of
Easements, Restrictions, Covenants for
Unique Lake Geneva Office Park recorded
June 16, 2009 as Document No. 766152,
said condominium being located in the City
of Lake Geneva, County of Walworth, State
of Wisconsin on the real estate described in
said Declaration and incorporated herein by
this reference thereto.
Tax Key No.: ZUN 00002
Property Address: Generally
Described as 800 and 820 North Geneva
Parkway, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
DATED: August 7, 2013
Attorney Edward F. Thompson
State Bar No. 1013187
CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C.
617 E. Walworth Ave.
P.O. Box 445
Delavan, WI 53115-0445
Phone: (262) 728-9196
Facsimile: (262) 728-1012
E-mail: edthompson@clairlawoffices.com
www.clairlawoffices.com
Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting
to collect a debt on our clients behalf and
any information obtained will be used for
that purpose. If you have previously
received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bank-
ruptcy case, this communication should not
be construed as an attempt to hold you per-
sonally liable for the debt.
August 15, 22, 29, 2013
WNAXLP
TOWN OF
BLOOMFIELD
ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-02
Date: February 4, 2013
An ordinance to repeal and recreate
Section 5.13 (2) and (3) of the Municipal
Code of the Village of Bloomfield, Walworth
County, Wisconsin, to repeal and recreate
the Rates for Service.
The Village Board of the Village of
Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin,
does hereby ordain as follows:
Section One: Section 5.13(2) and (3)
of the Municipal Code of the Village of
Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin is
hereby created to read as follows:
5.13 CHARGES FOR
RESCUE SERVICES.
(2) DEFINITIONS. For the purposes
of this section, the following words have the
following meanings:
(a) ALS means advanced life sup-
PUBLIC
NOTICES
said shore to a point which is intersected by
the East line of Lot A; thence North 1 20
West along the East line of said Lot A to the
Southwest corner of said Lot C; thence
along the West line of said Lot C to the
place of beginning. Also easement rights-
described by a Document dated August 11,
1984 and recorded on August 14, 1984 in
Volume 329 of Records, pages 230-234, as
Document No. 106093. Said land being in
the Town of Linn, Walworth County,
Wisconsin. Tax Key No. IA 2200001.
Address of Property: N2319 Geneva
Oaks Trail, Lake Geneva, WI 53147
TERMS OF SALE: 10% cash, certified
check, money order or cashiers check at
date of sale, with the balance due upon con-
firmation of sale.
Dated at Elkhorn, Wisconsin, this
26th day of July, 2013.
By: /s/ DAVID GRAVES, SHERIFF
Harrison, Williams & McDonell, LLP
527 Center Street, Suite 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Telephone: 262-248-8175
Fax: 262-248-8175
Aug. 8, 15, 22, 2013
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
Case No. 13CV00154
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK
Plaintiff,
v.
HAMMERSMITH, LLC a/k/a
HAMMERSMITH, L.L.C.,
ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI,
DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI,
UNIQUE LAKE GENEVA OFFICE
PARK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC., and
LAKE GENEVA BUSINESS PARK
PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.,
Defendants.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on June 3,
2013 in the amount of $1,448,984.53 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment,
10% of the successful bid must be paid to
the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified
funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (per-
sonal checks cannot and will not be accept-
ed). The balance of the successful bid must
be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances and subject to tenants rights, if
any. Purchaser to pay all transfer and
recording fees and costs of any title evi-
dence.
PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth
County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co.
Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION:
Unit 2, together with said units undivided
percentage interest in the common ele-
ments (and the exclusive use of the limited
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN:
CIRCUIT COURT:
WALWORTH COUNTY:
BRANCH II:
File No. 12 CV 00890
NORTHBROOK BANK & TRUST
COMPANY,
Plaintiff,
vs.
LEWIS J. BORSELLINO and JULIE
BORSELLINO, his wife, and
BENJAMIN VITULLO, as Trustee under a
Trust Agreement dated February, 2012 and
kin known as the North 2319 Geneva Oaks
Trail Land Trust.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by
Judgment of Foreclosure and sale entered
in this action on March 7, 2013, the under-
signed Sheriff of Walworth County,
Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the
lobby of the Walworth County Sheriffs
Department, 1770 County Road NN,
Elkhorn, Walworth County, Wisconsin, on
the 19th day of September, 2013, at 10:00
oclock a.m. of that day, the foreclosed
premises directed by said judgment to be
sold, located in the Town of Linn, Walworth
County, Wisconsin, and described as fol-
lows, to-wit:
Lot A of Certified Survey No. 22 as recorded
in the office of the Register of Deeds for
Walworth County, Wisconsin, on July 6,
1966 in Volume 1 of Certified Surveys on
page 22 as Document No. 582707, said sur-
vey being a part of Lots 4 and 5, S.B.
Chapins Subdivision and a part of the
Northwest of Section 4, T1N, R17E, with
the exception of that portion of said lot
shown on the plat as Right-of-way for own-
ers of Lots A-C being 12 feet in width
together with an equal undivided interest
in common with the owner of Lot B of
Certified Survey No. 22 in the North 283.12
feet of the following described parcel of
land, to-wit: Commencing at the Northwest
corner of said Lot C described above;
thence North 76 46 West 35.25 feet to a
point; thence South 1 20 East to a point
where the said line would be intersected by
the extension of the South line of Lot C;
thence South 89 15 East to a point 10 feet
West of the Southwest corner of said Lot C;
thence South 1 20 East to the shore of
Geneva Lake; thence Southeasterly along
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE
UPCOMING ISSUE
LEGAL NOTICES
Please turn to page 7
PUBLIC NOTICE TO ALL CUSTOMERS OF THE
VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD UTILITY DEPARTMENT
The Village of Bloomfield Utility Department collects an annual amount of $151,110 for
providing public fire protection (PFP) service to the Village of Bloomfield. This cost covers
the additional storage, pumping, and distribution needed to provide the high flows and pres-
sures used to fight fires. Currently, the Village of Bloomfield collects this municipal PFP
charge through property taxes. Effective September 30, 2013 the Village of Bloomfield will
no longer collect the municipal PFP charge. As such, the Village of Bloomfield Utility
Department has requested Public Service Commission authorization to collect all of the PFP
charge from each customer, or benefiting person, on the water utility bill (based on the
Equivalent Meters Method) in accordance with Wis. Stat. Sec. 196.03(3)(b), which reads as
follows:
196.03(3)(b). Unless the governing body of the city, village or town adopts a resolution
providing that the city, village or town will pay the retail charges for the production, storage,
transmission, sale and delivery or furnishing of water for public fire protection purposes that
are not included in general service charges:
1. A public utility shall include the charges in the water utility bill of each customer of the
public utility in the city, village or town.
2. A municipal utility may, in addition to including the charges in water utility bills under
subd. 1., bill the charges to any person who meets all of the following conditions:
a. The person is not a customer of the municipal utility
b. The person owns land that is located in the city, village or town and in an area in which
the municipal utility has an obligation to provide water for public fire protection.
This change in billing for PFP will allow for the collection of PFP charges from property
owners who are not subject to property taxes. The Village does not intend to charge non-gen-
eral service customers as defined in subd. 2. above.
The proposed quarterly PFP charges are as follows:
Meter Size Quarterly Charges
5/8 $ 23.10
3/4 23.10
1 57.60
l l/4 84.00
l l/2 114.00
2 183.00
3 345.00
4 576.00
6 1,155.00
8 1,845.00
10 2,769.00
12 3,693.00
The following is a projected quarterly billing comparison:
Customer Meter Volume Without PFP With PFP Percent
Type Size Gallons Charge Charge Increase
Residential 3/4 12,000 $ 51.60 $ 74.70 45%
Commercial 1-1/2 24,000 97.20 211.20 117%
Public Authority 2 120,000 357.00 540.00 51%
Note: These projected quarterly bills DO NOT include sewer charges.
Anyone wishing to petition the Commission regarding this matter should file, within 20
days of this notice, either in writing at the following address: Public Service Commission of
Wisconsin, Attention: Steve Kemna, P.O. Box 7854, Madison, WI 53707-7854, or via email
to: Stephen.Kemna@wisconsin.gov
If you have questions, concerning the decision to direct charge PFP, please contact the
Village of Bloomfield Utility Department at 262-279-5020.
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 7B
PUBLIC NOTICES
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
VILLAGE OF FONTANA
ON GENEVA LAKE
Walworth County, WI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
for
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT
APPLICATION
before
VILLAGE OF FONTANA
COMMISSION
Monday, August 26, 2013 at 5:30 pm
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Public
Hearing will be held on Monday, August 26,
2013 beginning at 5:30 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matter may be heard,
before the Plan Commission in the Fontana
Village Hall located at 175 Valley View
Drive. This hearing will be conducted for the
purpose of hearing all interested partici-
pants concerning a Conditional Use Permit
Amendment Application filed by Tim
Wichman/Faulk & Foster for US Cellular,
122 Locust Lodge Ave., Council Bluffs, IA
51503, to authorize an antennae addition
plan for the existing tower on the Robert
Stewart property, 202 W. Main Street,
Fontana, WI, in the AH-35 ETZ Zoning
District. Copies of the application and all rel-
evant information are on file at the Fontana
Village Hall and available for public inspec-
tion during regular office hours from 8:00 am
to 4:00 pm Monday through Friday.
Submitted by:
Dennis L. Martin
Village Clerk
villageclerk@villageoffontana.com
Aug. 8 & 15, 2013
WNAXLP
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
VILLAGE OF FONTANA
ON GENEVA LAKE
Walworth County, WI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
for
ZONING CODE AMENDMENT
before the VILLAGE OF FONTANA PLAN
COMMISSION
and the JOINT EXTRATERRITORIAL
ZONING COMMITTEE
(Village of Fontana, Town of Linn,
Town of Walworth)
Monday, August 26, 2013, 5:30 p.m.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Public
Hearing will be held before the Village of
Fontana on Geneva Lake Plan Commission
and the Joint Extraterritorial Zoning
Committee, at the Fontana Village Hall, 175
Valley View Drive, on Monday, August 26,
2013 starting at 5:30 p.m. or as soon there-
after as the matter may be heard concerning
a Petition to Amend the ETZ Zoning
Ordinance Sections 18-510, 18-520, 18-
530, 18-548, 18-549, 18-570 and 18-572,
filed by the Village of Fontana to update and
align the ETZ Ordinance with the Walworth
County Zoning Code and Village of Fontana
Zoning Code. Copies of the petition are on
file at the Village Hall and available for pub-
lic inspection during regular office hours
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
Submitted by:
Dennis L. Martin, Village Clerk
villageclerk@villageoffontana.com
Aug. 8 & 15, 2013
WNAXLP
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
ORDINANCE NO. 08-05-13-02
An Ordinance Amending
Ordinance No. 12-15-04-1
Related to the Planned Development
Zoning in Place for the
Abbey Springs Development.
WHEREAS, the Village Board did
previously adopt Ordinance No. 12-15-04-
01, which said ordinance is incorporated
herein by reference as if set forth at length
herein, whereby the entirety of the therein
described Abbey Springs
Resort/Commercial Development (the
Subject Property) was converted to
Planned Development Zoning; and
WHEREAS, subsequently, Abbey
Springs, Inc. (the Petitioner) did petition
the Village (the Petition) for an amend-
ment to the Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01 and
the General Development Plan and the
Precise Implementation Plan (together the
Development Plan) approved by said
Ordinance whereby the mix of boat moor-
ings allowed in the Yacht Club use shall be
amended without increasing total moorings;
and
WHEREAS, said Petition was
referred to the Plan Commission for the
Village of Fontana-on-Geneva Lake for a
public hearing and recommendation as
required by the Village Code and by 62.23
Wis. Stats.; and
WHEREAS, the Plan Commission,
after due notice, did conduct a public hear-
ing on the proposed amendment described
herein and did make a favorable recommen-
dation to the Village Board for the Village of
Fontana-on-Geneva Lake; and
WHEREAS, the Village Board for the
Village of Fontana-on-Geneva Lake, having
given due consideration to the recommen-
dation of the Plan Commission and the sub-
mittals made by the Petitioner, does make
the determinations set forth herein.
NOW, THEREFORE, the Village
Board of the Village of Fontana-on-Geneva
Lake, Walworth County, Wisconsin, do
ordain as follows:
SECTION 1.
The recitals set forth above are incor-
porated herein by reference as if set forth at
length herein.
SECTION 2.
That the provision of Ordinance No.
12-15-04-1 at Section 3.B.(1)(c)(i.). Building
Location and Height, shall be deleted in its
entirety and recreated to read as follows:
That the provisions of Ordinance No.
12-15-04-01 at Section 3(2)(c)ii., shall be
deleted in its entirety and recreated to read
as follows:
For the Yacht Club use, the building
area, building location, building height, and
other requirements with regard to said use
shall be as set forth in the Development
Plan. Said Yacht Club use shall include the
limited right to undertake the Boat Storage
Use, herein defined, and shall be subject to
the following limitations on the number of
boat slips, mooring buoys, dingy docks, and
the storage of watercraft in the Boat Storage
Area, herein defined:
Boat slips: 84
Mooring buoys: 18
Dingy docks: 24
Dry storage of boats
and boat trailers: 158
For purposes of this subsection, a dingy
dock shall mean a site eligible for a single
watercraft mooring.
SECTION 3.
All other terms and conditions of
Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01 , and previous
amendments thereto, not inconsistent here-
with shall remain in full force and effect. To
the extent this Ordinance conflicts with the
terms of Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01, and
previous amendments thereto, this
Ordinance shall control.
SECTION 4.
This Ordinance shall be in full force
and effect upon and from its passage,
approval and publication as required by law.
PASSED AND ADOPTED by the
Village Board of the Village of Fontana-on-
Geneva Lake this 5th day of August, 2013.
VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE OF
FONTANA-ON-GENEVA LAKE
By: Arvid Petersen, Village President
Attest: Dennis L. Martin, Village Clerk
The undersigned do hereby consent
to the terms of this Ordinance as required
by Section 62.23(7)(b) Wis. Stats. and by
the Fontana Municipal Code.
ABBEY SPRINGS, INC.
By: Jerry Mortier, Executive Director
Attest: Dennis Martin, Village Clerk
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
SECTION 1.
The Recitals set forth above are
incorporated herein by reference as if set
forth at length herein.
SECTION 2.
That the Precise Implementation Plan
portion of the Development Plan for the
Subject Property shall be further amended
to include the area and structure depicted in
the documents outlined more specifically in
Exhibit A, attached hereto and incorporat-
ed herein by reference. Specifically, this
amendment is designed to allow construc-
tion for a turf care/cart storage building and
a community maintenance building. To the
extent the Exhibit A documents are incon-
sistent with the existing Development Plan,
the Exhibit A document shall control.
SECTION 3.
