OregOn Observer

The
Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 6 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
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Summer Camps and Classes go through August 31, 2013
Fall Classes Begin September 3, 2013
Wayne and Dee
Ace are the fifth
generation of
Aces to oper-
ate the family
farm on County
Highway D that
was purchased
in 1913 by
Wayne’s great-
great grandfather,
William Hull
Ace, seen in the
framed picture
with his wife, Ann
Jane Wallace.
Photo by Seth Jovaag
Ace family farm hits century mark
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
There was a time in the
mid-1990s when no one
would have blamed Wayne
Ace for ditching the farm-
er’s life.
A coupl e weeks aft er
cumulative wear and tear
caused his back to go out
in 1994, Wayne lost two
fingers when his right hand
was cut by a machine that
blows feed into grain silos.
That accident required six
surgeries in five months
and a regimen of antibiotics
to stave off infection.
“I was out here milking
cows with an IV pump in
my pocket,” said Ace, 52.
But Ace and his wife,
Dee, kept at it. And last
Tu e s d a y , t h e f a mi l y
reached a milestone, when
their farm was one of 126
statewide officially added
to the list of 8,700 “Century
Farms” in Wisconsin.
The Aces attended the
Aug. 6 Sesquicentennial
and Century Farms Awards
Program at the Wisconsin
State Fair, where guests
including Gov. Scott Walk-
er commended farms that
have reached the 100-year
or 150-year mark.
“My biggest goal was to
be still milking cows the
year I got this (award),”
Ace said Monday at the
family’s home on County
Highway D in the Town of
Oregon.
Blazing Costa Rica
U12 soccer club squad plays, learns in Central America
anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
An entire town surrounded the soccer field
June 9 before the Oregon U12 Blaze took on
the local cup team in Quepos, Costa Rica.
The lights illuminated the field as a light
rain fell, and the Blaze’s emotions were
mixed with nervousness, excitement and awe
– playing in front of the largest crowd of any
game they’ve played in.
When the whistles blew, the Blaze learned
about the different style of physical play right
away and adjusted to the buzz of the audience
and the rain.
For most of the Blaze, that was the lasting
memory from a trip to Costa Rica from June
8-15 that included taking a plane and leav-
ing the country for the first time and playing
pick-up games with locals on the beach.
Kyl er Schri eve, Ben Lynch, Johnny
Coughlin, Laszlo Orosz, Carter Hendrick-
son and Collin McCombs all said they would
enjoy a return trip during an interview at the
Firefly in Oregon.
“Yes, I would definitely do it again,” said
several of the boys. “It would be fun.”
Different kind of game
Although the Blaze lost that first game,
the team went on to finish the trip 2-1-1 with
wins against the Manuel Antonio team – a
neighboring town to Quepos – and earning
revenge against Quepos later on. The Blaze
also tied San Jose Academy.
The first game in Quepos was advertised
throughout the town with signs and word-of-
mouth, and the stadium was packed.
But t here were many di fferences i n
The Oregon
Soccer Club
U12 Blaze team
stares out at
the ocean dur-
ing its trip to
Quepos and
Manuel Antonio
in Costa Rica,
held June 8-15.
The team played
games against
Quepos and
Manuel Antonio
teams and
brought in San
Jose Academy,
as well.
Photo submitted
Elementary
school
principals talk
about goals
SCott De LaRUeLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
With a new school year right
around the corner, Monday’s
Oregon School Board meeting
focused on annual progress and
goals at the district’s three ele-
mentary schools.
Brooklyn Elementary School
Principal Kerri Modjeski, Neth-
erwood Elementary School Prin-
cipal Dan Rikli and Prairie View
Elementary School Interim Prin-
cipal Michelle Gard talked about
“culture, character and commu-
nity” goals in the schools, and
how to improve them.
The district has 1,328 stu-
dents in three-year-old through
fourth grade programs at the
three schools. In recent years, a
variety of survey questions have
been sent out to the students,
parents and staff to help provide
data to guide changes.
Topics range from student
achievement and needs to how
well parents are informed of
their children’s’ progress. Not
surprisingly, there were both
positive and negative trends
touched on during the brief over-
view.
On the rise
Rikli said teachers at all three
schools have recently begun
“pre-assessing” learning units,
to better determine what students
know or don’t know, which has
helped in a variety of test scores.
“We can pre-load some of the
Turn to Ace/Page 11
Turn to Costa Rica/Page 10 Turn to OSB/Page 11
2
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Community Cooperation
Residents band together to rebuild Hillcrest Park
SCott De LaRUeLLe
Unifed Newspaper Group
There’s nothing to bring
a community together like
rebuilding a park.
That ’s what resi dent s
around Hillcrest Park in the
Town of Oregon found out
last week as they banded
together to purchase and
relocate some much-needed
playground equipment.
Organizer Lora Warner,
who moved to the area with
her family around seven
years ago, had been look-
ing for ways to improve the
park for several months.
She got the go-ahead from
the parks chairman, Steve
Root, to do some fact-find-
ing, and when neighbor
Paty Wooldridge found out
about playground equip-
ment up for sale at a day
care in Waterloo, they knew
it was a perfect match.
Warner told Root about
the equipment, got togeth-
er a proposal for the parks
commission, which was
approved that night, and
then the following night,
the town board approved
pur chasi ng $22, 000 of
playground equipment for
$5,000.
“The whole project went
really fast,” Warner said.
“Josh and I kind of hit the
ground running and got it all
together.”
A group of area volun-
teers got together to spend a
day removing the equipment
and installing it at Hillcrest,
including Jerod Wooldridge,
Josh Nordstrom, Caroline
Templeton, Shane Dammen,
Josh Weiss, Mark and Lora
Werner and Lindy Clark and
we got the existing park out
of the ground.
The volunteers soon found
many neighborhood children
willing and able to help out
as well, including Tallyn and
Brayden Werner, Teagan and
Gracie Gilbertson, Daniel
and Mitchel Compton, Gray-
son and Griffin Nordstrom,
Sam and Maggie Temple-
ton, Sidney Schilling, Hans
Weiss and Diego and Gabri-
ella Wooldridge.
“They brought their work
boots and work belts and
were helping to hammer
and stake things into to the
ground,” Warner said. “It
was so wonderful to watch
the kids helping with the
park. They got a ton of work
done.”
New local hangout
Warner said the park was
in need of some remodeling,
with only a slide and some
swings there for kids to
play on.
“It hasn’t really been a
park that kids would want
to play in, because so much
of the equipment was run-
down, and 20 or 30 years
old,” she said. “It was real-
ly gray over there.”
When organizers found
out the day care in Water-
l oo was rel ocat i ng and
didn’t want to dig up and
reinstall their playground
equi pment , t he perfect
solution was found, at a
very reasonable cost to the
town. Now it’s time for
local families to continue to
bond while they enjoy their
“new” park. Work is sched-
uled for completion Aug.
19-20 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
“It’s amazing how our
little community has grown
with this project,” Warner
said. “The cool thing about
this is with the kids help-
ing, 20 years from now they
can say, ‘I helped build that
park,’ and that’s the neat-
est thing. They were all out
there, hammering nails, and
were able to help with that,
and now they have a sense
of pride with that park.
Photos submitted
The neighborhood helps out with the park rebuild. Left to right is, Maggie Templeton, Sam Templeton,
Caroline Templeton, Josh Nordstrom, Mitchell Compton, Teagan Gilbertson, Daniel Compton, Brayden
Werner, Andy Schilling.
Tallyn Werner and Josh Nordstrom work together.
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Board adopts new
contract for senior center
BILL LIvICk
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Village of Oregon
wi l l be payi ng sl i ght l y
more under a new three-
year contract for funding
the Oregon Area Senior
Cent er t hat t he Vi l l age
Board adopted last week.
The contract had previ-
ously been approved by
three other municipalities
that use the center.
Represent at i ves from
the towns of Oregon and
Rutland and the Village
of Brooklyn were part of a
working group, along with
members of the Oregon
Village Board, that has
met several times in the
past year to forge a new
funding formula.
Key elements of the new
contract had been agreed
to by the various parties.
But a new budget cap pro-
posal had been a sticking
point.
The Or egon Vi l l age
Board had want ed a 10
percent cap on how much
the center’s budget could
increase from the previ-
ous year before obtaining
the consent of the other
municipalities. The Vil-
lage of Brooklyn and the
Town of Rutland sought to
limit the increase to 5 per-
cent.
The wor ki ng gr oup
agreed to a compromise of
7 percent, which the Vil-
lage Board accepted Mon-
day.
The Village of Oregon
owns and oper at es t he
senior center and essential-
ly leases the space and ser-
vices to the other munici-
palities.
The agreement includes
a new cos t al l ocat i on
method that incorporates
elements of the existing
budgeting process along
wi t h new appr oaches .
Cost s for operat i ng t he
senior center will be allo-
cat ed i n t hree di fferent
ways: fixed costs based on
population, case manage-
ment based on time spent
on cases, and outreach and
other programs and servic-
es based on usage tracked
by a new software pro-
gram, My Senior Center.
Fi xed cost s, such as
those involved with oper-
ating and maintaining the
senior center and Village
of Oregon administrative
staff hours used in the cen-
ter’s budgeting and per-
sonnel issues, will contin-
ue to be allocated on a per
capita basis. Costs for case
management, the center’s
most expensive service,
wi l l be al l ocat ed based
on t he pri or t hree-year
average amount of time
spent in each community.
Ot her program cost s,
such as outreach and infor-
mation and assistance, will
be tracked by the new soft-
ware system. Allocations
will be based on the aver-
age number of “units” the
software shows the center
was used by residents of
each municipality.
If, for example, previ-
ous years resulted in the
center being used 50 per-
cent by Village of Oregon
residents, 15 percent by
Village of Brooklyn resi-
dents, 15 percent by Town
of Rutland residents and
20 percent by Town of
Oregon residents, then out-
reach and other program
costs would be allocated
accordingly, 50/15/15/20,
for the next year.
The change in the fund-
i ng a r r a nge me nt wa s
prompted after the Town
of Dunn pulled out of the
previous contract last year.
The original contract had
been in effect since about
1995, Senior Center direc-
tor Alison Koelsch said,
and was based solely on
population.
“Ironically, this is prob-
abl y how t he Town of
Dunn wanted it all along,”
Koelsch said. “I’m just
thankful the Town of Dunn
is still contributing.”
Seni or s i n Dunn ar e
no longer receiving case
ma na ge me nt s e r vi c e s
from the senior center but
continue to use other ser-
vices. While town offi -
cials decided to abrogate
the contract with the cen-
ter because they felt they
were paying a dispropor-
tionate share, they plan to
continue making an annual
payment to the center. Last
year the town paid the Vil-
lage of Oregon $15,000 for
using the center.
“The other municipali-
ties wanted their alloca-
tions a little more specific
than just (based on) popu-
l at i on, ” she sai d. “You
have to work with them
because that’s our funding
source. They liked the idea
that they’re not paying for
something that they’re not
using.”
The Village of Oregon
is going to have to pay a
little more under the new
proposal , Koel sch sai d,
“but it only makes sense.
The majority of the peo-
ple are from the village
and the majority of people
usi ng case management
are from the village, so
naturally they’re going to
have a bigger payment, but
we also have a bigger pop-
ulation to pull from.”
Village of Oregon
Homeowner ‘frustrated’ by
flooding, village response
BILL LIvICk
Unifed Newspaper Group
Members of a family that
owns approximately 16 acres
on the village’s west side are
asking village officials to
negotiate a land purchase and
“do the right thing” to help
alleviate flooding of proper-
ties along Jefferson Street.
Joe DiMaggio and his sis-
ter, Jean Trainor, contend
that the village has developed
and approved development
in something called the Bad-
fish Drainage District First
Addition without obtaining
required permits.
Village officials said they
were not aware that the
Drainage District even exist-
ed, and say that any develop-
ment was approved by the
Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources and Dane
County.
At last week’s Village
Board meeting, DiMaggio
showed a video of flood-
ing on the family’s property
at 455 Jefferson St. that was
taken June 23 after storm that
dropped an inch-and-a-half
of rain.
DiMaggio filmed his fam-
ily’s backyard, which is
crossed by the Oregon branch
of the Badfish Creek. The
video shows extensive flood-
ing of the area.
About 14 acres of the
DiMaggios’ property is north
of the creek in an area that’s
bordered on three sides by
village-owned land.
DiMaggio charged the
village is responsible for
flooding that has gotten
worse over the course of the
past decade, and that the vil-
lage has been unresponsive
to his requests for action to
resolve the problem.
Trainor said the family
hopes the village will buy the
property and use it to contain
stormwater runoff. She said
that would not only benefit
the family but also help other
west-side properties that are
experiencing flooding and
wet basements.
After last week’s meet-
ing, village administrator
Mike Gracz said he would
“do some research on this
drainage district issue” and
get back to the family with a
response.
Gracz is on vacation and
could not be reached for
comment this week.
DiMaggio told the Observ-
er he is extremely frustrated
about the situation.
“All we’ve ever asked
them to do is sit down and
negotiate fairly with us,” he
said. “We’re asking for them
to have some moral compass
about themselves. Our prop-
erty’s been damaged.”
The family has brought the
flooding issue to the village’s
attention several times in the
past but has not been able to
achieve a resolution.
DiMaggio said he expects
the Village Board to take
up the matter at its Aug. 19
meeting.
Photo by Victoria Vlisides
Above is an example of flooding. A yard off of Fish Hatchery
Road was flooded a day after heavy rainfall a month and a half
ago.
