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Annual B udget

Fiscal Year 2013


Recipient of the 2007 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award

The City of Coral Springs

To be the nations premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family.

City Attorney John Hearn, Commissioner Vince Boccard, Commissioner Larry Vignola, Mayor Roy Gold, Commissioner Claudette Bruck, Vice Mayor Tom Powers, City Manager Erdal Dnmez Erdal Dnmez, City Manager Susan Grant, Deputy City Manager Roberto Hernandez, Deputy City Manager Robert Goehrig, Director of Budget, Strategy, and Communication Rita Radziwon, Senior Financial Analyst Chelsea Stahl, Senior Financial Analyst Forrest Lehman, Senior Financial Analyst Liliana Alvarez, Senior Financial Analyst Sherri Toops, Grant Writer Linda Kuhlman, Budget Analyst

Proposed September 12, 2012

Cover design by Christine Parkinson Jahrsdoerfer

T able of Contents
City Managers Letter ........................................................................................................................................................... v Budget Highlights ............................................................................................................................................................... 1 Ad Valorem Taxes ................................................................................................................................................................. 2 Combined Budget Summary ............................................................................................................................................... 3 Staffing Changes ................................................................................................................................................................. 6 Capital Improvement Program ............................................................................................................................................ 7 Impact of CIP on the Citys Operating Budget .................................................................................................................... 10 Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update ...................................................................................................................................... 18 Measuring Results ............................................................................................................................................................. 27 Fiscal Year 2012 KIO Summary ........................................................................................................................................... 33 Service and Operations Strategy ........................................................................................................................................ 34 Customer-Involved Government ........................................................................................................................................ 35 Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability .............................................................................................................. 38 Financial Health and Economic Development .................................................................................................................... 46 Traffic, Mobility and Connectivity ...................................................................................................................................... 49 Youth Development and Family Values .............................................................................................................................. 53 Strength in Diversity .......................................................................................................................................................... 56 Excellence in Education...................................................................................................................................................... 60 Department Performance Levels ....................................................................................................................................... 62 Sample Performance Budget Page .................................................................................................................................... 64 City Commission ....................................................................................................................................................... 65 City Managers Office ................................................................................................................................................ 67 Human Resources ..................................................................................................................................................... 71 Financial Services ..................................................................................................................................................... 75 Information Services ................................................................................................................................................ 79 City Attorney ............................................................................................................................................................ 82 Development Services .............................................................................................................................................. 84 Police ....................................................................................................................................................................... 90 Economic Development............................................................................................................................................ 94 Fire/EMS ................................................................................................................................................................... 95 Public Works ............................................................................................................................................................. 99 Sportsplex/Tennis................................................................................................................................................... 104 Parks and Recreation .............................................................................................................................................. 107 Aquatics ................................................................................................................................................................. 111 Coral Springs Center for the Arts............................................................................................................................. 114 Coral Springs Charter School .................................................................................................................................. 115

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Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

T able of Contents (continued)


Revenue and Expenditure Fund Summaries .................................................................................................................... 117 General Fund Summary.......................................................................................................................................... 117 Fire Fund Summary ................................................................................................................................................ 120 Water and Sewer Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................... 121 Health Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................................... 122 General Insurance Fund Summary.......................................................................................................................... 122 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Summary ......................................................................................................... 123 Public Art Fund Summary ...................................................................................................................................... 123 Equipment Services Fund Summary ....................................................................................................................... 124 Pension Fund Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 125 Debt Service Fund Summary .................................................................................................................................. 125

City of Coral Springs, Florida

iii

T ables and Illustrations


Voter-approved debt service millage rate ............................................................................................................................ 2 Tax rate Fiscal Year 2013 ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 Operating millage rate ........................................................................................................................................................ 2 Operating millage rate comparison Fiscal Year 2013 ............................................................................................................ 2 Appropriated Funds BudgetFiscal Year 2013 ................................................................................................................... 3 Summary of net budgeted revenuesFiscal Year 2013...................................................................................................... 4 Summary of net budgeted expendituresFiscal Year 2013 ............................................................................................... 5 Full-time positions added in Fiscal Year 2013 ...................................................................................................................... 6 Net full-time position changes per fiscal year ...................................................................................................................... 6 Fleet Replacement Program contributions and expenses .................................................................................................... 8 Computer Replacement Program contributions and expenses ............................................................................................ 8 CIP funding sources Fiscal Year 2013............................................................................................................................... 9 CIP impact on the operating budget Fiscal Year 2013 ........................................................................................................ 10 Fleet replacement cost Fiscal Years 20132023 .............................................................................................................. 11 FY 2013 Capital projects financed via grants...................................................................................................................... 12 Budget Process Map .......................................................................................................................................................... 16 Satisfaction with items that influence perceptions of Coral Springs................................................................................... 28 Sustainability Index 2008-2012......................................................................................................................................... 29 Composite Index ................................................................................................................................................................ 30 City of Coral Springs Business Model ................................................................................................................................. 34 Long-Range Transportation Improvement Plan ................................................................................................................. 51 2012-2014 Short-Range Transportation Improvement Plan .............................................................................................. 52 Department Revenue, Expenditure and Position Summary for Fiscal Year 2013 ................................................................ 62 Department Impact of Key Intended Outcomes for Fiscal Years 2012 2013 ..................................................................... 63 Organization ChartsBy Department.............................................................................................................................. 65 Revenues and Expenditures by Program/CategoryBy Department ............................................................................... 66 Performance MeasuresBy Department ......................................................................................................................... 69 Revenue and Expenditure Fund Summaries .................................................................................................................... 117 General Fund Summary.......................................................................................................................................... 117 Fire Fund Summary ................................................................................................................................................ 120 Water and Sewer Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................... 121 Health Fund Summary ........................................................................................................................................... 122 General Insurance Fund Summary.......................................................................................................................... 122 Coral Springs Charter School Fund Summary ......................................................................................................... 123 Public Art Fund Summary ...................................................................................................................................... 123 Equipment Services Fund Summary ....................................................................................................................... 124 Pension Fund Summary ......................................................................................................................................... 125 Debt Service Fund Summary .................................................................................................................................. 125

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Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

City Manager s Letter


I am pleased to present to you the proposed budget for Fiscal Year 2013, which is the final budget supporting the 2012-2013 Strategic Plan. This budget outlines numerous efforts and initiatives that will help position the City to meet our communitys needs despite a slow, but steady, economic recovery. Despite the medias steady drumbeat of dire economic predictions, there is positive news to report. For example, in our community, efforts to mitigate foreclosures have helped cut the total number of residences in some stage of the process to 1,941 as of June 2012 from a high of nearly 5,500 in May 2010. The City of Coral Springs unemployment rate has fallen to 6.9%, well below Floridas rate of 8.5% as of May 2012. And, in a positive comparison to surrounding communities in Broward County, the City saw a 1.56% increase in taxable values over the past year. This is the first increase in taxable assessed values since Fiscal Year 2008. Meeting our Communitys Service Needs Even more importantly, despite all the economic turmoil, the City has maintained or increased service levels throughout our community. Our residents agree that we are succeeding. Our recent residential (2011) and business (2012) surveys show that the City of Coral Springs is setting the standard with regard to the overall quality of City services. The City of Coral Springs ranked at or above the U.S. and Florida averages in all 47 areas that were assessed on the survey. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of the residents surveyed in the City of Coral Springs were satisfied (ratings of 4 or 5 on a 5-point scale) with the overall quality of City services compared to a national average of just 56% and a Florida average of 60%. Going forward, we will continue to deliver for our community, and the following Business Plan provides a sound blueprint for focusing on the four key areas our residents have told us are most important: Community aesthetics Public safety Educational excellence Local business vitality

Impact of Increasing Millage Rate in 2013 We are proposing a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2013 using a millage rate of $4.5697, using $1.5 million in reserves and no increase in user fees. Adopting the rolled-back rate was not a realistic option given that it would have resulted in $480,000 less revenue than the current rate. This reduction in revenue would have seriously hampered our ability to meet our residents most important needs. The proposed millage rate of $4.5697 is 4% higher than the current millage rate of $4.3939. This increase will allow investment in our communitys appearance, safety, and infrastructure. The additional tax revenue will be allocated toward such projects as restoring the financial reserve, hiring three additional police officers, starting the design work for a new Safety Town, and renovating Sartory Hall. The impact to the average single-family homeowner would be $42.62 per year in additional property taxes to the City. The proposed budget includes numerous initiatives designed to enhance our communitys quality of life. A key initiative in the Fiscal Year 2012 Business Plan was pension reform. We are pleased to report mutual resolution with the Citys Police union will result in savings of over $3 million in the Fiscal Year 2013 and future budgets. Also in Fiscal Year 2012, the Citys finances were reviewed by the three major rating agencies. Though these reviews contained suggestions to improve our financial position, we were able to maintain our AAA ratings.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Key Initiatives for the Coming Year While the Business Plan includes economic data as well as the Citys budget process and methodology, most essentially it includes staffs proposals for initiatives geared toward addressing our residents needs and enhancing our communitys look, feel and overall appeal. These initiatives will serve as the guiding force behind the Citys Fiscal Year 2013 activities. Highlights of the 33 new initiatives, as well as 32 ongoing initiatives, contained within the Business Plan include: Continuing to invest in our vital information technology infrastructure, which was critically behind industry standards. Encouraging business development and redevelopment by redesigning the Economic Development Foundation (EDF) web site, create an economic development strategic plan, and establish an economic incentive account. We will also continue to work closely with the EDF , Community Redevelopment Agency, Chamber of Commerce, and the Retail Coalition to diversify the tax base and absorb vacant commercial space. Continuing to support educational excellence by fostering our alliance with Broward College and ensuring the Charter School remains highly rated. Continuing to address the aesthetic appeal of our neighborhoods under the Community Pride umbrella. This initiative will enhance the appearance of our medians, rights-of-way and public buildings and will also invest heavily in our parks. Enhancing the Citys tree canopy will continue this year with fertilizing and tree trimming, as well as with planting more trees throughout the parks and around public buildings. Enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of the code enforcement process by automating a number of outdated and manual systems. Revitalizing key elements of our communitys infrastructure, in part by utilizing proceeds from the low-interest Economic Recovery Zone Redevelopment Bond. Projects include improving the appearance, safety, and ease of movement in Mullins Park, and also replacing and/or renovating the tackle football, flag football and soccer buildings. Additionally, infrastructure improvements slated as part of the downtown development planincluding burying power lines, installing turn lanes, erecting mast arms, and installing sidewalkswill also begin. Once these infrastructure improvements are completed, downtown Coral Springs will become more economically viable for investors as the economy begins to improve. Maintaining a safe community will remain a top priority. Not only will the high-visibility Make a Call, Make a Difference campaign continue, but we will make every effort to involve concerned citizens in the safety of their neighborhoods by creating web-based reporting mechanisms. We will invest in the latest technology to ensure our officers have the best tools for enhancing neighborhood safety. Finally, we will celebrate the Citys 50th anniversary with events throughout the year.

Honoring our Partnership We know that maintaining our premier community requires a joint effort and strong partnership between the City and our residents and businesses. While the following Business Plan is our community contract for the coming fiscal year, we consider it the means to an ongoing dialogue with our residents and we offer numerous channels for feedback and suggestions. We also know that it is our employees who make all of these accomplishments possible, and we would not have emerged from the recent recession were it not for the herculean efforts of our dedicated and creative work force. We thank them and express the deepest debt of gratitude for their loyalty and ingenuity. On their behalf, we all look forward to a productive and successful 2013 as we continue to forge the best path for our Community of Excellence.

Erdal Dnmez City Manager

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Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Budget Highlights
Introduction
The Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget, which will be adopted on September 18, 2012, is a numerical reection of the Fiscal Year 2013 Business Plan. By allocating our resources through a balanced alignment with the City Commissions seven strategic priorities and departmental performance indicators, we believe this budget will successfully meet the challenges we have before us and set the stage for our continued success in the future. Solid Waste Special Assessment will decrease $6.48 for a single family residence. General Fund debt service for franchise and capital revenue bonds, as a percentage of total budget, will equal 3.6% in Fiscal Year 2013 as compared to 2.4% in the current year, well within its General Fund debt service policy limitation of 12.5% of total General Fund expenditures. With a General Obligation bond indebtedness of 0.25% of total taxable assessed value, the City is well below its debt policy limit of 5%. Personal Services Total proposed full-time positions in all funds for Fiscal Year 2013 is 768 (excludes the Fire/EMS services contract staff). Added fourteen full-time positions, ten in the General Fund and four in the Fire Fund. General Fund added three Law Enforcement Of cers in Police Patrol, three Parks Technicians and one Parks Maintenance Worker, two Code Enforcement positions, and one Of ce Assistant in Public Works Streets Division. The Fire Fund added three Fireghter/Paramedics to the Suppression Division and one Senior Of ce Assistant to the Training Division. Capital Improvements The City will invest $23,701,975 in Fiscal Year 2013 to address its capital needs. For more on capital, refer to Capital Improvement Program included in this document. These changes reect our continued emphasis to maximize customer satisfaction by providing the same quality service levels as last year to the Citys businesses, residents, and employees during dif cult economic times.

Budget in Brief
The proposed operating net budget for Fiscal Year 2013 for all funds totals $151,756,237. This represents a decrease of $396,661 or 0.3% less than the Fiscal Year 2012 net budget. The Fiscal Year 2013 budget is balanced, prudent and responsive to community needs as identied in the Fiscal Years 2012 - 2013 Strategic Plan. Some features of the Fiscal Year 2013 budget that deserve special attention are: The proposed operating millage rate will increase from $4.3939 to $4.5697, an increase of $0.1758 or 4%. This increase will allow the City to collect approximately $1,729,000 additional property tax revenue than last year. The voter-approved debt service millage rate will decrease from $0.2915 to $0.2906, a decrease of $0.0009 or 0.3%. The combined general operating and debt service millage rate is $4.8603 per $1,000 of assessed value, an increase of $0.1749 or 3.7%. An increase of $9.33 per single family residence for Fire Special Assessment fees. A Water and Sewer fee increase of approximately $1.82 per month for an average single family residence.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Ad Valorem T axes
Tax rate Fiscal Year 2013
General Operating Millage Debt Service Millage Combined City Millage Rate $4.5697 $0.2906 $4.8603

Operating millage rate


$8.0000

The proposed operating millage rate will increase from $4.3939 to $4.5697 or 4% in Fiscal Year 2013. This property tax rate will generate approximately $1,729,000 more than last year. A 13% decrease in Fiscal Year 2008 was in response to property tax legislation.

$7.0000 $6.0000 $5.0000 $4.0000 $3.0000 $2.0000 $1.0000 $0.0000 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 $3.8715 $3.8715 $3.8715 $3.8715 $3.8715 $3.3651 $3.3651 $3.8866 $4.3559 $4.3939 $4.5697

Voter-approved debt service millage rate


$1.0000 $0.8000 $0.6000 $0.4000 $0.2000 $0.0000 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

$0.5228 $0.4131 $0.3924 $0.2510 $0.2915 $0.2906 $0.2134 $0.1774 $0.1763 $0.1763 $0.1763

The debt millage rate will decrease from $0.2915 to $0.2906 or 0.3% in Fiscal Year 2013. This debt millage rate will reect the actual debt service approved by voter referendum. In prior years, fund balance was used to subsidize the annual debt service payment.

Operating millage rate comparison Fiscal Year 2013


$8.0000

When comparing Broward County cities with populations greater than 55,000, Coral Springs operating millage rate is one of the lowest of the 11 municipalities.

$7.4479

$7.2899 $6.4654 $6.1142 $6.0543 $5.6368 $5.1856


CoralSprings

$7.0000 $6.0000 $5.0000 $4.0000 $3.0000 $2.0000 $1.0000 $0.0000


Ta m ar ac

$4.9700 $4.8122 $4.5697 $4.1193

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Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Da vi e Co ra lS pr in gs Ft .L au de rd al e

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Combined Budget Summary


Appropriated Funds BudgetFiscal Year 2013
 General Fund CASHBALANCE BROUGHTFORWARD RevenuesByType: Taxes: MillagePer$1,000 AdValoremTaxes $4.5697 AdValoremTaxes $0.2906(VOTEDDEBT) SolidWasteAssessment FireFundSpecialAssessment SalesandUseTaxes FranchiseFees UtilityServiceTaxes LicensesandPermits IntergovernmentalRevenue ChargesforServices FinesandForfeitures MiscellaneousRevenues OtherFinancingSources TotalRevenuesand OtherFinancingSources GrandTotalRevenuesandBalances ExpendituresByType: GeneralGovernmentalServices Education PublicSafety PhysicalEnvironment EconomicEnvironment CultureandRecreation DebtService CapitalImprovementProgram (ExcludingOpeatingCIP) OtherFinancingSources(Uses) TotalExpendituresand OtherFinancingUses Reserves TotalAppropriatedExpendituresand Reserves $1,500,000 Debt Service Fund $0 Capital Projects Fund $189,000 Public Art Fund $0 Waterand Sewer Fund $3,190,000 Fire Fund $0 Charter School Fund $1,086,035 FY2013 Total Budget $5,965,035

32,428,839 2,062,241 1,864,900 9,728,904 7,230,104 9,904,259 10,212,079 3,661,531 12,358,624 12,558,085 1,979,940 4,088,628 1,017,293

19,453,254 3,248 3,959,663 70,000 10,148,940 86,500

5,324,469 2,023,073 53,000 172,500 25,938

10,380,445

32,428,839 2,062,241 1,864,900 9,728,904 7,230,104 9,904,259 10,212,079 3,661,531 28,063,538 34,034,412 2,032,940 4,334,376 15,238,334

97,304,282 $98,804,282

6,025,152 $6,025,152

10,148,940 $10,337,940

86,500 $86,500

19,523,254 $22,713,254

17,327,884 $17,327,884

10,380,445

160,796,457

$11,466,480 $166,761,492

$13,646,165 566,942 55,012,496 6,874,449 250,000 14,341,495 3,596,864 0 4,515,871

11,466,480 14,803,729 16,633,049 281,840 86,500 6,025,152 10,337,940 1,487,027 2,291,295 4,311,338 232,860

$13,646,165 12,033,422 69,816,225 23,507,498 531,840 14,427,995 14,166,214 10,337,940 8,294,193

98,804,282 0 $98,804,282

6,025,152 0 $6,025,152

10,337,940 0 $10,337,940

86,500 0 $86,500

22,713,254 0 $22,713,254

17,327,884 0 $17,327,884

11,466,480 0

166,761,492 0

$11,466,480 $166,761,492

Note: Revenues (sources) and Expenses (uses) for Equipment Services, Health, and General Insurance funds are incorporated within all other appropriated funds included in this summary and thus, not listed separately.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Summary of net budgeted revenuesFiscal Year 2013


FY2012 Adopted NetBudget Percent of Total FY2013 Proposed NetBudget Percent of Total Dollar Change Percent Change

GeneralFund FireFund WaterandSewerFund HealthandGeneralInsuranceFu C.S.CharterSchoolFund PublicArtFund EquipmentServicesFund DebtServiceFund Total

$93,317,942 15,515,483 21,013,612 1,245,000 11,903,260 76,500 5,775,147 3,305,954 $152,152,898

61.3% 10.2% 13.8% 0.8% 7.8% 0.1% 3.8% 2.2%

$93,958,623 16,208,294 22,713,254 1,610,000 11,466,480 86,500 3,517,657 2,195,429

61.9% 10.7% 15.0% 1.0% 7.6% 0.1%

$640,681 692,811 1,699,642 365,000 (436,780) 10,000

0.7% 4.5% 8.1% 29.3% 3.7% 13.1% 39.1% 33.6% 0.3%

2.3% (2,257,490) 1.4% (1,110,525) 100.0% ($396,661)

100.0% $151,756,237

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different because of the interfund transfers.

FiscalYear2013NetBudgetAllFundsRevenues $151,756,237
Equipment Services Fund 2.3% WaterandSewerFund 15.0%

CharterSchool Fund 7.6% Other 1.1% General Fund 61.9% Fire Fund 10.7% DebtService Fund 1.4%

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Summary of net budgeted expendituresFiscal Year 2013


FY2012 Adopted NetBudget Percent of Total FY2013 Proposed NetBudget Percent of Total Dollar Change Percent Change

GeneralFund FireFund WaterandSewerFund HealthandGeneralInsuranceFu C.S.CharterSchoolFund PublicArtFund EquipmentServicesFund PensionFund DebtServiceFund Total

$64,888,412 10,852,069 17,626,865 15,120,020 10,483,260 76,500 10,794,794 16,425,088 5,885,890 $152,152,898

42.6% 7.1% 11.6% 9.9% 6.9% 0.1% 7.1% 10.8% 3.9%

$66,903,902 11,098,592 19,176,769 15,888,674 10,046,480 86,500 8,671,101 13,859,067 6,025,152

44.1% $2,015,490 7.3% 12.6% 10.5% 6.6% 0.1% 246,523 1,549,904 768,654 (436,780) 10,000

3.1% 2.3% 8.8% 5.1% 4.2% 13.1% 19.7% 15.6% 2.4% 0.3%

5.7% (2,123,693) 9.1% (2,566,021) 4.0% 100.1% 139,262 ($396,661)

100.0% $151,756,237

Note: The total net budgeted revenues and expenditures/expenses are equal. However, the total by fund for revenue and expenditure/expenses are different because of interfund transfers.

FiscalYear2013NetBudgetAllFundsExpenditures $151,756,237
PensionFund 9.1%

Insurance Funds 10.5%

DebtService Fund andPublic Art Fund 4.1% CharterSchool Fund 6.6% Fire Fund 7.3%

General Fund 44.1%

WaterandSewerFund 12.6% Equipment Services Fund 5.7%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Stafng Changes
Full-time positions added in Fiscal Year 2013
General Fund: Additions: Law Enforcement Officer Parks Technician Parks Maintenance Worker Code Enforcement Office Assistant-Public Works-Streets Sub-Total Fire Fund: Additions: Firefighter/Paramedic Senior Office Assistant Training Center Sub-Total Net New Positions

3 3 1 2 1 10

3 1 4 14

Net full-time position changes per fiscal year


50 40 40 29 30 20 10 0 2 10 13 20 11 8 17 16 8 5 7 4 15 14 44

ExcludesFireStafffor CityofParkland,Florida

12

14

13

Note: Chart shows in Fiscal Year 2013, a net change of fourteen additional full-time positions. Four were added to Parks and Recreation, three to Police Patrol, two to Code Enforcement, and one to Public Works in the General Fund. Four positions were also added to the Fire Fund. From Fiscal Years 2008 through 2011, 34 full-time positions were deleted primarily due to the elimination of vacant positions, with some positions eliminated through attrition and in response to tax reform and the economic recession. In Fiscal Year 2007, 11 public safety positions were added. In Fiscal Year 2003, public safety employees were added as a result of September 11th national tragedy. Paid firefighters were added in Fiscal Year 2001, and EMS startup began in Fiscal Year 1996.

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Capital Improvement Program


The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) is an economical and responsible nancial plan to ensure quality public services today and in the future. The CIP is a separate budgeting process within the annual operating budget. Collectively, the CIP and the Five-Year Forecast serve as a road map to intelligently plan for the Citys future. The capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2013 is programmed at $23,701,975. This total breaks down as follows: General Fund Water and Sewer Fund Equipment Services Fund Charter School Fund Tree Trust Fund Fire Fund Public Art Fund $10,981,865 $7,961,000 $3,162,157 $645,653 $475,000 $389,800 $86,500

Capital expenditure Fiscal Years 2013-2018$136,897,903


*Other 1.8% EquipmentServices Fund18% CharterSchool Fund0.9% FireFund 1.3% WaterandSewer Fund27.1% GeneralFund 50.9%

The CIP procedure is used to plan, budget, and nance the purchase and/or construction of large capital infrastructure, facilities, equipment, and other xed assets. The City uses this process to ensure these expensive, long-lived projects are aligned with its strategic direction and that the money is well-spent. The capital item to be undertaken or purchased, the year in which it will be started, the anticipated capital outlay each year, the estimated impact on the operating budget, and the method of nancing the project are all listed in the CIP summaries that follow this description. The six-year Capital Improvement Program includes Fiscal Year 2013 budget and expenditure projections for the next ve years. The total capital request for Fiscal Years 2013 through 2018 is $136,897,903.

*includes capital projects funded by the Public Art Fund and the Tree Trust Fund

CIP Selection Process The Capital Improvement Program provides detailed information for all CIP projects with capital outlays greater than $5,000 that the City plans to construct, improve, or purchase during Fiscal Years 2013 through 2018. Each department submitting a capital acquisition request completes a Project Description Form. The request includes the following information: project title, department/division, linkage to strategic priority or initiatives, expected life of equipment (when applicable), additional operating cost, additional revenue or income, contingencies, project description, update, alternatives, impact on other departments, and a justication. The CIP is updated annually to make adjustments for changing capital needs, changes in availability and cost of funds, and to add a year of programming to replace the year just completed. The CIP process begins in early January with a review of the process to determine if there are any changes that will make the process more user-friendly, ef cient, or effective. Next, departments conduct a xed assets inventory including an inventory of vehicles, computers, and printers. link the Capital Improvement Program to the Strategic Plan. In the spring, capital requirements owing from the adopted Strategic Plan and Business Plan are identied. Each project recommended for inclusion in the Fiscal Year 2013 capital budget is linked to the Strategic Plan as it relates to the City Commissions seven priorities. The CIP also takes into consideration department needs, the Comprehensive Plan Capital Improvement element, and the Water and Wastewater 2007 Master Plan Update.

Capital expenditure Fiscal Year 2013$23,701,975


Equipment Services Fund 13.3% *Other 2.4% Charter School Fund 2.7% Fire Fund 1.7%

General Fund 46.3%

Water and Sewer Fund 33.6% One of the key improvements to the process has been to

*includes capital projects funded by the Public Art Fund and the Tree Trust Fund

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Fleet Replacement Program contributions and expenses


Fiscal Year 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 Contributed Estimated Interestand Expenses Depreciation Interest Depreciation $2,210,651 $2,317,270 $200,000 $2,517,270 $3,162,157 $2,433,112 $131,227 $2,564,339 $5,672,821 $2,579,099 $119,270 $2,698,369 $4,988,217 $2,733,845 $59,781 $2,793,626 $3,272,210 $2,897,875 $15,890 $2,913,765 $3,858,831 $3,071,748 $8,721 $3,080,468 $3,669,590 $3,256,053 $0 $3,256,053 $4,271,391 $3,451,416 $0 $3,451,416 $3,477,643 $3,658,501 $0 $3,658,501 $6,044,198 $3,878,011 $0 $3,878,011 $4,217,634 $4,110,692 $0 $4,110,692 $3,037,381 $4,357,333 $0 $4,357,333 YearEnd Balance $6,561,337 $5,963,519 $2,989,067 $794,476 $436,031 ($342,332) ($755,869) ($1,575,844) ($1,394,986) ($3,561,174) ($3,668,116) ($2,348,164)

This recurring source of money makes the fund self-suf cient. Existing assets are replaced on a life cycle replacement schedule. New equipment can be added through a new initiative if it can be shown to support the Strategic Plan. The table on the left shows the annual replacement cost of the Citys eet inventory with the corresponding contributions required to make pay-as-you-go eet purchases, thereby eliminating the need to borrow. In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will invest nearly $3.2M to replace vehicles and equipment that otherwise would be more costly to maintain.

The following policy guidelines are used to dene a capital expenditure and steer the management of the process: A capital expenditure is dened as a major construction, expansion, purchase, or major repair/replacement of buildings, utility systems, streets, or other physical structures or property which has an estimated total cost of $5,000 or more and generally has an expected life of at least ve years. Capital items under $5,000 are generally included in the various Fiscal Year 2013 funds operating budgets. Capital improvements are programmed and scheduled based on the Citys projected nancial ability to purchase and maintain the capital project. All projects are prioritized and ranked based on criteria including the strength of the linkage between the capital expenditure and the Citys strategic priorities. General Fund debt service expenditures will not exceed 12.5% of the total annual General Fund budget. Voter-approved general obligation debt will not exceed 5.0% of the Citys total taxable assessed valuation. CIP Project Categories: Capital projects are divided into one of three primary categories: Capital improvement projects: The purchase, replacement, maintenance, and repair of infrastructure and xed assets is budgeted and accomplished through the Capital Improvement Program Fleet replacement: The entire inventory of vehicles and equipment is evaluated annually in order to prioritize replacement and repairs needed in the upcoming year, based on age, condition, maintenance cost, and expected life of each equipment. The Equipment Services Fund provides for the purchase, replacement, and maintenance of the Citys eet and other large equipment (such as generators or tillers). This is an internal service fund in which departments are charged for the usage or depreciation of the equipment.

Computer replacement: The Computer Replacement Program is used to purchase and maintain computer hardware (including scanners, laptops, and desktops) and software. This is also a self-suf cient, internal service fund. Existing computer technologies are replaced on a standardized replacement schedule that considers legacy as well as usage. The table below shows the annual investment cost to perform technology upgrades and replace the existing inventory of computers. Funding for Capital Projects can be obtained from any of the following sources: Current General Fund, Fire Fund, and Water and Sewer Fund operating revenuesthese appropriated revenues will generally be used to purchase modest, routine operating capital items. Franchise revenue bonds and capital revenue bondsthis consists of debt that is secured through the pledge of City General Fund franchise revenues and other non-ad valorem revenues. Water and Sewer revenue bondsthe Water and Sewer Fund is an enterprise fund supported by fees for service rather than by taxes. Revenue bonds are repaid with revenues generated from this fund, not by contributions from the General Fund.

Computer Replacement Program contributions and expenses


Fiscal Contributed Estimated Year Expenditures Depreciation Yearendbalance 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 $381,700 $41,550 $188,100 $1,272,650 $506,400 $179,000 $137,900 $165,900 $1,331,300 $335,350 $319,000 $344,520 $361,746 $379,833 $398,825 $418,766 $439,705 $461,690 $484,774 $509,013 $581,568 $884,538 $1,058,184 $165,367 $57,792 $297,558 $599,363 $895,153 $48,627 $222,290

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenue bonds are obtained to increase plant capacity and modernize the Utility system. General obligation bonds this funding source requires voter approval and is used to nance major capital projects with an expected life of 15 to 30 years. Debt retirement is achieved through a special ad valorem debt millage separate from the General Fund ad valorem operating millage. Variable-rate debt bonds and loansthis funding source will be used to purchase capital items through the Florida Intergovernmental Financing Commission (FIFC) or other nancial institution with a contractual obligation specifying payment terms, including principal and interest to be paid over a period of time. Equity nancing this is generally known as pay-as-yougo nancing and involves dedicating budget surpluses that are generated in previous years to capital purchases. When the City equity nances some of its CIP, it reduces the amount of debt that needs to be issued. Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) loan this program provides low-interest loans for planning, designing, and constructing drinking water and wastewater projects. This program is also known as a State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan. Grant funding this program refers to giving of funds for a specic purpose. Funds may be granted from federal, state, or local sources, such as Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA), Florida Department of Transportation, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Energy Ef ciency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG), Resource Recovery Board, Florida Department of Health, etc. Tax Incremental Financing (TIF)this captures the future taxes of real estate improvements in a designated area to pay the present cost of these improvements. All eet requests are accompanied by a Fleet Replacement Form identifying the vehicle type, quantity, replacement cost, vehicle identication numbers, model type, and specialty items necessary to put the vehicle in service. In addition, current status and condition of each vehicle is required as part of the justication submitted for review (e.g. mileage, life-to-date repair cost, etc). Prior to being included in the six-year Capital Improvement Program, each potential project is analyzed to determine its nancial impact on operations, operating expenditures, and revenues. The total cost of each recommended project is identied as part of the capital budgeting process and associated operating expenses are included in the operating budget. In the CIP, the Project Description Form for each project identies expected debt service costs, including interest rate and life expectancy assumptions, as well as operating and maintenance costs for new equipment.

CIP funding sources Fiscal Year 2013


Funding Source OperatingGeneral Fund OperatingFire Fund OperatingEquipment Repl. Fund OperatingWater and Sewer Fund Debt Service Fund Reserve Facilities Reserve Equity Financing Grants Charter School Fund Public Art Fund Tree Trust Fund Renewal and Replacement Fund Road Impact Fund Impact Fees (W&S) Public Safety Bond Fund Balance Loan Revenue Bond (W&S) Total FY 2013 CIP Budget $643,925 $389,800 $3,162,157 $1,006,500 $1,000,000 $1,139,304 $189,000 $2,536,404 $645,653 $86,500 $475,000 $2,554,500 $63,700 $1,200,000 $753,000 $4,656,532 $3,200,000 $23,701,975

The CIP Review Committeemade up of the City Manager, the department requesting the capital, and staff from the Budget of cediscuss all capital requests with further justication, research, and analysis during the meetings. If the need proves to be valid and the capital is part of the Citys overall strategic plan, the project is recommended for approval. The Senior Management Team reviews the entire list of proposed capital projects along with the funding sources and restraints. A nal list of projects is recommended to the City Commission by this team for inclusion in the capital budget. In summary, the six-year CIP provides the necessary components of a sound Capital Improvement Program. The table above describes sources of nancing the capital budget in Fiscal Year 2013. It is important to note that $11.4M or 48.2% of the capital expenditure in Fiscal Year 2013 will be funded by reserves, operating capital or equity and $2.5M or 10.7% will be funded via grants, thereby reducing the need of new debt obligations.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Impact of CIP on the City s Operating Budget


Additional Operating Expenses
Additional operating expenses include all additional cost associated with a capital project, including any non-routine expenditure (additional maintenance costs, utility cost, personnel costs, etc.) offset by anticipated savings or new revenues generated by that project. For example, the addition of eet items such as ve patrol vehicles, four pick up trucks (three for Parks and one for Public Works), and small equipment to enhance litter removal will have an effect on the operating budget. The estimated fuel and maintenance cost for each equipment type is described in the Fleet Assets section on the following page.

CIP impact on the operating budget Fiscal Year 2013

Operating Budget $151,756,237

CIP Impact $5,202,382

Capital Improvement Budget $23,701,975

General Fund This years capital will impact the Citys general operating fund by $643,925, as described in the General Fund operating capital table. Fire Fund The Fire Funds operating capital totals $389,800. This budget will be used for necessary improvements and upkeep of re stations, replacement of portable radios for reghters, purchase thermal imaging cameras for search and rescue operations, and continue installation of trafc light controllers at major intersections allowing emergency vehicles to safely and quicker arrive to emergency scenes. Water and Sewer Fund The Water and Sewer Funds operating capital of $1,006,500 will nance the following projects: ongoing replacement of re hydrants, to ensure standard requirements are met while providing adequate re protection, continue inspection, repair, and maintenance of water and wastewater valves ensuring all components of the sanitary system will perform as needed during times of emergencies, security improvements at the Water Treatment Plant, and replacement of six water service lines on NW 100th Avenue to improve water quality distribution on this section of the City. Additionally, operating funds will be used to conduct a water rate study which includes the evaluation of the current rate structure and a complete analysis of revenues required to sustain operating expenses and meet capital investments in order to maintain the infrastructure. The report will recommend rate adjustments for the forecasted period, in order to generate suf cient income to ensure a long-term nancial health for the water and sewer utility fund. Equipment Services Fund In Fiscal Year 2013, the City is projecting a $3,162,157 operating capital expense in the Equipment Services Fund to replace vehicles and equipment that have exceeded their useful life (refer to Fleet Assets for more information).

Operating Capital
Operating capital is a funding source for capital requests, vehicles, and equipment that are relatively modest in cost, have a short life expectancy and/or spending for them recurs annually or fairly regularly. Each fund allocates money to make appropriate purchases or capital enhancements, nanced through recurring revenues. The total impact of capital in the Fiscal Year 2013 operating budget is $5,202,382.

Projects funded via General Fund operating capital


Department AquaticComplex Project TimingSystemReplacement PatioFurnitureReplacement(Aquatics) PatioFurnitureReplacement(Mullins) FunbrellasReplacement(Cypress) WindScreenReplacement EntrancePlaza AquaticsMullins DeckStaining CenterForTheArts ReplaceEntranceDoorsatTheater CityManager ContingencyforCommunityPride/50thanniversary ReplaceAgendaModule HistoricalMuseumRepairsandMaintenance DigitalEditingandStorageEquipment DevelopmentServices TrafficCalming DowntownPlanning ParksandRecreation SartoryHallImprovements SafetyTownBuilding(Architectural&Engdesign) Police AVLSecurityDisplayReplacement Weapons GranTex SafetyTownImprovements CEMPPlannerSoftware K9TacticalVests BEARUnitEquipment Patrolvehiclesfor3(addstostaff)officers PublicWorks Study/StormHardeningofWestside DrainageSystemPermitRenewal Sportsplex/Tennis ReplaceBackstopNetting FencingTennisCourts Transportation HumanResources Total BridgeRepairs SawgrassSignsFeasibility ELearningPlatform FY2013 Budget $10,000 $16,500 $15,000 $7,000 $6,000 $30,000 $8,750 $4,000 $25,000 $18,450 $5,150 $20,000 $10,000 $15,000 $100,000 $50,000 $12,500 $6,000 $12,000 $5,000 $6,300 $6,225 $80,000 $107,700 $15,000 $10,000 $8,000 $5,000 $7,500 $12,000 $9,850 $643,925

10

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Debt Service
Debt service refers to the amount of interest and principal the City will pay on its outstanding debt during a scal year. In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will borrow $4.7M to nance capital improvements for departments in the General Fund. Repayment of this loan is programmed for Fiscal Year 2014; therefore, this new debt has no effect in the Citys Fiscal Year 2013 operating budget. Repayment of a $536,000 loan secured to fund improvements at two lift stations will continue this year. The total annual principal and interest payment for this loan is $34,926. The City has secured long-term nancing from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan program for improvements at the water treatment plant as well as throughout the entire water and sewer system. The interest rate for this nancing is 60% of the market rate, resulting in low-cost nancing for these improvements over a term of 20 years. Nearly $19 million in nancing has been obtained and many projects have been completed (i.e. replacement of existing wells, construction of new raw water supply wells, and installation of wellheads and transmission lines). The SRF loan program requires payment to begin six months after completion of capital projects nanced through these loans. The total debt service in Fiscal Year 2013 for repayment of SRF loans is budgeted at $1,004,138. In addition, the City will borrow $3.2M to continue rehabilitation of booster stations and perform other improvements on the water and sewer system.

The Citys inventory of vehicles is inspected annually to prioritize replacement and repairs based on age, condition, maintenance cost, and life expectancy. This analysis helps to determine which vehicles can be repaired (instead of replaced) thereby extending their useful life. This operational ef ciency results in annual cost savings in vehicle replacement. This cost savings have a positive impact on the operating budget by reducing the chargeback allocation to all funds. For example, In Fiscal Year 2010 and 2011, the City purchased 10 hybrid vehicles using funds from the Energy Ef ciency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG). This grant allowed for savings of approximately $125,000 to the Citys Fleet Replacement Fund; therefore, reducing the amount allocated to other funds for vehicles replacement. In Fiscal Year 2012, leftover balances from other energy ef ciency projects were reallocated towards the purchase of two more hybrid vehicles. These new vehicles replaced two existing old cars scheduled for purchase during that year, providing cost savings to the Equipment Services Fund. Chargeback is a term used to describe the method to reimburse the Equipment Services Fund for the usage of an asset over its expected useful life (also known as funded depreciation) rather than borrowing money to buy the asset at the beginning of its useful life. Depreciation fees collected from departments are held in the Fleet Replacement Fund until the money is needed to purchase replacement items. The total chargeback allocation for Fiscal Year 2013 is $2,446,483 of which $1,795,572 impacts the General Fund, $204,524 is allocated to the Water and Sewer Fund, and $446,387 is paid by the Fire Fund.

