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AIRCRAFT

NAVWEPS O1-45HHC-5O1A
FIT PROCD & CHARAC

Supplemental NATOPS Flight Manual


NAVY MODEL

'AIRCRAFT
. - '. ( TITLE UNCLASSIFIED)

.;. .
"

THIS PUBLICATION SUPPLEMENTS NAVWEPS O1-45HHC-5O1 NATOPS FLIGHT MANUAL FOR MODEL F-8C AIRCRAFT

. . . . f ' ' ' ' ~ " ' " '


THIS PUBLICATION SUPERSEDES NAVWEPS O1-45HHC-5O1 A DATED 1 NOVEMBER 1963, WHICH SHOULD BE REMOVED FROM THE FILES AND DESTROYED.
:

This publication shall not be carried in aircraft on combat missions or whe reasonable chance of its falling into the bands of an unfriendly nation, , .authorized by the "Operational Commander."
. ' ISSUED BY AUTHORITY OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE CHIEF OF THE BUREAU OF NAVAL WEAPONS ' /I

aV S.-

MflV t 8 "^ ' '"

NOTICE This document contains information affecting the national de-. . _ ' CENTER fense of the United States within the meaning of the Espionage Laws, Title LftNfaLEY * " ' . ' 18, U. S. C, Sections 793 and 794. The transmission or the revelation of LIBRARY, its contents in any manner to an unauthorized person is prohibited by law. HAMPTON, VIRG NIA'

C401342

PAGES TO SAME PUBLICATION OF PREVIOUS DATE

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AIRCRAFT

NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A
GROUP 4 DOCUMENT D E C L A S S I F I E D AFTER DOD OIR 12 Y E A R S

520O. 10

FIT PROCD & CHARAC

Supplemental NATOPS Flight Manual


NAVY MODEL
PERFORM DATA

F-8C AIRCRAFT
THIS PUBLICATION SUPPLEMENTS NAVAIR O1-45HHC-5O1 NATOPS FLIGHT MANUAL FOR MODEL F-8C AIRCRAFT.

(NASA-CR-168454) S U P P L E M E N T A L MATOPS FilGHT M A N U A L N A V i MODEL F-8C AlflCBAFO: (VougJit Aeronautics, Dallas, Tex.) 160 p

mammauaue^aaBam
00/01

N82-72146 Onclas 02662

This publication shall not be carried in aircraft on combat missions or when there is a reasonable chance of its falling into the bands of an unfriendly nation, unless specifically authorized by the "Operational Commander."
ISSUED BY AUTHORITY OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS AND UNDER THE DIRECTION OF COMMANDER, NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND

NOTICEThis document contains information affecting the national defence of the United States within the meaning of the Espionage Laws, Title 18, U. S. G, Sections 793 and 794. The transmission or the revelation of its contents in any manner to an unauthorized person is prohibited by law.

15 August 1964
Changed 15 July 1966^

CR01243 *

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

Reproduction for nonmilitary use of the information or illustrations contained in this publication is not permitted without specific approval of the issuing service (NASC or AMC). The policy for use of Classified Publications is established for the Air Force in AFR 205-1 and for the Navy in Navy Regulations, Article 1509.
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INSERT LATEST CHANGED PAG ES. DESTROY SUPERSEDED PAGES.

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NOTE: The portion of the text affected by the curi ent change is indicated by a vertical line in the outer margins of the page.

Page No.
*i
1-7 . . *l-8 . . *l-9 . . 4-7 . . *11-30 . M1-30A . *11-30B . "11-30C . *11-30D . *ll-37. . *11-50A . *11-50B . *11-50C . M1-50D . "11-50E . *11-50F . *11-50G. *11-50H. *11-50J . *11-50K. *11-50L. *11-50M. *ll-64 . *ll-65 . *ll-89 . *11-90 . *11-107 . *11-108 . "Index 2 "Index 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Date of Latest Change 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 1 Dec 1964 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 1 Dec 1964 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966 15 July 1966

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IDENTIFICATION AND DESCRIPTION OF MATERIAL

REV. CLASSIFICATION

KfeVtiiSPS "01-^5BHC-501A, Suppleissntal.HA'jJOBS Flight Manual,';Navy.Model F-8C Aircraft dtd 15 August 196^ ^ (WUQf Control !

/J

jTITi-S

H. R. Mabsy Claiaf of Flight Test Operations


E COP/ '
.-8VONATURE OATS TITUK

This material contains information affecting th national defense of the United States within the meaning of the Espionage Laws, Title 18, U.S.C., Sections 793 *nd 794, the transmission or revelation of which in any manner to an unauthorized person Is_ma*fc'*l1bv law.

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS WASHINGTON, D. C. 20350

LETTER OF PROMULGATION

1. The Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization Program (NATOPS) is a positive approach towards improving combat readiness and achieving a substantial reduction in the aircraft accident rate. Standardization, based on professional knowledge and experience provides the basis for development of an efficient and sound operational procedure. The standardization program is not planned to stifle individual initiative but rather, it will aid the Commanding Officer in increasing his unit's combat potential without reducing his command prestige or responsibility. 2. This Manual is published for the purpose of standardizing ground and flight procedures, and does not include tactical doctrine. Compliance with the stipulated manual procedure is mandatory. However, to remain effective this manual must be dynamic. It must stimulate rather than stifle individual thinking. Since aviation is a continuing progressive profession, it is both desirable and necessary that new ideas and new techniques be expeditiously formulated and incorporated. It is a user's publication, prepared by and for users, and kept current by the users in order to achieve maximum readiness and safety in the most efficient and economical manner. Should conflict exist between the training and operating procedures found in this manual and those found in other publications, this manual will govern. 3. Checklists and other pertinent extracts from this publication necessary to normal operations and training should be made and may be carried in Naval aircraft for use therein. It is forbidden to make copies of this entire publication or major portions thereof without specific authority of the Chief of Naval Operations.

PAUL H. RAMSEY Vice Admiral, USN Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air)

Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

INTERIM CHANGE SUMMARY


CHANGE NUMBER CHANGE DATE PAGES AFFECTED PURPOSE
Previously incorporated or cancelled

1 through 13

SERVICE CHANGE SUMMARY


The following is a list of service changes which apply to this manual but which may not be incorporated in the aircraft. The service change is briefly described and, where applicable, information is given for visual determination of incorporation.
Service Change (Type Change and Change Number) Aircraft Service Changes: 335
338

Description

Visual Identification

Relocates instrument static ports. Addition of dual pylon provisions. Provides' for continuous operation of the engine ignitor during missile firing or jettisoning operations.

Airframe Change 451

New static port visible forward of two existing ports. Dual pylons mounted on fuselage. Toggle switch on throttle quadrant decaled CONT IGN.

UNCLASSIFIED

Changed 15 July 19*66

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

CONTENTS
Section 1
Part 4

- AIRCRAFT
Aircraft Operating Limitations

1-1

Section IV - FLIGHT PROCEDURES AND CHARACTERISTICS


Part 2 Flight Characteristics

4-1

Section XI - PERFORMANCE DATA


Part 1 Part 2 Introduction Performance Charts

11-1

o
UNCLASSIFIED Hi

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

make a good

APPROACH
to your
FLIGHT MANUAL
\

This publication contains classified materials supplementing the unclassified F-8C NATOPS Flight Manual. The section and part headings of the unclassified manual have been retained to facilitate cross-referencing between publications. It is essential for you to understand that section I, part 4 is the only authorized source of operating limitations, and that changes will be published in the form of regular or interim changes of this supplement.

o
nr
UNCLASSIFIED

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

section I

aircraft

CONTENTS
PART 1-AIRCRAFT AND ENGINE* PART 2-SYSTEMS* PART 3-AIRCRAFT SERVICING* PART 4-AIRCRAFT OPERATING LIMITATIONS
Introduction Airspeed Limitations f ~. __ . 12 1 -. 2 : 12
.
r

Power Control Hydraulic System


Trim and Stabilization System

1-2

Maneuvers Acceleration Limitations Engine Limitations o ^^ ~


External Stores Limitations

12 13 _ _
_

13 ^
13

Refer to unclassified NATOPS Flight Manual

1-1

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

PART 4 - AIRCRAFT OPERATING LIMITATIONS


TRIM AND STABILIZATION SYSTEM
Note Refer to NATOPS Flight Manual for additional limitations. In the clean condition, with only the roll stabilization system inoperative, restrictions are not changed from basic aircraft restrictions. With yaw stabilization and rudder-aileron interconnect systems inoperative, the following restriction applies: Maximum permissible load factors See figures 1-1 and 1-2.

O
f

INTRODUCTION
This section contains classified limitations that must be observed during normal operation of the aircraft. They are derived from actual flight tests and demonstrations. Limitations which are merely associated with a certain technique or specialized phase of operation are discussed appropriately in sections III, IV, and V and other parts of this section.

AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
Note Refer to NATOPS Flight Manual for additional limitations. The maximum permissible indicated airspeeds in smooth or moderately turbulent air are as follows: With arresting hook, landing gear, speed brake and wing leading edge droop retracted and wing down As shown in figures 11 and 12 Carrying Sidewinder 1A missile with MK 8 warhead .Refer to figure 1-5

MANEUVERS
The following maneuvers are permitted if the restrictions of figures 1-1 through 1-3 are observed: Loop Chandelle Immelmann turn Aileron rolls Note

POWER CONTROL HYDRAULIC SYSTEM


Note Refer to NATOPS Flight Manual for additional limitations. With one power control hydraulic system inoperative, operation is restricted to the following limits: Maximum acceleration (PC 1 out) 4.0 g (PC 2 out) same as yaw stab inoperative (figures 1-1 and 1-2)

Aileron rolls shall not be initiated at less than 1.0 g. During rolls, the stick shall not be moved forward of the level flight longitudinal stick position, for the entry airspeed used. The following maneuvers are not permitted: Rolls in excess of 360 bank angle change

Intentional spins

O
1-2

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

ACCELERATION LIMITATIONS
Note Except as noted, the following restrictions apply for the basic aircraft with wing down, gear up and with speed brake or leading edge cruise droop extended or retracted. The maximum permissible accelerations for flight in smooth air at gross weights of 24,000 pounds or less are as shown in figures 1-1 and 1-2. When flying in conditions of moderate turbulence, it is essential that accelerations resulting from deliberate maneuvers be reduced 2.0 g below those shown in figure 1-3 in order to minimize the possibility of overstressing the airplane as a result of the combined effects of gust and maneuvering loads. As gross weights are increased above 24,000 pounds, the permissible accelerations decrease. To determine the maximum permissible accelerations at higher gross weights, see figure 13. The maximum permissible accelerations for rolling pullouts are further reduced as a result of aerodynamic effects at altitude as shown in figures 11 and 12. The maximum negative acceleration is 2.4 g up to 725 KIAS and 0 g above 725 KIAS. Note Refer to section IV, part 2, for flight characteristics and erroneous accelerometer indications during rolling pullouts near acceleration limits. With inflight refueling probe extended, the permissible acceleration range is 1.0 g to 3.0 g. Permissible range in the landing configuration is 0 to 2.0 g.

Following spin recovery, with wing down and landing droop extended, the permissible acceleration range is 0 to 3.5 g. With leading edge droop unlocked (barberpole indication) , the permissible acceleration range is 0 to 3.5 g.