Police rePorts
Information taken from the
Oregon Police Department log
book. Oregon residents unless
otherwise noted.
July 24
5 p.m. A man reported that
he was threatened by phone
by another resident for mak-
ing disparaging remarks
about the alleged caller at a
public meeting earlier in the
week. No charges.
July 25
8:01 a.m. A 17-year-old
Brooklyn woman was taken
to a Madison hospital after
she swerved her vehicle near
Park Street and South Perry
Parkway to avoid a rabbit
and crashed the vehicle into
a tree. She was cited for fail-
ing to maintain control of her
vehicle.
11:39 p.m. A 47-year-
old woman who allegedly
punched a man in the face in
their apartment on the 200
block of Walnut Street was
cited for disorderly conduct
and battery.
July 27
3:03 p.m. Police were
called to a burglary on the
200 block of Lynne Trail after
an acquaintance of the home-
owner found a suspect rum-
maging through the home’s
basement. The suspect fled
on foot before police arrived.
Police called for a police-
dog unit from Stoughton and
set up a perimeter but soon
called off the search when
they were able to identify a
possible suspect stemming
from a previous incident.
The suspect, a 25-year-old
man from Evansville, was
arrested later that day on ten-
tative burglary charges. He
was charged Aug. 1 in Dane
County Circuit Court with
misdemeanor counts of tres-
passing and theft, according
to online court records.
Aug. 2
3:30 a.m. A 26-year-old
woman was arrested after she
allegedly pulled a roommate
out of her car using a “choke
hold.” The suspect pleaded no
contest Aug. 8 in Dane County
Circuit Court to a single count
of disorderly conduct, online
court records show.
Aug. 3
2:35 a.m. Police respond-
ed to an apartment on the
200 block of Walnut Street,
where a woman alleged that
a 20-year-old man allegedly
preventing her from going
inside, chased her, threw her
to ground by the neck and
held her down while choking
and hitting her. The suspect
is still at large.
Aug. 7
9 a.m. A woman reported
that someone broke into her
husband’s truck in a parking
lot on the 100 block of Wolfe
Street and stole tools and a
camera. No suspects.
Aug. 9
1:18 p.m. A 31-year-old
man was arrested on tenta-
tive charges of battery and
strangulation after police
responded to reports of a
woman screaming on the 200
block of Walnut Street. The
man was accused of punch-
ing a female victim in the face
and squeezing his arm around
her neck.
–Seth Jovaag
4
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Thursday, August 15, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 6
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
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T
wice in a little over a
week I have been arrested
at the state Capitol for
singing “without a permit.”
Actually the first citation said
simply, “no permit,” while the
second citation described the
violation as “unlawful assembly
without authorization.”
The crack-
down by the
Capitol Police
on participants
at the Capi-
tol, who have
joined in the
Solidarity
Singers Sing-
Along, seems
to have ener-
gized the resis-
tance to Gov. Scott Walker and
the Republican-led state Legis-
lature that have pushed through
budget cuts and policies that
are widely viewed as attacks
on public employees, teachers,
elderly and the poor.
At the heart of the battle these
days, however, is the fundamen-
tal question of free speech and
the right of peaceable assembly.
The Wisconsin Constitution
is remarkably unambiguous on
this point.
SECTION 3. Every person
may freely speak, write and
publish his sentiments on all
subjects, being responsible for
the abuse of that right, and no
laws shall be passed to restrain
or abridge the liberty of speech
or of the press.
SECTION 4. The right of the
people peaceably to assemble,
to consult for the common good,
and to petition the government,
or any department thereof, shall
never be abridged. (emphasis
added on the last four words)
The Capitol Police are
charged with the dubious task
of enforcing an “emergency
administrative rule” that is
unlikely to hold up under even a
cursory scrutiny in the courts.
After my first arrest, on July
30, I was taken to the basement
cafeteria in the Capitol, where
a couple of dozen of us were
frisked and then sat handcuffed
with our hands behind our
backs for over an hour while
we waited to be issued our cita-
tions. It was, quite frankly, very
uncomfortable, but to pass the
time we continued singing, and
the acoustics in the basement
of the Capitol were amazing.
It wasn’t exactly the Mormon
Tabernacle Choir but the sound
was fabulous.
Shortly after I got home I got
a call from my son, Jim, who
had seen a photo of my arrest at
the Capitol on Facebook. I sus-
pect my children may have been
wondering “Dad, what took you
so long?”
I couldn’t help but think of
my brother, Gene, who is now
a family-practice doctor in
Portland, Ore. In 1961, he had
spent 40 days in the maximum-
security unit of the state peni-
tentiary in Parchman, Miss., as
a “freedom rider,” arrested for
“disturbing the peace” by walk-
ing into the “colored” waiting
room in a segregated bus station
in Jackson, Miss.
The state and the issues are
different, but the struggle is
still the same, to preserve and
protect the Constitution and the
rights that so many Americans
have fought and died for. Ironi-
cally, a number of veterans who
were in Madison for a “Vets for
Peace” convention and chose to
join the Sing-Along were also
arrested and taken to jail.
Some have questioned why
the Sign-Along participants
don’t just apply for a permit.
The bottom line is that there is a
fundamental principle at stake.
Speech that must be pur-
chased is not free, and the ero-
sion of our rights under the
guise of overly broad and ill-
defined “emergency rules” is
something that must be resisted.
This situation reminds me
of a quote (often erroneously
attributed to Thomas Jefferson
but well-used by statesmen in
the 19th century): “Eternal vigi-
lance is the price of liberty.” It
appears that we are once again
being asked to pay that price.
After receiving my citation, I
asked if I might have the single
sheet of paper on which I had
printed Sections 3 and 4 of the
Wisconsin Constitution. It had
been confiscated when I was
arrested.
I was told it was being held
as “evidence.” I thought, how
appropriate and how ironic.
Charles Uphoff is a City of
Fitchburg resident.
Have you ever been
to jail for justice?
Uphoff
Community Voices
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take
submissions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff
reserves the right not to print any letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take priority over submissions from recent-
ly printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions on our editorial policy, call editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or email ungeditor@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
Oregon native in National
American Miss competition
Jessi ca Lorenz, an Oregon
native, has been selected as state
finalist in the National Miss
America Pageant, to be held
Aug. 24-25 at the Chula Vista
Resort in Wisconsin Dells.
The National American Miss
pageants are held for girls ages
4-18, and have five different
age divisions. Jessica will be
participating in the Preteen age
division, along with other out-
standing ladies from across Wis-
consin.
Lorenz’s act i vi t i es i ncl ude
participating in school as a stu-
dent council member, singing
in the choir and playing the alto
saxophone. Outside of school
she is an avid soccer player and
karate student. She also enjoys
camping, horseback riding and
spending time with her friends
and family.
Jessi ca’s sponsors i ncl ude
Dai ry Queen on
Mi n e r a l Po i n t
R d . , D r e a m
Cl oset s, Kar at e
America in Ore-
gon, Associ at ed
Machinery Sales,
Unwi nd Ther a-
peut i c Massage,
Wi cked Mai nt e-
nance Sol ut i ons
and various family and friends.
The wi nner of t he pageant
will receive $1,000 dollar cash
reward, the official crown and
banner, a bouquet of roses and
air transportation to compete in
the national pageant in Califor-
nia where she will receive an
exciting complimentary tour of
Hollywood and two V.I.P. tick-
ets to Disneyland.
Lorenz
Fitchburg police make burglary arrest
KImBERly WEThAl
Observer correspondent
Fitchburg police arrested a man
who allegedly was responsible
for many thefts and burglaries in
the neighborhoods of north McKee
Road, according to a news release
from the department.
The police department is still
keeping tabs on additional reports
of thefts in the area for investigative
purposes since the arrest. The depart-
ment is not releasing the suspect’s
name to avoid jeopardizing their
ongoing investigation.
The thefts and burglaries were
committed during late night and
morning hours and homes and vehi-
cles that were unlocked were the first
to be targeted, Fitchburg police offi-
cer Jay Wilson said in the release.
Lieutenant Todd Stetzer said that
police had linked the burglaries to
a single suspect and made the arrest
on July 25. The suspect is currently
being held in the Dane County Jail.
Community members still are
urged to lock their homes and vehi-
cles at night and when they are away,
double-check that garage doors are
closed up and to leave a porch light
on to help fend off possible burglar-
ies. Community members are also
encouraged to report any suspicious
behavior to the police immediately
and are advised not to wait on giving
over viable information.
“Often when investigating a series
of events, citizens have observed
suspicious behavior by the suspects,
however, (they) did not report the
activity at the time it was taking
place,” Stetzer said.
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Mindy Quinn of Janesville and Mike & Linda Quinn of Milton, are
pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Megan Lyn, to
Andrew Jacob Aschenbrenner, son of Tom and Dawn Aschenbrenner
of Oregon.
Megan is a 2005 graduate of Milton High School, 2012 graduate of
St Anthony’s School of Nursing. She is currently working in SICU in
Milwaukee, WI.
Andrew is a 2005 graduate of Oregon High School, a 2010 graduate
of UW-Milwaukee. He is currently a Structural Engineer in Milwaukee,
WI.
The couple’s wedding will be at Holy Mother of Consolation Church,
Oregon, WI on September 7, 2013
The couple will reside in New Berlin, WI.
Aschenbrenner
Quinn
ENGAGEMENT
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Old Stage is known for our consistently excellent sweet corn, melons and tomatoes. Try our home
grown green beans, zucchini, cucumbers as well as Tennessee tomatoes. Indiana water and musk
melon. South Carolina (Big Smile) peaches and sweet Michigan blueberries. Our Yellow Doll
Watermelons are ready. Our Muskmelons are ready and they are awesome! Our tomatoes are looking
great and starting to come in, but the best thing we have is our sweet corn. It’s absolutely delicious!!
Thanks for supporting local agriculture!
Special Orders Welcome!
“From our gardens to your table”
Old Stage Vegetable Gardens
Oregon - Stop-N-Go (corner of Janesville & Hwy. M)
Fitchburg - PDQ (McKee Rd. next to AMC Star Cinema)
Fitchburg - Liquor Town Parking Lot
(5273 Williamsburg Way, just off Verona Rd.)
New Glarus - (Hwy. 69) Chalet Landhaus parking lot
Monroe - Red Apple Restaurant
Monona - Lacali’s Market & Spirits (Monona Dr.,
1 block off Broadway, 2 blocks off Beltline)
Madison - Corner Sherman Ave. & Commercial Ave.
(in front of Noah’s Art Pets)
1002 S. Whitney Way (Entrance to Vitense Golfland)
Open 7 Days a Week
Approximate Hours: 10:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
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Skaalen Auxiliary Ice Cream Social
Sunday, August 18
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Home- Baked Pie, Schoep’s Ice Cream
& Beverage ~ $3.00 per person
Matching Funds provided by Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans - East Dane County Chapter
Entertainment in the Skaalen Chapel
Skaalen Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
400 N. Morris St. • Stoughton, WI 53589
873-5651 • www.skaalen.com
‘Oregon in Motion’ features community walk
SETh JOvAAg
Unifed Newspaper Group
Before the Oregon High School
varsity football team’s home opener
against Baraboo on Friday, Aug. 23,
area residents will have a chance to
get fit together.
The newly-formed Oregon Area
Wellness Coalition is hosting a com-
munity walk around the track inside
Panther Stadium at 5 p.m.
Dubbed “Oregon in Motion,” the
event marks the first community-wide
event for the new coalition that’s
modeled after a similar group found-
ed several years ago in Stoughton.
“Everyone is invited to come and
walk the track,” said Amy Miller,
director of the Oregon School Dis-
trict’s community education program
and a member of the coalition that
formed in May.
Walkers can check in starting at
4:30 p.m. After the walk concludes at
6 p.m., festivities will move near the
OHS field house, where kid-friendly
activities like face-painting and bean-
bag toss games will be offered and
concessions from the Oregon Ath-
letic Boosters will
be available. Kids
should be accompanied by adults.
The coalition’s goal is to improve
health and wellness in the communi-
ty. Earlier this summer, it led a bike
safety drive that included yard signs
encouraging riders to wear helmets,
and local police and fire/EMS work-
ers doled out small prizes when they
encountered cyclists wearing helmets,
Miller said.
The group meets monthly and
comprises representatives from local
churches, schools, law enforcement
and emergency services agencies, the
Village of Oregon, the Oregon Senior
Center, the Oregon Area Chamber of
Commerce and Stoughton Hospital,
as well as other community members,
Miller said.
For more information about the
walk or the coalition, contact Miller
at alm@oregonsd.net.
If you go
What: the first “Oregon in Motion”
event, organized by the recently-
formed Oregon Area Wellness
Coalition
When: 5-7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 23
Where: A walk on the OHS Panther
Stadium track runs from 5-6 p.m.;
activities and food follow from 6-7
p.m. near the OHS field house
How much: Free
After School Clubs golf
outing registration open
Ear l y r egi st r at i on i s
underway for a golf out-
ing hosted by After School
Clubs, Inc. that will raise
funds to help area low-
income families keep using
the nonprofit organization’s
services.
The first annual “Tee it
up” event will be held Sat-
urday, Sept. 28, at Foxboro
Golf Club, 1020 County
Hwy. MM.
Registration is $260 for
groups of four golfers, $65
for individual golfers or
$10 for lunch only. Hole
sponsorships are also avail-
able for $100.
Earl y regi st rat i on for
foursomes are due Aug. 27
and are $240. All registra-
tions are due Sept. 18.