Fleet Assets

The table below shows projected annual investment cost to Replacement of vehicles and equipment is funded by replace the Citys eet assets for the next 10 years. operating capital through the Equipment Services Fund. Vehicles maintenance expenses and gasoline cost are This internal services fund provides for the operating also funded by the Equipment replacement fund. This and maintenance costs of the Citys vehicles and major expense is also collected from all applicable departments equipment. Fuel, maintenance, and depreciation expenses via interfund transfers. The fuel and maintenance budget are determined on a full-recovery basis for each eet asset for Fiscal Year 2013 totals $3,005,357. The impact to the type. The allocated amount for each department in the Citys general operating fund is $2,418,058, the Fire funds City is calculated based on the expected life of the vehicle/ allocation is $364,046, and the Utilities funds portion is equipment, the type of equipment, fuel and maintenance $223,253. costs, and purchase price. The additional eet items requested for funding in Fiscal Year Fleet replacement cost Fiscal Years 20132023 2013 are estimated to increase fuel $7.0 and maintenance costs as follows: ve patrol cars: $36,500 and four $6.0 $6.1 pick up trucks: $10,545. Vehicles $5.7 $5.0 used by Code Rangers (volunteers trained to conduct inspections in $4.0 neighborhoods) also increase gasoline $4.3 $3.9 $5.0 $3.5 $3.0 and repair cost. These additional $3.7 $4.2 $3.2 $3.3 expenses will be offset by cost $3.1 $2.0 avoidance resulted from purchasing energy saving air conditioning units, $1.0 more ef cient motors for City pools, $0.0 and hybrid vehicles.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

11

Replacing cars with hybrid vehicles, which provide better gas mileage than standard automobiles, has resulted in fuel cost savings citywide. The annual gasoline savings is estimated to be $300 per vehicle due to increased fuel ef ciency and enhanced performance. This savings are reected in the operating budget by reducing the fuel and maintenance charges allocated to user departments.

FY 2013 Capital projects financed via grants


Source of grant RRB Project Single stream recycling program Commercial facade Recreactional and therapeutical activities for seniors NW 38th Drive sidewalks Youth scholarships Playground replacement Replace handguns and tasers Driving simulator No Smoke system Chest compression devices Glidescopes Allocation $1,539,861 $80,000 $40,970 $250,000 $47,000 $51,205 $19,057 $289,036 $140,000 $36,675 $42,600

Grants
The City of Coral Springs is continually seeking grant opportunities to help nance projects that support its seven strategic priorities and link to Business Plan initiatives. Grants from Federal, Local, and State sources are researched and applied for with the ultimate goal of funding specic projects that meet our customers needs, while lowering departmental operating costs. For Fiscal Year 2013, the City has been awarded $2,536,404 to assist with funding of necessary capital projects. A breakdown of projects nanced via grants, with their corresponding allocation, is presented in the table to the right. These granted funds impact the Citys budget by supplementing 10.7% of the total Capital expenditure for Fiscal Year 2013.

CDBG

JAG FEMA (AFG) Fla. DOH

Capital Improvement Summary by Fund


Fund Name
GeneralFund Water&Sewer EquipmentServices CharterSchool TreeTrust Fire PublicArt TotalCIP(allfunds)

FY2012 Budget
$8,357,932 $14,954,500 $2,210,651 $574,215 $526,111 $252,079 $76,500 $26,951,988

FY2013 Budget
$10,981,865 $7,961,000 $3,162,157 $645,653 $475,000 $389,800 $86,500 $23,701,975

FY2014 Plan
$23,138,325 $6,291,500 $5,672,821 $516,092 $470,000 $507,390 $128,500 $36,724,628

FY2015 Plan
$15,418,531 $6,471,500 $4,988,217 $30,000 $270,000 $275,899 $175,500 $27,629,647

FY2016 Plan
$8,349,141 $5,535,000 $3,272,210 $30,000 $220,000 $162,640 $153,500 $17,722,491

FY2017 Plan
$6,210,705 $5,575,000 $3,858,831 $20,000 $120,000 $200,214 $200,500 $16,185,250

FY2018 Plan
$5,602,245 $5,285,000 $3,669,590 $0 $0 $223,577 $153,500 $14,933,912

TotalCost FY20132018
$69,700,812 $37,119,000 $24,623,826 $1,241,745 $1,555,000 $1,759,520 $898,000 $136,897,903

12

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

CIP Budget by Funding SourceAll Funds


FundingSource Operating GeneralFund FireFund W&SFund EquipmentServicesFund TotalOperating EquityFinancing TotalEquityFinancing Reserves GFFacilitiesReserves DebtServiceFundReserves CapitalReserves(W&S) TotalReserves ForfeitureFunds GeneralFund TotalForfeitureFunds Grants CDBGGrant JusticeAssistanceGrant ResourceRecoveryBoardGrant FEMAAFGGrant FloridaDOHGrant UASI TotalGrants Loan/grantdependent GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund TotalLoan/grantdependent CharterSchoolFund TotalCharterSchoolFund Loan(GeneralFund) TotalLoan(GeneralFund) PublicArtFund TotalPublicArtFund PublicSafetyBondfundbalance TotalP.SafetyBondFundBalance R&RFund(W&S) TotalRenewal&ReplacementFund RevenueBond(W&S) TotalRevenueBond RoadImpactFund TotalRoadImpactFund TreeTrustFund TotalTreeTrustFund ImpactFees(W&S) TotalImpactFees(W&S) GeneralObligationBond TotalGeneralObligationBond TotalCIP FY2012 Budget $100,000 $252,079 $809,000 $2,210,651 $3,371,730 $5,126,852 $5,126,852 $916,000 $0 $2,208,000 $3,124,000 78,300 78,300 $651,277 $23,590 $100,000 $120,068 $24,000 $217,845 $1,136,780 $1,000,000 $5,771,000 $6,771,000 $574,215 $574,215 $0 $0 $76,500 $76,500 $0 $0 $666,500 $666,500 $5,500,000 $5,500,000 $0 $0 $526,111 $526,111 $0 $0 $0 $0 $26,951,988 $645,653 $645,653 $4,656,532 $4,656,532 $86,500 $86,500 $753,000 $753,000 $2,554,500 $2,554,500 $3,200,000 $3,200,000 $63,700 $63,700 $475,000 $475,000 $1,200,000 $1,200,000 $0 $0 $23,701,975 $516,092 $516,092 $16,732,293 $16,732,293 $128,500 $128,500 $0 $0 $2,350,000 $2,350,000 $3,250,000 $3,250,000 $0 $0 $470,000 $470,000 $0 $0 $3,000,000 $3,000,000 $36,724,628 $30,000 $30,000 $11,046,149 $11,046,149 $175,500 $175,500 $0 $0 $2,350,000 $2,350,000 $3,160,000 $3,160,000 $0 $0 $270,000 $270,000 $0 $0 $3,000,000 $3,000,000 $27,629,647 $30,000 $30,000 $7,148,378 $7,148,378 $153,500 $153,500 $0 $0 $1,850,000 $1,850,000 $3,250,000 $3,250,000 $0 $0 $220,000 $220,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $17,722,491 $20,000 $20,000 $4,971,501 $4,971,501 $200,500 $200,500 $0 $0 $1,850,000 $1,850,000 $3,160,000 $3,160,000 $0 $0 $120,000 $120,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $16,185,250 $0 $0 $4,421,100 $4,421,100 $153,500 $153,500 $0 $0 $1,850,000 $1,850,000 $3,000,000 $3,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $14,933,912 $1,241,745 $1,241,745 $48,987,953 $48,987,953 $898,000 $898,000 $753,000 $753,000 $12,804,500 $12,804,500 $19,020,000 $19,020,000 $63,700 $63,700 $1,555,000 $1,555,000 $1,200,000 $1,200,000 $6,000,000 $6,000,000 $136,897,903 $469,175 $19,057 $1,539,861 $429,036 $79,275 $0 $2,536,404 $1,065,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,065,000 $475,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $475,000 $430,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $430,000 $430,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $430,000 $415,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $415,000 $3,284,175 $19,057 $1,539,861 $429,036 $79,275 $0 $5,351,404 FY2013 Budget $643,925 $389,800 $1,006,500 $3,162,157 $5,202,382 $189,000 $189,000 $1,139,304 $1,000,000 $2,139,304 FY2014 Plan $943,432 $507,390 $691,500 $5,672,821 $7,815,143 $741,000 $741,000 $156,600 $500,000 $656,600 FY2015 Plan $53,382 $275,899 $961,500 $4,988,217 $6,278,998 $211,000 $211,000 $133,000 $500,000 $633,000 FY2016 Plan $85,763 $162,640 $435,000 $3,272,210 $3,955,613 $122,000 $122,000 $63,000 $500,000 $563,000 FY2017 Plan $99,204 $200,214 $565,000 $3,858,831 $4,723,249 $147,000 $147,000 $63,000 $500,000 $563,000 FY2018 Plan $86,145 $223,577 $435,000 $3,669,590 $4,414,312 $137,000 $137,000 $43,000 $500,000 $543,000 TotalCost FY2013FY2018 $1,879,851 $1,759,520 $4,094,500 $24,623,826 $32,357,697 $1,567,000 $1,567,000 $1,597,904 $3,500,000 $5,097,904

City of Coral Springs, Florida

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Major Capital Projects by Department


Department/Fund
DevelopmentServices EmergencyMedical Services DrivingSimulator NoSmokeSystem PhoneSystemReplacement InformationServices CityDataBackupandRecovery RemoteAccessSystemUpgrade CJISSecurityCompliance MullinsParkRenovations MullinsParkRevitalization 15yearPlaygroundReplacement NeighborhoodParksRenovations ParksandRecreation MediansLandscapeUpgradesPhaseI PickupTrucks NorthCommunityParkRenovations SartoryHallImprovements CypressParkRenovations SurveillanceEquipment Police GunRangeRoofandStuccoWaterproofing PatrolVehiclesfor3additionalofficers SingleStreamRecyclingProgram EmergencyPowerforPublicSafetyBldg AirConditioningMaintenance/Replacement PublicWorks RoofReplacementandRepair CityHallLightingandFrontEntranceModifications CityHallRoofReplacement A/CImp.atPolice'sCommunicationsCenter WaterConservingPlumbingUpgrades RoadResurfacingProgram Transportation NW38thDr.Sidewalk,Curb,Gutter&Drainage MasterParkingLotRefurbishing ResurfaceandRestripeParkingLots FireFund FireStationsPaintingandImprovements BoosterStationRehab DowntownWater&SewerImprovements WaterTreatmentPlantImprovements Infiltration/InflowCorrectionProgram GalvanizedWaterServiceReplacement SecurityImprovements WaterandSewerFund GIS/AssetManagementTool RawWaterSupplyWells,WellheadsandTransm PotableWaterInterconnectWithCoconutCreek ValveRepairandReplacement ForceMainandLiftStationIsolationValves FireHydrantReplacementProgram SparePumpsandReplacementPumps CharterSchoolFund RoofReplacement AirConditioningRepairandReplacement

CapitalProject
RoyalPalmEntryway

FY2013 Budget
$330,291 $361,295 $175,000 $1,000,000 $245,707 $240,000 $150,000 $200,000 $200,000 $181,205 $150,000 $150,000 $106,500 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $204,000 $150,000 $107,700 $1,539,861 $743,000 $352,640 $225,000 $205,000 $175,000 $100,000 $100,000 $906,000 $339,000 $248,000 $193,000 $147,000 $2,000,000 $1,200,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $850,000 $300,000 $340,000 $250,000 $154,500 $150,000 $150,000 $100,000 $100,000 $445,653 $130,000

FundingSource
TreeTrustFund($175k);Loan($155,291) FEMAgrant(80%);City'smatch20%(Loan) FEMAgrant(80%);City'smatch20%(Loan) DebtServiceFundReserves Loan Loan Loan Loan Loan CDBG($51,205);Loan($130k) Loan TreeTrustFund Loan Loan GeneralFundOperatingCapital Loan Loan FacilitiesReserves GeneralFundOperatingCapital ResourceRecoveryBoardGrant PublicSafetyG.O.BondFundBalance FacilitiesReserves FacilitiesReserves Loan FacilitiesReserves Loan FacilitiesReserves Loan CDBG($250k);Loan($89k) Loan Loan FireFundOperatingCapital W&SRevenueBond W&SImpactFees W&SRevenueBond W&SRenewalandReplacementFund W&SRenewalandReplacementFund W&SOperatingCapital W&SOperatingCapital W&SRenewalandReplacementFund W&SRenewalandReplacementFund W&SOperatingCapital W&SRenewalandReplacementFund W&SOperatingCapital W&SRenewalandReplacementFund CharterSchoolFund CharterSchoolFund

14

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Major Capital Projects by Location


Capital Projects Citywide
Infiltration/Inflo correction program Galvanized water service replacement Roof replacement and repair Remote Access System upgrade Surveillance equipment No Smoke System Single Stream recycling program CJIS security compliance Valve reapir and replacement Driving Simulator Force main & lift station isolation valves Fire hydrant replacement program Water conserving plumbing upgrades Phone System replacement Raw water supply wells, wellheads, and transmission Coral Springs Drive Medians landscape upgrades phase 1 North Community Park Roof repair; playground replacement; vehicles (3); renovations; Resurface and restripe parking lots GIS Asset management tool City data back-up and recovery Neighborhood parks renovations Air Conditioning maintenance/replacement Potable water interconnect with Coconut Creek Spare pumps and replacement pumps Patrol vehicles for 3 additional officers

Water Treatment Plant Phase 3 Improvements Security Improvements

Firing/Gun Range Roof and stucco waterproofing

NW 38th Drive Sidewalk (curb, gutter, and drainage) Creekside Drive

Future Downtown Water and Sewer Improvements

Road resurfacing City Hall North Lighting and front entrance modifications; roof repairs and replacement

Tennis Center Resurface/restripe parking lots

Center for the Arts Resurface/restripe parking lots

Coral Springs Charter School Roof and air conditioning replacements

Riverside Drive
Master parking lot refurbishing

Lakeview Park Playground replacement Royal Palm Boulevard Entryway Coral Ridge Drive Medians landscape upgrades phase 1 City Hall South Roof repairs and replacements Public Safety Building A/C improvements at Communications Center; Emergency power Cypress Park Renovations Mullins Park Booster station rehab, park revitalization, roof repairs, park renovations, and improvements to Sartory Hall Facility Street name Capital project

City of Coral Springs, Florida

15

Budget Process Map

January Strategic Plan


Resident / Business Survey (as scheduled)

February

March

April

May

June

Workbooks Compiled & Hot Topics Idened

Commission Workshop

Final Dra Published

Management SWOT Exercise

Business Plan
Environmental Scan Select Iniaves Business Plan Workshop

Operang Budget & Performance Measures


Five-Year Forecast Budget Client Feedback

Departmental Budget Packages Distributed for Business Plan, Stang, Operang Budget, CIP & Replacement Programs

Packages Returned Stang & Capital CMO/Dept. Meengs Line Item Review Performance Measures

Quarterly PM Report

Quarterly PM Report

Capital Budget
Replacement Programs Distributed Replacement Programs Updated Fixed Asset Inventory Distributed

16

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

KIOs Set

New Capital Items

July
Note: The Strategic Plan is a mul-year plan. In certain years the Business Plan Environmental Scan is the rst element.

August

September

October

November
Elecons

December
New Commission Orientaon

City of Coral Springs Strategic Planning & Performance Measurement Process Map January 2012

Business Plan Presentaon

Composite Index

Fund Summaries Balanced First Budget Hearing To Next Years Quarterly PM Proposed Budget Prepared To Environmental Scan Quarterly PM Report Budget Adopted Adopted Budget Published

Quarterly PM Report

Proposed CIP Prepared

Fiscal Year Ends

Fixed Asset Inventory Updated

City of Coral Springs, Florida

V
Second Budget Hearing Budgeted Purchases

17

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update


Customer-Involved Government
Initiative 50th Anniversary Planning Department(s) CMO, Communications and Marketing Update as of Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 During Q1, the logo and website were developed, and committee members were recruited. In Q2, the Coralsprings50.org website was launched and the members of the 50th Anniversary committee were selected by the City Commission. A part-time event coordinator was hired in Q3 and is participating on committee meetings. Members of the internal staff meet every two weeks, while the volunteer committee meets monthly. Staff has worked with the sponsorship coordinator to develop the Citys sponsorship package. The committees are beginning to formulate the event schedule for the year. During Q1, streetlight outage reporting was enhanced by the combined efforts of Streets staff, Code Rangers, and PD personnel. A message board was placed advertising the streetlight outage hotline to report outages. During the rst quarter, 340 streetlights were reported out and assigned to the responsible agency for repair. In Q2,the team reported 256 streetlights out to the responsible agency. Public education continued at Slice meetings. A survey of streetlights blocked by trees was completed in Q2 and trimming began during Q3. Two part-time streetlight monitors were hired to increase reporting of outages. 747 streetlights have been reported and repaired through the end of May; 30 trees were trimmed, with streetlight level readings taken before and after. Trimming generated a signicant increase in light output. The streetlight monitors reported 163 outages in April and May. The City is working with FPL on new streetlight installations where they are warranted. This program has been advertised and promoted during the rst 3 quarters of the scal year, but thus far we have only a few volunteers. The sports leagues have agreed to inform staff of any issues they see around the elds and courts they use. The Parks Moms program is combining with this program to generate more interest. During Q2,the closed captioning equipment was ordered and received. It was installed and was used for the rst time in Q3. Purchasing assisted in the selection of the closed captioning services required to transcribe the City Commission meetings. The June 5 City Commission broadcast was the rst broadcast using closed captioning technology. The availability of this service has been marketed via eNews, Whats Happening, and social media and will be included in the next issue of the Coral Springs Magazine. Web-based reporting has not started yet, awaiting for I.S. to work on the exporting of the information to our RMS program. Once that has been accomplished, actual web-based reporting can begin. On January 23, an evaluation committee selected 1 vendor out of 15 who responded to the Citys Branding RFQ. The City Commission approved the selection of North Star on February 7. The in-market visit from Northstar took place in May. In mid-June the community survey was launched. On July 5 the survey was closed with 571 surveys collected. The Understanding and Insights Presentation to staff has been scheduled for July 18, and presentation to the City Commission is scheduled for July 24. As of Q3 there are 16 active Code Rangers that are assisting Code Ofcers and administrative staff in various tasks. Code Rangers are now working with Code Ofcers in their zones using door hangers for code violations. The Code Rangers conducted 1,688 inspections in Q1, 1,553 in Q2, and 1,716 in Q3, with about 70% compliance. Code rangers have been assisting in sending notices on delinquent Business Tax receipts, working on the street tree program, and checking and re-inspecting streetlight outages. There are 5 former police vehicles converted to Code Ranger Patrol vehicles. Status In progress

Street Lighting Improvements

Public Works

In progress

Park VIPs (Volunteers in Parks)

Parks and Recreation

In progress

Closed Captioning City TV

Communications and Marketing

Complete

Web-Based Crime Reporting

Police

In progress

City Marketing Plan

CMO, Communications and Marketing

In progress

Code Enforcement Rangers (ongoing)

Code Enforcement

Complete

18

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (continued)


City Hall Security Improvements Police The City Hall Security Project received the UASI approvals for funding In progress during the rst quarter of calendar year 2012. Also during Q1, Facilities began internal project enhancements which include secure door installation for the City Attorneys Ofce and construction in Water Billing for enhanced employee security limiting public access. As of the end of Q3, the installation for the Water Billing Department is at 95% completion. The conrmation of the vendor selection was approved by the City Commission and formal quotes have been submitted and approved for purchase. Awaiting nal building department approvals and environmental historical protection form approvals, the timeline for installation for the access card system, cameras, and alarm system will be scheduled. Human Resources is drafting policy for the access card system and employee identication cards. FEMA online training was suggested to Human Resources to incorporate with employee distribution of access cards for emphasis on environmental awareness and safety planning. Architectural and engineering design was completed in October 2011, and In progress construction began early in 2012. As of March 31, construction is about 80% complete. The station should be nished by June 2012. In progress The Building Division held the following meetings 1st quarter 2012: 3 pre-review meetings, 6 pre-construction meetings, 2 in progress meetings, and 2 wrap-up meetings. During the 2nd quarter, there were 3 pre-review meetings, 5 pre-construction meetings, 5 in-progress meetings, and 1 wrapup meeting. During Q3, there were 2 pre-review meetings, 4 pre-construction meetings, 5 in-progress meetings on 2 projects, and 1 wrap-up meeting. The Focus Group meets quarterly.

Station 71 Improvements (ongoing) Fire Building Division and EDF Customer Communication (ongoing) Building

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability


Initiative Park Improvement Master Plan Department(s) Parks and Recreation Update as of Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Status The Master Park Plan was completed in Q1 and is the list of smaller projects Complete that need to be completed in all the parks. Many of the smaller items have already been completed; the remaining items will require funding in future years. Completion of items within the 5 Year Park Master Plan will depend on available capital funds in upcoming years. During Q1, scope of work and pricing was agreed upon with the Citys In progress plumbing contractor, West Broward Plumbing, to install new urinals, toilets and faucets in City-owned buildings. During Q2, plumbing retrots were completed at CH South, and Fire Stations 43 and 95. Plumbing retrots have showed signicant reductions in water use at CH South and FS 43. Water consumption at FS 95 has remained constant. Work is in progress at the Charter School, the Fire Training Facility and Tennis Center. When completed, the plumbing contractor will move to the Gymnasium, Cypress Hammock Park and the Aquatics Complex. In progress Preliminary research and data is being collected by City staff and the engineering consultant on the impact of fats, oils and grease on the wastewater collection system. A meeting with the other utility districts was held in Q2 to assess the impact of FOG on their wastewater collection systems. As of Q3, Eckler Engineering is working on the draft report for the FOG Study. They have researched the FOG programs of several different municipalities and provided an analysis of their ordinances in the draft report. We have determined the annual added costs to the utilities to deal with FOG to be about $55,000 for the City of Coral Springs Public Utility, approximately $5,000 for CSID. No additional costs have been segregated due to FOG for NSID and Royal Utilities. We are in the process of surveying various restaurants in town to determine what they do with their grease traps and the associated costs. Once the surveys of the food establishments have been completed, then Eckler Engineering will compare the costs to the food establishments with the costs to the utility districts and determine how best to implement and enforce a FOG ordinance.

Water Saving Devices

Public Works

Fats, Oils, and Grease (FOG) Regulation Program

Public Works

City of Coral Springs, Florida

19

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (contin (continued) ued)


Community Pride Phase III Parks and Recreation During Q1 pressure cleaning was completed for the medians, sidewalks and gutters on Sample Rd., Westchester subdivision, University Dr., Forest Hills Blvd., Community Parks, City Hall, Gym and at re stations. During Q2 the pressure cleaning crew completed all north/southbound median curbs and Atlantic Blvd. The City Tree Master Plan for all parks and public buildings is complete as of Q2. The tree trimming crew started working in Q1 with the full-time employees, and part-time staff began in Q2. The crew trimmed Cypress Park, Gymnasium and started on Coral Springs Drive in Q2 and City Hall and the West Side in Q1. Landscape architects were hired in January and began designing the Royal Palm entranceway, Maplewood Estate linear park upgrade and landscaping for transformers on University Dr. & Cardinal Road. Irrigation and landscape upgrades to the medians are also underway. In Q2, weed and feed was put down on all the median and park grass areas. Renovations to Cypress Hammock Park and Orchid Park were completed in April. Renovations to Pride Promoters Park which were completed in May. Poiniciana Park and Betti Stradling Park had numerous small renovation jobs completed in Q2. The east side of Cypress Park had asphalt overlay of the parking lot and pathways. Cypress Hammock and Orchid Park were completed in April, including the replacement of sign posts and trafc signs. The 3rd Quarter was very busy with several projects being completed and others being planned for the 4th quarter. Pride Promoters Park is complete with the exception of the new landscaping and sod, which will be installed in early July. New park signs were installed at Pride Promoters Park, Turtle Run Park, Mullins Park and Whispering Woods Park. New bleacher pads were installed at the baseball eld at Jaycee Park. A new sidewalk was installed in Mullins Park from NW 29th Street up to the parks main road. A new sidewalk was installed by the Mullins Park pool so it would meet ADA requirements. The landscape plans for Mullins Park were nished for the section by St. Andrews Towers and around the pool. Installation of material will done during the 4th quarter. The pressure cleaning crew has completed all the median curbs and noses throughout the City. They are currently cleaning sidewalks and outside curbs along Wiles Road. The tree trimming crew completed Volunteer Park, Veterans Park, Charter School and Coral Springs Dr. Medians. Cypress Park Buildings were all painted this quarter. See Mullins Park Revitalization for details for that park. Community Development As of Q3, 63 applications were submitted. Eight properties to date have transitioned to home rehabilitation assistance, and 4 properties are under contract. Funding remains for 3 low-income properties. City will issue a public notice to market the program for the remaining applicants in August. Code Enforcement During Q1, the Code Division sent out over 800 letters requiring landlords of 2 units or more to register their properties with the City. This registration program lets the City obtain a more current database of ownership and management of rental properties. A second notice was sent out after March 1, and as of the end of Q3 we have received 740 applications. Code will be stepping up enforcement on the registrations program. A Landlord/Tenant Workshop was held in April with Code Enforcement, Police and Community Development. About 100 landlords learned about the registration program, fair housing and the nuisance abatement program. City Attorneys Ofce The 7-member Nuisance Abatement Board was appointed at the October 4, 2011, Commission meeting, and the group met once in December 2011 for organizational purposes. The board will implement the Nuisance Abatement ordinance that was approved by the Commission on July 5, 2011. The Board last met June 26, and will meet as needed to take action on nuisance properties. In progress

Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP3)

In progress

Neighborhood Preservation Program Enhancement

In progress

Nuisance Abatement Board

Complete

20

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (contin (continued) ued)


FPL Transformer Screening Feasibility Study Parks and Recreation The landscape architect has been hired and has completed the conceptual design. As of Q3, the landscape plans have been completed and they were sent to FP&L for their approval. If approved the next step will be to enter into an agreement with WCI to allow us to plant on their property around the transformers on University Dr. between Wiles Rd. and Sample Road. Landscaping cannot be within 3 ft. of the transformer on 3 sides and 8 ft. on the 4th side, which will prevent us from landscaping some sides of specic transformers. In Q1, the architect nalized the drawings for the 3 buildings at Mullins Park, and they were submitted to DRC for nal review. In Q2, the buildings went out to bid. Demolition of soccer and ag football buildings occurred in April. The new pathway for Mullins Park was designed by the City engineers and the architect. As of Q2, the playground lights were installed and are operational, and a new black vinyl chain link fence was installed around the playground. Several trees were transplanted that were in the way of the buildings. The 2 new re hydrants were installed in April. We are going to obtain bids for installing articial grass on the playground. Sod renovations were completed on 3 of the soccer/football elds. Q3 update: The 3 Buildings at Mullins Park had to go back out to bid because of specic requirements from the Federal Government on how their funds must be used. The new bid is expected to open in July with a recommendation to the Commission in August. Other projects completed in Mullins Park this quarter included new sidewalks from NW 29th St. to the main road in the park and new sidewalks by the pool. Landscape plans for the area by St. Andrews towers and around the pool were completed. Planting is scheduled for the 4th quarter. Bids were received for articial turf on the playground, which is expected to be installed in the 4th quarter. Completed the development of the app-order program to allow citizens to report code violations via their Android or IOS phones (including iPads). The application enables reports to be electronically downloaded with photos of the violation. Citizens can download the app at no cost. The app-order program went live on the Internet with a formal presentation at the May 1 Commission meeting. The RFP process for a complete business application for Code Enforcement is moving forward. The vendor selection process has been completed and the City is now engaged in contract negotiations with that vendor. This process should be completed by the end of the Q3 of the calendar year. Implementation is scheduled to start in the Q4 of 2012. The Cypress Playground was completed in Q2. The playgrounds for Sandy Ridge Sanctuary and DeDe Gilmore Park are ordered and should be installed in July or August. A contract was awarded November 15, 2011, by the City Commission to two contractors to perform inow and inltration correction. A pre-construction meeting was held in December, and work began during the second quarter. Contractor #1 is approximately 30% complete and continues to make progress on addressing leakage caused by inow through manholes. Contractor #2 has not started work but contract term requires completion by January 2013. The 2012 Inow and Inltration correction program has addressed leaks in manholes amounting to 194,040 gallons per day at a cost of $141,769. The City will realize its return on investment in 1.5 years based on current Broward County wastewater treatment charges. The Foreclosure Registration Program has been very successful in providing Code with data on property managers of vacant buildings, enabling us to correct code violations. Code has registered 239 properties in Q1,134 in Q2, and 222 in Q3 for a total of 595 properties for FY 2012. Many of the foreclosed homes have been occupied in the last year but Code is expecting more vacant homes to appear. Banks have been more active in evicting previous owners, leaving properties vacant. In progress

Mullins Park Revitalization

Parks and Recreation

In progress

Code Enforcement Process Improvement

Information Services

In progress

Playground Equipment Replacement Program Inow and Inltration Program

Parks and Recreation

In progress

Public Works

In progress

Foreclosures: Neighborhood Protection (ongoing)

Code Enforcement

In progress

City of Coral Springs, Florida

21

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (contin (continued) ued)


Community Development Submitted a grant application for Global Greens Creating Sustainable Neighborhoods Technical Assistance Program which was not awarded. Researched the logistics and costs associated with bringing the National League of Cities Sustainability Steering Committee spring 2012 meeting to Coral Springs. Hosted Broward County to present the Municipal Green Initiatives Survey to the NEC during Q2. In Q3, the City received silver certication with Florida Green Government, which is to be presented to the City Commission in August. Tree Canopy Restoration (ongoing) Community Development Q1: Provided the NEC with an updated analysis of the Street Tree Subsidy program which will serve as a basis for requesting a further extension of the program through 2012. Worked with the new City Arborist to develop a way of utilizing and expanding the GIS based tree inventory, which will continue to be a focus next quarter. Q2: Working with Parks and Rec to identify additional planting options in parks and medians. Continued increase in Street Tree Subsidy requests due to deadline extension. Q3: Street Tree Subsidy Program is ongoing. Signicant progress being made in Westchester and County Club areas. The City is in conversation with Broward County about the participation in the Countys Urban Forestry Management Program. CDBG Action Plan (ongoing) Community Development City was awarded $814,096 funds for FY 2012. The grant agreement was executed in November 2011. Bid opening began for Mullins Park Fire Hydrants Project, which requires City Commission approval. Designs and plans for NW 110th Avenue Sidewalk Project, NW 85th Avenue South sidewalk and drainage project and Mullins Park Pathway project are in progress. Fire Hydrants at Mullins Park and NW 25th Ct Trafc Calming projects were completed in Q3. NW 85th Ave South side project is in progress and should be completed in the beginning of the 4th quarter. Make a Call, Make a Difference Police The Make a Call, Make a Difference initiative is in full swing. Sgt. Gallagher Campaign made a presentation to civilian members of the police department and other departments within the city, educating employees on suspicious activity and what to look for out in the eld. The Community Services unit made a similar presentation at school PTA & PTO meetings and developed another presentation targeted to students. Some schools have placed information on their school website. Flyers have been handed out at numerous community events. Flyers were also given to local businesses and hospital for distribution. Public Safety Announcements are being shown at the local movie theatre and Twenty Digital Advertising placed an ad on 30 TV locations throughout the city. Signs have been place at several entrances to the city, message boards displayed within the parks, gyms and mall, and posters have been placed in Publix supermarkets within the city. Several burglary arrests were the result of citizens calling in suspicious activity. Sustainability Initiatives (ongoing) In progress

In progress

In progress

In progress

Financial Health and Economic Development


Initiative Internal Auditor Business Development Department(s) City Commission Update as of Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Status The rm of Morre, Stephens, Lovelace was selected as internal auditor in In progress December. The audit contract between the rm and the City Commission was nalized in Q2, and work began during Q3. City Managers Ofce, Created database using CoStar and foreclosure websites. Fewer commercial In progress EDF vacancies, but ofce vacancy rate is critical due to foreclosures on key properties. EDF delivers quarterly economic development updates to Retail Coalition core group. Assisting 15 businesses that are part of the Preferred Client Program. Community Development Revised the application package to tailor the emphasis of signs/lighting in the In progress Commercial Faade program. The yer and application package is posted on the Citys website. Property owners in the target area received a letter and yer about the program. As of Q3, we have received 14 applications. Staff reviewed all the applications and recommended 5 projects to receive assistance.

Commercial Facade Program

22

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (continued)


Fire Department Accreditation Process Phase I Fire In progress Standards of Response Coverage: Began development work with target completion of rst draft on December 13, 2012. This includes a community risk analysis, time and on-scene performance expectations, distribution of resources and other data analysis. It will form the cornerstone for all our other work on accreditation. Subsequent revisions will occur as a result of guidance from a CFAI evaluator assigned to provide feedback, and must be in nal form by one month prior to site visit. Issues uncovered so far and being worked on are related to data collection that is consistent for all years, and measures according to CFAI standards. Recent issues with new station location in Parkland and automatic aid agreements impact standards of coverage in a major way, so have slowed development until recent clarications occur. Data collected on Community Risk analysis will also impact 2013 ISO rating survey, results of which may validate nding of our standards of coverage plan. This is an ongoing initiative. New content is added each quarter to the In progress csbizassist.org website. In progress During Q1 there were 33 properties sold with original ne amounts of $2,352,366. These nes were reduced to $258,465, saving the property owners $2,093,900. During Q2 there were 26 properties with an original ne amount of $2,397,039, with nes reduced to $39,686, saving the property owners $2,357,352. During Q3, 21 properties with an original amount of $1.1 millions had nes reduced to $49,979. Many of the properties were foreclosures and the lien reductions allowed houses to be sold and occupied. The FY 2013 amnesty program runs from June 1 through September 30, In progress 2012. This program allows businesses that have never applied for a business license to register with the City for the current year without penalties.