All other terms and conditions of
Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01, as amended,
not inconsistent hererwith shall remain in full
force and effect. To the extent this
Ordinance conflicts with the terms of
Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01 or earlier
amendments thereto, this Ordinance shall
control.
SECTION 4.
This Ordinance shall be in full force
and effect upon its passage, approval and
publication as required by law.
PASSED AND ADOPTED by the
Village Board of the Village of Fontana this
5th day of August, 2013.
VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE
OF FONTANA-ON-GENEVA LAKE
By: Arvid Petersen, Village President
Attest: Dennis Martin, Village Clerk
The undersigned do hereby consent
to the terms of this Ordinance as required
by Section 62.23(7)(b) Wis. Stats. and by
the Fontana Municipal Code.
ABBEY SPRINGS, INC.
By: Jerry Mortier, Executive Director
Attest: Dennis Martin, Village Clerk
EXHIBIT A
1. Drawings and renderings pre-
pared by Excel Engineering, Inc. and filed
with the Village of Fontana on June 4, 2013
and bearing project number 1214890, and
compromised of pages C10, C1.1, C1.2,
C1.3, A1.1 and A2.0 as to the proposed cart
storage building.
2. Drawings and renderings pre-
pared by Excel Engineering, Inc. and filed
with the Village of Fontana on June 4, 2013
and bearing project number 1214880, and
compromised of pages C10, C1.1, C1.2,
C1.3, A1.1 and A2.0 as to the proposed
maintenance building
3. Storm water and erosion con-
trol calculations as prepared by Grant
Duchac, P.E. under job number 1214880
and 1214890 and filed with the Village of
Fontana on June 4, 2013 and comprised of
23 primarily two sided pages.
4. Wetland Delineation Report as
prepared by Excel Engineering, Inc. and
bearing project number 1214880 and filed
with the Village of Fontana on June 4, 2013
and comprised of 20 primarily two sided
pages.
5. Application for Planned
Development Amendment received by the
Village of Fontana on June 4, 2013, includ-
ing a two page project narrative prepared by
Excel Engineering, Inc.
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
VILLAGE OF FONTANA
ON GENEVA LAKE
Walworth County, WI
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
for
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT
APPLICATION
before
VILLAGE OF FONTANA
PLAN COMMISSION
Monday, August 26, 2013 at 5:30 pm
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Public
Hearing will be held on Monday, August 26,
2013 beginning at 5:30 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as the matter may be heard,
before the Plan Commission in the Fontana
Village Hall located at 175 Valley View
Drive. This hearing will be conducted for the
purpose of hearing all interested partici-
pants concerning a Conditional Use Permit
Application filed by Maria Klesmith, 1081 S.
Lakeshore Drive, Fontana, WI, to authorize
the construction of Holy Theophany
Orthodox Chapel on the James and Georgia
Athans property at N2107 Highway 67,
Walworth Township, WI, in the A1-ETZ
Zoning District. Copies of the application
and all relevant information are on file at the
Fontana Village Hall and available for public
inspection during regular office hours from
8:00 am to 4:00 pm Monday through Friday.
Submitted by:
Dennis L. Martin
Village Clerk
villageclerk@villageoffontana.com
August 8 & 15, 2013
WNAXLP
VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD
Bloomfield Village/Town Hall
N1100 Town Hall Road, Pell Lake, WI
The Village of Bloomfield and Town of
Bloomfield Planning & Zoning Commission
and Boards will hold a Public Hearing on
proposed Telecommunications Ordinance
on September 9, 2013 at 6:30 p.m.
Interested parties may inspect a copy of the
Telecommunications Ordinance and pro-
posed revisions to the Bloomfield Municipal
Code by visiting the Village/Town Hall dur-
ing business hours at N1100 Town Hall
Road, Pell Lake, WI. Written comments on
the proposed Ordinance and code changes
may also be submitted to the Clerks office
prior to the public hearing.
Village of Bloomfield Town of Bloomfield
Cynthia L. Howard Cynthia L. Howard
Village Clerk Town Clerk
Aug. 15 & 22, 2013
WNAXLP
Public Hearing on the
Village of Bloomfield
& Town of Bloomfield
Proposed Revisions to the Needs
Assessment Study
And Ordinance for the Park Impact Fee
September 9, 2013, 6:30 p.m.
Village/Town of Bloomfield
Village/Town Hall
N1100 Town Hall Road, Pell Lake, WI
The Village of Bloomfield and Town of
Bloomfield Planning & Zoning Commission
and Boards will hold a Public Hearing on
proposed revisions to the Needs
Assessment Study and Ordinance for the
Park Impact Fee on September 9, 2013 at
6:30 p.m. Interested parties may inspect a
copy of the Draft Needs Assessment Study
for the Park Impact Fee and revised
Ordinance by visiting the Village/Town Hall
during business hours at N1100 Town Hall
Road, Pell Lake, WI. Written comments on
the Draft Needs Assessment Study for the
Park Impact Fee and revised Ordinance
may also be submitted to the Clerks office
prior to the public hearing.
Village of Bloomfield Town of Bloomfield
Cynthia L. Howard Cynthia L. Howard
Village Clerk Town Clerk
Aug. 15 & 22, 2013
WNAXLP
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
ORDINANCE NO. 08-05-13-03
An Ordinance Further Amending
Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01
Related to the
Planned Development Zoning
For The Abbey Springs Development.
WHEREAS, the Village Board did
previously adopt Ordinance No. 12-15-04-
01, which said Ordinance is incorporated
herein by reference as if set forth at length
herein, whereby the entirety of the therein
described Abbey Springs
Resort/Commercial Development (the
Subject Property) was converted to
Planned Development Zoning; and
WHEREAS, the Village Board did
thereafter adopt amendments to the terms
of said Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01 and the
terms and restrictions set forth therein,
which said earlier amendments are incorpo-
rated herein by reference as if set forth at
length herein; and
WHEREAS, subsequently, Abbey
Springs, Inc. (the Petitioner) did again peti-
tion (the Petition) the Village of Fontana-
on-Geneva Lake for a further amendment to
the existing ordinances controlling the
Planned Development Zoning for the
Subject Property and an amendment to the
Precise Implementation Plan (PIP) portion
of the Development Plan, which said term is
defined by Ordinance No. 12-15-04-01; and
WHEREAS, the Petition was referred
to the Plan Commission for the Village of
Fontana-on-Geneva Lake for recommenda-
tion as a proposed amendment to the
Precise Implementation Plan component of
the Development Plan as required by the
Village Code and by 62.23 Wis. Stats.; and
WHEREAS, the Plan Commission did
make a favorable recommendation to the
Village Board for the Village of Fontana-on-
Geneva Lake; and
WHEREAS, the Village Board for the
Village of Fontana-on-Geneva Lake, having
given due consideration to the recommen-
dation of the Plan Commission and the sub-
mittals made by the Petitioner, does make
the determinations set forth herein.
NOW, THEREFORE, the Village
Board of the Village of Fontana-on-Geneva
Lake, Walworth County, Wisconsin, do
ordain as follows:
VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD
SECTION IV SEVERABILITY
If any provision of this ordinance or its appli-
cation to any person or circumstance is held
invalid, the invalidity does not affect other
provisions or applications of this ordinance
that can be given effect without the invalid
provision or application, and to this end the
provisions of this ordinance are severable.
SECTION V EFFECTIVE DATE,
CONSTRUCTION
This ordinance is effective on publication or
posting.
This ordinance shall not be construed to
authorize the destruction of any public
record after a period less than prescribed by
statute or state administrative rules.
The village clerk shall properly post or pub-
lish this ordinance as required under s.
60.80, Wis. stats.
Adopted this 1ST day of JULY, 2003.
[Signatures of village board President]
[Signatures of village board Trustee]
[Signatures of village board Trustee]
[Signatures of village board Trustee]
[Signatures of village board Trustee]
Attest: [Signature of village clerk]
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. C-3
Date: April 8, 2013
An ordinance to repeal 1.02 and
recreate 1.02 of the Municipal Code of the
Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County,
Wisconsin. The Village Board of the Village
of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin,
does hereby ordain as follows:
Section One: Sections 1.02 of the
Municipal Code of the Village of Bloomfield,
Walworth County, Wisconsin is hereby
repealed and recreated as follows:
1.02 ELECTED OFFICIALS. The
elected officials of the Village Board shall
consist of four (4) Trustees, and one Village
President.
(1) Trustees. The Village shall elect
two (2) Trustees in odd-numbered years
and two (2) Trustees in even-numbered
years for two (2) year terms.
(2) President. The President shall be
elected in odd-numbered years for a term of
two (2) years; except that:
(a) The initial term of two (2) years
shall be in the even-numbered year of 2012;
and
(b) The President shall be elected
in the even-numbered year of 2014 for a
term of one (1) year; and
(c) The President shall be elected
in odd-numbered years for a term of two (2)
years beginning in the odd-numbered year
of 2015 and remaining a term of two (2)
years thereafter consistent with 61.19 Wis.
Stat.
Section Two: This charter ordinance
is enacted pursuant to 66.0101 and
61.195 Wis. Stats., and in compliance with
village annual elections and appointments
requirements as governed by 61.19 Wis.
Stat.
Section Three: This ordinance shall
be in full force and effect 60 days after its
passage and publication. If within the 60-
day period a petition conforming to the
requirements of 8.40 Wis. Stat., and
signed by a number of electors of the Village
equal to not less than 7% of the votes cast
in the Village for governor at the last gener-
al election is filed in the office of the clerk of
the Village demanding that the ordinance be
submitted to a vote of the electors.
Adopted this 8th day of April, 2013.
Kenneth H. Monroe
Village President
Attest: Cynthia L. Howard
Village Clerk
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-07
Date: August 5, 2013
An ordinance to create Section
10.04(1)(q) of the Village of Bloomfield
Municipal Code, Walworth County,
Wisconsin, regarding lawn maintenance.
Section One: The Village Board of the
Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County,
Wisconsin, does hereby ordain and create
Section 10.04(1)(q) of the Village of
Bloomfield Municipal Code to read as fol-
lows:
(q) LAWN MAINTENANCE. All
lawns on improved properties consisting of
grass and/or weeds shall be kept cut to a
height not to exceed twelve (12) inches.
(i) Public policy. Overgrown lawns
are an intermittent and recurring problem
which shelter pests and vermin, aggravate
health problems for people who have cer-
tain allergies or health conditions, detract
from property values, and make neighbor-
hoods less attractive to residents and
prospective residents.
(ii) Municipal enforcement. Due to the
unique characteristics of this type of public
nuisance, in addition to any other enforce-
ment methods herein or otherwise allowed
by law, the Village may also enter property
and abate lawns that violate this ordinance
by mowing them, without first seeking a
court order, subject to the notice provision
herein. Work preformed shall be by Village
personal or contracted services at the dis-
cretion of the Village.
(iii) Notice. The Village shall first
notify the property owner and/or any person
or legal entity causing the condition, by
posting a notice at or near the property
entrance, giving them ten (10) days to cor-
rect the condition, and stating that the
Village will do so thereafter if they do not.
(iv) Collection of abatement costs.
Cost of the abated will be $100.00 for
administrative costs per abatement plus
actual cost of abatement. Unless the prop-
erty owner and/or person or entity causing
the condition pays the cost of abatement
within twenty (20) days of notice of said
cost, the Village may collect the cost of
abatement as allowed by law, including as a
special charge under Sec. 66.0627, Stats.,
or under Ch. 10.06, herein.
Section Two: Pursuant to Sec.
66.0103 and 60.80(1) and (3), Wis. Stats.,
this Ordinance shall be effective the day
after its publication subsequent to its adop-
tion.
Adopted this 5th day of August, 2013.
Ken Monroe, Village President
Attest: Cynthia Howard, Village Clerk
August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
Public Hearing on the
Village of Bloomfield
& Town of Bloomfield
Proposed Telecommunications
Ordinance
September 9, 2013, 6:30 p.m.
Continued from page 6
HELP WANTED
Lake Geneva Schools is an equal opportunity employer.
Aide Position:
Part time position. School location and hours to be
determined. Duties will include working with stu-
dents, staff and other assigned duties. Position is
school day only.
Cleaning Positions:
Part-time openings. School location to be determined.
School days only.
Deadline for application is Thursday, August 22,
2013. The Support Staff application is available at
the District Office 208 South Street, Lake Geneva
or on our website www.lakegenevaschools.com.
Please send your letter of interest and application
to:
Dr. James Gottinger, Superintendent
Lake Geneva Schools
208 South Street
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
The #1 Real Estate organization in Wisconsin is searching for the right
candidates to partner with the most rewarding and exciting business oppor-
tunity today.
SHOREWEST REALTORS is now interviewing for our next training
class. Contact John Tisdall at jtisdall@shorewest.com or call
(262) 248-1020 today to learn more or to attend one of our career seminars.
HELP WANTED
NEWSPAPER JOB OPENING
THE LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
IS LOOKING FOR A SPORTS EDITOR
The Lake Geneva Regional News is seeking an energetic sports editor who loves
the game and deadline journalism. Coverage includes all area sports. Youll be a one-
person sports department, so you get to run your own ship.
Writing, editing, photography, page design.
Well provide a great learning experience in an atmosphere where everyone
works together and wants to be the best they can be.
Full-time. Fringe-benefits. Immediate opening.
Please send resume, cover letter and clips. Were looking for someone who is
already published, so clips are required.
Send to John Halverson, Editor
Lake Geneva Regional News, PO Box 937, Lake Geneva WI 53147
or email to jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
Engerman Contracting is growing!
Trim Carpenter
Laborer
Receptionist
Must have construction experience,
capable of supervising others, work well
indep. Valid DL. Great people skills.
Benefits offered; full-time.
Call or email resume
262/248-9210
Office@EngermanContracting.com
Lake Geneva, WI
8B The Regional News August 15, 2013
Help Wanted 20
Residential
Rentals
84
Help Wanted 20
Residential
Rentals
84
1011221
Celebrating our 50th anniversary, Kenall has been a proud
advocate for manufacturing in the U.S.A. and has become a
champion in developing advanced lighting solutions for
healthcare, high-abuse, transportation, food processing,
sealed enclosure and security detention environments.
ASSEMBLER (electrical) - 2nd shift
Working in our safe and progressive manufacturing
environment, this position is responsible for the assembly of
Kenalls lighting products. You will also perform testing, check
work quality and identify and troubleshoot assembly
performance problems.
Requirements include:
Assembly experience (electrical wiring a plus)
Mechanical aptitude; ability to use most hand tools
Ability to read and understand blueprints, engineering
drawings, work orders and written instruction
Good (English) communication skills
WAREHOUSE GROUP LEADER-Temp to Perm, 2nd shift
The Warehouse Group Leader will ensure the most effective
utilization of available personnel while maintaining maximum
efficiency and highest quality to achieve departmental
objectives and goals and support management in identifying
training requirements for department employees.