ENGINE LIMITATIONS
Note Refer to NATOPS Flight Manual for additional limitations.
ENGINE OPERATION

Turbojet engines should be operated at the lowest thrust conditions compatible with mission and flight requirements and maintained within the specified military rating and maximum rating time limits whenever practicable. However, if the mission or flight conditions absolutely necessitate operation at these ratings for longer than 30 minutes military or 15 minutes maximum, the thrust should not be reduced for only a short interval in adherence to these limits but operation continued at the high thrust level until conditions permit a reduction in thrust. Continuous negative g operation is limited to 10 seconds.

EXTERNAL STORES LIMITATIONS


Refer to figure 1-4.

1-3

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

FLIGHT OPERATING LIMITATIONS

ORIGINAL AIRSPEED SYSTEM (BEFORE ASC 335) BASIC AIRPLANE, TWO OR FOUR SIDEWINDER CONFIGURATION, TWO OR FOUR ZUNI PACK MAXIMUM ACCELERATION G UNITS (SEE NOTE 1) 24,000 LBS

8 o

FULL AILERON 180 ROLLS

LU

a a

5 u

O
20
FULL AILERON >C 180 ROILS

10

10

100

300

400

500

600

INDICATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

1. Refer to Figure 1-3 for effect of gross weight an acceleration limits from sea level to 30,000 feet. 2. Refer to section IV, NATOPS Flight Manual, for effects of yaw-stabilization failure on flight characteristics. 3. Refer to Figure 1-5 for airspeed limitations when carrying Sidewinder 1A missile with MK-8 warhead.

Figure 1-J

1-4

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

FLIGHT OPERATING LIMITATIONS


IMPROVED AIRSPEED SYSTEM (AFTER ASC 335) BASIC AIRPLANE, TWO OR FOUR SIDEWINDER CONFIGURATION, TWO OR FOUR ZUNI PACKS MAXIMUM ACCELERATION G UNITS (SEE NOTE 1) 24,000 IBS

MAXIMUM SPEED CLEAN CONDITION STOPS 90 ROUS

FULL AILERON 360 ROLLS

>

^.S

STX

S If.

X.FUIL AILERON '/ 180 ROUS

100

300

400

500

600

700

INDICATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

1. Refer to Figure 1-3 for effect of gross weight on acceleration limits from sea level to 30,000 feet. 2. Refer to section IV, NATOPS Flight Manual, for effects of yaw-stabilization failure on flight characteristics. 3. Refer to Figure 1-5 for airspeed limitations when carrying Sidewinder 1A missile with MK-8 warhead.

Figure 1-2

1-5

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC75t)1A

ACCELERATION LIMITS VERSUS GROSS WEIGHT

CQ

bfi

K H W O 0

Aileron rolls shall not be initiated at less than 1.0 g. During rolls the stick shall not be moved forward of the level flight longitudinal stick position for the entry airspeed used.

-2

-4

22

24

26

28

GROSS WEIGHT - 1000 LB CLEAN CONDITION

SEA LEVEL TO 30,000 FEET


60482-55

Figure 1-3

1-6

NAVWEPS 01-46HHCHC-501A

JHP*

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

r,

EXTERNAL STORES LIMITATIONS


STATIONS - FUSELAGE (NOTE 1) STORES DUAL PYLONS Upper Lower Upper Lower Lett Left Right Right PYlONS r wwa Left Right MAXIMUM INDICATED AIRSPEED Of MACH NUMBER (WHICHEVER IS LESS) (NOTE 2) ; FIRING CARRYING KIAS CARRYING FIRING OR JETTISONING Do not fire above 65,000 feet. Use military rated thrust for firing above 60,000 feet. The minimum airspeed for firing above 50,000 feet varies linearly between 180 KIAS at 50,000 feet and 205 KIAS at 60,000 feet. When firing above 55,000 feet or jettisoning above 15,000 feet, place the continuous engine ignition switch ON (or manually depress the ignite microswitch) at least 10 seconds before firing to prevent possible engine flameout. Firing of SW-1C missiles from upper right dual pylon station is only permitted for operational necessity, because of excessive paint erosion. Do not fire above 50,000 feet. Above 15,000 feet, place the continuous engine ignition switch ON (or manually depress the ignite microswitch) at least 10 seconds before firing to prevent possible engine flameout. NORMAL ACCELERATION REMARKS

IMN

SIDEWINDER (-1A OR -1C)

Figure 15 Sheets 1 & 2 (See Note 3) Figures 1-1 and 1-2

Aircraft Limits (See remarks) Figures 1-1 Sheets 1 & 2 __j ana Figure 1-2

Og-2g

ZUNI ROCKETS (IN LAU-33/A OR LAU-35/A ROCKET PACKS ON AERO3A LAUNCHERS ONLY

Figures 11 and 1-2

0.95

0.5g-1.5g

1. A check (V) indicates station occupancy. 2. When carrying stores in combination, the more restrictive limits apply. 3. Figure 1-5 lists additional airspeed limitations when carrying Sidewinder 1A missile with MK-8 warhead.
60182-5-13

Figure 14

G
Changed 1 December 1964

1-7

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS

I
H w w

AIRCRAFT CARRYING SIDEWINDER 1A WITH MK 8 MOD 0/1/2 WARHEAD STANDARD DAY-59F (15 C) AT SEA LEVE

50

40

III IV 30

20

10

0.8

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

2.2

MACH NUMBER

LIMITATIONS ZONE I: ZONE II: ZONE III: ZONE IV: No Restrictions Repeated excursions of no more'than 10 minutes each permissible Repeated excursions of no more than 5 minutes each permissible; inspection of warheads recommended after each excursion into Zones II and III. Avoid

1. Limitations do not apply to aircraft climb schedules. 2. If limitations of Zones II, III and IV are violated, the warhead should be destroyed by jettisoning the missile, if possible. If not possible, landing on the carrier or airstrip can be made with low order risk. 3. Limitations apply only to the Mk 8 Mod 0/1/2 warhead. The Mk 8 Mod 3 warhead is unrestricted.
604825-8NB

Figure _LrS ttheef


1-8
Changed 15 July 1966

BblA

Section I Aircraft Operating Limitations

AIRSPEED LIMITATIONS
AIRCRAFT CARRYING SIDEWINDER 1A WITH MK 8 MOD 0/1/2 WARHEAD HOT DAY-103F (39.5C) AT SEA LEVEL

50

40

II

w Q

30

20
w
CO V3

CD

10

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

MACH NUMBER

LIMITATIONS ZONE I: ZONE II: ZONE III: ZONE IV: No Restrictions Repeated'excursions of no more than 10 minutes each permissible Repeated excursions of no more than 5 minutes each permissible; inspection of warheads recommended after each excursion into Zones II and III. Avoid

1. Limitations do not apply to aircraft climb schedules. 2. If limitations of Zones II, III and IV are violated, the warhead should be destroyed by jettisoning the missile, if possible. If not possible, landing on carrier or airstrip can be made with low order risk. 3. Limitations apply only to the Mk 8 Mod 0/1/2 warhead. The Mk 8 Mod 3 warhead is unrestricted.
6048259NB

Figure J-5 fSheef 2) Changed 15 July 1966

1-9

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

section IV

flight procedures and characteristics

CONTENTS
PART 1- FLIGHT PROCEDURES* PART 2-FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS
4-2

Unit Horizontal Tail

4-2
4>2

Level Flight Maneuvering Flight

4-3 4-3
4-8

Angle of Attack

4-8

*Refer to unclassified NATOPS Flight Manual

o
UNCLASSIFIED 4-1

Section IV Flight Characteristics

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

PART 2 - FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS

INTRODUCTION

UNIT HORIZONTAL TAIL


Longitudinal stick forces (figure 4-1) are light and are determined by stick position away from trim, rate of stick motion, g load, and pitch acceleration.

Note Refer to NATOPS Flight Manual for additional information.

SPEED BRAKE
The Crusader's operating regime covers an extremely wide band of flight conditions ranging from the low speeds required for carrier operations, through the speeds required for long-range cruising flight, to high speed flight at low and high altitudes. Flight stabilization, stick variable gain, a two-position wing, and fixed ventral fins are utilized to permit satisfactory operation throughout the flight envelope. As the speed brake extends, it causes a nose-up trim change under all flight conditions. At subsonic speeds this trim change is so small as to be negligible, but at supersonic speeds the magnitude increases gradually until, at 1.55 IMN, about 15 pounds of push force is required to offset the trim change.

4-2

UNCLASSIFIED

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section IV Flight Characteristics

LEVEL FLIGHT

MAXIMUM SPEED

Figure 42 illustrates the maximum speed capabilities of the aircraft for military and maximum thrust in level flight with and without external stores. Do not expect to achieve the speeds shown under all operating conditions. Actual speed achieved in any flight may exceed or fail to reach the values shown, depending upon gross weight differences, atmospheric conditions and the status of engine trim.

maneuvering at low altitudes, and avoid abrupt control applications. Pitch control is more sensitive with the aft center-of-gravity positions which occur with 1,000 pounds or less fuel in the main system, and caution must be exercised to avoid overcontrolling. For normal operation at all altitudes, particularly below 20,000 feet, the aircraft should be flown as nearly in trim as possible. The control system is least sensitive when operated near trim where action of the variable-gain linkage results in relatively large stick deflections per unit deflection of the horizontal tail. Because of the rapidity with which flight conditions change at low altitudes with combat thrust, precise trimming is difficult. Recommend minimum trimming be attempted during a combat thrust climb below 20,000 feet until familiar with the trimming characteristics in this flight regime. Be aware of the acceleration and deceleration resulting from using afterburner or speed brake* at low altitudes and the consequent possibility of overcontrolling. Any oscillation resulting from overcontrolling will be satisfactorily damped by releasing the control stick. Supersonic pullouts are buffet free, and limit loads can be imposed on the aircraft even at the higher altitudes. It is recommended that the Crusader pilot become thoroughly familiar with the differences of stick force g required at all altitudes before utilizing the aircraft to its maximum capabilities.

MANEUVERING FLIGHT
SYMMETRICAL PULLOUTS

Symmetrical pullouts may be performed in dive recoveries, steady-state turns, tail chases, "rat races," etc. Figure 41 indicates the stick force per g required for maneuvering flight at 10,000 and 40,000 feet. These curves show that the stick force per g required for low-altitude maneuvering is less than that required at higher altitudes. Between 0.80 IMN and 1.00 IMN at low altitudes, the stick force per g is approximately half of that needed for pullouts at higher altitudes.

Horizontal tail effectiveness at high speeds and low altitudes is sufficient to inadvertently exceed the structural limits of the aircraft in abrupt pullups. Be particularly alert to this possibility during high-speed

STICK FORCES
15

STICK FORCE LB/G

10

10,000 FT

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

MACH NUMBER

O
Figure 4-1

60482- 4

4-3

Section IV Flight Characteristics

NAVWEPS 01

MAXIMUM SPEED-LEVEL FLIGHT


Standard Day ENGINE: J57-P-16

Airplanes Prior To Incorporation Of ASC 335

I
Two Sidewinder Missiles Without Missiles Four Sidewinder Missiles (After ASC 338)
_ 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8
2.0

INDICATED MACH NUMBER Airplanes With ASC 335 Incorporated


60
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0 - AH -H 4"

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!N "^51- ^^^ ^ "^ j


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\1 Mi Litary Thrust 1 f s' X 1 t.*' S^ 1 .' * '^^ 1 1 _ ^r 1 . ^ f


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* ^rf^1

X^, ^^

../ X, N ." ^^ ,^* ^ X*

sliC 'X ^<

1. Clean condition 2. Standard day 3. Typical combat gross weight (24, 475 Ib without missiles; 24, 350 Ib with two missiles; 25, 000 Ib with four missiles) 4. Maximum speed with military thrust may be considered the same without missiles or with 2 missiles, and varies only slightly (above 35, 000 feet) with 4 missiles.