Proceeds will fund the
J une Venden s chol ar -
ship, named for a beloved
ASC staffer who died in a
car accident in 1997. The
scholarship helps cover
tuition for low-income fam-
ilies who want to sign up
for ASC’s programs, which
run before and after school
and during the summer.
The club annually gives
about $20,000 in tuition
reimbursements to local
families in need, organizers
have said.
For more information,
contact Lisa Gits at 835-
9808 or l i sagi t s@aft er-
schoolclubs.org.
Photo submitted
Wii did it!
Oregon Senior Center is involved with a Wii Bowling League among area Senior Centers.
Last Thursday, the team became the champions of the summer league. They won three games out of five against Stoughton in the cham-
pionship round.
This is the first time Oregon has won the trophy in the four years since they have been playing in the Wii Bowling League.
Pictured are bowlers (from left to right) Mahlon and Peggy Hallmark, and Bonnie and Skip Bohse.
Observer makes buying photos easier
The Oregon Observer
now sells photos on smug-
mug.com that will be mailed
directly to you.
You can go to ConnecOre-
gonWi.com and click on
photo galleries on the top
bar. There are also links
under the photo galleries tab
that link directly to commu-
nity and sports photos.
Once on smugmug, you
can click on a gallery and
click the buy button on the
photo or on the tab above it.
There, you will have a
choice of a 4x6, 5x7 or
8x10. A 4x6 is 4.95 plus
taxes. A 5x7 is 6.95 plus
taxes and an 8x10 is 9.95
plus taxes.
Questions? Email Antho-
ny Iozzo at sportsreporter@
wcinet.com.
6
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
LUTHERAN CHURCH
PO Box 233, Oregon, 53575
(608) 286-3121
offce@communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry
Parkway, Oregon
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger
Associate Pastor Twink Jan-
McMahon
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
9:30 am Worship service at the
Oregon High School PAC
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
• Relationship & Divorce
Support Group. State
Bank of Cross Plains.
Every other Monday
night at 6:30 p.m.
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Thursday, Aug. 15
• 7:30-10:30 a.m., Oregon Rotary STEM talk, State
Bank of Cross Plains, 835-4002
Friday, Aug. 16
• 1 p.m., Nelson brother’s train presentation, Oregon
Senior Center, 835-5801
Saturday, Aug. 17
• 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Lions school supply drive,
Walgreens, lions-serve.org
Monday, Aug. 19
• Noon, Market Day orders due, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-8501
• 6 p.m. Village board meeting, Oregon Village Hall
Tuesday, Aug. 20
• 11:30 a.m., Silver Threads, Oregon Senior Center,
835-5801
• 6:30 p.m., Town of Oregon planning commission,
Town Hall
• 7 p.m., Sounds of Summer concert, Triangle Park
Thursday, Aug. 22
•1-3 p.m., Mystery bag crafts, Oregon Public Library
Friday, Aug. 23
• 9:30 a.m., Healthy breakfast talk, Oregon Senior
Center
• 11 a.m., Piano and chimes recital, Oregon Senior
Center
• 4:30 p.m., Oregon in Motion walk, Oregon High
School Stadium
Monday, Aug. 26
• 1 p.m., Women’s Equality Day meeting, Oregon
Senior Center
• 2-6 p.m., Blood drive, Gorman and Co., 200 N. Main
Street
• 5 p.m. Village personnel meeting, Oregon Village
Hall
• 6:30 p.m., Village of Brooklyn planning and zoning,
Village Hall
Community calendar
Thursday, Aug. 15
Movie: “The Apartment”
(1960)
Friday, Aug. 16
Oregon Chamber of
Commerce Meeting (Aug. 15)
Saturday, Aug. 17
“Universal Sound” Band @
Summer Concert-in-the-Park
(of Aug. 13)
Sunday, Aug. 18
Worship Service: People’s
United Methodist Church
Monday, Aug. 19
6 pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
Board Meeting
Tuesday, Aug. 20
“Trains” Program @ Oregon
Senior Center (of Aug. 16)
Wednesday, Aug. 21
“Karen Wickham” @ Oregon
Senior Center (Aug. 20)
Thursday, Aug. 22
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Aug. 19)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, Aug. 19
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:00 Rubber Stamping
9:00 Caregivers Support
12:00 Market Day Due
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
4:00 T.O.P.S. Weight Loss
Tuesday, Aug. 20
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
11:30 Silver Threads
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
Wednesday, Aug. 21
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Full COA Meeting
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 Euchre
4:00 Exploring an eReader
Thursday, Aug. 22
AM—Chair Massage
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
2:00 Trivial Pursuit
5:00 Market Day Pickup

Friday, Aug. 23
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Nutrition Program
9:30 Blood Pressure
11:00 Piano & Chimes
1:00 Movie
Monday, Aug. 19
Three Cheese Lasagna,
California Mix, Fruit Cup,
Multi Grain Bread, Marg.
Tuesday, Aug. 20
Roast Pork w/Gravy,
Mashed Potatoes, Harvard
Beets, Strawberry Shortcake
w/ Topping, W.W. Bread
VO-Veggie Lasagna
Wednesday, Aug. 21
Chicken Cacciatore, Egg
Noodles, Sugar Snap Peas,
Diced Peaches, Multi Grain
Bread, Cookie
VO-Soy Meat Sauce
Thursday, Aug. 22
BBQ Shredded Beef on
W.W. Bun, Macaroni Salad,
Carrot Coins, Pears, Ice
Cream Cup
VO-Soy Sloppy Joe
SO– Taco Salad
Friday, Aug. 23
Brats on Soft Bun, Potato
Salad, Coleslaw, Fresh
Melon Mix
V.O. Veggie Dog
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, Aug. 15
1-Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Aug. 12) 2-Special
School Board Meeting (of Aug.
13)
Friday, Aug. 16
“Blue Vinyl”
Saturday, Aug. 17
Oregon Kids Triathlon Hilites
(of Aug. 10)
Sunday, Aug. 18
“Digital Dump”
Monday, Aug. 19
“A River of Waste”
Tuesday, Aug. 20
“Exporting Harm: High-Tech
Trashing of Asia”
Wednesday, Aug. 21
“The Story of Stuff”
Thursday, Aug. 22
OHS Boys Varsity Soccer vs
Alumni (of Aug. 20)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings Senior center
Pope Francis
In his first official meeting with journalists, the new pope gave
some insight into why he chose the name Francis. After the two-
thirds vote was reached, a fellow cardinal from Brazil, Claudio
Hummes, embraced him and said to him “Don’t forget about the
poor.” This stuck with him, he said, and immediately made him
think of St. Francis, who was devoted to the poor, renouncing his
father’s considerable wealth as a young man and living essen-
tially as a poor beggar. St. Francis was known as “Il Poverello,”
the little poor man. Pope Francis went on to say that as the vote-
counting continued he thought about war, and St. Francis’s devo-
tion to peace. The first line of the prayer of St. Francis says “Lord,
make me an instrument of thy peace.” And finally, St. Francis
was enamored of nature and saw God’s hand in all of physical
creation. Pope Francis summarized his choice of names by say-
ing “Francis of Assisi…the man of poverty, the man of peace, the
man who loves and guards creation.” This was a good choice of
names, and inspiring ideals for the man leading the world’s larg-
est Christian denomination.
– Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
“Defend the weak and the fatherless; uphold the cause of the
poor and the oppressed. Rescue the weak and the needy; deliver
them from the hand of the wicked.”
Psalm 82: 3-4
Train presentation
Join Mark and Mike Nelson at 1
p.m. Friday, Aug. 16, at the Oregon
Senior Center, as they discuss their
extensive experiences with trains in
Wisconsin and throughout the United
States.
Their father was a conductor who
gave his sons many opportunities to
enjoy train travel.
They show slides of different trains,
display memorabilia and share their
love of trains.
School supply collection
The Oregon/Brooklyn Lions will
be participating in a statewide proj-
ect with the Lions of Wisconsin in
collecting school supplies for those
who cannot otherwise afford them.
The event will take place at Wal-
greens (704 N. Main St.) from 9-5
p.m., Saturday, Aug. 17. The group is
accepting donations. For more infor-
mation about the project, visit lions-
serve.org.
Market day
The order deadline is for Market
Day is Monday, Aug. 19, at noon
unless you’re ordering online; then
the deadline is 11 p.m. The pick-
up date is Thursday, Aug. 22, at the
Senior Center between 5-6 p.m. We
must have at least $500 in sales in
order for this month’s fundraiser to
take place.
Sounds of summer
“Dimensions in Sound” will be per-
forming from 7-8 p.m. in Waterman
Park on Tuesday, Aug. 20. Food and
beverages will be available from 6-8
p.m., including items from Pizza Pit.
Silver Threads
Seniors can socialize with friends,
neighbors and other seniors and enjoy
entertainment by Karen Wickham at
the Silver Threads among the Gold
club.
The group meets the every third
Tuesday from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. for
a potluck, socializing and entertain-
ment. Entertainment begins at 1 p.m.
The next gathering will be Tuesday,
Aug. 20, at the Oregon Senior Center.
New members are always welcome.
Dues are $10 per person or $15 for a
couple.
Guests should bring their own place
setting and a dish to pass for the pot-
luck or a monetary donation.
Unbag a mystery
The Oregon Area Public Library
will feature “Mystery Bag Crafts”
from 1-3:30 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 22,
where kids will make a project using
only what is in the “mystery bag.”
We’ve recently launched the option to
renew your newspaper subscription
electronically with our secure site at:
connectoregonwi.com
Easily
renew your
subscription
online!
Want to get your community event or calendar item in the Observer?
Send an email with the information to:

ungcalendar@wcinet.com
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
Thank you,
Sun Prairie FFA
Alumni, for buying
my pig at the
Dane County Fair.
Frannie Ruth
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Louie Fahey
for purchasing my steer at
the 2013 Dane County
Meat Animal Sale
Austin Kramer
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National Night
Out 2013
The annual “National Night Out”
was a big hit last Tuesday in its
18th incarnation in Oregon. The
event, which began in 1984 as an
effort to promote community crime
prevention, has since expanded to
include more than 15,000 commu-
nities across the U.S. and Canada.
The 100 block of Spring Street
was closed off beginning at 5 p.m.,
and many families took advantage
of the picture-perfect summer
evening to take in everything from
karate demonstrations and tours
of Fire Department, EMS and
police vehicles to a showing of
“Madagascar 3.” And there was
plenty of free food on hand, with
kids eagerly chowing down on
ice cream, hot dogs, popcorn and
snow cones.
Photos by Scott De Laruelle
Susan Kosharek of Oregon took it easy with sons Tiernan, 1, and Duncan, 4, who enjoyed some ice cream treats.
Buy photos
Go to www.ungphotos.smug mug.com to purchase
photos from your favorite Oregon Observer galleries,
including this one.
If you ever see a photo that isn’t on the website, email
Anthony Iozzo at sportsreporter@wcinet.com.
Alexa Hearn, 4, of Oregon is all smiles as she sits atop a police motorcycle – a definite favorite with boys and girls alike.
Jack Dewbre, 3, of Oregon got a great view of the festivities
perched on the shoulders of his dad, Les.
Grant Carr, 5, of Oregon, was incognito in his drawn-on
glasses and moustache.
8
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Inventory Reduction Sale
50% OFF
Discontinued and Select Varieties
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4062 County Road A
(608) 873-8329
Stoughton, WI 53589
Open 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m., Monday through Friday
9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m., Saturday
www.thefowerfactorynursery.com
100’s of Varieties to Choose From
Including Rock Garden, Water Plants, Hostas,
Daylilies, Ornamental Grasses and
Native, Sun and Shade Perennials.
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Annual show expected to draw more than 100 artists
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
The work of more than 100 Wisconsin art-
ists – including five from Oregon – will be
showcased in the fifth annual Fitchburg Agora
Art Fair Saturday.
The juried fair is set amid the impressive
architecture of the Agora complex and the nat-
ural prairie landscape of southern Wisconsin.
It will feature local and regional artists from
every medium: painting, ceramics, jewelry,
photography, glass, metals, woodwork, mixed
media, fiber and sculpture.
There will be plenty of other activities,
including live music on two stages, a Capital
Brewery beer and wine garden, a children’s
art yard, local food and beverages, retailer spe-
cials, and a flower show.
Oregon fiber artist Connie Thompson is
returning for a second appearance at the fair.
Last year she received an award for her work,
and she is excited about the possibilities again
this year.
“It was well attended last year and run abso-
lutely beautifully from the artist’s point of
view,” she said.
“It was very attractive for people to come to,
with the beer gardens and the children’s activi-
ties. It’s beautiful location and is laid out really
well.”
In addition to Thompson, Oregon artists
David Miess, Mitch Sigmund, Jann Kalscheur
and Julie Walser will participate in this year’s
event.
Thompson specializes in fiber art, specifi-
cally soft sculpture and landscape quilts. She
makes art dolls, which are not play things but
actual sculptures, she said.
“It’s all made out of fabric and stuffed with
poly fill, so I can shape facial features and
fingers and joints,” Thompson explained. “I
design my own costuming and I work directly
from fabric.”
Thompson said she works primarily with
cottons – batiks are her favorite.
She also makes costumes and recycles cloth-
ing fabrics.
“I’ve gotten some beautiful things at resale
shops that are from India or Africa,” she said.
“I can use those fabrics over again.”
Walser is a jewelry maker who uses “an
eclectic variety of techniques,” she said. “I
also do some enameling and some fused glass
work.”
She will return to the Agora Fair for a third
time Saturday and is looking forward to the
experience.
“The Agora is a very nice show with a lot
of great artists and a really nice set up with the
food and music and really great people that run
it,” she said.