Prior supervisory or lead experience in manufacturing setting
Ability to give direction, manage follow up and supervise
employees work
Extensive ERP, (EPICOR) knowledge as it relates to order
picking and stocking requirements
Forklift certification, required
Good (English) communication skills
SET-UP / OPERATORS (2nd shift)
Press Brake: Amada HFB-FBD equipment.
Must possess 2+ years experience on similar equipment,
basic math and blueprint reading skills.
Committed to advancing the state of lighting, Kenall is an
established, stable organization with a proven track record of
excellence and great corporate culture. If you share our drive,
professionalism and enthusiastic spirit and would like to be a
part of a growing organization, we would like to hear from you.
Please forward your resume to:
ATTN: Human Resources
1020 Lakeside Drive
Gurnee, IL 60031
Fax: 847 360-9480
Apply online at: www.kenall.com
Apply in person: Monday-Thursday 8:00 am - 4:00 pm;
Friday 8:00 am - 1:00 pm
1
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0
9
2
8
8
Wood Creek
Kenoshas best in apartment living!
1 Beds from $560
2 Beds from $670
552-8365
G& S PROPERTIES Office 694-3077
Call Today to Schedule an Appointme nt!
7919 60th Ave. #103
1009283
24 Hr. Maintenance, easy access to the interstate, plus great local shopping
RENTALS STARTING AT
$
640per month
2 Bedroom/2 bath
all appliances, full size washer/
dryer, private patio, balcony,
private entry, attached garage
2 Bedroom/1 bath
all appliances, on site laundry,
private patio, balcony,
secured entry, garages available
Quiet
Residential Living
Residential
For Sale
98
LAKE GENEVA Need house for your lot, like
new, modular home for sale. 1250 sq. ft. 2
BR, 2 BA, appliances, furnace, water heater,
You move it plus $50,000. 630-212-1472
Motorcycles 114
HONDA REBEL 250CC 2009 - Good condition,
5,024 mi., $2,000. Ph. 262-694-3137
Parts & Services 116
BRAKE ROTORS/PADS, Bendix new.
Best Deals in Town.
Call 920-723-6557
Trucks & Heavy
Equipment
118
1998 Dutch Mobile Home for sale by owner 2
bedrooms/2 bath/garage/deck in Pioneer
Estates. N2020 HWY H Lake Geneva, WI.
#570 Call 262-248-3750 or 847-471-4768
Automobiles 120
04 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS 62k, new
tires, battery, leather. Remote start. Grandma
kept. $5,500. 262-215-6634
CADILLAC SEVILLE 2000 $2650 Full power,
sun roof, 20+ mpg, serviced by Cadillac, very
very clean 262-220-0287
CHEVROLET IMPALA 2002 $2600 OBO - Titled
in Wisconsin Kenosha Co. Ph. 847-525-
7204.
FORD 1998 MUSTANG $3500. 106K miles;
Mint! Automatic; Brand new brakes & tires.
OBD analyzed. $3500 obo. Ph. 262-455-5471
HONDA CIVIC HYBRID 2010 $15,900. 46K
miles, Call between 4 pm & 8 pm 616-309-
8953
MITSUBISHI 2001 ECLIPSE SPYDER GT CON-
VERTIBLE $4,500 138k miles, Silver with
black leather interior. Ph. 847-980-0062.
SUZUKI AEIRO 2003 - Lift back, 4 door, 4 cylin-
der, 5 speed, ver y clean, runs per fect,
$3500. 262-945-0248.
Residential
Rentals
84
1004 HARBOR MOTEL
Efficiency Apt. Clean with Cable TV, internet,
phone, refrigerator & microwave,
Kitchenette, sleeping room. Daily/weekly
rates.
847-872-5400
42ND AVE., 4919 3 BR Townhome,
Newly remodeled, appliances includ-
ed, Full basement. $940. No hous-
ing/pets. Ph. 262-515-5944.
44TH PL., 1920 LOWER 3BR APT., 2 car
garage, laundry, basement storage, appli-
ances. $925/mo. + utilities. 262-945-9240
60TH ST., 1615
FREE MICROWAVE
FREE HEAT & HOT WATER!
COMPLETELY REMODELED.
1 BR, $639 - Efficency $449
2 BR, $689. Elevator, underground
parking, locked lobby, close to shopping
& bus line. No smoking building.
No pets. Ask for Everett,262-617-1104
LAKE COMO SMALL 1 BD HOME completely
rehabed. New appliances, hardwood floors.
large deck. 773-777-8070 leave message.
LAKE GENEVA 1 BD APT. 2 blks from Lake on
Maxwell St. Off street parking. $625 mo.
608-215-0668
LAKE GENEVAKitchenettes and sleeping
rooms. Affordable. 262-248-4988.
PELL LAKE LARGE RANCH HOUSE 3BD 1.5
BA, living room & large kitchen, laundry area,
Very large same level family room w/huge
fireplace. Enclosed breezeway, 2 car garage,
extra large wooded yard. Appliances includ-
ed. $975 mo + sec. dep. Call 262-279-6830
eve. & weekends or call cell 262-903-1946.
If no answer leave message. Avail. Sept.
SHARON, WI Modern 1 and 2 BD apts.
Country living in Historic Sharon. 20 minutes
from Lake Geneva, 15 from Delavan. 10 from
Walworth. Located on Hwy 67. 262-736-
2300
ZION EAST SIDE VALUES1BR units on 2nd
floor, staring at $575 per month plus gas,
electric, & security deposit. No pets. Ph. 847-
903-7563
ZION TOWNHOUSE Nicely updated 3BR,
end unit, 1.5BA, full heated basement w/
washer/dryer hookups. Living room has nice
view of huge front yard, private driveway,
Tenant pays all utilities. Close to shopping
restaurants, transportation.224-419-5552
Business/
Commercial Rentals
88
LAKE GENEVA Commercial condo #208 located
at 700 Veterans Parkway. 1480 sq. ft. Terms
negotiable. Contact 608-289-3583
Rummage,
Estate, Moving
49
27TH AVE., 7730 - Sat. 8-12 New and gently
used kids toys, Build a Bears & Build a Bears
clothes, small kitchen appliance, ladies &
kids clothes, baby items. Lots to see, come
and check it out.
#1891
BEACH PARKEstate Sale, Fri. & Sat., Aug. 16
& 17, 10am-4pm; Sun., Aug. 18, a.m., 10415
Country Lane. 70s bedroom set, pool table,
costume jewelry, Hummels, garage full &
household miscellaneous.
GARAGE SALE: - N3174 Tamarack Road Lake
Geneva, Friday August 16 8:00-3:00. Girls 0-
4T, Boys 0-18 mo., highchair, jumpers, etc.
Wood furniture, etc
WAUKEGANSt. Pauls Lutheran Church annu-
al rummage sale, Fri., Aug. 16, 9am-5pm &
Sat., Aug. 17, 9am-3pm, 824 N. Lewis Ave.,
Waukegan (1 block north of Grand). Large
selection of items & great deals!
Miscellaneous 50
FURNITURE Office desk (4-drawer), wood
grain, fairly new. Excellent condition. $200.
Enter tainment center, 4 tall x 4 long.
Excellent condition. $150. 262-497-8260.
MATTRESSES Full $65. Queen $75. King
$95. Like new, extra thick. 6224 22nd Ave.
Drop-off avail. 262-496-6750.
POWER KEG OUTFITTERS
GUN BUYING EVENT
Saturday & Sunday
August 17th & 18th 9am-3pm.
We are buying Rifles, Shotguns & hand guns in
working condition or NOT. We also buy Firearm
parts, Ammo, Reloading & related items.
Power Keg also buys Swords, Knives,
Bayonets & Razors. This even will take place
inside the Antique Castle Mall, 1701 S.E.
Frontage Rd., Sturtevant, WI (I-94 & Hwy
20) For info call 262-497-6688 ask for Joe
WANTED TO BUY BUYING Gold & Silver -
coins - paper money - pocket & wrist watches
- knifes - swords & military items & more!
262-497-6688 Joe
Recreation,
Exercise & Sports
52
1963 17 Chris Craft Custom Ski Boat.
Completely restored. 350 Chevy motor. Low
hours since restoration. 1993 Karavan single
axel trailer with surge brakes included.
$9500.00 OBO 815-509-6278
BOAT-Tyee Grand Sport 18 powered by 150
hp outboard EFI 99 trolling motor. Fully
equipped, water ready! $14,750. 694-3608
BRASS Once fired. Cleaned & inspected.
Federal .223, Federal .40 SW. Call 262-496-
1329.
CUSTOM BOAT COVERS/seat upholstering,
motor & drive repair/replacements. Stereo
installations, buffing, waxing, indoor boat stor-
age w/free winterizing & wash. Since 1963
AmericanMarineDelavan.Com
262-728-3453
Auctions, Antiques,
Collectibles
55
STAMP COLLECTION Large life long
accumulation/collection of U.S. Foreign
Mint and Used Albums, Booklets, etc.
Serious Inquires Only Please.
262-496-1822
Pets, Supplies
& Services
62
PET CREMATION SERVICES
Pets are family too! Cremation
services for your pets. Kenosha
Funeral Services & Crematory.
Ph. 262-652-1943 - 8226 Sheridan Rd.
Residential
Rentals
84
1 & 2 BRs STARTING AT $675
www.professionalrealty.biz
262-942-8399 Pet Friendly
7TH AVE., 6343 - Cozy 1BR UPPER w/ patio,
appliances. Great location! Cats allowed, no
smoking. $600/mo+escrow. 262-496-6086
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
2524 - 18TH STREET
$670 - $750 HEAT INCLUDED!
262-551-7255
CALL FOR SUMMER SPECIAL
Tree-Lined Community Near Bike Trail
1000 sq. ft., Balconies, Garages
SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT
1805 BIRCH RD Kenosha, WI 53140
www.petrettiapartments.com
1 BEDROOM from $560
2 BEDROOM from $670
GAS FOR HEATING, COOKING
AND HOT WATER INCLUDED
262-552-8365
WOOD CREEK APARTMENTS
Mon.-Fri. 9-6; Sat. 10-4. Sunday by Appt.
http://www.edwardrose.com/woodcreek
Help Wanted 20
CAREGIVERSNorthPointe Resources is hir-
ing caring adults age 21 or older to work with
adults with developmental disabilities in a res-
idential group home setting in Lake County.
Candidates must have a high school diplo-
ma/GED and a valid drivers license. Must
also pass background check & drug screen.
To apply, please go to our website www.north-
pointeresources.org or pick up application at
3441N. Sheridan Road Zion, IL 60099.
DELIVERY
ROUTES
KENOSHA NEWS
is looking for route delivery
INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS
North Side or South Side
Extra income comes easy with an early
morning delivery route.
Our delivery crews are out early in the
morning so they have the rest of the
day open for other activities.
Are you looking for an early morning job
in your neighborhood? A Kenosha
News delivery route could be perfect
for you.
Stop in to pick up
a form at the
FRONT LOBBY
5800 7th Avenue
Kenosha, WI
53140-0190
Job Site ID#1011169
DRIVERS (SCHOOL BUS)
Olson Transportation is hiring drivers for
routes in Deerfield, Lake Bluff and Lake
Forest. $13.85 to start. Prior driving
experience may qualify for higher pay. Must
be 21 years of age or older. All candidates
must pass a drug test and background
check. Must pass a pre-employment
physical. Health benefits available.
Paid training. Apply in person:
1134 N. Route 41, Gurnee, IL 60031
Ph. 847-336-0720.
Job Site ID#1006412
DRIVERS Needed for upcoming school year
to transport special needs children. Sign on
bonus. Call (847) 244-8700 M-F 9am-2pm.
Drivers: CDL-A Local Drivers Wanted. $15.50
an hour Monday-Friday, Excellent Benefits.
6mos verifiable T/T exp. Req. Call Danielle!
855-273-0212 www.DriveCeladon.com
MANUFACTURING / PRODUCTION
R&B Grinding Co., Inc., a well established and
growing machine shop is seeking to add to our
team!
Screw Machine Setup and Operators
Brown & Sharpe, ACME, Greenlee, and
Conomatic Automatic Screw Machines.
CNC Turning Machine Setup and
Operators
Mazak, Haas, Hyundai Wia Machines.
Machine Repair
Hydraulic, Mechanical, CNC Electronics
Openings are available on three shifts. Prefer
skilled, but we are willing to train. All posi-
tions offer competitive wages/benefits pack-
age. Apply in person or send to: R&B Grinding
Co. Inc., 1900 Clark St., Racine, WI 53403,
262-634-5538 blange@rbgrinding.com, fax
262-635-7540
Job Site ID#1011744
ROUGH FRAMING LABORER Experienced
rough framer with 6 months or
more experience preferred.
Call 262-657-0218 after 8am.
Job Site ID#1010966
TRUCK DRIVERS - NOW HIRING! Truck Driving
School Instructors. JOIN CRSTs brand new
training school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa!
Relocation assistance provided. Call 866-
497-2187; email: mknoot@crst.com
Job Site ID#1011719
WAREHOUSE JOBS
400 openings. Hiring now on all
shifts. Racine area. Stable job history
and must pass drug test. $9-15/hour.
CDL Drivers
Clerical/Customer Service
Dock Workers
Forklift
Order Selectors
Shipping Clerks
Packagers
Service First Staffing
4901 Washington Ave
Racine
hr@service1ststaffing.com
Job Site ID#1011895
Service
Directory
26
FLOORING INSTALLATION Baumbach Flooring
installs your carpet, vinyl and tile. 262-245-
6168
ROOFING J&R Roofing. All types of roofing
and exterior work done. Low prices and Senior
discounts. Free estimates. Ph. 262-455-
5937.
In Loving
Memory
8
KOLE
IN LOVING MEMORY
OF
GERT KOLE
Aug. 12, 1995
Laura Kole Straley
Aug. 05, 2011
Love and miss both
of you.
Love, Ron & Kim,
Ruby & Family XO
Help Wanted 20
BRISTOL SCHOOL
DISTRICT NO. 1
PART-TIME CUSTODIANS
Bristol School has an opening for evening
part-time custodians as well as substitutes.
RtI MATH AIDE
Bristol School has an opening for a
part-time RtI Math Aide.
KITCHEN SERVER
Bristol School has an opening for a
part time kitchen server.
LIBRARY AIDE
Bristol School has an opening for a
part time library aide.
If interested, please stop by
Bristol School District located at
20121 83 Street, Bristol, WI
for an application.