20
D 8

* 10
Q

ii.-y n i' II

1 f/ i;7
1.0

1 it/

0.8

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

INDICATED MACH NUMBER


6048265(1)
X-^X

Figure 4-2 fSheet \)

NAVWEPS

HC-501A

Section IV Flight Characteristics

MAXIMUM SPEED-LEVEL FLIGHT-

WITH FOUR ZUNI PACKS (WITH OR WITHOUT ZUNIS) Standard Day ENGINE: J57-P-16

Airplanes Before ASC 335

0.8

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

Data based on: 1. Clean condition 2. Standard day 3. Typical combat gross weight 25,150 pounds with 4 Zuni packs (8 Zuni rockets).

INDICATED MACH NUMBER

Airplanes With ASC 335

PRESSURE ALTITUDE - 1, 000 FT

\
a

h^ ^^^

->

-*,

Mil iary Thrust

\
/

Ma:iimu Thi ust

/
f

, 1 I
II III
0.8 1.0 1.2

i-

to

Or

LN ^
1.4 1.6 1.8
60482-6-5(2)

eo

j^

at

INDICATED MACH NUMBER

Figure 4-2 (Sheet 2)


4-5

Section IV Flight Characteristics

NAVWI

ROLLING ROLLOUTS
60
50
H W

and aileron deflections in order to avoid roll coupling. Except at very low airspeeds, rolls are well coordinated in all parts of the flight envelope denned by the speed, bank angle and stick deflection restrictions in section I, part 4. At low altitudes above 600 KIAS roll rates decrease with increasing speed but are adequate throughout the flight envelope. Avoid large bank angles which may require excessive time to roll back to level flight when flying at high speeds at low altitude. Roll rate can be significantly improved in this flight area by reducing speed and by applying rudder in the direction of roll.
ROLLING PULLOUTS

40

30

20

10

The characteristics of Crusader rolling pullouts (rolling while pulling g, as in breaking off a gunnery run) fall roughly into the following categories: low KIAS subsonic, high KIAS subsonic, and supersonic. These categories occur about as shown in figure 4-3, but the dividing lines are not as sharp as shown.
0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6

TRUEMACH NUMBER Low EAS Subsonic Rolling Pullouts High EAS Subsonic Rolling Pullouts Supersonic Rolling Pullouts
604B

Because the accelerometer is located above the aircraft roll axis, the instrument indicates less than the true load factor during rolls. This erroneous indication is a function of the square of roll rate and the error may be as large as 1.0 g for full aileron rolls in the high KIAS subsonic region. Therefore, the acceleration limits of section I, part 4, can be exceeded without a verifying cockpit indication.

Figure 4-3

ROLLS

Roll stability is positive throughout the flight envelope. At medium and high altitudes, satisfactory roll rates are available throughout the flight envelope. During rolls, the basic aerodynamic characteristics of the aircraft are such that adverse yaw develops at subsonic, transonic, and low supersonic speeds. The aileron-rudder interconnect coordinates rolls by opposing the tendency for buildup of favorable yaw at supersonic speeds and high altitudes. The interconnect is programmed with altitude to introduce maximum adverse yaw above 45,000 feet and minimum below 13,000 feet. However, at very high Mach numbers favorable yaw continues to build up during rolls, making it necessary to restrict permissible roll angles

To prevent exceeding rolling pullout acceleration limits at high KIAS and low altitude when rolling at load factors in excess of 3.0g: Avoid rapid lateral stick movement which might lead to inadvertent aft stick movement. Do not exceed moderate rates of rolL Erroneous cockpit accelerometer indications and the aircraft pitching tendency while rolling both increase with an increase in rate of rolL

4-6

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A Low KIAS Subsonic Rolling Pullouts

Section IV Flight Characteristics

Rolling pullouts at low g are fairly smooth and the rate of roll is quite high if full aileron is used. Some adverse yaw may be noticed. This adverse yaw decreases the rate of roll and tends to make the roll somewhat unsteady. If sufficient g's are pulled to cause buffeting during the rolling pullout, the adverse yaw increases markedly, further reducing the rate of rolL Further increase in g causes further reduction in rate of roll to the point where the aircraft may abruptly stop rolling or even start to roll in the opposite direction. Immediately recover from this condition by neutralizing controls. Failure to do so may precipitate a snap roll maneuver possibly followed by spin entry. In this flight region it appears most efficient and tactically advantageous to perform rolling pullouts at low g to avoid buffeting, thereby taking advantage of higher rates of roll and maintaining a wide margin with respect to the point where snap maneuvers may be encountered.
High KIAS Subsonic Rolling Pullouts

order to avoid overshooting the schedule. Acceleration to climb schedule is rapid, and the climb attitude is very steep. This attitude will flatten somewhat at altitude, and with experience the pilot will learn to anticipate this flattening in order to hold a more constant climb schedule. Extend cruise droop in a climb as airspeed drops below 300 KIAS. Lead the level-off altitude by a few thousand feet except at extremely high altitudes. Due to the rapid acceleration from brake release to climb schedule (approximately 1 minute) when in afterburner, very little time is available to thoroughly check the aircraft before obtaining high speeds. Accordingly, do not attempt afterburner climbs following takeoff until familiar with the aircraft. Military thrust climbs following takeoff are comparable to maximum performance climbs in subsonic aircraft. Extend cruise droop in the climb as airspeed drops below 300 KIAS. Due to airspeed and attitude changes during climbs, a small amount of directional and lateral retrimming is required. ZOOM CLIMBS (See figure 4-4.) A zoom climb permits the high kinetic energy level of supersonic flight to be used to attain altitudes far in excess of those attainable in steady-state climbs. Generally speaking, initiate zooms from .Mach numbers greater than 1.50 and at altitudes of at least 40,000 feet. Under certain atmospheric conditions, elevated Mach numbers can be achieved at 45,000 to 50,000 feet However, it has been found that the apparent advantage of initiating a zoom climb from 50,000 feet decreases because of the increased UHT deflections required to obtain 2.0 g at this altitude. It is recommended that maximum altitude zooms be . started between 40,000 and 45,000 feet at maximum speed.

Rolling pullouts in this region are affected by the same factors that prevail at low KIAS. However, at high KIAS the buffet boundary is so high that the structural limit of the aircraft is obtained before buffeting or adverse yaw become major factors. For this reason, rolling pullouts will be smoother and generally will be buffet-free. An increase in positive load factor (g), without additional aft stick is also characteristic of rolling pullouts in this regime.
Supersonic Rolling Pullout

Supersonic rolling pullouts are extremely smooth and are accompanied by adverse yaw. No buffeting will be encountered at any speed or altitude within the g
limits.

CLIMBS

When an afterburner climb is made following takeoff, establish the climb attitude approximately 0.05 . Mach number short of the desired climb schedule in

Prior to initiation of a zoom climb, set the VGI to zero to establish the correct climb angle. Place the continuous engine ignition switch in ON. Smoothly I apply a load factor of 2.0 g and hold it until 30 climb angle is reached. Hold this climb angle until airspeed drops to 220 KIAS, then begin 0.5 g pushover over the top. To preclude afterburner blowout and possible subsequent engine instability, move the throttle to the MILITARY position at 60,000 feet or 200 KIAS, whichever occurs first.

Changed 1 December 1964

4-7

Section IV Flight Characteristics

NAVWEPS

501A

TYPICAL ZOOM CLIMB


TYPICAL ZOOM CLIMBS TO MINIMUM AIRSPEED OF 170 KNOTS IAS AT TOP OF CLIMB

0.6

0.8

1.0 1.2 1.4 INDICATED MACH NUMBER


Figure 44

1.6

1.8
6048267

During zoom climb maneuvers above 50,000 feet, a minimum oil pressure of 30 psi is permissible. The principal advantage to be gained through use of the "zoom" maneuver is to achieve supersonic speed at an altitude higher than that at which the aircraft can normally become supersonic by first climbing and then accelerating. DIVES (See figure 4-5.) Note Refer to the NATOPS Flight Manual for additional information. Below 20,000 feet aileron effectiveness deteriorates at speeds near the extremes of the permissible Sight .envelope. Considerable retrimming of rudder and ailerons is usually necessary in high-speed dives. Unusual sounds, variously described as those produced by rapidly shooting a gun alongside the cockpit, the dose passage of artillery shells, or the mooing of a cow may be encountered in this area. These sounds have proved to be of no consequence.

ARMAMENT
Note Refer to NATOPS Flight Manual for additional information.
SIDEWINDER MISSILE FIRING

The missiles light off and depart from the aircraft with a dull explosive sound. At high speeds the aircraft will yaw slightly away from the missile after it leaves the launcher. At extreme altitudes and low speeds, engine flameout may occur if the restrictions in section I, part 4 are not observed. If the aircraft is being maneuvered so as to cut sharply across the missile wake in firing runs at moderate altitudes and low speeds, a loud bang may emanate from the engine as a result of momentary compressor stall. This momentary stall is of no consequence, and in most cases engine instruments will not reflect any change, because of the extreme brevity of the condition.

ANGLE OF ATTACK (Sn-ft*n 4-6.)

4-8

NAVWEPS

Section IV Flight Characteristics

DIVE RECOVERY

CONSTANT

4-W

PULLOUT

INDICATED AIRSPEED AT START OF PULLOUT


40

INDICATED ALTITUDE AT START OF PULLOUT 1,000 FEET

VZ*

20

yfrrA
400

500

600 700 800 TRUE AIRSPEED - KNOTS

900

1000

ALTITUDE LOST DURING PULLOUT - 1,000 FEET

12

16

20

24

Refer to figures 1-1 and. l-2.for "G


DATA BASED ON: FLIGHT TESTS DATA AS OF: 1 DECEMBER 1958
80482-9 0(1)

Figure 4-5 (Sheet 1)

Section IV Flight Characteristics

NA

1A

DIVE RECOVERY-

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CONSTANT

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^ 600 700 800 TRUE AIRSPEED - KNOTS


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ALTITUDE LOST DURING PULLOUT - 1,000 FEET

Refer to figures 1-1 and 1-2 for "G" limits.

DATA BASED ON: FLIGHT TESTS DATA AS OF: 1 DECEMBER 1958


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Figwre 4-5 (SJieef 2)

4-10

NA

01A

Section IV Flight Characteristics

ANGLE-OF-ATTACK RELATIONSHIP

1,000

EXAMPLE: Known - Alt, CAS, Wt, Load Factor Sheet 1 A B B-C D Sheet 2 E F G H Sheet 3 J K L M

Calibrated Air Speed Pressure Altitude Mach Number Equivalent Air Speed Gross Weight Load Factor Equivalent Air Speed Coefficient of Lift Coefficient of Lift Mach Number Equivalent Air Speed Correct Angle of Attack

400 Knots 20,000 Ft 0.84 380 Knots 20,000 Lbs 2G 380 Knots 0.21 0.21 0.84 380 Knots 4.0 Deg (71.1 Mils)

60482-69(1)

Figure 4-6 (S/teef IJ

*.!