CS BizAssist (ongoing) Enhanced Code Enforcement Lien Reduction (ongoing)

City Managers Ofce, Communications and Marketing, EDF Code Enforcement

Business Tax Amnesty (ongoing)

Code Enforcement

Traffic, Mobility, and Connectivity


Initiative Westview Turn Lane Street Indexing Signs Phase II Northwest Broward Consortium for Planning Transportation Improvements Update as of Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Status This project began early in Q1 and was completed in Q2. The turn lane into Complete North Community Park has improved trafc ow on Westview Dr. Community Development Permits have been issued for 13 indexing signs along Sample Road. All Complete signs have been installed along Wiles Road for Phase II. Community Development Planners from Coconut Creek, Margate, Coral Springs and the Metropolitan In progress Planning Organization met on 11/30/11. Planners did not meet in the second quarter. NW Planners met on 5/9/12. University Dr. Alternatives Analysis to begin later this year. Broward Countys Transit Development Plan (TDP) 2013 update scope of services has been approved and is to begin later this year, We will promote Sample Road to be elevated to a Strategic Priority in this TDP update. Community Development Q1: 12 streets were tested for the Citys trafc calming program (6 for In progress evaluation of existing speed humps and 6 were new streets or follow-up from the SW/SE Slice meeting). Parts were purchased for the maintenance of speed cushions on Shadow Wood Boulevard. Staff worked with Turtle Run CDD on proposed roadway improvements at Creekside Drive/NW 41st Drive, Creekside Drive/Turtle Creek Drive, and Turtle Run Boulevard. Q2: 9 streets were tested for the Citys trafc calming program (3 for evaluation of existing speed humps and 6 were new streets or follow up from citizen requests). Speed cushions on Shadow Wood Blvd. were repaired. Competitive bids were sought for the installation of permanent speed humps to replace speed cushions on NW 25 Court. Q3: 5 streets were tested for the Citys trafc calming program 2 of which were for evaluation of existing speed humps and 3 were new street or follow-up from citizen requests. Software problems with the trafc counters have prevented more trafc studies from being performed. Construction of permanent speed humps was completed on NW 25 Ct. Department(s) Public Works

Traf c Management (ongoing)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

23

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (continued)


Bike Path and Walkway Inventory and Master Plan In progress Engineers have completed the design of a bike path/sidewalk for NW 38th Drive from NW 85th Avenue to University, ultimately providing connectivity to the downtown district. A public meeting to present the project to the neighborhood took place in Q2. The City has contracted with an engineering consultant to document existing bike path lanes on state and county roadways and determine the feasibility of adding bike lanes to City roads within the paved right-of-way limits. Report is approximately 50% complete, and will be completed by the end of the scal year. The City proposed 22 roadway links (approximately 34 miles) for bicycle facilities consideration. Special emphasis is being given to connect to bicycle facilities that exist or planned within long range transportation plans. Botek Thurlow Engineering (BTE) has conducted eld reviews and measurements of the 22 roadway links. If a roadway link would require widening of an existing curb and gutter drainage section to provide for bicycle facilities, that link was dismissed from consideration due to cost constraints. To that end, our effort is concentrated on the remaining 12 roadway links (approximately 22 miles) for the feasibility study network. The results of the eld reviews indicate that the subject 12 roadway links seem to have potential to incorporate bicycle facilities (designated bike lanes and wide outside lanes). The study will determine whether on-road bicycle facilities can be accommodated through strategies such as re-striping, narrowing travel lanes, or by adding pavement to existing roadways that currently do not have curb and gutter. The consultant is identifying typical sections for each segment as well as likely bottleneck conict points and alternatives (i.e. canal bridges, roundabouts, etc). The preliminary recommendations for providing designated bike lanes and wide curb lanes following trafc standards will be presented to the Trafc Management Team at their August meeting. Community Development Staff members attended FDOT Local Agency Program workshop on 11/9/11. In progress During Q2, staff researched scope of services of other municipalities transportation enhancement pathway projects for design services. In Q3, C3TS submitted a proposal that was higher than the budget and was asked to nd ways to lower the cost of the proposal. Requested a proposal from Davidson Design Studio for landscape design of the pathway. Police Seven cameras are active at 5 intersections, most of them along University Complete Drive. In the 7 months since the cameras have been active, accidents at those intersections have dropped 17% over the same time period last year. Discussions are underway for a possible light at the northbound intersection of US 441 and Wiles Road. Public Works

Downtown Pathways Phase II

Red Light and Security Cameras Implementation (ongoing)

Youth Development and Family Values


Initiative Sports Events and Venues Promotion Department(s) City Managers Ofce, Communications and Marketing Update as of Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 This initiative will dovetail with the Citys branding/marketing initiative and will take shape as the branding recommendations are developed. C&M staff has held several meetings to discuss the development of a Coral Springs Sports Events and Venues Promotion website. The website design is underway and the content is being reviewed by facility managers. The Holiday Family Fun Run was held prior to the 2011 City Holiday Parade. The run, which went up and back on Sample Road drew approximately 100 runners of all ages. The event was considered a success and planning is underway for the Second Annual Family Fun Run prior to the 2012 Holiday Parade. Students that were involved in the summer Leadership Mentoring Program of July 2011 were invited to participate in additional volunteer programs during Q1 (holiday card project for the soldiers and Holiday Parade). In Q2 33 students took part in Teen Success Day on March 29, 2012 This event was held on April 2 at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. Approximately 350 high school students attended the program. There were 9 panelists representing local, county and state levels of government Status In progress

Holiday Fun Run

Sportsplex

Complete

Mentoring Leadership Program

Police

In progress

Teen Political Forum (ongoing)

Human Resources

Complete

24

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (continued)


Senior Empowerment Program (ongoing) Car Club (ongoing) Parks and Recreation Parks and Recreation Staff worked with the seniors to hold another Windows to My World Program in Q3. Staff has also applied for a grant, which, if received, will help fund intergenerational programs. A new photography class is scheduled for July. During the rst quarter staff worked to get new members for the club by distributing iers to all high schools and issuing press releases. These efforts produced two new members of the club. Club members participated in the Holiday Parade. The annual Car Show was held at Sportsplex on February 4. There was a good turnout, but the weather kept some cars from entering. The food trucks were a success. The event raised approximately $2,000 for the Car Club . The City will be housing the Blazer at the Westside maintenance yard as soon as the club purchases a car cover Our contract is still active with Workforce One until May 2012. We contacted the organization in January 2012 to reactivate our partnership. Changes our City Attorney recommended to the WorkForce One contract were sent back to them for adjustment and they are working on making the changes. Teen Cookoff was held on Feb. 4 with 3 teams competing. It was held as part of the Teen Car Show. This years contest was a barbeque. The winning team was Coral Glades High School. In progress Complete

WorkForce One Partnership (ongoing) Teen Cookoff (ongoing)

Human Resources

In progress

Parks and Recreation

Complete

Strength in Diversity
Initiative Visioning Summit Update Department(s) Human Resources, City Managers Ofce Update as of Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 This event was held on April 26 and April 27 at the Coral Springs Library. There were about 100 participants from the community, in addition to about 25 members of staff and City Commission who acted as observers/advisors. A draft report has been submitted to the City Manager. City Managers Ofce, The Commission resolution to change the name of 29th Avenue to Ben Community Development Geiger Drive was approved December 6, 2011. Broward County agreed to fabricate and install the new signs. Ben Geiger Drive will be the primary name and NW 29 Street will be the secondary name. A formal dedication ceremony was held April 2, 2012. Human Resources Staff continues to maintain close contact with the Family Success Center to exchange information and provide mutual assistance. As of Q2, communication with the center has become more difcult. We are sensing some resistance on their part to getting involved in community events. Human Resources This event was held on Saturday, May 19, 2012, at the Coral Springs Marriott and attended by nearly 220 people. A female comedian, Marion Grodin, and a group of Haitian dancers, called The Buttery Dancers, provided entertainment. Human Resources This event will be held on Saturday, September 29, 2012, at the Coral Springs Marriott. The two groups continue to work closely to host monthly Peace Walks and other events throughout the year. This relationship continues to thrive. Status Complete

Rename 29th Street Ben Geiger Drive

Complete

Family Success Center (ongoing)

In progress

CommuniTea (ongoing)

Complete

International Dinner Dance (ongoing)

In progress In progress

Partnership Between Multi-Cultural Human Resources Advisory Committee and One Planet United (ongoing) Weekend of Peace Celebration (ongoing) Human Resources

WorldFest (ongoing)

Human Resources

Martin Luther King Program Enhancements (ongoing)

Human Resources

This event is projected to be held during Q4. Members of the Multi-Cultural In progress Committee and One Planet United have started discussions on a new program called Peace in Music which will most likely be held in October/ November this year. This event took place Sunday, April 15. About 5,000 people attended the Complete event, which provided an array of entertainment, cuisins, and culture saluting the diverse population of Coral Springs and surrounding areas. Committee volunteers conducted a cooking demonstration, and Kids World and Teen World offered games and activities of interest to all ages. Complete The 22nd Annual MLK weekend celebration began Friday, January 13 with a Business Luncheon and Community Celebration and ended on Monday, January 16 with a Diversity/Leadership Day for middle school and high school students. Our keynote speaker for the event was Willie Gary, a trial attorney and humanitarian from Stuart, Florida. We have started working on securing a speaker for the January 2013 event. Scholarship interviews were held in April to award MLK Scholarship funds to high school seniors.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

25

Fiscal Year 2012 Initiative Update (continued)


Excellence in Education
Initiative Cambridge Advanced Program at Coral Springs Charter School Department(s) City Managers Ofce, Coral Springs Charter School Update as of Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 The program is in its rst year at the school, focusing on language arts and science for grades 7 through 9. 383 students are enrolled in the program for the 2012-13 school year. All of our middle school CAPS instructors and several of our high school instructors attended several professional growth seminars aimed at increased understanding of integrating the Cambridge program with our State Curriculum Standards. We had seven different parent evening meetings centered around our CAPS program. Our CAPS students are very enthusiastic about the program, with 99% of all students desiring to stay in the program throughout their high school career. Students are excited about the opportunity to earn college credit while in school and the possibility of achieving the distinguished Cambridge Diploma in addition to the high school diploma. Beginning with the 2012-13 school term we plan to add at least 8 subjects to the high school CAPS options. We will be adding additional courses for subsequent years. City staff continue to provide support to the Charter School regarding quality, strategic planning, performance measurement, and any other areas as needed. Coral Springs Charter School received an A for the eighth consecutive year. The school grade accounts for students performance in several subjects as well as graduation rate, college readiness, and acceleration among high school students. The website is complete and marketing of this initiative continues with emphasis on encouraging businesses to use the site to recruit potential employees. During Q2, the sign ups totalled 419 job seekers and 6 businesses. During Q3, the sign ups totaled 454 job seekers and 11 businesses Broward College has leased a parcel at the northwest corner of Sample and University. Tenant improvements needed to retrot at least 11 classrooms and administrative ofces have begun. City staff is working with the college on a marketing plan. The college is currently registering students for the class term beginning October 2012. Status Complete

Charter School Organizational Excellence (ongoing)

Human Resources

In progress

Student Database Outreach Project Communications and (ongoing) Marketing

In progress

Broward College Campus in Coral City Managers Ofce, Springs EDF, CRA

In progress

26

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Measuring Results
Quarterly Performance Review
Overview The City has developed a performance measurement and management system to align department services and programs with the City Commissions seven strategic priorities. The system enables departments to systematically measure results and make timely adjustments when results fall short of expected performance levels. Three components make up the system: a quarterly performance reporting program, a composite index that measures the overall nancial and service operation position, and the State of the City report. These elements play an important part in the Citys overall Business Plan and help keep the organization on target. Departmental Measures A total of 100 performance measures have been established to measure results achieved through services and programs provided by the Citys 12 operating and support departments. The majority are on track to meet their goals by the end of Fiscal Year 2012. Four of the performance measures double as Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) and are discussed in the KIO Analysis.

Key Intended Outcome Analysis and Current Initiative Update


Twenty-six Key Intended Outcomes (KIOs) have been established, all of which support at least one of the seven strategic priorities. Performance goals for each KIO were developed as part of the City Commissions Fiscal Years 2012-2013 Strategic Plan. As of the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2012, ten of those goals have been met or are on target to be met, and seven are not being reported this year since they are based on results of the resident survey that was not conducted this year. Information for three other goals is not yet available. Two goals for the year have not been achieved. The business survey rating of the Citys communication with businesses was 81% compared to the goal of 88%. In the coming year, the City will be improving its methods of communicating with local businesses to better conform with those used by the businesses. The Citys crime rate for calendar year 2011 was higher than goal. The increase was partially due to a decrease in population, and partially due to an increase in burglaries. The newly-formed BEAR unit will address this problem. Four other KIOs are on watch and may not meet their goals. The number of youths in City-sponsored leadership opportunities may not meet its goal of 2,000 students. The youth mentoring program was not conducted during Fiscal Year 2011, and was revived in a slightly different format for Fiscal Year 2012, but participation levels were not as high as expected.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

27

The number of trees planted is likely to fall short of the goal of 1,750 due to the lower level of development and redevelopment activity in the City. The number of students attending higher-education courses at partner institutions may not meet its goal as a result of the delays in the opening of the Broward College campus in Coral Springs. The level of volunteer activity continues to be in a trough; this goal may need to revised for Fiscal Year 2013. Business Survey Results In the spring of 2012, ETC Institute administered a phone survey to a random sample of 401 businesses in the City of Coral Springs. The purpose of the survey was to gather feedback from business owners and senior managers to help identify ways to improve the quality of City services to those businesses. A survey of business owners was last performed in 2008. Overall, results of the survey were positive. Businesses are satised with City services and perceive the City as being friendly to business. Ninety-ve percent of the businesses surveyed felt the quality of City services was higher than or meeting their expectations. Overall satisfaction with City services has improved since the last survey in 2008, and the percentage who gave very good ratings for customer service increased signicantly from 40% in 2008 to 61% in 2012.

The respondents ranked the following City services or departments as most important to their organization: Fire inspection 49% Police 48% Business tax 28% EMS 18% Code enforcement 18% Survey recommendations include: continuing to give high priority to public safety and enhancing the overall image of the City, nding ways to improve the code enforcement process for businesses, and improving awareness in the business community about the types of services available to them through the Citys web site. All of the KIO results and initiatives for Fiscal Year 2012 are summarized on the following pages and in the appendix.

Satisfaction with items that influence perceptions of Coral Springs


QualityofnewdevelopmentintheCity

29%

34%

26%

11%

Qualityofpubliceducation

36%

37%

17%

10%

Overallfeelingofsafety

36%

45%

14% 6%

OverallimageoftheCity

50%

37%

10% 4%

Overallqualityoflife

50%

38%

9% 4%

0% VerySatisfied
Source: ETC Institute, 2012 Business Survey

20%

40% Neutral

60%

80% Dissatisfied

100%

Satisfied

28

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Supplier and Partner Performance Data Sustainability Index


The Citys most important suppliers, partners, collaborators, and distributors are those that provide direct service to customers. Waste Management, Inc. picks up and processes trash and recycling. Professional Facilities Management operates the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. Charter Schools U.S.A. manages and staffs the Citys charter middle and high school. Advanced Cable Communications provides the infrastructure for television programming. Median mowing is accomplished through a group of contractors. Service standards are part of the contracts with these organizations; the standards spell out customer requirements and are discussed through periodic regularly scheduled meetings. For instance, Public Works management meets quarterly with Waste Management to review performance data and exchange information and ideas on operations. City management meets quarterly with the principals of schools in the City to assess our partnership with them regarding athletic eld use, after school programs, leadership development, etc. In Fiscal Year 2009, the City created a Sustainability Index to track a broad spectrum of green and sustainability benchmarks. This tool lines up with our Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability strategic priority. During Fiscal Year 2011, the index was ne-tuned by assigning weights to index items according to their relative importance. Since the index is so new, the Fiscal Year 2011 results offered us the rst opportunity to evaluate our overall performance. Results for Fiscal Year 2011 were buoyed by strong performance of two indicators: linear feet of sidewalk improvements and number of trees planted. During Fiscal Year 2012, the greatest concern in the index is the continued increase in fuel use, which has the effect of lowering the index total. This indicator is among the most important in the index because it not only has an impact on our environment, but directly affects City expenditures. About half of the increased fuel consumption can be attributed to the Community Pride and Code Ranger initiatives and the new tree trimming equipment. The cause of the remaining fuel increase will be researched, and any necessary actions to improve our environmental sustainability will be taken during the coming year.

Sustainability Index 2008-2012


1 Number of trees planted Base equals KIO for respective year 2 Number of Certified Backyard Habitats Base equals actual number for 2007 3 Biodiversity index for environmental sites (Sandy Ridge, Pine Flats, Red Lichen, Cypress Gateway) Base equals actual number for 2008, not measured before 4 Percentage of "Green Building" checklist items fulfilled Base equals actual number for 2008, not measured before 5 Average Daily per capita consumption of potable water (gallons used Base equals actual number for 2007 Actual 2008 6,873 3,000 27 73 0.80 0.80 Actual 2009 3,491 2,000 46 73 0.80 0.80 Actual 2010 2,061 2,000 15 73 0.79 0.80 Actual Actual Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 2011 2012 2012 2012 Goal 2,118 170 288 352 2,000 1,750 1,750 1,750 6 73 0.79 0.80 3 2 3 Weight 1.25000

0.25000

0.79

0.79

0.79

0.50000

25% 25% 93 103

29% 25% 97 103

30% 25% 89 103

26% 25% 93 103

28%

27%

24%

0.50000

87

92

88

1.00000

6 KwH of electricity used in select City facilities 13,506,275 12,913,802 12,852,467 (Aquatics, Fire Training, City Hall N&S, Charter School, Gymnasium, 13,506,275 13,506,275 13,506,275 Tennis Clubhouse, Public Safety Bldg., Utility Plant) Base equals actual number for 2008, not measured before 7 Sheets of white copier paper used 4,750,000 5,600,000 5,000,000 Base equals actual number for 2008, not measured before 4,750,000 4,750,000 4,750,000 8 Fuel Consumed by City Operations (diesel and unleaded) Base equals actual number for 2008 9 Linear feet of improved or new bike lanes, sidewalks, pathways Base equals KIO for respective year 10 Number of CS residents dropping off household hazardous waste Base equals actual number for 2008, not measured before Total index value 386,325 386,325 500 500 827 827 115.5 384,440 386,325 3,678 500 881 827 124.4 389,180 386,325 3,866 2,500 966 827 103.7

13,476,300 3,135,410 3,151,870 3,264,964 13,506,275

1.83334

5,600,000 1,000,000 1,200,000 4,750,000 408,467 386,325 15,674 2,500 875 827 109.4 96,471 117,682

800,000

1.58333

103,937

1.83333

4,664 2,500 910

0 2,500 0

0 2,500 0

0.25000

1.00000

City of Coral Springs, Florida

29

Composite Index
The Composite Index comprises ten indicators, carefully chosen to give an overall snapshot of our nancial and operating results. The Composite Index score is projected to remain steady in Fiscal Year 2013, primarily because of the increase in residential property value. A chart and description for each indicator is presented on the following two pages.

Composite Index
175 145.6 151.4 156.8 160 162.4 162 161.8 158.5 158.8 158.4 150 120.7 126.5

136.7

141.1

140.9

125

100 Projected Projected

75

50

25

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Residential Property Values


$9.0 Billions $8.0 $7.0 $6.0 $5.2 $5.0 $4.0 $3.0 $2.0 $1.0 $0.0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 $3.6 $3.7 $4.0 $4.3 Projected Projected $4.7 $5.7 $6.5 $7.6 $8.3 $7.7

Good
Source: Broward County Property Appraisers Office $5.4 $5.4 $5.5

$6.2

(Propertyvalues reflectcalendar yearratherthan fiscalyear.)

Residential taxable assessed property values decreased drastically in Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011. The decrease is due to property tax legislation passed in January 2008 and is indicative of the national recession which began in 2008. Values remained steady for Fiscal Year 2012 and are expected to increase slightly for Fiscal Year 2013.

Non-Residential Property Values


The decrease in residential property values (see chart above) caused the increase in non-residential as a percentage of total value. Non-residential includes commercial/industrial sites, as well as agricultural, institutional, government and miscellaneous real estate. As residential values improve, non-residential values should easy back to about 20%.
30% Asa%ofTotalPropertyValues 25% 21.2% 20% 22.1% 22.9% 23.8% 23.6% 22.6% 22.1% 27.9% 28.8% 27.4% 26.5%

Good
Source:Broward CountyProperty Appraisers Office

21.2%

21.9% 20.1% 19.7%

15%

10% (Property valuesreflect calendaryear ratherthan fiscalyear.) FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

5%

0%

30

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Projected

Customer Satisfaction
The City has consistently received high ratings in customer satisfaction from our residents. The overall satisfaction rating decreased in Fiscal Year 2009, yet ratings for departments and services increased. Results from the 2011 survey show a return to record high levels. In an effort to save money, the Residential Survey is being conducted every other year.
100% 91% 93% 90% 92% 93% 93% 95% 95% 93% 93% 92% 92% 95% 95% 92%

Good

80% Nosurveyconducted;usedprioryearresult Nosurveyconducted;usedprioryearresult Nosurveyconducted;usedprioryearresult

60%

40%

Projected 8,200 Projected

20%

Source:2011 Resident Survey conductedby ETCInstitute.

0%

FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Crime Rate
4,500

Incidentsofmajorcrimesper100,000 population
4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 Projected

2731.4

2583.9

2530.1

2559.1

2688.8

2500.5

2259.3

2469.4

2530.0

The incidents of major crimes per 100,000 population increased. This is due to a 4% rise in the number of Source: indexed crimes (3,271 from 3,145) coupled with a CityofCoral SpringsPolice lower population number. The 2010 Census for Coral Departmentand Florida Departmentof Springs was 4% less than prior estimates by BEBR. LawEnforcement The new burglary reduction unit is intended to prevent CrimeReport crimes. Good
(Crimefigures arecalculated utilizingcalendar yearratherthan fiscalyear)

3987.6

3506.9

3390.1

3193.5

3001.2

3085.5

The rise in the crime rate from FY 2009 to FY 2010 was the result of a mathematical anomaly. While the number of crimes decreased during this period, the population upon which the ratio is based decreased at a faster rate.

Athletic League Participants


Some of the activities offered by the Parks and Recreation Department are basketball, soccer, football, baseball, roller hockey, lacrosse, and cheerleading. Independent teams and programs, though not counted in this measure, also utilize City facilities. The decline in FY 2011 was due primarily to the number of participants moving from recreational leagues to more competitive travel leagues, whose participants are not included in this measure.
14,000 12,500 12,636 12,000 11,757 10,855 10,959 11,624 11,150 10,151 10,000 9,500 8,500 8,000 7,792 8,763 8,158 8,200

Good

6,000 Projected Source: CityofCoral SpringsParks andRecreation Department

4,000

2,000

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Accidents at Major Intersections


180 160 140 120 100 80 Projected Projected 60 40 20 0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 169 160 147 138 130 131 132 122 123 123 120 124 116 124 124

Good The number of accidents at 16 major intersections is tracked and analyzed to reveal trends and to identify which methods are effective at reducing the number of crashes. Overall, this measure has been trending downward since Fiscal Year 1994. It is projected that the number of accidents at major intersections will not exceed 124 during the scal year based on current trends.

Source: CityofCoral SpringsPolice Department TrafficDivision

City of Coral Springs, Florida

31

Volunteers in Government
600 519 509 520 520 500 410 400 Projected 303 266 Projected 431 404 479 454 494 463

Good The number of volunteers in government reached an all-time high of 519 for Fiscal Year 2010. The slight decline in FY 2011 was expected. We anticipate the number of volunteers increasing in FYs 2012 and 2013 because of the Citys 50th Anniversary events. Members of our committees and boards are counted as volunteers for this indicator.
Source: Databaseof Boardsand Committees

458

463

300

200

100

0 FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

Employee Satisfaction
All employees are surveyed annually by the Human Resources Department to determine overall job satisfaction. The decline in satisfaction for FY 2011 is likely due to increased employee work loads that began in FY 2009 and the wage freeze in FY 2010.
100% 92% 80% 91% 95% 95% 93% 91% 94% 95% 97% 95% 95% 97% 90% 90% 90%

Good

60% Projected Projected Source: CityofCoral SpringsHuman Resources Department Employee Survey FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

40%

20%

0%

Employee Productivity
12.0 EmployeesPerMillionDollarsofRevenue 10.0 8.78 8.0 7.96 7.61 7.25 7.17

Good It will take fewer than six full-time employees to generate one million dollars of revenue, down from 10.91 in Fiscal Year 1994.
Source: Financial Services AnnualBudget (Calculation includesfull time employeesfor allfunds dividedbyNet Revenues)

6.94

6.57

6.39

6.0

5.97

5.77

5.77

5.60

5.39

5.13

5.24

4.0 Projected FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

2.0

0.0

School Overcrowding
Overcrowding has continually decreased for Coral Springs schools since FY 2002. Enrollment and capacity numbers are provided by the Broward County School District.
150% %CapacityStudentStations 125% 119% 122% 122% 123% 113% 114% 112% 104% 100% 96% 95% 92% 92% 93% 92% 92%

Good
Source: Broward County School Board

75%

Projected FY1999 FY2000 FY2001 FY2002 FY2003 FY2004 FY2005 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013

50%

25%

(Percentages reflect academicyear ratherthan fiscalyear.)

0%

32

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Fiscal Year 2012 KIO Summary


FY 2010 Actual FY 2011 Actual 95% 93% 90% 37,504 93% 88% 94% 97% FY 2012 Goal 92% 90% 42,000 88% 90% FY 2012 1st Qtr N/R N/A 5,321 N/R N/R FY 2012 2nd Qtr N/R 95% N/A 7,799 N/R 81% N/R 97% FY 2012 3rd Qtr N/R N/R N/A N/A 7,979 N/R N/R N/R N/R

Customer-Involved Government (8)


1 Overall quality rating for City services and programs (Resident Survey) 2 Overall quality rating for City services by business owners (Business Survey) 3 Employee satisfaction rating (Human Resources Survey) 4 Number of citizen volunteer hours donated to the City of Coral Springs 5 Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with residents (Resident Survey) 6 Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with businesses (Business Survey) 7 Customer service rating by residents (Resident Survey) 8 Customer service rating by businesses (Business Survey) 92% 93% 97% 41,567 86% 88% 89% 97%

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability (6)


1 Percent of Code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to admin./judicial process 2 Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year 3 Number of volunteer hours aimed at enhancing the environment 4 City crime rate (crimes/100,000 residentsCalendar Year) 5 Safety rating in neighborhood (Resident Survey) 6 Number of trees planted within the City 90% 15 590.25 2,559.8 93% 2,061 90% 15 545.5 2,469.4 95% 2,118 75% 15 1,500.0 2,530.0 1,750 89% 3 317 N/R 170 87% 4 1,328 2,688.8 N/R 288 82% 3 527 N/R N/R 352

Financial Health and Economic Development (3)


1 Maintain City bond ratings Moody Aaa, Fitch AAA, S&P AAA Moody Aaa Moody Aaa Fitch AAA S&P AAA 2 Residents' value rating (Resident Survey) 3 Non-residential value as a percent of total taxable value 77% 27.9% Fitch AAA S&P AAA 72% 28.8% Moody Aaa Fitch AAA S&P AAA 20.0% Moody Aaa Fitch AAA S&P AAA N/R N/A Moody Aaa Fitch AAA S&P AAA N/R N/A Moody Aaa Fitch AAA S&P AAA N/R N/R N/A N/A

Traffic, Mobility and Connectivity (2)


1 Number of linear feet of improved sidewalks, bike paths, and bike lanes 2 Number of riders on intracity bus routes 3,866 87,513 15,674 88,299 2,500 85,000 4,664 25,189 0 24,057 0 24,297

Youth Development and Family Values (3)


1 Number of youths involved in City sponsored leadership opportunities 2 Number of teen volunteer hours donated to the City of Coral Springs 3 Number of middle school after-school programs offered annually 1,484 21,432 18 1,602 18,424 14 2,000 20,000 15 183 1,185 14 426 2,359 14 603 1,578 14

Strength in Diversity (2)


1 Minority residents who feel that the City is a great place to live (Resident Survey) 2 Citizen rating of City Government for respecting religious and ethnic diversity (Resident Survey) 94% 95% 98% 98% N/R N/R N/R N/R N/R N/R N/R N/R

Excellence in Education (2)


1 Achieve gains in math/reading mean scale score at the Charter School 2 Number of students attending courses offered by partnering institutes of higher education 1.0% 2,468 0.4% 2,531 0.6% 3,000 N/A 198 N/A 848 N/A N/A 232

Note: Prior Business Survey conducted in FY 2008. Reported FY 2008 Business Survey Results as Actuals for FY 2010 and FY 2011

Fiscal Year 2012 3rd Quarter Results Met or exceeded goal 5 Did not meet goal 2 On target 5 On watch 4 Not available 3 N/A Not reported 7 N/R Total Measures 26

City of Coral Springs, Florida

33

Service and Operations Strateg y


This Business Plan covers the second year within a two-year Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013. The seven priorities identied by the City Commission for this strategic planning cycle set the agenda for this Business Plan, namely: Customer-Involved Government Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Financial Health and Economic Development Traf c, Mobility, and Connectivity Youth Development and Family Values Strength in Diversity Excellence in Education While the Strategic Plan sets out the vision, the Business Plan outlines tangible plans for making the vision a reality. In each of the priority areas, department directors have developed initiatives that will direct the way the City operates in order to address our seven priorities and implement the vision expressed in the Strategic Plan.

Our New Initiatives


Initiatives are chosen that will assist us in achieving our Key Intended Outcomes. We include those we feel are signicant contributors to supporting our strategic priorities or put additional demands on our resources. In this way, we identify the most signicant actions we plan to take next year. Fiscal Year 2013 will present new challenges. Adhering to our successful business model, we will be preparing for the new normal that is resulting from the slow recovery from the Great Recession. This Business Plan includes several initiatives designed to proactively City of Coral Springs Business Model prime the engine of economic growth Citizen Input Data Analysis by assisting our existing business community and deploying Strategic Plan resources to encourage redevelopment Business Plan of commercial areas such as the Corporate Budgets Park. In addition, since aesthetics and overall Output to Citizens attractiveness of a community have been shown to be essential to draw new businesses and residents, a number of Business Plan initiatives will enhance the Citys appearance and overall safety. Wherever applicable, operating expenditures have been identied for the rst year only. Capital expenditures also reect only the rst year of the project, and do not include capital carrying costs.

A Word About Existing Services and Ongoing Initiatives


In some sections, we have highlighted initiatives that were in previous Business Plans that are still being implemented in Fiscal Year 2013. Generally, if an initiative is fully operational and integrated into our service package, it will not be mentioned. The emphasis is on multiyear implementation and the evolution of existing initiatives. For more detail about the services we provide and the performance measures we use to manage those services, please reference the departmental sections of the Annual Budget.

34

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Customer-Involved Government
New Initiatives
City Hall Lighting and Entrance ADA Modifications
Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $205,000 This project will provide better accessibility to this facility while improving the aesthetics of the front entrance into City Hall North. In Fiscal Year 2012, an assessment was conducted along with an estimate of construction costs. The next phase consists of constructing a ramp outside the east and west doors of the lobby in place of the existing step down. This improvement will facilitate customer access to of ces located on the east and west side of the building as well as entrance from the rear parking lot into City Hall of ces. The concrete landing in the front of City Hall will be replaced with pavers or stamped concrete to create an aesthetic appeal and better visibility to all customers and visitors. Other enhancements planned to improve safety at this building include lighting in front of the wings and along the center driveway. Staff is planning to modernize the current enterprise software application (i.e., Sungard H.T.E.) or replace it with a different enterprise resource program (ERP). The main goal of modernizing the ERP is to streamline the nancial, budgeting, human resources, building, permitting, asset management, and licensing processes throughout the City. An improved ERP will also provide self-service functionality for both citizens and staff. Other specic advantages of an ERP system is that it reduces redundant data entry, tracks activity and cost information associated with work orders, manages the collection of money from multiple locations with full audit trails, and produces exible nancial reports. Another major advantage of this application is the capability to fully integrate asset management with the general ledger. Prior to modernizing the system the City has used for more than 20 years, the City will spend this year learning stakeholders needs and determine the alternatives available in the marketplace.

Enterprise Resource Program


Lead Department: Information Services Capital Outlay: $30,000 (allocated in FY 2012)

Key Intended Outcomes


Overall quality rating for City services and programs (Resident Survey) Overall quality rating for City services by business owners (Business Survey) Employee satisfaction rating (Human Resources Survey) Number of citizen volunteer hours Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with residents (Resident Survey) Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with businesses (Business Survey) Customer service rating by residents (Resident Survey) Customer service rating by businesses (Business Survey)

FY 2012 Goal
92% 90% 42,000 88% 90%

FY 2013 Goal
92% 90% TBD 88% 90%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

35

IT Infrastructure Modernization
Lead Department: Information Services Capital Outlay: $1,000,000 Lease: $500,000 per year for four years beginning in Fiscal Year 2014 The City is planning to merge its voice and data network onto a single platform. This merger is expected to increase the quality of service because of alternate routing of both voice and data. With this merger no single site outage will impact service at other locations and service will be rerouted automatically using new and improved technology. The City will experience a reduction in the cost of internal calls based on calls being routed on the Citys infrastructure as opposed to a local carrier. Key components of the new voice and data architecture include: replacing the existing phone system, servers, switches and routers, and the purchase of additional software licenses. The existing voice system has been in place for over seven years and is no longer supported by the vendor. It is anticipated the new platform will serve the Citys voice and data requirements for the next ten years.

City Charter Review


Lead Department: City Attorneys Of ce Operating Expenses: $20,000 The Citys Charter provides for the periodic review of the Charter to ensure the structure continues to serve the needs of the community. Every ten years the City Commission appoints a 15-member committee to review the Citys charter, make recommendations for any changes to the Commission, and provide for public input at the committees meetings. This committee will be appointed in March 2013. Applications for membership to the committee will be made available at the beginning of 2013 to give the Commission time to review the application materials. The committee must submit its recommendations to the City Commission by November 2013. In 2004, (the last time the committee convened) the Commission directed staff to arrange for inclusion of the recommended changes on the General Election ballot.

Downtown Planning
Lead Department: Community Development Partner: Community Redevelopment Agency Operating Expenses: $5,000

Building Division Customer Service Enhancements


Lead Department: Building Operating Expenses: $10,000 The Building Division will undertake two new programs to improve customer service. The rst program will educate homeowners who make building improvements to their own homes. These people are often inexperienced in construction and may not be aware of their responsibilities and liabilities during the building process. All residential owner/builders will be offered a pre-submittal meeting with staff specic to the work involved which will allow them to understand the processes, procedures, and expectations of their project. In addition, the Building Division will revise its website and handouts to make them more useful to builder/owners. The second facet of the program will be a survey of building inspection customers. We will gather feedback from our residents, business owners and contractors on ways we can provide the best building inspection service. Each customer will be given a survey to complete. The completed survey will be returned by the customer directly to an independent survey rm. This rm will analyze the results and provide the City only aggregate level information.

Capital Outlay: $15,000 Based on input received at the May 2012 Visioning Summit and other survey results, the City will continue to explore appropriate uses for the Downtown area in terms of public gathering opportunities, future activities, and the connectivity between the public and private spaces needed to create a sustainable Downtown. The City will coordinate a discussion of the anticipated gateway hub, amphitheater and other civic uses within the Downtown. These uses will also promote pedestrian and bicycling connections which together will create a sense of place the residents/ commercial owners have been seeking for the past several years. Encouraging public-private partnerships will be a cornerstone discussion. Ultimately, Downtown zoning district (s) will be codied in order to further this effort.

36

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Ongoing Initiatives
Street Lighting Improvements (2012-2013) Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $20,000 This program was initiated last year in response to customers comments regarding inadequate street lighting in nine of 30 residential survey sections. These concerns are also communicated during Slice of the Springs Meetings and through the Citys Help Desk. In Fiscal Year 2012, the City employed a licensed tree trimmer to properly prune trees away from blocked lights; therefore enhancing illumination and visibility of City streets. In the event tree trimming doesnt improve foot candle, streetlights would be upgraded from 70-watt to 150watt high pressure sodium xtures. Other measures that will continue in Fiscal Year 2013 are focused on better reporting light outages and quicker replacement of non-working street lights. To do so, the City hired two part time staff to assist identifying and monitoring lighting outages at night. In addition, Code Rangers have been trained to nd pole numbers and conduct inspections in neighborhoods during the winter months when sunset occurs earlier in the evening. A media educational campaign is under way to instruct residents on the proper method of reporting streetlight outages. A mobile message board was deployed in front of the Slice of the Springs meetings encouraging the public to call the Streetlight Outages hotline, thereby contributing to the safety of their neighborhoods. Improving lighting in neighborhoods is expected to increase the perception of safety among the Coral Springs community.

Code Enforcement Rangers (2012-2013) Lead Department: Code Enforcement Operating Expenses: $4,700 Code Rangers are volunteers trained to help improve the aesthetics of the City by helping Code Of cers uncover simple violations such as dirty roofs, overgrown lawns and hedges, trash and litter, and illegal signs. The group of volunteers receives 16 hours of training before being assigned to a patrol zone where they issue friendly reminder door hangers at properties with violations. If violations arent corrected within a reasonable period, the case is assigned to a Code Of cer. In Fiscal Year 2012, they have also assisted with the street tree program and business tax programs, and with checking streetlight outages. Several retired police vehicles have been converted to Code Ranger patrol vehicles for use by these volunteers. The Code Rangers have completed over 4,800 inspections in the rst three quarters of this year, with a 70% compliance rate. Web-Based Crime Reporting (2012-2013) Lead Department: Police Operating Expenses: Existing Forfeiture Fund: $36,000 (approved in previous years) The goal of the web-based reporting program is to provide an option for citizens to report certain types of crimes directly from their home or business. Customers will be able to self-report incidents such as minor theft, vandalism, lost property, harassing phone calls, or other minor crimes without a suspect 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, without having to wait for an ofcer to respond to their call. The report will be reviewed and approved by Police Department personnel, and citizens will be able to obtain an ofcial copy of the police reports within 5 business days. The program is currently under development. The Citys Information Services department is working on exporting the information to the records management system. Once that has been accomplished, the program will be tested and publicized so that citizens can begin making their reports.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

37

Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability


New Initiatives
Burglary Enforcement and Reduction (BEAR) Unit
Lead Department: Police Operating Expenses: $15,000 Capital Outlay: $80,000 In 2011, residential and vehicle burglaries increased in Coral Springs. In December 2011, a temporary BEAR unit was formed to determine if the unit, in conjunction with other police department programs, could have an effect on the burglary rate. The temporary unit has been very successful, using proactive methods such as analyzing crime statistics to determine times and locations where burglaries are likely to occur, educating residents on crimeprevention tactics, and conducting high visibility patrols in targeted neighborhoods. From January 1 to March 31, 2012, residential burglaries decreased over 15% and vehicle burglaries decreased 46% from the same time period in 2011. The permanent BEAR unit will be composed of one sergeant and six of cers, all coming from current department staff. Operating expenses consist of additional salary for the sergeant upgrade as well as special assignment compensation for of cers assigned to the unit. The capital outlay consists of funding for vehicles, GPS locators, and other specialized equipment.

Resurface Master Parking Lots


Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $248,000 To encourage economic development and support its existing business the City will invest in the aesthetics improvements to the master parking lots along Sample Road. In Fiscal Year 2013, the scheduled enhancements include repairing, resurfacing, and re-striping master parking lots east of Riverside Drive, as well as adding new signs, sign posts, and stubs. As part of the scheduled improvements, current parking stripes and ramps will be upgraded to comply with existing ADA requirements. This resurfacing effort will enhance safety in the community and the aesthetic improvements will enhance the curb appeal of these commercial areas.

Key Intended Outcomes


Percent of Code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to administrative/judicial process Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year Number of volunteer hours aimed at enhancing the environment
(A subset of the CIG KIO. Includes environmental partnerships, student research projects, Eagle Scout projects, EarthFest, Adopt-A-Street, and Waterway Cleanup.)

FY 2012 Goal
75% 15

FY 2013 Goal
75% 15

1,500

1,500

City crime rate (crimes per 100,000 residents)


(Note: lower population may make crime RATE higher)

2,530
(Note: NEC goal

TBD 92% 1,000

Safety rating in neighborhood (Resident Survey) Number of trees planted within the City
recommendation)

1,750

38

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Public Safety Technology Upgrades


Lead Department: Police Capital Outlay: $132,000 Todays police departments rely on numerous high-tech tools to effectively ght crime, some of which are in need of upgrade. For example, the Departments existing license plate reader is outdated. The replacement units incorporate high-resolution cameras to scan vehicle tags while an of cer is driving. If a stolen or suspect tag is identied, the system will immediately alert the of cer, provide a phone alert to investigators, and upload the vehicles GPS location into a web-based program available to law enforcement agencies across the nation. The Departments automated ngerprint identication system (AFIS) also needs to be replaced. The current AFIS system works in conjunction with that of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce. Since BSO intends to upgrade its system, the CSPD must upgrade its system to remain compatible. The AFIS unit consists of a computer, software, camera, and an FBI-certied scanner that allow users to capture, encode, and submit latent ngerprints and palm prints directly from evidence. With this equipment, latent print experts can conveniently track cases through the system, perform quality checks, and verify search results. Funds will also be used to purchase computer forensic analysis equipment to allow of cers to retrieve evidence stored in cell phones, computers, and other electronic devices. The Department currently must rely on other agencies computer forensic units for this type of analysis, and having its own equipment will allow investigations to proceed more quickly.

Public Art for 50th Anniversary


Lead Department: Community Development Partner: Public Art Committee Public Art Fund: $75,000 The Citys Public Art Program will celebrate its 10th anniversary in 2013 and has introduced a number of artists and artworks to the City. Since its inception, 14 works of art have been purchased or commissioned through this program. This initiative will provide increased publicity for the Citys 50th anniversary and the Public Art Program. The Public Art Committee has placed a call for artists to commission a unique piece of art for the City. The proposed location for the artwork will be at the east entry of Atlantic Boulevard. The Committee will review the artists submittals and ultimately recommend the artist and artwork for the City Commission to approve. The Public Art Committee has budgeted $75,000 in FY 2013 to complete this project.

Public Safety Communication System and Equipment Upgrade Study


Lead Department: Police Operating Expenses: $45,000 The current P25 communication equipment is an analog based system. The development of digital technology has made it dif cult to procure repair parts. In fact, the manufacturer of the Citys equipment stopped making replacement parts in 2005. The decrease in the availability of parts has greatly increased the cost to operate the system. Furthermore, the manufacturer has announced it will no longer support analog systems. The City, therefore, will take steps to upgrade this important system. Replacing the P25 communication system is complex and costly. Estimates range from $4 million to $8 million. Therefore, it is important this project be done correctly the rst time. The City will procure the services of an independent consultant to conduct a needs analysis; advise it on the options available; assist in writing a request for proposal; and assist in evaluating responses to its request for proposal. The consultant will explore both short- and long-term solutions that will be cost-effective and serve the needs of our citizens and employees.

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39

Single-Family Rental Registration Program


Lead Departments: Code Enforcement Operating Expenses: $120,389 Capital Outlay: $52,540 Declining real estate prices over the past several years and the foreclosure crisis have created the perfect market for the real estate investor. Many of the single-family home foreclosures in Coral Springs have been purchased by investors and are being used as rental properties. We estimate there are approximately 2,700 rental homes in the city. These properties have accounted for a signicant portion of new code enforcement cases over the past year. This initiative will expand the current rental registration program. Currently, owners of rental properties with two or more units are required to register with the City, which provides us with a database of contact information for use in case of emergencies and for correcting code violations. This initiative will require owners of single-family residences to register those properties as well. The improved Single-Family Rental Registration Program will consist of education of tenants and property owners on Coral Springs code requirements, and an annual exterior inspection of those properties. Additional personnel may be needed to implement this program. Expenses of the program consist of salary, benets, and equipment and supplies. Operating expenses will be offset by the revenue generated from the registration fee.

