TERRYMcAULIFFE

FOR GOVERNOR

PUTTING JOBS FIRST
KEEPING VIRGINIA COMPETITIVE IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY

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o be the best state for business we have to focus on building on the Commonwealth’s strengths while diversifying our economy. We’re faced with serious challenges as our federal government learns to live within its means, but these challenges also represent an opportunity to grow a strong and diverse 21st century economy.

Virginia has traditionally been one of the best states for business and it’s because members of both parties have accepted a few straightforward principles. • C  ontinuing Virginia’s tradition of fewer, smarter regulations. Here in Virginia our regulatory structure has always been one that maintained our standards without imposing burdens on our businesses. We need to continue down that path, emphasizing the need to oversee our current regulations efficiently rather than constantly creating new ones. •I nvesting in Transportation and Education. Our transportation and education systems are the building blocks that allow the private sector to flourish. We must make strategic investments in these sectors so that we can have as strong an economy as possible. • Honoring Veterans’ service and respecting their training. Returning veterans shouldn’t have to jump through hoops or take classes on skills they already have trained to do to be certified for a new profession. As Governor, Terry will have a full-time staff member dedicated to creating automatic trade and professional certifications for returning veterans. This high-level staff person will work with the Department of Defense, lawmakers, and licensure bodies to help ensure that our veterans have an easy and sensible transition into the workforce. • Giving everyone in our economy a seat at the table. When the state makes rules that affect people’s livelihoods, they should be a part of the conversation. Virginia should ensure proper representation of both workers and management on regulatory boards and licensing panels. •E  nsuring that employment laws are followed. People should be paid for the time they work. Women and minorities should not be discriminated against. Workplaces should be safe and well maintained. These and other basic workplace rules need to be properly enforced.

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Getting the Basics Right

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Virginia competes with hundreds of nations and 49 other states for the jobs of the 21st century. Having a trained and ready workforce is critically important. As Governor, Terry will focus on making sure Virginians have the skills they need to grow our economy and provide for their families. •F  ocusing on our Community Colleges. Virginia’s community college system is an incredible asset and should be treated as such. Terry will focus on supporting our community college system as the centerpiece of our workforce development system.
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2 Workforce Development

 iving Community Colleges the tools to succeed. Every dollar spent on Community College workforce training G creates many more in economic development. It’s time to invest where we get the greatest return. Helping our community colleges grow facilities and faculties will grow the number of career-ready Virginians. Increased support for workforce-development programs. Ensuring that our community colleges are providing every student with the “soft skills” – those basic job readiness skills that will allow them to transition into on the job training – necessary to succeed in their careers along with specialized training options for specific industries will ensure that our workforce can meet the needs of our industries.  hallenge Grants. By providing some state support through challenge grants we can improve community C college fundraising and bring more private dollars into our system.  roadening access for veterans to include all programs. Currently our veterans only have federal benefits for B degree granting programs. We should create state scholarships for those veterans that want to pursue career certifications. ncreased flexibility and authority. We need to free our Community Colleges up from old-fashioned I purchasing, work order, and hiring restrictions – let presidents and department heads run their schools so they can be more efficient and spend their resources on their core mission of educating and training Virginians. ncreased collaboration with local high schools. We should do everything we can to get students in career I training the best education and familiarize them with their community college. ncentives for increasing partnerships with local businesses. Our community colleges are going to partner I with local industry to provide, where possible, tailored training programs to give our students the tools they need to succeed.  dditional staff and program support for continuing education. In today’s job market people are going to need A to upgrade their skills periodically and we need to make sure that our system is available.

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•  Investing in Pre-K through 12 Education. Without a strong start our students aren’t going to be able to launch into careers or continue their education. A strong economy demands a well educated workforce.

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eforming the SOL Tests. We must have a strong system of student achievement and teacher evaluation. R Unfortunately our current system isn’t working for parents, students, or teachers. The current Standards of Learning tests have created an environment with an over-emphasis on drilling students to take one-time, multiple-choice tests. There is no question that teachers must be held accountable through fair, multidimensional means, and that we need to ensure that students are learning what we want them to know, but we can do a better job. nnovation in Education. Quality educational systems need to think more creatively. Partnerships with I businesses and Community Colleges to give our students firm credentials and skills training, emphasis on STEM and Computer Science, and increased flexibility for our school districts will all help bring our schools into the 21st century.  upporting our Schools. Over time, the Commonwealth has reduced state investment in our schools, reducing S the resources of our schools and shifting the burden to local school districts. It’s time to restore funding and give our school systems the tools they need to provide world class educations for our kids.  rowing support for career training. Our schools need to partner with community colleges and businesses to G provide valuable and useful career training. Letting Teachers Teach. Our teachers need to be relieved of the growing amount of paperwork and administrative tasks so they can focus on the job they signed up for: educating our kids.

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• Traditional 4-year Colleges and Universities. We have one of the proudest traditions of higher education in the country, but it must remain affordable to parents and students. Our universities and colleges are challenged to stay current and absorb more students while their funding has been cut dramatically.
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Controlling costs and fees to keep our kids out of debt. Every student in Virginia deserves the opportunity to get a quality education and start their working lives without the burden of heavy debt. Emphasize financial aid. We must ensure that, in this era of rising costs, all students have a fair shot at getting a college education. Supporting returning veterans. As our veterans return home, many of them will seek education in our colleges and universities. We need to ensure that these are welcoming places for them and understand their needs and talents. Making employment data available. Virginia should do more to ensure that students, parents, and colleges and universities all know about and can easily access state data on what jobs are going to be available and in which fields. Increased support for research and development. In addition to creating new products and industries, supporting requests for funding from our schools’ research departments will bring revenues back to the schools and attract new faculty. Helping our schools to become more entrepreneurial will bring more resources and talent to our higher education system.