Applications may also be found on our
Bristol School website @ Bristol.k12.wi.us
or email your resume/application to
Ryczek.gal@bristol.k12.wi.us
Job Site ID#1011036
Classified
SPECIALS
2
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August 15, 2013 The Regional News 9B
REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, August 15th, 2013
through Wednesday, August 21st, 2013
TV
L i s t i n g s
10B The Regional News August 15, 2013
EVENTS
& TRAVEL
CHANNEL
DINING
CHANNEL
Maple Fest Lake Geneva
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for more
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Wine Lounge
SHOPPING
CHANNEL
Aldens Kennels Best Bargains Inc Paper Dolls Paper Dolls J. Roberts
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Black Point Estate Geneva Lake
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Electric
Railroad
Big Foot Beach
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Bloomfield
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LODGING
CHANNEL
Mill Creek Hotel Grand Geneva Resort
GOLF &
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CHANNEL
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PLAY-PER-
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CHANNEL
Also playing:
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UNDERGROUND LAKE GENEVA
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Current Episodes:
Winterfest 2013
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Currently playing on
Sports
C
Serving Badger, Big Foot & Williams Bay High Schools
Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, August 15, 2013
Bowling bash
Walworth Lanes was
rocking last week.
2C
Team wins YMCA
league title for
A family thing for softball
champs Stahulak Concrete
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY Steve Stahulak took over the Stahu-
lak Concrete mens slow-pitch softball league seven years
ago when it joined the YMCA Lake Geneva Friday Night
league.
The 48-year-old Genoa City native brought a bunch of
talented players from Skips Lakeside, winners of national
and state tournaments for the past three decades.
While the guys arent traveling out of state anymore,
theyre still dominating the local league.
The ball club, which features Steve, son Travis, 18,
nephew Jeff, 26 and a host of veterans (Steve says the aver-
age age is 40), won its second league title in three years
Aug. 9 thanks to streaky hitting and solid defense.
Stahulak Concrete, which was originally run by Jack
Stahulak, Steves brother, won its rst playoff game at 7:30
p.m., 14-4, after trailing, 3-0. Then, the Genoa City boys
reeled off 14 rst-inning runs in a 15-1 rout in the champi-
onship seminal.
However, in the title game, Stahulak Concrete faced a
serious challenge from Vaughn Hammers. Concrete clung
to a 2-1 advantage into the sixth inning, but a ve-run sixth
proved to be the difference in a 7-1 triumph.
Dave Tobin, Steve Stahulak, Chris Cavallo, Zack Barn-
hardt and Jeff Stahulak smacked ve straight hits in the
decisive sixth inning. For Steve Stahulak, who is looking
for a successor at shortstop to carry on the winning tradi-
tion, you must have a deep team with guys who can get on
base and advance runners.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
A LOCAL SOFTBALL player slides under the tag of Stahulak Concretes pitcher Friday night to give his team a 3-0 lead in the YMCA
Friday Night mens softball league. Stahulak stormed back to win and captured the tournament title later that night.
No worries,
cable company
will play ball
Ive heard this story a hundred times.
Conicting egos with their priorities on the pocket
book instead of the customer huff and puff and cant reach
an agreement on a contract.
Im a rm believer of the adage the customer is always
right, and this case is no exception.
Currently, Time Warner
Cable, the largest cable tele-
vision provider in the state,
is at odds with WTMJ 4, and
people are irate.
No, not because they
cant watch the Olympics or
Sunday Night football. Or not
even because theyre missing
Saturday Night Live (even
though that would infuriate
me). Its because the thou-
sands upon thousands in the
Green Bay Packers Nation
are missing beloved pre-
season games. The Packers lost, 17-0, Friday night, and
the game was televised on Green Bays exclusive preseason
network, WTMJ.
However, numerous area resident who subscribe to
Time Warner Cable are without any access to their beloved
Packers. TMJ 4 is raising its rate some 200 percent, and
Time Warner isnt happy.
They threw it on the Spanish station, said Lake
Geneva resident Catrina Casper recently on an impromptu
Facebook poll. But I dont understand any of that, so I
have to mute it. Im looking into Direct TV, which I dont
like. But its football season, so its well worth it. Plus Im
missing some of my other shows. Not happy!!!
The emphatic statement has been echoed by many
others Ive talked to around town.
However, Im here to tell you there are many reasons
this will be resolved and why you shouldnt freak out.
Yount, others swing for a good cause at Grand Geneva
Golng with Brewers legends
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
TOWN OF LYONS Major League Baseball Hall of
Famer and Milwaukee Brewers legend Robin Yount looked
a bit lost Monday afternoon at Grand Geneva Resort and
Spa.
Riding along with a foursome on the Highlands Course
during the 28th Swing With The Legends charity event,
only the third player ever to win MVP at two positions
scanned the thick-grassed embankment adjacent to the
White River on No. 10 with a careful eye.
Im looking for our balls, Yount said. All my guys
went in the water.
After striking out on his search, Yount hopped in his
cart, sped to the opposite bank of the river and eventually
found a couple golf balls.
Crisis averted.
Yount and 25 other former MLB players, mostly Brew-
ers, attended the all-day event, which included colorful
introductions, a friendly dinner and some fun afterward at
Evolve, the resorts club.
According to the Swing With The Legends website,
Hall of Famers and the names youve watched play the
game, come together to help children and families nation-
wide.
Proceeds from the event, which included a round of golf
with a former player and dinner, goes to kids organiza-
tions like Treytons Field of Dreams and the Major League
Baseball Players Association Legends for Youth.
Yount, who said hes been coming to Lake Geneva since
the 1970s, loves giving back to the youth. He also enjoys
seeing his former teammates like MLB Hall of Famer Rollie
Fingers, Jerry Augustine, Jim Slaton, Mike Caldwell, Don
Money and Charlie Moore.
I like the camaraderie, Yount told a Regional News
reporter moments after his round of golf. Its nice getting
back here. I love this area.
Big Foot
alumnus
playing D1
football
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA Four hours a day of training. A meticu-
lous schedule telling you when to eat, sleep, workout and
snack. Even a mandatory enrollment in summer school.
The Division 1 college football lifestyle isnt for the
faint of heart.
A camp that started with 125 football hopefuls has
dwindled down thanks to quitters and ineligibilities.
Fontana native Carter Hehr, a former Big Foot star,
was sent home from camp Aug. 2 and
told to come back Aug. 24 for the start
of the fall season. Unfortunately, he
wasnt selected as one of two players
out of 20 who were invited to an exclu-
sive team camp.
Judy Hehr, Carter Hehrs mom,
being the friendly gal she is, texted
Arizonas head recruiting coach that
Friday, thanking him for this wonder-
ful opportunity for her son.
Say the word, and Carter is on the
next ight back out there, Judy said to
the coach.
Five days later, on Aug. 7, Arizona just couldnt deny
they needed Carter, a 5-foot-10 free safety.
We need him here as soon as possible, said the coach
when the call nally came.
Absolutely shocked, Carter hopped on a ight and
was on Arizonas practice eld last Sunday, Aug. 11.
He has been practicing at Arizona Stadium, which
seats 51,000, all week and will wear full pads Friday.
Truly cannot believe this is happening, Carter
tweeted Aug. 11 upon his arrival.
The former Big Foot quarterback, who racked up more
than 2,000 total yards and 35 total touchdowns upon
leading the Chiefs to the Division IV state title game, will
wear No. 37 for Arizona.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
MILWAUKEE BREWERS 2-TIME MVP ROBIN YOUNT
waves to fans Monday at Grand Geneva.
Hehr
PLEASE SEE HEHR PAGE 3C
PLEASE SEE RAMCZYK PAGE 3C
MIKE RAMCYK/REGIONAL NEWS
DAVEY NELSON waves during the golf outing.
Hehr No. 37 for Arizona
PLEASE SEE BREWERS PAGE 3C
PLEASE SEE SOFTBALL PAGE 3C
2C The Regional News August 15, 2013
SPORTS
Norman Barr Camp, SeaSpar hook up for magical day of bowling, laughter
Campers thrive at Walworth Lanes
By Mike Ramczyk
sports@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH TOWNSHIP The
smiles were a mile wide.
Bowling balls crashed into pins Aug. 7
at Walworth Lanes.
It was a fun time, a relaxing getaway
for Chicago-area individuals with special
needs looking for a recreational outlet.
Im in a league, said one camper to a
Regional News reporter.
In fact, that man out-bowled the
Norman B. Barr Camp instructor who put
the whole thing together. The camp, located
in Walworth Township, gives recreational
opportunities in the summer for inner-city
youth and adults with special needs.
On this particular occasion, Barr Camp
teamed up with Southeast Association for
Special Parks and Recreation (SeaSpar) to
entertain around 30 adults with special
needs to a day of bumper bowling.
Rachel Pavesich, 27, represents SeaS-
par, which has visited the Norman B. Barr
Camp for the past 15 years. She loves seeing
people like Katie Hansen, 26, and her peers
thrive at bowling and other activities.
Its awesome to see them in their own
element, without pressures from other
people, Pavesich said.
Hansen loves bowling, dancing and
even acting. She once starred in the play
Grease. She cant see out of her left eye,
and her vision problems make it hard to
walk and see much of anything at night.
Hansen, who takes eye medication
daily and wears protective glasses when
showering and playing sports, said she
experienced erce bullying in high school
due to her limited speech.
Because of my Down syndrome, I cant
see out of my left eye, she said. Its been
like that since birth.
But Katie isnt one to sit around and
wallow in her imperfections. She knows
her limits but breaks through them with a
positive attitude. A LaGrange, Ill., native,
Katie and her twin sister Megan, a teacher
in Chicago, love to hang out. They watch
Glee, Katies favorite show, and go bowling
regularly. Katie said her vision is just ne
when shes reading her bowling scores.
When shes not watching Glee or
Friends, Katie hangs with friends and
has Friday night social clubs, watches plays
and sporting events, makes crafts and
dances and sings with a passion.
Walworth Lanes owner Jeni Diehl said
hosting these individuals warms her heart,
and she would love to have them back.
Curt Schueler, 22, is a program director
at the 104-year-old Norman Barr Camp. A
fourth-generation employee, he said its a
gem on the lake.
Its a beautiful lake, he said. Once
you nd out what the camp is about, you
really love it.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
RACHEL PAVESICH, left, loves seeing campers like Katie Hansen having fun with other adults with special needs.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
ONE CAMPER, left, tries to will a strike, while another, right, points with pride after tossing a strike.
We are the champions
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
THE BADGER HIGH SCHOOL 14U JUNIORS recently won their M.A.J.O.R. Youth Baseball League
14U Standard Division title. Front Row: Eddie Dunn, Doug Ruess, Trace LaDu and John Marak. Back
Row: Coach Kirk LaDu, Jared Keenan, Austin Gallo, Blake Dodd, Patrick Ring, Mason Dumez and
Coach John Ring.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
SENIOR TONY ASHLEY, left, turns the corner during drills last week at
Badger football practice as Andy Cychner blocks Matt Reynolds. The
Badgers see their rst action in a scrimmage Friday at Milton at 4 p.m.
Follow your
block, young man
SPORTS
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 3C
The 57-year-old, widely considered the
best Brewers player ever, recently had left
shoulder surgery, so he didnt play golf.
Yount said the surgery didnt work and he
will need the same procedure on the same
arm.
An owner in the Northwoods collegiate
summer baseball league, headquartered
at Concordia University in Mequon, Yount
said his team, the Chinooks, recently made
their rst playoff appearance. He is excited
about the direction of the league, which
helps college players work on skills during
the offseason.
Yount and 26 other former major leagu-
ers, mostly Brewers, were announced one
by one before the 11:15 a.m. shotgun start.
Gorman Thomas, a power hitter from the
1982 American League champion team,
dazzled the small crowd with a funny
strut.
Yount was announced last and received
the biggest ovation. He joined the rest of the
guys in a line that included Fox Sports Wis-
consin telecaster Davey Nelson for a photo
shoot with various media.
Average Joes got a chance to golf with
a player, and spectators even brought out
lawn chairs, waited at No. 10, and received
autographs from just about every player on
baseball bats, pictures and cards.
Greg Vaughn, who is eighth on the Brew-
ers all-time home run list with 355 and
hit 50 in 1998 with the San Diego Padres,
cheered on his fellow golfer on the par-3 No.
15. Vaughn was within 10 feet of the cup on
his tee shot and then smiled and congratu-
lated his new buddies on their putts.
After the hole, Vaughns friendly atti-
tude shined through.
How you doing, man?, he said to the
Regional News reporter. You having fun?
The reporter professed his love for
Vaughn, mentioning Vaughn was his favor-
ite player growing up.
I shouldve had you with me the whole
time, Vaughn said.
When asked about his trade in 1998 that
sent Vaughn to San Diego, he seemed disap-
pointed he couldnt stay with the Brewers.
Thats the business of it, he said.
There was nothing I could do.
Vaughn nished his round of 18 holes
with a par on the par-4 16th hole.
No strangers to the spotlight, the former
baseball greats had no problem waving
to the cameras, posing for pictures with
strangers and signing whatever was thrown
in front of them.
First, the Big Ten Network had
a similar issue with Time Warner
Cable a few years back just before
football season. In the 11th hour,
after an exhausting number of
complaints from angry customers,
Big Ten Network gured it out and
everyone was happy.
I have every reason to believe the
same will happen here, at the latest
by the very end of August.
Let me give you some perspec-
tive on just how much the state loves
the Packers. I started my journalism
career in the Milwaukee Journal
Sentinel sports department in 2006.
We would often get complaints of
how we covered the Packers much
more than the Brewers, even though
the Brewers are in Milwaukee.
As early as a couple weeks ago,
the Brewers game story was on page
7 of the section, and the front page
was led with two Packers train-
ing camp stories. Yes, only training
camp. Thats how much people care
about the Green and Gold.
If Time Warner Cable and TMJ 4
dont reach an agreement by the end
of the preseason, it wont be the end
of the world. Preseason arent enter-
taining, have no purpose and the
score doesnt count. By the time the
regular season rolls around Sept. 6,
Packer games will be televised on
Fox, ESPN and TMJ 4. Actually,
three games, Oct. 27 at Minnesota,
Nov. 17 at the New York Giants and
Dec. 8 versus Atlanta, are slated for
TMJ 4. Worst-case scenario is the
two networks wait until October to
resolve this thing.
Yes, it would suck to miss all
those Sunday Night games, but at
least you wouldnt miss a Packer
game that counts because just about
every game is on Fox.
The Packers are a state institu-
tion. These corporate big whigs need
to step up and realize that, sooner
rather than later.
Or there will be an entire legion
of fans, armed with the power of
Twitter and Facebook, blasting Time
Warner Cable and WTMJ and seri-
ously affecting their bottom lines.
That will force any company to give
in.
Expect to be watching the
beloved Green and Gold by Saturday
at the earliest and by Aug. 23, the
date of the teams nal home pre-
season game, at the latest.
Football, the most powerful force
in sports entertainment, and its fan
base, will always win.
The customer is always right.
Hitting a softball is totally different than
hitting a baseball, he said. We have a lot of
experience and we know how to move guys
over. Were all team players. We got some
breaks this year.
Travis Stahulak recently signed to play
baseball at Viterbo University next spring.