The rst phase included architectural drawings for the construction of three new buildings at Mullins Park. Design plans for a new pathway around the three baseball elds and football eld was also completed last year, as well as demolition of the soccer and ag football buildings. During phase II of this project, staff will coordinate installation of articial turf on the grass around the playground, complete construction of new sidewalks from NW 29th Street to the main road in the park as well as the section near the pool. The construction of the three park buildings will commence. Modernizing Mullins Park will require the installation of directional signage throughout the park, upgrades to landscaping, and replacement of park equipment such as benches, trash cans, and picnic tables.

Royal Palm Entryway Construction


Lead Departments: Public Works and Community Development Capital Outlay: $94,709 allocated in FY 2012; $155,291 in FY 2013 Tree Trust Fund: $175,000. In 2012, staff obtained a survey instrument, select a landscape architect to implement the conceptual design and ultimately work towards construction of an entry feature at the east entrance of the City on Royal Palm Blvd. This is the rst of several potential entryways identied for aesthetic improvements and involves coordination with numerous entities. The City has received permission from the north side property owner (Coral Springs Christian Academy) to obtain the necessary easements and design proposal in which to place a portion of the improvements within their property. This includes deleting an unconstructed egress/ ingress opening on Royal Palm Boulevard that requires County action. Sunshine Water Control District and Coral Springs Improvement District must also approve the overall plans impacting their easement (culvert) and pump station improvements. In addition to the efforts described above, the Design Development Plan will be presented for review and approval by the City which includes a meandering sidewalk on the north side of Royal Palm Boulevard, a retaining wall and decorative columns, landscaping with irrigation, landscape lighting, decorative paving, and the installation of pedestrian street lights. Royal Palm Blvd. will be curbed with improved drainage along the north side from the Citys east boundary Riverside Drive.

Mullins Park RevitalizationPhase II


Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Capital Outlay: $400,000 This programs goal is to improve the overall aesthetic appearance of Mullins Park, the oldest and largest park in Coral Springs. An important element of the Mullins Park Revitalization was the creation of an integrated architectural landscape design to give a coordinated look and feel to all neighboring facilities, including the Public Safety Complex and the Center for the Arts. In 2011, a landscape conceptual plan was developed for this park. Recommendations from the plan suggested improving the appearance, safety, and ease of movement within the park. Attracting more tournaments and special events is an important outgrowth of this beautication effort by transforming this park into a showcase for the City.

40

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Code Compliance Microgrants


Lead Department: City Managers Of ce Operating Expenses: $5,000 Financial hardships being experienced by many homeowners have made it dif cult for some City code violations to be corrected. The City will donate $5,000 to a non-prot corporation that performs home improvements that will help Coral Springs homeowners in nancial distress pay for the services they need to correct code violations. This pilot program will cover only violations involving discolored roofs.

Litter Removal Enhancement


Lead Department: Public Works Operating Expenses: $90,000 Capital Outlay: $95,000 Litter continues to grow as an environmental concern to our customers. The Public Works Streets Division implemented the Litter Control Program in February 2008, which consists of four crew members working from three individual Toro Workman (golf cart type) vehicles to increase litter collection. Over the last four years, a total of 948.55 cubic yards was collected from the public right-of-way. The crew has worked diligently in removing litter from approximately 73.46 miles of public right-of-way every 15 working days. Since the program began, citizen complaints regarding litter in the City have declined by 62%. The goal is to further improve service levels by reducing the sweep of the City by four days. To do so, the City will hire an additional crew including three part-time workers for litter collection. This additional staff will contribute to collecting more litter in a shorter amount of time (from 15 working days to 11). Enhancing the program will expand the removal area to 113 miles of public right-ofway. As a result, staff will collect an additional 117 cubic yards of litter per year, which represents a signicant increase in employee productivity. In addition, this program prevents litter from entering into the drainage systems and will lead to further reduction in customer complaints.

CURRENT LITTER CONTROL PROGRAM

WYNDH

AM

TUR TLE

ISLAND

_ ^ _ ^
5 2
CORAL RIGDE DR

NW 66

MS RE

_ ^
BERG

RID G

TE R

PIN E

54
E

55
DR

WILES RD

WO OD

SAWGRASS EXPRESSWAY

W SAMPLE RD

85 AVE

DR

CORAL SPRINGS DR

SPORTSPLEX

_ ^
12

BLVD

31

32
ROYAL PALM BLVD

UNIVERSITY DR

_ ^
8

NW 29 ST

RIVERSIDE

33

NW 28 ST

34

_ ^
27 ST
24 ST

CURRENT AS OF 2012 LITTER CONTROL PROGRAM

89

DR

HILLS

22 21
IE W EV LA K

DR

23
14

24
SHADOW
RAMBLEWO OD

_ ^
9
WO O D

_^ ^ _
13

_ ^
4
DR

25

11

12

W. ATLANTIC BLVD

13
DR

_ ^ ^ _ _ ^ _ ^ _ ^ _ ^ _ ^ _ ^ _ ^ _ ^

ROCK

_ ^
11

NW 110 AVE

NW 40 ST

DR

SIDE

44
DR

45

46

Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 6 -10 Zone 11 Zone 12 Zone 13 Zone 14

RIV ER SID

14

City of Coral Springs, Florida

TUR TLE C RE

41

42

43

_ ^
3

DR

EK

_ ^
6

RD

RUN BLVD

_ ^
10

DR

STATE RD 7 (US 441)

ON HER
BAY

61
LAKES

BLVD

56
CRE EKSIDE DR

SAWGRASS EXPRESSWAY

BLV D

WESTVIEW DR

51

52

53
L RA CO

DR

S HIL L

FOREST

VD BL

41

Median Master PlanPhase I


Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Capital Outlay: $150,000 In 2012, an architectural review of all City medians was conducted to analyze existing condition and present recommendations. As a result, a Median Master Plan is being developed to implement the suggested improvements. Some of the recommended median upgrades include adding new trees, installation of new shrubs, removing existing ground cover and replacing with new ground cover, installation of a more ef cient irrigation system, and adding new sod and shrubs. The plan is intended to unify the look of the medians, contributing to the Citys goal of revitalizing the aesthetics and improving the perception of how people view the City. In Fiscal Year 2013, median landscaping will begin along Coral Ridge Drive, Coral Springs Drive, and Wyndham Lakes. The remaining City maintained medians will be scheduled for beautication efforts in the near future.

Providing adequate wildlife habitat throughout the City leads to a decrease in nuisance wildlife. In addition, the use of butter y gardens and native plants to attract native wildlife is in line with the new Florida Friendly Landscape Ordinance that encourages the use of more shrubs and bushes to reduce landscape watering needs.

Park Facilities Maintenance Crew


Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Operating Expenses: $221,036 Capital Outlay: $140,100 The purpose of this program is to maintain City parks in optimal conditions. To do so, it will be necessary to hire a maintenance crew to assist existing staff in keeping all park facilities safe and aesthetically pleasant for our customers. The crew will consist of three new technicians and one maintenance worker who will perform miscellaneous repairs. The goal is to have an in-house crew to immediately address plumbing and electric related issues occurring in City parks, as well as other upkeep and maintenance, such as carpet replacement, painting, and replacement of lights. Having in-house staff, rather than contractors, conduct proactive maintenance and repairs will reduce costs and ensure the parks are maintained to the standards our customers expect.

Community Wildlife Habitat Designation


Lead Department: Community Development Operating Expenses: $1,500 Several years ago, the City of Coral Springs registered with the National Wildlife Federation to become a certied Community Wildlife Habitat. To receive this distinction 300 private properties, seven public properties, and ve school properties must be certied backyard habitats. Currently there are nine public properties and seven school properties certied but only 248 single family properties. Although staff has taken every opportunity to encourage residents to register, the rate at which new properties are being certied has slowed signicantly over the last couple years. To achieve the goal of receiving Community Wildlife Habitat Certication by the 2013 Earth Fest event, the City will refocus attention in two ways. First, staff will send information to homeowners in neighborhoods explaining how their property fullls all the requirements of the backyard habitat program by virtue of their location. Good examples include, but are not limited to, Whispering Woods and Woodside Estates, and The Preserve. Second, the City will offer native plants to homeowners who get certied to make their property even more wildlife friendly. The value of the plants will not exceed $15 per property.

42

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Ongoing Initiatives
Water Saving Devices (2012-2013) Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $100,000 (Facilities Reserves) This program is to upgrade existing restroom plumbing xtures, such as toilets, urinals, faucets, and shower heads in 12 City facilities to water saving devices, as recommended in an energy study conducted in 2009 and 2010. The Consultants report observed the potential for 30% in water savings through the installation of water conserving motion activated low ow ush valves or water strainers at the Center for the Arts. The report identied similar benets at the 12 buildings evaluated under the Audit. The implementation phase began in Fiscal Year 2012. Plumbing retrots were accomplished in City Hall South, Fire Stations 43 and 95, and the Westside Compound. In Fiscal Year 2013, the City will continue replacing existing plumbing xtures with improved and more ef cient devices at the following facilities: Charter School, Fire Training Academy, City Hall North, Gymnasium, Tennis Center, Aquatics, Cypress Hammock Park and Center for the Arts. CDBG Action Plan (2011-2013) Lead Department: Community Development FY 2013 CDBG Allocation: $586,468 Each year, the City is required to complete an annual Action Plan as a part of the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. The plan describes specic projects and activities that the City will undertake in the coming year to address priority needs identied in the ve year plan. These priorities include providing a suitable living environment, decent and affordable housing, and expanded economic opportunities. The CDBG program allows the City to utilize grant funds for capital improvement projects in the Citys low- to moderate-income areas. The following projects are listed in the 2012-2013 Action Plan: NW 38th Drive Sidewalk (curb, gutter and drainage): $250,000 Commercial Faade Program: $80,000 Playground Replacement (Poinciana Park): $51,205 Youth Scholarship Program: $47,000 Senior Recreation and Functional Training $30,970 Senior Recreation and Therapeutic Program: $10,000 Planning and Administration: $117,293

Inow and Inltration Program (2012-2013) Lead Department: Public WorksUtilities Capital Outlay: $1M (Renewal and Replacement Fund) The purpose of this program is preventing the in ow and in ltration of ground water into the sewer lines, which ultimately travels to Broward County Wastewater Treatment Facility for treatment. A Wastewater Facilities Plan, created in 2007 identied this project as a top priority for the City. Rehabilitation of the sanitary sewer system began in Fiscal Year 2012 with relining defective or cracked sewer lines, manhole repair and coating, point repairs, and site restoration. There are a number of vitried clay segments and joints that are allowing groundwater to enter the sewer system due to decay, cracking and root intrusion. This extra water adds to the ow of wastewater sent to Broward County for treatment, needlessly increasing the pumping, treatment, and disposal costs. This initiative allows the City to continue sewer rehabilitation, making great strides toward eliminating the in ltration, preventing structural defects, while reducing wastewater treatment costs paid to the County. Community Pride Phase IV (2010-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Capital Outlay: $2,000,000 CDBG: $301,205 The Community Pride initiative got off the ground in 2010 by developing a multiyear plan focusing on revitalizing city facilities, rights-of-way, parks, and medians in preparation for the Citys anniversary. This initiative, therefore, will dovetail with the 50th Anniversary Committees initiative meant to plan events celebrating the Citys anniversary. Community Pride continued in 2011 with projects designed to revitalize the look of the City, such as modications to existing bicycle and pedestrian walkways, parking lot improvements, renovations to neighborhood parks, and enhancing and allocating additional resources to the maintenance of roadway medians. In 2012, these projects continued and additional projects designed to enhance the aesthetic appeal of City-owned properties began. For example, park common grounds (non-athletic elds) were fertilized on a continuing basis to beautify the entire park. In previous years the City invested heavily in restoring the tree canopy. Therefore, the City hired an in-house tree trimming crew to maintain a healthy tree canopy by regular and proper trimming of those trees. A full-time arborist has established a master tree trimming program to include trees in medians and at all public buildings, parks and linear

City of Coral Springs, Florida

43

parks throughout the City. Other projects consistent with promoting beautication efforts were implemented during Fiscal Year 2012. These include painting and pressure cleaning of buildings, resurfacing and maintaining City roads, repair and replacement of roofs at various City facilities, and upkeep of athletic elds and pools. Proposed activities for Fiscal Year 2013 are: upgrades to Mullins Park, continued replacement of playgrounds at City parks, upgrades to parking lots and pathways, painting the exterior of various park buildings, beautication of park grounds, streetlight upgrades, signage enhancements, pressure cleaning roofs and walls of City facilities, and installation of new fencing at City facilities. Improvements to landscape will be made on linear parks and medians as suggested in the Median Master Plan. Pressure cleaning of curbs and sidewalks will continue throughout the City. Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP3) Lead Department: Community Development Grant Funded: $1,657,845 In 2010, Congress appropriated a third round of Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds through the Dodd-Frank Act enabling the City to receive an additional allocation of $1,657,845. The main goal of NSP3 is to invest funds in programs and projects that revitalize targeted neighborhoods and reconnect those neighborhoods with the economy, housing market, and social networks of the community and metropolitan area as a whole. The City has been using these funds to provide grant assistance to low-to-moderate income persons through the following strategies. Financing Mechanism (Purchase Assistance): This activity sets aside funds to address the abundance of vacant homes by assisting qualied buyers with purchasing a foreclosed property that has been deemed eligible under NSP3. Purchase and Rehabilitation Assistance: This activity sets aside funds to assist homeowners that purchased a foreclosed property with NSP3 funds to help them make minor repairs and/or make energy ef cient improvements. Twenty-ve percent of the funds from each type of assistance must be set aside to assist low-income persons, with the remainder used for moderate-income persons. The City must expend 50% of funds by March 2013 and 100% by March 2014. Eight properties have been purchased to date with ve more properties under contract. It is anticipated that fteen properties will be purchased and improved.

Tree Canopy Restoration (2010-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Operating Expenses: $60,000 (Tree Trust Fund) For many years, the City has been committed to reaching at least 30% tree canopy coverage Citywide. Thirty percent canopy coverage is signicant because of the enhanced benets to the environment at this level. The benets include reduction of heat islands, increased rainfall interception, reduced ooding and increased oxygen production. This goal was dealt a severe setback during the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons when nearly a third of the mature tree canopy was destroyed. The City had reached an approximate coverage of 23% prior to this but was reduced to an estimated 16% after the hurricanes. To achieve to a 30% tree canopy by 2020, as outlined in the Citys Comprehensive Plan, several components are in place. Street Tree Subsidy Program In 2006, the City began this program which allowed eligible property owners to plant appropriate shade trees as street trees and receive up to $200 in subsidy per tree. This program was later expanded to include multifamily and commercial properties as well. This program is now in its nal year in 2012 and its conclusion will have provided all eligible neighborhoods in the City with an opportunity to take advantage of the street tree subsidy program. As a result, over 3,000 trees have been planted in residential neighborhoods and nearly 600 street trees were planted in commercial districts. Tree Master Plan - The City has embarked on a multiyear Tree Master Plan to install a signicant number of trees in City parks and on other public property. These trees will be further supplemented by native understory planting where appropriate. Over the next 10 years, trees planted under the Tree Master Plan and the Street Tree Subsidy Program will mature and will contribute signicantly to the overall canopy coverage. Effective education including information on Right Tree, Right Place In conjunction with the Street Tree Subsidy Program, the City began an educational campaign for property owners. The goal is to encourage comprehensive tree care understanding that includes selecting trees with quality structure, planting them correctly and in appropriate locations and caring for the trees over the long term. Evaluating extent of canopy coverage In accordance with the Comprehensive Plan, the City will begin performing a tree canopy analysis every ve years to determine progress towards the 30% tree canopy goal.

44

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

GIS-based tree inventory The City has completed the rst phase of developing a Geographic Information System-based tree inventory for public property. The inventory includes almost 2,000 trees located around public buildings. An expansion of the tree inventory to include medians and parks will be undertaken by the City arborist. This data will be valuable for ensuring that the City-owned trees will be properly documented and cared for. Additionally, it opens up the possibility to begin quantifying the economic benets of trees as part of the green infrastructure. Code Enforcement Process Improvement (2012-2013) Lead Department: Information Services Operating Expenses: $24,000 The purpose of this initiative is to improve the ef ciency and effectiveness of parts of the Code Enforcement process by updating some of the divisions automated systems. New software should allow the staff to handle an increased caseload as well as allow citizens to submit code violations more easily. In FY 2012 the process for purchasing a complete business application for Code Enforcement began, and vendor presentations were made in the fourth quarter of the year. In the third quarter, a free smartphone application was launched that allows citizens to report code violations and submit photos with the report.

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45

Financial Health and Economic Development


New Initiatives
City Branding Phase II - Implementation
Lead Department: Communications and Marketing Partner: Economic Development Foundation Operating Expenses: $60,000 In Fiscal Year 2012, the City contracted with North Star Destination Strategies to develop a branding strategy as part of the Citys overall marketing effort to attract and retain both residents and businesses. Phase I of this process has resulted in a brand platform, new logo, and an action plan for brand implementation. City Branding Phase II will allow staff to put into place some of the key elements and recommendations in the branding strategic action plan. An important element of this effort is to contact new residents to make them familiar with the A to Z Guide as well as the Citys web site to inform them about the various services the City has to offer.

Economic Development Enhancements


Lead Department: City Managers Of ce Partner: Economic Development Foundation Operating Expenses: $250,000 The City Managers Of ce, in partnership with the Economic Development Foundation (EDF), is facilitating the forward progress of the economic recovery by making sure the City maintains the commercial and industrial property tax base at or above 20% of the total tax base. The EDFs mission is to expand and diversify the commercial tax base through targeted strategies which support the Citys quest to be the premier community in which to live, work and raise a family. This targeted approach will identify specic industries that are establishing the future of the area and of the country, such as medical services and information technology (IT), global IT opportunities, educational services, logistics and distribution, foreign trade opportunities in the import/export market as well as light manufacturing. This initiative will encompass these primary efforts: Revamping the EDF web site to provide relevant, useful information focused on EDFs core services. Developing an Economic Development Strategic Plan, providing regular status updates on progress, causes and effects. Providing Economic Development incentives for qualied targeted industries. Include ways to enhance the competitiveness of the Corporate Park in the Economic Development Strategic Plan.

Key Intended Outcomes


Bond ratings Residents value rating (Resident Survey) Non-residential value as percent of total taxable value

FY 2012 Goal
AAA 20%

FY 2013 Goal
AAA 72% 20%

46

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Corporate Promotional Video


Lead Department: Communications and Marketing Partners: Economic Development Foundation, Community Redevelopment Association Operating Expenses: $5,000 In Fiscal Year 2012, the City undertook an economic development initiative which included a branding study as well as producing a sports event promotional website. Phase II of the economic development strategy will include the production of a corporate video. This video will be used to encourage business entities to relocate or expand their presence in Coral Springs. This initiative will focus on the Citys assets and also capitalize on the prestige of being a Baldrige-award-winning community of excellence.

EMS Equipment: Time=Life


Lead Department: Fire EMS Grants: $79,275 Capital Outlay: $26,425 (City Match) The City has received two grant awards from the Florida Department of Health EMS Matching Grant program for the purchase of equipment to improve and expand our Emergency Medical Services. The grant funds will be used to purchase four video laryngoscopes and three chest compression devices. The City is required to provide at least a 25% match of the total cost. During calendar year 2011, the Fire Department responded to 13,556 calls for service (23,698 total runs). Of these, 54 required advanced airway intervention and 17 required additional measures to secure an airway. Time is of the essence when establishing an airway and the longer this procedure takes, the lower the chances of survival. With the use of a video laryngoscope, it only takes seconds to intubate a patient, even those with dif cult airways. Cardiac events occurred in 62 of the calls for service. The key to a successful resuscitation of a patient suffering from cardiac arrest is continuous effective chest compressions. The automatic chest compression devices offer highquality, uninterrupted CPR over an entire resuscitation event. Both the video laryngoscopes and the chest compression devices allow the Department to increase operational ef cacy as well as improve patient survival rates.

Fire Academy Promotional Campaign


Lead Departments: Fire, Communications and Marketing Operating Expenses: $25,000 During the recent recession, the Fire Academys customer base shifted substantially. Prior to the recession, the Academy was lled with new students working toward basic re service certication, a lengthy, involved course of study which commands high tuition rates. As hiring of new reghters has fallen off, the Academy now primarily provides in-service training and required recertication of existing professional reghters, at signicantly lower rates. The Coral Springs Fire Academy is an integral part of the Fire Department but it has evolved to serve a wider purpose, fullling the training needs of over 35 re departments across eight counties. It was recognized as the top re training center in the State of Florida in 2007 and 2011. The Academy has continually contributed to the improvement of re service training in Florida and has one of the largest academies in the state by volume of students. The promotional campaign will feature this long history of excellence, promoting the City as an educational center, as a means to attract students interested in the basic re service certication. The Coral Springs Fire Academy promotional campaign will be designed to dovetail with the branding effort which is expected to be completed early in Fiscal Year 2013.

Water Rate Study


Lead Department: Public WorksUtilities Operating Expenses: $35,000 (Water and Sewer Fund) The 2007 Water and Sewer Rate Study recommended replacing the current two-tier rate structure with an entirely new rate structure designed to encourage water conservation. The two-tier structure was replaced with a multi-tier, inclining ve-block rate structure for residential customers. This rate structure was adopted to give residential customers a price incentive to conserve water. Beginning in November 2007 the recommended water rate increases have been implemented. With the adoption of the 10-Year Water and Sewer Master Plan, the Water Utility will commission a new water and sewer rate study to determine whether current usage and rate structure will generate suf cient revenues to support the utilitys ongoing operating costs as well as planned repair and rehabilitation of existing assets.

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Ongoing Initiatives
Internal Auditor (2012-2013) Lead Department: City Commission Operating Expenses: $100,000 In Fiscal Year 2012, the City contracted with an outside auditing rm to provide an independent and objective review of the Citys nances and operations. The rm was tasked with ensuring internal controls are in place to safeguard assets, determining that nancial and other reports disclose information fairly and accurately, making sure City resources and public funds are being utilized effectively, and monitoring compliance with local, state, and federal laws and regulations. A workshop was held on December 13, 2011, and the internal auditor outlined the process to complete the internal audit. Based on requests and suggestions from the City Commission and City management, an audit plan was established based on the priority areas identied by the City Commission. The external auditor is now implementing this plan.

Commercial Faade Program (2012-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Community Development Block Grant: $80,000 This initiatives goal is to assist businesses in the City by improving the look and aesthetics of their storefronts. This program will potentially attract new customers to this area and contribute to future redevelopment within Coral Springs. Utilizing Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the City will re-establish its commercial faade program. This program was part of the Citys 2004 and 2005 Business Plans and focused on properties within the Citys Community Redevelopment Area. In Fiscal Year 2012, $57,000 was allocated to this initiative. Due to the number of businesses interested in the program, an additional $29,507 was added to the budget in Fiscal Year 2012. The $80,000 allocated for Fiscal Year 2013 will be targeted at small businesses along Sample Road and Wiles Road and focus on updating signage and lighting for these businesses as well as redesigning storefronts. The total available amount of $166,507 is projected to provide assistance to between eight to 10 businesses.

48

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

T rafc, Mobility and Connectivity


New Initiatives
New Sidewalks at 38th Drive and 85th Avenue
Lead Department: Public Works FY 2013 Capital Outlay: $250,000 Community Development Block Grant; $89,000 (Citys portion) FY 2012 Capital Outlay: $200,000 In 2010, the City contracted with a consulting engineering rm to perform an evaluation of potential sidewalk construction in conjunction with the Citys master bike path comprehensive plan. The goal is to provide pedestrian connectivity to the future downtown, public transportation, and industrial and commercial districts. The inspection identied seven areas most in need of new concrete sidewalks. Two of the highest priority areas were identied as future pedestrian paths to University Drive and the downtown district. These areas are 38th Drive between University Drive and 85th Avenue from 38th Street to 40th street. Providing walkways along streets leading into the downtown area is consistent with the Community Redevelopment Agency plan to facilitate pedestrian access to downtown, specically to the Northwest Regional Library and Coral Springs Charter School. There are currently no sidewalks on these roadway segments creating con icts between pedestrians, bicyclists, and automobiles using these roads simultaneously.

Coral Hills Drive Sidewalk Design


Lead Departments: Public Works Capital Outlay: $50,000 The goal of this initiative is to increase safety to pedestrians walking on Coral Hills Drive. The design for this project will be completed during Fiscal Year 2013 and replacement of the existing asphalt path in place from Sample to Wiles Road is planned for the following year. Preliminary cost estimates were provided by an engineering rm on contract with the City. The project calls for construction of a concrete sidewalk on one side of Coral Hills Drive from Sample to Wiles Road. Work will consist of a 6-foot sidewalk, curb, gutter and drainage as determined during the design phase.

Key Intended Outcomes


Number of linear feet of improved sidewalks, bike paths, and bike lanes Number of riders on intracity bus routes

FY 2012 Goal
2,500 85,000

FY 2013 Goal
2,500 85,000

City of Coral Springs, Florida

49

Roadway Resurfacing and Alley Improvements


Lead Department: Public Works Capital Outlay: $906,000 The Citys roadway resurfacing programs goal is to resurface up to 10 miles of City roads per year. This resurfacing technique has proven to extend the life of the asphalt surface by 18-20 years which is more cost-effective than reconstructing the entire road bed and surface. Each City road is resurfaced between the 20th and 25th year of useful life, preventing deterioration of the road base. Improvements include removing the old street surface and base materials and replacing with more durable materials, followed by grading and installation of new asphalt. In Fiscal Year 2013, portions of the remaining sections of the Turtle Run area will be completed, as well as the roads in Butler Farms, Coventry, and Pine Ridge, and Creekside Drive north of Wiles. Other roads scheduled for the future resurfacing include 105th Avenue and Coral Springs Drive, 100th Avenue west of Coral Hills Drive, portions of Coral Hills Drive and other roads listed in the Road Resurfacing Master Plan. Alleys improvements began in Fiscal Year 2007 with an engineering evaluation of 13 alleys in the City. The report identied alleys needing the installation of a twofoot concrete valley gutter and an overlay of the surface with compacted asphalt. A master plan was created to classify public alley ways into low, medium and high priority categories, depending on the type of repair and improvements identied in the study. Since the program began, ve alleys have been improved. For Fiscal Year 2013, this initiative includes refurbishing alleys on the following locations: West side of University Drive between 14th and 16th Avenues. East side of University Drive between 16th and 19th Avenues. The alleyway behind 7500 block of Sample Road, on the west side of Woodside Drive. The remaining alleys listed in the master plan will be scheduled for enhancements in future years.

Right Turn Lane at Shadow Wood Boulevard and Riverside Drive


Lead Departments: Public Works Capital Outlay: $63,700 (Road Impact Fund) This project was initiated as a response to citizens concerns regarding pedestrian safety at this intersection. Vehicles coming from the westbound direction are encroaching into a striped non-vehicular access lane to make a right turn (northbound) from Shadow Wood Boulevard onto Riverside Drive. The Trafc Management team evaluated this situation and recommended the construction of a right turn lane to alleviate the trafc congestion, especially before and after school hours. Adding a turn lane at this intersection will also avoid any future unpermitted use of the striped area, ensuring pedestrians safety.

Ongoing Initiatives
Downtown Pathways Phase II (2012-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Operating Expenses: Existing This initiative is to construct a pathway in the downtown area of Coral Springs to improve access to local social service agencies, schools, places of worship, and medical facilities. This pathway will be suitable for pedestrians and bicyclists with direct access to downtown. The pathway will be constructed east of Coral Springs Drive along Ben Geiger Drive (also known as NW 29th Street) and north of Coral Hills Drive to Sample Road, with a section of the pathway cutting across the southeast section of the Coral Springs Medical Center. Transportation enhancement funding ($545,000) to construct the Downtown Pathway will become available in July 2014 and does not require a local match. However, the design of the pathway is the responsibility of the City and is estimated for completion by the end of 2012. In Fiscal Year 2013, staff will work with the Florida Department of Transportation in developing project timelines and completing Local Agency Program certication. Demolition of existing sidewalks will follow in Fiscal Year 2014.

50

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Northwest Broward Consortium for Planning Transportation Improvements (2012-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Operating Expenses: Existing The Broward Metropolitan Planning Organizations 2035 Long-Range Transportation Plan identied gateway hubs at two intersections: Sample Road/University Drive and Sample Road/State Road 7. Four cities in northwest Broward (Coral Springs, Margate, Coconut Creek and Parkland) have begun cooperating in developing plans and programs that will support transit services on the Sample Road corridor. The consortium will also develop transit supportive land use initiatives to promote the development of gateway hubs at or near these intersections. A primary directive of the planning consortium is to establish a transit connection, referred to as the Educational Corridor connecting Pompano Beach to the Broward College campuses in Coconut Creek and the new campus in Downtown Coral Springs, utilizing State Road 7 and Sample Road. This initiative lays the groundwork for long-term transportation planning for the northwest portion of Broward County.

This is a long-term effort to obtain federal, state and county funding for projects that enhance the downtown area and improve transit ridership. Planners from Coconut Creek, Margate, and Coral Springs continue to meet regarding this project. Trafc Management (2010-2013) Lead Department: Community Development Operating Capital: $10,000 Current projects include red light cameras, road resurfacing, intersection improvements and turn lanes, and pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure improvements. Funding for this initiative is for ongoing maintenance of the Citys traf c calming program. In Fiscal Year 2012, 26 streets were tested for traf c calming measures, and speed cushions were repaired or installed on two streets. Community Development also worked with the Turtle Run CCD on improvements to several streets in that area. The Traf c Management team meets monthly to monitor trafc-related issues and proposed developments throughout the City and surrounding area. It is composed of representatives from Community Development, Public Works, Police, Fire, and Engineering.

Long-Range Transportation Improvement Plan

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1. University Drive/Sample Road - Add SB, EB and WB right turn lanes 2. University Drive/Wiles Road - Add NB, SB, EB, and WB left turn lanes - Add NB and SB through lanes 3. Sample Road/Coral Springs Drive - Add EB and WB right turn lanes 4. Sample Road/Riverside Drive - Add EB right turn lanes Add NB and SB left turn lanes 5. Sample Road/NW 85th Avenue - Add NB and SB left turn lanes 6. Coral Hills Drive - Sample Road to NW 29th Street Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 7. NW 33rd Street - Coral Hills Drive to NW 99th Way Widen to provide a 3-lane cross section 8. University Drive - Wiles Road to NW 40th Street Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 9. Wiles Road - University Drive to Riverside Drive Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 10. Wiles Road - Rock Island Road to US 441- Widen from 4 to 6 lanes 11. Proposed Transit Center 12. Downtown Pathways 13. Future Sidewalks 14. University Drive - Sawgrass Expy to Wiles Road- Resurfacing 2014 15. Multi-Modal Improvements (MPO) 16. Entryway Improvements (Sidewalk, lighting, landscaping, and entry feature

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City of Coral Springs, Florida

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51

Red Light Camera Implementation (2012-2013) Lead Department: Police Operating Expenses: Existing Enhanced Revenue: $50,000 Seven cameras were installed at ve intersections throughout the City at the end of FY 2011, and went live September 15, 2011. Early indications are that the cameras have been effective in preventing trafc accidents at those intersections. Accidents at the 5 intersections have declined 17% from the same time period last year. The City is exploring the possibility of installing one more camera at the intersection of Wiles Road and State Road 7.

2012-2014 Short-Range Transportation Improvement Plan

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City Roadway Resurfacing Program Sidewalk/Pathway Improvements Mast Arm Installation w/Video Detection (Broward County) Video Detection Installation (Broward County) Downtown CRA Infrastructure Project (Sample Road/University Drive) Downtown Pathway (Transportation Enhancement Grant) US 441 (RRR) - Sawgrass Expressway to Sample Road Coral Ridge Drive/Sawgrass Expressway - sidewalk connections, traffic signal interconnections Bus Shelters Entryway Improvements (Sidewalk, lighting, landscaping, and entry feature) Alleyways Refurbishment Program Regional Bike Trailhead (Broward County) Right Turn Lane (Shadow Wood Blvd. westbound)

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Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Area

52

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

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Youth Development and Family Values


New Initiatives
50th Anniversary Celebration
Lead Department: Community Development Operating Expenses: $150,000 Enhanced Revenue: $100,000 via sponsorship opportunities Preparation is underway for the Citys 50th Anniversary Celebration on July 10, 2013. City staff is working in conjunction with a committee of volunteers appointed by the City Commission on a host of events and promotional efforts. The focus is on the planning and promotion of the Citywide events that will take place through 2013. The branding of all ongoing major City events will be part of the 50th Anniversary festivities. Funding will be offset by sponsorships obtained by the Citys consultant. Examples of the activities include: participation in the Holiday Parade, establishing a half marathon and 5K run, hosting Broward County Pioneer Day, and other special events during the week of July 4 through July 10, 2013

Half Marathon and 5K Run/Walk


Lead Department: Sportsplex Operating Expenses: $15,000 The City, in conjunction with In the Zone Event and Sports Management, will be conducting a half marathon and 5K road race. The purpose of this event is to encourage healthy lifestyle choices while providing positive exposure to the City and its facilities and local businesses. The event is projected to bring 1,000 runners to the City and will begin and end at the Sportsplex. The event is going to be a part of the Citys 50th Anniversary Celebration and is scheduled for March 30, 2013. The city expects this to develop into an annual event.

Key Intended Outcomes


Number of youths involved in City sponsored leadership opportunities Number of teen volunteer hours Number of middle school after-school programs offered annually

FY 2012 Goal
2,000 20,000 15

FY 2013 Goal
TBD TBD 15

City of Coral Springs, Florida

53

Ongoing Initiatives
Car Club (2007-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Operating Expenses: Existing The teen car club, Project CS, has had great success since its inception in September 2007. It is one of the few car clubs in Broward County geared toward teens, and allows the teens to learn leadership as well as technical skills. The teens meet regularly to restore cars that have been con scated by the Coral Springs Police Department. Members work on customizing vehicles, relying on funds collected through fundraisers. The members interact not only with automotive professionals, but with the local business community and restaurants as sponsors. The Car Show was held on Saturday, February 4 at the Sportsplex. Flyers and press releases helped to promote the event; however, the weather kept some cars from entering. Overall, it was a good turnout, food trucks were a success and the event raised approximately $2,000 for the Car Club. The City will be housing the Blazer at the Westside maintenance yard and staff will continue promoting the club to recruit more members. Teen Political Forum (2009-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing The Teen Political Forum gives our youth the opportunity to meet their elected of cials in person, ask questions, and feel involved in the decisions affecting their community. This years Forum was held on April 2, 2012, at the Coral Springs Center for the Arts, and was attended by nearly 350 high school students. Nine elected of cials made up the panel. The Police and Fire chiefs were also in attendance, ready to answer questions. The event was more interactive than in past years, and the questions posed by the students showed a high level of interest in their community. The City plans to host this successful forum again in Fiscal Year 2013.

Senior Empowerment Program (2009-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Operating Expenses: Existing This initiative began in 2009 to help make Coral Springs a community for a lifetime. The Senior Advisory Committee, City staff, and Commission work together to provide educational programs for seniors, teaching them to be self-suf cient and involved in the community, and to help them relate to younger age groups. In past years, physical tness and computer classes have been offered. A very popular program is the Window to My World offered at St. Andrews Towers and the Sartory Senior Center. This event provides seniors the opportunity to tell a story, discuss their past, present, and future plans, and put together a book that will become a keepsake for their children and grandchildren. Due to the success of this event, staff will continue inviting Coral Springs residents who are 55 years or older to participate in this program in the future. Other senior activities planned for next year include intergenerational programs and incorporate a new photography class for seniors. Teen Cookoff (2011-2013) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Operating Expenses: Existing The Teen Cookoff event began two years ago with the purpose of showcasing local teens culinary talents. Participants can be in grades 9 through 12 and must be a Coral Springs resident or attend school in Coral Springs. Teams may be made up of two to six participants to compete outdoors at the Sportsplex. In Fiscal Year 2012, this program was incorporated as part of the Teen Car Show event held in February. The annual cookoff contest is advertised on the Citys web site to encourage teams to enter their application and show off their culinary skills. This years challenge was a barbeque with entries from three different teams. Each team received the same ingredients, provided by Whole Foods Market, to prepare barbeque ribs and a side dish. Prizes are awarded in different categories. The winning team for this years cook off was Coral Glades High School. In Fiscal Year 2013, this event will continue to be offered with support from the Youth and Family Committee.

54

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Playground Equipment Replacement Program (20122013) Lead Department: Parks and Recreation Capital Outlay: $130,000 Community Development Block Grant: $51,205 Phase I of this program consisted of creating a plan to ensure playground equipment in our parks is scheduled for replacement before the end of its expected useful life. We currently have 33 playgrounds throughout the City in our neighborhood and community parks and the average life expectancy of the equipment is 15 years. In the past, equipment in each park was replaced on an as-needed basis to maintain a safe recreational environment and to meet all the Americans with Disabilities Act requirements for playgrounds. All playground equipment and surfaces are inspected regularly by our maintenance staff and a certied playground inspector. In Fiscal Year 2012, each playground was evaluated and placed in the replacement cycle by priority with the purpose of replacing rst those in critical need due to damage from inclement weather or unforeseen conditions. The rst new equipment installed was the playground in Cypress Park, followed by Kiwanis, DeDe Gilmore, Riverside and Fern Glen parks. In Fiscal Year 2013, the scheduled playgrounds to be replaced are Oakwood and North Community parks. In addition, grant funds have been allocated by CDBG to replace the playground equipment at Poinciana Park. The remaining playgrounds have been included in the Capital Improvement Program for replacement in future years.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

55

Strength in Diversity
New Initiatives
Mullins Park Water Tank Mural
Lead Department: Coral Springs Museum of Art Partners: Community Development, Public Art Committee Grant-Funded: $67,000 Public art is an important aspect of the City of Coral Springs. The Coral Springs Museum of Art celebrated its 15th anniversary in 2012 and continues to provide a venue for local and international artist to display their artwork. The Coral Springs Museum of Art was awarded a Community Foundation of Broward Grant to bring residents closer together through common efforts to address issues of public concern through arts. The museum will receive a $67,150 grant for this project. The project requires a 25% inkind match ($33,575) along with an additional 25% ($33,575) to be raised through contributions to the museum. The grant requires the project be completed by March 31, 2013.

BizArt Annual Event


Lead Department: Community Development Partner: Community Redevelopment Agency Operating Expenses: $5,000 (Public Art Fund) In 2012, the City of Coral Springs, the Coral Springs Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) and the Public Art Committee co-sponsored an event entitled BizArt, a celebration of the Citys business community and the Citys Sculpture on Sample exhibition. Although the event was ultimately cancelled due to inclement weather, the venue selected (NW 94th Avenue south of Sample Road) proved to be an excellent location to hold a public event. This year, City staff will work with these partner agencies to establish an annual event in Downtown Coral Springs. The City intends to seek collaboration from the Coral Springs Chamber of Commerce and other business organizations to promote and ensure a successful event. The Public Art Fund has allocated $5,000 for site preparation, including trash collection and advertisement costs.