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•  Supporting and encouraging the growth of apprenticeship programs. These critically important training programs give apprentices the tools they need to join lucrative and in-demand trades, and give employers the security of knowing that their hires can do the job.

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Virginians can get a return on investment on their tax dollars through targeted incentives. •C  utting red tape and solving problems for business. As Governor, Terry will empower the chief jobs creation officer to be a single point of contact and authority for all incentive and business acquisition or growth activity. This person’s entire focus will be solving problems and helping businesspeople grow Virginia’s economy. • Making sure our incentive programs actually work. We must streamline our programs and ensure that they’re being administered as effectively and efficiently as possible. •S  tronger accounting and accountability. By requiring strong rules for data collection and verification we can ensure that Virginia’s business incentives and assistance are actually working for Virginia’s economy. •S  upporting struggling economies. By increasing focus on Southside and Southwest Virginia and partnering with the Tobacco Commission, we can help diversify and strengthen these economies.

3 Business Incentive Programs

Virginia has been a top state for business for many years. We should continue our support of key assets that helped make it so. •S  upporting our nation’s defense. Virginia has always had a unique role in our nation’s defense and we should continue to be the best hosts for our armed forces possible. As Governor, Terry will work tirelessly to ensure that our military has all it needs here in the Commonwealth. •B  uilding on success. Virginia must increase the efforts to diversify those businesses engaged in defense and government contracting, and better support the commercialization of their products beyond governmental customers. By broadening their customer bases these businesses become stronger and more resilient. •B  uilding Virginia’s markets and trade around the world. Governor McDonnell and other recent Governors have made strong gains in international trade thanks to our top-notch global air and seaport facilities. We must continue to pursue overseas trade. •S  upporting our Port. The publicly owned Port of Virginia is one of the largest assets the Commonwealth has, and it provides tens of thousands of jobs. We must renew our commitment to supporting the port’s operations and making it easier for those industries that make use of our port to get their goods in and out of port facilities.

4 Building on Our Strengths

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Virginia needs to broaden the areas in which our economy performs well if we’re going to weather future downturns and federal spending reductions. Growing new sectors of our economy will provide jobs for thousands of Virginians and ensure our prosperity for generations. •2  1st Century technology creating 21st Century jobs. Virginia should build on our success in IT to grow our cyber security industry – a key new federal priority – to become a national and global leader. • Virginia is for Lovers – and tourists. Tourism is already a $20.4 billion industry in Virginia. We need to commit greater resources toward expanding this asset. • Building our energy future. Clean energy jobs are a small but growing portion of Virginia’s economy. By setting standards that encourage new industry and are competitive with our neighbor states we can create thousands of jobs and do the critical work of cleaning up our air and water – and combat climate change. • Increasing advanced manufacturing. Advanced manufacturing jobs are the heart of a strong and growing economy and we need to do more to attract these high-skill, high-salary jobs and ensure that we’ve got the workforce to fill them. • Working on Education. Virginia’s education sector will have to expand to train the future’s workforce, deal with a growing population, and replace the many educators nearing retirement. We must work quickly to attract and retain the best educator workforce. • Creating opportunities in healthcare. When Terry is Governor expansion of Medicaid will create over 33,000 new jobs and we must ensure that we’re poised to fill them. • Exporting our Agricultural and Forestry products. The agriculture and forestry industries are $79 billion industries. The Commonwealth should work to encourage and support these growth industries – moving their products to cities around the state, nation, and globe.

5 Diversifying our Economy

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TRANSPORTATION: A MODERN, EFFICIENT SYSTEM
Virginia has just seen passage of the first significant bipartisan compromise on transportation funding in 27 years. This was a response to an impending funding crisis that would have made Virginia ineligible for federal highway matching funds. Having now secured these resources, the next Governor will begin the equally important task of ensuring that they’re spent wisely and with the goal of building a more prosperous future for all Virginians.

For too long Virginia’s road and transit construction planning has been a laundry list of projects and programs, some of which still make sense and some of which no longer fit the need for which they were designed. We need to strategically prioritize what we’re building and where. We should look at our current and proposed transportation expenditures from top to bottom and support those which should move forward and pull the plug when they don’t make sense. Since Virginia’s economy relies on a strong transportation network, job retention, job expansion and job growth will be a key factor in prioritizing precious transportation dollars.

1 Pick the Right Projects; Build the Best Ones

Virginia’s recent transportation funding bill was a compromise. It wasn’t perfect, but it was the first step forward in decades. We need to build on that success by protecting the current transportation revenues and ensuring that Virginia’s transportation system supports the ongoing economic recovery in Virginia. • A  transportation lockbox. Funds that support our transportations system – and by extension, our economy – must be protected. • P  ushing Congress to do its job. Our leaders in the U.S. House should be pushed to enact the Marketplace Fairness Act, applying the same rules to Internet retailers that main street retailers have to work with. This revenue is a critically important part of the recent transportation compromise and without it gas taxes will rise for Virginia citizens.

2 Protecting Progress on Transportation Funding

The Virginia Department of Transportation is a huge organization, managing the third largest highway system in the U.S., with significant strengths and weaknesses. In addition to protecting the public safety, VDOT must focus on its core priorities, including its role in supporting state and local job growth. •F  ix it first. You don’t put a new wing on your house when you’ve got a leak in your roof. For entirely too long Virginia has allowed our roads and bridges to deteriorate, making repairs more costly down the road. It’s time to establish and achieve clear standards for ALL our roads and bridges. • Getting the best deal for Virginia. Public/private partnerships are a critically important tool for Virginia’s transportation future.  Projects like the HOT lanes represent win-win deals for the public and for our private partners.  However, public/private partnership projects are only as good as the deal that gets made. It is time to review some current agreements and renegotiate those where the Commonwealth or the public wound up with a raw deal. Moving forward, we will insist on partnerships that meet clear standards of transparency, accountability, and public benefit.