The 2013 Badger graduate overcame a broken
leg in only a month and recently shined on
the pitching mound for the Genoa City Senior
Legion.
Jeff is a former player at Badger, and Steve
played at Badger and then Carroll College for
a season.
Brant, 12, is the next generation. Steve
hopes the youngster will one day star for
Badger at shortstop just like his father. Though
he claims his knees are starting to go, Steve is
still a premiere shortstop and a tough out at
the plate.
I hope Travis keeps playing hardball,
Steve said. And I hope I can play at least one
year with Travis, Jeff, Brant and myself.
In a phone conversation, Steve worried
about his future with the team. But whenever
he gets discouraged, he thinks of teammate
Tom Jooss. The 63-year-old, who coaches
girls basketball at Badger with his son, David,
is still kicking in the softball world. He was an
integral member of last weekends champion-
ship team.
My inspiration is Tom, Steve said. If he
can do it, I can do it.
Quite the honor roll
Some of the best players in Milwaukee
Brewers history showed up Monday
at Grand Geneva for the 28th annual
Swing With The Legends charity golf
outing. Heres a list of all the players
who were there, including some non-
Brewers. Do you remember them?
Rollie Fingers, Mike Caldwell, Greg
Vaughn, Robin Yount, Jaime Easterly,
Don Money, Ken Sanders, Jerry
Augustine, Davey Nelson, Kevin
Mench, Buzz Capra, Don August, Bill
Campbell, Bill Sharp, Paul Popovich,
Gorman Thomas, Pete Ladd, Tom
Tellman, Paul Wagner, Dick Stigman,
Willie Mueller, Brad Woodall, Rich
Nye, Roy Sievers, Steve Rogers, Gene
Hiser, Charlie Moore, Jim Slaton
Brewers/Hall of Famers Yount, Fingers, TVs Nelson and Augustine appear
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Already a participant in a summer class at Arizona as well as a
rigorous training regimen that included training four hours a day
with five fitness trainers for four weeks, Hehr feels blessed.
I dont care, Im so grateful to be here, he said.
With 50,000 students at the school, Hehr is one-fifth of one
percent of the population that has unlimited access to a facility
that boasts a 5,000-foot video screen, the fourth-largest in col-
lege football, and an amazing $72 million expansion that was con-
structed in 2009.
The addition has seats and luxury boxes atop a four-story com-
plex housing locker rooms, football offices, a weight training area,
a cafeteria for student-athletes, the new Sands Club and new con-
cessions and bathrooms.
Judy almost cant believe this surreal experience. She said
Carter said he doesnt care if the team makes the Rose Bowl or the
Toilet Bowl, he just knows for sure he will travel with the team.
Arizona, which finished the 2012 campaign 8-5 and won the
New Mexico Bowl, 49-48, over Nevada, may not need Carter this
year or even next year.
But perhaps Carter, who is quite possibly the most successful
quarterback in area football history, will be picking off passes and
crunching ball carriers in the secondary someday.
One thing cant be denied Carters in it for the long haul.
Check next weeks Regional News for more on the Big Foot foot-
ball team, and stay tuned to see if Hehr is playing on the field on
Saturdays this fall.
As always, like Regional News Sports Check for more exclusive
photos of Hehr and other area football players.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
GOLFERS were treated to massages before their rounds Monday at Grand Geneva.
MIKE RAMCZYK/REGIONAL NEWS
MLB HALL OF FAMER ROLLIE FINGERS
cringes at his tee shot on No. 15 Monday.
Ramczyk
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
FILE PHOTO
HEHR (intercepting pass) set the Big Foot interception record.
Hehr/Dynamic high school QB will play safety in college
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Softball/Steve hoping to play with Brant, Jeff, Travis soon
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
MIKE RAMCZYK/
REGIONAL NEWS
STEVE
STAHULAK,
from left,
Travis and
Jeff share
a lighter
moment
Friday night.
After all, win-
ning is fun.
4C The Regional News August 15, 2013
WALWORTH COUNTY COURT
Illinois man faces
sexual assault charge
An 18-year-old man is accused of sexu-
ally assaulting a Walworth woman in her
home.
Armando Mezo-
Reyes of Woodstock Ill.,
faces felony charges of
second-degree sexual
assault and misdemeanor
battery.
If convicted of the
felony, Mezo-Reyes faces
up to 40 years imprison-
ment and $100,000 in
nes.
Mezo-Reyes report-
edly knew the victim
before the assault. He is in the Walworth
County jail in lieu of a $10,000 cash bond.
According to the criminal complaint:
On Aug. 5 police responded to the home
of a woman, and the woman said Mezo-Reyes
entered and remained in her home without
permission.
The woman, who is identied in court
reports as Victim 1, said Mezo-Reyes threat-
ened to hurt her if she called police. Mezo-
Reyes slapped, pushed and shoved Victim 1.
He also allegedly told her he would kill her if
she didnt stop crying.
Victim 1 told police that Mezo-Reyes held
her on the oor with both hands and her neck
and sexually assaulted her.
Mezo-Reyes was at the residence when
police responded. When police questioned
him, he admitted that he refused to leave the
home, and that he sexually assaulted Victim
1.
Alleged drunken driver faces
felony bail jumping charge
A man accused of his eighth drunken-
driving offense faces a felony bail jumping
charge for allegedly missing a court hearing.
If convicted of the
bail jumping charge,
Paul B. Bernier, 54,
Franklin, faces up to six
years imprisonment and
$10,000 in nes.
The eighth-drunken
driving charge carries
a minimum penalty of
three years in prison and
a maximum of 10 years.
According to the
criminal complaint on
the drunken driving charge:
On Feb. 2, at about 2:41 p.m., police
stopped Berniers vehicle for driving errati-
cally. The ofcer could smell alcohol on Ber-
nier, and Berniers speech was slurred.
Bernier has previous drunken driving
convictions for arrests that occurred on Aug.
3, 2003; March 24, 2004; Nov. 4, 2004; Dec.
11, 2005; Dec. 23, 2005; Oct. 18, 2006 and
Feb. 7, 2010.
According to the bail jumping charge:
Bernier was set to appear in court April
2, but he didnt.
Man gets prison for OWI crash
A 25-year-old Lake Geneva man who
drove drunk and injured a passenger in his
car was sentenced Aug. 8 to 1 1/2 years in
prison.
David James Crockett II, 304 East St.,
pleaded guilty to a felony charge of injury by
intoxicated use of a vehicle.
Crockett was also sentenced to ve years
of extended supervision.
According to the criminal complaint:
On Oct. 11 at about 12:06 a.m. police
responded to a crash near the intersections
of County Highway F and State Highway 50.
A vehicle was found in a nearby eld. At
the time of the crash, Crockett was allegedly
driving and a woman was also in the car.
The ofcer smelled alcohol on Crockett
and asked him how much he had to drink.
Crockett responded, Too much.
Both Crockett and the passenger were
taken to Froedtert Hospital, Wauwatosa.
The passenger suffered multiple frac-
tured vertebrae and a fractured leg.
Lake Geneva man gets probation
A Lake Geneva man pleaded guilty to two
felony bail jumping charges and four misde-
meanor counts.
Donald A. Monroe, 18, was sentenced to
two years of probation and ordered to com-
plete 30 hours of community service.
If Monroe successfully completes his
probation he his eligible to have his record
expunged.
Monroe was originally charged with
felony burglary.
According to the criminal complaint on
the felony bail jumping charge for a June 20
incident:
Police responded to an apartment com-
plex for a report of a man who was passed out
in a hallway.
When police arrived, they identied the
man as Monroe and reported that he smelled
of intoxicants. A marijuana pipe was found
in Monroes back pocket.
According to the criminal complaint on
the April 19 incident:
Police were called to a Lake Geneva apart-
ment complex for a report of a man pounding
on a window. Police arrived and identied
Monroe, who smelled of intoxicants.
Monroe was given a portable Breatha-
lyzer test, which came back with a result of
0.208. The legal limit to drive is 0.08.
A condition of Monroes bond for bur-
glary charge was not to consume alcohol.
According to the criminal complaint on
the burglary charge:
On March 8 at 7:05 a.m. police were
called to the Lakeside Country Store at N1457
Orchid Drive for a report of a burglary.
That morning an employee saw Laffy
Taffy sticks in the walkway, and when she
went into the store she noticed the money
drawer was open.
The employee reported that a window
had been damaged. She also said cashed-out
lottery tickets and $300 was missing from
the store.
On March 10, Bloomeld Police Inves-
tigator Lori Domino went to the store and
spoke to the employee again. The employee
said she suspected Monroe had burglarized
the store.
She said when Monroe was in the store,
he stared at the broken window and then
purchased several energy drinks.
The employee said Monroe typically
didnt have enough money for one energy
drink.
Police questioned Monroes brother, Mat-
thew Monroe.
Matthew Monroe, 17, admitted to police
that they took a metal grate off of a window
with tools and then broke the window.
Matthew of Pell Lake faces a felony bur-
glary charge. Matthew also told Domino that
he and Donald split the money.
Man faces OWI, endangering
safety charges
A 41-year-old man faces two felony
charges after ghting with a woman on
Highway 12.
Kenny O. Noland of Antioch, Ill., has
been charged with two counts of second-
degree recklessly endangering safety.
If convicted of those charges he faces up
to 20 years imprisonment and $50,000 in
nes. He also faces a misdemeanor charge of
disorderly conduct.
As a result of the incident, he also has
been charged with fth-offense drunken
driving.
According to the criminal complaint:
On July 8 police responded to a report
of a ght on Highway 12. When the deputy
arrived he spoke to a woman who said
Noland and a child were passengers in a car
she was driving.
Noland was sitting in the front seat and
started lunging into the drivers seat and
punching the dashboard. Noland reportedly
had been drinking and he and the driver
were arguing..
The driver pulled the car onto the shoul-
der of Highway 12 and told Noland to exit the
vehicle. After Noland got out of the vehicle,
he chased it on the shoulder of the road.
The woman exited the car to assist
the child in the back. Noland grabbed the
womans shoulders and started shaking her.
Noland entered the vehicle, put the keys in
the ignition and attempted to start the car.
When an ofcer arrived, he saw the
vehicle rolling forward on Highway 12 with
Noland in the drivers seat.
When a sheriffs deputy arrived, Noland
made an obscene gesture and swore.
Noland was transported to the hospital
for a blood draw, and swore at the deputy
during the trip to Aurora Lakeland Medical
Center. At the emergency room at Lakeland
Hospital, Noland kicked another sheriffs
deputy.
Police used a Taser to subdue him.
Man faces battery charge
In a parking lot outside of a wedding
reception, a man allegedly punched a member
of the wedding party in the back of the head
and pushed him to the ground, causing the
victims brain to bleed.
Damon K. Honea, 21, Decatur, Ill., has
been charged with felony battery, and, if con-
victed, he faces up to six years imprisonment
and $10,000 in nes.
According to the criminal complaint:
On Oct. 21, 2012, police responded to
the emergency room for a report of a patient
whose brain was bleeding. Police spoke to the
victims brother who said he and his brother
were in the parking lot at the Nippersink
Resort when they heard a man and woman
screaming at each other.
The two brothers also heard the woman
scream for help and that she had been head
butted.
The brothers approached the couple, and
the woman ed. One of the brothers recog-
nized the man as Honea, and decided to leave
because they didnt want to get involved.
The victim was punched in the back of
the head as he was leaving, and was pushed
to the ground and hit his head. When the
man was on the ground, Honea straddled
over him with his st raised.
The victims brother put his arm around
Honeas neck to stop him.
Police spoke to Honea by phone, and
Honea said he was in the parking lot during
the wedding reception when two guys got
into his business.
Honea told police the men chest bumped
him, pushed him and one man held him
down while the other kneed him. Honea
said he didnt know the men and that he was
really wasted.
Police spoke to the woman who said
Honea head butted her the night of the wed-
ding.
Medical records show that the victim was
admitted into intensive care for an intracere-
bral hemorrhage.
A CT scan showed contusions in both
frontal lobes, the basal frontal area and the
right temporal lobe.
The victim was diagnosed with Bradycar-
dia, which is known to cause cardiac arrest
in some patients.
Men allegedly beat man
at Burger King
Two men are accused of knocking a man
out and fracturing the bone near his eye
socket at the village of Walworths Burger
King.
Matthew C. Jordan, 19, Elkhorn, and
Blake F. Nolin, 19, of rural Elkhorn, have
each been charged with felony substantial
battery.
If convicted they each face up to 3 1/2
years imprisonment and $10,000 in nes.
They both also face a misdemeanor
charge of disorderly conduct, which carries a
maximum penalty of 90 days in jail.
According to the criminal complaint:
On July 20, police responded to a ght in
progress at the Burger King in the village of
Walworth. When the ofcer arrived he saw a
man bleeding from his eye.
A witness told police that Jordan, Nolin
and a 16-year-old boy attacked the victim.
The witness gave a description of the vehicle
that the men arrived in to police, and police
were able to locate the car.
Inside of the car, police found blood, two
wooden sticks and a chain with a large lock.
When police transported Nolin to jail, he
said, I think I broke my little nger on my
right hand. Oh, I shouldnt have said that.
At Mercy Walworth Hospital, police
were with Nolin when he told an emergency
room doctor that he broke his hand when he
punched someone in the face.
Mezo-Reyes
Bernier
10
th
Anniversary
REAL ESTATE
G
R
O
U
P
Saturday, August 17
GREAT MUSIC, GREAT FOOD and GREAT FUN
all on Kenoshas scenic lakefront.
Presenting...
Ticket Outlets
Tickets available at Tenutas
Deli, Andreas and Kenosha
Community Foundation.
DAVID BENOIT
1
30
PM
4
30
PM
5
30
PM
3 PM
7 PM
HarborPark All Star Blues Revue
Hosted by Funky Michael Coleman and
Steve Rainman Rainey
Featuring Omar Coleman & Toronzo
Cannon
The Chicago Blues Jam!
KUSD Jazz All-Stars
Brent Kimbrough & Company
For more information, call 262-654-2412 or visit mahonefund.org.
This is a rain or shine event.
Ticket Prices
General Admission
TX Roadhouse VIP Lounge
$30
$85
Children 10 and under are free.
Includes meal and beverage
Gates open at 1 pm.
HELP WANTED
NEWSPAPER JOB OPENING
THE LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
IS LOOKING FOR A SPORTS EDITOR
The Lake Geneva Regional News is seeking an energetic sports editor who loves
the game and deadline journalism. Coverage includes all area sports. Youll be a one-
person sports department, so you get to run your own ship.
Writing, editing, photography, page design.
Well provide a great learning experience in an atmosphere where everyone
works together and wants to be the best they can be.
Full-time. Fringe-benefits. Immediate opening.
Please send resume, cover letter and clips. Were looking for someone who is
already published, so clips are required.