4-11

Section IV Flight Characteristics

NAVWEPS 0145HHC-501A

ANGLE-OF-ATTACK RELATIONSHIP

GROSS WEIGffT1,000 LB

16

20

60 80 LIFT -1,000 POUNDS

100

120

1.2

1.0

0.8

COEFFICIENT OF LIFT

0 6

0.4

0.2

40

60 80 LIFT -1,000 POUNDS

100

120

60M2-6-9(2)

Figure 4-6 (Sheet 2)

4-12

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section IV Flight Characteristics

ANGLE-OF-ATTACK RELATIONSHIP

1.0 :----:::::::::::::it
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F/gi/re 4-6 fS/ieef 3) I^CLASSIFIEO

4=13

Section IV

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

4-14

UNCLASSIFIED ^

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWB>S 01-45HHC-501A

section XI

performance data

CONTENTS
PART 1- INTRODUCTION
Scope Arrangement Abbreviations and SymbolsAirspeed Conversion Standard Data PART 2-PERFORMANCE CHARTS Using the ChartsComputer Mission Planning Takeoff, Combat Allowance, Descent and Landing Data All Configurations Climb, Cruise, Range and Endurance Decision and Specific Range Data Configuration I Climb, Cruise, Range and Endurance Decision and Specific Range Data Configuration II Climb, Cruise, Range and Endurance Decision and Specific Range Data Configuration III
__ 11-17 _ 11-33 _ __ _

11-2 11-2 11-2 11-2 11-11

..._ 11-37

11-51 11-79 11-97

UNCLASSIFIED

11-1

Section XI Introduction

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

PART 1 - INTRODUCTION
SCOPE
This section contains data from which performance of the aircraft can be predicted for all types of missions. The information is not only useful for flight planning but also serves to illustrate the effects of many of the variables which affect the aircraft's performance. The text includes examples that illustrate the use of individual data charts. These examples consist of assumed flight conditions for which typical performance data items are read from sample charts. The sample charts are overprinted in red with instructions showing the derivation of flight data. Planning problems covering typical missions are also included. These sample mission plans make use of data from most of the charts published in the manual. Knowledge of the chart forms gained by studying the sample charts will prove helpful in use of the mission planning problems. The conditions of landing gear, wing, and wing leading edge extension used to qualify various charts are listed below:
Condition Clean Cruise Landing Description Landing gear retracted, wing down, wing leading edge retracted. Landing gear retracted, wing down, wing leading edge in cruise droop position. Landing gear extended, wing up, wing leading edge in landing droop position.

The remaining performance data are arranged in three configurations with climb, cruise (profile), range and endurance decision and specific range charts grouped together for each configuration. With the exception of climb and specific range charts in configuration I (where two sets of charts are provided), all loadings within a configuration fall within 5% of the data shown. The external stores loadings which pertain to each configuration are listed on the title page of each configuration area.

ABBREVIATIONS AND SYMBOLS


CAS EAS EPR FT GS HW KIAS LB MN NAUT MI SL TAS TW_ Calibrated airspeed Equivalent airspeed Engine pressure ratio Feet Ground speed Headwind Knots indicated airspeed Pound (s) Mach number Nautical miles Sea level True airspeed Tailwind

1/V7

Inverse of the square root of density ratio

AIRSPEED CONVERSION
INTRODUCTION

ARRANGEMENT
Part 1 contains airspeed conversion data and standard atmosphere data (with discussions) and sample problems and charts. Part 2 contains discussions and sample problems to aid in using the performance charts and REST computer, performance charts common to all configurations and performance charts common to specific aerodynamic configurations. The data common to all configurations include takeoff, combat allowance, descent and landing charts.
11-2

The primary use of the airspeed conversion charts is for changing from one type of airspeed notation to another. The relationships between types of airspeed notations are as follows: IAS = indicator reading corrected for instrument error CAS = IAS corrected for position error (figure 11-1) TAS = CAS corrected for altitude and temperature (figure 11-2) EAS = TAS corrected for atmospheric density effects (figure 11-3) Except that angle-of-attack-relationship (figure 4-6) may have to be employed, the primary conversion necessary will be IAS, CAS and TAS conversions using figures 11-1 and 11-2.

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A POSITION ERROR CORRECTION

Section XI Introduction

knots EAS, and to the left to the TRUE PRESSURE ALTITUDE scale to find 26,000 feet. The TRUE MACH NUMBER curves are labeled with the corresponding indicated Mach number to permit conversion from either type of notation to the other.
AIRSPEED - MACH NUMBER CONVERSION

This chart (figure 111) gives the corrections that are to be added to indicated airspeed, altitude and Mach number to obtain calibrated airspeed, pressure altitude and true Mach number. For example, assume an indicated airspeed of 350 knots at 40,000 feet with the airplane in the clean condition. Enter the clean condition airspeed correction chart (sheet 2) at the 350-knot IAS line and project vertically to the 40,000-foot curve. At this intersection project horizontally to the left to obtain a correction of 6.5 knots. Add 6.5 to 350 to obtain a CAS of 356.5 knots. Altitude and Mach number corrections are obtained in a similar manner. Sheet 3 of the position error correction charts presents> correction data in a convenient combined form for reading true speed and altitude when indicated values are known. For instance, assume flight at 500 knots indicated airspeed at 25,000 feet indicated altitude (indicated airspeed and altitude include instrument error corrections). Enter the chart at the intersection of the dashed 500-knot INDICATED AIRSPEED curve and the 25,000-foot INDICATED ALTITUDE line, then read downward to the EQUIVALENT AiKSPEED scale to find 460

This chart (figure 112) gives the true Mach number, calibrated airspeed and true airspeed for standard and nonstandard atmospheric temperatures. For example, assume a CAS of 425 knots at an altitude of 40,000 feet with a free air temperature of -35C. Enter the chart at the 425-knot CAS line and project vertically to the 40,000-foot TRUE PRESSURE ALTITUDE curve. At this intersection, project horizontally to the left to obtain a true Mach number of 1.31. Following the TRUE AIRSPEED curve from the CAS and altitude intersection to the right and downward will give a standard atmosphere TAS of 753 knots. If the temperature is not standard for the altitude (figure 11-4), project horizontally to the right from the CAS and altitude intersection, to the sea level curve, then downward to the -35C FREE AIR TEMPERATURE curve and horizontally to the right to obtain a corrected TAS of 785 knots.

UNCLASSIFIED

11-3

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

POSITION ERROR CORRECTION


ORIGINAL AIRSPEED SYSTEM (PRIOR TO INCORPORATION OF ASC 335)

MODEL: F-8C

STANDARD DAY

ALTITUDE CORRECTION
2000 CLEAN CONDITION PRESSURE ALTITUDE = INDICATED ALTITUDE + CORRECTION

1000
CORRECTION - FEET

-1000

-2000

-3000

-4000

150

250

350

450 550 650 INDICATED AIRSPEED - KNOTS


LANDING CONDITION

750

50
CORRECTION - FEET PRESSURE ALTITUDE = INDICATED ALTITUDE + CORRECTION

-50

120

130

140

150

160

170

180

INDICATED AIRSPEED - KNOTS DATA BASED ON: FLIGHT TESTS DATAiAS OF: 1 DECEMBER 1958
6U82-A-Z(I)

Figure 11-1 (Sheet 1)


11-4

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

POSITION ERROR CORRECTION


AIRSPEED CORRECTION 15
1

ORIGINAL A.RSPEED SYSTEM (PRIOR TO INCORPORATION OF ASC 335)

STANDARD DAY

. _V

10

CORRECTION -KNOTS

I
100 200 300 400 500 600 700
800

900

INDICATED AIRSPEED - KNOTS

CORRECTION - KNOTS

110

130

140

150

160

170

180

190

MACH NUMBER CORRECTION


.05

INDICATED AIRSPEED - KNOTS

:: CLEAN CONDITION

CORRECTION - MACH NO.

-.15 -.20
..25

: TRUE MACH NO. = INDICATED MACH NO. + CORRECTION

.5

.6

.7

.8

.9

1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0

INDICATED MACH NUMBER DATA BASED ON: FLIGHT TESTS DATA AS OF: 1 DECEMBER 1958
F/gure 11-1 (Sheet-2) UNCLASSIFIED
6048 ZA 2(2)

11-5

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

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UNCLASSIFIED

6048Z-A-6Q

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

POSITION ERROR CORRECTIONIMPROVED AIRSPEED SYSTEM (AIRPLANES WITH ASC 335 MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: FLIGHT TESTS DATE: 1 March 1960 ALTITUDE CORRECTION CLEAN CONDITION
PRESSURE ALTITUDE = INDICATED ALTITUDE + CORRECTION! 50,000

INCORPORATED)

-800 100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

550

600

650

700

750

800

850

INDICATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

E
1 O

LANDING CONDITION
-PRESSURE ALTITUDE = INDICATED ALTITUDE + CORRECTION-

50

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170 iso

190 200 210 220

INDICATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

60MZ-A-I (4)

Figure 11-I (Sheet 4) UNCLASSIFIED


11=7

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

POSITION ERROR CORRECTION


MODEL: F-8C IMPROVED AIRSPEED SYSTEM (AIRPLANES WITH ASC 335 DATA BASIS: FLIGHT TESTS
DATE: March I960
10

INCORPORATED)

AIRSPEED CORRECTION

CLEAN CONDITION ::::::::::CAS = IAS + CORRECTiON:::

-5

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CORRECTION KNOTS

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100

200

400 500 600 700 INDICATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

800

900

LANDING CONDITION

120

140

160 180 200 220 INDICATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

240

MACH NUMBER CORRECTION


.04 .02

CLEAN CONDITION
TRUE MACH NO. = INDICATED MACH NO. + CORRECTION

0
-.02 -.04

CORRECTION MACH NO.