3 Strengthen the Virginia Department of Transportation

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•S  eparate planning from delivery. Project selection and long term planning should be a collaboration among transportation experts, Virginia’s elected leaders, and local and regional leaders. Transportation planning in Virginia needs to support local communities as well as local, regional and statewide economic growth. VDOT must be a part of that process, but may not be best suited to understanding local land use or broad economic trends. VDOT should be in the business of managing maintenance and construction of transportation infrastructure, not setting the Commonwealth’s agenda. This approach to 21st century planning will:
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Ensure a good return on investment Build livable and sustainable communities Find the least intrusive solution. For example, a turn lane at a tenth of the cost of an interchange

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n Adapt   infrastructure to community needs rather than a community being forced to adapt to one particular infrastructure solution  n Consider all transportation options, including pedestrian, bike, barge, rail, bus, ferry, demand management, and technology solutions

•U  se 21st century technology to solve 21st century problems. We can incorporate modern traffic management and safety systems to improve our transportation system and save commuters and businesses time and money without major new construction.

Too many Virginia residents and businesses will be seeing their hard earned money lost to rising tolls. It should not cost thousands of dollars for our citizens to get from home to work, or for small businesses to be unfairly penalized for trying to conduct daily business. Virginia’s leaders need to find fair solutions to our rising toll burdens. Major toll increases are currently planned for early in 2014, and we now have the resources to address this critical issue.

4 Stop Toll Escalation

Working with local and regional partners in government, the Commonwealth should be doing much more to incentivize smart growth and modern land use planning. •G  etting a good return on our investment. Our transportation network’s top priority should be to maximize the growth of our economy. People should be able to freely move around their communities and goods should be able to quickly and easily make it to market. Projects should increase land value and drive economic growth. • Building livable and sustainable communities. By encouraging use of best practices by developers and local planners, like interconnectivity and modern development strategies, we can reduce the burdens on our transportation infrastructure. •D  on’t use bulldozers when shovels will work. We should make sure that we’re targeting our projects to the specific problems they’re designed to fix. Sometimes a turn lane or a wider ramp can do as much good as added lanes or entirely new roads.

5 Modern Land Use Planning for a Modern Virginia

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•L  ook at the whole impact of our projects and plans. We should evaluate projects based on all of the benefits they’ll bring to our communities: economic impact, congestion relief, open space preservation, and all of the other factors that go into building vibrant, livable communities. • Working with local partners. Richmond doesn’t know the needs and special circumstances of every community in Virginia and it shouldn’t pretend to. When a problem arises in our transportation system we should work together to explore all of the possible alternatives. •G  iving commuter options. We should focus on the investments that give Virginians choices about how they want to get around: transit systems, walking, biking, and a well maintained and uncongested system of roads.

6 Supporting a Rail System that Supports Virginia
•C  ontinuing to support Virginia’s freight rail infrastructure. The Commonwealth should continue to partner with Norfolk Southern, CSX, and all other rail operators for freight rail improvements to support Port of Virginia operations, distribution, manufacturing, and all other aspects of Virginia’s economy that rely on rail service. •M  oving Trucks to Trains. Our rail policy should be making it easier to partner with private rail companies to make our highways safer and get trucks off the road. • Increasing support for inter-city passenger rail. Virginia’s cities and citizens need to be connected to other markets. We should continue to invest in those lines that make economic sense to ensure that our passenger rail service is fast, frequent, reliable, and affordable:
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Virginia has remarkable assets in our network of freight and passenger rail. These systems support Virginia’s economy and help connect Virginia’s businesses and marketplace to the rest of the country.

Supporting passenger rail to Roanoke. Continued support for the Lynchburg and Charlottesville line. Studying and implementing improvements on Richmond to DC rail line. Marketing and supporting Norfolk passenger rail.

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•I mproving connectivity across our network. We should make sure that our rails fully connect distribution and delivery centers along with providing passenger access to our airports.

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Virginians deserve choices. Transit systems provide choices while increasing property values and commercial activity. • Increasing support for transit. We must continue to invest in our local and regional transit systems. • Tying together local communities and economies. The Commonwealth should encourage local governments and transit systems to work together to connect our workforce to jobs. •D  iscourage duplication of services. Where multiple systems exist and overlap the Commonwealth should encourage consolidation. •P  rioritize connecting our light rail and subway systems for economic development. In those parts of the Commonwealth that have a need for light rail or subway systems, we should support those systems and make expansions when they will support economic development. Of critical importance to that mission are projects like:
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7 Supporting Our Local and Regional Transit Systems

Bringing Metro Rail all the way to Dulles Airport and into Loudoun County. Creating a seamless Hampton Roads transit system from the Naval base to the waterfront.

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8 Keeping the Port of Virginia for Virginians 9 Transportation Beyond, and Above, Our Borders

Virginia’s port is one of the most valuable assets we possess, and provides billions of dollars in economic development and tens of thousands of jobs. It is critically important that we don’t turn this resource over to outside corporations with incentives to limit competition.

Just as Virginia supports its seaports and airports, we must continue to look to the future and provide strong support to our spaceport at Wallops Island. There will be a few states that capture the emerging commercial space industry, and we must ensure that the Commonwealth helps lead the way on this new industry.

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PRE-K THROUGH 12: EDUCATING VIRGINIA FOR TOMORROW’S JOBS
Education is the single most important thing we can do to build a strong Virginia and what our kids need to build successful lives. Whether they’re going to invent a product, start a business, or get the job of their dreams, it all starts with the basic skills and confidence that only a good education can provide, and right now we’re not doing enough.