Key Intended Outcomes


Minority residents who feel that the City is a great place to live (Resident Survey) Citizen rating of City government for respecting religious and ethnic diversity (Resident Survey)

FY 2012 Goal

FY 2013 Goal
90% 93%

56

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Ongoing Initiatives
Family Success Center (2005-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing The Northwest Regional Family Success Center, located on Ben Geiger Drive (NW 29th Street), in the heart of Coral Springs, provides services to individuals and families through collaboration with other human services departments, governmental agencies, and nonprot organizations. Onsite services include emergency nancial assistance, integrated intake, assessment, case management, counseling, and life skills classes. The center offers workshops and participates in community events providing information and referrals for employment, housing, counseling, legal aid, subsidized child care, and health, elderly, and veterans services. In FY 2011, the City HelpDesk team visited the center to familiarize themselves with the new programs and services offered there. The City will continue to support the activities of the Family Success Center.

CommuniTea (2008-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing The Coral Springs Multi-Cultural Committee created this event in 2007, and it was such a success that it has become an annual affair. CommuniTea is an afternoon multi-cultural tea party which encourages social interaction among members of the various ethnic groups of our community. Groups are encouraged to decorate their tables with a theme of their choice. Guests can bring their own special teacup to share their favorite teacup story. Whole Foods Market donates a variety of international teas for everyones enjoyment. This years event was held May 19 at the Coral Springs Marriott at Heron Bay and was attended by nearly 220 people, a signicant increase over last years attendance of 165. Participants were treated to a lively folkloric Haitian dance performance by The Butter y Dancers, in addition to being entertained by a comedian.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

57

International Dinner Dance (2009-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing The International Dinner Dance was created to increase the awareness and appreciation for the diversity of cultures that abound in our community and surrounding areas. We focus on a different culture each year as we celebrate together in a harmonious setting. Guests experience global cuisine and entertainment without leaving Coral Springs. Ethnic dress is encouraged to lend a special air to the evening. The popular event features food, dancing and live entertainment, all with an international twist. This years event will be held at the Coral Springs Marriott on Saturday, September 29, 2012, and will highlight the countries of Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago to celebrate 50 years of independence for each. Partnership between Multi-Cultural Advisory Committee and One Planet United (2009-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing The Multi-Cultural Advisory Committee was formed in 1995 to address the needs of an increasingly diverse community, and has been active in producing educational and cultural programs. One Planet United is a nonprot organization headquartered in Coral Springs that promotes unity among all people through experiential and educational programs, community projects, and resources. The two groups collaborate in numerous activities: conducting monthly Peace Walks, entering a oat in the annual Holiday Parade, organizing the Muslim Festival of Eid, producing the annual Weekend of Peace, and sponsoring the Teen Club and annual Faith in Music concert.

Weekend of Peace Celebration (2009-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing The Coral Springs Multi-Cultural Advisory Committee brings the community together when celebrating the annual International Day of Peace. Residents and local schools are invited to take part in the event that highlights ways to promote peace, diversity and unity in our community. The one-day celebration expanded to a weekend event several years ago to make it more inclusive of all cultures and faiths. This year the weekend celebration will begin on Friday, September 21 with a ceremony at the International Peace Garden, adjacent to the Coral Springs Center for the Arts. The weekend will come to a close on Sunday, September 23 with a newlyproduced Peace in Music concert. All local houses of worship and schools will be invited to send their choirs or choral groups to participate.

58

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

WorldFest (2006-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing WorldFest is an outdoor one-day festival, organized by the Multi-Cultural Advisory Committee, showcasing the variety of cultures that make up the community of Coral Springs. This years WorldFest, held April 15, 2012, at the Sportsplex, provided a spectacular array of entertainment, cuisine and culture that saluted the diverse population of the greater Coral Springs area. Committee volunteers conducted a cooking demonstration offering taste samples and recipes of delicious and unusual food items. Kids World and Teen World offered games, dances and activities to interest all ages. The event was attended by approximately 5,000 people.

Martin Luther King Program (2010-2013) Lead Department: Human Resources Operating Expenses: Existing The Martin Luther King Committee has been organizing the weekend celebration honoring Dr. King for over 22 years. The program has grown from a grassroots event to a nationally renowned weekend celebration and successful scholarship program. The keynote speaker for the 2013 event will be Ms. Joan Higginbotham, one of only three female African-American astronauts in America. The weekend event begins with a Business Luncheon and Community Celebration on Friday, January 18, 2013. This is followed by a Leadership/ Diversity Day on Monday, January 21, the King Holiday, for middle and high school students. The days program focuses on the life and teachings of Dr. King and makes the students realize that This is a Day On, not a Day Off.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

59

Excellence in Education
Ongoing Initiatives
Coral Springs Outreach Database Lead Department: Communications and Marketing Partner: Economic Development Foundation Operating Expenses: Existing In early Fiscal Year 2012 the website and database for the Coral Springs Outreach project was completed and the program was shared with school principals and guidance counselors. The program was expanded to include all job seekers, not just the student population. The Coral Springs Outreach Project will continue this scal year, with a focus on expanding the involvement of local businesses. Cambridge Advanced Program at Coral Springs Charter School (2012-2013) Lead Departments: City Managers Of ce Partner: Coral Springs Charter School Operating Expenses: Existing Coral Springs Charter School initiated the Cambridge Advanced Program of Studies (CAPS) for students in grades 7 through 9 during the 2011-12 school year. The programs rst year attracted 383 students with 99% desiring to stay in the program throughout their high school career. The programs focus began with language arts and science and will expand during the 2012-13 school term to include high school CAPS options such as General Paper, Thinking Skills, Sociology, Environmental Science, high level mathematics, Spanish, Psychology and Marine Science. The Cambridge program is an internationally recognized, pre-university curriculum which offers a rigorous program of studies. CAPS is sponsored by Cambridge University in England and is currently offered at only a handful of schools in Broward County. The program emphasizes the value of broad and balanced study for academically able students. Its strengths lie in the exibility and structure of the curriculum encouraging in-depth, working knowledge of each subject, and in essay-based examinations as assessment of that knowledge and skill mastery. These examination papers are sent to Cambridge for marking. Students who complete the program will have a special designation on their diploma and be able to earn college credit based on their examination scores. All public colleges and universities in Florida accept Cambridge credits.

Key Intended Outcomes


Achieve gains in math/reading mean scale score at the Charter School Number of students attending courses offered by partnering institutes of higher education

FY 2012 Goal
0.6% 3,000

FY 2013 Goal
TBD 3,500

60

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Charter School Organizational Excellence (2009-2013) Lead Department: City Managers Of ce Operating Expenses: Existing The Charter Schools efforts in continuous improvement are apparent in its students success. The school has been named an A school for eight consecutive years, and was recognized for student engagement during the Florida Sterling conference in June 2010. The school continuously focuses on process improvement. Its ability to review data on a regular basis allows for uidity in the curriculum and other school programming. As the school moves in to the 2012-2013 school year it will look to deliver an enhanced curriculum with the foundation based on reading throughout multiple content areas. School programs strategically developed based on prior performance will lead to innovative opportunities for all stakeholders.

Broward College Campus in Coral Springs (2011-2013) Lead Department: City Managers Of ce Partners: Economic Development Foundation, Community Redevelopment Agency Operating Expenses: Existing The University and College Partnership was established in 2005. Enrollment has climbed rapidly over the last two years with a majority of the students enrolled in Broward College, one of the three universities in the partnership. Due to this impressive performance, the City, in conjunction with the Economic Development Foundation, established an alliance dedicated to increasing the presence of Broward College in Coral Springs. The ultimate goal of having a permanent presence for the college somewhere within our Community Redevelopment Area and downtown was made a reality during Fiscal Year 2011. In January 2011, Broward College signed a lease for approximately 19,000 square feet in the Village Square Shopping Center located at the northwest corner of Sample and University. The tenant improvement renovations for retrotting 10 classrooms and administrative of ces will be completed by end of July 2012. Broward College is currently registering students at Coral Springs Center campus for the Fall 2012 session beginning in October. Course offerings include day, evening, and weekend classes focusing on Bachelors and Associate Degrees, and college credit certicates in high wage, high demand occupations. It is projected that enrollment will reach 5,000 students over the next ve years at this location. The Broward College Coral Springs Center is the strong anchor and spark that will accelerate retail vacancy absorption in our downtown area.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

61

Department Performance Levels


Each of the Citys departments develops a work plan and new initiatives based on the current Strategic Plan. The Business Plan summarizes the new initiatives and the Performance Budget summarizes the resources allocated to each department and the performance measures negotiated to dene acceptable results. Included on the following pages are each departments mission statement, core processes, outputs, organization chart, new initiatives, program/expenditure summary, objectives and performance measures. A summary table of revenues, expenditures and position counts by department for Fiscal Year 2013 is listed below.

Department Revenue, Expenditure and Position Summary for Fiscal Year 2013
Department CityCommission CityManager'sOffice HumanResources HealthFund FinancialServices GeneralInsuranceFund* InformationServices CityAttorney DevelopmentServices Police FireFund** EmergencyMedicalServices PublicWorks Water&SewerFund EquipmentServices Sportsplex/Tennis Parks&Recreation Aquatics C.S.CenterForTheArts*** C.S.CharterSchoolFund PublicArtFund Personal $106,860 1,751,496 842,502 99,860 1,438,891 106,633 1,422,957 470,528 3,837,639 23,336,389 8,286,067 5,418,595 1,466,077 1,826,319 803,086 630,465 3,824,554 1,001,763 0 0 0 Benefits $90,433 645,202 323,690 11,387,155 640,667 740,327 562,813 182,791 1,636,203 15,820,984 4,103,496 2,463,362 655,981 845,256 359,356 239,494 1,848,272 395,132 0 0 0 Operating $126,325 549,297 196,692 1,591,560 449,280 2,006,137 1,009,744 185,695 887,112 5,125,055 1,272,968 993,208 2,198,199 9,133,483 2,198,415 786,661 4,164,544 976,210 50,000 9,198,327 0 Capital $0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4,443 389,800 0 4,000 1,024,136 0 6,200 23,200 0 0 848,153 86,500 Total Other Expenditures $0 $323,618 0 2,945,995 0 1,362,884 0 13,078,575 0 2,528,838 0 2,853,097 0 2,995,514 0 839,014 15,000 6,375,954 0 44,286,871 3,275,553 17,327,884 0 8,875,165 0 4,324,257 9,884,060 22,713,254 5,608,640 8,969,497 0 1,662,820 0 9,860,570 0 2,373,105 395,000 445,000 1,420,000 11,466,480 0 86,500 Total Revenues $0 7,234 628,515 13,078,575 225,000 2,853,097 18,304 0 5,155,606 2,265,217 17,327,884 2,499,120 385,025 22,713,254 8,969,497 835,379 1,792,383 1,688,317 0 11,466,480 86,500 Total Positions 5.00 20.50 11.25 1.25 25.00 1.50 19.50 6.00 63.00 298.00 107.84 65.16 28.00 35.00 15.00 9.00 80.00 16.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

*Workers CompensationPropertyCasualty **Includes City of Parkland, Florida ***Center for the Arts is now a division in the General Fund
$

62

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Department Impact of Key Intended Outcomes for Fiscal Years 2012 2013
Legend: Direct Impact- ~ Indirect Impact-{ No or Low Impact- Blank

Development Serv vices

City Manager's Off fice

Information Service ces

Parks & Recreation n

s Human Resources

s Financial Services

Customer-Involved Government
Overall quality rating for City services and programs (Resident Survey) Overall quality rating for City services by business owners (Business Survey) Employee satisfaction rating (Human Resources Survey) Number of citizen volunteer hours Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with residents (Resident Survey) Overall rating of the City in terms of communicating with businesses (Business Survey) Customer service rating by residents (Resident Survey) Customer service rating by businesses (Business Survey) ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ { { { { { { ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~

Neighborhood and Environmental Vitality


Percent of Code cases brought into voluntary compliance prior to administrative/judicial process Number of formal and informal neighborhood partnerships each year Number of volunteer hours aimed at enhancing the environment City crime rate (crimes per 100,000 residents) Safety rating in neighborhood Number of trees planted within the City ~ ~ { ~ { { ~ { { { ~ { ~ { { { { { { { { { ~

Financial Health and Economic Development


General obligation 'AAA' rating Residents' value rating (Resident Survey) Non-residential value as percent of total taxable value ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { { { { { ~ ~ { ~ { { { { { { { ~ { ~ { ~ { { { ~ { ~ ~

Traffic, Mobility and Connectivity


Number of linear feet of improved sidewalks, bike paths, and bike lanes Number of riders on intracity bus routes

Youth Development and Family Values


Number of youths involved in City-sponsored leadership opportunities Number of teen volunteer hours Number of middle school after-school programs offered annually { { { { ~ { { { { { { { ~ { { ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ { ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ { { { { { { { { { {

Strength in Diversity
Minority residents who feel that the City is a great place to live (Resident Survey) Citizen rating of City Government for respecting religious and ethnic diversity (Resident Survey)

Excellence in Education
Achieve gains in math/reading mean scale score at the Charter School Number of students attending courses offered by partnering institutes of higher education

City of Coral Springs, Florida

Sportsplex/Tennis

Public Works

Fire/EMS

Aquatics

Police

63

Sample Performance Budget Page


Title
Indicates the department.

New Initiatives
Fiscal Year 2012 Business Plan Initiatives for this department, if available.

Mission
Developed by the department, this is a statement that identies the particular purpose for the department.

Revenues and Expenditures


A summary of the budgeted departmental revenues and expenditures.

Core Processes and Outputs


A listing of the fundamental processes and the outputs for the department.

Performance Linkage
The Strategic Priority and Directional Statement that support the departments performance measures.

Organization Chart
An organization chart showing the breakdown of programs, divisions and personnel.

Performance Measures
The actual historical performance and future goals for the department.
or CityAtt ney 2013 FY et dg Bu gefrom %Chan gefrom FY12Budget $Chan  Budget  12 FY  6) ($6,10 6) ($6,10 65) ($13,4 6,359 1,000 0 6) ($6,10 0.00 0.00 n/a 0.72% 0.72% 2.78% 3.60% 0.54% n/a 0.72% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

ry dyCatego m anar gra lSumm y Proia s lb re Financ u 10 it ta d en n e FY20 E xp Departm




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Mission

w ith in ements ts and ag re ct complia nce Contrac nt ract s ra co nt e co ar re ep w and pr e to ensu Rev ie test ti me fr am ience. ents, the shor ndor inconven n and 0 ag reem t ve ately 20 esentatio at ion. ou pr im re ith ox l w appr istr y lega in ew el vi m dm ti re A d e and/or ct ive an ission and City in legal e ide ef fe Prepar s and leases. tion To prov the City Com m ents the City Prosecu enti ng th cont ract es to olat ion implem posu res and sly re pr advice to ou icipal Vi al igat ion. ed ze itt ex ce nd le lit and Mun ing com m n ha iz is d io im T his of d at . an in an rs Litig rsies y of m the City y mat te cont rove m issions polic behalf of st at utor on on t e ur is om ral co Adv City C liabilit y. de Fe d l e an r in St at potent ia Appea qu ir ies ng risk. ti zen in to li m iti nd to ci proaches Respo tative ap n, updates l en io ev ga at tr le pr is ounsel dm in inui ng of Ef fect uate h and C , City A ent cont mat ters m ission Researc and pres s in all ipate in City Com and com m ittee ters. Pa rt ic sent the ive mat f. in istr at Repre assigned boards cial duties. to st af ment/a dm d ei r of and all employ sion an ng to th is in ni m e ai at rt om ip C law pe Pa rt ic for City serv ices e legal . agency Prov id g de pa rt ments rd inate in bo at t su er d op on an er nmen ved Gov om m issi her er-Invol d City C s and ot Custom 10 Atten s. ct 20 ra r nt ea Y , co meeti ng r Fiscal solutions None fo nces, re sh ion. e ordi na fa 50 Prepar ts in a ti mely ns and tio en lu m so docu 10 0 re imately e approx Prepar es. ordi na nc

orney CityAtt itures: Expend mary mSum Progra ney or tt A  ty Ci Total

ry Catego aryBy Summ al Person s Benefit es Expens Other n at Litig io Total

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55 $781,5 55 $781,5 87 $474,3 2 169,43 89,663 73 ,0 48 55 $781,5

20 $845,1 20 $845,1 93 $483,9 2 176,43 5 69 184, 0 20 ,1 45 $8

14 $839,0 14 $839,0 28 $470,5 1 182,79 5 185,69 0 14 $839,0

74 $388,8 6 139,97 5 99 9, 34 63,021 66 ,8 41 $9 6.00 6.00 0.8%

6.00 6.00 0.8%

6.00 6.00 0.8%

6.00 6.00 0.7%

s Position E's FTE's wideFT talCity To %of

sses a Core Proce

nd Outpu

ts

Perform

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ceson resour nment alandhuman Gover volved cusitsfinanci In y er ne or fo stom ent CityAtt Priority:Cu TheCitywill c velopm t: FY2010 Strategi nalStatemen dbusinessde Actual Goal Directio aesthetics,an ctiveness n, fe io Ef ) educat mentType: 100% rs de or re nce, 99% Measu ,ordina by olutions ed ion(res naccompani at sl : gi re Le twhe Measu arationof reques 1)Prep workdaysof 10 within

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FY2011 ual Act 100%

FY2012 oj. Pr Goal 100% 99%

y ttorn ey CityCiA ty At torn

ey City Attorn nfilled) Attorney (u Deputy City (2) ey rn to At ty Assistant Ci nt Assista Executive etary Legal Secr tigation Outside Li

64

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

City Commission
Mission
To provide the Charter of ces clear policy direction toward making the City of Coral Springs the premier community in which to live, work and raise a family. Customer-Involved Government Develop innovative ways to make participation in local government activities possible for all residents and foster a sense of engagement among the citizenry by effectively communicating a common identity, actively seeking insight into the needs of the community, aligning City services with customer expectations, and continuing to strive for excellence. Financial Health and Economic Development Continue to enhance the high level of service quality and nancial stability that the City has become known for by encouraging redevelopment, diversifying tax and revenue sources, ensuring the long-term viability of nancial strategies, and implementing new urbanism techniques. Excellence in Education Maintain effective partnerships with the Broward County School Board and individual local public and private schools within Coral Springs to address overcrowding, promote safety, increase parental participation, elevate student achievement, and expand educational opportunities. Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Provide support to neighborhood groups and individual homeowners and business owners in maintaining and improving property values, aesthetics, and safety throughout the City. Lead by example in the stewardship of natural resources by preserving existing Environmentally Sensitive Land sites, promoting the replenishment of the Citys tree canopy, encouraging native landscaping, and planning for the conservation of resources. Youth Development and Family Values Promote and increase opportunities for youth to become engaged in the world, while providing support in addressing the profusion of issues facing them. Empower families to create strong ties, pass on values and traditions, strive for economic security, increase health and safety, and join in creating a shared community vision.

City Commission

Mayor (0100) 0

Vice-Mayor 1 (0100) 0

Commissioner 3 (0100) 0

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

City of Coral Springs, Florida

65

City Commission (continued)


Strength in Diversity Capitalize on the strength of diversity in our community through ongoing dialogue and gathering together to communicate, understand, and celebrate our differences and similarities. Trafc, Mobility and Connectivity Promote best practices and effective technology to improve safe mobility and encourage convenient and accessible modes of transportation.

Core Processes
Provide policy direction for City operations. Promote public participation in government through regular and special City Commission meetings, public hearings and workshops. Encourage partnerships with the private and nonprot sectors to resolve local issues.

Expenditures by Program and Category


p CityCommission Expenditures: ProgramSummary CityCommission Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions y FY2010 Actual FY2011 Actual FY2012 Budget FY2013 Budget $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$291,513 $291,513

$255,208 $255,208

$298,557 $298,557

$323,618 $323,618

$25,061 $25,061

8.39% 8.39%

$97,504 88,515 105,494 0 $291,513 5.00

$85,587 76,003 93,618 0 $255,208 5.00

$87,833 86,166 124,558 0 $298,557 5.00

$106,860 90,433 126,325 0 $323,618 5.00

$19,027 4,267 1,767 0 $25,061 0.00

21.66% 4.95% 1.42% n/a 8.39% 0.0%

66

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

City Manager s Ofce


Mission
To provide support and systems that empower City departments to anticipate and meet customer expectations and carry out City Commission policy initiatives. Budget and Strategy Monitor Citys nancial condition and provide nancial strategies to ensure scal solvency. Maintain Financial Trend Monitoring System. Prepare biennial/triennial Strategic Plan, annual Business Plan, annual budget document, and Capital Improvement Program. Produce the Citys Business Plan, budget document and Capital Improvement Program. Process biennial/triennial Strategic Plan including the Environmental Scan, the SWOT Analysis and the Strategic Planning Workshop Presentation. Maintain Performance Measurement System. Produce Departments Quarterly Performance Reports. Provide effective communication between the City Commission, staff, residents and other customers. Work with Economic Development Foundation to continue to draw quality corporations to the City of Coral Springs. Aggressively seek grants on behalf of the City and oversee administration of grant funding.

Core Processes and Outputs


City Managers Ofce Organize and mobilize City departments to address the seven priorities established by the City Commission. Complete strategic activities for the City Commissions seven priority areas. Provide overall management of all City departments in a way that empowers employees to exceed customer expectations.

City Managers Office


City Manager

Executive Assistant to City Manager


Executive Assistant

Senior Office Assistant

Deputy City Manager

Deputy City Manager*

CRA Coordinator 1 (3200) 1

City Clerk's Office 4 (3501) 4

Budget, Strategy, and Communications

*0.5 position, shared with Water and Sewer Fund

City Clerk

Director Budget, Strategy, and Communications

Assistant City Clerk Records Mgmt Coordinator Senior Office Assistant

Communications and Marketing 5 (0604) 5

Management & Budget Office 5 (1901) 5

Manager Communications and Marketing

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

Senior Financial Analyst (4) Creative Services Coordinator Editor and Producer Broadcast Communications Coordinator Writer/Media Relations Coordinator

City of Coral Springs, Florida

67

City Manager s Ofce (continued)


Apply for and administer loans for water and sewer system improvements from State Revolving Fund. Collaborate with Police and Fire pension boards, Charter School Advisory Committee, and other committees. Communications and Marketing Communicate public information in an effective, creative manner. Publish three editions of Coral Springs magazine, Annual State of the City Report, and other informational publications; Provide writing, design, photography and other graphic services for print, digital and video formats. Provide multimedia, video and photographic support, and produce public service announcements and programming for use by the broadcast media. Develop and manage the Citys web sites, including coralsprings.org and csteens.com. Produce programming and manage the Citys TV station, Channel 25. Provide special event promotion. Handle media relations. Produce programming and schedule the Citys radio station, 1670 AM. City Clerk Serve as Secretary of the City. Oversee City Commission agenda process which includes creation of bimonthly agendas, coordination of over 500 agenda memoranda, duplication and distribution of agenda material to interested parties, implement and encourage the Citys paperless agenda environment. Inform citizenry of public hearings by advertising pursuant to Florida law. Manage codication and distribution to subscribers of the Municipal Code, both the general volume and Land Development Code. Provide public notice for approximately 300 public meetings annually. Serve as the Citys records custodian by preserving the integrity of the Citys of cial records, which encompasses business transactions, law and policy making, and property matters. Communications and Marketing Financial Health and Economic Development Corporate Promotional Video (with Economic Development Foundation and Community Redevelopment Agency) City Branding Phase II (Implementation) (with Economic Development Foundation) Fire Academy Promotional Campaign (with Fire Department) Maintain an historical database of over four million document images Citywide from 1963 to the present and respond to public records requests. Maintain a database of public meetings via audio tapes, CD-ROMs and summaries of the meeting proceedings, and respond to more than 1,500 customer requests for information annually. Provide for records disposal to the fullest extent permissible by Florida law, and the cost effective, legal maintenance of permanent records for all City departments. Serve as the director of municipal elections as required by the City Charter and Florida Statutes.

New Initiatives
City Managers Of ce Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Code Compliance Microgrants Pilot Program Financial Health and Economic Development Economic Development Enhancements (with Economic Development Foundation)

68

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


CityManager'sOffice Revenues: CityClerk Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary Administration Management&BudgetOffice CommunicationsandMarketing CRA CityClerk Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $10,677 $10,677 FY2011 Actual $8,095 $8,095 FY2012 Budget $10,239 $10,239 FY2013 Budget $7,234 $7,234 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget ($3,005) ($3,005) 29.35% 29.35%

$847,632 450,274 821,914 0 495,489 $2,615,309

$1,083,705 562,948 764,730 0 434,819 $2,846,202

$832,666 600,876 786,318 71,245 507,746 $2,798,851

$862,221 617,489 887,334 69,960 508,991 $2,945,995

$29,555 16,613 101,016 (1,285) 1,245 $147,144

3.55% 2.76% 12.85% 1.80% 0.25% 5.26%

$1,694,539 541,199 375,008 4,563 $2,615,309 19.50 19.50 2.5%

$1,848,051 612,434 379,578 6,139 $2,846,202 20.50 20.50 2.6%

$1,732,206 628,508 438,137 0 $2,798,851 20.50 20.50 2.6%

$1,751,496 645,202 549,297 0 $2,945,995 20.50 20.50 2.6%

$19,290 16,694 111,160 0 $147,144 0.00 0.00 n/a

1.11% 2.66% 25.37% n/a 5.26% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

Performance Measures
CityManager'sOffice StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)OverallqualityratingforCityservicesandprograms (ResidentSurvey) 93% 95% 2)Customerservicerating(ResidentSurvey) 93% 94% StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 3)Employeesatisfactionrating 93% 97% 93% 90% 90% 90%

FY2013 Goal 92% 90%

FY2013 Goal 90%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

69

Performance Measures
BudgetandStrategicPlanning StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)Internalcustomersatisfactionrating(FinancialServices InternalSurvey) 88% 99% 88% 95% 95% 95% 2)Process100%ofbudgettransferswithin24hoursofreceipt 3)Facilitateorsupportcrossfunctionalprocessimprovement teams StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Efficiency Measure: FY2010 Goal Actual Yes 1.6% 0.9days FY2011 Goal Actual Yes 3% <7days Yes 1.5% 1.6days FY2012 Goal Proj. Yes 3% <7days Yes 0.3% 2days FY2013 Goal Yes 2% <7days 100% 2 100% 2 100% 2 100% 3 100% 2 100% 2

FY2013 Goal 95% 100% 2

4)ReceivetheGFOADistinguishedBudgetPresentationaward Yes 5)Payrollregularsalariesadoptedbudgetversusactual,netof 3% policychanges 6)Producemonthlyfinancialstatementswithinsevenbusiness <7days daysofperiodclose

CommunicationsandMarketing StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatements:EvaluateandenhancethemethodsofcommunicatingwithcitizensandbusinessestoprovideinformationonCitynews andissuestothewidestpossibleaudiencebyleveragingtechnology;BrandCoralSpringsbypromotingtheCitysidentityasaCommunityof Excellence,consistentwiththeCity'smission MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal Survey) 94% 94% 94% 97% 94% 94% 94% 2)AwarenessofCoralSpringsmagazinebynewresidents (ResidentSurvey) 79% 87% 79% 3)Averagenumberofuniquepageviewsonwebsite (changedfrom"numberofuniqueusersessions"forFY2012) 105,000 4)NumberofepisodesproducedforWhat'sHappening 12 5)Numberofnewpromotional/informationalcampaigns developed 16 106,557 12 45 105,000 12 20 123,661 12 38 115,000 12 20 129,000 12 20 115,000 12 30

City Ci Clerk's Cl k' Office Offi StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety,education, aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 1)NumberoffilesaddedtotheIBPMsystem(NewforFY 2010) 2)NumberofimagesaddedtotheIBPMsystem(NewforFY 2010) 3)NumberofsearchestotheIBPMsystem(NewforFY2010) 4)Numberofboxesstoredoffsite(NewforFY2010) 5)Numberofboxesretrievedfromoffsite(NewforFY2010) 6)Numberofboxesdestroyed(NewforFY2010) 7)Percentageofagendapackagescompletedanddistributed atleast5dayspriortothenextCityCommissionmeeting(new forFY2013) 8)Numberofhoursofstafftimepermeetingspentpreparing summaryminutes(newforFY2013) 30,000 550,000 50,000 3,700 900 500 118,630 811,590 116,263 3,409 934 426 132,000 942,000 123,650 3,900 1,200 1,000 109,764 758,608 120,248 3,905 814 271 132,000 950,000 125,000 3,900 900 400 118,000 discontinue 900,000 discontinue 100,000 discontinue 4,000 discontinue 200 550 discontinue discontinue 95% TBD

70

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Human Resources
Mission
Human Resources The Human Resources Department is committed to providing expertise in attracting, developing, and sustaining a high quality workforce committed to excellent service. Health Fund To provide Coral Springs employees and their families with a competitive benets package consisting of a comprehensive, yet cost effective program for health, life, and long-term disability benets.

Core Processes and Outputs


Recruitment Recruit top talent by coordinating advertising, screening, interviewing, testing, selection, employee database management. Timely processing of job applications to identify the most qualied candidates. Employee Development Provide training and development opportunities in the areas of compliance, customer service, leadership development and other topics identied through needs analysis. Offer training through a variety of methods including instructor-led, e-learning, webinars, forums, mentoring, shadowing, books, and articles.

Human Resources

*Director of Human Resources (75%1000/25% 8501)

Human Resources 6.5 (1000) 6.5 Human Resources Partner (1.5) Senior Human Resources Coordinator Pension Administrator Human Resources Analyst Senior Office Assistant HR Support Specialist

Community Relations (1001 & 1007) 4

Health Fund 1.25 (8501) 1.25

**General Insurance Fund .5 (8801) .5 Human Resources Partner (.5)

Community Relations Manager Senior Human Resources Coordinator Senior Community Relations Coordinator Community Relations Coordinator *Position split 75% Human Resources, Office Assistant 25% Health Fund.

**1.5 total positions in General Insurance Fund.

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

City of Coral Springs, Florida

71

Human Resources (continued)


Compensation and Classication Support the development and maintenance of the Citywide broad band classication system, preparation and maintenance of classication specications, preparation and maintenance of job descriptions, and completion of salary surveys. Perform a comprehensive review of the Citys classication and compensation system to ensure competitive salaries to enable the City to hire and retain the best qualied employees. Timely and accurate processing of payroll change authorizations. Compliance/Safety Coordinate Citywide safety programs. Provide effective methods to ensure a safe work environment including safety training, committee meetings, library, events and programs. Employee Relations Partner with departments to provide guidance and consultation on human resource matters. Develop, communicate and implement policies. Discretely manage employee relations issues. Effectively manage collective bargaining negotiations. Benets Administration Administer Police & Fire retirement plans. Provide administrative support for general employee retirement plan, self-insured comprehensive medical and dental plan, and fully insured vision plan. Ensure that the aggregate and specic reinsurance coverage is maintained. Limit health care costs to less than the medical in ation rate. Provide fully insured basic life insurance, employee paid supplemental group life, long-term disability coverage, and wellness programs to all eligible employees. Coordinate the Citys Sterling/Baldrige efforts including coordination of the Citywide survey. Community Relations/Citizens Services/City Hall in the Mall Act as a clearinghouse for citizen requests for information and service via the Citys Help Desk. Coordinate the Special Events Funding Program. Provide an added level of service and convenience by coordinating various new and existing City, county, state and federal programs and services at our City Hall in the Mall satellite location. Human Resources staff serve as liaisons on the MLK Committee, Multicultural Advisory Committee, and the Customer-Involved Government Committee. Plan and organize a minimum of ten community, multicultural and education-related special events, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend Celebration, State of the City Reception, Unitown, Uniteens, Unikids, National Day of Prayer, International Dinner Dance, Worldfest, and other Ethnic Festivals. Quality Initiatives Provide strategic direction and support for the Citys quality initiative and coordinate annual external customer surveys, Human Resources Customer Service Survey, and Department Director/Supervisor 360-Degree Assessments.

72

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


HumanResources Revenues: CityHallInTheMall Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary HumanResources CommunityRelations CityHallInTheMall Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $644,409 $644,409 FY2011 Actual $584,233 $584,233 FY2012 Budget $626,954 $626,954 FY2013 Budget $628,515 $628,515 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $1,561 $1,561 0.25% 0.25%

$801,278 253,437 273,563 $1,328,278

$799,457 270,467 270,932 $1,340,856

$770,276 276,707 284,323 $1,331,306

$800,771 279,359 282,754 $1,362,884

$30,495 2,652 (1,569) $31,578

3.96% 0.96% 0.55% 2.37%

$899,825 292,966 135,487 0 $1,328,278 12.00 12.00 1.5%

$893,133 304,371 143,352 0 $1,340,856 11.75 11.75 1.5%

$846,592 310,602 171,862 2,250 $1,331,306 11.25 11.25 1.4%

$842,502 323,690 196,692 0 $1,362,884 11.25 11.25 1.4%

($4,090) 13,088 24,830 (2,250) $31,578 0.00 0.00 n/a

0.48% 4.21% 14.45% 100.00% 2.37% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

HealthFund Revenues: Transfers InterestIncome Recoveries AppropriatedRetainedEarnings Total Expenses: ProgramSummary HealthDental LongTermDisability LifeInsurance Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's

FY2010 Actual $9,221,210 48,717 1,039,886 0 $10,309,813

FY2011 Actual $9,735,428 22,189 1,036,440 0 $10,794,057

FY2012 Budget $11,350,582 60,000 1,050,000 0 $12,460,582

FY2013 Budget $11,603,575 45,000 1,130,000 300,000 $13,078,575

$Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $252,993 (15,000) 80,000 300,000 $617,993 2.23% 25.00% 7.62% n/a 4.96%

$10,808,885 212,848 161,085 $11,182,818

$11,053,208 155,379 120,517 $11,329,104

$12,190,022 144,500 126,060 $12,460,582

$12,808,015 144,500 126,060 $13,078,575

$617,993 0 0 $617,993

5.07% 0.00% 0.00% 4.96%

$132,259 9,387,072 1,663,487 $11,182,818 1.50 1.50 0.2%

$111,764 9,595,896 1,621,444 $11,329,104 1.25 1.25 0.2%

$101,901 10,689,121 1,669,560 $12,460,582 1.25 1.25 0.2%

$99,860 11,387,155 1,591,560 $13,078,575 1.25 1.25 0.2%

($2,041) 698,034 (78,000) $617,993 0.00 0.00 n/a

2.00% 6.53% 4.67% 4.96% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

73

Performance measures
HumanResources StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)PercentageofemployeeswhoagreewiththestatementI wouldrecommendworkingfortheCitytoafriend (discontinueafterFY2013) NEWEmployeeengagementindex 2)PercentageofemployeeswhofeelHumanResources providesqualityservices 3)Percentageofemployeesthataresatisfiedwithliaison 4)Percentageofemployeesthataresatisfiedwithwellness activities 5)Percentageofemployeeswhobelievebenefitsareinline withneeds 6)Cycletimeexternalrecruitment(requisitiontojoboffer)

FY2013 Goal

93%

97%

93%

90%

95%

90%

90% 95% 97% 92% 91%

97% 92% 91%

99% 95% 94%

97% 92% 91%

99% 96% 92%

97% 92% 91%

97% 92% 91%

94% 95% 40 39 business business days days

90% 88% 90% 40 38 40 business business business days days days

90% 90% 40 discontinue business days 90%

NEWQualityofhiresatisfaction StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 7)Respondtocustomerrequestswithin48hrs 100% 94% 100% 96% 100% 97% andcloseservicerequestwithinoneweek 90% 100% 90% 100% 90% 100% StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Effectiveness Measure: 8)Sickhoursperemployee FY2010 Goal Actual 40 50.2 FY2011 Goal Actual 40 52.4 FY2012 Goal Proj. 48 50

FY2013 Goal 100% 100%

FY2013 Goal 48

StrategicPriority:StrengthinDiversity DirectionalStatement:Leveragetheresourcesthatexistinourculturallydiversecommunitytoencourageinnovationandcreativityinsolving communitychallenges MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 10)Percentageofminorityapplicantsperrecruitment 40% 54% 40% 58% 45% 45% 45% 11)PercentageofemployeeswhoagreewithIamableto applytheskillsorknowledgelearnedthroughCitytrainingto myjob 90% 90% 90% 88% 90% 90% discontinue NEWPercentageofemployeeswhoagreewith"Iamsatisfied withtheaccesstotrainingresourcestoassistinmy professionaldevelopment." 90%

74

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Financial Services
Mission
Financial Services To preserve the Citys strong nancial condition by creating responsible nancial strategies, effectively managing the Citys resources, and providing analysis and recommendations that ensure optimal economic outcomes. General Insurance Fund (Workers Compensation, Property and Casualty) To oversee the Citys self-insurance program including administration and operations. Program provides general, professional, vehicle liability, workers compensation and property insurance. As such, this unit is essential to the proper protection of the Citys assets. Its primary function is analyzing exposures and taking an active role in administering a quasi/self-insurance program. This involves the assumption of risk to commercial insurance carriers, whenever and wherever benecial.

Core Processes and Outputs


Financial Services Provide nancial policy, cash management, debt management, accounting, payroll, accounts payable, purchasing, central stores, budget, risk management, and utility billing for the City.

Financial Services
Director of Financial Services (1501) General Insurance Fund 1 ( 8801 ) 1 Risk Management Coordinator Administration 3 ( 1501 ) 3 City Controller Senior Office Assistant Accounting Services 7 ( 1601 ) 7 Revenue & Collection 6 ( 1602 ) 6 Purchasing 9 ( 1700 ) 9

Accountant ( 3 ) Senior Office Assistant ( 4 ) Administration Accounting Analyst Accounting Assistant 5 ( 1701 ) 5 Billing Operations Technician Payroll Coordinator Payroll Technician Purchasing Administrator Senior Accounting Assistant Purchasing Agent II ( 3 ) Senior Office Assistant Central Stores 4 ( 1702 ) 4 Central Stores Coordinator Purchasing Assistant ( 3 )

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

City of Coral Springs, Florida

75

Financial Services (continued)


Produce the Citys Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. Process over 12,000 accounts payable checks and prepare over 26,000 payroll checks. Reconcile and track over 50 different funds. Process over 3,000 purchase orders. Purchase over $32 million in goods and services. Monitor the budget through monthly nancial reports. Administer Citys risk management policies. Renance and restructure Citys outstanding debt. Monitor Citys nancial condition and provide nancial strategies to ensure scal solvency. Maintain all water and wastewater customer accounts. Process over 146,000 utility bills including standby. Oversee day-to-day operations of the Coral Springs Museum of Art. General Insurance Fund (Workers Compensation, Property and Casualty) Administer and maintain Citys insurance programs for workers compensation, general, professional, vehicle liability and property insurance. Procure insurance coverages. Review and respond to all claims and administer assistance to the City Attorneys Of ce regarding claims management and settlement. Receive and process all workers compensation claims. Coordinate and facilitate with Safety Program/Evaluation Team meetings, reporting all incidents and accidents to the team.