Walser likes going to flea markets and
antique stores in search of unusual and inter-
esting things to use in her work.
“I like to do a variety of things,” she said. “I
think probably like a lot of artists, I’m a little
ADD and so I keep trying different techniques.
I try to do things that not everybody else does.”
Along with the art, fair organizers have lined
up live music for the entire day. The Capital
Brewery Beer Garden will be set up next to the
Capital Stage.
The event is free to attend and open to the
public, and will take place rain or shine. Plen-
ty of free parking will be available with free
shuttles running throughout the day from the
surrounding parking areas.
The Agora is located two miles south of
Highway 12/18 (the beltline) off Fish Hatchery
Road.
Photos submitted
The Agora Art Fair features five Oregon artists including work from Connie Thompson (top right) and
Julie Walser (top left and below). David Miess, Mitch Sigmund, Jann Kalscheur will also be featured.
If you go
What: Agora Art Fair, featuring the work
of more than 100 Wisconsin artists
When: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug.
17
Where: Agora Fitchburg, 5500 East
Cheryl Parkway, Fitchburg
Cost: Free admission
More info: www.agoraartfair.com and on
Facebook
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, August 15, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Photo submitted
Oregon 18U softball team reaches finals

Local Oregon-area girls were part of the Jaguars softball team that won the 18U championship Aug. 2-4 in Adams. Oregon’s Hailey Morey
and Verona’s Shannon Whitmus provided pitching and catcher Dani Moore threw out base runners throughout the weekend.
MLB teammate for a day
Netherwood Knoll student wins contest to be a batboy for the Chicago Cubs
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
When Net her wood Knol l
fourt h grader Et han Johnson
heard he had won a contest to
be an honorary batboy for the
MLB’s Chicago Cubs, he was
surprised and excited.
Johnson, with the help of his
grandparents who live in Ore-
gon, Ill., filled out a form to be
able to walk onto Wrigley Field
and sit in the dugout.
Later, he was looking at family
vacation photos from Colorado
when the notification came that
he was the winner and would go
to the July 14 game against the
St. Louis Cardinals.
At Wrigley Field, he was able
to sit in the dugout at the start of
the game, had his name flash on
the scoreboard and announced
on the PA and was able to get
autographs of all the Cubs play-
ers, including Starlin Castro and
Anthony Rizzo.
“It felt like I was one of the
players, because I got to sit in
the dugout and got a ball signed
by the regular position people,”
Johnson said.
Little league lessons
Johnson plays little league in
Oregon and is a big baseball fan,
and the experience of meeting
players and watching them play
also brought him lessons.
But the lessons were not the
approach at the plate or how to
field or a new pitch. The lesson
was being able to stand strong
after a hit by pitch.
“I learned if you get hit by
the ball, you just walk it off and
go to first base,” Johnson said.
“And the next time you get up to
bat, you shouldn’t be scared or
anything.”
Conflicted fan
Johnson is a Milwaukee Brew-
ers fan, but he is also a Chicago
Cubs fan because he visits his
grandparents in Illinois, who are
all Cubs fans.
But on this day, he was just
like any other Chicago fan root-
ing for the Cubs against the Car-
dinals.
“It was t ough because t he
Cardinals got a run in the first
inning, and I was like, ‘Oh no,
now the Cubs are never going to
win,’” Johnson said.
But the Cubs did give some
excitement to Johnson and the
fans by tying the game later on
a couple of home runs, despite
finally losing 10-6.
The conflict of being a Brew-
ers and a Cubs fan goes a lot
deeper t han j ust t hi s game
though.
Whenever the two teams play
each other, Johnson has a whole
new problem as a fan.
“It is very hard,” Johnson said.
“I can’t decide which team I
would like to win.”
Photos submitted
Netherwood Knoll fourth-grader Ethan Johnson sits in a suite at Wrigley Field after winning a contest to be an honorary bat-
boy for the Chicago Cubs on July 14. Johnson received an autographed baseball and was able to sit in the dugout and walk
the field before and at the start of the game.
Oregon High School
Fall season inches closer
with games this week
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
The 2013 Oregon High School fall season is
about to start with games/matches scheduled for this
week.
Look for results in the paper on ConnectOregon
Wi.com.
Girls golf
Aug. 20-21: 7:15 a.m., Wisconsin Dells invita-
tional
Girls tennis
Aug. 21: 9 a.m., McFarland invitational
Look for previews of all the teams in the
upcoming issues of the Verona Press and cover-
age all season.
The annual football guide will come out Aug.
29 and will have previews on the Panthers and
the conference.
You can also follow our Twitter @OregonOb
server1 and like us on Facebook for scores and
updates from games all season.
‘I learned if you get hit
by a ball, you just walk it
off and go to first base.’
Fourth grader Ethan Johnson
on what he learned while
being the batboy for the Cubs
Ethan Johnson walks on the field
before the July 14 game against the St.
Louis Cardinals.
10
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Costa Rica: U12 Blaze learn culture, different style of play on memorable vacation
Photo submitted
15U baseball finish runner-up at tourney
The 15U Oregon boys baseball team attended the Fourth Annual Green Bay Area Baseball All-Star
Tournament July 26-28 where they won all their games before falling to Marinette in the championship
game.
Team members (front, from left) are: coach Brett Subach, Tyler Poppe, Logan Hurda, Josh Gomoll,
Jake Odegard, Steven Davis, Matt Yates, Adam Heath, Ben Weiland, Sam Mueller, Jared Jones and
coach Tyler Olson.
condi t i ons and st yl e of
play that the Blaze had to
adjust to.
One was the weather. It
rained a lot, as it was the
edge of the rainy season,
and t he fi el d had gi ant
puddles of water through-
out. The conditions would
have caused the cancella-
tion of games in Oregon
but not in Costa Rica.
The teams played around
t he puddl es and had t o
adjust when the ball would
come to a halt in muddy
divots.
A second adj ust ment
was how to play around
s t r ay dogs . The dogs
would run on the field, but
no one thought anything of
it and would play around
them. So the U12 Blaze
had to do the same thing.
Of course, there was also
the more physical play the
Blaze had to deal with and
the larger field and bigger
goals. The players joked
how McCombs looked like
a tiny speck inside the net.
Costa Rican culture
Quepos and Manuel
Antonio were also winners
during the trip, because
both towns wouldn’t nor-
mally have the money to
play talented teams like
San Jose Academy and the
U12 Blaze.
But soccer is the sport of
the country, and many of
the Blaze players noticed
just how big it was, espe-
ci al l y si nce Or egon i s
known as a soccer town in
Wisconsin.
“There is always some-
one playing on the soc-
cer field before us,” Kyler
said. “Every time I crossed
the soccer field, I saw at
l east fi ve ki ds pl ayi ng
there.”
Laszlo’s mother, Stacey,
who helped put the trip
together, said every town
i n Cost a Ri ca seems t o
have a church and a soccer
field.
But c hi l dr e n woul d
play everywhere else, too,
including the beach, other
open fields or down the
road.
There was a language
barrier to overcome with
the games. But even with
pi ck- up games on t he
beach and circle exercises,
communi cat i on became
easy, as hand signals and
gest ur es wer e used t o
al ert ot hers, somet hi ng
the Blaze players plan on
using when they resume
soccer in Oregon.
“I t hi nk i t made me
more confident in myself,
because the teams were
better than the usual teams
that we play,” Hendrick-
son said.
Planning
The trip planning began
in December with Stacey
Orosz and Nancy Lynch
setting up vacation rentals
in Manuel Antonio near
the ocean and mountains
of Costa Rica and seeing
if some of the Blaze boys
could come and play.
After one ‘Yes,’ several
others followed until the
entire team was able to
go. Even when other par-
ents couldn’t attend, they
helped secure money for
the Blaze players to go.
Danny Gildea, the Blaze
coach, was unabl e t o
attend, but assistant coach-
es George Conduah and
Craig Roscos were able to
make the trip.
The or gani zer s al s o
secured the tickets for the
San Jose Academy team
and hel ped set up t he
schedule for the week.
The planning included a
big beach barbecue at the
end of the trip with two
professional soccer play-
ers, a catamaran adventure
around the shore and a zip-
line outing.
Local mission
Besides a vacation and
games, the boys also par-
ticipated in a type of mis-
si on by donat i ng used
equi pment t o t he poor-
er locals, but there was
one instance that wasn’t
planned during a game.
A Costa Rican 6-year-
ol d boy was si t t i ng on
top of a fence watching
t he game, when Col l i n
McCombs decided to give
the Blaze’s extra jersey to
him.
Other members of the
t eam t ook pi ct ures and
donated a ball to the child
as well, and they all said
it was a thrill to see the
boy’s reaction.
“He was walking around
like, ‘look at me every-
body.’ He was just thrilled
like it was the best thing
you could have ever done,”
Stacey Orosz said.
Continued from page 1
Photos submitted
The U12 Blaze played in Manuel Antonio and Quepos while in Costa Rica.
Ace grabs Midwest Trucks feature at
Madison International Speedway
Travis Sauter won Sunday’s ARCA Mid-
west Tour / ARCA CRA Border Wars 150
at Madison International Speedway. The win
was Sauter’s tenth straight, an all-time record
win streak for super late models at Madison.
Chester Ace of Oregon won the Midwest
Trucks feature while Cory Talaska took
home top honors in the Legends.
Oregon Kids Triathlon results
The Oregon Kids Triathlon was Aug. 10,
and the race was broken down into several
age groups.
5-6 year olds Overall
Male
1) Easton Lindert 14:47 (third)
2) Ian Torgerson 16:05
3) Preston Serrault 16:07
Female
1) Molly Armstrong 14:16 (first)
2) Seneca Schuch 14:37 (second)
3) Luella Sheehan 14:48
7-8 year olds Overall
Male
1) Quinton Bush 11:17 (first)
2) Quinn Schroeder 11:19 (second)
3) Cameron Mueller 11:28 (third)
Female
1) Abigail Rupnow 12:24
2) Kate Aman-Lavicky 13:27
3) Meredith Pansegrau 13:41
9-10 year olds Overall
Male
1) Quint Dahmen 29:46 (first)
2) Turner Sieren 30:01 (second)
3) Alex Hoopes 30:13 (third)
Female
1) Lauren Pansegrau 31:22
2) Hannah Sage 31:45
Swartzmiller
3) Sophie Swartzmiller 33:23
11-12 year olds Overall
Male
1) Michael Madoch 28:24 (third)
2) Caden Ramspott 28:44
3) Sam Lynch 28:59
Female
1) Olivia Rawson 27:00 (first)
2) Elizabeth Pansegrau 27:49 (second)
3) Reagan Hoopes 29:25
13-14 year olds Overall
Male
1) Gus Newcomb 27:41 (first)
2) Ryan Madoch 31:56 (second)
3) Paul Lema 34:31 (third)
Female
1) Taylor Lyons 35:35
2) Natalie Donkle 35:36
3) Emily Decker 36:20
15-17 year olds
Male
1) Riley Nilsen 32:14
Female
1) Danielle Harris 34:06
Sport shorts
‘There is always someone playing on
the soccer field before us. Every time I
crossed the soccer field, I saw at least five
kids playing there.’
Kyler Schrieve, 12, U12 Oregon Blaze
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Labor Day
Early Deadlines
Due to the Labor Day holiday,
the Display Ad Deadline for the
September 4 Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, August 28 at 3 p.m.
Classified deadline will be Thursday, August 29 at Noon.
Display & Classified Deadlines for the
September 5 Oregon Observer, Verona Press
and Stoughton Courier Hub will be
Friday, August 30 at Noon.
Our offices will be closed
Monday, September 2
in observance of the holiday.
The Ace homestead was
purchased on Feb. 25, 1913,
by Wayne’s great-great
grandfather, William Hull
Ace.
Five generations later,
the Aces are still milking
roughly 40 cows and grow-
ing crops on 112 acres they
own and another 100 they
rent, Ace said.
Besides last week’s rec-
ognition, the Ace farm will
soon get a road sign desig-
nating them as a Century
Farm, one of a handful in
the Oregon area, according
to another “Century Farm”
owner, Jerry Jensen, who
reached the milestone in
2009.
Wayne Ace has been on
the farm since 1979, when,
as a new graduate of Ore-
gon High School, he moved
about two miles from his
childhood home to the fam-
ily farm to work with his
grandfather and great uncle.
Dee and Wayne mar-
ried in 1980, purchased the
farm in 1989 and have since
raised five kids there: Ange-
la, 27, Joann, 24, Chester,
22, Shelly, 21, and Brooke,
13.
Wayne estimated that
when he started in 1979, the
Town of Oregon probably
had 30 dairy farms. Today,
there are nine.
It’s a tough job, no doubt,
and not just because of the
physical toll farm work can
take. Wayne said milk pric-
es are only about 50 percent
higher than they were 25
years ago, while gas prices
have risen ten-fold.
Yet he’s still at it, main-
taining a profession he was
introduced to as a child who
chipped in at his grandpa’s
farm on weekends and dur-
ing summer vacations.
The farm is far more effi-
cient than it was a quarter-
century ago. The family has
added barn-cleaning sys-
tems, two silos, four live-
st ock sheds and shops,
among other improvements
since the late 1980s.
Outside employment has
helped, too. Dee works full-
time as an accounts payable
administrator for Full Com-
pass in Madison. Wayne
also became a school bus
contractor in 1990 and owns
Wayne Ace Bus and Limo
Service, running a fleet of
nine vehicles that transport
groups to parties or other
events throughout Wiscon-
sin.