-.06 -.08

-.12 -.14

.2

.4

.6

.8

1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 INDICATED MACH NUMBER

2.2
60482- A- 1(5)

Figure U-l
11-8

(Sheet 5)

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

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UNCLASSIFIED

11-9

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

svx - aaadsinv anax

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11-10 UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Introduction

STANDARD DATA
INTRODUCTION

These charts contain standard atmosphere data applicable to all flight operations. They consist of a standard conversion for atmospheric density effects, a tabulation of standard altitude characteristics, a tabulation of range factors for computing effects of winds aloft, and a wind vector diagram.
DENSITY ALTITUDE CHART

fuel information read from the profile. The chart takes into account wind from any direction relative to the course of the airplane. Winds from either side have the same effect on range as long as they are of the same velocity and are at the same relative angle. Assume that the profile charts have been consulted to obtain the distance that can be attained with a specified amount of fuel under no-wind conditions, but that there is an expected headwind or tailwind. Enter the range factors chart at the proper relative wind angle and velocity and read the range factor for the planned true airspeed. Multiply the no-wind range by the range factor to obtain the increased or decreased range (depending upon whether there is a tailwind or headwind) attainable with the same amount of fuel. When a known distance is to be traversed and it is desired to find the fuel and time required using the profile charts and considering wind effects, it is first necessary to find a "factor distance" with which to enter the no-wind profile charts. The known distance is divided by the appropriate range factor to obtain the factor distance, which has no use other than as a device for entering the profile charts to read fuel and time. When using the combat radius profile, it is not necessary to consider headwind or tailwind as long as the true wind is constant during both the outbound and inbound portions of the flight. If the winds outbound and inbound are different, is is necessary to average the range factors for the relative winds outbound and inbound. With a direct crosswind, range will be reduced somewhat and wind must be considered.
CROSSWIND CHART

This chart (figure 11-3) is used to obtain l/V ff (factor used to convert true airspeed to equivalent airspeed) and the density altitude when the pressure altitude and ambient temperature are known. The standard day temperature-altitude relationship is shown by the line from 25 at the bottom of the chart to -57 at the pressure altitude of 37,000 feet, then vertical to the top of the chart. To use the char*, enter at the known temperature, project vertically to known pressure altitude and read density altitude to the left of this intersection or the 1/V" to the right. For example, assume a pressure altitude of 30,000 feet and an ambient temperature of -30C. Enter chart at the -30C line and project vertically to the 30,000-foot PRESSURE ALTITUDE curve. Reading to the left of this intersection gives a density altitude of 31,800 ft, and to the right^ gives a value of 1.67 for 1/V*. Dividing TAS by 1/V* gives EAS.

STANDARD ATMOSPHERE TABLE

This table (figure 114) gives the standard day con; ditions at various altitudes for density ratio, l/V 0 ^ temperature, speed-of-sound ratio, atmospheric pressure and pressure ratio. To find the value of any item on a standard day, read figure to the right of the altitude in the appropriate column.
RANGE FACTORS CHART

The flight profile charts do not include wind effects and for this reason it is necessary in flight planning to modify the profile data for the effects of expected winds aloft. The range factors chart (figure 115) provides factors for various relative winds and true airspeeds that permit adjustment of range, time and

This chart (figure 116) permits determination of runway headwind and crosswind components when local wind conditions are known. For instance, assume that the wind over the runway is 40 knots from 35 relative to the runway and it is desired to find the headwind component for use in reading the takeoff distance chart. Read up to 35 radius line to the 40-knot wind line. From this point, project horizontally to the RUNWAY COMPONENT scale to obtain 32.5 knots. The chart is read in the same manner to find tailwind component by using the angle between the reciprocal of runway heading and the local wind.

UNCLASSIFIED

11-11

Section XI Performance Chart*

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

DENSITY ALTITUDE CHART


ICAO STANDARD DAY STANDARD DATA

80

5.20

5.10
4.80.

5.00
4.70 4.45

4.30
4.15 4.00 3.85 3.70 3.55 3.40

-5 -80 -70 -60 -50 -40


-30 -20 -10

.94

10

20

30

40

50

60

TEMPERATURE- CENTIGRADE

O
Figure 71-3

11-12

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

STANDARD ATMOSPHERE
ICAO STANDARD DAY STANDARD SL CONDITIONS:
TEMPERATURE - 15*C (59' f) PRESSURE -29.921 IN. Hg; 2116.216 IB/SO FT DENSITY -.0023769 SLUGS/CU FT SPEED OF SOUND -11 16.89 FT/SEC; 661. 7 KNOTS

CONVERSION FACTORS:
1 IN. Hg- 70.727 L8/SQ FT 1 IN. Hg- 0.491 16 LB/SQ IN. 1 KNOT -1.1 51 M.P.H. 1 KNOT -1.688 FT/SEC

ALTITUDE FEET
0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000
6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 13,000 14,000 15,000 16,000 17,000 18,000 19,000 20,000 21,000 22,000 23,000 24,000 25,000 26,000 27,000 28,000 29,000 30,000 31,000 32,000 33,000 34,000 35,000 36,000 36,089 37,000 38,000 39,000 40,000

DENSITY RATIO

TEMPERATURE

TO
1.0000 1.0148 1.0299 1.0454 1.0611 1.0773 1.0938 1. 1107 1. 1279 1. 1456 1. 1637
1. 1822 1.2011 1.2205 1.2403 1.2606

C
15.000 13.019 11.038 9.056 7.076 5.094

SPEED OF SOUND KNOTS


661.7 659.5 657.2 654.9 652.6 650.3
648.7 645.6 643.3 640.9 638.6 636.2 633.9 631.5 629.0 626.6 624.2 621.8 619.4 617.0 614.6

PRESSURE IN. Hg.


29.921 28. 856 27. 821 26.817 25.842 24. 896 ,23.978 23.088 22.225 21.388 20. 577 19.791 19.029 18.292 17. 577 16. 886 16.216 15. 569 14.942 14. 336 13. 750

PRESSURE RATIO
6
1.0000 .9644 .9298 .8962 .8637 .8320
.8014 .7716 .7428 .7148 .6877 .6614 .6360 .6113 .5875 .5643

1.000 .9711 .9428 .9151 .8881 .8617

59. 000 55.434 51. 868 48.302 44. 735 41. 169 37. 603 34.037 30.471 26. 905 23.338 19. 772 16.206 12.640 9.074 5.508

.8359 .8106 .7860 .7620 .7385


.7155 .6932 .6713 .6500 . 6292

3.113 1.132 -0. 850 -2.831 -4. 812


-6.793 -8. 774 -10.756 -12. 737 -14.718 -16.699 -18. 680 -20. 662 -22. 643 -24. 624

.6090 .5892 .5699 .5511 .5328


.5150 .4976 .4806 .4642 .4481

1.2815 1.3028 1.3246 1. 3470 1. 3700 1.3935 1.4176 1. 4424 1.4678 1.4938 1.5206 1.5480 1.5762 1.6052 1.6349 1.6654 1.6968 1.7291 1.7623 1.7964 1.8315 1.8347 1.8753 1.9209 1.9677 2.0155

1.941 -1.625 -5.191 -8. 757 -12.323 -15. 889 -19.456 -23.022 -26.588 -30. 154
-33.720 -37.286 -40. 852 -44.419 -47.985 -51.551 -55.117 -58. 683 -62.249 -65.816 -69.382 -69. 700

.5420 .5203 .4994 .4791 .4595 .4406 .4223 .4046 .3876 .3711 .3552 .3398 .3250 .3107 .2970 .2837 .2709 .2586 .2467 .2353 .2243 .2234 .2138 .2038 .1942 18JA2_A_,

-26. 605 -28. 587 -30. 568 -22. 549 -34. 530
-36.511 -38.492 -40.474 -42.455 -44.436 -46.417 -48.398 -50.379 -52.361 -54.342 -56.323 -56. 500

612.1 609.6 607.1 604.6 602.1


599.6 597.1 594.6 592.1 589.5 586.9 584.4 581.8 579.2 576.6 574.0 573.7

13. 184 12. 636 12. 107 11.597 11. 103


10.627 10. 168 9.725 9.297 8.885 8.488 8.106 7.737 7.382 7.041

.4325 .4173 .4025 .3881 .3741 .3605 .3473 .3345 .3220 .3099
.2981 .2971 .2843 .2710 .2583 .2462

6.712 6.683 .397 6.097 5.811 5.538

Figure 11-4 (Sheet 1) UNCLASSIFIED


11=13

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

STANDARD ATMOSPHERE
ICAO STANDARD DAY
STANDARD SL CONDITIONS:
; TEMPERATURE - 15C (59 F) PRESSURE -29.921 IN. Hg; 2116.216 LB/SQ FT DENSITY -.0023769 SLUGS/CU FT SPEED OF SOUND- 11 16.89 FT/SEC; 661. 7 KNOTS

CONVERSION FACTORS:
1 IN. Hg- 70.727 LB/SQ FT 1 IN. Hg- 0.491 16 LB/SQ IN. 1 KNOT -1.1 51 M.P.H. 1 KNOT -1.688 FT/SEC

ALTITUDE FEET
41,000 42,000 43,000 44,000 45,000 46,000 47,000 '48,000 49,000 50,000 51,000 52,000 53,000 54,000 55,000 56,000 57,000 58,000 59,000 60,000 61,000 62,000 63,000 64,000 65,000 66,000 67,000 68,000 69,000 70,000 71,000 72,000 73,000 74,000 75,000 76,000 77,000 78,000 79,000 80,000

DENSITY RATIO

TEMPERATURE

vo"
2.0645 2.1148 2.1662 2.2189 2.2728 2.3281 2.3848 2.4428 2.5022 2.5630 2.6254 2.6892 2.7546 2.8216 2.8903 2.9606 3.0326 3.1063 3.1819 3.2593 3.3386 3.4198 3.5029 3.5881 3.6754 3.7649 3.8564 3.9502 4. 0463 4.1447 4.2456 4.3488 4.4545 4.5633 4.6738 4.7874 4.9039 5.0231 5.1454 5.2706

C
-56.500

SPEED OF SOUND KNOTS


573.7

PRESSURE IN. Hg.


5.278 i 5.030 4.794 4.569 4.355 4.151 3.956 3.770 3.593 3.425 3.264 3.111 2.965 2.826 2.693 2.567 2.446 2.331 2.222 2.118

PRESSURE RATIO

2>
.1764 .1681 .1602 .1527 .1455 .1387 .1322 .1260 .1201 .1145 .1091 .1040 .09909 . 09444 . 09001 .08578 .08176 .07792 .07426 . 07078 .06746 . 06429 .06127 .05840 .05566 .05305 . 05056 .04819 .04592 .04377 .04171 .03976 . 03789 .03611 . 03442 . 03280 .03126 . 02980 . 02840 . 02707
60432 A-38

.2346 .2236 .2131 .2031 .1936 .1845 .1758 .1676 .1597 .1522 .1451 .1383 .1318 .1256 .1197 .1141 .1087 .1036 .09877 .09414 .08972 .08551 .08150 .07767 .07403 . 07055 .06724 .06409 .06108 .05821 .05548 .05288 . 05040 .04803 .04578 .04363 .04158 .03963 .03777 . 03600

-69.700

-56.500

-69.700

573.7

2.018 1.924 1.833 1.747 1.665 1.587 1.513 1.442 1.374 1.310 1.248 1.190 1.134 1.081 1.030 0.982 0.935 0.892 0.850 0.810.