76

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


FinancialServices Revenues: RevenueandCollection Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary Administration Museum AccountingServices Accounting RevenueandCollection SubTotal Purchasing Administration CentralStores SubTotal FinancialResearchandAnalysis* Total
*DivisioncombinedwithAccountinginFY2011

FY2010 Actual $105,060 $105,060

FY2011 Actual $92,854 $92,854

FY2012 Budget $250,000 $250,000

FY2013 Budget $225,000 $225,000

$Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget ($25,000) ($25,000) 10.00% 10.00%

$320,197 102,144 546,498 478,835 $1,025,333 $651,467 246,674 $898,141 $172,079 $2,517,894

$305,349 105,343 620,683 487,621 $1,108,304 $649,457 244,226 $893,683 $0 $2,412,679

$394,234 106,683 672,158 511,316 $1,183,474 $674,223 289,537 $963,760 $0 $2,648,151

$567,325 0 577,598 519,076 $1,096,674 $578,463 286,376 $864,839 $0 $2,528,838

$173,091 (106,683) (94,560) 7,760 $86,800 ($95,760) (3,161) $98,921 $0 ($119,313)

43.91% 100.00% 14.07% 1.52% 7.33% 14.20% 1.09% 10.26% n/a 4.51%

SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's

$1,533,473 729,666 247,755 7,000 $2,517,894 27.00 27.00 3.4%

$1,481,360 702,884 228,435 0 $2,412,679 25.50 25.50 3.3%

$1,568,691 806,334 273,126 0 $2,648,151 26.00 26.00 3.3%

$1,438,891 640,667 449,280 0 $2,528,838 25.00 25.00 3.1%

($129,800) (165,667) 176,154 0 ($119,313) (1.00) (1.00) n/a

8.27% 20.55% 64.50% n/a 4.51% 3.85% 3.85% n/a

GeneralInsuranceFund Revenues: Transfers InterestIncome Recoveries Total Expenses: ProgramSummary Workers'Compensation Property Casualty Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's

FY2010 Actual $2,570,436 55,902 552,683 $3,179,021

FY2011 Actual $2,700,573 32,793 300,795 $3,034,161

FY2012 Budget $2,564,555 50,000 85,000 $2,699,555

FY2013 Budget $2,718,097 50,000 85,000 $2,853,097

$Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $153,542 0 0 $153,542 5.99% 0.00% 0.00% 5.69%

$1,945,497 1,323,995 (686,284) $2,583,208

$859,672 1,585,318 74,845 $2,519,835

$1,099,000 1,438,055 162,500 $2,699,555

$1,164,700 1,541,397 147,000 $2,853,097

$65,700 103,342 (15,500) $153,542

5.98% 7.19% 9.54% 5.69%

$73,387 1,232,363 1,277,458 $2,583,208 1.50 1.50 0.2%

$80,904 537,241 1,901,690 $2,519,835 1.50 1.50 0.2%

$82,849 636,143 1,980,563 $2,699,555 1.50 1.50 0.2%

$106,633 740,327 2,006,137 $2,853,097 1.50 1.50 0.2%

$23,784 104,184 25,574 $153,542 0.00 0.00 n/a

28.71% 16.38% 1.29% 5.69% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

77

Performance Measures
FinancialServices StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)Internalcustomersatisfactionrating(FinancialServices InternalSurvey) 95% 97% 95% 98% 95% 95% 2)Percentageofpurchaserequisitionsunder$10,000 processedwithin24hours 87% 92% 90% 91% 90% 90% StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Efficiency Measure: 3)Uncollectiblewaterbillings 4)Numberofitemsinmanagementletterspreparedbythe Citysexternalauditors(discontinueafterFY2012) 4)NEWNumberofrepeatitemsinmanagementletters preparedbytheCitysexternalauditors 5)Percentageofinvoicespaidwithin30days 6)OutofstocklevelofthetotalinventoryatCentralStores 7)NEWNumberofdayslostfromonthejobinjuriesper100 employees(formerlyinHumanResources) 8)NEWPercentageofsubrogationeligibledollarsrecovered FY2010 Goal Actual 1.0% 0.7% 0 2 0 99.8% 2.8% 49.1 FY2011 Goal Actual 1.0% 0.6% 0 0 0 99% 2.93% 35.2 FY2012 Goal Proj. 1.0% 1.0% 0 0 0 99% 2.25% 42.5 0 99% 2.25% TBD 47% FY2013 Goal 1.0%

FY2013 Goal 95% 90%

98% 1.75% 50

99% 1.75% 50

99% 1.75% 50

78

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Information Services
Mission
To sucessfully integrate people, process and technology by fostering partnerships and consistentlyu delivering solutions that serve as the foundation of City operations. Computing platforms in the network include AS/400, le servers, and application servers. Access to a computing platform from most locations is accommodated via LAN, which, in turn, is interconnected to form the Citys WAN. Application Development and Integration Develop and maintain business applications, integrating them with the production computing environment. Maintain, administer, and upgrade three AS/400 computing systems and the 35 HTE integrated applications that are operational on this platform. Maintain, administer, and upgrade nine NetWare and 53 NT (a Microsoft operating system) servers, and the 97 applications and services that are server based.

Core Processes and Outputs


The Information Services department provides voice and data services to over 1,000 staff at 60 locations. The voice network includes over 400 wireless devices and over 900 wired devices, approximately half of which are related to PBX switches (Public Safety, City Hall, Center for the Arts and Tennis Center). The remaining lines provide basic telephone service (CENTREX) from AT&T. The data network consists of more than 850 desktop and laptop computers that can access a full suite of general purpose software tools, as well as 142 business applications and services. Elements of the data network consist of computing platforms, local area networks (LAN), and the wide area network (WAN).

Information Services
Director of Information Services 19.5 (2001) 19.5
Principal Office Assistant

Applications Administrator

GIS/Data Administrator

Network Administrator

Applications Administrator (Project Management)

Senior Programmer Analyst (2) Programmer Analyst Senior Network Specialist Network Specialist (3)

Senior CADD and GIS Tech Programmer Analyst Production Support Specialist Senior Programmer Analyst Senior Network Specialist *Apps Analyst-Asset Mgmt. (.5) Programmer Analyst

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

*Position split 50% Information Services Div. 2001; 50% Public Works-Utilities-Adm. Div 6001

City of Coral Springs, Florida

79

Information Services (continued)


Infrastructure Enhancement Plan, manage, and maintain a production environment (platforms, LANs, and WAN) in accordance with service level agreements related to security, reliability, availability, and performance of voice and data services. Maintain, administer, and upgrade the Citys WAN, consisting of eight LANs, over 1,200 nodes, and 60 locations. Information Management Provide and support desktop access to general purpose software tools, business applications and data across multiple computing platforms, and external services, data, or applications. Maintain, administer, and upgrade four PBX systems and over 900 lines that comprise the Citys voice communications infrastructure in 51 separate locations. Maintain, administer, and upgrade the Citys mobile computing environment and its 275 plus users from Police, Fire, Code Enforcement, and Fleet Management. Maintain, administer, and upgrade the GIS and AutoCADD computing platforms and applications serving departmental needs City-wide. Maintain, administer and provide information relative to the Citys library of plat maps, as-builts, and design drawings. Customer Service Provide on demand service and support for system and security administration, problem resolution or coordination, acquisition research and assistance, and information requests relative to tools, data, and applications. Respond to over 8,100 requests for service per year. Project Management Provide timely assistance and/or information required to satisfy customer requests and/or align their expectations to service delivery capabilities. Execute the current department work program that includes over 80 projects.

New Initiatives
Customer-Involved Government Enterprise Resource Program Information Technology Infrastructure Modernization

80

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


InformationServices Revenues: InformationServices Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary ComputerServices Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $4,262 $4,262 FY2011 Actual $16,935 $16,935 FY2012 Budget $17,600 $17,600 FY2013 Budget $18,304 $18,304 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $704 $704 4.00% 4.00%

$2,590,506 $2,590,506

$2,533,073 $2,533,073

$2,670,743 $2,670,743

$2,995,514 $2,995,514

$324,771 $324,771

12.16% 12.16%

$1,364,168 483,190 743,148 0 $2,590,506 20.00 20.00 2.5%

$1,346,776 492,916 693,381 0 $2,533,073 19.00 19.00 2.4%

$1,387,937 542,337 740,469 0 $2,670,743 19.00 19.00 2.4%

$1,422,957 562,813 1,009,744 0 $2,995,514 19.50 19.50 2.4%

$35,020 20,476 269,275 0 $324,771 0.50 0.50 n/a

2.52% 3.78% 36.37% n/a 12.16% 2.63% 2.63% n/a

Performance Measures
InformationServices StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Workload FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)NumberofISDevelopmentProjectsimplementedin accordancewithCitysBusinessPlanandISWorkProgram 20 31 28 28 20 20 StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 2)Meetservicelevelagreementregardingsystemavailability 99.7% 3)Meetservicelevelagreementregardingresponseand resolutiontoreportedproblems 95% 4)Meetservicelevelagreementregardingondemandservice requests 97% 5)CustomersatisfactionratingfromsurveyofInformation Services(switchedfromannualtotransactionsurveyin2010) NEWMeetservicelevelagreementregardingnetwork availability NEWMeetservicelevelagreementregardingapplication availability NEWMeetservicelevelagreementregardingserver availability 99.9% 94% 97% 99.7% 95% 97% 99.7% 93.2% 95.6% 99.5% 90% 95% 99.0% 97.2% 90.7%

FY2013 Goal 15

FY2013 Goal discontinue discontinue discontinue

91%

99%

91%

99.1%

95%

97%

95.0% 99.7% 98.0% 98.5%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

81

City Attorney
Mission
To provide effective and timely legal representation and advice to the City Commission and City administration. This of ce zealously represents the City in legal controversies and is committed to implementing the City Commissions policy of minimizing exposures and potential liability. Contracts Review and prepare contracts and agreements within the shortest time frame to ensure contract compliance without vendor inconvenience. Prepare and/or review approximately 200 agreements, contracts, and leases. Litigation and Municipal Violation Prosecution Advise on statutory matters and handle litigation. Appear in State and Federal court on behalf of the City. Respond to citizen inquiries Bring about preventive approaches to limiting risk. Participate in and present continuing legal updates to staff. Participate in employment/administrative matters. Aggressively enforce the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act.

Core Processes and Outputs


Research and Counsel Represent the City Commission, City administration, and all assigned boards and committees in all matters of law pertaining to their ofcial duties. Provide legal services for City Commission and operating departments. Attend City Commission and subordinate agency meetings. Prepare ordinances, resolutions, contracts and other documents in a timely fashion. Prepare approximately 100 resolutions and 50 ordinances.

New Initiatives
Customer-Involved Government City Charter Review

City Attorney
City Attorney Deputy City Attorney Assistant City Attorney (unfilled) Municipal Prosecutor Executive Assistant Legal Secretary Outside Litigation

82

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Expenditures by Program and Category


CityAttorney Expenditures: ProgramSummary CityAttorney Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Litigation Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual FY2011 Actual FY2012 Budget FY2013 Budget $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$941,866 $941,866

$781,555 $781,555

$845,120 $845,120

$839,014 $839,014

($6,106) ($6,106)

0.72% 0.72%

$388,874 139,976 349,995 63,021 $941,866 6.00 6.00 0.8%

$474,387 169,432 89,663 48,073 $781,555 6.00 6.00 0.8%

$483,993 176,432 184,695 0 $845,120 6.00 6.00 0.8%

$470,528 182,791 185,695 0 $839,014 6.00 6.00 0.7%

($13,465) 6,359 1,000 0 ($6,106) 0.00 0.00 n/a

2.78% 3.60% 0.54% n/a 0.72% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

Performance Measures
CityAttorney StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 1)PreparationofLegislation(resolutions,ordinance,orders) within10workdaysofrequestwhenaccompaniedby 99% 100% 99% 100% 99% 100% 99%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

83

Development Services
Mission
To plan and facilitate quality development and redevelopment, maintain neighborhood sustainability, and enhance the human and natural environment of the City. Coordinate and implement neighborhood revitalization and enhancement efforts through continued coordination with residents and other government agencies. Conduct three Slice of the Springs meetings and ensure 93% of attendees nd the neighborhood meeting productive. Collaborate on 15 neighborhood partnerships (formal and informal). Oversee traf c management on City streets and coordinate with federal, state, and local agencies to improve traf c. Implement state and federal programs (CDBG, NSP, HOME opportunities). Screen applicants for home repair programs resulting in 55 grants being awarded each year. Collect and evaluate data for the 10 components of the Sustainability Index Monitor and observe the sustainability of the City through the Neighborhood and Environmental Committee. Promote environmental awareness by offering formal and informal education and training. Provide resources to concerned citizens and organizations.

Core Processes and Outputs


Construction Management Provide coordination for capital construction projects to ensure projects are completed on time and within budget. Provide coordination and support for economic development and private/public development partnerships. Community Development Continue to provide technically sound and professional recommendations to the City Commission, along with the various boards and committees appointed by the City Commission. Maintain the Citys recertication of its Comprehensive Plan. Maintain department customer satisfaction rating at 95%. Incoroporate the Public Art Program and Coral Springs Museum of Art to provide more comprehensive approach towards the arts.

Development Services
Director of Development Services 3 ( 3100 ) 3 Development Services Administrator Development Services Coordinator Community Development 13 ( 3001-3004 ) 13 Code Enforcement 21 ( 5403 ) 21 Chief Code Enforcement Officer Code Enforcement Coordinator Senior Code Enforcement Officer Code Enforcement Officer (10 ) Senior Office Assistant (2) Principal Office Assistant Senior Tax Collection Specialist Tax Collection Specialist Inspector I Office Assistant (2) *Construction Management
*No staff in these divisions

*Engineering (5901) Chief Building Official Funded in 5101 Structural 8 ( 5301 ) 8

Building 26 ( 5100-5300 ) 26

Director of Community Development Funded in 3001

Administrative 11 ( 5101 ) 11 Senior Office Assistant Senior Permit Services Rep. ( 4 ) Permit Services Rep. ( 5 )

Planning & Zoning 6 ( 3001 ) 6

Neighborhood/Environmental Services 7 ( 3004 ) 7

Executive Assistant

Deputy Bldg. Official/ Chief Structural Inspector Inspector II ( 4 ) Inspector I ( 3 ) Plumbing 1 ( 5303 ) 1 Chief Inspector

Planning & Zoning Manager Landscape Inspector Associate Planner Assistant Planner

Chief Planner Senior Planner Transportation Planner Environmental Coord./City Forester Community Development Coordinator Neighnorhood Coordinator Assistant Museum Director

Electrical 4 ( 5302 ) 4 Chief Inspector Inspector II ( 3 ) Mechanical 2 (5304) 2 Chief Inspector Inspector II

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

84

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Development Services (continued)


Ensure the ecological integrity of environmentally sensitive lands through regular inspections, exotic species removal, and general preventive maintenance. Continue to monitor 1,500 volunteer hours per year dedicated towards enhancing the environment. Implement the objective of environmental monitoring and improving a sustainable urban forest, with specic emphasis on tree canopy replacement. Continue to provide accurate plan review to ensure compliance with land development regulations and architectural design guidelines in order to encourage quality aesthetic standards. Administratively review 50 Development Review Committee and Architectural Review Committee projects. Process 15 petitions for various land development actions. Process 500 paint approval forms. Assist the public (both residential and commercial) with general zoning information and aesthetic issues. Maintain cycle time for new DRC plan reviews at eight days by the Zoning Division. Conduct 1,600 zoning inspections. Maintain cycle time for sign permits and small permits at two days by the Zoning Division. Continue to process designer and monument signs to increase the aesthetic appeal while staying businessfocused. Provide technical support to the Building and Code Enforcement divisions, as well as the Community Redevelopment Agency effort in conjunction with Downtown Coral Springs. Provide detailed analysis on current topics affecting the City, such as tracking properties in foreclosure on a monthly basis. Research and apply for various grants that support department objectives and improve mobility and connectivity within the City. Building Provide prompt, accurate, and courteous customer service for plan review, building permits, and eld inspections for all building permit applications to ensure conformance of construction in the City with Florida Building Codes. Conduct plan reviews in 15 days or less 90% of the time. Conduct approximately 23,000 building inspections. Process 4,300 contractor license insurance information requests. Schedule 5,000 inspection appointments. Provide plan reviews and issue approximately 8,000 building permits. Complete requested inspections within one day 95% of the time. Process approximately 2,500 open permit search requests within three days. Process 600 record requests. Issue 20,000 notication postcards to permit holders and property owners. Respond to 60,000 incoming calls for Building and Code Enforcement divisions via the Customer Care Center. Code Enforcement Educate the public on the Citys Code of Ordinances and enforce the code to preserve and enhance the aesthetics of our residential and business areas. Provide code education to both residential and commercial properties. Perform over 30,000 code enforcement eld inspections and neighborhood preservation inspections. Coordinate and implement programs on code enforcement issues with the assistance of other departments. Process over 11,000 cases. Address and resolve problems of vacant/abandoned properties with health and safety violations. Require banks to register and maintain foreclosed properties. Collect 12,000 illegal snipe signs from our street rightsof-way. Provide education to elementary school students on fun ways for their families to contribute to, enhance, and preserve the aesthetics of their community. Support 20 Code Rangers partnered with Code Of cers and administrative staff. Receive, process, and dispatch both emergency and nonemergency calls for Code Enforcement. Ensure businesses and homeowners have obtained business tax receipts (formerly known as occupational licenses) to conduct business in the City. Process 6,200 business tax receipts.

City of Coral Springs, Florida

85

Development Services (continued)


Process 6,100 Administrative Citations. Respond to citizen requests, questions, and complaints within 48 hours. Engineering Provide engineering inspection on capital projects, right-ofway permits, and developer-provided infrastructure. Issue approximately 125 driveway permits. Complete requested inspections within one day. Perform approximately 500 inspections.

New Initiatives
Community Development Customer-Involved Government Downtown Planning Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Public Art Project for 50th Anniversary Royal Palm Entryway Construction (with Public Works) Community Wildlife Habitat Designation Youth Development and Family Values 50th Anniversary Celebration Strength in Diversity BizArt Annual Event Mullins Park Water Tank Mural (with Coral Springs Museum of Art) Building Customer-Involved Governmen Building Division Customer Service Enhancements Code Enforcement Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Single-Family Rental Registration Program

86

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


DevelopmentServices Revenues: CommunityDevelopment Building CodeEnforcement* Engineering Total
*IncludesBusinessTaxrevenue

FY2010 Actual $74,264 2,418,399 2,133,890 1,183 $4,627,736

FY2011 Actual $93,272 2,439,084 2,067,594 0 $4,599,950

FY2012 Budget $158,663 2,955,650 2,362,475 0 $5,476,788

FY2013 Budget $138,723 2,549,512 2,467,371 0 $5,155,606

$Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget ($19,940) (406,138) 104,896 0 ($321,182) 12.57% 13.74% 4.44% n/a 5.86%

Expenditures: ProgramSummary DevelopmentServices CommunityDevelopment Building CodeEnforcement Engineering Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital GrantsandAids Total Positions DevelopmentServices CommunityDevelopment Building CodeEnforcement Engineering Total FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's

$260,773 1,094,439 2,472,263 1,595,349 206,592 $5,629,416

$259,653 1,115,883 2,511,262 1,614,964 184,184 $5,685,946

$276,019 1,361,025 2,587,960 1,783,438 186,150 $6,194,592

$377,898 1,456,254 2,550,192 1,805,460 186,150 $6,375,954

$101,879 95,229 (37,768) 22,022 0 $181,362

36.91% 7.00% 1.46% 1.23% 0.00% 2.93%

$3,512,464 1,322,669 782,939 944 10,400 $5,629,416

$3,539,225 1,403,939 740,782 0 2,000 $5,685,946

$3,764,617 1,544,765 870,210 0 15,000 $6,194,592

$3,837,639 1,636,203 887,112 0 15,000 $6,375,954

$73,022 91,438 16,902 0 0 $181,362

1.94% 5.92% 1.94% n/a 0.00% 2.93%

2.00 12.00 27.50 19.50 0.00 61.00 61.00 7.8%

2.00 12.00 26.50 19.50 0.00 60.00 60.00 7.6%

2.00 12.00 26.00 20.00 0.00 60.00 60.00 7.6%

3.00 13.00 26.00 21.00 0.00 63.00 63.00 7.9%

1.00 1.00 0.00 1.00 0.00 3.00 3.00 n/a

50.00% 8.33% 0.00% 5.00% n/a 5.00% 5.00% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

87

Performance Measures
DevelopmentServices CommunityDevelopment StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)Departmentcustomersatisfactionrating 95% 99% 95% 99% 95% 95% StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 2)CycletimeforsmallpermitsbytheZoningDivision(Building PlanReview) 2days 1day 2days 1.5days 2days 2days 3)CycletimeforsignpermitsbytheZoningDivision(Building PlanReview) 2days 3days 2days 1day 2days 2days 4)Cycletimeforplanreviews(newandmajor/minor)bythe ZoningDivision(DevelopmentReviewCommittee) 8days 8days 8days 8days 8days 8days 5)ComprehensivePlanconsistencywithDepartmentof CommnityAffairs(DCA) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 6)NumberofappealsonArchitecturalReview(ARC) (discontinuedafterFY2012) 1 0 1 0 1 0

FY2013 Goal 95%

FY2013 Goal 2days 2days 8days Yes discontinue

StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability DirectionalStatement:Supportourneighborhoodaestheticswithproactivecodeenforcementandpartnershipswithneighborhood/homeowner associationsthatensurehealthyandvitalneighborhoods,freeofcrime,grime,anddecline MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 7)Numberofhousingunitsrehabilitatedusingpublicfinancial assistanceper$100,000housingrehabilitation 3.60 3.52 3.60 3.42 3.60 3.60 3.60 8)Averagenumberofdaysfromapplicationforrehabilitation 365 275 365 392.5 365 365 assistancetocompletionofrehabilitationwork discontinue (discontinuedafterFY2012) days days days days days days 8)Averagenumberofdaysfromthereceiptoftheresident's 45days applicationforrehabilitationassistancetoapplicationapproval
(newforFY2013)

StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability DirectionalStatement:Supportourneighborhoodaestheticswithproactivecodeenforcementandpartnershipswithneighborhood/homeowner associationsthatensurehealthyandvitalneighborhoods,freeofcrime,grime,anddecline MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 9)TimelinessratioofCDBGspending:annualCDBGallocation availablebyJuly31 1.50 1.34 1.50 1.49 1.50 1.50 1.50

88

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Performance Measures
CommunityDevelopment(continued) StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability DirectionalStatement:Supportourneighborhoodaestheticswithproactivecodeenforcementandpartnershipswithneighborhood/homeowner associationsthatensurehealthyandvitalneighborhoods,freeofcrime,grime,anddecline MeasurementType:Demand FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 10)Numberofformalandinformalneighborhoodpartnerships eachyear(KIO) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability DirectionalStatement:EnhancetheCity'streecanopybyeducatingpropertyownersinpropertreeselectionandplacement MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 11)NumberoftreesplantedwithintheCity(KIO) 2,000 2,061 2,000 2,118 1,750 1,750 Note:FY2012goalpublishedas2,000 Building Measure: 1)Requestedinspectionscompletedwithinoneday 2)Percentofplanreviewscompletedwithin15workingdays CodeEnforcement Measure: 1)Percentofcodecasesbroughtintovoluntarycompliance priortoadministrative/judicialprocess 2)PercentofsurveyrespondentssatisfiedwithCityeffortsat maintainingthequalityoftheirneighborhoods(Resident SurveyrevisedforFY2011 ) NEWPercentofsurveyrespondentssatisfiedwiththeCity's effortstoreduceneighborhoodblight(BusinessSurveynew forFY2013) ConstructionManagement Measure: 1)BuildthefollowingCityconstructionprojectswithinbudget andontime: FireStation71 PoliceTacticalTrainingBldg FY2010 Goal Actual 70% 91% FY2011 Goal Actual 70% 70% 90% 89% FY2012 Goal Proj. 75% 89% FY2013 Goal 75% 75% FY2010 Goal Actual 90% 100% 95% 98.6% FY2011 Goal Actual 90% 100% 95% 99.1% FY2012 Goal Proj. 90% 99% 95% 96% FY2013 Goal 95% 90%

FY2013 Goal 1,000

75%

87%

FY2010 Goal Actual

FY2011 Goal Actual Aug11 Aug12

FY2012 Goal Proj. Aug12 Dec11 Jun12 Nov11

FY2013 Goal

City of Coral Springs, Florida

89

Police
Mission
To provide professional, high quality and effective police service in partnership with the community. Manage the overall working of the Police Department to provide a safe and secure community environment. Provide public informational services. Identify specic training needs of department personnel.

Core Processes and Outputs


Administration Administer the nancial, operational and capital budgets of the department.

Investigations Investigate property crimes such as burglaries, thefts etc., and violent crimes such as batteries, assaults, domestic violence, child abuse (physical, sexual, and neglect), elderly abuse, adult sex crimes, homicide, and aggravated battery.

Police
Chief of Police 2 (4101) 2
Executive Assistant

Operations Deputy Chief (funded in 4201)


Executive Assistant (funded in 4201)
Special Events* (4108)

Operational Support

Special Operations

Criminal Investigations

Sr. Office Asst. (funded in 4301)

Dive Team* (4114)

Patrol Unit 113 (4201) 113

Substation Unit 3 (4211) 3

General Investigations 18 (4301) 18

Special Investigations 16 (4302) 16

Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Lieutenant (4) Law Enforcement Sergeant (11) Law Enforcement Officer (85) Traffic Accident Investigator (9) Senior Office Assistant

Law Enforcement Officer (3)

Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant

Law Enforcement Sergeant (2) Investigator (10) Victim/Family Advocate (2) Principal Office Assistant (2)

Tactical/Gang Unit 10 (4204) 10

Investigator (10) Criminal Investigations Specialist (2) Crime Analyst Principal Office Assistant (2)

Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant

Traffic Unit 10 (4202) 10

Law Enforcement Officer (8) Crime Scene Investigation 10 (4305) 10

Law Enforcement Sergeant Motorcycle Officer (9)

Bicycle Unit 6 (4209) 6

Law Enforcement Sergeant Humane Unit 3 (4205) 3 Law Enforcement Officer (5)

Crime SceneInvestigations Unit Supervisor Latent Fingerprint Examiner Crime Scene Technician (5) Property Room Technician (2) Crime Lab Technician

Humane Officer (3)

K-9 Unit 5 (4203) 5

Law Enforcement Officer (5)

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number
Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

BEAR Unit 7 (4212) 7

Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer (6)

90

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Police (continued)
Patrol Receive, process, and dispatch both emergency and nonemergency calls for Police and Fire Rescue. Respond to 170,000 projected calls for service and incident response. Support Functions Process all external and internal requests for reports and information. Coordinate eet and facility maintenance. Juvenile Operate the School Resource Ofcer program and present educational program at all grade levels. Coordinate court-ordered community service hours program for juveniles and adults.

New Initiatives
Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainabilty Burglary Enforcement and Reduction (BEAR) Unit Public Safety Technology Upgrades Public Safety Communication System and Equipment Upgrade Study

Administration Deputy Chief (funded in 4110)

Office of Professional Standards 2 (4102) 2

Special Response Team* (4107)

Vice and Intelligence 14 (4103) 14

Human Resources 5 (4104) 5

Community Services

Communications 29 (4502) 29

Fiscal Management 5 (4110) 5

Law Enforcement Sergeant Senior Office Assistant

Law Enforcement Sergeant Investigator (12) Intelligence Analyst

Human Resources Administrator Background Investigator HR Support Specialist Principal Office Assistant (2) Off-Duty Detail* (4109)
Principal Office Assistant (funded in 4303)

Communications Administrator Telecommunicator (19) Communications Technical Coordinator Communications Shift Supervisor (6) Emergency Call Taker (2)

Deputy Police Chief Fiscal Accreditation Administrator Senior Office Assistant Principal Office Assistant (2)

Training 5 (4210) 5

Volunteer Services 1 (4308) 1

Emergency Mgmt 1 (4115) 1

Central Records 7 (4501) 7

Law Enforcement Sergeant Law Enforcement Officer (2) Range Master Principal Office Assistant

Volunteer Services Coordinator

Emergency Mgmt Coordinator

Records Supervisor Principal Office Assistant (4) Office Assistant (2)

Building/Fleet 5 (4503) 4.63

Youth Liaison 19 (4303) 19

Senior Fleet/Facilities Coordinator Fleet/Facilities Coordinator Custodian (2) Building Custodian (0.63)
* No full-time staff assigned to these divisions

Law Enforcement Captain Law Enforcement Sergeant (2) Youth Liaison Officer (15) Community Involvement 2 (4207) 2

Law Enforcement Officer Community Involvement Coordinator School Crossing Guards* (4206)

City of Coral Springs, Florida

91

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


Police Revenues: OfficeoftheChief OffDutyDetail Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary Administration OfficeoftheChief Vice/Intelligence HumanResources OffDutyDetail CommunicationsCenter FiscalManagement SpecialResponseTeam SubTotal FY2010 Actual $1,623,150 380,683 $2,003,833 FY2011 Actual $1,754,422 350,245 $2,104,667 FY2012 Budget $1,933,546 387,600 $2,321,146 FY2013 Budget $1,862,113 403,104 $2,265,217 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget ($71,433) 15,504 ($55,929) 3.69% 4.00% 2.41%

$298,004 2,438,701 358,594 301,886 2,527,691 850,060 163,224 $6,938,160

$304,729 2,529,520 361,581 279,995 2,525,768 947,961 162,772 $7,112,326 2,194,368 75,441 328,935 826,210 127,597 440,513 378,793 500,609 $4,872,466 $11,984,792 $256,000 $256,000

$304,356 2,494,308 378,125 304,170 2,607,745 922,427 180,735 $7,191,866 3,463,088 84,440 347,861 841,728 136,916 463,767 423,000 537,857 $6,298,657 $13,490,523 $261,236 $261,236

$267,796 2,418,415 378,307 310,254 2,578,046 924,006 183,830 $7,060,654 3,331,414 88,880 364,402 845,416 137,959 463,281 445,555 536,241 $6,213,148 $13,273,802 $275,976 $275,976

($36,560) (75,893) 182 6,084 (29,699) 1,579 3,095 ($131,212) (131,674) 4,440 16,541 3,688 1,043 (486) 22,555 (1,616) ($85,509) ($216,721) $14,740 $14,740

12.01% 3.04% 0.05% 2.00% 1.14% 0.17% 1.71% 1.82% 3.80% 5.26% 4.76% 0.44% 0.76% 0.10% 5.33% 0.30% 1.36% 1.61% 5.64% 5.64%

AdministrationCommunityServices YouthLiaison* 2,525,839 EmergencyManagement 0 CommunityInvolvement 339,877 Training 818,496 VolunteerServices 120,376 CentralRecords 431,774 CrossingGuards 367,265 BuildingandFleetMaintenance 541,561 SubTotal $5,145,188 SubtotalAdministration OfficeofProfessionalStandards OfficeofProfessionalStandards SubTotal Operations Support Patrol SpecialEvents Traffic Humane SubTotal SpecialOperations Tactical/GangUnit K9 SubstationUnit BicycleUnit BEARUnit SubTotal CriminalInvestigations GeneralInvestigations SpecialInvestigations CrimeSceneInvestigations DiveTeam SubTotal SubTotalOperations Total SummaryByCategory Personal* Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's $12,083,348 $245,044 $245,044

$18,747,677 85,059 2,039,800 208,212 $21,080,748 $1,490,990 1,000,532 555,462 973,066 0 $4,020,050 $2,835,568 2,406,252 849,645 14,866 $6,106,331 $31,207,129 $43,535,521 $21,461,678 17,073,780 4,937,680 62,383 $43,535,521 296.00 295.63 37.6%

$19,118,530 92,931 1,966,740 214,100 $21,392,301 $1,560,726 1,000,811 672,933 958,256 0 $4,192,726 $2,884,375 2,454,928 839,848 14,282 $6,193,433 $31,778,460 $44,019,252 $21,476,308 17,755,035 4,764,541 23,368 $44,019,252 295.00 294.63 37.6%

$20,397,020 79,271 1,948,213 227,107 $22,651,611 $1,554,570 1,012,473 632,759 945,358 0 $4,145,160 $2,911,192 2,442,119 908,562 13,416 $6,275,289 $33,072,060 $46,823,819 $23,171,482 18,601,242 5,051,095 0 $46,823,819 295.00 294.63 37.4%

$17,560,363 87,855 1,886,053 227,151 $19,761,422 $1,683,425 954,305 459,024 922,247 988,782 $5,007,783 $2,670,311 2,323,468 960,615 13,494 $5,967,888 $30,737,093 $44,286,871 $23,336,389 15,820,984 5,125,055 4,443 $44,286,871 298.00 297.63 37.1%

$2,836,657 8,584 (62,160) 44 ($2,890,189) $128,855 (58,168) (173,735) (23,111) 988,782 $862,623 ($240,881) (118,651) 52,053 78 ($307,401) ($2,334,967) ($2,536,948) $164,907 (2,780,258) 73,960 4,443 ($2,536,948) 3.00 3.00 n/a

13.91% 10.83% 3.19% 0.02% 12.76% 8.29% 5.75% 27.46% 2.44% n/a 20.81% 8.27% 4.86% 5.73% 0.58% 4.90% 7.06% 5.42% 0.71% 14.95% 1.46% n/a 5.42% 1.02% 1.02% n/a

*SROsalariescoveredbyforfeiturefunds:FY2010$1.0mil;FY2011$1.25mil;FY2012$1.5mil;FY2013$900,000

92

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Performance Measures
Police StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Measure: 1)PoliceDepartment'soverallqualityrating(ResidentSurvey) 93% 95% 2)Percentageofcustomerswhohascontactwithorknows theirneighborhoodofficers(ResidentSurvey) 45% 49% 3)NEWSatisfactionratingbybusinesses(BusinessSurvey) 2009 4)AveragePoliceresponsetime(fromtimeofcalltoarrival) 5)Averagenumberoffalsealarms(businesses&residences) 5:10 4,600 4:58 4,122 5:10 4,600 2010 4:45 4,323 5:00 4,000 2011 5:00 4,300 92%

FY2013 Goal 95% 45% 2012 5:00 discontinue

StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:Increaseandpromotecitizenvolunteerismwithafocusonmaximizingoperationalimpact MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Measure: 6)Volunteerhoursdonatedbyboardandcommitteemembers 6,500 6,166 6,500 4,969 5,500 4,800

FY2013 Goal discontinue

StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability;CustomerInvolved DirectionalStatement:Supportourneighborhoodaestheticswithproactivecodeenforcementandpartnershipswithneighborhood/homeowner associationsthatensurehealthyandvitalneighborhoods,freeofcrime,grime,anddecline MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 7)PercentageofresidentswhofeelthatCoralSpringshas remainedassafeorbecomeasaferplacetolive(Resident
Survey)

70% 2010 0% 2010 0% 2010 28% 2010

74% 4.56% 3.53%

2011 0% 2011 0% 2011

81% 28% 8.89%

75% 2012 0% 2012 0% 2012 28% 2012 5%

8)NEWSafetyratingbybusinesses(BusinessSurvey) 9)Stabilizetheburglaryrateata0%increaseadjustedfor population(Source:UniformCrimeReport) 10)Maintain0%increaseincrimerateasadjustedfor population(Source:UniformCrimeReport)

2009 0% 15.6% 2009 0% 1.07% 2009 28% 2009 29%

11)Clearancerateforcrimes(Source:UniformCrimeReport) 12)NEWReducerobberies(Source:UniformCrimeReport)

26%

28% 2011

28%

StrategicPriority:Traffic,Mobility,andConnectivity DirectionalStatement:Promotemoreeffectivetrafficmanagementtechnologytoreducecurrentandfuturetrafficoverload MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 2011 2010 2009 13)Trafficcrashesper1,000citizens 40 31 40 30 35 30 14)NEWNumberofhighschoolstudentsthatareawarded safedrivingcertificatesatgraduation 48 149 114 15)NumberofstudentsthatparticipateinYouthMentoring Program(*ProgramdiscontinuedQ1FY2010throughFY2011)

FY2013 Goal 2012 35 120

80

21*

n/a

n/a

10

20

discontinue

City of Coral Springs, Florida

93

Economic Development
Mission
To expand and diversify the commercial tax base through targeted strategies which support the citys quest to be the premier community in which to live, work, raise a family, and learn.

New Initiatives
Financial Health and Economic Development Business Development (with City Managers Of ce)

Core Processes and Outputs


Promote absorption of existing vacant commercial, industrial and retail space by continuing to maintain and develop relationships with the top real estate experts in Broward County. Set the stage for new development as well as redevelopment when the economy improves and our proactive approach sparks opportunities in selected targeted industry sectors. Implement Economic Development Business Plan. Improve vacancy rates in commercial, industrial, and retail sectors. Utilize Co-Star for tracking Coral Springs properties and vacancy rates. Conduct a community breakfast for Broward Countys top brokers. Promote the Community Redevelopment Agency through the presence of Broward College in Fiscal Year 2012. Maintain the EDF Preferred Client Program. Work with local banks, venture capitalists, Small Business Assistance program and the Retail Coalition Group to assist, support, and grow business in Coral Springs. Center Number = Department/Division Number

Economic Development
Deputy City Manager (Funded in 0501)

Continue to increase local property values through key tenant improvement projects.

Performance Measures
EconomicDevelopment StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment;CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TargetfuturegrowthindustriesandcollaboratewithEDF,ChamberofCommerce,andbusinesscommunitytoencourage growthandretention MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 1)Increasenonresidentialtaxbaseannually
Duetoeconomicconditions,measurediscontinuedinFY2012.Alternative measureswillbeformulatedduringFY2012.

2)Attractorexpandprojects

$232M 7

($202M) 8

10

TBD

TBD

94

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Fire/EMS
Mission
To assist the public in the protection of life and property by minimizing the impact of res, medical emergencies, and other potential disasters or events that affect the community and environment. Oversee the daily operations pertaining to Inspections, Prevention, Suppression, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and Training. Respond to a projected 14,000 calls for service. Provide contractual Fire/EMS service to the city of Parkland and provide Fire/EMS to unincorporated Broward County. Attain 90% average response time of eight minutes or less for calls for service. Fire Suppression Respond to all types of re-related emergencies within the City. Maintain seven re pumper engines and two ladder trucks.

Core Processes and Outputs


Administration Perform the management and administration of the Fire Rescue Department budget, policies, and procedures providing department-wide leadership and direction. Oversee 161 career reghters.