For years, the two of them
would wrap up chores ear-
ly – Wayne usually began
milking cows at 4:30 a.m. –
before heading off to those
“day jobs.”
In addition, Wayne was
first elected to the Town
Board of Supervisors in
1997 and is now the group’s
longest-serving member, a
tenure he credits to his tell-
it-like-it-is approach to poli-
tics.
He gi ves a si mi l arl y
straight assessment of his
career in farming.
“If I had to do it over
again, I don’t know if I’d
have done it,” he says.
Besides the injuries to his
hand and back, Wayne also
has dealt with lung problems
stemming from years of
breathing dust in grain silos.
He had double pneumonia in
2004, and those issues were
exacerbated in August 2008
when he fell through a hid-
den air pocket in a 60-foot
silo while leveling out alfal-
fa sileage, a dangerous pre-
dicament that ended when
a rescue team used a ladder
truck and a system of ropes
and pulleys to pull Ace up
and through a small hatch in
the top of the silo.
St i l l , Wayne sai d hi s
“heart is in milking cows,”
a habit that started young
when he’d mi l k before
school.
Wayne admits, however,
that he’s hesitant to encour-
age the next generation to
keep the farm going, even
though more of the work is
automated and less back-
breaking than it once was.
But his only son, Chester,
22, is already aboard. He
started working full-time at
the farm in 2009 and now
does most of the milking
and chores and raises 30
ewes and a couple of sows.
“He want s t o do i t , ”
Wayne sai d. “I do not
encourage or push him into
it. I’ve asked him different
times. He says, ‘No, I want
to stay here and do it.’
“Farming’s in his heart,
it’s in his blood.”
Chester said he wants to
keep the farm going.
“I’ve been doing it since I
was 5, 6 years old,” he said.
“I love doing it. I love rais-
ing good cows, I love milk-
ing good cows.”
There’s a chance, then,
that the Ace family could in
50 years be recognized as a
state sesquicentennial farm.
Chest er sai d he ful l y
intends to keep running the
farm for years to come. But,
perhaps with his dad’s expe-
rience in mind, he issues one
caveat:
“You can’t predict the
future.”
Ace: Milking roughly 40 cows and growing crops on 112 acres they own, 100 acres they rent
Continued from page 1
Photo submitted
Wayne and Dee Ace, their five children and three grandchildren are at the family farm that turned 100 years old earlier this year.
information that’s needed
before going into the unit,
and I think that’s a pretty
si gni fi cant di fference, ”
he said. “Kids feel more
successful, they feel they
know what they’re doing
once they go into the unit.”
At Netherwood, 98 per-
cent of students met the
reading goal, with 94 per-
cent meet i ng t he mat h
goals. At Prairie View,
the school dramatically
increased its mentors, from
three to 10, with plans for
a similar rise in numbers
next year.
In Brooklyn, the char-
acter surveys pointed out
some encouraging news.
St udent s were asked t o
respond to the statement,
“I am a good student. I
behave at school. Students
at my school treat me with
respect.” Since the 2009-10
school year, the number of
“agree” or “strongly agree”
responses st eadi l y rose
from 81 percent to 93 per-
cent last year.
Parents responded to the
statement, “Students show
respect for each other, ”
with the number of “agree”
or “strongly agree” respon-
dents moving up steadily
from 65 percent in ’09-
10 to 84 percent last year.
St aff responded t o t he
statements, “I feel that staff
care about me. I work with
people who treat me with
respect. My administrator
treats me with respect.”
Those responding “agree”
or “strongly agree” rose
from 84 percent in 2009-10
to 99 percent last year.
Needs improvement
Meanwhile, Rikli said
administrators and staff are
working to find answers
about feedback that wasn’t
so posi t i ve. He ci t ed a
parent s’ survey, where
in response to the ques-
tion, “I believe my child is
safe while at school,” only
90 percent this past year
answered “Yes,” compared
to 96 percent in 2008-09.
“That’s something we
need to dig into and find
out why folks are feeling
that way,” he said. “Wheth-
er it’s pick-up and drop-off
or their kids are coming
home and saying they’re
not t reat ed wel l on t he
playground – whatever it
may be. That’s a concern-
ing piece of information.”
In response to the ques-
tion, “My child’s school
is free from bullying and
harassment,” only 55 per-
cent of parents answered
“ a gr e e ” or “ s t r ongl y
agree.”
“So 45 percent of the
folks out there are thinking
there’s something going
on,” Rikli said. “Obvious-
ly, they know that based
on what their kids tell them
when they come home. So
that’s a disturbing piece of
information as we move
forward.”
Another point of empha-
sis this year will be com-
municating with parents
about their child’s perfor-
mance. Rikli said another
“bothersome trend” was
di scover ed i n par ent s’
answer to the statement, “I
know how well my child
is progressing at school.”
In 2008-09, 92 percent of
parents answered “agreed”
or “strongly agreed,” num-
bers t hat have st eadi l y
dropped in recent years to
83 percent this past year.
Modjeski said some of
the decrease could be due
to parents not accessing
online information about
student performance that
has been added in recent
years.
“They may still like the
mailed copy,” she said. “It
correlates with the drop in
the last two years.”
OSB: Administrators and staff work to find answers on negative feedback
Continued from page 1
Coming up
The next school
board meeting is
slated for 6:30 p.m.,
Monday, Aug. 26.
‘They may still like
the mailed copy.
It correlates with
the drop in the last
two years.’
Kerri Modjeski,
Brooklyn Elementary
School Principal
2013 spring grads
UW-Milwaukee
Ryan James Bandt, BS -
Bachelor of Science, School
of Education; Stephanie
Marie Brasser, MS - Master of
Science, College of Nursing;
Kristina S Caughill, BS -
Bachelor of Science, College
of Letters and Science;
Holly Marie Glanville, MS -
Master of Science, College of
Nursing; Mazie Ann Kading,
BS - Bachelor of Science,
School of Education; Callista
Rae Schmitz, BS - Bachelor
of Science, College of Health
Sciences; Jessica Lynn
Thompson, MS - Master of
Science, College of Health
Sciences; Lee Bennett
Webber, BS - Bachelor of
Science, College of Health
Sciences.
UW-Stout
Megan Hagstrom received
a BS in Hotel Restaurant and
Tourism; Gerald Schleinz
received a BS in Dietetics.
12
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Oregon History
July
Oregon history is
provided by the Oregon
Area Historical Society
at 159 W. Lincoln St.
Gerald Neath compiles
information.
The society’s hours are
Tuesdays: 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., the first Saturday of
month: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
(September - May) and
Saturdays in June, July and
August.
100 yrs. ago (1913)
• George Shampnor of
Oregon and Ford Melville of
Brooklyn, joining other Civil
War veterans who had fought
in the Battle of Gettysburg,
visited the scene of the
battle in commemoration of
its 50th. Anniversary. The
State Legislature appropriated
$15,000 to defray all expens-
es for the trip.
• Fincher Bros. were build-
ing a new livery barn (on
Jefferson St. near the pres-
ent day municipal parking lot)
It was noted that the build-
ing would be a sheeted steel
structure 58 by 75 foot, hav-
ing a capacity for 53 horses
besides plenty of room for
feed, and the new Ford vehi-
cles they were now selling.
• Fincher Bros. announced
that there had been a reduc-
tion of $50.00 in the price of
their new Ford vehicles. The
price would now be $575.00
including freight. Those who
recently purchased vehicles
included Miller Hansen,
Melville Bros. and J. Sprecker
of Brooklyn.
• A free lecture was given
at Woodman’s Hall by W. J.
Laughlin entitled “Messiah’s
Coming Kingdom.” Everyone
was welcome and NO collec-
tion would be taken.
• Some bad weather passed
through Oregon. Hailstones
as large as walnuts damaged
the colored glass windows on
the north side of the Catholic
Church. Also a number of
tobacco sheds in the area
were blown down.
50 years ago (1963)
• Whitey’s Cafe (pres-
ent day site of Breitbach
Chiropractic) was purchased
by Vera Klitzman and Alice
Jones who will operate under
the name of “Oregon Coffee
Shop”.
• Allen Gasner takes over
as Rotary President from Paul
Kohlman. The other Rotary
officers were Atty. Jay Winter,
vice-president; Richard
Wechter, secretary; and Owen
Richards, treasurer.
• Syl Farris, Superintendent
of Public Works, announced
restrictions on sprinkling
lawns because of the drought
conditions.
• Lucey Realty was advertis-
ing the Grand Opening of their
Wausau built home at 280
Prairie View St. Lot and home
was priced at $15,990.00.
The sales person for Lucey
Realty was longtime local
resident, Jay Bossingham.
• Four machines to make
flashlight batteries were
developed by Wisconsin
Mold & Tool Co. (now oper-
ating as WISCO Industries).
They were shipped through
an American Co. for use in
Israel. Employee Kenneth
Comstock engineered the
project with the assistance of
Ray Sherman, and Eli Beals.
Elving Kjellstrom was presi-
dent of the company.
• Area resident, Bill
Sweeney, commented on fish-
ing, “Why go up north, when
you can catch’em right in
your front yard.” He showed
off a 39 inch Northern, weigh-
ing 12 pounds that he had
caught in front of his home
on Lake Waubesa. Some
may remember Bill when he
worked as a salesperson at
Lappley Chevolet.
• At the annual school
district meeting three of the
school board members were
re-elected: Milo Schneider
from the Town of Dunn,
Thomas Grady from the
Town of Oregon, and John
Black from the Village. Two
other nominees running for
the positions were Lyman
Anderson and Phil Peterson.
• Milt Hinkle, an old west-
ern aficionado, was in town
with loud speakers mounted
a top his car doing what he
termed “stampeding” for the
coming 14th Annual World
Championship Rodeo to be
held at Holmes No Oaks
Ranch in Fitchburg.
25 years ago (1988)
• Oregon Elementary and
Middle School students
received awards for their
posters depicting traffic safe-
ty. The contest sponsored
by the American Automobile
Association was directed by
Dr. Ed Guziewski, Principal
of Oregon Middle School and
Jim Clark, Oregon Elementary
Principal. The students
receiving awards and recogni-
tions were Kelly Barth, Jenny
Stoffel, Nichole Smith, Tana
Spink, Talitha Holvenstot,
Jennifer Wacket and Corrie
Hecox. Their art instructor
was Pat Keehn.
• The Oregon Straw Hat
Players presented a dinner
theater production of “Annie”
at Tucker’s Inn (a restaurant
formerly at the Cross Plains
Bank site). Entrees for the
event were baked cod, filet,
and chicken codon bleu.
• Bob Behnke, member of the
Oregon FFA Chapter, attended
the National FFA Conference
in Washington D. C. While
there he visited the offices of
Wisconsin Congressman, Bob
Kastenmeier of Sun Prairie
and Senator Bob Kasten of
Milwaukee.
• Brenda Blomstrom wins
four medals in the track com-
petition at the Badger State
Games with two first place
finishes and two seconds.
• The OHS Marching Band
ended their 1988 season by
taking a record 11 “Best of
Show” awards, making it
one of their best years. In
the special award areas they
received Best Percussion 7
times, Best Color Guard 5
times, Best Drum Major 5
times Best General Effect 2
times, Best Woodwinds,
once, and Best Marching and
Maneuvering band, once.
• Students participating in
John Bauman’s popular sum-
mer school guitar classes
were Valorie Arbogast, Jason
Czerwonda, Jeremy Gilbert,
Dan Joswiak, Andy Sisler,
Bobbie Sue Monroe, Dustin
Paulson, Rebecca Seed, Tana
Seed, Jason Smith, Janeal
Bernau, Brian Dinkel, Jeremy
Guenther, Chris Richardson
and Shannon Murphy.
• The play “Planet of the
Perfectly Awful People” by
Joseph Robinette was per-
formed by students in the
summer class “Theater for
Young People” directed by
Daniel Hanson. The cast
included Leslie Farnsworth,
Bethany Gipp, Rachel Jones,
Chad Kopenski, Shanti Lall,
Jace Nichols, Kurt Schnabel
and Audrey Baumeister.
Others helping with the pro-
duction were Cody Sharkey,
Sarah Uphoff and Sara Sheffy.
• In celebration of “Penny
Days” Valley Bank (now BMO
Harris) gave out Wooden
Nickels that could be taken to
the IGA Grocery Store (now
the Firefly) to be redeem for
an ice cream cone.
• Oregon resident, Ardis
Sarbacker, catches a 42 inch,
18 pound, 2 oz. musky in the
Chippewa Flowage. However,
she notes that this was only
her second largest musky
catch. Five years ago she had
caught a 48 inch, 30 pound
“hunker” at Little St. Germain
Lake in Vilas County.
10 years ago (2003)
• The Hillcrest Bible Church
gets the go ahead from the
Village to construct a 9,000
square foot multipurpose
building behind their church
building.
• The reconstruction of
Main Street continues with a
completion date near the end
of August, prior to the start of
school.
• Katie Matthew was
crowned 2003 Oregon Youth
Ambassador at the Summer
Fest last month.
• Elizabeth James and
Alex Ring, students at Rome
Corners Intermediate School,
performed at Disney World in
Orlando, Florida as part of the
Kehl School of Dance’s Junior
Jazz Team and Footlights Tap
Team.
• Oregon’s Merri-Hill
neighborhood continue with
their tradition of holding an
annual Independence Day
Parade. Tony Ricker skated
to the parade with his dog,
Pooki.Nine-year old Max
Sampson lead the parade with
an American Flag and a plas-
tic bag for collecting candy.
Four year old , Nathan Krenz,
holding a patriotic umbrella,
rode in a wagon pulled by his
mother, Nadine.