Send to John Halverson, Editor
Lake Geneva Regional News, PO Box 937, Lake Geneva WI 53147
or email to jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
I was pleased and a little
embarrassed when Managing
Editor Rob Ireland showed
me a copy of the Aug. 1 Lake
Geneva Times.
Ostensibly a competitor,
the Times had done a story on
Underground Lake Geneva, a
program we run on ReelLifeTV.
net. ReelLifeTV.net is a video
spinoff of the Regional News.
So why havent we done a
story on it? I asked more to myself than Rob.
The story in the Times, written by editor
Vicky Wedig, did a great job of giving the
reader a feel for how our ReelLife videogra-
phers cover an event. In this case, they were
giving us a taste of the Carson and Barnes
Circus held on the Lake Lawn Airport grounds
a few weekends ago.
The story captured the exuberance of
Phil Bonyata, who heads our ReelLifeTV.net
efforts, Joy Kowald our ace videographer and,
most of all, Philip Sassano our gifted racon-
teur who hosts Underground Lake Geneva.
That said, theres really no way to capture
Sassano. For one thing he moves too fast. For
another, he talks as fast as he thinks a quip
always at the tip of his tongue.
Sassano, whose day job is owning a design
rm and Rened Rustic, Studio and Gallery,
is a born host who gives life to
any room he walks into.
As a measure of his energy,
a friend of mine reported one
day about a conversation he
had with Philip over coffee. As
though he needs coffee, the
friend said.
Frankly, Im not even sure
how Philip ended up as part of
our network family.
My bosses at our corporate
ofces asked me the other day, how much do
we pay him?
Nothing, I said.
And then I repeated myself several times
because corporate bosses cant seem to get
their head around the concept of someone
working for free.
If memory serves and it sometimes
doesnt the Sassano saga started when he
caught a commercial we did for ReelLifeTV.
net that ran on YouTube.
Whats this ReelLife TV? Sassano asked
me one day over the phone.
I explained it to him. We shoot commer-
cials, put them on ReelLifeTV.net and on You-
Tube.
When I transferred him to Bonyata I
knew it was a match made in heaven. Two
creative personalities with a gift for gab and
outlandish energy. They hit it
off. And when Joy was worked
into the equation, Sassano was
so happy with her personality
that he eventually hired her to
work at his store.
Before even I knew it those
three musketeers had started
Underground Lake Geneva
sort of a walking minstrel
show whereby they visit area
events and gure it out as they
go along.
The Times article men-
tioned that the shows are
unscripted. Its true. Beyond
broad concepts going in, they
make it up as they go along.
Its one reality show thats really a reality
show. Sassano is a master ad libber. We never
know what will come out of his mouth and I
dont think he does, either.
ReelLife is one of those rare ideas that has
received rave reviews. Knock on wood, Im
still waiting for a bad one. Our testimonials
ll in the white spaces in the Regional News
and Resorter.
I can brag about it because it has nothing
to do with me. Give Phil, Joy and Philip a free
hand and I can just sit back and enjoy it like
everyone else.
My favorite videos from the
ReelLifeTV.net vault are the
interviews Sassano did with
local students for his What is
Lake Geneva Missing? cam-
paign an awareness project
to start discussion about our
community.
Theyre a spinoff of the
AT&T Its Not Complicated
commercials. AT&T spent a
gazillion dollars on the com-
mercials and auditioned thou-
sands of kids.
Philip just walked in cold
with kids supplied by the
school and pulled it off every
bit as well as the high-priced
marketing people did.
And check out our entire network at Reel-
LifeTV.net.
We thank the Times for getting the scoop
on us. The whole story is available at http://
news.mywalworthcounty.com
Now Im wondering why we havent done
an Underground on ReelLifeTV.net itself or,
for that matter, the Regional News. Ill just sit
back and see if Philip, Phil and Joy read the
paper to see if they pick up on my little hint.
Halverson is editor and general manager
of the Regional News.
Dear W.C.,
Please help my family.
We are in desperate need of
assistance. My children and I
are sharing a rental with my
mother but this is a bad envi-
ronment for us to be in. My
mother did not tell me she was
unable to pay her utilities due
to her cigarettes and buying
stuff for her new boyfriend.
I found out she has been
paying for her all boyfriends
expenses. He has her brainwashed into thinking she needs to
help him, all while letting her own family down.
Now she told me she is going to move in with him, leaving
me with the rent and unpaid utilities. We have been sharing a
house for 18 months. I thought living with my mother would
be a good nancial move for me when my husband left us two
years ago. She promised to only smoke outside. Now I nd she
is gone most nights and when she is home with my children
she is smoking inside with her boyfriend.
Our deal was she would pay utilities and I would pay the
rent. Now we are about to be evicted because she let our utili-
ties be disconnected. I do not have the money to pay the over-
due utilities. Every penny I earn goes to food, rent and gas for
my car to get to work. I would love to get out of this situation
and on our own.
Can you please help us?
Dear readers,
I called the mother, and we spoke briey about her situ-
ation. She invited me over right away as they had been living
without utilities and were about to be evicted as the terms on
her lease were to keep the utilities on. I drove to the rental to
see what kind of environment the children and mother were
living in.
As soon as the mother opened the door to invite me in I
could smell the strong odor of cigarettes in the air. I mentioned
this and the mother said, My mother hasnt been here since
yesterday and I have the windows open. That is how much she
smokes in the house. Everything smells of her smoke.
After a brief walk through the house I suggested we sit out-
side to talk and that the children play outside as well. I noticed
the children both had coughs. I explained to her about the
negative health effects of secondhand smoke on children and
herself.
She told me, You dont have to tell me about that. I already
know. My daughter has asthma that was manageable. It hadnt
even bothered her until my mother started smoking in the
house after her boyfriend told her it was her right. When he is
here he smokes inside too.
I could not believe how selsh these two adults were being
to not care about the childrens health, especially when it
caused asthma attacks.
Over the years I have come across many young children
with cancer and asthma. When a cigarette is smoked inside the
carcinogens remain on the furniture, walls, ooring, window
treatments, clothing, all surfaces for days. The toxins in the
cigarette smoke attack the childrens developing respiratory
system, causing coughing, wheezing, respiratory infections,
then asthma, allergies and eventually cancer. I have come
across several young children dying from cancer.
I have seen them weak, having lost all their hair, watching
out a window at the other healthy children playing outside. I
did not want to see that happen to this family.
When she rst moved in with her mother everything was
OK, until the lazy boyfriend moved in.
She did not realize it would be putting the health of her
children and herself at risk.
After a few more questions it was clear the mother and
children needed to get out of that lease and move into a smaller
place of their own. I offered to call the landlord on her behalf.
The landlord was understandably upset by the utilities being
disconnected.
When I told him the only way the mother and children
could get by in the future was by getting out of the lease he was
even more upset. I talked with him for some time and we came
to an agreement. If he could nd a new renter right away he
would apply her security deposit to the overdue utility bill.
The mother agreed to those terms. After the conversation
with the landlord we went over her budget to determine how
much she could afford for rent on her own.
The woman told me, I have been trying to get along with
my mother my whole life. She always does what she wants
without ever considering anyone else. Somehow she manages
to always get by. This time she took me down with her.
Resorter Editor/
Special Projects Coordinator
Jessica Franzene
Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters
Thursday, August 15, 2013
Community & Commentary
D Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS
CONTACT
Newsroom
(262) 248-8096
jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net
Advertising
(262) 248-4444
ads@lakegenevanews.net
Fax (262) 248-4476
General Manager/Editor
John Halverson
BUSINESS STAFF
Office Manager
Sue Hinske
Customer Service/Office
Glenda Hill
Jacki Larisch
EDITORIAL STAFF
Managing Editor/New Media
Rob Ireland
Sports Editor
Mike Ramczyk
Reporters
Jade Bolack
Chris Schultz
Steve Targo
ADVERTISING STAFF
Advertising Representatives
Duane Hove
Mike Coolidge
Phil Bonyata
ReelLifeTV/Videographer
Joy Kowald
Graphic Arts Director/
Advertising Sales
Michael Reinsissel
Asst. Graphic Arts Director
Sarah Schauf
PLEASE SEE TIME IS NOW PAGE 2D
PRODUCTION STAFF
The Lake Geneva Regional News Serving the area for more than 140 years Published every Thursday by the Lake Geneva Printing and Publishing Co.
We were scooped on our own story
Mother chooses boyfriend over family
PHOTOTORIAL
JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS
TARNISHING THE IMAGE? Lake Geneva has such a great rep-
utation as an upscale tourist community, its a shame that some
of the downtown trash receptacles like this one near the corner
of Main and Broad streets are in such sorry shape. The wood
on the benches could also use replacement. Maybe, for next
summer the city could rustle up a few bucks for remodeling.
John Halverson, editor
I cant worry about her anymore. I have
to put my children rst in my life. I knew this
was a hard decision for her to make, but it was
one she had to make.
I asked the mother if I could talk to her
mother. She said she would try to get her to
talk with me. She called her mother outside to
talk.
After introducing myself I tried to explain
to her the importance of her smoking outside.
She just did not seem to grasp the concept
of the smoke affecting her grandchildrens
health.
I asked her if she loved her grandchildren
and she said, Of course.
When I told her how smoking around the
children was not being a loving grandmother,
she did not want to hear any of this and walked
in the house. Her boyfriend came outside with
the smell of alcohol on his breath.
He told me, We can smoke anywhere we
want! I asked where he got his cigarettes. He
looked confused by the question. I told him, I
was told you have not had a job in four years.
This time he looked at me and smiled, as
if to be proud of his record-breaking time of
being lazy.
The grandmother of the children stepped
back outside, apparently having heard our
conversation, and shouted, I buy our ciga-
rettes and beer. What of it?
I knew the only
income she had was
her disability check
so the two were using
that to fund their bad
habits. They both stormed off and left the
house. The mother of the children said she
did this often to her when she did not want
to hear what she should do. I could see the
grandmother was beyond our capabilities of
assistance and knew we needed to just help
the mother and children.
I kept in touch with the mother for the
next few days as she worked hard to nd an
affordable apartment to rent. I suggested a
few rentals I knew of that were more within
her price range. She agreed to go look.
After going to see the rental, and noticing
the lack of cigarette smoke odor in the build-
ing, she agreed to the move. The health of her
children was the most important thing to be
considered. I also kept in touch with the land-
lord, hopeful to hear if he had a new tenant for
the home the mother was renting. God must
have heard our prayers as everything seemed
to fall into place quickly.
The following day we found a two bed-
room apartment she could afford. The land-
lord informed me he had a tenant ready to
take the home the following week. He would
make good on his offer and pay off the over-
due utilities.
The grandmother returned to the house
she rented with her daughter and grandchil-
dren. She came one evening with the boy-
friend, both pufng on cigarettes even though
the mother told them repeatedly to leave their
smoking outside, and took her belongings.
She even took some belongings that were
not hers but refused to listen to her daughters
pleas to stop as the boyfriend argued with her
too. The mother called me in tears after they
left, hurt by her own mothers betrayal again.
She informed me they somehow had found
another person to live with.
We helped this mother and two children
with rst months rent and security deposit
on her new apartment. We also helped them
with some household necessities and toilet-
ries, as these were the items the grandmother
had taken with her, even though they did not
belong to her. We pro-
vided the mother with
gas gift cards to help
with her daily com-
mute to work. All this
assistance enabled the mother and children
to start out with a new budget, one that made
their new life healthy and their apartment a
home.
My last visit was to a clean smelling
apartment lled with childrens laughter, not
coughing and wheezing. They all kept repeat-
ing, Thank you. Thank you. Their gratitude
for not becoming homeless was shared with
all of you that make our mission to bring pov-
erty relief to those in need possible.
Together, we will continue to replace the
fear, pain and suffering of poverty, with com-
passion, healing, caring and sharing with our
hearts to change lives. Thank you for helping
us achieve Gods good works for those in des-
perate need.
Health and happiness,
God bless everyone,
W.C./Sal
New mailing address
Make checks payable to:
The Time Is Now to Help
P.O. Box 1
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
The Time Is Now to Help is a federally
recognized 501(c)3 charitable organization
licensed in the states of Wisconsin and Illi-
nois. You will receive a tax deductible, item-
ized thank you receipt showing how your
donation provided assistance for the poverty
stricken.
A special thank you
Fox Charities, Lake Geneva School of
Cooking, Chef John Bogan, Pentair Founda-
tion, The Summertime Foundation, Dick and
Jean Honeyager, Lake Geneva Area Realty,
Interstate Insurance Group, Keith Gibson
and Family, Jim and Ardith Drescher, Nestor
and Bien Alabarca, Dr. Gerald Theune, Bill
and Susan Bosworth, Wayne Reuter, Wil-
liam and Carol Dick, Therese Kuban, Martin
Group, John Stensland and Family, Marvin
and Audrey Hersko, Albert and Ellen Burnell,
Michael and Kathe Beach, Sylvester and Vir-
ginina Seick, Walter and Florence Strumpf,
James and Karen Goodrick, Fit For A Queen,
Chad Jones for his Petting Zoo at Genoa City
Days benetting TINTH, Michael Glass,
Robert and Shirley Lipinski, Lauren Grady,
William and Jean Isaacson, W.C. Family
Resource Center/Food Pantry volunteers, and
all the God loving volunteers of all our caring
food pantries, all of you who support The Time
Is Now to Help donation boxes, and the busi-
nesses that allow our donation boxes.
Anyone who would like a Time Is Now
donation box in your business, please call
(262) 249-7000.
Please visit
www.timeisnowtohelp.org.
2D The Regional News August 15, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
PCOMING ATTRACTIONS
U
SEPT. 14
Dress it up or dress it down on Saturday, Sept.
14, when the Forbeck Foundation presents the Blue
Jean Ball, Rat Pack Style. The 11th annual event will
take place at the beautiful Lake Geneva Country
Club and will bring together both scientic scholars
and supporters. Guests can expect to learn about
the personal impact the Forbeck Foundation has
on childhood cancer, while enjoying a fun evening
of cocktails, dinner, and dancing. Whether in denim
or dressed like Frank, the Forbeck Foundation wel-
comes you to the most comfortable ball in beautiful
Wisconsin. All funds from the Blue Jean Ball will
directly support the Scholar Retreat, this year to
be held Sept. 13 to 16, in Williams Bay. Tickets are
available online at www. wgfrf.org. For sponsorship
opportunities please e-mail Jamie@wgfrf.org or call
(773) 425-5980.
AUG. 16-20 & 24-30
Ongoing
Visit ReelLifeTV.net for exclusive video
specials on upcoming events and
year-round activities in the
Geneva Lake area.
The Lake Geneva Farmers
Market is held on Thursdays from
8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Horticultural Hall,
330 Broad St. Vendors line the side-
walk and also ll the hall, offering
fresh produce, garden plants, arts
and crafts and more.