Fire/EMS
Fire Chief Funded in 4601 and 4702
Senior Office Assistant (funded in 4601 and 4702)

Administration 3.5 ( 4601 ) 3.5

Communication Services 1.84 ( 4602 ) 1.84

Suppression 91.5 ( 4801 ) 91.5

Emergency Medical Services 58 ( 4702 ) 58

EMS-Communication Services 6.16 ( 4703 ) 6.16

EMS Training 1 ( 4705 ) 1 Assistant Chief Training Officer

Deputy Fire Chief (0 .5 ) Telecommunicator ( .69 ) Emergency Mgmt and Planning Chief Emergency Call Taker ( 1.15 ) Senior Office Assistant (0.5 ) Fire Equipment Technician ( 0.5 )

Assistant Fire Chief ( 1.5 ) Battalion Chief ( 1.5 ) Fire Captain ( 13.5 ) Rescue Lieutenant ( 16 ) Driver Engineer/Paramedic (19) Driver Engineer/EMT (5) Firefighter/Paramedic ( 34 ) Firefighter/EMT

Deputy Fire Chief ( .5 ) Telecommunicator ( 2.31 ) Assistant Fire Chief ( 1.5 ) Emergency Call Taker ( 3.85 ) Battalion Chief ( 1.5 ) Fire Captain ( 16.5 ) Rescue Lieuteneant ( 14) Firefighter/Paramedic ( 16 ) Driver Engineer/Paramedic ( 6 ) Fire Equipment Technician ( 0 .5 ) Senior Office Assistant( 0.5 )

Training 2 ( 4805 ) 2

Inspection 9 ( 4901 ) 9

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

Chief Training Officer Senior Office Assistant

Fire Marshal Fire Inspection Captain Fire Inspector II ( 5 ) Fire Inspector I ( 1 ) Senior Office Assistant

City of Coral Springs, Florida

95

Fire/E MS (continued)
Training Oversee various comprehensive training for all re suppression personnel. Fire Inspection The division performs approximately 6,400 annual re safety inspections and approximately 5,600 re-inspections on all commercial and residential properties of three or more living units, and re safety inspections in all public and private schools (including those located in Parkland). Perform approximately 1,100 permit inspections and review 1,300 plans. Provide re prevention activities, such as Safety Town and re extinguisher demonstrations. Conducted over 100 re investigations to determine origin and cause. Emergency Medical Services Provide assistance and emergency medical care to victims of sudden illness or injury. Provide dual-tier emergency medical service maintaining seven full-time units 24 hours a day (including Parkland). Assure 24 hours a day, seven days a week operability of seven EMS rescue vehicles, three reserve rescue vehicles, and three reserve re pumpers. Provide contractual Fire/EMS service to the city of Parkland and provide Fire/EMS to unincorporated Broward County. Receive, process, and dispatch both emergency and nonemergency calls for Fire and Emergency Medical services. Fire/EMS Training Academy Provide the highest quality training classes for paramedics and reghters.

New Initiatives
Financial Health and Economic Development Fire Academy Promotional Campaign (with Communications and Marketing) EMS Equipment: Time = Life

96

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


Fire/EMS Revenues: FireFund SpecialAssessment Intergovernmental ChargesforServices MiscellaneousRevenues FinesandForfeitures PartialYearAssessment OtherFinancingSources UnappropriatedFundBalance SubTotal EMSGeneralFund EmergencyMedicalServices ContractServices SubTotal TotalRevenues Expenditures: ProgramSummary FireFund Administration CommunicationServices Suppression Training Inspection Capital CapitalReserve(BudgetAmendment) DebtService InterfundTransfers NonDepartmental SubTotal EMSGeneralFund EmergencyMedicalServices CommunicationServices Training SubTotal TotalExpenditures SummaryByCategory FireFund Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Training CapitalReserve(BudgetAmendment) NonDepartmental InterfundTransfers DebtService SubTotal EMSGeneralFund Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital SubTotal Total Positions Fire EMS TotalPositions FTE's Fire EMS TotalFTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $8,447,849 4,014,625 2,069,597 78,979 40,183 0 7,499 500,000 $15,158,732 $1,992,318 1,751 $1,994,069 $17,152,801 FY2011 Actual $8,807,061 4,927,600 1,872,109 71,426 34,138 0 6,225 0 $15,718,559 $2,053,514 1,751 $2,055,265 $17,773,824 FY2012 Budget $9,121,906 5,136,218 2,155,891 77,000 53,000 25,938 0 0 $16,569,953 $1,994,390 1,751 $1,996,141 $18,566,094 FY2013 Budget $9,728,904 5,324,469 2,023,073 172,500 53,000 25,938 0 0 $17,327,884 $2,497,369 1,751 $2,499,120 $19,827,004 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $606,998 188,251 (132,818) 95,500 0 0 0 0 $757,931 $502,979 0 $502,979 $1,260,910 6.65% 3.67% 6.16% 124.03% 0.00% 0.00% n/a n/a 4.57% 25.22% 0.00% 25.20% 6.79%

$393,642 103,131 10,688,823 1,083,618 939,040 43,725 700,000 232,860 165,806 793,603 $15,144,248 $7,634,364 346,150 161,678 $8,142,192 $23,286,440

$407,371 113,086 10,319,319 1,051,909 1,035,197 294,378 130,082 232,860 168,931 1,477,068 $15,230,201 $7,552,445 378,712 180,008 $8,111,165 $23,341,366

$569,027 121,398 11,256,620 1,133,259 1,155,572 252,079 0 232,860 154,228 1,694,910 $16,569,953 $8,125,778 411,476 194,979 $8,732,233 $25,302,186

$565,704 122,652 11,794,044 1,141,198 1,180,131 389,800 0 232,860 163,291 1,738,204 $17,327,884 $8,262,757 415,312 197,096 $8,875,165 $26,203,049

($3,323) 1,254 537,424 7,939 24,559 137,721 0 0 9,063 43,294 $757,931 $136,979 3,836 2,117 $142,932 $900,863

0.58% 1.03% 4.77% 0.70% 2.13% 54.63% n/a 0.00% 5.88% 2.55% 4.57% 1.69% 0.93% 1.09% 1.64% 3.56%

$7,637,208 3,485,843 1,001,585 43,725 1,083,618 700,000 793,603 165,806 232,860 $15,144,248 $5,310,032 2,035,549 796,611 $8,142,192 $23,286,440 103.84 65.16 169.00 103.84 65.16 169.00 21.5%

$7,910,495 2,980,383 984,096 294,378 1,051,909 130,082 1,477,068 168,931 232,860 $15,230,201 $5,424,613 1,884,727 801,825 $8,111,165 $23,341,366 103.84 65.16 169.00 103.84 65.16 169.00 21.5%

$8,179,624 3,785,777 1,137,216 252,079 1,133,259 0 1,694,910 154,228 232,860 $16,569,953 $5,544,748 2,367,240 820,245 $8,732,233 $25,302,186 103.84 65.16 169.00 103.84 65.16 169.00 21.4%

$8,286,067 4,103,496 1,272,968 389,800 1,141,198 0 1,738,204 163,291 232,860 $17,327,884 $5,418,595 2,463,362 993,208 $8,875,165 $26,203,049 107.84 65.16 173.00 107.84 65.16 173.00 21.6%

$106,443 317,719 135,752 137,721 7,939 0 43,294 9,063 0 $757,931 ($126,153) 96,122 172,963 $0 $142,932 $900,863 4.00 0.00 4.00 4.00 0.00 4.00 n/a

1.30% 8.39% 11.94% 54.63% 0.70% n/a 2.55% 5.88% 0.00% 4.57% 2.28% 4.06% 21.09% n/a 1.64% 3.56% 3.86% 0.00% 2.37% 3.85% 0.00% 2.37% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

97

Performance Measures
Fire/EMS StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment;FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)MaintainFireRescuequalitystandards: Averageresponsetimeofeightminutesorlessfor90%of allFire/EMScalls 90% 88% 90% 89% 90% 9095% Aminimumoffourteenfirefightersonscenewithinten minutes90%oftimeforallstructuralfires 90% 100% 90% 100% 90% 100% Amaximumofcustomercomplaintsand/orpublicsafety serviceprofessionalcomplaintsoflessthanonepercentofthe totalcallvolume <1% 0.00% <1% 0.00% <1% <1% Medicalcomplaintsfiledbymedicaldirectorand/ormedical personnelathospitalswillbelessthanonepercentoftotalcall volume <1% 0.00% <1% 0.00% <1% <1% StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 2)Provideinspectionreporttocustomerwithin12daysfrom 12 6 12 8 12 810 dateofinspection(revisedforFY2008) days days days days days days 3)ProvideaminimumofspecialtyclassesattheFireAcademy: FloridaFirefighterMinimumStandardsclasses 8 11 8 8 8 6 andEMTclasses 4 4 4 5 5 4 4)Percentageofcustomerswhoaresatisfiedwiththequality oftheFireDepartment(ResidentSurveyrevisedforFY2009 ) 5)Percentageofcustomerswhoaresatisfiedwiththequality oftheemergencyparamedics(BusinessSurveynewforFY 2012 )

FY2013 Goal

90% 90%

<1%

<1%

FY2013 Goal 12 days 6 4

95%

99%

95%

99%

98

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Public Works
Mission
Public Works To support Coral Springs in becoming the nations premier community in which to live, work, and raise a family by providing superior quality facilities, infrastructure and customer-focused services to both internal and external customers. Utilities To provide the City utilities service area with a reliable and safe water supply that is adequate for all customer needs including re protection; and to ensure that wastewater is collected and disposed of properly in accordance with all regulations and standards as set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Broward County Health Department and the Broward County Environmental Protection Department. Equipment Services To support all departments of the City by maintaining and repairing all vehicles and equipment in a timely and costeffective manner.

Core Processes and Outputs


Public Works Administration Coordinate overall department management, administration, and budget. Oversee the contractual responsibilities of the solid waste franchise holder.

Public Works
Director of Public Works Funded in 5501

Administrative Services 1.5 ( 5501 ) 1.5

Solid Waste Recycling ( 5502 )

Streets 21.5 ( 5601 ) 21.5

Facilities Management 5 ( 5801 ) 5

Equipment Maintenance 15 ( 5701 ) 15

Utilities 35 ( 6000-6005) 35

Project Technician (0.5 )

Streets Superintendent Lead Worker ( 2 ) Senior Office Assistant Equipment Operator II ( 3 ) **Streets Technician ( 8.5 ) Office Assistant Neighborhood Service Worker ( 5 )

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

Fleet Superintendent Administration Lead Mechanic 5 ( 6001 ) 5 Mechanic ( 11 ) Generator Technician *Deputy City Manager ( 0.5 ) Senior Office Assistant Utilities Superintendent ***Util Engineer/Fac. Supt. ( 0.5 ) ****Apps. Analyst-Asset Mgmt. (.5) *Position split 50% City Manager's Office **Streets Technician ( 0.5 ) Div. 0501; Utilities-Adm Div. 6001 Senior Office Assistant Office Assistant **Position split 50% Streets Div. 5601; 50% Utilities-Adm Wastewater Collection Div. 6001 7 ( 6005 ) 7 ***Position split 50% Fac. Mgmt Div. 5801; 50% Utilities-Adm Div. Utilities Coordinator 6001 Utilities Instrumentation ****Position split 50% Utilities-Adm. Equipment Operator II ( 2 ) Div. 6001; 50% Information Services Lift Station Mechanic Div. 2001 Video Inspection Technician Utilities Service Worker

***Util Engineer/Fac. Supt. ( 0.5 ) Facilities Technician Electrician Lead Worker Carpenter Project Technician ( 0.5 )

Water Distribution 8 ( 6002 ) 8 Utilities Lead Worker Water Conservation Coordinator Equipment Operator II Utilities Service Technician Utilities Locator Technician Utilities Service Worker ( 3 )

Water Treatment 15 ( 6003 ) 15

Wastewater Treatment ( 6004 )

Chief Water Plant Operator Water Plant Maintenance Coordinator Utilities Mechanic ( 2 ) Senior Water Plant Operator ( 5 ) Water Plant Operator ( 5 ) Utilities Service Worker

City of Coral Springs, Florida

99

Public Works (continued)


Streets Perform repair and maintenance of City-owned asphalt streets, bike paths and parking areas. Maintain over 144 miles of bike paths. Maintain over 575 lane miles of City streets. Inspect 8 miles of state roads and 32 miles of county roads. Resurface 5.4 miles of roadway. Clean and maintain over 6,500 drains. Facilities Perform in-house or contract for maintenance, repair, and minor construction of all City buildings. Maintain 662,170 square feet of City facilities. Utilities Perform management, administration, and support for the daily operation of water treatment, water plant maintenance, water distribution, wastewater collection, and wastewater treatment. Produce an average of 5.4 million gallons per day of treated water. Equipment Services Repair and maintain all City vehicles including re, police, and small engine equipment. Maintain 858 vehicles/equipment and 598 pieces of small engine equipment (including Parkland). Prepare specications for new equipment and vehicle purchases. Provide specialized equipment installation for public safety vehicles. Repair and service motorcycles for cities of Margate and Coconut Creek. Repair and service Parkland Fire and Public Works vehicles and equipment (26 vehicles, 9 pieces of equipment, 47 pieces of small engine equipment).

New Initiatives
Customer-Involved Government City Hall Lighting and Entrance ADA Modications Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Litter Removal Enhancement Resurface Public Master Parking Lots Royal Palm Entryway Construction (with Community Development) Financial Health and Economic Development Water Rate Study Trafc, Mobility, and Connectivity New Sidewalks at 38th Drive and 85th Avenue Right Turn Lane at Shadow Wood Boulevard at Riverside Drive Roadway Resurfacing and Alley Improvements Coral Hills Drive Sidewalk Design

100

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


PublicWorks Revenues: AdministrativeServices Streets Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary AdministrativeServices SolidWasteRecycling SubTotal Streets FacilitiesMgmt. Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $302,691 0 $302,691 FY2011 Actual $303,092 47,125 $350,217 FY2012 Budget $315,000 0 $315,000 FY2013 Budget $337,900 47,125 $385,025 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $22,900 47,125 $70,025 7.27% n/a 22.23%

$257,015 14,846 $271,861 $2,907,315 695,263 $3,874,439 $1,371,883 570,200 1,932,356 0 $3,874,439 29.00 28.70 3.6%

$252,790 27,267 $280,057 $3,016,087 706,635 $4,002,779 $1,421,353 611,244 1,966,352 3,830 $4,002,779 29.00 28.70 3.6%

$264,973 31,500 $296,473 $3,104,460 738,732 $4,139,665 $1,426,825 642,547 2,066,293 4,000 $4,139,665 28.00 27.70 3.5%

$327,023 37,460 $364,483 $3,240,968 718,806 $4,324,257 $1,466,077 655,981 2,198,199 4,000 $4,324,257 28.00 28.00 3.5%

$62,050 5,960 $68,010 $136,508 (19,926) $184,592 $39,252 13,434 131,906 0 $184,592 0.00 0.30 n/a

23.42% 18.92% 22.94% 4.40% 2.70% 4.46% 2.75% 2.09% 6.38% 0.00% 4.46% 0.00% 1.08% n/a

EquipmentServices Revenues: Fuel/Maint/ChargebackTransfers ParklandFuel/MaintenanceCharg Margate/CoconutCreekFuel/Mai FAUFuel/MaintenanceCharge InterestIncome AppropriatedFundBalance Other Total Expenses: ProgramSummary EquipmentMaintenance Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Depreciation InterfundTransfers DebtService EquipmentPurchases Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's

FY2010 Actual $5,314,487 25,608 3,153 370 215,798 1,505,214 151,653 $7,216,283

FY2011 Actual $5,105,042 125,267 4,434 592 116,107 3,822,033 65,300 $9,238,775

FY2012 Budget $5,314,666 117,000 6,500 2,000 150,000 5,424,640 75,007 $11,089,813

FY2013 Budget $5,451,840 108,000 7,500 0 140,000 3,162,157 100,000 $8,969,497

$Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $137,174 (9,000) 1,000 (2,000) (10,000) (2,262,483) 24,993 ($2,120,316) 2.58% 7.69% 15.38% 100.00% 6.67% 41.71% 33.32% 19.12%

$6,363,736 $6,363,736 $681,809 304,108 1,611,081 11,745 2,249,779 0 1,505,214 $6,363,736 15.00 15.00 1.9%

$9,068,012 $9,068,012 $701,322 312,084 1,982,794 0 2,249,779 2,000,000 0 1,822,033 $9,068,012 15.00 15.00 1.9%

$11,089,813 $11,089,813 $802,686 356,072 2,189,145 0 2,317,270 3,213,989 0 2,210,651 $11,089,813 15.00 15.00 1.9%

$8,969,497 $8,969,497 $803,086 359,356 2,198,415 0 2,446,483 0 0 3,162,157 $8,969,497 15.00 15.00 1.9%

($2,120,316) ($2,120,316) $400 3,284 9,270 0 129,213 (3,213,989) 0 951,506 ($2,120,316) 0.00 0.00 n/a

19.12% 19.12% 0.05% 0.92% 0.42% n/a 5.58% 100.00% n/a 43.04% 19.12% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

101

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


WaterandSewerFund Utilities Revenues: Water Wastewater PrivateFireLineFee MeterSales DoubtfulAccounts BackflowRecertificationAdm.Fee Misc.Income ChargesforService CapitalizationfromPriorYearCIP AppropriatedFundBalance InterestIncome Total Expenses: ProgramSummary Administration WaterDistribution WaterTreatment WastewaterTreatment WastewaterCollection SubTotal NonDepartmental Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital SubTotal NonDepartmental Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $7,705,877 8,987,838 22,026 10,615 (19,513) 0 0 89,727 0 0 87,417 $16,883,987 FY2011 Actual $8,167,917 10,226,080 18,508 8,699 (24,201) 0 19,152 97,261 430,217 0 46,052 $18,989,685 FY2012 Budget $8,188,500 10,300,000 22,200 12,000 0 0 9,000 193,512 0 2,208,000 80,400 $21,013,612 FY2013 Budget $8,490,805 10,701,700 22,755 14,000 0 16,000 12,500 195,494 0 3,190,000 70,000 $22,713,254 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $302,305 401,700 555 2,000 0 16,000 3,500 1,982 0 982,000 (10,400) $1,699,642 3.69% 3.90% 2.50% 16.67% n/a n/a 38.89% 1.02% n/a 44.47% 12.94% 8.09%

$453,471 794,803 2,248,677 5,893,627 1,008,093 $10,398,671 $6,064,468 $16,463,139 $1,645,980 689,906 8,062,785 318,572 $10,717,243 $5,745,896 $16,463,139 35.50 35.50 4.5%

$477,263 829,474 2,467,023 5,279,144 1,030,928 $10,083,832 $6,403,440 $16,487,272 $1,667,838 741,669 7,668,231 344,251 $10,421,989 $6,065,283 $16,487,272 35.50 35.50 4.5%

$578,626 883,699 2,689,407 6,213,417 1,131,592 $11,496,741 $9,516,871 $21,013,612 $1,800,791 834,489 8,844,338 3,034,123 $14,513,741 $6,499,871 $21,013,612 35.50 35.50 4.5%

$651,985 903,577 2,745,257 6,422,686 1,099,189 $11,822,694 $10,890,560 $22,713,254 $1,826,319 845,256 9,133,483 1,024,136 $12,829,194 $9,884,060 $22,713,254 35.00 35.00 4.4%

$73,359 19,878 55,850 209,269 (32,403) $325,953 $1,373,689 $1,699,642 $25,528 10,767 289,145 (2,009,987) ($1,684,547) $3,384,189 $1,699,642 (0.50) (0.50) n/a

12.68% 2.25% 2.08% 3.37% 2.86% 2.84% 14.43% 8.09% 1.42% 1.29% 3.27% 66.25% 11.61% 52.07% 8.09% 1.41% 1.41% n/a

102

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Performance Measures
PublicWorks StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)Departmentsoverallqualityservicerating(ResidentSurvey) n/a 93% 93% 93% 2)Numberofcomplaintsfromresidentialcustomersabout WasteManagementper10,000pickups <6 1.82 <6 2.27 <6 1.3 StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 3)Availabilityrateofallvehicles/equipmentforall departments 4)CompleteroutineFacilitiesworkorderswithin15working days92%ofthetime 5)Custodialservicesexpenditurespersquarefoot 6)Percentofhydrantsoutofservicemorethan20days 7)Potholerepairresponsetime 8)Operatingcostsperlanemileforstreetsweeping 92% 92% $1.50 <1% 3days $30 98% 99% $1.19 0% 2day $30 90% 90% $1.58 <1% 3days $30 97% 98% $1.24 0% 2days $30 92% 92% $1.61 <1% 3days $30 92% 96% $1.61 0% 3days $30

FY2013 Goal 93% <6

FY2013 Goal 92% 96% $1.61 <1% 3days $30

StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability DirectionalStatement:Preserve,rejuvenate,andrevitalizetheaestheticsoftheCitythroughproactivemaintenanceofCityparks,medians,and infrastructure MeasurementType:Workload FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 9)PercentofStreetsDivisionsavailablestaffhoursfor preventivemaintenanceofCityinfrastructure 25% 41% 35% 31% 30% 30% 25% StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability DirectionalStatement:Advocateforconservingourlimitedwaterresourcesbyeducatingcitizensaboutwaterqualityandconservationpractices MeasurementType:Demand FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 10)Averagelessthan9.79mgdofwastewaterflowona quarterlybasis <9.79 8.58 <9.79 6.9 <9.79 8.5 <9.79 105 89.3 100 94 100 91 100 11)Waterusagepercapita(forCoralSpringsWaterDistrict) gal/day gal/day gal/day gal/day gal/day gal/day gal/day <10% 4.7% <10% 8.5% <10% 7.50% <10% 12)Percentof"unaccountedfor"water

City of Coral Springs, Florida

103

Sportsplex/ Te nnis
Mission
To serve as a sports and entertainment destination to the residents of Coral Springs and northwest Broward County by providing sports and recreational activities and special events; and to be an exceptional tennis service team by providing quality services, well-maintained facilities, and a customer-focused staff. Cypress Park Tennis Center, other City parks, and two middle schools. Programming Provide programs for all levels of tennis players. Host 118,000 tennis players. Provide athletic facilities for Coral Glades High School. Registration Generate over $320,000 in tennis lesson revenue.

Core Processes and Outputs


Maintenance Provide high quality athletic facilities for school and resident use. Maintain safe and clean tennis facilities at Tennis Center,

New Initiatives
Youth Development and Family Values Half Marathon and 5K Run/Walk

Sportsplex/Tennis
Executive Director of Sportsplex Funded in 7810

Sportsplex 1 ( 7810 ) 1

Athletics 5 ( 7812 ) 5

Cypress Tennis 1 ( 8401 ) 1

Tennis Center 2 ( 8409 ) 2

Parks & Recreation Coordinator Parks Technician ( 2 ) Maintenance Worker ( 2 )

Executive Assistant

Parks & Recreation Coordinator Parks Lead Worker

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

104

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


Sportsplex/Tennis Revenues: Sportsplex AthleticComplex CypressTennis TennisCenter Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary Sportsplex AthleticComplex CypressTennis TennisCenter Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $244,637 19,825 137,211 367,632 $769,305 FY2011 Actual $230,517 17,714 146,599 357,347 $752,177 FY2012 Budget $261,764 22,946 152,000 384,840 $821,550 FY2013 Budget $276,716 23,633 148,180 386,850 $835,379 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $14,952 687 (3,820) 2,010 $13,829 5.71% 2.99% 2.51% 0.52% 1.68%

$302,340 419,703 221,996 627,314 $1,571,353

$308,584 439,902 223,393 622,550 $1,594,429

$332,156 464,239 243,077 628,574 $1,668,046

$331,629 463,150 240,374 627,667 $1,662,820

($527) (1,089) (2,703) (907) ($5,226)

0.16% 0.23% 1.11% 0.14% 0.31%

$599,609 201,763 769,981 0 $1,571,353 9.00 9.00 1.1%

$600,672 215,318 778,439 0 $1,594,429 9.00 9.00 1.1%

$635,715 235,954 790,177 6,200 $1,668,046 9.00 9.00 1.1%

$630,465 239,494 786,661 6,200 $1,662,820 9.00 9.00 1.1%

($5,250) 3,540 (3,516) 0 ($5,226) 0.00 0.00 n/a

0.83% 1.50% 0.44% 0.00% 0.31% 0.00% 0.00% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

105

Performance Measures
Sportsplex StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Efficiency Measure: 1)RevenuegeneratedfromSportsplexconcessionaires. FY2010 Goal Actual $250K $241K FY2011 Goal Actual $242K $250K FY2012 Goal Proj. $255K $270K FY2013 Goal $273K

StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 2)NumberofspecialeventsandactivitieshostedatSportsplex (discontinuedafterFY2012) 80 64 75 70 75 77 Tennis StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Efficiency Measure: 1)Combinedcostrecoveryratio 2)Tennislessonrevenue FY2010 Goal Actual 60% 59% $320K $312.3K FY2011 Goal Actual 60% 60% $320K $335K FY2012 Goal Proj. 60% 57% $320K $310K

FY2013 Goal

FY2013 Goal 60% $320K

StrategicPriority:YouthDevelopmentandFamilyValues DirectionalStatement:Encouragehealthylifestylechoicesbyprovidingleisure,cultural,fitness,andrecreationalopportunitiesthrough partnerships MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 3)Maintaincustomerserviceratings: TennisCenter 90% 97% 90% 97% 90% 90% 90% 90% 92% 90% 92% 90% 92% CypressPark(discontinuedafterFY2012) 4)MembershipbaseatCypressPark(discontinuedafterFY2012) 5)MembershipturnoverattheTennisCenter 6)CustomerserviceratingforcourtmaintenanceattheTennis Center 7)Numberoftennisspecialevents 8)Numberoftennisteams 9)Numberofhoursoftenniscourtmaintenanceat neighborhoodparks(newforFY2013) 10)Numberofservicerequestsatneighborhoodtenniscourts
(newforFY2013)

135 30% 90% 10 62

43 21% 91% 27 64

75 30% 90% 20 60

37 21% 91% 31 56

50 30% 90% 20 60

44 30% 90% 30 61

30% 90% 25 60 200 25 325

11)Numberofhoursmaintainingdogpark(newforFY2013)

106

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Parks and Recreation


Mission
To provide exceptional leisure opportunities, beautication of the City and support in reaching the City Commissions strategic priorities. These services will include quality, safety, and diversity and will exceed our customers expectations.

Core Processes and Outputs


Park Maintenance Coordinate overall management of Parks and Recreation divisions. Maintain quality athletic elds and courts for over 1,150 organized sports teams. Maintain 49 parks totaling 765 acres including buildings, structures, landscaping, irrigation and equipment.

Parks and Recreation


Director of Parks and Recreation Funded in 8102

Cypress Park 11 ( 8101 ) 11

Mullins Park 11 ( 8102 ) 11

North Community Park 9 ( 8103 ) 9

Neighborhood Parks 16 ( 8116 ) 16

Parks Superintendent Parks and Rec Coordinator Parks Technician (2) Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker ( 6 )

Parks and Rec Coordinator Parks Technician ( 2 ) Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker ( 6 )

Parks and Rec Coordinator Parks Technician (2) Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker ( 5 )

Parks and Rec Coordinator Parks Technician (3) Parks Lead Worker Senior Office Assistant Maintenance Worker ( 10 )

Beautification 1 ( 8117 ) 1

Landscape 15 ( 8118 ) 15

Irrigation 8 ( 8119 ) 8

Environmentally Sensitive Land 1 ( 8121 ) 1

Parks and Rec Coordinator

Parks and Rec Coordinator Arborist ParksTechnician ( 2 ) Parks Lead Worker Maintenance Worker ( 10 )

Parks and Rec Coordinator Parks Technician ( 2 ) Maintenance Worker ( 5 )

Parks and Rec Coordinator

Activity Center 1 ( 8204 ) 1

Recreation Services 5 ( 8205 ) 5

Summer Recreation 1 ( 8208 ) 1

Transportation 1 ( 8209 ) 1

Parks and Rec Coordinator

Parks and Rec Coordinator ( 4 ) Office Assistant

Recreation Superintendent

Bus Driver

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

City of Coral Springs, Florida

107

Parks and Recreation (continued)


Landscape and Irrigation Install, repair, and maintain irrigation systems, landscaping, and athletic turf in parks, medians, and all public buildings, facilities and grounds. Recreational Programming Provide programming for seniors, teens, special needs populations, preschoolers, after-school, summer recreation, and at-risk youth among others. Administrative Services Manage new park construction and existing facility enhancements. Develop, implement, and monitor the budget and strategic plan for Parks and Recreation. City representative to sports groups, Kreul Classic, and Sports Coalition Committee. Negotiate reciprocal use agreements with schools, both public and private. Prepare grants and inter-local, reciprocal use, and lease agreements. Revenue collection for permits, rentals, clinics, summer recreation and other programs. Coordinate and secure sponsorships and advertising. Accommodate over 4,000,000 park visitors to all sites. Scheduling Provide eld and court permits for 19 City-recognized sports programs, independent leagues and organizations, and drop-in groups. Transportation Provide community and senior bus service.

New Initiatives
Neighborhood and Environmental Sustainability Mullins Park Revitalization Phase II Median Master Plan Phase I Park Facillities Maintenance Crew

108

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


ParksandRecreation Revenues: Parks CypressPark MullinsPark NorthCommunityPark NeighborhoodParks SubTotal Recreation MullinsActivityCenter RecreationCenter SummerRecreation TransportationServices* Gymnasium SubTotal Total
*IncludesCommunityBusProgramRevenues

FY2010 Actual

FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Budget

FY2013 Budget

$Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$103,630 270,387 38,374 82,807 $495,198 $50,772 17,555 626,858 166,927 407,046 $1,269,158 $1,764,356

$109,659 312,453 37,267 114,312 $573,691 $35,929 18,966 611,434 170,480 394,907 $1,231,716 $1,805,407

$89,268 265,765 40,013 84,487 $479,533 $59,718 19,817 652,863 169,956 411,964 $1,314,318 $1,793,851

$115,000 273,735 41,211 87,019 $516,965 $58,507 20,410 622,448 174,053 400,000 $1,275,418 $1,792,383

$25,732 7,970 1,198 2,532 $37,432 ($1,211) 593 (30,415) 4,097 (11,964) ($38,900) ($1,468)

28.83% 3.00% 2.99% 3.00% 7.81% 2.03% 2.99% 4.66% 2.41% 2.90% 2.96% 0.08%

Expenditures: ProgramSummary Parks CypressPark MullinsPark NorthCommunityPark NeighborhoodParks Beautification Landscape Irrigation EnvironmentallySensitiveLand SubTotal ProgramSummary Recreation ActivityCenter RecreationServices SummerRecreations TransportationServices Gymnasium SubTotal Total SummaryByCategory Parks Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital SubTotal SummaryByCategory Recreation Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital SubTotal Total Positions Parks Recreation TotalPositions FTE's Parks Recreation TotalFTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's

$976,728 1,169,834 598,742 1,172,449 864,108 774,049 510,766 131,944 $6,198,620

$1,014,503 1,267,667 633,104 1,198,648 887,586 964,126 517,110 133,302 $6,616,046

$1,104,249 1,287,531 705,904 1,401,601 951,021 1,341,315 556,756 139,517 $7,487,894

$1,184,954 1,283,987 788,432 1,508,540 1,027,894 1,353,132 577,192 165,603 $7,889,734

$80,705 (3,544) 82,528 106,939 76,873 11,817 20,436 26,086 $401,840

7.31% 0.28% 11.69% 7.63% 8.08% 0.88% 3.67% 18.70% 5.37%

$85,906 417,872 568,492 320,155 429,359 $1,821,784 $8,020,404

$87,487 406,859 572,801 325,124 416,206 $1,808,477 $8,424,523

$101,581 446,915 602,813 356,320 407,864 $1,915,493 $9,403,387

$102,428 444,370 608,040 397,797 418,201 $1,970,836 $9,860,570

$847 (2,545) 5,227 41,477 10,337 $55,343 $457,183

0.83% 0.57% 0.87% 11.64% 2.53% 2.89% 4.86%

$2,410,623 1,118,880 2,662,434 6,683 $6,198,620

$2,502,967 1,254,476 2,852,156 6,447 $6,616,046

$2,858,584 1,503,815 3,117,495 8,000 $7,487,894

$3,002,488 1,624,024 3,242,022 21,200 $7,889,734

$143,904 120,209 124,527 13,200 $401,840

5.03% 7.99% 3.99% 165.00% 5.37%

$788,439 191,419 841,926 0 $1,821,784 $8,020,404 60.00 8.00 68.00 60.00 8.00 68.00 8.6%

$776,881 201,272 830,324 0 $1,808,477 $8,424,523 63.00 8.00 71.00 63.00 8.00 71.00 9.1%

$826,894 220,798 867,801 0 $1,915,493 $9,403,387 68.00 8.00 76.00 68.00 8.00 76.00 9.6%

$822,066 224,248 922,522 2,000 $1,970,836 $9,860,570 72.00 8.00 80.00 72.00 8.00 80.00 10.0%

($4,828) 3,450 54,721 2,000 $55,343 $457,183 4.00 0.00 4.00 4.00 0.00 4.00 n/a

0.58% 1.56% 6.31% n/a 2.89% 4.86% 5.88% 0.00% 5.26% 5.88% 0.00% 5.26% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

109

Performance Measures
ParksandRecreation Parks StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)Qualityserviceratingforappearanceofrecreation/athletic facilities(ResidentSurvey) 91% 98% 2)Customerserviceratingforparksandrecreationstaff (ResidentSurvey) 91% 95% 3)Safetyratingofneighborhoodparks(ResidentSurvey) 91% 93%

FY2013 Goal 94% 94% 92%

StrategicPriority:NeighborhoodandEnvironmentalSustainability DirectionalStatement:PreserveandtreasureourESLsites,whilemakingthemasaccessibletocitizensandstudentsasgoodstewardshipwill allow MeasurementType:Demand FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 4)Numberofvisitorsparticipatingintoursof2ESLsites 150 151 150 143 150 100 discontinue (excludingEarthFest) Recreation StrategicPriority:CustomerInvolvedGovernment DirectionalStatement:TheCitywillfocusitsfinancialandhumanresourcesontheareasmostimportanttoitscustomers:safety, education,aesthetics,andbusinessdevelopment MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2012 FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. 1)Customerserviceratingofsummerrecreationprogram 98% 98% 98% 99% 98% 98% StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Efficiency Measure: 2)CostrecoveryratiofortheRecreationDivision FY2010 Goal Actual 58% 70% FY2011 Goal Actual 60% 61% FY2012 Goal Proj. 60% 60% FY2013 Goal 60%

FY2013 Goal 98%

StrategicPriority:Traffic,Mobility,andConnectivity DirectionalStatement:PartnerwithFDOT,BrowardCountyandtheMPOregardingpublictransportationopportunitiesincludingconnectivityto regionalsystemsandthecreationofgatewayandcommunityhubs MeasurementType:Efficiency FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 3)Numberofridersoncommunitybuses(KIO) 100,000 87,513 100,000 88,299 85,000 90,000 90,000 StrategicPriority:YouthDevelopmentandFamilyValues DirectionalStatement:Promotepositiveoutletsforyouthduringafterschoolhoursand MeasurementType:Demand FY2011 FY2010 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual 4)Programparticipationofatriskyouth IncludesWeightTraining,NightCourtandTeenConcerts 8,000 9,177 9,000 8,964

FY2012 Goal Proj. 9,000 9,000

FY2013 Goal discontinue

110

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Aquatics
Mission
To be the premier aquatic service team in South Florida focused on exceeding customer expectations through a philosophy of providing quality services, well-maintained facilities, and customer-friendly and attentive staff. To provide City government support in reaching the City Commissions priorities and initiatives. Permit and supervise private rentals, camps, and training camps. Coordinate and oversee a full-service wellness program and tness area. Safety Provide safe environment for family recreational and organized swimming use of pools. Accommodate 500,000 Aquatic Complex participants and visitors. Perform mandated water chemistry and ltration standards to meet compliance with Florida Department of Health regulations. Programming Coordinate and oversee a variety of swimming, dryland, and community awareness programs as determined by customers needs. Conduct 32,000 swim classes annually to over 4,000 participants through three different Learn to Swim programs..

Core Processes and Outputs


Administration Oversee the total operations of three very diverse aquatgic facilitieis including a world class Aquatic Complex, a family-oriented water park, and a mixed-use facility. Negotiate and administer constracts of third-party contractors providing a variety of services to facility customers. Administer 40-Year Lease and Inter-Local Agreements with Broward County School Board. Coordinate and supervise high school sanctioned events as outlined in 40-Year Lease Agreement. Petition for national and international level aquatic competitions creating exposure and economic impact to City and facility. Front Desk Operations Handle all facility registrations, memberships, release waivers, and other paperwork.

Aquatics
Director of Aquatics (Funded in 8303)

Cypress Pool (8301)

Mullins Pool (8302)

11

Aquatic Complex (8303) 11 Director of Aquatics Parks & Recreation Coordinator Parks & Recreation Technician Parks & Recreation Associate (6) Senior Office Assistant Principal Office Assistant

Parks & Recreation Coordinator Parks & Recreation Associate (2)

Parks & Recreation Associate (2)

Left Number = Number of Positions Right Number = Number of FTEs (Full-Time Equivalent) Center Number = Department/Division Number

City of Coral Springs, Florida

111

Aquatics (continued)
Pool and Facility Maintenance Provide general maintenance to buildings, grounds, and pools. Maintain ten pools, a 7,500 square foot tness center, a full-service swim shop, and three concession venues. Retail Sales/Concession Generate over $450,000 in gross sales at the Swim Shop. Operate a full-service swim shop, which includes an authorized dealer of high-performance swim suits Oversee concession operations at all three facilities including a full-service coffee shop/juice bar at the Aquatic Complex.

112

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


AquaticServices Revenues: CypressPool MullinsPool AquaticsComplex Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary CypressPool MullinsPool AquaticsComplex Total SummaryByCategory Personal Benefits OtherExpenses Capital Total Positions FTE's %ofTotalCitywideFTE's FY2010 Actual $152,844 75,185 1,444,916 $1,672,945 FY2011 Actual $158,996 68,873 1,456,013 $1,683,882 FY2012 Budget $139,000 64,750 1,400,000 $1,603,750 FY2013 Budget $147,640 69,091 1,471,586 $1,688,317 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget $8,640 4,341 71,586 $84,567 6.22% 6.70% 5.11% 5.27%

$309,459 236,343 1,889,501 $2,435,303 $1,013,319 343,883 1,076,508 1,593 $2,435,303 17.00 17.00 2.2%

$286,667 213,343 1,924,534 $2,424,544 $998,741 351,639 1,074,164 0 $2,424,544 16.00 16.00 2.0%

$319,397 251,946 1,810,912 $2,382,255 $1,023,797 389,568 968,890 0 $2,382,255 16.00 16.00 2.0%

$308,853 254,063 1,810,189 $2,373,105 $1,001,763 395,132 976,210 0 $2,373,105 16.00 16.00 2.0%

($10,544) 2,117 (723) ($9,150) ($22,034) 5,564 7,320 0 ($9,150) 0.00 0.00 n/a

3.30% 0.84% 0.04% 0.38% 2.15% 1.43% 0.76% n/a 0.38% 0.0% 0.0% n/a

Performance Measures
Aquatics StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Efficiency Measure: 1)ThecombinedcostrecoveryfortheAquaticServices AquaticComplex AquaticServicesDivision FY2010 Goal Actual 55% 40% 76.6% 68.8% FY2011 Goal Actual 55% 45% 76% 70% FY2012 Goal Proj. 60% 50% 75% 65% FY2013 Goal 60% 50%

StrategicPriority:YouthDevelopmentandFamilyValues DirectionalStatement:Encouragehealthylifestylechoicesbyprovidingleisure,cultural,fitness,andrecreationalopportunitiesthrough partnerships MeasurementType:Demand FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 2)Increasemembersandreducememberturnover: AquaticComplexmembership 5,800 6,025 5,800 5,965 5,800 5,000 5,500 AquaticComplexmembershipturnover 49% 36% 49% 43% 49% 49% 49% CypressPoolaveragedailypoolusage 205 220 205 311 205 220 205 MullinsPoolaveragedailypoolusage 128 106 125 107 125 110 120 StrategicPriority:YouthDevelopmentandFamilyValues DirectionalStatement:Encouragehealthylifestylechoicesbyprovidingleisure,cultural,fitness,andrecreationalopportunitiesthrough partnerships MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 3)Maintaincustomerserviceratings: Aquaticfacility 92% 99% 92% 98% 92% 96% 92% CypressParkPool 92% 100% 92% 99% 92% 96% 92% MullinsParkPool 92% 99% 92% 99% 92% 96% 92%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

113

Coral Springs Center for the Arts


Mission
To provide a diverse schedule of programming for all residents, reduce the decit of the venue, and deliver high quality customer service to all.