We must have a strong system of student achievement and teacher evaluation. Unfortunately our current system isn’t working for parents, students, or teachers. The current Standards of Learning tests have created an environment with an over-emphasis on drilling students to take one-time, multiple-choice tests. There is no question that teachers must be held accountable through fair, multi-dimensional means, and that we need to ensure that students are learning what we want them to know, but we can do a better job. Improvements include: •F  ocusing on progress through pre-testing. If a 5th grade teacher gets a child reading at a 1st grade level and, by the end of the year, has that child reading at a 4th grade level, the current system calls that teacher a failure. We must move toward progress-based data instead of simplistic grade level requirements. • Permitting flexible test timing and formats. If school districts want to break up the SOL into smaller portions, administer it closer to the end of the school year, or administer the test differently for children with different learning styles, we should support that. • A blue ribbon commission to study the content being tested and the format of tests. Teachers and students both report that the facts focused on in SOL tests don’t always line up with the most important concepts from each subject and that they’re often poorly presented. Tests are only as good as the questions they ask. • Moving to essay or short answer-based testing where possible. Multiple-choice tests drive teachers to drill individual facts rather than broad understanding. It’s good if a child knows when we landed on the moon, but it’s much better if the child knows about the space race, NASA, and the Apollo program. Essay and short answer tests let our kids demonstrate knowledge and our teachers teach.

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Reforming the SOL Tests

Quality educational systems need to think more creatively. Partnerships with businesses and Community Colleges, emphasis on STEM and Computer Science, and increased flexibility for our school districts will all help bring our schools into the 21st century. •R  obust pursuit of public private partnership and awarding credit for certification and credentialing. When kids get certified in IT, or as mechanics, or as EMTs, we need to support and give credit for those accomplishments. Our goal should be students graduating from high school with career or college ready skills. • Incentivizing creation of laboratory schools at all schools of education. Lab schools allow institutions of higher learning to partner with local schools to improve education for both sets of students. • Partnering high schools with local community colleges for workforce training. Combining high school and Community College career training will improve outcomes, preserve resources, and get a higher quality education for all of our students.

2 Innovation in Education

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• Comprehensive digital student records. By ensuring that we have compatible systems for student data we can track progress, find problems, and discover new trends in student performance. These records will be implemented using the best privacy protection standards available. • Promoting STEM and computer science education as early as possible. The jobs of the 21st century require the skills of the 21st century. We need to set up our students to succeed. •T  eaching our students to write. Nearly every job or pursuit of higher education will eventually require that our kids express themselves through writing.

Over time, the Commonwealth has reduced state investment in our schools, reducing the resources of our schools and shifting the burden to local school districts. •R  estoring the Standards of Quality and fully funding them. In recent years, economic hardship forced our leaders in Richmond to look for budget balancing strategies that led them to undermine the standards of quality, our curriculum, and standards for school services. It’s time to restore those standards and make sure our schools have the tools they need to get the job done. • Attracting and retaining the best teachers. Our teachers have seen their salaries and benefits decline significantly, in real terms, over the past several years. Paying our teachers properly is the only proven way to attract and retain the highest quality educators. •P  ursuing savings through efficiencies at the local and state level. The state needs to be a good steward of taxpayer dollars. Increased resources will need to be paired with improved efficiency at the local level. Where services are being paid for separately between local governments and school administrations they should be combined.

3 Supporting Our Schools

Our teachers need to be relieved of the growing amount of paperwork and administrative tasks so they can focus on the job they signed up for: educating our kids. •T  ask force to reduce administrative and non-instructional workload for teachers. By reducing the time teachers spend doing something other than teaching or preparing to teach, we increase the time they spend focused on education. •T  argeted and improved professional development. By supporting teacher in pursuing professional development in the areas they actually want to improve their skills we can get better educators without wasting their time and the state’s resources.

4 Letting Teachers Teach

Every young Virginian deserves access to the benefits of an early childhood education.

5 Increasing Support for Pre-K and Early Childhood Education

• Broaden the reach of the Preschool Initiative. Virginia should change the distribution requirements to ensure eligible preschoolers in every community can participate in Virginia’s Preschool Initiative.

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• Improve skill levels in our early childcare workforce. We can up-skill the early care and education workforce through targeted, affordable training in partnership with Virginia’s community college system. • Bring public and private resources to bear to improve early childhood education. Leverage partnerships with small business to ensure families’ access to high quality early education.

HIGHER EDUCATION: A SKILLED WORKFORCE FOR 21ST CENTURY JOBS
Education is the single most important thing we can do to build a strong Virginia and what our kids need to build successful lives. Whether they’re going to invent a product, start a business, or get the job of their dreams, it all starts with the basic skills and confidence that only a good education can provide, and right now we’re not doing enough.

Community colleges provide tremendous resources to their local communities. But tremendous growth in student enrollments combined with decreasing state support over the past decade has stretched their ability to meet demands for classes and act as the drivers of workforce development. •G  iving Community Colleges the tools to succeed. Every dollar spent on Community College workforce training creates many more in economic development. It’s time to invest where we get the greatest return. • Challenge Grants. By providing some state support through challenge grants we can improve community college fundraising and bring more private dollars into our system. •I ncreased flexibility and authority. We need to free our Community Colleges up from old-fashioned purchasing and hiring restrictions – let presidents and department heads run their schools so they can be more efficient and spend their resources on what matters. •I ncreased support for workforce-development programs. Ensuring that our community colleges are providing every student with the “soft skills” – those basic job readiness skills that will allow them to transition into on the job training – necessary to succeed in their careers along with specialized training options for specific industries will ensure that our workforce can meet the needs of our industries. •I ncreased collaboration with local high schools. We should do everything we can to get students in career training the best education and familiarize them with their community college. • Provide support for “career coaches” in high schools. Giving our community colleges the opportunity to place career coaches in high schools to help guide students toward career readiness will keep our kids in the pipeline to college or a career.

1 Community Colleges

We have one of the proudest traditions of higher education in the country, but they must remain affordable to parents and students. Our universities and colleges are challenged to stay current and absorb more students while their funding has been cut dramatically.