Figure 11-4 (Sheet 2) 11-14 UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

RANGE FACTORS

\v/ 1 *t A **1 A

Relative Wind Angle (Degrees)


,

Wind Velocity (Knots)


V AC IAS

40

60
0.829 0.850 0.867 0.880 0.891 0.848 0.867 0.882 0.894 0.904 0.903 0.917 0.927 0.935 0.941 0.985 0.989 0.991 0.992 0.994

80
0.772 0.800 0.822 0.844 0.855 0.796 0.822 0.842 0.858 0.871 0.866 0.885 0.899 0.910 0.919 0.974 0.980 0.984 0.987 0.989

100
0.714 0.750 0.778 0.800 0.818
0.742 0.776 0.801 0.822 0.839 0.824 0.852 0.870 0.885 0.897 0.959 0.969 0.975 0.980 0.984

120
0.657 0.700 0.733 0.760 0.782 0.688 0.729 0.760 0.785 0.805 0.784 0.816 0.840 0.858 0.873

350 400 450 500 550 350 400 450 500 550 350 400 450 500 550 350 400 450 500 550 350 400 450 500 550 350 400 450 500 550 350 400 450 500 550

0.886 0.900 0.911 0.920 0.927 0.899 0.912 0.922 0.930 0.936 0.938 0.946 0.953 0.958 0.962 0.994 0.995 0.996 0.997 0.997

30

60

90

0.941 0.955 0.964 0.971 0.976 1.127 1.116 1.106 1.098 1.091 1.282 1.248 1.222 1.200 1.183 1.343 1.300 1.267 1.240 1.218

120

1.052 1.046 1.041 1.037 1.034 1.097 1.085 1.076 1.068 1.062 1.114 1.100 1.089 1.080 1.073

1.075 1.066 1.059 1.054 1.050 1.146 1.127

1.094 1.085 1.076 1.070 1.064 1.191 1.168 1.149 1.135 1.123 1.228 1.200 1.178 1.160 1.146

1.110 1.101 1.092 1.085 1.079 1.237 1.208 1.186 1.168 1.154 1.286 1.250 1.222 1.200 1.182

150

1.113
1.102 1.093 1.172 1.150 1.133 1.120 1.109

180

60482A4A

Figure 71-5 UNCLASSIFIED

11-15

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

CROSSWIND'
STANDARD DATA

60

50

.{2 O

40

2 o u
I

30

20

10

10

20

30

40

50

60

CROSSWIND COMPONENT KNOTS

60482-A-37

Figure

11-6

11-16

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

PART 2-PERFORMANCE CHARTS


USING THE CHARTS
All of the sample problems are preceded by a discussion of the type of data or information to be obtained from the charts or profiles. The sample problems then illustrate the use and reading of the charts.
TAKEOFF DATA

preflight determination of normal ground run distance, obstacle clearance distance, nosewheel liftoff speed, takeoff speed, maximum refusal speed, maximum refusal distance, and speeds or distances for checking takeoff acceleration during ground roll.

Takeoff Distance This chart (figure 117) permits the determination of the normal ground run distance and the total distance to clear obstacles as high as 200 feet when the runway temperature, pressure altitude of the runway, takeoff gross weight of the aircraft, runway wind, and height of obstacle are known. Values can be obtained for headwinds up to 40 knots and tailwinds up to 20 knots.

The takeoff data charts provide distance and speed data for various phases of the takeoff operation, including normal and crosswind takeoffs, minimum run (short field) takeoff, and takeoffs performed to clear obstacles. Takeoff data are based on the takeoff technique described in section III of the NATOPS Flight Manual. The information provided makes possible

TAKEOFF DISTANCE
MILITARY THRUST WITH OR WITHOUT MISSILES Hard Surface Runway Landing Condition

DISTANCE REQUIRED FOR GROUND RUN 3,150 FT

Distance to dear obstacle comprises normal ground roll, plus distance covered in transition to dimb, plus distance required to dimb over height of obstade.

14 DISTANCE2REOUIREB TO CLEAR V 10 OBSTACLE OF ISO FT 7,500 FT 3 TOTAL DISTANCE TO CLEAR OBSTACLE-1,000 FEET

16

Distance valid for airspeed on TAKEOFF SPEED chart. 432-A-25

UNCLASSIFIED

11-17

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A


I jUWLfc

TAKEOFF SPEED

tr1i%g4j^;

JUXMBM REFUSAL SPE


FIELD PRESSURE ALTITUDE 2,000 FT

NOT TO BE USED FOR

SHT PLANNING
EH9-ER CHART AT &EQFF GROSS WEIGHT 28,000 IB "
S

NOT. TO BE USED FOR FLIGHT PLANNING


' OtICTBJMWAT -H-M

ILITARY THRUST :
'TWKT "-"'

-- 4.2s @ 32.2c
lQ ^

4.0 @ 2,000 FT ALT S

;:

'

no 161 KTS 1 AS
T / O SPEED

--,--ENTER CHART AT 2 TAKEOFF GROSS 4 A REFUSAL SPEED WEIGHT 28,000 18 6 KTS MAXIMUM :REFUSAl SPEED

--;-;--;.

:FOR WET OR ICY


:RUNWAY

IY AIR TEMPERATURE , F (32.2C)


\JO

26

S\

JJ2&

UNWAY LENGTH 10 000 FT

80

100

120

140

!/

180

MAXIMUM IWUfl MUfUTTHtUSI

3. u~M.<.i.<~dMMAXIMUM REFUSAL SPEED a.'L.V'iS"w'lillT '22 KTS ON DRY SSr HARD SURFACE RUNWAY
60462-A-41 6048Z-A-29

Takeoff Speed

TAKEOFF PLANNING Example

This chart (figure 11-8) permits the determination of the normal and the short field (minimum run) takeoff speeds when the airplane gross weight and takeoff thrust are known. Both combat and military thrust takeoff airspeeds may be determined. A separate chart is provided to show maximum crosswind conditions under which takeoff is recommended.
Maximum Refusal Speed

This chart (figure 119) permits the determination of the maximum refusal speed when the aircraft gross weight, field pressure altitude, runway air temperature and usable runway length are known. The refusal speed is the maximum speed to which the aircraft can accelerate and then stop in the available runway length.
Velocity During Takeoff Ground Run

Assume Military thrust takeoff Gross weight 28,000 pounds Runway air temperature 90F (32.2C) Field pressure altitude 2,000 feet Headwind component 25 knots Runway length10,000 feet Obstacle 150 feet high 8,500 feet from takeoff end of runway Acceleration check distance 2,000-foot marker
Find

This chart (figure 11-10) permits the determination of the airspeed that should be attained at any predetermined distance during the takeoff ground run or the distance that should be attained at any given airspeed during the takeoff ground run, when the takeoff airspeed and the normal takeoff distance are known. In using this chart, no allowance need be made for headwinds or tailwinds since the chart is entered with normal takeoff distances that are already corrected for wind effects.
11-18

Normal ground run Obstacle clearance distance Takeoff speed Maximum refusal speed Refusal distance Acceleration check speed 1. To find the normal ground run, enter the sample takeoff distance chart at the RUNWAY AIR TEMPERATURE scale A and read the chart as shown in steps B through f of the sample chart to obtain normal ground distance 5,150 feet

UNCLASSIFIED

I)
NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

VELOCITY DURIN6 TAKEOFF GROUND RUN-

MILITARY THRUST WITH OR WITHOUT MISSILES

180

, TAKEOFF AIRSPEED CORRECTED FOR FIELD ALTITUDE AND - ' >2 ESTABLISH NORMAL ACCELERATION TEMPERATURE 161 KIAS jft\ | | | | | | | [f]\ \ \ [JJJ | CURVE PA

; =

: ' '

: ' ' '

RAiiEi TO GUIDE LINES 'mTl [iifrfiTTi

ttrllrTTTtrrLLll+nl

!:;:!::;::!:::::;!:;;;=p SAMPLE CHART -i \ \ \ \


s> SPEED 122 KIAS /::::;.: : z . : . . i . - . :..,....,-!..,. . . ! . . .
MAXIMUM REFUSAL - E 3" 7 ' - - - a ' >?< -y< - - - 9 9* ?

::::::::::::::::::::::: NOT TO BE USED FOR :::: ::::::::::::::::::::::: FLIGHT PLANNING c : : :

VftsPEED AT ACCELERATION j' Q CHECK DISTANCE 107 KIASy^2

l - 7 * ' ?* - 2 - ; - : - ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; -!.,... |^!

--;-

100

2 _ .. 1 _ ^ '.,
l

f. .- - ^ - -Z - - ..,

-i~lf I*-'?
'.

t.i. t

:;;

( . .i.2.i * .1 .1 -
t

t . l j .12 II 1 1 !jf J%t/f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 111 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 M*-

Ylul1

tlyi

-DISTANCE 2,600 F T ; ; ; ;

" BFHIHAl

' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

--

NQR

60 :::;;;::::::::::: ::::: :::


....III'.

,
- I
3-

:::: ::RUN s.iso FT I::;::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


-'-

MAI GROUND'

...[.. j

Mill

:::::::::::::::: ::::: :;(!!:::::::::::::::::::: : p f i l :


^0
1
'/fl

ARBITRARY ACCELERATION U H S U M CHECK DISTANCE 2,000 FT Chart applicable for non-standard condition! if airspeed used to enter chart is corrected for ambient temperature and field pressure altitude.

10

11

12

GROUND RUN- 1,000 FEET

60482-A-30

To find the total distance to clear an obstacle of 150 feet, proceed as in the steps above through point C on the GROSS WEIGHT curve, then read the chart from point C through point J to obtain obstacle clearance distance. .7,500 feet Since the obstacle clearance distance obtained from the chart is less than the distance to the known obstacle, it is safe to proceed with the takeoff.

If a wet or icy runway surface were being considered, it would be necessary to enter the A refusal speed chart and read as shown in the sample problem to obtain corrected maximum refusal speed.... 116 KIAS 5. To find the refusal distance, enter the velocity during ground roll chart at the refusal speed and read as shown in the sample problem to obtain distance 2,600 feet To find the refusal distance when a wet or icy runway surface is considered, enter the velocity during ground roll chart with the corrected maximum refusal speed. 6. To find the acceleration check speed, enter the velocity during takeoff ground roll chart at the intersection of the 2,000-foot GROUND RUN DISTANCE line and the previously established NORMAL ACCELERATION CURVE, as shown On the sample chart. Read to the INDICATED AIRSPEED scale to obtain acceleration check speed 107 KIAS

3. To find the takeoff airspeed, enter the takeoff speed chart on the GROSS WEIGHT scale and read the chart as shown in the sample to obtain a level, standard day takeoff speed of 152.5 KIAS. Add factors for field altitude and temperature to obtain corrected takeoff speed 161 KIAS

4. To find the maximum refusal speed, enter the sample refusal speed chart at the takeoff gross weight and read as shown to obtain maximum speed on a dry, hard-surfaced runway122 KIAS

11-19

Section XI Performance Charts

NA

'S*t)l-45HHC-501A
THRUST WITHOUT MISSILES

CLIMB CONTROL-

Doy Civit. Condition AinoMd Below 300 WAS

TIME TO CLIMB TO 35.0.00 F T 1 MIN 50 SEC

DESIRED AIT 3S.OOO FT

READ DOWN HERE TO FIND GROSS WEIGHT PASSING : THROUGH 20.000 FT 26,375 I

DISTANCE 6SVERED

NAU CAl Ml

"

ESTABLISH CLIMB WEIGHT GUIDE LINE FOR TAKEOFF GROSS WEIGHT OF 27,000 IB

FUEL USI IN CLIMB 27,000 - 26.000

24
1000 POUNDS

18

1 000 -IB

GROSS WEIGHT AFTER CLIMB LB 26,000 , M. For each 1 *C above standard day temperature increase value obtained at fbllawi: Distance 2%
Tim. Fu.l

2J% 1%

2. Climb at conttanl lru Mach number of 0.90. 3. Maximum endurance alHtvd* is 35,000 feet. 4. Far field takeoff add 1.0 min. and 500 Ib. far tint* and fuel from release af brakes. 60482A35

CLIMB DATA

Climb Control

The climb charts present data for determining best climb speed, rate of climb, time to climb and ground distance covered during climb for climbs performed with either military or maximum thrust. The military thrust climb is performed to a varying speed schedule for best performance, while maximum thrust climb performance is best if flown at constant Mach number.