• Oregon High School
class of 2003 graduates who
received scholarships from
the Rotary Club were Krysia
Utrzig, Ted Herman, Jason
Russell, Drew Baryenbruch,
and Natasha George.
• Amy Kleppert, director
of Oregon’s Youth Center
announced that the youth
center would be moving
from its location at 280 West
Netherwood Road to the old
EMS building located at 110
Oak Street.
• The Oregon American
Legion baseball team won
the State Line League cham-
pionship. Members of the
team were Clint White, Ryan
Stace, Steve Nelson, Mitch
Staley, Casey Johnson, Eric
Deegan, Brian Anderson,
Brody Wachter, Zach Jensen,
Bob Marszalek and Dustin
Brabender. Their coach were
Mark Genin and assistant
coach Al Genin.
• GroMor (a venture of Mark
Mortensen and Jeff Groenier)
purchased the commercial
lots at 106 and 110 North
Main Street, from the Village
for $10,000 for a redevelop-
ment project.
Family set for N.Y. trip
after husband takes
home big prizes for pie
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unifed Newspaper Group
After more than three
decades of practice, Jeffrey
Doyle-Horney is making
baking success look easy as,
well, pie.
The 56-year-old former
Oregon Middle School
teacher – fresh off winning
the 2012 Wisconsin State
Fair Grand Championship
for his black raspberry lat-
tice pie – was at it again,
winning the Kenmore Fam-
ily Fruit Pies Competition
at this year’s fair against 31
other contestants. And his
secret weapon – grandmoth-
er Lucy’s raspberry lattice
pie – featuring black and red
raspberries – was again the
center of attention.
Doyle-Horney, a Stough-
ton resident who teaches
elementary school music
in Madison, said when the
competition judges asked for
a family heritage recipe, he
knew exactly what to make.
“(It) comes from when I
was quite young and would
pick raspberries with my
dad and granddad,” he said.
“What we didn’t eat right off
the vine, we brought home
to grandmother Lucy, who
would make them into a pie.”
It’s no surprise that an
award-winning recipe would
include some out-of-the ordi-
nary ingredients, and Doyle-
Horney goes all-out for his
creations. For instance, he
has used duck eggs instead
of chicken (richer yolk),
vodka instead of water when
making the crust (doesn’t
create gluten when mixed
with flour), and hand-picked
berries from Lake Kegonsa
State Park instead of store-
bought fruit. To make the
tasty crust, he uses Willow
Creek leaf lard, which comes
from heritage Berkshire pigs
raised in Sauk Prairie.
Pie perfection
While he said winning
either of the prizes was an
honor, this year’s Kenmore
contest was unique because
it included presentation and
storytelling, and Doyle-
Horney was happy to play
his part, rehearsing his “per-
formance”
several times
at home and
r e- wr i t i ng
hi s scr i pt
for dramatic
effect.
“I had a
red-checked
tablecloth,
pie basket, rolling pin, tin
bucket of berries and my
granddad’s cane, hat and
glasses as props to aid in the
storytelling,” he said. “It was
an element of theater that
went into the presentation.
The contest was really hyped
– lots of cameras and audi-
ence – and the bakers were
participants. Usually you just
watch and wring your hands
nervously.”
Surprisingly, Doyle-Hor-
ney’s submitted pies at the
Stoughton Fair and Wiscon-
sin State Fairs didn’t go as
well with the judges this year,
so he was happy to win the
Kenmore prize. The spoils of
victory will include a $5,000
kitchen makeover and an all-
expenses trip to New York
for he and his wife, Kathy,
a long-time Rome Corners
Intermediate School teacher,
to attend the Food Network’s
Wine and Food Festival in
October.
“This is way cool for us
both,” he said.
Photo submitted
Stoughton resident Jeff Doyle-Horney won the Kenmore Family
Fruit Pies Competition at this year’s State Fair against 31 other
contestants. His “grandmother Lucy’s raspberry lattice pie” was
the winning recipe.
Doyle-Horney
POlice rePOrtS
Information taken from the
Oregon Police Department log
book. Oregon residents unless
otherwise noted.
July 24
5 p.m. A man reported that
he was threatened by phone
by another resident for mak-
ing disparaging remarks
about the alleged caller at a
public meeting earlier in the
week. No charges.
July 25
8:01 a.m. A 17-year-old
Brooklyn woman was taken
to a Madison hospital after
she swerved her vehicle near
Park Street and South Perry
Parkway to avoid a rabbit
and crashed the vehicle into
a tree. She was cited for fail-
ing to maintain control of her
vehicle.
11:39 p.m. A 47-year-
old woman who allegedly
punched a man in the face in
their apartment on the 200
block of Walnut Street was
cited for disorderly conduct
and battery.
July 27
3:03 p.m. Police were
called to a burglary on the
200 block of Lynne Trail after
an acquaintance of the home-
owner found a suspect rum-
maging through the home’s
basement. The suspect fled
on foot before police arrived.
Police called for a police-
dog unit from Stoughton and
set up a perimeter but soon
called off the search when
they were able to identify a
possible suspect stemming
from a previous incident.
The suspect, a 25-year-old
man from Evansville, was
arrested later that day on
tentative burglary charges. He
was charged Aug. 1 in Dane
County Circuit Court with
misdemeanor counts of tres-
passing and theft, according
to online court records.
Aug. 2
3:30 a.m. A 26-year-old
woman was arrested after she
allegedly pulled a roommate
out of her car using a “choke
hold.” The suspect pleaded no
contest Aug. 8 in Dane County
Circuit Court to a single count
of disorderly conduct, online
court records show.
Aug. 3
2:35 a.m. Police respond-
ed to an apartment on the
200 block of Walnut Street,
where a woman alleged that
a 20-year-old man allegedly
preventing her from going
inside, chased her, threw her
to ground by the neck and
held her down while choking
and hitting her. The suspect
is still at large.
Aug. 7
9 a.m. A woman reported
that someone broke into her
husband’s truck in a parking
lot on the 100 block of Wolfe
Street and stole tools and a
camera. No suspects.
Aug. 9
1:18 p.m. A 31-year-old
man was arrested on tenta-
tive charges of battery and
strangulation after police
responded to reports of a
woman screaming on the 200
block of Walnut Street. The
man was accused of punch-
ing a female victim in the face
and squeezing his arm around
her neck.
–Seth Jovaag
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
www.portmaritimefestiVal.com
Visit Port Washington’s Harborfront
August 23-25, 2013
Free
Admission
to Festival
Grounds
Working vessels of the Great Lakes
Historic & Educational Exhibits
Treasure Hunts, Childrens Area
Cardboard boat regattas 2 P.M. Saturday & Sunday
262-268-1132 info
Sat: Kapco/KNation presents American Idol Finalist: Naima Adedapo
followed by FIREWORKS
Sunday: Modern Country Band: SaddleBrook

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Legals
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
VILLAGE OF OREGON
JEFFERSON STREET
PARKING LOT
VILLAGE OF OREGON
DANE COUNTY, WI
The Village of Oregon will receive
sealed bids at the Village Hall, located at
117 Spring Street, Oregon, WI 53575 for
the construction of Village of Oregon Jef-
ferson Street Parking Lot until 1:00 P.M
Thursday, August 29, 2013. All bids will
be publicly opened and read aloud at that
time.
The work for which bids are asked
includes the following: The work con-
sists of the reconstruction of the existing
parking lot located to the westerly side of
the businesses along South Main Street
in the Village of Oregon. The access to
the parking lot is located off of Jefferson
Street. The intent of the project is to re-
move the existing pavement, grade the
existing base, and install new pavement
on the parking lot. The lot will be expand-
ed slightly to maximize the Village prop-
erty and a concrete dumpster pad will be
installed. Striping of the parking lot and
fencing are included in the project.
The BIDDING DOCUMENTS may be
examined at the offces of MSA Profes-
sional Services, Inc., Madison, Wiscon-
sin; the Village of Oregon; Wisconsin.
Planholders list will be updated interac-
tively on our web address at http://www.
msa-ps.com under Bidding.
Copies of the BIDDING DOCUMENTS
are available at www.questcdn.com. You
may download the digital plan docu-
ments for $20 by inputting Quest eBid-
Doc #2872353 on the website’s Project
Search page. Please contact QuestCDN.
com at 952-233-1632 or info@questcdn.
com for assistance in free membership
registration, downloading, and working
with the digital project information.
No proposal will be accepted unless
accompanied by a certifed check or bid
bond equal to at least 5% of the amount
bid, payable to the OWNER as a guaran-
tee that, if the bid is accepted, the bidder
will execute and fle the proper contract
and bond within 15 days after the award
of the contract. The certifed check or
bid bond will be returned to the bidder
as soon as the contract is signed, and if
after 15 days the bidder shall fail to do
so, the certifed check or bid bond shall
be forfeited to the OWNER as liquidated
damages.
No bidder may withdraw his bid
within 60 days after the actual date of the
opening thereof.
Pursuant to Section 66.0903, Wis-
consin Statutes, the minimum wages
to be paid on the project shall be in ac-
cordance with the wage rate scale estab-
lished by State wage rates.
OWNER reserves the right to waive
any informalities or to reject any or all
bids.
Published by the authority of the Vil-
lage of Oregon.
CONSULTING ENGINEER:
MSA Professional Services, Inc.
2901 International Lane, Suite 300
Madison, WI 53704
Kevin C. Lord, RLS, P.E.
(608) 242-7779
Published: August 15 and 22, 2013
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
PLAN COMMISSION AGENDA
TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013
6:30 PM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
1. Call Plan Commission meeting to
order.
2. Approval of minutes from the last
meeting.
3. Public Comments.
4. Discussion and possible re: Ap-
pointment of Plan Commission Members.
5. Discussion and possible Action
re: TORC procedures.
6. Discussion and possible Action
re: Town’s Submittal Application for Land
Division, Rezones and CUP.
7. Communications.
8. Adjournment.Note: Agendas are
subject to amendment after publica-
tion. Check the offcial posting locations
(Town Hall, Town of Oregon Recycling
Center and Oregon Village Hall) includ-
ing the Town website at www.town.or-
egon.wi.us or join the Town’s e-mail list
to receive agendas at townoforegon@
mailbag.com. It is possible that members
of and possibly a quorum of members of
other governmental bodies of the town
may be in attendance at any of the meet-
ings to gather information; however, no
action will be taken by any governmen-
tal body at said meeting other than the
governmental body specifcally referred
to in the meeting notice. Requests from
persons with disabilities who need as-
sistance to participate in this meeting or
hearing should be made to the Clerk’s
offce at 835-3200 with 48 hours notice.
Post: August 12, 2013
Published: August 15, 2013
WNAXLP
Store featured in 1895 Observer supplement
Powers & Wackman store (1895) is
now part of Mason’s on Main. It was
one of several businesses featured in
a supplement in the Oregon Observer
from April 18, 1985, to profile the
community and businesses.
It reads, “Powers & Wackman,
dealers in clothing, keep a nice line
of gents’ furnishing goods, up to date
and in proper style; can suit anyone
from a bridegroom to a congressman.
They have a nice trade and low pric-
es.”
Information is from an 1895 sup-
plement to the Observer to profile the
community and businesses.
Another excerpt reads:
“In issuing this Business Index,
designed as a lasting souvenir of one
of the bustling villages of Southern
Wisconsin, the publishers believe that
the course pursued—that of imparting
information—will prove a benefit to
all, and be appreciated by those liv-
ing in other places. We have gleaned
every possible data obtainable and
trust in our efforts to please that no
cause for criticisms will be intro-
duced and that we will do justice to
the occasion.”
Historic photo
Photo courtesy of Oregon Area Historical Society
OPD joins drunken
driving campaign
The Or egon Pol i ce
Department will be out in
force along with hundreds
of ot her l aw enforce-
ment agencies throughout
Wisconsin for the annu-
al “Drive Sober or Get
Pulled Over” crackdown
on drunken drivers from
Aug. 16 to Sept. 2.
The campaign aims to
get people to find alterna-
tive ways of getting home
after drinking, rather than
getting behind the wheel,
Oregon chief Doug Pettit
said in a news release.
“Drunken dri vi ng i s
entirely preventable,” Pet-
tit said. “You can desig-
nate a sober driver or find
an alternative way home.
But if you make the irre-
sponsible choice to drive
while impaired, our offi-
cers will be on the look-
out, and we will arrest
you.”
Drunken driving is one
of the most prevalent and
deadly crimes in Wis-
consin, according to the
Wisconsin Department of
Transportation. Last year,
223 people were killed
and nearly 3,000 injured
in alcohol-related traf-
fic crashes in Wisconsin.
There were nearly 27,000
convictions for drunken
driving in the state last
year.
In addition to the conse-
quences of seriously injur-
ing or killing yourself or
others, drunken driving
arrests can be a burden for
those who chose to drive
after drinking.
“The devastating conse-
quences of a drunken driv-
ing arrest include major
embarrassment, expen-
sive penalties, mandatory
installation of an ignition
interlock device, and pos-
sibly jail time,” Pettit said.
“Driving drunk will be a
decision you’ll regret the
rest of your life, if you are
lucky enough to live.”
To help prevent drunken
driving, the Zero In Wis-
consin traffic safety ini-
tiative has a free “Drive
Sober” mobile app, which
i ncl udes feat ures l i ke
“Find a Ride,” blood alco-
hol estimator and desig-
nated driver selector to
help you get home safely
and achieve zero prevent-
able deaths on Wisconsin
roadways.
The Drive Sober app
can be downloaded by vis-
iting zeroinwisconsin.gov.
Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook
as “Oregon Observer”
and then LIKE us.
14
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
140 Lost & Found
LOST GOLF Clubs, Oregon area. Small
Reward. 608 873-5339.
143 notices
ROTARY MEMBERS have helped
immunize more than 2 billion children in
122 countries! Locate the nearest club at
www.rotary.org. This message provided
by PaperChain & your local community
paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 PLaces to Go
GUN SHOW August 16-18th. LaCrosse
Fairgrounds, West Salem, WI. Friday
3-8pm, Saturday 9am-5pm, Sunday
9am-3pm. Large selection of guns and
ammo. Conceal & Carry classes avail-
able at the show. Info: 563-608-4401
(wcan)
163 traininG schooLs
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just
10 Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 9/7/2013. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
TRAINING FOR CNA
And Computer and Clerical
Early bird discount.
www.newaydirections.com or
Call Neway Directions
for class schedules
608-221-1920
340 autos
2004 FORD Taurus Wagon SE.
Good condition. One owner! New
battery. 87,800 miles. $3995. OBO.
Metallic grey. 608-239-3201
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck of Boat to
Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vaca-
tion. Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All
paperwork taken care of! 888-439-5224
(wcan)
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
342 Boats & accessories
$9995+FSD FOR a new boat or pontoon
package- Both with lots of standard
features! New 16' Pontoon w/furniture
& 25HP or New 16' Boat, locator, trailer
& 25HP. Your choice $9995.+FSD.
American Marine & Motorsports
Shawano 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New and Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats,
Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye boats, Cudd-
ys, Cruisers up to 33 feet and Outboards
@ Guaranteed Best Price! Crownline
Axis Malibu Triton Alumacraft Mirrorcraft
Misty Harbor & more! American Marine
& Motorsports Super Center Shawano-
where dreams come true 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
RENTALS WAVERUNNERS Pontoons
- Ski Boats - Fishing Boats Outboards -
Canoes - Kayaks. Daily or weekly. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Fun Center,
Shawano 715-526-8740 (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 recreationaL VehicLes
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
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360 traiLers
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Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 heLP Wanted, GeneraL
BIG SKY RESTAURANT- In Stough-
ton. Experienced line cooks and servers
needed. Call Sean 234-0486
EXPERIENCED CONCRETE Finisher
Must have valid drivers license. Com-
petitive wages. Health, dental available,
608-884-6205
HOUSE CLEANER: Must be thorough
and quick . 4-8 hours per week.
References 873-7833
Crown Point Resort
MADISON AREA Road Maintenance
Company accepting applications for CDL
drivers and laborers. Full time beginning
now thru October. For more information
call 608-842-1676.
PART TIME DELI Help Wanted.
Apply at 135 S. Main St, Oregon.

SUPER 8 Verona has immediate openings
for Maintainence personnel. Full and Part
time positions available, $10-12/hr. Apply
in person at 131 Horizon Dr, Verona, Wi
SUPER 8 Verona has immediate open-
ings for our Front Desk Staff. $9-10/hr.
Paid training, paid holidays, paid vaca-
tion. Apply in person 131 Horizon Dr.
Verona, WI
SERVICE TECHNICIANS needed
for local and statewide pipe
maintenance & trenchless rehab
services. Must have good driving
record & CDL preferred-will train
right individual. Working w/heavy
equipment is required w/some
travel. Strong computer skills a plus.
Benefits available DOQ with rapid
advancement for right individual.
Call McCann's
Underground 608-835-3124 or apply
in person at:
611 N Burr Oak Ave. Oregon, WI
SIENNA MEADOWS- OREGON,
has immediate job opportunities
to join our compassionate Care
Specialist Team. We offer competitive
wages designed to attract and retain
quality staff. Various shifts available
both full and part time. Preferred
candidate will have a C.N.A. and all
state mandated courses completed.
Go to www.siennacrest.com to print
an application today! Turn in your
completed application to :
116 Spring St, Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-0040 E.O.E.
THE STARK AGENCY in Madison wants
motivated professionals to join our debt
collection team. Competitive, self-direct-
ed, creative thinkers with strong nego-
tiation & problem-solving skills. Previous
collection experience is helpful; banking
and finance experience is a plus. Once
trained you'll manage your own portfolio
& control your income. Bilingual is a plus.
Computer literacy and typing speed of
at least 35 WPM required. Women and
minorities are encouraged to apply. Email
resume to nrichardson@hestark.com
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Part time,
days only. Become a part of our
growing Team! Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
434 heaLth care, human
serVices & chiLd care
PERSONAL CAREWORKER needed for
girl with disabilities in Verona. Monday-
Friday 7:00am-8:30 am and 3:30 pm to
5:30 pm, weekends flexible. Assist to get
ready for school, bus comes to home.
Call for more information: 608-238-8119
SIENNA MEADOWS- OREGON, has
immediate job opportunities to join
our compassionate Care Specialist
Team. We offer competitive wages
designed to attract and retain quality
staff. Various shifts available both full
and part time. Preferred candidate will
have a C.N.A. and all state mandated
courses completed. Go to www.
siennacrest.com to print an
application today! Turn in your
completed application to:
116 Spring St, Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-0040 E.O.E.
444 construction,
trades & automotiVe
GENERAL LABORER positions avail-
able. Must be able to lift 100 lbs on a
regular basis. Must have valid drivers
license and references. Please mail let-
ter of application and resume to All Dry
Waterproofing, INC. 621 E South St,
Stoughton, WI 53589
447 ProFessionaL
OTR DRIVERS NEEDED
* Above Average Mileage Pay
* Avg 2500-3500/wk
* Flexible Home Time
* 100% No Touch
* Full Benefit Pkg CDL/A
* 12 Months Exp. Preferred
1-888-545-9351 Ext. 13
Jackson WI
www.doublejtransport.com (wcan)
508 chiLd care & nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stough-
ton / Pleasant Springs Licensed Family
Childcare 22 yrs. exp. Quiet acre lot.
Summer & Fall Openings Available Sum-
mer Field Trips - Kindergarten Readi-
ness Music Program - Indoor Platform
& Slide Teacher Directed Call: 873-0711
Location - Experience - Rates All on our
website at: www.browndeerdaycare.com
OREGON- LICENSED in home
family child care has immediate
openings. Ages 6 weeks through 5
years. Call 608-445-3217
516 cLeaninG serVices
WANT SOMEONE to clean your house?
Call DOROTHY'S SWEEP CLEAN. We
are Christian ladies that do quality work.
Dependable and have excellent refer-
ences. Call 608-838-0665 or 608-219-
2415. Insured.
532 FencinG
CRIST FENCING FREE ESTIMATES.
Residential, commercial, farm, horse.
608-574-1993 www.cristfencing.com
548 home imProVement
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING Crack
filling and striping. No job too small.
Call O & H at 608-845-3348 or 608-
845-8567
DECK STAINING & power washing fast
and efficient. Also house washing. Free
quotes 608-669-7879 Green Gro Design
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Summer-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
Interior-Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
RECOVER PAINTING offers all car-
pentry, drywall, deck restoration and all
forms of painting. Recover urges you
to join in the fight against cancer, as a
portion of every job is donated to cancer
research. Free estimates, fully insured,
over 20 years of experience. Call 608-
270-0440.
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a
sensible price. Free estimates,
Insured, Polite, Professional.
608-873-9623
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
550 insurance
SAVE MONEY On Auto Insurance from
the major names you trust. No forms. No
hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR
MY QUOTE now!
888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 LandscaPinG, LaWn,
tree & Garden Work
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing, trimming,
rototilling ,etc. 608-235-4389
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 ProFessionaL serVices
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Electrical Repair
and Installations.
Call 800-757-0383 (wcan)
ONE CALL Does it All!
Fast and Reliable Plumbing Repairs
Call 800-981-0336 (wcan)
576 sPeciaL serVices
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and
surrounding area. Merry Law Offices.
608-205-0621. No charge for initial con-
sultation. "We are a debt relief agency.
We help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code."
586 tV, Vcr &
eLectronics rePair
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
wcan
590 Wanted: serVices
NEED HOST Parents for German/Swiss
High School Students, for all or part of
2013-14 school year. Reflections Int'l
608-583-2412 www.
reflectionsinternational.org (wcan)
601 househoLd
NEW MATTRESS SETS from $89.All
sizes in stock! 9 styles. PlymouthFurni-
tureWI.com 2133 Eastern Ave. Plymouth,
WI Open 7 days a week (wcan)
606 articLes For saLe
BRINKMANN SMOKER Charcoal grill.
Slow cook BBQ for moist, delicious fla-
vor. Used a few times, like new. Asking
$60. 608-669-2243
BUTTERFLY CHAIRS Black canvas.
Made in the USA! Metal frame fold up
for easy storage. Comfortable. Indoor/
Outdoor. $20 for the pair.
608-669-2243
FIREWOOD DRY Crab apple, Ash and
Maple. Small to giant sizes.
$6. per bundle or large piece.
Verona 608-669-2243
648 Food & drink
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
888-676-2750 Use Code 48643XMT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff79 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES- Order MouthWa-
tering Gifts for Any Occassion! SAVE
20% on qualifying gifts over $29. Fresh
dipped berries starting at $19.99! Visit
www.berries.com/happy or Call 888-479-
6008 (wcan)
650 Furniture
SPACESAVER BUNKBED/DESK COM-
BINATION. With mattress/ shelves. Like
new. $100. 608-835-9725
652 GaraGe saLes
EDGERTON 1408 County Rd A, Moving
Sale. 8/17 8am-3pm. Toro Snow Blower,
treadmill, ping pong table, holiday deco-
rations, antiques, misc
OREGON 4711 Holm road 8/16-8/17
9am-5pm. Many great items for every-
one. See Craig's list.
OREGON 4796 Schneider Dr. Aug
14-16, 8am-5pm. Queen bed, tent, toys,
crib, changing table, clothes, etc.
OREGON 6296 Onwentsia Trl.
8/16 and 8/17, 8am-5pm. Baby-
4 years clothes and gear.
OREGON 532 Lexington Dr. August
15-17, 8am-4pm. Household, jewelry,
couch, love seat, mirrors, toys, post
cards, Halloween, Red wing crock, exc-
ersize cruncher, china cabinet.
STOUGHTON- 2602 Iverson Rd 8/15-
8/17 7am-5pm Antiques, tools, toys,
linens, household misc. furniture, lawn
mowers. Cash Only
STOUGHTON- 2704 & 2685 Rolling
View Rd. 8/15 5:00pm-?, 8/16 8am-?
8/17 8am-12pm. Teen boys/girls, name/
brand clothing, plus/sizes, household,
riding lawn mower.
STOUGHTON- 3144 Cty Hwy A 8/16-
8/17 7am-3pm. 8/18 8am-12pm. Number
system on Fri numbers given at 6am.
Antiques: primitive/cabinets, iron/beds,
wicker, collectibles, household items,
tools. Cash & charge cards accepted.
Sorry No checks. See Craigslist, State
Journal.
STOUGHTON- 528 & 532 Nygaard. 8/16
12pm-4pm, 8/17 9am-4pm. Reduction
sale. Lots of misc.
664 LaWn & Garden
3'-12' EVERGREEN & Shade Trees.
Pick up or Delivery! Planting Available!
DETLOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444
(wcan)
666 medicaL & heaLth suPPLies
ATTENTION SLEEP Apnea sufferers
with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP replace-
ment supplies at little or no cost. Plus
Free home delivery. Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection. 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL ALERT FOR SENIORS - 24/7
monitoring. Free Equipment. Free ship-
ping. Nationwide Services. $29.95/month
Call Medical Guardian today. 877-863-
6622 (wcan)
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
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Mowing / Trimming / Clean-up
Tree/Shrub Pruning
Planting & Edging
Shredded Bark & More!
Jeff 608-575-5984
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• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
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** DRIVERS **
FULL-TIME DRIVERS
FOR REGIONAL WORK
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s
Private Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI.
Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreen’s
stores within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND,
SD). Workweek is Tuesday-Saturday. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
• Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
• Full Beneft Pkg. includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
• 401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
• Paid Holidays and Vacation
• Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min.
2 yrs. tractor-trailer exp. & meet all DOT require-
ments. Send resumé to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755.
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LARGE CLASSIC MOTOR CYCLE AUCTION
COPUS TOWING AND RECOVERY, LLC
August 11, 6:00 P.M. to August 17, 2013, 10:00 A.M.
MOTORCYCLES/CAR/SUPPLIES: Internet Starts August 11,
2013, 6:00 P.M. Ends Live/Internet Auction, May 17, 2013, 10:00 A.M.
Open House on August 13, 4-7 P.M. at 4775 Co Hwy B, Oregon.
Appointments can be made at 608-516-5401.
Go to www.wanlessauctiongroup.com.
TERMS: Cash or checks accepted. Credit cards are required for reg-
istration with Proxi Bid. 13% buyers fee per lot. Cash or check there
will be a discount of 3%. Vehicles and supplies are property of the State
Bank of Cross Plains. Announcements at auction take precedence. 5.5%
sales tax applies.
Go to www.wanlessauctiongroup and link to Proxi Bid
to review catalog and bid.
TERMS: 13% buyers fee will be added to all purchases. Cash and checks
accepted with a 3% discount. Credit cards will be accepted and required
to register with Proxi Bid.
ABSOLUTE INTERNET AUCTIONS
WANLESS AUCTION GROUP
Lyle Wanless #WI #22, Broker
4658 Hwy. 92, Brooklyn, WI 53521
Office: (608) 455-8784 Cell: (608) 516-5401
Email: lyle@wanlessauctiongroup.com
See listing at www.wanlessauctiongroup.com
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Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
AUCTIONS
August 24th! 30+ properties up for auction. All
types. Opening bids below list prices! Bid Online!