2 Four-year Schools

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• Public Four Year Schools n  Controlling costs and fees to keep our kids out of debt. Every student in Virginia deserves the opportunity to get a quality education and start their working lives without the burden of heavy debt.
n Emphasize   financial aid. We must ensure that, in this era of rising costs, all students have a fair shot at getting a college education. n  Ensuring proper representation on governing boards. It is critically important that alumni, staff, students, and other members of college and university communities are involved in the selection of their governing boards. The Governor should solicit and respect slates of nominees from college and university communities when filling board slots.

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aking employment data available. Virginia should do more to ensure that students, parents, and colleges and M universities all know about and can easily access state data on what jobs are going to be available and in which fields.

n Focus   on expansion of those schools interested in expansion. Virginia absolutely needs more space in our colleges and universities, but we should focus on those institutions with growth in enrollment as part of the plan. Every school shouldn’t have tens of thousands of students.

n   Renewed commitment by the state to academic freedom for professors. Only by assuring our researchers that they can study free of fear that they’ll be subpoenaed or prosecuted can we attract and retain the brightest minds.

n Supporting   returning veterans. As our veterans return home, many of them will seek education in our colleges and universities. We need to ensure that these are welcoming places for them and understand their needs and talents.

n Pursuing   online and virtual education. We cannot afford to sacrifice quality, but where possible we must embrace online education.

n Modern management systems. College and universities need to adopt modern methods of management and administration to control costs and improve efficiency.

n  Supporting our Historically Black Colleges and Universities. These institutions play a critical educational, cultural, and commercial role in our system and should continue to get our support.

n  Increased support for research and development. In addition to creating new products and industries, supporting requests for funding from our schools’ research departments will bring revenues back to the schools and attract new faculty.

• Private Four Year Schools
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 rotect the Virginia Tuition Assistance Grants. These grants help keep private schools – a critical part of P Virginia’s higher education system – affordable and available for Virginia students. ncrease community college articulation agreements. Our community colleges already have agreements with I our public schools to permit high achieving students to transfer after two years and we should ensure that a similar option exists for private schools as well.

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A HEALTHIER, STRONGER VIRGINIA

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hanges in healthcare present a tremendous opportunity to create jobs as we transition toward 1) a modern and efficiently-managed health delivery system, 2) implement the Affordable Care Act, and 3) transition toward more home- and community-based care. Terry’s goals in addressing these transitions will be to create jobs, save patients money, improve the quality of care, save the taxpayers money and grow our economy.

Making Healthcare Management More Modern and Efficient

n  A Chief Operating Officer for state health systems efficiency. By reorganizing the way state health plans and delivery systems are managed, we can save time and money while delivering better value for our tax dollars. Critical to this reorganization will be the creation of a high-skill managerial position that will focus on efficiency and modernization of Virginia’s management of state health services.

n  Virginia’s Healthcare Industry. Virginia is home to some of the finest institutions, personnel and health companies in the world. We should continue to work with our remarkable providers, insurers and associated industries that contribute to our economy and wellbeing.

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ocus workforce training. We know that Medicaid Expansion will create over 30,000 jobs, and we’re going to F need people to fill them. We need to ensure that this growing segment of our economy has the talent it needs. Virginia’s Community College System will be our primary focus as we expand workforce training. ntegrate the system. As a Commonwealth, we must do all we can to ensure coordination of high-quality I care. By giving guidance and incentives for providers to coordinate all health professionals and paraprofessionals into more integrated systems of care, where appropriate, we can improve outcomes for patients and lower costs.  tick with Virginia’s current framework on tort reform. The recent tort reform agreement between lawyers and S doctors was a model for civil dialogue in public policy in the best Virginia tradition.

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n  Tackle tough healthcare challenges directly. Virginia should work with healthcare providers to help deal with the changes coming in our healthcare system.

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eep more of our Virginia-trained doctors. As a Commonwealth, we need to work with our hospitals and the K federal government to increase residency slots and keep Virginia-trained doctors in Virginia.  ddress chronic conditions through better coordination of patient-centered care. Virginia must focus A our efforts on cost-effective strategies at managing chronic conditions (heart disease, diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and obesity) and preventing avoidable expense in our healthcare system.  ontinue and improve disaster and emergency planning coordination. Our medical facilities do an excellent C job coordinating with state emergency management officials, but continuing and improving that state of readiness requires consistent training and planning.

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ttract and retain our health care workers. EMTs, home healthcare workers, and the medical supply industry A should all be able to earn a good wage and work in decent conditions. Continue and expand veterans’ services. If veterans can’t get their VA healthcare in a timely fashion, it’s up to  the state government to be their advocate and give them access to existing state programs to fill the gap.  ontinue to support efforts to expand rural health delivery. By encouraging the federal government to expand C residency slots and by supporting state programs that aid in loan repayments for rural health professionals, we can ensure that all Virginians get access to quality care. ncrease support for home and community-based services through the Area Agencies on Aging. The Area I Agencies on Aging are essential to keeping older adults and people with disabilities in their homes and communities.  dequately fund nursing home and long-term care. Virginia should ensure adequate training and resources are A available for nursing home and long-term care to ensure quality care.

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n Medicaid Reform. Medicaid is a critical program for hundreds of thousands of Virginia families, people with disabilities and older adults, including a majority of our senior population in long-term care. However, the system can be improved in significant ways to make it more efficient for patients, healthcare providers and Virginia taxpayers. Reforms to payment and delivery systems and the inclusion of a system-wide COO will save money and create efficiencies that improve outcomes.