These charts permit the determination of time to climb, distance covered, and fuel used during the climb to a designated altitude when the gross weight is known for start of climb. Climb figures may be determined for both maximum and military thrust with and without missiles. Distance covered is for a no-wind condition and suitable correction must be made for the effects of winds aloft.

O
11-20

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

SAMPLE CHART i wrmour MISSILES


Slumhud Day

NO T TO BE USED FOR F LIGHT PLANNING

i:i;;i;(j!;::::::::::::: ! ;::;:;:;:::: S !S i ! . . . . : , 1 1 j i . : , ' i , . . .


4 0 '|l!!l .. isp > < ; , ! , .i,.i, s ; , s , : ,.!,

I
: !

i
1 yi
^

|*Si*
ENTER CHART

: ; s ; MAXIMUM Vs 1 '!- :;;!-;: ;;;I-;J' ST

*--^~
j H 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 | 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 (SH-ftJ

> S ;

30 l > < ; ^ - - : : : : : : : : : : : : <HrHrS AT 20.000 FT : : : : : : : : : : : :

UOUFNTiOY

r.ltCHS. Wtir.HT

' ;! < ' i

AT 20,000 FT 26,375

:::::: ::i::s::!j:!jpgj|!JS|: ::::::::::::::: :::::::::::::::

;;;!!!!i:^:^::^ftat#:::::::;::::::::;;:::::::;;;::i; :::::!;:f;:i;:!i:!ffi:S& ::::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::5 _ . . . s


! !

S- -

10

::!;: : :!&|:::::::::::::::::::::: MILITARY- r [ 1 * ' 5 THRUST : S i ' j ! - j ::::::: ^^^ttlftiffl ia^|-S---S----'::2oW=:i!ji!hi;::::: -- 22,000- 5 > - i ' : ufloo^ ::. j j 1 . j !:!:::: ( - - - E ... C .... k 28,000 i i ! . S . . . s .:::::::::::::::::!i::5:::^:::s:::!::::::::::::::::::::::::::: . - - 30,000, ! ! . S . - S ::::::::::::::::::S:::^:::|::! . 5 :::S:::::::::::::::::::::::::: J---IS ;
5 1 !

jiiiiiiiHiSiililiiiJiiiiiJii
s

. . J-Li

rk ' -i .b ^

^KIH
500
600 700
60482A34

10

15

'20

30

200

RATE O(CUMB- \000 FT/MIN RATE OF ClIMB 19,700 FT PER MIN

BEST CUMB SPEED-KNOTS CAS BEST CLIMB SPEED AT 20,000 FT .425 KTS CAS

Best Climb This chart permits not only determination of the climb speed schedule, but also the rate of climb for any pressure altitude when aircraft gross weight is known. Both maximum and military thrust airspeeds and rates of climb may be determined. CLIMB PLANNING Example Assume Maximum thrust takeoff Desired altitude 35,000 feet Gross weight 27,000 pounds Configuration without missiles Find Time to climb to 35,000 feet Distance covered in climb Gross weight after climb Fuel used during climb Best rate of climb and airspeed at 20,000 feet 1. To find the time and the distance covered in a maximum thrust climb to 35,000 feet, enter the

sample climb control chart at 27,000 pounds on GROSS WEIGHT curve and read chart as shown in the sample problem to obtain distance covered in the climb 16 nautical miles Time to climb 1 minute, 50 seconds Gross weight at 35,000 feet 26,000 pounds To find the fuel used during the climb, subtract the gross weight at 35,000 feet from the takeoff gross weight to obtain 1,000 pounds 2. To find the best climb rate and speed at 20,000 feet, it is first necessary to find the gross weight at 20,000 feet. Enter the climb control chart at 27,000 pounds on GROSS WEIGHT curve and read up to the 20,000-foot ALTITUDE line then down to GROSS WEIGHT scale to obtain gross weight 26,375 pounds 3. To find best climbing speed and best rate of climb at 20,000 feet when climbing with maximum thrust, enter the best climb chart at 20,000 feet on the ALTITUDE scale and read the chart for the gross weight obtained in step 2 as shown in the sample problem to obtain rate of climb 19,700 feet-minutes Best climb airspeed 425 knots CAS

Section XI Performance Charts CRUISE DATA

_ 1-45HHC-501A

The cruise data charts detail the range and endurance performance characteristics of the aircraft. The convenient profile chart presentation supplemented by illustrated examples provides for both speed and accuracy in Sight planning. The ease of flight planning achieved using profile charts is accomplished through elimination of much of the computation required in handling data read from the detailed charts for individual phases of flight operation. The relationships of fuel, time, and distance are presented pictorially on the profiles for all altitude up to the optimum cruising altitude. Also included in the cruise data presentation are the combat allowance charts, which permit determination of time available and fuel required for various altitudes and Mach numbers using constant military or maximum thrust settings. Tables of range and endurance limits are included to furnish quickdecision data for low fuel load under fouled-deck conditions.
Level Flight Cruise

cruising flight increases as fuel is consumed and gross weight reduced, necessitating a continuous but gentle climb to achieve maximum range. The optimum altitude for cruise-climb flight will vary from day to day as the temperature varies. So, also, will climb performance change with temperature. If the cruise is to be initiated after making a climb to altitude, this change in climb performance can be used as a guide in determining the altitude at which to initiate cruiseclimb. The proper altitude to initiate the cruise-climb procedure can be obtained by climbing at the recommended climb speed schedule until the rate of climb reaches the standard day value determined from the best climb chart for the applicable aircraft gross weight and thrust setting. At this altitude, cruising flight should be initiated at the recommended true Mach number and the aircraft will seek the proper altitude for cruise-climb, maximum range flight.
Effect of Wind on Cruise Performance

The recommended level flight cruise speeds are tabulated on the profile charts. At the end of the initial climb, the recommended cruise speed for the desired altitude should be exceeded slightly before thrust is reduced to ensure maintaining adequate speed until stable cruise conditions are established. The recommended calibrated airspeed and a constant pressure altitude should be maintained throughout cruising flight. As fuel is used, the required thrust should be reduced to maintain the prescribed airspeed. The effect of nonstandard free air temperature on level flight cruise performance is negligible if the recommended calibrated airspeed or true Mach number is maintained at the desired pressure altitude. To maintain the recommended speed with nonstandard temperatures, higher thrust settings (engine pressure ratios) are required on hot days and lower settings on cold days, with resultant increased or decreased fuel flows. The changes in fuel flow, however, are compensated by increased or decreased TAS so that the fuel economy remains practically unchanged. Flight time will vary with the resulting change in ground speed.
Cruise-Climb Procedure

For the purpose of cruise control, all winds may be expressed by considering the head or tailwind component, regardless of the total wind with respect to the aircraft course for the time required to complete the mission. One method of determining the effect of wind upon time, fuel, and distance, is to compute the average true airspeed (no wind) and apply wind to the average TAS to obtain the average ground speed. A table of Range Factors is provided in this appendix for computing wind effects, and the use of these factors is illustrated in the examples for the profile charts.
COMBAT RADIUS PROFILE

This chart gives the maximum radius of action that can be attained with either optimum altitude cruise (cruiseclimb) or constant altitude cruise with a given amount of fuel allocated for combat use at maximum radius. The data is based upon an optimum climb schedule to altitude, maximum range cruise outbound and return, and a maximum range descent. The distances traveled in climbing can be obtained as well as distance at which descent should be initiated. This profile chart must be used in conjunction with the combat allowance charts to determine time for combat with a given amount of fuel.
Example

To achieve absolute maximum range, the flight should be conducted at a continually varying optimum altitude for cruising flight (cruise-climb) for each momentary gross weight. The optimum altitude for

Assume A practice combat mission is to be flown in which cruise out will be made at a constant altitude of 30,000 feet allowing for 2,000 pounds of fuel for simulated

11-22

Section XI NAVW C-501A Performance Charts

COMBAT RADIUS PROFILE

WITH OR WITHOUT MISSILES Crime Condition Abov. 30,000 Foot Taksjoff Gro*. Woight 77,700 Pound. IF COMSAT FUEL IS USED FOR

ENTER CHART AT CLIMI PATH AND DESIRED ALTITUDE

200
DISTANCE COVERED IN CLIMB 48 NM DISTANCE AT WHICH DESCENT SHOULD II INITIATED 65 NM

300

400 X

300
IDLE THRUST DESCENT - CONSTANT 240 KNOTS CAS CRIHSf SCHEDULE

COMBAT RADIUS- NAUTICAL MILES RADIUS OF ACTION 415 NM

CLIMB AND CRUISE-CLIMB PATHS DESCENT PATH COMBAT FUEL AVAILABLE TOTAL FUEL USED - CRUISE OUT TOTAL FUEL USED - CRUISE BACK

1. Fuel allowance of 550 pounds ii included for storting, wannup, tajtiing, takeoff, and acceleration to best climb ipMd. 2. UM military thrust for climb. 3. Rang* is computed for ICAO standard day. Chart applicable to nonstandard conditions if recommended cruise CAS is maintained.

4. Wind effect! not included.

ALTITUDE FT

MACH NO.
0.86 n px

CAS

Cruise-Climb 5. Determine combat time by use of combat allowance chart. CRUISE-BACK - "-.eUOOO 6. Combat fuel includes all maneuvers ^-TOOOO from end of cruise-out la start of 20,000 cruise-back. CRUISE-OUT ' 10,000 7. Cruise-back altitude must be same as SI or above cruise-out altitude.

ft4J

0.86 0.79
OJ1

0.64 0.59

3003 326 354 387

combat at maximum radius of action. The return flight is to be made at 40,000 feet. Find Distance covered in climb to 30,000 feet Maximum radius of action Fuel remaining after combat Distance at which descent is initiated 1. Enter the sample combat radius profile chart at the intersection of the 30,000-foot ALTITUDE line with the CLIMB curve and read as shown to obtain the distance covered in climb (no wind) 48 nautical miles 2. To find the radius of action with constant altitude cruise, again enter the chart at the intersection of the 30,000-foot ALTITUDE line and the 2,000-pound COMBAT FUEL line and read the chart for distance 415 nautical miles For maximum attainable radius, cruise-climb procedure would be employed and the chart would be read at points along the CRUISE-CLIMB lines for cruise-out and cruise-back. 3. To find the fuel remaining after combat, first interpolate between the cruise-out fuel lines,

as shown, to read fuel used for all operations conducted prior to combat. 3,500 pounds Add combat fuel to find total fuel used prior to beginning the return flight (2,000 4- 3,500) 5,500 pounds Subtract fuel used from initial fuel load to obtain fuel remaining (8,657-5,500) 3,157 pounds 4. To find the distance, from the point of destination, at which the descent should be initiated, read as shown from the intersection of the 40,000-foot altitude line and the CONSTANTSPEED DESCENT line to obtain 65 nautical miles The chart is based on 1,000 pounds of fuel remaining at destination. Radius of action considering larger or smaller amounts of reserve fuel can be obtained by entering the combat radius profile chart with a combat fuel figure that is either increased or decreased by the amount of the change in reserve fuel. If a reserve of only 500 pounds were desired in the preceding example, the profile chart would be entered with 1,500 pounds instead of 2,000 pounds (the amount used considering a fuel reserve of 1,000 pounds).
11-23

Section XI Performance Charts

J 501A

MISSION PROFILE

WITH OR WITHOUT MISSILES Cniiw Condition Abov. 30,000 FMI Takeoff Grow Weight 27700 Poundi
TOTAL TIME OF FlIOHT PRIOR TO DESCENT

SAMPLE CHART |
NOT TO BE USED FOR
FLIGHT PLANNING

2 HIS, 34 MIN
ENTER CHA IT AT DESHED CRUISE All CLIMB PAT

MILITARY THRUST CLIMB

SL
AIR DISTANCE NAUTICAL MILES TOTAL NO WIND DISTANCE mrr^-rm ATTAINABLE PRIOR TO k U U i a DESCENT 1,225 NM 3. Rang* ii computed for ICAO standard day. Chart applicable to nonstandard conditions if recommended cruise CAS is maintained. 4. Wind effects not included. 5. No allowance is mod* for c.nt, landing, or (INTEKfOLATE)

DISTANCE COVERED IN CLIMB TO 33.000 FT

64 NM

FLIGHT PATH TIME TO CUMB AND CRUISE FUEL USED 60482A46

1. Fuel allowance of 530 poundl ii in* eluded for starting, warmup, taxiing,
takeoff, and a c c e l e r a t i o n to belt

climb speed.