St. Francis de Sales Parish and
School, 148 W. Main St., Lake
Geneva. First and third Wednesdays
of the month. More than $1,000 in
cash prizes including progressive
Jackpot and pull-tabs. Doors and
concessions open at 6 p.m. Bingo
starts at 7p.m. For more informa-
tion, call St. Francis Church at (262)
248-8524.
Every month, throughout the year, Yerkes
Observatory offers several evening observ-
ing sessions, if weather permits, usually
on some weeknights and some Saturday
nights. Participants aged 12 and up have
the opportunity to admire the night sky,
seen with the unaided eye and through a
large 24-inch diameter reector.
To ensure its dark enough, observing pro-
grams run from 9:30 until 11:30 p.m. Aug.
16-20 and 24-30. The charge is $25 per
person, payable the night of the event. Each
session is limited to a total of 10, adults and
children aged 12 and up. Advanced reser-
vations must be made: send email to: rdd@
yerkes.uchicago.edu or call (262) 245-5555,
ext. 880.
AUG. 28 -
SEPT. 2
Live entertainment at the Grand-
stand, a midway carnival and
champion livestock, harvests and
artwork from all over the county
will be some of the highlights of
the Walworth County Fair. Kenny
Loggins, The Oak Ridge Boys, The
Beach Boys and Jerrod Niemann
will headline at the Grandstand,
with many other local and region-
al groups performing throughout
the fairgrounds. Visit www.wal-
worthcountyfair.com for more
information.
Time ies
FROM THE FILES
Aug. 19, 1993
Mt. Zion Christian Temple collected
supplies for the homeless shelter operated
by the New Hope Mission in Davenport,
Iowa. Dave Halverson loaded the van for
the trip and people from the church and
Lake Geneva area businesses spent a work
weekend at the mission repairing damage
due to the ooding Mississippi River.
Among Lake Geneva school district
staff receiving service awards at the
opening inservice day were Dona Button,
25 years; Betsy Bystol, 20 years; Jerry
Stelse, 15 years; Barry Mess, 10 years; and
Gordon Wisniewski, 5 years.
Faith Christian School in Williams
Bay had 223 students enrolled for open-
ing day.
Badger High School sophomore
Robert Stetter attended a week-long foot-
ball camp at Trinity College, Deereld,
Ill., featuring National Football League
players.
Thor Rasmussen, Williams Bay, a
member of the National Audubon Society,
attended Audubons Great Lakes regional
conference in Rockford, Ill., learning
more about protection of biodiversity in
the area.
Aug. 21, 2003
Local businessmen and brothers
Mark and Brett Stinebrink were named
the winners of the Geneva Lake Area
Chamber of Commerce Stu Herzog Out-
standing Citizen Award.
Instructors Roger Miller, Clarence
Cammers, Rode Sharaya and Dick Netz-
inger were among those providing a hunt-
ers safety course presented by the Woods
and Water Sportsman Club, Geneva
Township.
New members of the National Honor
Society at Big Foot High School included
Hope Foster, Michael Dowden, Ashley
Travis and Jessica Derenne.
Mike Coolidge began his second year
as the athletic director at the Williams
Bay Schools.
A 3-year-old female deer shot in Fon-
tana by a police ofcer on March 6 tested
positive for chronic wasting disease. The
deer had appeared to be sick and a con-
servation warden requested the ofcer to
shoot it.
Time Is Now/I have to put my children first in my life
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
LETTERS
To the Editor:
We know them, we see them, and perhaps weve even been one of
them. Drunken drivers come from all walks of life, but they do have
something in common. Theyve made one of the most dangerous and
irresponsible decisions an operator of a potentially lethal weapon can
make.
Last year, 223 people died and nearly 3,000 were injured in alco-
hol-related crashes in Wisconsin. Many of them were innocent victims
who were killed or injured by a drunken driver.
To help combat drunken driving, the Lake Geneva Police Depart-
ment ofcers will be out in force from Aug. 16 through Sept. 2, which
includes the Labor Day weekend, for the national Drive Sober or Get
Pulled Over campaign.
Drunken driving is entirely preventable. So we urge you to use a
designated driver or nd another way home if youre impaired. The
Zero in Wisconsin trafc safety initiative also offers a free Drive Sober
mobile app that can be downloaded by visiting zeroinwisonsin.gov.
During this crackdown on drunken drivers and throughout the
year, we are serious when we say, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.
Sgt. Bridgett Way
Lake Geneva Police Department
To the Editor:
When Gov. Scott Walker took ofce he pledged to not be a one
party governor. He promised to protect our natural resources
and to support our education system. Our resources are threat-
ened by the mining bill that deems harm to the environment is
necessary and permitting high capacity wells with no regard for
ground water consequences. In exchange for corporate campaign
support, Walkers legislators abandoned their duty to serve public
interests in favor of special interests.
In support of education, Walker cut school funding (K-col-
lege) by more than $2 billion. He offered and nanced unac-
countable private schools as a substitute for public education.
Teachers were promised that Act 10 would reward the best and
brightest. What public employees received was a $1 billion loss
in buying power. Veteran teachers headed for retirement. Those
that remained saw their take-home pay cut with no hope of even
matching ination.
The ballot box has always been the means by which voters
could express dissatisfaction with those in power. Secretive
redistricting has left most Assembly and Senate districts incum-
bent-friendly and the voter little in the way of competitive choice.
Dissent is no longer viable at the ballot box nor at the Peoples
House. Holding a picture of Jesus or a sign reading Article 1,
Section 4 can lead to arrest. Simply gathering at the capital or
singing God Bless America provokes a profound police pres-
ence.
Government of and for the people cannot occur when gov-
ernment by the people is denied.
Jerry Hanson
Elkhorn
Not what we were
promised in 2010
Clamping down
Lake Geneva High School
class reunion
The fourth all-school class reunion for
classes from 1934 to 1958 at Lake Geneva
High School will be held Sunday, Sept. 15,
at 5 p.m., at the Lake Geneva Riviera.
Those planning the event have not
been able to contact the following class-
mates.
From the class of 1938, Caroline Baker
Johns, Marjorie Chapyak Chevis and Janet
Charles Lewis; 1939, Dorothy Tomiska
Jones and Herminia Kinsale Zyskowski;
1945, Shirley Stromberg Huff; 1951, Emily
Brooks and Clarence Tesch; 1952, Richard
Klenhofer, Delois Payne Payne Millard,
Beverly Fleming Roth, Donna Klabunde
Hardwick and Jim Schmidt.
Call Barb Braden at (262) 248-3394
with contact information or notice of
their death.
For any members of the classes who
may not have received information about
the event, contact Braden and it will be
sent out.
COMMUNITY NOTE
Letters to the Editor must be signed by the writer, include a phone num-
ber and address in order to be considered for publication in the Lake Geneva
Regional News. No names will be withheld.
Letters emailed to the Regional News must contain a telephone number
and address so the writer can be reached. They should be sent to jhalverson@
lakegenevannews.net.
The Regional News reserves the right to edit letters. Letters that are libel-
ous, vulgar or profane will not be published. Poetry also will not be published.
All decisions regarding this letters policy are at the discretion of the editor. The
deadline for submitting a letter for any given week is 5 p.m. Friday.
LETTERS POLICY
I buy our cigarettes and beer.
What of it?
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
August 15, 2013 The Regional News 3D
OBITUARIES DEATH NOTICES
Dorothy C. Bognar, 80, Lake Geneva, died Friday, Aug.
9, 2013, at Aurora Lakeland Medical Center, Lake Geneva. Mass
of Christian burial at 11 a.m., Monday, Aug. 12, at the Steinke
Funeral Home, Lake Geneva, with the Rev. James Scheurman,
of St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church, Lake Geneva, ofciat-
ing. Burial at Roselawn Memory Garden, Delavan Township.
For online guest registry, go to www.steinkefuneralhomeinc.
C. Pauline Polly Culp, 86, a longtime resident of Lake
Geneva, died Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, at Arbor Village in Lake
Geneva. Memorial services at a future date. Derrick Funeral
Home and Cremation Services, Lake Geneva, assisted the
family with arrangements.
Mary Louise Geupel, 69, Fontana, died Saturday, Aug.
10, 2013, at her home. Funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m., Saturday,
Aug. 17, at St. Benedict Catholic Church in Fontana, with burial
at Oak Hill Cemetery in Lake Geneva. Visitation from 9:30
a.m. until time of services Saturday at the church. Toyntons
Walworth Funeral Home assisted the family.
Agatha Lanzillotti, 93, recently passed away in hospice
care in Park Ridge, Ill. Mrs. Lanzillotti, in addition to being a
loving wife and mother, had a long, diverse professional career
that included writing, acting, and teaching.
Scott Lee Leners, 52, village of Bloomeld (Pell Lake),
died Monday morning, Aug. 5, 2013, at his home. Celebration
of Scotts life announced at a later date. The Haase-Lockwood
and Associates Funeral Home and Crematory of Genoa City
handled the arrangements.
John H. Peacock, 86, Lake Geneva, died Friday, Aug. 9,
2013, at Holton Manor Nursing Home in Elkhorn. Services at
11 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 14, at the First Evangelical Lutheran
Church, Lake Geneva, with the Rev. Peter Metzger ofciating.
Visitation one hour before services at the church. In lieu of
other expressions of sympathy, memorials may be made to the
church. Steinke Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Lake
Geneva, assisted the family with arrangements.
Betty Jean Sommer, 82, formerly of Lake Geneva,
died Saturday Aug. 10, 2013, at her home in Torrance, Calif.
Funeral arrangements are pending at Derrick Funeral Home
in Lake Geneva, www.derrickfunerallhome.com.
The Rev. Dr. Kazou A. Andy Takaya, 86, Lake
Geneva, died Saturday, July 27, 2013, at Mercy Hospital in
Janesville. Celebration of Andys life Saturday, Aug. 17, at 2:30
p.m., at the First Congregational United Church of Christ,
Lake Geneva, with the Rev. Gary Hougen ofciating. Visitation
Saturday, Aug. 17, from 1 p.m. until time of services. In lieu of
other expressions of sympathy memorials are requested to a
charity of donors choice. Derrick Funeral Home and Crema-
tion Service assisted the family with arrangements.
Bonnie J. Tiso, 65, Lake Geneva, died Sunday, Aug. 11,
2013, at her residence. Celebration of her life at a later date.
Steinke Funeral Home and Cremation Services assisted the
family with arangements.
Jacqueline Louise Jackie Valinoti, 73, died peace-
fully in loving care on Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, at Chatuge
Regional Nursing Home, Hiawassee, Ga., of complications
from kidney disease. Visitation Sunday, Aug. 11, at Cochran
Funeral Home, Hiawassee. Funeral service Monday, Aug. 12,
at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, Blairsville, Ga., and
interment followed at Laurel Hills Memory Garden, Hiawas-
see. Donations in Jackies memory may be made to Chatuge
Regional Nursing Home, Hiawassee, GA.
Irene H. Witte, 90, West Allis, formerly of Lake Geneva,
died Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, at Village of Manor Park Nurs-
ing in West Allis. Services at 1 p.m., Thursday, Aug.15, in the
chapel of the Derrick Funeral Home in Lake Geneva, with the
Rev. Earl F. Lindsay ofciating. Burial in Oak Hill Cemetery
in Lake Geneva. Visitation Thursday from 11 a.m. until time
of services at the funeral home. In lieu of other expressions of
sympathy, memorials are requested in Irenes name to Village
of Maple Park Foundation, 3023 S. 84th St., West Allis, WI,
53227.
Scott Lee Leners
Aug. 16, 1960 - Aug. 5, 2013
Scott Lee Leners, 52, village of Bloomeld (Pell Lake),
died Monday morning, Aug. 5, 2013, at his home.
He was born on Aug. 16, 1960, in Chicago, the son of the
late Matthew and Lee Vanwolvelere Leners. On March 10,
2010, in Key West, Fla., he married Tammy Tate. Scott for-
merly lived in Richmond, Ill., before moving to Pell Lake in
2003.
Scott was self-employed, owning Tuneups, Tires and
Brakes in Pell Lake. He enjoyed motorcycles, cars, shing
and hunting.
He is survived by his wife, Tammy; two sons, Jason
(Melissa Barry) Sensabaugh and Matthew Leners, both of
Elkhorn; a stepdaughter, Tiffany Neuroth, Twin Lakes; three
grandchildren, Jacob, Josie and Levi; and two sisters, Cyn-
thia Leners, Pell Lake, and Teri (Paul) Borders, Tennessee.
Celebration of Scotts life will be announced at a later
date. The Haase-Lockwood and Associates Funeral Home
and Crematory of Genoa City handled the arrangements. For
online guestbook, go to haaselockwoodfhs.com.
Jacqueline Louise
Jackie Valinoti
March 11, 1940 - Aug. 6, 2013
Jacqueline Louise Jackie
Valinoti (ne Brandley), 73,
died peacefully in loving care
on Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013,
at Chatuge Regional Nurs-
ing Home, Hiawassee, Ga., of
complications from kidney
disease.
Jackie was born on March
11, 1940, in Beaver Dam, to
John and Helen Brandley. The
family moved to Lake Geneva
when Jackie was a small child
and she spent the remainder
of her youth there. She was active in lake sports, including
swimming and ice skating, and her passion for drama led her
to become president of Lake Geneva High Schools drama club.
She graduated from high school in 1958, and the University of
Wisconsin-Madison in 1962 with a degree in home econom-
ics.
After college graduation, Jackie moved to Waukegan, Ill.,
to pursue a teaching career, where she met Michael Valinoti.
They were married in Lake Geneva on July 11, 1964. Jackie
and Mike raised their two daughters in Waukegan. She worked
part-time as a preschool teacher, volunteered as a catechism
teacher at her church and served as an assistant Brownie Girl
Scout troop leader. She enjoyed mentoring junior teachers,
playing bridge with her many neighborhood friends and vaca-
tioning with her family.
Jackie and Mike retired to Hiawassee in 1996. There they
enjoyed the beautiful mountain and lake views, friendly neigh-
bors, frequent vacations and visits from family and friends.
She is survived by her beloved husband of 49 years,
Michael; daughters, Victoria (Michael) Sakshaug and Eliza-
beth (Thomas) McCarthy; sister, Judith Moore; brother, John
Brandley; grandchildren, Joseph and Katherine Sakshaug and
Sylvia McCarthy; an uncle and aunt, Benjamin and Doris Little;
cousins, William Little, Lela Schaefer, and Cheryl Wenker; and
many nieces, nephews, grandnieces, and grandnephews.
Jackie was preceded in death by her parents; her sister,
Jane Brandley; and several uncles and aunts.
Visitation Sunday, Aug. 11, at Cochran Funeral Home,
Hiawassee. Funeral service Monday, Aug. 12, at St. Francis
of Assisi Catholic Church, Blairsville, Ga., and interment fol-
lowed at Laurel Hills Memory Garden, Hiawassee. Donations
in Jackies memory may be made to Chatuge Regional Nursing
Home, Hiawassee, Ga.