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Continue efforts to reform the delivery and payment systems. The reforms pursued by the Reform Commission are a good start, but we can continue to build on those reforms to make improvements beyond those goals.  ayment and delivery system improvements. The systems we use to deliver Medicaid treatments can be P improved to save taxpayer dollars while delivering better care for our citizens. By focusing on outcomes, not procedures, the Commonwealth can move toward a system of care that rewards quality, not the volume of services.
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 sing modern metrics and outcome tracking. By applying modern industry best practices and U demanding that we track our successes and failures through registries, we can improve our delivery systems, identify strengths and weaknesses, and provide timely feedback to improve care.  se modern technology. Updating our technology will allow us to improve care through new solutions U like telemedicine.  pply innovative cost-reduction strategies and systems. Virginia should test proven, innovative methods A of care through pilots using Accountable Care Organizations, bundled payments, the patient-centered medical home, etc. as a way to better coordinate care, improve the quality of care, improve outcomes, and lower costs.  evelop more case managers for care. Coordination of services and making sure that different providers D know all the details of patients’ healthcare can save money and time while providing better outcomes.

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reate savings and efficiencies by focusing on long-term and community care for our senior citizens. The C Commonwealth can be much more innovative when it comes to strategies that help our seniors stay healthier and stay in their homes longer. We should encourage more regular and preventive interactions with healthcare professionals. This will improve quality of life even as it bolsters our communities and conserves valuable healthcare resources.

n Health IT. The revolution in information technology is poised to dramatically improve healthcare, but it’s critically important that we get this right. A huge volume of the world’s internet traffic flows through Northern Virginia, and across the Commonwealth we’ve got some of the brightest minds in both healthcare and computer science. We can increase our citizens’ safety as they use multiple medical facilities. Additionally, this transition will save patients, providers, and the Commonwealth money and resources.

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irginia hospital systems are already making great strides. Virginia should continue to support our healthcare V providers in adopting electronic medical records and other health IT systems, and should act as a convener to assist others in the transition away from non-digital operations.  elemedicine. Not every Virginian can get to see specialists in every field, and in 2013, you shouldn’t have T to drive for hours just to have a quick conversation and evaluation. By increasing the use of telemedicine, we can bring expertise to every corner of the Commonwealth and improve care while saving money.  ealth IT exchange. The creation of an exchange that aggregates and makes shareable health data will H provide tremendous benefits to consumers, doctors, and researchers.

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Making the Affordable Care Act Work for Virginia

n  Virginia’s Responses to the Affordable Care Act. The next Governor is going to need to work hard to ensure that, as the Affordable Care Act is implemented, we get the best result possible for Virginia. Well-intentioned policymakers supported and opposed that legislation, but that debate is over and it’s time to implement the law in the way that creates jobs and brings about savings and better outcomes for Virginia patients, doctors, and businesses.

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apid response team. We know that there are going to be bumps in the road as Virginia and other states R set about implementing the Affordable Care Act. Individuals and business will need help navigating the marketplace, understanding eligibility for certain tax credits, choosing a plan, etc. By creating a team of business and healthcare specialists to help us navigate our way, we can provide businesses and individuals a simple place to go to answer questions, solve problems and get enrolled in the plan that is right for them.  eek flexibility from the federal government. The Obama Administration has already delayed the business S mandate, which will allow Virginia employers’ concerns to be heard. Some parts of the ACA law simply aren’t going to work for all Virginians. As Governor, Terry will work with federal regulators to get flexibility for Virginia’s citizens, providers and businesses to incorporate new models of care across the Commonwealth that have proven to improve quality, improve outcomes, and reduce costs.

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earn from other states. The Governor must have a team ready and able to talk to their counterparts in other L states, to see what’s working and what isn’t. During his administration, Terry’s health team will conduct formal reviews of implementation successes and failures with a specific eye toward models that have been more successful in other states.

n Medicaid Expansion. Both morally and economically, expanding Medicaid is right for Virginia. Implemented properly, the Medicaid expansion can create jobs, reduce costs, and provide lifesaving coverage to hundreds of thousands. Additionally, Virginia can expect over $500 million in net General Fund savings by reducing indigent care costs and creating other efficiencies under an expanded Medicaid. Terry will include Medicaid expansion in every budget he submits to the General Assembly.

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Accept the federal Medicaid expansion. Expanding Medicaid will: 
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 ring over $21 billion of Virginia federal tax dollars back to the Commonwealth according to the B Richmond Times-Dispatch Provide health care coverage for over 400,000 Virginians, according to state projections  Create approximately 33,000 jobs, according to the Senate Finance Committee  Create high quality jobs in areas where the economy is struggling   eep rural hospitals and clinics open, creating jobs and investing in high-quality, life-saving technologies K to provide optimal care for all Virginians.

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upport the efforts of the Bipartisan Medicaid Reform Commission. The Medicaid Reform Commission S created by the General Assembly during the 2013 session is pursuing important improvements in our Medicaid system.  ork with the federal government to implement reforms. By having the Governor’s office engage aggressively W with the federal government, Virginia can get the flexibility it needs to implement any needed reforms to the Medicaid system.

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n  Health Benefits Marketplace. One of the most important aspects of the Affordable Care Act is the creation of health insurance marketplaces, called Health Benefits Exchanges. If allowed to function properly, these marketplaces will lower costs through participation from individuals and business and through increased competition while making it easier for people to comparison shop.

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Virginia exchange. Terry believes that we should have implemented a state run exchange when we had the A chance. Now that a plan for a modified version of a federally-administered exchange is being developed, Virginia should continue to move incrementally toward Virginia control while learning from our peer states’ implementation efforts.

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trong consumer protections and diverse viewpoints. As the exchange is implemented, Virginia should ensure S that the voices of medical professionals, health plans, hospital systems, consumer advocates and patients are all heard.  uild on the VHRI recommendations. The Virginia Health Reform Initiative was a successful example of B bringing together many stakeholders to design complex policy.