Core Processes and Outputs


Coordinate event management and production. Program national tours. Provide theater and meeting room rentals. Host 365 meetings. Accommodate over 122,000 theater attendants. Facilitate Museum exhibitions, programming, and events. Museum hosts 105 events and 190 classes. Accommodate over 35,000 museum attendees. Box of ce services. Catering services and concessions.

Revenues and Expenses by Program and Category


CenterfortheArts InterfundTransfers CIP TheaterSubsidy Total Expenses: ProgramSummary CoralSpringsCenter ForTheArts Total FY2010 Actual 152,655 395,000 $547,655 FY2011 Actual 289,415 395,000 $684,415 FY2012 Budget 0 0 $0 FY2013 Budget 0 0 $0 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget 0 0 $0 n/a n/a n/a

$577,488 $577,488

$578,446 $578,446

$445,000 $445,000

$445,000 $445,000

$0 $0

0.00% 0.00%

SummaryByCategory OperatingExpenses $29,833 $46,613 $50,000 $50,000 PFMOperatingSubsidy 395,000 395,000 395,000 395,000 Capital 152,655 136,833 0 0 Total $577,488 $578,446 $445,000 $445,000 CenterfortheArtsFundeliminatedinFiscalYear2012andisnowadivisionintheGeneralFund. Positions 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 FTE's 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

$0 0 0 $0 0.00 0.00

0.00% 0.00% n/a 0.00% n/a n/a

Performance Measures
CenterfortheArts StrategicPriority:FinancialHealthandEconomicDevelopment DirectionalStatement:Maintainfinancialstabilityandsolvency MeasurementType:Effectiveness Measure: 1)Netannualincome 2)Grossticketsales FY2010 Goal Actual $159K $21K $1.6M $1.6M FY2011 Goal Actual $100K $118K $1.6M $2.1M FY2012 Goal Proj. $125K $125K $1.65M $1.66M FY2013 Goal $135M $1.75M

114

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Coral Springs Charter School


Mission
To provide students with ample opportunity to achieve academic excellence and personal success. To facilitate this learning process by providing a safe, challenging, entrepreneurial, and nurturing environment that instills a lifelong desire for learning and actively taking part in lifes opportunities.

Core Processes and Outputs


Adhere to the Sterling Award for Organizational Performance Excellence criteria in secondary education, through exemplifying excellence in international nance, business, law, and entrepreneurship education. Engage students, faculty, families, and community in a sustained learning process.

Revenues and Expenditures by Program and Category


CharterSchool Revenues: Tuition Total Expenditures: ProgramSummary CharterSchool Total SummaryByCategory OperatingExpenses(CSUSA) TransfertoGeneralFundLease Capital Total FY2010 Actual $11,996,761 $11,996,761 FY2011 Actual $11,748,074 $11,748,074 FY2012 Budget $11,903,260 $11,903,260 FY2013 Budget $11,466,480 $11,466,480 $Changefrom %Changefrom FY12Budget FY12Budget ($436,780) ($436,780) 3.67% 3.67%

$11,979,062 $11,979,062

$11,936,609 $11,936,609

$11,903,260 $11,903,260

$11,466,480 $11,466,480

($436,780) ($436,780)

3.67% 3.67%

$9,872,811 1,420,000 686,251 $11,979,062

$10,081,410 1,420,000 435,199 $11,936,609

$9,586,495 1,420,000 896,765 $11,903,260

$9,198,327 1,420,000 848,153 $11,466,480

($388,168) 0 (48,612) ($436,780)

4.05% 0.00% 5.42% 3.67%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

115

Performance Measures
CharterSchool StrategicPriority:ExcellenceinEducation DirectionalStatement:AchieveacademicgoalsintheCharterSchoolandsupporttheACEAcademyandotherinitiativeswhichgivehighschool studentsleadershipandcareeropportunitiesandentrepreneurialskillsthatbenefitlocalbusinessesbytrainingemployeesofthefuture MeasurementType:Effectiveness FY2011 FY2012 FY2010 FY2013 Measure: Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Proj. Goal 1)SchoolgradeasreportedbytheFloridaDepartmentof Education A A A A A N/A A

TheschoolgradeisbasedprimarilyuponstudentachievementdatafromtheFCAT2.0,Algebra1endofcourse(EOC)assessments,andthe(FAA).Highschoolgradesinvolve additionalcomponentsongraduation,acceleration,andcollegereadinesswhicharecalculatedneartheendofthecalendaryear.CoralSpringsCharterSchool'sStrategicPlan includesallofthemeasurestrackedeachyear.Theyarecategorizedwithintheschool'sfourprioirtyareas:AcademicAchievement,OperationalPerformance,Cultureof Excellence,andFinancialHealth.

2)PercenteligibleforBrightFuturesatthe75%level 3)Parentswhoagreethattheirchildrenaresafeinschool 4)Staffwhoagree"Ifeelsafe"(NEW) 5)ParentswhoagreeIwouldrecommendtheCharterSchool toafriend 6)SatisfactionamongACEbusinesspartners 7)Staffengagementmeasure(NEW) 8)Student/teacherratioformiddleschool(New) 9)Student/teacherratioforhighschool(New) 10)Positivebudgetaryvariance 11)MaintenanceofWorkingCapitalperFinancialPolicy

34% 90% 90% 95% 20/1 25/1 Yes Yes

34.9% 97.5% 100% 98.0% 97% 89.0% 21.13/1 21.5/1 Yes Yes

38% 92% 92% 95% 20/1 25/1 Yes Yes

44.6% 98%/97% 100% 98%/99% 98% 92.7% 21.5/1 20.7/1 Yes Yes

38% 92% 92% 95% 20/1 25/1 Yes Yes

44.6% N/A 99% 98% 93% N/A N/A N/A Yes Yes

35% 95% 95% 95% 95% 90% 22/1 25/1 Yes Yes

116

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

General Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues GeneralOperating AdValoremTaxes SolidWasteAssessment FranchiseFees: Electricity SolidWaste SolidWaste(RFPReimbursement) Towing/Other SubtotalFranchiseFees UtilityServiceTaxes: Electricity Water Propane/NaturalGas SubtotalUtilityTaxes StateIntergovernmentalRevenues: CommunicationsServicesTax PEGRevenues SharedRevenues AlcoholicBeverages SalesTax OtherRevenue/MunicipalRebate SubtotalStateIntergovernmental OtherIntergovernmentalRevenues: Miscellaneous CommunityBusProgramRevenues FirstLocalOptionFuelTax SecondLocalOptionFuelTax PublicSafetyE911 RecyclingMaterialRevenue ResourceRecoveryDistribution SubtotalOtherIntergovernmental SubtotalIntergovernmental PermitsandBusinessTax: BuildingPermits NotRelatedStateSurcharge RebillableOvertime OtherPermits(WasteHauling) SubtotalPermits BusinessTax SubtotalPermitsandBusinessTax ChargesForServices: ParksandRecreation Parks CypressPark MullinsPark NorthCommunityPark(Park31/35) NeighborhoodParks FY2011 Actual FY2012 Adopted Budget FY2013 Proposed Budget $ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$31,378,077 $31,512,835 $30,899,061 $32,428,839 983,711 994,502 1,438,000 1,864,900

$1,529,778 426,900

4.95% 29.69%

7,165,627 1,483,569 0 89,412 8,738,608

7,050,212 1,491,104 0 92,566 8,633,882

7,297,500 1,673,000 0 100,535 9,071,035

7,370,475 1,929,730 500,000 104,054 9,904,259

72,975 256,730 500,000 3,519 833,224

1.00% 15.35% n/a 3.50% 9.19%

7,690,082 1,639,697 144,841 9,474,620

7,589,037 1,794,541 167,833 9,551,411

7,639,800 1,841,627 167,749 9,649,176

8,100,000 1,878,459 173,620 10,152,079

460,200 36,832 5,871 502,903

6.02% 2.00% 3.50% 5.21%

6,119,035 69,769 3,007,201 46,632 6,519,259 163,194 15,925,090

5,673,513 76,750 3,158,028 53,662 6,713,258 43,658 15,718,869

5,800,000 38,760 3,353,900 117,682 7,102,540 43,031 16,455,913

5,700,000 60,000 3,471,595 125,346 7,230,104 44,322 16,631,367

(100,000) 21,240 117,695 7,664 127,564 1,291 175,454

1.72% 54.80% 3.51% 6.51% 1.80% 3.00% 1.07%

0 124,853 1,298,132 940,025 269,672 301,291 354,205 3,288,178 19,213,268

40,000 124,913 1,293,370 936,579 294,424 300,692 0 2,989,978 18,708,847

40,000 125,199 1,331,612 964,270 350,000 313,500 0 3,124,581 19,580,494

40,000 124,954 1,331,612 964,271 220,124 336,400 0 3,017,361 19,648,728

0 (245) 0 1 (129,876) 22,900 0 (107,220) 68,234

0.00% 0.20% 0.00% 0.00% 37.11% 7.30% n/a 3.43% 0.35%

2,348,776 0 1,183 12,476 2,362,435 1,175,110 3,537,545

2,118,582 243,547 0 0 2,362,129 1,151,648 3,513,777

2,610,000 243,346 53,000 7,500 2,913,846 1,230,120 4,143,966

2,300,000 145,779 53,530 7,500 2,506,809 1,154,722 3,661,531

(310,000) (97,567) 530 0 (407,037) (75,398) (482,435)

11.88% 40.09% 1.00% 0.00% 13.97% 6.13% 11.64%

103,630 270,389 38,374 82,807

109,658 312,452 37,266 114,312

89,268 265,765 40,013 84,487

110,000 273,735 41,211 87,019

20,732 7,970 1,198 2,532

23.22% 3.00% 2.99% 3.00%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

117

General Fund Summary (continued)


FY2010 Actual Recreation ActivityCenter RecreationServices SummerRecreation Transportation Gymnasium Aquatics CypressPool MullinsPool AquaticsComplex Sportsplex Tennis TennisCenter CypressTennis SubtotalParksandRecreation ChargesforServiceOtherFunds: Water&SewerFund FireFund SubtotalChg/SvcOtherFunds ChargesforServiceOther: GeneralGovernment CityHallintheMall PublicSafety EMSTransportFees EMSInterfacilityTransportation SubtotalChg/SvcOther SubtotalChargesForServices FinesandForfeitures CourtFines OtherPoliceFines RedLightCameras CodeEnforcementCitations&Liens OtherMiscellaneous Subtotal Interest Rents&Royalties 50thAnniversary CRAContribution CharterSchoolLease OtherIncome: Auction HurricaneAdjustment ConferenceCenter OtherMiscellaneous Subtotal TotalGeneralOperating Other TransferfromFireFund(ParklandIndirectcost) TransferfromCDBGFund TransferfromLibraryFund ForfeitureSRO's AppropriatedFundBalance TotalOther GrandTotalRevenues 50,772 17,555 626,858 42,074 407,044 152,844 75,185 1,444,917 264,462 367,631 137,211 4,081,753 1,578,298 755,693 2,333,991 97,907 644,305 948,982 1,967,232 105,179 3,763,605 10,179,349 684,565 120,480 0 710,137 105,130 1,620,312 480,561 1,055,509 0 369,595 1,420,000 7,906 20,984 0 618,004 646,894 89,098,049 310,523 0 0 1,645,459 1,955,982 FY2011 Actual 35,928 18,966 611,434 45,567 394,906 158,997 68,873 1,456,014 248,231 357,346 146,600 4,116,550 1,649,617 1,371,950 3,021,567 555,310 584,165 1,046,634 1,980,848 47,071 4,214,028 11,352,145 619,178 100,309 0 657,846 113,677 1,491,010 306,074 1,538,664 0 0 1,420,000 9,927 0 0 59,444 69,371 89,092,518 0 97,798 1,000,000 0 2,550,000 3,647,798

FY2012 Adopted Budget 59,718 19,817 652,863 44,757 411,964 139,000 64,750 1,400,000 284,710 384,840 152,000 4,093,952 1,802,824 1,432,545 3,235,369 676,469 626,954 1,062,494 1,900,000 79,568 4,345,485 11,674,806 700,000 129,340 50,000 675,000 308,885 1,863,225 650,000 1,450,000 0 122,436 1,420,000 17,575 0 150,000 181,578 349,153 92,311,352 0 111,959 500,000 1,500,000 3,550,000 5,661,959

FY2013 Proposed Budget 58,507 20,410 622,448 49,099 405,000 147,640 69,091 1,471,586 288,359 398,840 148,180 4,191,125 1,921,487 1,504,172 3,425,659 637,993 628,515 1,192,838 2,400,000 81,955 4,941,301 12,558,085 650,000 118,500 50,000 702,000 459,440 1,979,940 575,000 1,472,500 100,000 119,960 1,420,000 17,926 0 150,000 233,242 401,168 96,286,989 0 117,293 0 900,000 1,500,000 2,517,293

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget (1,211) 593 (30,415) 4,342 (6,964) 8,640 4,341 71,586 3,649 14,000 (3,820) 97,173 118,663 71,627 190,290 (38,476) 1,561 130,344 500,000 2,387 595,816 883,279 (50,000) (10,840) 0 27,000 150,555 116,715 (75,000) 22,500 100,000 (2,476) 0 351 0 0 51,664 52,015 4,776,980 0 5,334 (500,000) (600,000) (2,050,000) (3,144,666) $830,971 2.03% 2.99% 4.66% 9.70% 1.69% 6.22% 6.70% 5.11% 1.28% 3.64% 2.51% 2.37% 6.58% 5.00% 5.88% 5.69% 0.25% 12.27% 26.32% 3.00% 13.71% 7.57% 7.14% 8.38% 0.00% 4.00% 48.74% 6.26% 11.54% 1.55% n/a 2.02% 0.00% 2.00% n/a 0.00% 28.45% 14.90% 5.17% n/a 4.76% 100.00% 40.00% 57.75% 55.54% 0.85%

$91,054,031 $92,740,316 $97,973,311 $98,804,282

118

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

General Fund Summary (continued)


FY2010 Actual Expenditures: Departmental CityCommission CityManager HumanResources FinancialServices InformationServices CityAttorney DevelopmentServices/Engineering CommunityDevelopment Police CodeEnforcement EmergencyMedicalServices Building PublicWorks Parks&Recreation Aquatics Sportsplex&Tennis TotalDepartmental NonDepartmental C.I.P. C.I.P.ConferenceCenterEquipment NonDepartmental Contingency EconomicDevelopmentIncentive MarketAdjustment OtherPostEmploymentBenefits(OPEB) CRASpecialAssessment TuitionReimbursement InsuranceAllocation(LTDHealthLIWC) CharterSchool(LeaseExpense) CenterfortheArts Attrition/RestructuringSavings InternalAuditor PDCommSys&EqtImprovementStudy 50thAnniversary MicrosoftOfficeLicense SQLDatabaseLicense Property/Casualty FireFundGovt.Assessment SubtotalNonDepartmental InterfundTransfers: FireFundNonprofitSubsidyChurches/Schools CenterforthePerformingArtsFund SubtotalInterfundTransfers DebtService: RevenueBond RevBonds'04(Refunding) RevBonds'08 RecoveryZoneBond2010Sample&University SubtotalRevenueBond TotalDebtService TotalNonDepartmental GrandTotalExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures Positions 1,629,946 1,577,338 0 3,207,284 3,207,284 7,919,793 ($359,739) 629.66 1,628,346 1,574,713 0 3,203,059 3,203,059 7,067,606 $36,262 627.91 FY2011 Actual

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2013 Proposed Budget

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$291,513 2,615,304 1,328,275 2,517,893 2,590,506 941,866 467,366 1,094,437 43,535,519 1,595,348 8,142,187 2,472,266 3,874,439 8,020,401 2,435,304 1,571,354 83,493,977 0 0 645,535 0 4,494 124,895 450,000 221,636 0 387,092 553,810 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 954,718 134,172 3,476,352 841,157 395,000 1,236,157

$255,208 2,846,202 1,340,856 2,412,679 2,533,073 781,555 443,837 1,115,883 45,223,489 1,614,964 8,111,165 2,511,262 4,002,779 8,424,523 2,424,544 1,594,429 85,636,448 0 0 957,490 0 17,774 21,938 0 0 0 499,419 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 972,457 141,132 2,610,210 859,337 395,000 1,254,337

$298,557 2,798,851 1,331,306 2,648,151 2,670,743 845,120 462,169 1,361,025 46,823,819 1,783,438 8,732,233 2,587,960 4,139,665 9,403,387 2,382,255 1,668,046 89,936,725 50,000 50,000 793,143 421,050 400,000 75,000 830,000 160,000 81,414 0 566,610 445,000 (250,000) 100,000 0 25,000 0 0 887,823 156,715 4,791,755 897,755 0 897,755

$323,618 2,945,995 1,362,884 2,528,838 2,995,514 839,014 564,048 1,456,254 44,286,871 1,805,460 8,875,165 2,550,192 4,324,257 9,860,570 2,373,105 1,662,820 88,754,605 643,925 0 684,981 427,265 250,000 222,000 0 137,413 90,707 0 566,942 445,000 0 100,000 45,000 150,000 270,000 360,000 939,990 159,915 5,493,138 959,675 0 959,675

$25,061 147,144 31,578 (119,313) 324,771 (6,106) 101,879 95,229 (2,536,948) 22,022 142,932 (37,768) 184,592 457,183 (9,150) (5,226) (1,182,120) 593,925 (50,000) (108,162) 6,215 (150,000) 147,000 (830,000) (22,587) 9,293 0 332 0 250,000 0 45,000 125,000 270,000 360,000 52,167 3,200 701,383 61,920 0 61,920

8.39% 5.26% 2.37% 4.51% 12.16% 0.72% 22.04% 7.00% 5.42% 1.23% 1.64% 1.46% 4.46% 4.86% 0.38% 0.31% 1.31% 1187.85% 100.00% 13.64% 1.48% 37.50% 196.00% 100.00% 14.12% 11.41% n/a 0.06% 0.00% 100.00% 0.00% n/a 500.00% n/a n/a 5.88% 2.04% 14.64% 6.90% n/a 6.90%

375,696 1,565,863 405,517 2,347,076 2,347,076 8,036,586 $0 631.91

1,625,384 1,565,963 405,517 3,596,864 3,596,864 10,049,677 $0 641.41

1,249,688 100 0 1,249,788 1,249,788 2,013,091 $830,971 $0 9.50

332.63% 0.01% 0.00% 53.25% 53.25% 25.05% 0.85% n/a 1.50%

$91,413,770 $92,704,054 $97,973,311 $98,804,282

City of Coral Springs, Florida

119

Fire Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues: NonAdValoremSpecialAssessmentFees NonAdValoremSpecialAssessmentFee GovernmentAssessment NonprofitSubsidy(Churches&Schools) SubTotalNonAdValoremSpecialAssesmentFees PartialYearAssessment Intergovernmental BaseContract(Parkland) BaseContract(BrowardCounty) SubTotalIntergovernmental ChargesforServices: FireInspectionServices FireReInspectionFees TrainingTuitionFees TrainingMiscellaneousFees StateEducationIncentiveFund SpecialOvertime OffDutyFireRescueService PlanReviewFees SubTotalChargesforServices FinesandForfeitures: FireInspectionFines FalseAlarmRecovery SubTotalFinesandForfeitures Other: InterestIncome MiscellaneousRevenue DoubtfulAccounts SaferGrant UnappropriatedFundBalance SubTotalOther GrandTotalRevenues Expenditures: Departmental Administration CommunicationService Suppression Training Inspection TotalDepartmental NonDepartmental C.I.P. RateConsultant Contingency AssessmentCollectionCosts IndirectCosts EconomicConditions ComputerReplacementProgram SubTotalNonDepartmental InterfundTransfers: Capital(BudgetAmendment) PropertyCasualtyTransfer SubTotalInterfundTransfers BondDebtService: RevenueBond'04(Refunding) RevenueBond'08 SubTotalDebtService TotalNonDepartmental GrandTotalExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures Positions FY2011 Actual $7,472,520 134,172 841,157 8,447,849 8,241 4,002,500 12,124 4,014,624 735,041 29,597 962,596 126,516 46,467 38,020 24,814 106,546 2,069,597 37,083 3,100 40,183 73,746 5,233 (742) 0 500,000 578,237 $15,158,731 $7,806,592 141,132 859,337 8,807,061 5,746 4,915,476 12,124 4,927,600 739,928 23,784 819,937 110,185 46,600 0 34,323 124,438 1,899,195 33,138 1,000 34,138 43,936 533 350 0 0 44,819 $15,718,559

FY2012 Adopted Budget

FY2013 Proposed Budget

$ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$8,067,436 156,715 897,755 9,121,906 25,938 5,123,352 12,866 5,136,218 810,000 30,000 971,463 157,225 47,000 0 40,203 100,000 2,155,891 50,000 3,000 53,000 65,000 12,000 0 0 0 77,000 $16,569,953

$8,609,314 159,915 959,675 9,728,904 25,938 5,311,217 13,252 5,324,469 818,100 30,600 826,000 150,230 47,940 0 40,203 110,000 2,023,073 50,000 3,000 53,000 65,000 12,000 0 95,500 0 172,500 $17,327,884

$541,878 3,200 61,920 606,998 0 187,865 386 188,251 8,100 600 (145,463) (6,995) 940 0 0 10,000 (132,818) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 95,500 $757,931

6.72% 2.04% 6.90% 6.65% 0.00% 3.67% 3.00% 3.67% 1.00% 2.00% 14.97% 4.45% 2.00% n/a 0.00% 10.00% 6.16% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% n/a n/a 124.03% 4.57%

$393,643 103,131 10,688,820 1,083,618 939,040 13,208,252 43,725 0 0 19,607 755,693 13,477 4,826 837,328 700,000 165,806 865,806 132,860 100,000 232,860 1,935,994 $15,144,246 $14,485 103.84

$407,371 113,086 10,319,319 1,051,909 1,035,197 12,926,882 294,378 19,999 0 19,614 1,371,950 0 65,505 1,771,446 130,082 168,931 299,013 132,860 100,000 232,860 2,303,319 $15,230,201 $488,358 103.84

$569,027 121,398 11,256,620 1,133,259 1,155,572 14,235,876 252,079 0 114,371 22,932 1,432,545 108,718 16,344 1,946,989 0 154,228 154,228 132,860 100,000 232,860 2,334,077 $16,569,953 $0 103.84

$565,704 122,652 11,794,044 1,141,198 1,180,131 14,803,729 389,800 0 100,000 22,932 1,504,172 100,000 11,100 2,128,004 0 163,291 163,291 132,860 100,000 232,860 2,524,155 $17,327,884 $0 107.84

($3,323) 1,254 537,424 7,939 24,559 567,853 137,721 0 (14,371) 0 71,627 (8,718) (5,244) 181,015 0 9,063 9,063 0 0 0 190,078 $757,931 $0 4.0

0.58% 1.03% 4.77% 0.70% 2.13% 3.99% 54.63% n/a 12.57% 0.00% 5.00% 8.02% 32.09% 9.30% n/a 5.88% 5.88% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 8.14% 4.57% n/a 3.85%

120

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Water and Sewer Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues OperatingRevenues Water Wastewater PrivateFireLineFee MeterSales DoubtfulAccounts/WriteOffs BackflowRecertificationAdm.Fee MiscellaneousIncome ChargesforService TotalOperatingRevenue NonOperatingRevenues InterestIncomeOperating CapitalizationfromPriorYearCIP AppropriatedFundBalance TotalNonOperatingRevenue GrandTotalRevenues Expenses Departmental Administration WaterDistribution WastewaterCollection WaterTreatment TotalDepartmental NonOperating WastewaterTreatment Capital NonDepartmental TransferToRenewalandReplacement BusinessDevelopment Property/Casualty ComputerReplacement RevenueBondSeries2010 RevenueBondSeries2012 SRFLoanW&SWells SRFLoanLiftStationsRehab SRFLoanWaterTreatmentPlantImprovements SRFLoanTransmission,Dist,Interconnect SRFLoanSourceandTreatment SRFLoanForestHillsWellfield TotalNonOperating GrandTotalExpenses RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions FY2011 Actual FY2012 Adopted Budget FY2013 Proposed Budget $ % ChangeFrom ChangeFrom FY12Budget FY12Budget

$7,705,877 8,987,838 22,026 10,615 (19,513) 0 0 89,727 16,796,570

$8,167,917 10,226,080 18,508 8,699 (23,915) 0 4,120 112,007 18,513,415

$8,188,500 10,300,000 22,200 12,000 0 0 9,000 193,512 18,725,212

$8,490,805 10,701,700 22,755 14,000 0 16,000 12,500 195,494 19,453,254

$302,305 401,700 555 2,000 0 16,000 3,500 1,982 728,042

3.69% 3.90% 2.50% 16.67% n/a n/a 38.89% 1.02% 3.89%

87,417 0 0 87,417 $16,883,987

46,052 430,217 0 476,269 $18,989,684

80,400 0 2,208,000 2,288,400 $21,013,612

70,000 0 3,190,000 3,260,000 $22,713,254

(10,400) 0 982,000 971,600 $1,699,642

12.94% n/a 44.47% 42.46% 8.09%

$453,472 794,802 1,008,096 2,248,678 4,505,048

477,263 829,474 1,030,928 2,467,023 4,804,688

$578,626 883,699 1,131,592 2,689,407 5,283,324

$651,985 903,577 1,099,189 2,745,257 5,400,008

$73,359 19,878 (32,403) 55,850 116,684

12.68% 2.25% 2.86% 2.08% 2.21%

5,893,627 318,571 1,799,148 560,000 200,000 488,213 3,798 2,680,440 0 0 14,297 0 0 0 0 11,958,094 $16,463,142 $420,845 35.50

5,279,144 338,156 1,813,438 578,717 225,953 497,125 3,440 2,922,550 0 0 24,060 0 0 0 0 11,682,583 $16,487,271 $2,502,413 35.50

6,213,417 3,017,000 2,148,237 666,500 271,000 453,859 6,300 2,775,867 0 143,255 34,853 0 0 0 0 15,730,288 $21,013,612 $0 35.50

6,422,686 1,006,500 2,248,255 2,554,500 281,840 480,527 7,600 2,761,666 545,534 143,255 34,926 407,066 147,015 120,046 151,830 17,313,246 $22,713,254 $0 35.00

209,269 (2,010,500) 100,018 1,888,000 10,840 26,668 1,300 (14,201) 545,534 0 73 407,066 147,015 120,046 151,830 1,582,958 $1,699,642 $0 (0.50)

3.37% 66.64% 4.66% 283.27% 4.00% 5.88% 20.63% 0.51% n/a n/a 0.21% n/a n/a n/a n/a 10.06% 8.09% n/a 1.41%

City of Coral Springs, Florida

121

Health Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues TransferGeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund GeneralInsuranceFund EquipmentServices InterestIncome RecoveriesRetirees COBRA Employees Other AppropriatedRetainedEarnings TotalRevenues Expenses HealthPlan LongTermDisability LifeInsurance TotalExpenses RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions FY2011 Actual 2012 Adopted Budget 2013 Proposed Budget $ ChangeFrom FY12Budget % ChangeFrom FY12Budget

$7,402,434 395,764 1,226,508 17,864 178,640 48,717 500,890 28,296 485,907 24,793 0 $10,309,813

$7,807,034 439,283 1,284,937 18,561 185,613 22,189 522,377 11,540 481,740 20,783 0 $10,794,057

$9,109,254 510,225 1,492,446 21,696 216,961 60,000 545,000 20,000 485,000 0 0 $12,460,582

$9,225,015 519,646 1,615,953 23,364 219,597 45,000 572,000 20,000 538,000 0 300,000 $13,078,575

$115,761 9,421 123,507 1,668 2,636 (15,000) 27,000 0 53,000 0 300,000 $617,993

1.27% 1.85% 8.28% 7.69% 1.21% 25.00% 4.95% 0.00% 10.93% n/a n/a 4.96%

$10,808,885 212,848 161,085 $11,182,818 ($873,005) 1.50

$11,053,209 155,379 120,517 $11,329,105 ($535,048) 1.25

$12,190,022 144,500 126,060 $12,460,582 $0 1.25

$12,808,015 144,500 126,060 $13,078,575 $0 1.25

$617,993 0 0 $617,993 $0 0.00

5.07% 0.00% 0.00% 4.96% n/a 0.0%

General Insurance Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues TransferGeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund HealthFund EquipmentServices ParklandContractServices InterestIncome RecoveriesMotorVehicle PropertyDamage Workers'Comp TotalRevenues Expenses Workers'Compensation Property/MotorVehicleLiability Casualty/GeneralClaims TotalExpenses RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions FY2011 Actual FY2012 Adopted Budget FY2013 Proposed Budget $ ChangeFrom FY12Budget % ChangeFrom FY12Budget

$1,726,250 530,866 274,706 1,950 20,804 15,860 55,902 36,969 29,369 486,346 $3,179,022

$1,824,940 544,956 308,836 1,631 20,210 0 32,794 43,570 24,730 232,494 $3,034,161

$1,746,256 501,790 294,430 1,698 20,381 0 50,000 50,000 25,000 10,000 $2,699,555

$1,847,892 529,995 317,122 1,806 21,282 0 50,000 50,000 25,000 10,000 $2,853,097

$101,637 28,205 22,691 108 901 0 0 0 0 0 $153,542

5.82% 5.62% 7.71% 6.36% 4.42% n/a 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 5.69%

$1,945,497 1,323,995 (686,284) $2,583,208 $595,814 1.50

$859,672 1,585,318 74,845 $2,519,835 $514,326 1.50

$1,099,000 1,438,055 162,500 $2,699,555 $0 1.50

$1,164,700 1,541,397 147,000 $2,853,097 $0 1.50

$65,700 103,342 (15,500) $153,542 ($0) 0.00

5.98% 7.19% 9.54% 5.69% n/a 0.00%

122

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Coral Springs Charter School Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues Intergovernmental OtherRevenue/Miscellaneous AppropriationofFundBalance  TotalRevenues Expenditures OperatingExpenses(CSUSA) TransfertoGeneralFundLease Capital TotalExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures $11,529,837 116,924 350,000 $11,996,761 FY2011 Actual $11,671,084 76,989 0 $11,748,073 FY2012 Adopted Budget $10,561,772 80,000 1,261,488 $11,903,260 FY2013 Proposed Budget $10,285,445 95,000 1,086,035 $11,466,480 $ ChangeFrom FY12Budget ($276,327) 15,000 (175,453) ($436,780) % ChangeFrom FY12Budget 2.62% 18.75% 13.91% 3.67%

$9,872,811 1,420,000 686,251 $11,979,062 $17,699

$10,081,410 1,420,000 435,199 $11,936,609 ($188,536)

$9,586,495 1,420,000 896,765 $11,903,260 $0

$9,198,327 1,420,000 848,153 $11,466,480 $0

($388,168) 0 (48,612) ($436,780) $0

4.05% 0.00% 5.42% 3.67% n/a

Public Art Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues PublicArtFees TotalRevenues Expenditures Capital TotalExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures FY2011 Actual FY2012 Adopted Budget FY2013 Proposed Budget $ ChangeFrom FY12Budget % ChangeFrom FY12Budget

$69,871 $69,871

$83,507 $83,507

$76,500 $76,500

$86,500 $86,500

$10,000 $10,000

13.07% 13.07%

$14,867 $14,867 $55,004

$37,720 $37,720 $45,787

$76,500 $76,500 $0

$86,500 $86,500 $0

$10,000 $10,000 $0

13.07% 13.07% n/a

City of Coral Springs, Florida

123

Equipment Services Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues OperatingRevenues FuelandMaintenanceTransfers GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund VehicleChargeBackTransfers GeneralFund WaterandSewerFund FireFund MiscellaneousRevenues InterestIncome Auction ChargesforFleetServices CityofParkland CityofMargate CityofCoconutCreek FloridaAtlanticUniversity TotalOperatingRevenue NonOperatingRevenues AppropriationsfromFundBalance FinancialStrategy EquipmentPurchases TotalNonOperatingRevenue  GrandTotalRevenues Expenses OperatingExpenses Personal Benefits OtherExpenses ChargeBackExpense TotalOperatingExpenses NonOperatingExpenses TransfertoCapitalFund EquipmentPurchases ComputerReplacement TotalNonOperatingExpenses GrandTotalExpenses RevenuesinExcessofExpenses Positions FY2011 Actual FY2012 Adopted Budget FY2013 Proposed Budget $ ChangeFrom FY12Budget % ChangeFrom FY12Budget

$2,573,172 208,348 283,189 1,666,565 221,396 361,818 215,798 151,653 25,608 3,153 n/a 370 $5,711,070

$2,348,060 194,488 312,715 1,666,565 221,396 361,818 116,107 65,300 125,267 2,574 1,860 592 $5,416,741

$2,464,836 204,211 328,349 1,716,561 228,037 372,672 150,000 75,007 117,000 4,000 2,500 2,000 $5,665,173

$2,418,058 223,253 364,046 1,795,572 204,524 446,387 140,000 100,000 108,000 5,000 2,500 0 $5,807,340

($46,778) 19,042 35,697 79,011 (23,513) 73,715 (10,000) 24,993 (9,000) 1,000 0 (2,000) $142,167

1.90% 9.32% 10.87% 4.60% 10.31% 19.78% 6.67% 33.32% 7.69% 25.00% 0.00% 100.00% 2.51%

0 1,505,214 $1,505,214 $7,216,284

2,000,000 1,822,033 $3,822,033 $9,238,774

3,213,989 2,210,651 $5,424,640 $11,089,813

0 3,162,157 $3,162,157 $8,969,497

(3,213,989) 951,506 $2,262,483 ($2,120,316)

100.00% 43.04% 41.71% 19.12%

$681,809 304,108 1,611,082 2,249,779 $4,846,778 0 1,505,214 11,745 $1,516,959 $6,363,737 $852,547 15.00

$701,322 312,084 1,982,794 2,249,779 $5,245,979 2,000,000 1,822,033 0 $3,822,033 $9,068,012 $170,762 15.00

$802,686 356,072 2,189,145 2,317,270 $5,665,173 3,213,989 2,210,651 0 $5,424,640 $11,089,813 $0 15.00

$803,086 359,356 2,198,415 2,446,483 $5,807,340 0 3,162,157 0 $3,162,157 $8,969,497 $0 15.00

$400 3,284 9,270 129,213 $142,167 (3,213,989) 951,506 0 $2,262,483 ($2,120,316) $0 0

0.05% 0.92% 0.42% 5.58% 2.51% 100.00% 43.04% n/a 41.71% 19.12% n/a 0.0%

124

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget

Pension Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues Transfers: GeneralFund FireFund WaterandSewerFund EquipmentServices HealthFund GeneralInsuranceFund TotalRevenues Expenses PolicePensionSworn EMS/FirePensionCertified ICMA(401)aGeneralEmployees ICMA(401)aManagement GeneralEmployeePension CityCommissionPension TotalExpenses RevenuesinExcessofExpenses FY2011 Actual FY2012 Adopted Budget FY2013 Proposed Budget $ ChangeFrom FY12Budget % ChangeFrom FY12Budget

$14,068,464 1,585,848 126,485 52,336 15,406 6,340 $15,854,879 $10,987,830 2,386,721 1,349,164 482,935 630,000 18,229 $15,854,879 $0

$14,078,969 985,885 128,187 53,329 11,666 7,163 $15,265,199 $11,310,445 1,536,214 1,377,296 523,015 500,000 18,229 $15,265,199 $0

$14,646,446 1,564,582 139,660 57,677 9,540 7,183 $16,425,088 $11,500,096 2,450,000 1,441,786 479,977 535,000 18,229 $16,425,088 $0

$11,897,390 1,748,752 137,580 57,517 10,114 7,714 $13,859,067 $8,700,000 2,700,000 1,457,372 496,895 500,000 4,800 $13,859,067 $0

($2,749,056) 184,170 (2,080) (160) 574 531 ($2,566,021) ($2,800,096) 250,000 15,586 16,918 (35,000) (13,429) ($2,566,021) $0

18.77% 11.77% 1.49% 0.28% 6.02% 7.39% 15.62% 24.35% 10.20% 1.08% 3.52% 6.54% 73.67% 15.62% n/a

Debt Service Fund Summary


FY2010 Actual Revenues AdValoremTaxes TransferfromGeneralFund TransferfromFireFund AppropriatedFundBalance InterestRebateRevenueBondSeries2010 Other InterestIncome* TotalRevenues Expenditures GeneralObligationBond2003A(Refunding) GeneralObligationBond2005A(Refunding) GeneralObligationBond2005B(Refunding) GeneralObligationBond2006PublicSafety GeneralObligationBondOther TotalGeneralObligationBond FranchiseRevenueBond2004(Refunding) CapitalRevenueBond2008* CapitalImprovementRevenueBondSeries2010** TotalRevenueBonds Other IssuanceCosts TotalOther TotalExpenditures RevenuesinExcessofExpenditures $1,429,219 3,207,284 232,860 0 0 0 83,105 $4,952,468 FY2011 Actual $1,277,185 3,203,059 232,860 0 0 40,255 42,558 $4,795,917 FY2012 Adopted Budget $2,049,905 2,347,076 232,860 1,250,000 0 0 6,049 $5,885,890 FY2013 Proposed Budget $2,062,241 3,596,863 232,860 0 129,940 0 3,248 $6,025,152 $ Changefrom FY12Budget $12,336 1,249,787 0 (1,250,000) 129,940 0 (2,801) $139,262 % Changefrom FY12Budget 0.60% 53.25% 0.00% 100.00% n/a n/a 46.31% 2.37%

*Interestincomefluctuatesyearlybasedonhowmuchcashisreserved,includingthe10%debtcommitment.

$353,340 606,563 522,191 551,438 1,250 2,034,782 1,763,556 1,677,988 0 3,441,544 0 0 $5,476,326 ($523,858)

$355,150 604,425 524,441 551,438 1,250 2,036,704 1,761,206 1,674,713 89,455 3,525,374 1,400 1,400 $5,563,478 ($767,561)

$355,400 610,413 532,704 551,438 4,000 2,053,954 1,758,556 1,665,863 405,517 3,829,936 2,000 2,000 $5,885,890 $0

$355,534 616,685 538,624 551,397 1,250 2,063,489 1,758,244 1,665,963 535,457 3,959,663 2,000 2,000 $6,025,152 $0

$134 6,272 5,920 (41) (2,750) 9,535 (312) 100 129,940 129,727 0 0 $139,262 $0

0.04% 1.03% 1.11% 0.01% 68.75% 0.46% 0.02% 0.01% 32.04% 3.39% 0.00% 0.00% 2.37% n/a

*CapitalRevenueBondwasissuedinAugust2008torefinanceFIFCLoans2001A&2002B. **CapitalImprovementRevenueBondSeries2010(akaBuildAmericaBond)wasissuedinDecember2010

City of Coral Springs, Florida

125

126

Proposed Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Budget