AugustAuction.com 866-643-1984 Registered
Auctioneer Wade Micoley #2647-052 (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get Paid
Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive & Benefts!
Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-6079 (CNOW)
Get more home time on Transport America’s regional
runs. Great miles, equipment + extras. Enjoy Transport
America’s great driver experience! TAdrivers.com or
866-204-0648. (CNOW)
Drivers - Day Cab Drivers Wanted. Competitive Pay,
HOME DAILY. Join the deBoer team now! deBoer
Transportation 800-825-8511 Apply Online: www.
deboertrans.com (CNOW)
Gordon Trucking CDL-A Drivers Needed Up to $3,000
Sign-on Bonus! Starting Pay Up to $.44 cpm Full
Benefts, Excellent Hometime, No East Coast. Call 7
days/wk! GordonTrucking.com 866-565-0569 (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
August 15, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
668 musicaL instruments
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 Pets
Cats and Kittens for adoption. Healthy,
friendly. 608-848-4174 www.Angels-
Wish.org. Verona.
676 PLants & FLoWers
PROFLOWERS Send bouquets for any
occasion! Birthday, Anniversary or Just
Because! Take 20% off your order over
$29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/ActNow
or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
688 sPortinG Goods
& recreationaL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
& Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 eLectronics
DIRECTV OVER 140 channels only
$29.99 a month. Call now! Triple Sav-
ings. $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade
to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!
Start saving today. 800-320-2429 (wcan)
DISH NETWORK STARTING at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
888-719-6981 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for
12 mo's) Options from ALL major service
providers. Call Aceller today to learn
more! 866-458-1545 (wcan)
696 Wanted to Buy
TOP PRICES
Any kind of scrap metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick-up
Property Clean Out
Honest/Fully Insured/U Call-We Haul
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 rentaLs
2 BEDROOM Townhouse apartment w/
full basement on Racetrack Rd-Stough-
ton $775/mo includes utilities. No Pets.
Security deposit and references are
required. Available Now for an approved
applicant. Call 608-241-6609
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
SPECTACULAR 2BR Stoughton. Quiet
historic neighborhood, Master bedroom
balcony overlooks 2-story living room.
Hardwoods, designer ceramic bath, sky-
lights, C/A. No Smoking. 608-238-1692
STOUGHTON- 2 b/4 unit on dead end st.
One up, remodeled bath, kitchen, dish-
washer, micro-stove-ref. window blinds-
oak-floors storage coin laundry. Heat,
water/sewer included. $715/mo 1 month
deposit. One cat okay. 561-310-5551
VERONA DUPLEX 3 bedroom. 1-1/2
bath, garage, A/C. 845-7041
VERONA ONE Bedroom Available
immediately. Heat Included, $520/Month.
Dave 608-575-0614
720 aPartments
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
VERONA 514 Topp Ave, 2 bedroom,
spacious, off street parking, A/C. Laundry
hookup, heat included. Available Sep-
tember 1. $690. rent/security deposit.
845-7057
740 houses For rent
LAKE KEGONSA- 3/bed, 2/bath,
screened porch, washer/dyer, pier, car-
port. No/Smoking. 15-20 minutes to
Madison. Lease available. $1500/mo.
608-217-6954
STOUGHTON 4-BDRM, 2 1/2 bath
raised ranch. 2 1/2 car garage. Newly
renovated. No pets. No smoking. $1450
plus utilities. 608-209-8816
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for The Oregon Observer
unless changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
STOUGHTON N MONROE St.
Comfortable 2 bdrm, 1 1/2 bath.
Appliances included: main floor washer/
dryer, central air, 1 car attached garage
w/extra storage space, large deck
overlooking spacious back yard. Very
nice neighborhood. $895. + 1/2 month
rent security deposit. Call Brady at
608-286-5282.
750 storaGe sPaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10 X 5 - 10 X 30
24/7 Access/Security lit.
Short/long term leases
608-334-1191
801 oFFice sPace For rent
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
810 commerciaL &
industriaL For saLe
VERONA CONTRACTOR'S Center
2400 sq. ft. shop with 2 bays
Radiant heat - Hot/Cold water
Bathroom/Shower 600 ft mezzanine
2 separate offices rented in front.
608-513-6273
820 misc. inVestment
ProPerty For saLe
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 40 wooded
acres. $32,000 OBO. CFR taxes. Terms
available. More land available 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE by Owner: Near Copper Har-
bor, MI. 80 wooded Acres. $70,000 OBO.
Montreal River runs thru land. CFR Tax.
Terms available. More land available.
715-478-2085 (wcan)
870 residentiaL Lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895
TOWN OF PLEASANT SPRINGS-
SPRING HILL 1st Addition. .70 wooded
lot. Has well on property. $70,000. Bob
608-873-8267
945 Farm: Land For saLe
60 ACRES of highly productive
farmland. $5000. per acre, land contract
and lease back possible.
Call 608-558-0933
970 horses
REGISTERED QUARTER Horses.
12th Annual Production Sale. Saturday
August 24, 6pm. Blair, WI 17 foals.
608-989-9300 www.capouchlivestock.
com (wcan)
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
990 Farm: serVice
& merchandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
Now hiring for PM shifts, full and
part-time hours available.
Shift & weekend differentials,
paid training & an array of
benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
www.elderspan.com
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
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Now hiring for PM shifts, full and
part-time hours available.
Shift & weekend differentials,
paid training & an array of
benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
www.elderspan.com
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
Now hiring for PM shifts, full and
part-time hours available.
Shift & weekend differentials,
paid training & an array of
benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
to download
an application:
www.elderspan.com
608.243.8800
for more
information call:
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
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Join Epic’s Temp Team
Looking for short term job assignments? Apply to be a mem-
ber of our internal temp team. We have assignments ranging
from one week to three months, sometimes on short notice.
The majority of our shifts are Monday – Friday, regular busi-
ness hours and require 40 hours per week.
Roles may be available for the following:
Administration/Offce Assistants
We are looking for energetic individuals with strong
communication skills and attention to detail to work as
assistants in several areas. Duties may require answering
phones, scheduling appointments, copying, fling, and
working on administrative tasks.
Culinary
Epic’s Users Group Meeting is happening soon and we
are looking for people September 8th-20th. Duties would
include cutting fruit and vegetables, traying food, building
sandwiches, packing bakery items, etc. No specifc experience
is required - just the willingness to work hard.
Horticulture
Responsibilities include assisting horticulturists with
maintenance of garden areas, green roofs, orchards, and
prairies. You’ll also be responsible for mowing, trimming,
mulching, watering, weeding, and composting. Experience
using commercial mowers, trimmers, blowers, and hand
tools is required.
Please apply online at http://careers.epic.com/position-218.
Or email your resumé to careers@epic.com.
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Web Designer
Are you a skilled web designer? Does working in an
ever changing, fast-paced environment excite you? Are
you a self-motivated person with creative ideas? If you
answered yes to all three of these questions, you might
be the TH Media’s next Web Designer.
This Web Designer position is located in Dubuque,
IA. Responsibilities include developing, testing, and
auditing of THonline, other TH Media websites, and
our mobile site. In addition, this person should also
be skilled in print design, provide a high level of timely
and accurate customer service, and stay abreast of the
latest trends as it relates to web development.
To be considered for this position, you must have
a two-year college degree in a related feld (or the
equivalent in experience) and one to three years’
experience with Web site creation, design and online
publishing. Additionally, experience with content
management systems is a plus.
For consideration, apply online at
http://www.wcinet.com/careers
TH Media, a division of Woodward Communications,
is an Equal Opportunity Employer
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Get Connected
Find updates and links right away.
Search for us on Facebook as “Oregon Observer” and then LIKE us.
Support your favorite teams all season long with
this guide to Oregon High School’s 2013 match-ups!
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Aug. 23 Baraboo Oregon
Aug. 30 Mount Horeb Mount Horeb
Sept. 6 Monona Grove Oregon
Sept. 13 Waunakee Oregon
Sept. 20 Milton Milton
Sept. 27 Edgewood Oregon
Oct. 4 Fort Atkinson Fort Atkinson
Oct. 11 Stoughton Stoughton
Oct. 18 Monroe Oregon
Sponsored by:
Ed Hefty Construction
1036 Hillcrest Dr. • Oregon
(608) 835-7804 • edhefty.com
VARSITY FOOTBALL
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Aug. 31 West Bend West West Bend
Sept. 7 Verona Area Verona
Sept. 12 Madison West Invite Yahara Course
Sept. 17 Badger Challenge Fort Atkinson
Sept. 21 Wausau East Invite Wausau
Sept. 28 Janesville Craig Janesville
Oct. 5 Stoughton Invite Stoughton
Oct. 12 Albany Invite Albany
Oct. 19 Conference meet Yahara Course
Sponsored by:
Marks Barber & Styling
787 N. Main St. • Oregon
(608) 835-3647 • marksbarber.com
BOYS VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Aug. 20 Wis. Dells invite Away
Aug. 22 Milton invite Away
Aug. 26 Waunakee invite Away
Aug. 27 Milton Home
Aug. 28 Portage invite Away
Aug. 29 Fort Atkinson Away
Sept. 4 Milton invite Away
Sept. 7 Middleton invite Away
Sept. 10 Stoughton Away
Sept. 16 Madison Edgewood Home
Sept. 17 Monona Grove Away
Sept. 18 Badger Cup Away
Sept. 25 Conference meet Away
Sponsored by:
Gerlach Wholesale Flooring
112 Janesville Street • Oregon
(608) 835-8276
GIRLS VARSITY GOLF
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Aug. 24 Kettle Moraine Away
Aug. 27 Waunakee Home
Aug. 30 Pewaukee quad Away
Aug. 31 Pewaukee quad Away
Sept. 3 Reedsburg Away
Sept. 5 Baraboo Home
Sept. 6 Madison East Away
Sept. 10 Milton Home
Sept. 13 Arrowhead quad Away
Sept. 14 Arrowhead quad Away
Sept. 17 Stoughton Away
Sept. 20 Belleville Home
Sept. 24 Monroe Home
Sept. 26 Fort Atkinson Home
Oct. 1 Madison Edgewood Away
Oct. 3 Madison Memorial Away
Oct. 8 Monona Grove Away
Sponsored by:
Diane Sliter Agency
835-5100
BOYS VARSITY SOCCER
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Aug. 27 Wis. Dells Home
Aug. 29 Milton Home
Aug. 31 Belleville invite Away
Sept. 5 Monona Grove Away
Sept. 7 Monona Grove invite Away
Sept. 12 Madison Edewood Away
Sept. 19 Stoughton Home
Sept. 21 Middleton invite Away
Sept. 26 Sauk Prairie Away
Oct. 1 Mount Horeb Away
Oct. 3 Monroe Home
Oct. 5 Reedsburg invite Away
Oct. 10 Fort Atkinson Away
Oct. 12 Conference meet Away
Oct. 17 Waunakee Home
Sponsored by:
Stoughton Hospital
Oregon Rehab & Sports Medicine Clinic
990 Janesville St. • Oregon
608-835-5373 • stoughtonhospital.com
GIRLS VARSITY VOLLEYBALL
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Aug. 31 West Bend West West Bend
Sept. 7 Verona Area Verona
Sept. 14 All-American Invite Luther College
Sept. 17 Badger Challenge Fort Atkinson
Sept. 21 Wausau East Invite Wausau
Sept. 28 Janesville Craig Janesville
Oct. 5 Stoughton Invite Stoughton
Oct. 12 Albany Invite Albany
Oct. 19 Conference meet Yahara Course
Sponsored by:
Bill’s Food Center
787 N. Main St. • Oregon
(608) 835-3939
GIRLS VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY
Get sports scores/results and
photos online at:
connectoregonwi.com
and in your
weekly hometown newspaper
Call (608) 835-6677
for subscription information
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Aug. 21 McFarland Invite McFarland
Aug. 22 Waunakee Oregon
Aug. 26 Baraboo Baraboo
Aug. 29 Portage Poartage
Sept. 3 Milton Oregon
Sept. 5 Stoughton Stoughton
Sept. 7 Stoughton Invite Stoughton
Sept. 12 Monroe Oregon
Sept. 17 Fort Atkinson Fort Atkinson
Sept. 19 Edgewood Oregon
Sept. 20/21 Waunakee Waunakee
Sept. 23 Monona Grove Mon. Grove
Sept. 24 Edgerton Oregon
Sept. 27/28 Badger Conference Nielsen T.S.
GIRLS VARSITY TENNIS
Sponsored by:
883 N. Main St. • 835-2265 • www.ub-t.com
DATE OPPONENT LOCATION
Sept. 3 Stoughton Invite Stoughton
Sept. 10 Milton Oregon
Sept. 17 McFarland McFarland
Sept. 24 Monroe Oregon
Oct. 1 Edgewood Edgewood
Oct. 5 Middleton Middleton
Oct. 8 Monona Grove Oregon
Oct. 15 Stoughton Stoughton
Oct. 19 Fort Atkinson Invite Fort Atkinson
Oct. 22 Fort Atkinson Fort Atkinson
Nov. 1 Conference meet Fort Atkinson
GIRLS VARSITY SWIMMING
Sponsored by:
Gary Wille’s Auto & Tire Center, Inc.
Complete Car & Truck Repair, Gas and Diesel
870 N. Main St., Oregon, WI
(608) 835-7339 • www.willeauto.com
16 - The Oregon Observer - August 15, 2013