John H. Peacock
Sept. 25, 1926 - Aug. 9, 2013
C. Pauline Polly
Culp
Nov. 23, 1926 - Aug. 9, 2013
C. Pauline Polly Culp, 86, a longtime resident of Lake
Geneva, died Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, at Arbor Village in Lake
Geneva.
The former C. Pauline Steinhilber was born in Indianapo-
lis, Ind., on Nov. 23, 1926, the daughter of the late Paul and
Minnie Ryan Steinhilber. She graduated from Broad Ripple
High School in Indianapolis and then from Hanover College
in Indiana with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English. On Nov.
17, 1951, in Indianapolis, she married Gaylord M. Culp. He
preceded her in death on Jan. 28, 2003. She was a longtime
member of the AAUW.
Polly is survived by three children, James (Anne) Culp,
Franklin, Katherine Culp, Elkhorn, and Timothy Culp, Water-
ford; four grandsons, Eric Culp, Geoffrey Culp, Jay (Courtney)
Culp and Tyler Culp; three granddaughters; Lindsey Olson,
Lorna Olson and Chynna Culp; and two great-grandchildren;
Natalie Anne Culp and Michael David Lee Culp.
Memorial services at a future date. Derrick Funeral Home
and Cremation Services, Lake Geneva, assisted the family
with arrangements. To sign the online guest registry, go to
www.derrickfuneralhome.com.
More
Obituaries
on
page D4
John H. Peacock, 86, Lake Geneva, died
Friday, Aug. 9, 2013, at Holton Manor Nurs-
ing Home in Elkhorn.
He was born Sept. 26, 1926, at Genoa
Junction, the son of John and Mildred Orr
Peacock. He married Betty May Gallup in
May 14, 1949, in Delavan. John was a lifelong
resident of Lake Geneva, a member of the
First Evangelical Lutheran Church, a 60-year
member of the VFW Post 5811, Lake Como,
and was employed several years at Walter
Dale as a sheet metal worker for heating and
air conditioning. He served in the U.S. Army
in World War II.
John is survived by his wife, Betty, Lake
Geneva; daughters, Susan Stetler, Montello,
Nancy (Barney) Brugger, Elkhorn, and Anne
(John) Whynott, Kenosha; a son, Richard
(Diane) Peacock, Lake Geneva; six grand-
children, Daniel (Rebekah) Stetler, Natalie
(Tyler) Hoffmann, Katie (Joey) Sweeney,
Molly Brugger, Abigail Whynott and Ryan
Whynott; and stepgrandchildren, Melissa
Kelly and Jack (Beth) Kelly.
He was preceded in death by his parents;
and a son-in-law, Sherman Stetler.
Services at 11 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 14, at
the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lake
Geneva, with the Rev. Peter Metzger ofciat-
ing. Visitation one hour before services at the
church. In lieu of other expressions of sym-
pathy, memorials may be made to the church.
Steinke Funeral Home and Cremation Ser-
vices, Lake Geneva, assisted the family with
arrangements. For online guest registry, go to
www.seinkefuneralhomeinc.
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4D The Regional News August 15, 2013
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
The Rev. Dr. Kazou
A. Andy Takaya
April 21, 1927 - July 27, 2013
The Rev. Dr. Kazuo A. Andy Takaya entered eternal life
on Saturday, July 27, 2013, at Mercy Hospital in Janesville.
Kazuo Andrew Takaya was born April 21, 1927, in Toch-
igi, Japan. He emigrated to the United States to study for the
Christian ministry. He served pastorates in Chicago, Honolulu
and Lake Geneva, followed by a six-year term as a volunteer
missionary in Japan.
He lived out his earthly life by visiting family and friends in
Japan and by proclaiming Gods word from two pulpits while
there.
He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; two children, Tamiko
M. (Christopher) Takaya-Hunt, Fort Wayne, Ind.; a son, Bunji
M. Takaya, Glenville, Ga.; a stepson, Charles (Betty) Arm-
strong, Chicago; six grandchildren, Serena Takaya, Jacob and
Jacy Furuto, and Michael, Valerie and Daniel Armstrong; a
sister, Tama (Takeshi) Otsuka; and many nieces and nephews
in Japan.
He was preceded in death by his rst wife, Maryann; and
ve brothers and sisters.
Celebration of Andys life Saturday, Aug. 17, at 2:30 p.m.,
at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, Lake
Geneva, with the Rev. Gary Hougen ofciating. Visitation
Saturday, Aug. 17, from 1 p.m. until time of services. In lieu of
other expressions of sympathy, memorials are requested to a
charity of donors choice. Derrick Funeral Home and Crema-
tion Service assisted the family with arrangements. To sign the
online guest registry, go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com.
Irene H. Witte
Feb. 27, 1922 - Aug. 8, 2013
Irene H. Witte, 90, West Allis, formerly of Lake Geneva,
died Thursday, Aug. 8, 2013, at Village of Manor Park Nurs-
ing in West Allis.
The former Irene Helen Button was born in Lake Geneva
on Feb. 27, 1922, the daughter of the late Alexander and Pearl
Powell Button. She graduated from Lake Geneva High School
in 1940 and then from Milwaukee State Teachers College,
with a degree in education.
On March 24, 1944, in Lake Geneva, she married Harold
Witte. He preceded her in death on Sept. 3, 1966. She was a
member of Gamma Phi Beta sorority and was a member and
past president the West Allis Womens Association for more
than 50 years.
Irene is survived by two sons, Mark Witte, West Allis, and
Michael (Joan) Witte, Aviston, Ill.; and three grandchildren,
Michael John, Angela and Jonathon.
Services at 1 p.m., Thursday, Aug.15, in the chapel of the
Derrick Funeral Home in Lake Geneva, with the Rev. Earl
F. Lindsay ofciating. Burial in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lake
Geneva. Visitation Thursday from 11 a.m. until time of ser-
vices. In lieu of other expressions of sympathy, memorials
are requested in Irenes name to Village of Maple Park Foun-
dation, 3023 S. 84th St., West Allis, WI, 53227. To sign the
online guest registry, go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com.
Mary Louise
Geupel
Sept. 19, 1943 - Aug. 10, 2013
Mary Louise Geupel, 69, Fontana, died Saturday, Aug. 10,
2013, at her home.
She was born Sept. 19, 1943, in Schenectady, N.Y., the
daughter of Joseph and Mary Ondrejko Tylenda. She married
David Geupel Dec. 28, 1985, in Chicago.
Mary worked in management for AT&T for 27 years,
retiring in 1992. She was a member of St. Benedict Catho-
lic Church in Fontana, Fontana Garden Club, AAUW and the
Tuesday Afternoon Bridge Club. She was a Master Gardener,
an avid bridge player and a four-time champion.
She is survived by her loving husband, David; two step-
children, James and Cheryl; two sisters, Carolyn Tylenda and
Elaine Connelly; and one brother, Joe Tylenda.
Funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 17, at St. Bene-
dict Catholic Church in Fontana, with burial following at Oak
Hill Cemetery in Lake Geneva. Visitation from 9:30 a.m. until
time of services Saturday at the church. Toyntons Walworth
Funeral Home assisted the family.
OBITUARIES
More Obituaries on page D3
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Agatha Lanzillotti
August 2013
Agatha Lanzillotti, 93, recently passed away in hospice
care in Park Ridge, Ill.
Mrs. Lanzillotti, in addition to being a loving wife and
mother, had a long, diverse professional career that included
writing, acting, and teaching.
During the 1950s and 1960s, living in Lake Geneva, Mrs.
Lanzillotti was a reporter for the Janesville Gazette. Mrs.
Lanzillotti won many news awards and was noted for her
coverage of several contentious events that occurred in and
around Lake Geneva including the spread of dutch elm dis-
ease, which ravaged thousands of trees but previously had
been relatively unknown in Wisconsin, a multi-year con-
troversy surrounding the construction of the Highway 12
bypass, and a proposal to build the U.S. Air Force Academy
on the shores of Geneva Lake. In 1954, a visiting delegation
of Air Force engineers was greeted by demonstrators oppos-
ing the school when the party came to inspect land. Never
one to avoid a good story, a photo on the front page of the
Gazette showed Mrs. Lanzillotti in the middle of a face-off
between the engineers and demonstrators.
Other events covered by Mrs. Lanzillotti included summer
visits to Lake Geneva by world famous pianist Dave Brubeck
and trumpeter Louis Armstrong. Mrs. Lanzillotti had long
conversations with them and afterward remarked at how
gracious they were in discussing their lives. She interviewed
senators John Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey during their
1960 campaigns for the Democratic Party nomination to run
for President. A sidelight of the interview with Humphrey
was that her husband, G.M. Lanzillotti, and Humphrey had
been close friends at Louisiana State University and her hus-
band and Humphrey had occasion to reminisce about their
university experiences and eventual careers.
Mrs. Lanzillotti, along with co-author Leo Terry, wrote
a musical play about the history of Lake Geneva that was
staged at the Lake Geneva High School auditorium in 1958.
The semi-professional production, featuring local actors,
singers, musicians, and support crew played to standing-
room-only audiences, was widely acclaimed in the region,
and attracted comment in Chicago and Milwaukee news-
papers. It was often mentioned that the whole town was
involved in the production and was a source of great civic
pride.
At other times in the 1950s, Mrs. Lanzillotti taught in a
one-room elementary school near Lake Geneva and was a
member of the editorial staffs of the American Journal of
Ophthalmology and the Encyclopedia Britannica, working
mostly from home. In the 1970s and 1980s, while living in
Chicago, she wrote several childrens stories and tutored
reading to at-risk youngsters as part of a community proj-
ect.
Mrs. Lanzillotti for many years worked at the Montgom-
ery Ward corporate headquarters in Chicago as a copy writer
for, among other things, product descriptions that appeared
in the famous Wards catalogs. To better understand the
details of the products, she enjoyed visiting manufacturing
plants throughout the U.S. to meet with designers.
In the 1940s and 1950s Mrs. Lanzillotti acted in little
theater presentations in Louisiana and elsewhere and was
a character voice on live radio soap operas originating from
New Orleans radio station WWL.
Mrs. Lanzillotti (nee Passantino) was born and raised in
New Orleans, Louisiana and often talked about the unique
culture at that time in the city and state and about the happy
family times she had with her mother Josephine and father
Joseph, four younger siblings and a host of relatives and
friends. She received a Bach-
elors degree in 1940 from
Louisiana State University
where she majored in Eng-
lish She married G.M. Lan-
zillotti, another Louisiana
State University student, in
1939 and they were married
for 72 years until his death in
2012.
Mrs. Lanzillotti is sur-
vived by her devoted son
Adrian (Young Hee) Lan-
zillotti of Fairfax, Virginia,
and daughter Diana (Robert)
Karis of Chicago, and grand-
sons Michael Karis and John
(Eden) Lanzillotti of Chicago
and Paul Lanzillotti of Las
Vegas.
Ethel Janet
(Cooper)
Siedschlag
Jan. 10, 1920 - Aug. 3, 2013
Ethel J. Siedschlag, 93, of Genoa City passed away Satur-
day, Aug. 3 at Aurora Memorial Hospital Burlington. Ethel
Janet Cooper was born on January 10, 1920 to the late Leslie
and Edith (Clark) Cooper in Richmond, Ill. Ethel was mar-
ried to Norman Sparky Siedschlag in Richmond, Ill., on Dec.
24, 1941. Ethel was a member of the Grace Lutheran Seniors
Club.
Her three children survive Ethel: Rosemary Johnson of
Pell Lake, WI. Carol (Vic) Long of Genoa City, and Wendy
(Paul Pescetto) Siedschlag of Twin Lakes. Two grandchildren
also survive her: Bob (Michelle) Schinker of Genoa City, and
Dave (Donna) Schinker of Rockford, Mich. Ethel has three
great-grandchildren that survive her, Tim (Shannon) Schinker
of Genoa City, Matt (Candice Petrillo) Schinker of Burlington
and Hannah Schinker of Rockford, Mich. One great great
grandchild survives, Colie Jean Schinker of Burlington. Three
sisters also survive, Annette Toynton, Frances Siedschlag and
Lucreta Nelson, and three brothers: Larry (Kathy) Cooper,
Donald (Jean) Cooper, and Albert (Faye) Cooper. Ethel was
preceded in death by her husband of 42 years Norm Sparky
Siedschlag and one daughter, Gail Marie. Three brothers also
preceded her in death, Kenneth, James and Jerry Cooper.
Services were Thursday Aug. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the chapel
of the Derrick Funeral Home in Lake Geneva, Pastor Keith
Aurand presiding. Visitation was from 4 p.m. until the time
of the service. Burial was at 10 a.m. in the Richmond Town-
ship Cemetery in Richmond, Ill. In lieu of other expressions
of sympathy the family has asked that you make a donation to
the charity of your choice. To sign the online guest registries
please visit www.derrickfuneralhome.com.
Patricia Rosseland, age
75 of Fontana, passed away
Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013, at her
home in Fontana. She was
born May 23, 1938, in Chi-
cago, the daughter of Roman
and Marguerite (Hardwicke)
Steinke. Funeral services
will be 7 p.m. on Thursday,
Aug. 15, 2013, at Calvary
Community Church in Wil-
liams Bay, with Rev. Melvin
Olberg ofciating. Visitation
will be from 4 p.m. to service
time at 7 p.m. at the church
on Thursday. Burial will be
at Central Wisconsin Vet-
erans Memorial Cemetery
in King on Friday, Aug. 16,
2013. Monroe Funeral Home
in Delavan is assisting the
family. Visit us at monroefh.
com.
Patricia Rosseland
May 23, 1938 - Aug. 11, 2013
Patricia Rosseland, age 75 of Fontana, passed away
Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013, at her home in Fontana. She was born
May 23, 1938, in Chicago, the daughter of Roman and Mar-
guerite (Hardwicke) Steinke.
Patricia was united in marriage to Erling Rosseland on
May 1, 1964, in Chicago. Along with her husband, they owned
and operated Rosseland Real Estate in Fontana and the Wal-
worth County area for over 20 years. Patricia attended Cal-
vary Community Church in Williams Bay. She was also a
Charter member of the Sons of Norway.
She is survived by her husband, Earl of Fontana, two
sons, Christopher (Joyce) Rosseland and Michael (Jeanette)
Rosseland both of Bartlett Ill., three grandchildren, two
great-grandchildren, and one brother, Michael Steinke of
Elgin, Ill.
Funeral services will be 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 15,
2013, at Calvary Community Church in Williams Bay, with
Rev. Melvin Olberg ofciating. Visitation will be from 4 p.m.
to service time at 7 p.m. at the church on Thursday. Burial
will be at Central Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery in
King on Friday, Aug. 16, 2013.
Monroe Funeral Home in Delavan is assisting the family.
Visit us at monroefh.com.
DEATH NOTICE