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Improving Care in Our Communities

n Mental Health. Mental health services are a critical part of Virginia’s healthcare and public safety services, and recent events in Newtown, Aurora, Oak Creek and Virginia Tech have all shown us that we need to take serious steps to continue to improve our mental health services. Beyond preventing violence, improvements in our mental health safety net can save us money and improve the quality of life for thousands of Virginians and their friends and family. Our mental health system should be able to support a full continuum of care – from a sufficient crisis response, to intense community services, and ultimately to a recovery-focused care leading to independence. By keeping mental health patients in their homes and jobs, and out of institutions or the legal system, we can save money and improve lives.

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ncrease resources for Crisis Intervention Training for public safety officers. Making sure that all of our law I enforcement agencies have enough personnel trained to deal with mental health emergencies just makes sense. These programs can be completed quickly and at a low cost, and they allow our first responders to even better serve the public. ncentivize the creation of more and higher-capacity crisis stabilization units. Once a public safety officer has I de-escalated a mental health crisis, they need to be able to transport the citizen in crisis to a nearby crisis stabilization unit. Ensuring that we have adequate numbers of these facilities will guarantee medical care for all citizens in crisis. ncrease resources for and personnel performing intensive case management – particularly for children. Our I dedicated case managers deserve our gratitude for handling as many cases per person as they do, but it’s simply too much to ensure that every citizen needing their support gets it. mprove the quantity and quality of long-term supportive housing for severely mentally ill and homeless I citizens. Housing services and supports are integral components in the community-based systems of care for individuals with serious mental illness and there is a direct correlation between psychiatric stability and stable housing. This form of treatment is less expensive than mental health institutions or imprisonment, and leads to dramatically improved outcomes. Increasing our support for these programs actually saves the Commonwealth money while providing better care to our citizens.

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mprove accountability and effectiveness within the system. These measures can help to control the growth I of Medicaid-funded mental health services and also will ensure that adults and children receive only the most effective types of services, and that providers and the system as a whole is held to high standards of accountability. With limited and precious resources, it is extremely important that all dollars are spent wisely. To ensure that Medicaid-funded mental health services for adults and children are effective and that there is adequate accountability in the system, it is extremely important to ensure that:

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icensure and regulatory standards define the minimum eligibility criteria for Medicaid-funded mental L health services, provider credentialing requirements, and acceptable services activities.  est practice models are articulated for Medicaid-funded mental health services. Currently there is a B lack of clear practice models, which is something that should be addressed. A lack of clear practice models explains why some Medicaid-funded mental health services are being provided in very different ways across Virginia.  epartment of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services has adequate staffing capacity for D licensing, administering audits and otherwise ensuring that services are delivered efficiently and effectively. This will help save taxpayers money and improve care.

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n Filling the gap for veterans’ mental health. Many of our service members returning from Iraq or Afghanistan join a population of older veterans, which experience signs of combat stress, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or a traumatic brain injury. Suicide has claimed the lives of more veterans than have been killed in action during recent wars. We have a duty to our veterans and we must do more. As Governor, Terry will ensure that Virginia does aggressive outreach to our veterans who might be struggling with mental illness.

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romotion. Mental health programs must be widely promoted and made accessible in ways that are easy P and avoid stigma for veterans.  ccess. Virginia needs to provide access to transition services and supportive housing for veterans A struggling with homelessness, substance abuse or mental illness.  unding. Virginia needs to properly fund crisis intervention training, counseling and facilities, so that F veterans and other Virginians in crisis can get the treatment they need.  ounseling. Virginia needs to ensure that outreach, treatment and resources are available for those C veterans who have been victims of sexual violence.

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n Ensuring people with disabilities receive quality care and services. If we are going to have a Commonwealth that works for all of us, we must work to create a system that advances opportunities for independent living, personal decision-making and robust participation in community life for Virginians with developmental and other disabilities. Disabled Virginians should be able to get the care they need in the setting they desire.

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ncrease access to quality community care. As disabled Virginians transition from institutional to I community care, we must ensure that systems are in place to guarantee quality of care in all settings.  ork to get our citizens off of waiting lists and in front of health care providers. Entirely too many W Virginia families spend entirely too long hoping to get access to a limited number of slots in our healthcare system for disabled Virginians. As Governor, Terry will work with legislators of both parties and the disability community to improve the system.  nsure smooth transition from institutional care to home and community-based care. With the recent E agreement with the DOJ to close institutions for people with intellectual disabilities, we need to ensure adequate resources are in place to guarantee the quality of care is as good in the community as it was in the institution.

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PROTECTING VIRGINIA’S AIR, WATER, AND OPEN SPACES
Conservation of our Commonwealth’s natural resources is a core responsibility of all Virginians and supports economic growth. Our Constitution obligates the Governor and the General Assembly to act as responsible stewards of Virginia’s environment. By protecting our natural resources, we defend the foundation of future economic growth and the long-term health of Virginians. As Governor, Terry will act in a responsible, bipartisan way to protect the Commonwealth’s precious resources for future generations of Virginians.

Thanks to the bipartisan work of lawmakers and non-profit organizations, a rigorous, science-based, multi-state program to truly clean up the Chesapeake Bay has been put together. The next four years are a crucial period for The Bay, which needs the support, advocacy, and leadership of the Commonwealth of Virginia if it is going to return to the economic, environmental, and recreational asset it can be. • Support localities’ water clean up plans. The Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) are the centerpiece of the plan to save the Bay. They are plans drawn up by localities in Virginia and other states to regulate the flow of pollutants into surrounding rivers and tributaries. Terry will direct the Department of Environmental Quality to engage and work side by side with these Virginia localities and representatives from the business community to help them implement their WIPs in an efficient and cost-effective way.
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Restore Virginia’s Streams, Rivers, and the Chesapeake Bay

Indentify and promulgate best storm water management practices. Storm water run off is one of the most difficult and expensive parts of the Bay’s ecosystem to manage. Terry’s Administration will coordinate with localities to identify the most efficient and cost-effective methods of dealing with storm water.

• Protect the Bay’s living resources. Fish and other living creatures of the Chesapeake are central to the economy and the livelihood of aquaculturists, watermen and recreational anglers. Virginia must enact innovative, science-driven strategies to manage these resources in a way that will sustain their populations for future generations. Successful bipartisan efforts to save the striped bass and blue crab populations are a good example of what we can accomplish when we work together. • Work with farmers to reduce agricultural run off. Farmers are the backbone of Virginia’s economy. As Governor, Terry will support farmers in continuing, refining and expanding their efforts to make meaningful contributions to protecting the Commonwealth’s rivers, streams and the Chesapeake Bay.

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It is a scientific reality that man-made climate change is causing sea levels to rise. It is a daily fact of life for Virginians living up and down the coast and it will have major impacts on billions of dollars’ worth of public and private infrastructure. We must act now to prevent decades of increasingly severe floods and natural disasters. • Convene a Climate Change Adaptation Commission. Terry will bring together a bipartisan commission of scientists, policy makers, conservationists, and industry representatives to proactively develop a comprehensive plan to protect Virginia’s communities from rising sea levels. • Draw on the expertise of Virginia’s university and college faculty. As Governor, Terry will encourage Virginia’s renowned network of universities and colleges to conduct research into the causes of and mitigation strategies for climate change. • Empower coastal localities. Mitigating the effects of climate change cannot be a one-size-fits all effort. As Governor, Terry will work with localities to give them the appropriate legal authority and find funding opportunities to enact local mitigation strategies. • Implement cutting edge surveying techniques. Part of mitigating sea level rise is having accurate data. The state government should take a lead role in identifying, prioritizing, and analyzing at-risk areas. • Coordinate with sister states. Recurrent flooding from sea level rise affects every coastal state. We should coordinate our efforts with our regional partners to identify best practices and share costs.

2 Act Decisively to Fight the Effects of Climate Change and Protect our Coastal Communities

Virginia’s natural beauty and open spaces are a crucial part of our identity. In order to preserve the natural and rural character of our Commonwealth, we need to continue the work of past administrations to protect open space. • Protect the land preservation tax credit. Virginia’s program of land preservation is routinely ranked as the best in the nation. As Governor, Terry will protect and promote the outstanding Land Preservation Tax Credit. • Preserve at least 400,000 acres of open space over four years. This pledge is the centerpiece of a bold, bipartisan agenda. Begun by Governor Kaine and continued by Governor McDonnell, this aggressive preservation of open land secures our environmental future for generations. • Prioritize publically accessible land. Where appropriate, land preserved by tax dollars should be publicly accessible. This may include innovative public/private partnerships to open new parks around the state. • Target preservation of environmentally sensitive areas. As Governor, Terry will seek to identify and prioritize the protection of Virginia’s most environmentally valuable ecosystems, such as the wetlands.

3 Preserve Open Space

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In order to ensure future economic growth, Virginia must guarantee a clean and stable source of water – groundwater and surface water – to businesses, farmers, and residents. Today, aquifers in many parts of the state are being drained faster than they are being refilled. We must work cooperatively with sister states to address this looming problem. • Engage localities in water planning. Terry will direct the Department of Environmental Quality to respond to dwindling aquifers by engaging localities in a comprehensive statewide process of water and drought planning. • Renew cooperation in interstate water use organizations. Water supply management is not a problem for Virginia alone. Any effective plan must involve the cooperation of our sister states through organizations like the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. • Implement water reuse strategies for industrial sites. As water becomes more scarce, industrial sites should be encouraged and incentivized, where appropriate, to make use of aggressive water recycling and treatment plans. • Work to protect air quality. Air quality is a national issue that by necessity has a national solution. Virginia should work cooperatively and proactively with sister states and federal regulators to do our part in solving this problem.

4 Ensure Adequate Water Supply and Air Quality

Virginia is blessed with an abundance of mineral resources. A core responsibility of government is the careful management of these resources on behalf of all Virginians. • Ensure local control of fracking and horizontal drilling regulation. Localities that will deal with whatever costs and benefits may result from fracking and horizontal drilling should be encouraged to examine the issue and enact those rules that they believe will best serve their citizens. Terry will protect localities’ rights to make their own decisions about land use activities within their jurisdictions.
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5 Sustainably Manage Virginia’s Mineral Resources

Oppose fracking and horizontal drilling in the George Washington Forest. The Commonwealth of Virginia is committed to protecting and managing the George Washington National Forest. Allowing fracking and horizontal drilling in this protected area is inconsistent with this commitment. Protect mineral rights of landowners. We have a responsibility to vigorously defend the rights of Virginia’s landowners. Terry will ensure that landowners are represented on the Virginia Gas and Oil Board.

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• Continue the moratorium on Uranium mining. A study by the National Academy of Sciences states Virginia would have to overcome “steep hurdles” before allowing mining and milling of the ore to ensure the safety of workers, the public, and the environment. Unless these hurdles can be cleared – and there has been no indication that they can be – the moratorium banning uranium mining should remain in place.

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Virginia’s rich and storied history gives us our unique place in the nation, forms part of our identity and draws tourists from around the world. We should take an active and cooperative approach to preserving these important monuments to our collective past. • Administer state and federal incentives for historic preservation. The Department of Historic Resources, with the cooperation of the federal government and local non-profits, has helped spur billions of dollars of private investment in historic preservation with strategic use of tax credits. • Ensure historic battlefields are protected. Significant portions of Virginia’s historic battlefields remain unprotected. The state should act in cooperation with localities and non-profits to coordinate their preservation. • Protect Virginia’s diverse heritage. The history of Virginia is the story of men and women from all walks of life and backgrounds. Our Commonwealth must celebrate their hard-won contributions.

6 Preserve Historic Resources

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