2. Uie military thrust for climb.

MISSION PROFILE This chart presents the relationships between time, fuel, distance, and altitude at all ranges, out to the maximum range of the aircraft. The relationship is based on a no-wind condition and considers a military thrust climb from sea level. A climb speed schedule of calibrated airspeed and Mach number ranging from sea level to the optimum cruise altitude is also included. Range and cruising time data may be determined for either constant altitude cruise or for maximum range cruise at optimum altitude. To determine the overall range capabilities including descent, data from the mission profile is supplemented with data read from the descent charts as shown in the following example. Example Assume A maximum range flight is to be made under the following conditions: Desired cruise altitude 35,000 feet Military rated thrust climb from sea level

Expected winds aloft30 relative at 80 knots Temperature at altitude 54C (standard day) Find Distance covered in climb to 35,000 feet Maximum range attainable and time required for entire flight including a constant speed descent to sea level with 1,000 pounds fuel reserve. 1. To find the distance covered in the climb, enter the sample chart at the intersection of the CLIMB PATH and the 35-000-foot ALTITUDE line read as shown to obtain distance 64 nautical miles 2. To find maximum range with 1,000-pound fuel reserve upon return to sea level, it is first necessary to enter the constant speed descent chart (figure 11-13) for descent from 35,000 feet to sea level to obtain descent speed 240 knots Distance covered in descent 55 nautical miles Time for descent 10.5 minutes Fuel required for descent and reserve (1,000 -f150) 1,150 pounds

11-24

NAVWI

01A

Section XI Performance Charts

3. Reenter the mission profile chart at the intersection of the 35,000-foot ALTITUDE line and the fuel available for use prior to descent (8,657 - 1,150=7,507) and read as shown in the sample problem to obtain Total time aloft. 2 hours, 36 minutes No-wind distance 1,225 nautical miles 4. To obtain the range under the specific wind conditions, first convert the recommended cruise speed (282 knots, CAS) to TAS by the airspeed-Mach number conversion table to obtain standard day TAS _ 480 knots t 5. Next, enter the range factor chart (figure 11-5) with relative wind angle of 30, TAS of 480 knots, and wind velocity of 80 knots to obtain range factor _ 0.851 6. Subtract the distance covered in the climb from the total no-wind distance to obtain no-wind range at altitude (1,225 -64)1,161 nautical miles 7. Multiply the known no-wind distance by the range factor to obtain cruising range at constant altitude (with wind) (1,161 X 0.851). 988 nautical miles 8. Find maximum range attainable at constant altitude including climb, cruise, and descent . (64 + 988 + 55) 1,107 nautical miles Find total time for flight including climb, cruise and descent (2 hours, 36 minutes 4- 11 minutes) 2 hours, 47 minutes 9. Observe the cruise and climb schedules noted on the charts. The mission profile chart can also be used to find fuel and time required for flight over a specified distance by entering the chart with cruising altitude and cruise distance (specified distance minus distance for descent). When wind effects must be considered in this type of problem, it is necessary to compute an air distance (factor distance) with which to enter the chart, as illustrated in the example for the optimum return profile chart. The maximum attainable' range is achieved when cruise-climb procedure is employed. In this case, the mission profile chart is entered at the intersection of the CRUISE-CLIMB PATH with the appropriate fuel curve. In inflight refueling missions, the mission profile chart may be used to establish the distance at which initial refueling rendezvous must be made. In the example above, for instance, distance and fuel data from the air refueling rendezvous chart would be substituted for the constant-speed descent data.

OPTIMUM RETURN PROFILE

This chart presents time, fuel and distance data for return flights on which maximum range is obtained by cruising at optimum cruise altitude (cruise-climb). The chart considers a military thrust climb from initial altitude to the optimum cruise altitude except for zones, close-in to the destination, in which maximum range is attained by cruising either at the initial altitude or at some intermediate altitude. For problems in which constant altitude return flight is to be considered for a certain fuel remaining, the desired data can be read from the inflight refueling profile. To determine the overall return , capabilities including descent, data from the profile may be supplemented with data read from the descent charts as shown in the example for the mission profile chart. Example Assume A complicated tactical mission is to be flown in which the return flight must be made under conditions sufficiently different from those that existed for cruiseout as to preclude use of the mission radius profile. The following conditions apply: Distance to base 550 nautical miles Fuel remaining 3,650 pounds Initial altitude 20,000 feet Desired fuel .reserve 800 pounds Expected winds aloft150 relative at 60 knots Find Initial cruise altitude Time of flight for return over base (descent not included) Fuel remaining over base 1. Enter the sample optimum return profile at 20,000 feet and 3,650 pounds of fuel remaining and read the following: Maximum range attainable by expending all fuel (no wind) 760 nautical miles Initial cruise-climb altitude 42,250 feet Cruise-climb time to expend all fuel 1 hour, 26 minutes Time to climb to cruise-climb altitude 6 minutes Time to climb and cruise until all fuel is expended (no wind) (1 hour, 26 minutes + 6 minutes) 1 hour, 32 minutes

11-2S

Section XI Performance

Charts

1-501A
WITH OR WITHOUT MISSCLES Cruise Condition Above 30,000 Feet Initial Grau Weight 27,700 Pounds

OPTIMUM RETURN PROFILEINITIAL CRUISE-CLIMB ALTITUDE 42,230 FT

FUEL REMAINING

[ SAMPLE CHART

-i

CLIMB SCHEDULE MILITARY THRUST I

I,110 IB

'V

NOT TO BE USED FOR FLIGHT PLANNING

IN THIS AREA, CUMB TO OPTIMUM ALTITUDE WINDS

AIOFT

CONSIDERING * DISTANCE - NAUTICAL MILES _ 49a NM

CRUISE SCHEDULE

CRUISE-CLIMB PATH (WITH TIME AT CRUISE-C11MB ALTITUDE) FUR REQUIRED LINE OF BEST RANGE FOR CONSTANT ALTITUDE RIGHT CUMB PATH GUIDE LINES

. Fuel required at any known distance includes allowance for military thrust dimb to best cruise altitude (if initial altitude is lower). . Range is computed for ICAO stand' ard day. Chart applicable to nonstandard conditions if recommended cruise CAS is maintained.

3. Wind effects not included. 4. No allowance is made for loiter, descent, landing, or reserve fuel. 5. Best cruise altitude is determined by intersection of the dimb path guide lines with lines of best range.
60482A48

2. As a means of reading the chart to include wind effects, it is first necessary to obtain an "air distance" using the range factor chart (figure 11-5). Range factor for 150 relative wind at 60 knots, average TAS for cruise 495 knots 1.103 Air distance to be flown (550^-1.103) 498 nautical miles 3- Subtract the air distance from the maximum range attainable to obtain the point at which to reenter the chart considering headwind (760 -498) 262 nautical miles 4. Again enter the profile at the CRUISE-CLIMB PATH and the air distance to obtain Cruise-climb time remaining 32 minutes Fuel remaining over base 1,110 pounds Comparison of fuel remaining over base with 800pound reserve desired shows 310 pounds available

for descent, which is adequate, as can be determined from the descent charts. 5. Total time of flight for return over base is found as follows: Cruise time (1 hour, 26 minutes- 32 minutes) 54 minutes Total time (54 minutes + 6 minutes) 1 hour 6. Observe the cruise and climb schedules noted on the chart. If the initial altitude and fuel remaining fall within the zone for which "climb to optimum altitude" is indicated, read upward, parallel to the climb path guidelines, to the LINE OF BEST RANGE FOR CONSTANT ALTITUDE FLIGHT to obtain the optimum altitude for return.

o
11-26

1A

Section XI Performance Charts

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE PROFILE-

WITH Ot WITHOUT MISSIUS


Stooooro Doy

OuiM Condition InWal Gro Woight 27700 Pounds

CENT AND RESERVE FUEL 730

ENTER CHART AT INITIAL ALTITUDE AND FUEL REMAINING

i
20

TIME ADR LOITER WITH 130 It DESCENT AND RESERVE FUEL 1 HR, fe MIN

LOITER TIME REMAIN! :ENT AND


RESERVE /UEL 22 Ml
10

SI

0.20

0:40

100

1:20

1:40

2OO

2:20

2:40

300

LOITER TIME HOURS: MINUTES

1. Chart applii only for loiter at con-

2. Applkabl* only to standard conditions. 3. No allowance it mod* for climb, dicMt, landing, or r*s*rv ful.

90482A49

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE PROFILE

This chart is used to determine the maximum endurance (loiter time) for constant altitude cruise at any initial altitude when the amount of fuel remaining is known. Maximum endurance is attained by flying at the recommended loiter airspeed for desired altitude. The chart represents the conditions which give the lowest rate of fuel consumption for cruise at a given altitude. No allowance is made for climb or descent performance or for reserve fuel. Example Assume A mission is being planned in which a maximum attainable period of loiter is desired at the initial altitude of 40,000 feet with 4,000 pounds fuel remaining.

find Maximum endurance with loiter at initial altitude, if it is desired to have fuel reserve of 500 pounds at sea level Fuel required for loiter 1. Enter the sample maximum endurance profile chart at the intersection of the 40,000-foot ALTITUDE line and the 4,000-pound FUEL REMAINING line and read as shown to obtain time to zero fuel remaining 1 hour, 51 minutes 2. Enter the maximum range descent chart at 40,000 feet on the ALTITUDE scale and read to obtain Time to descend 19 minutes Fuel to descend 230 pounds 3. Find fuel for descent plus 500 pounds of fuel reserve (230 + 500) 730 pounds

11-27

Section XI Performance Chart*

NAVWEPS 01-45
WITH OR WITHOUT MISSILES Standard Day Cnib. Condition Initial Grow W.ight-27,700 Pound* MILITARY THRUST CLIMB
ALT1000 FT

OPTIMUM ENDURANCE PROFILE

MACH NO.

CAS

1 1 1
1

M X
.84 .84 228 225

I
TIME REQUIRED COR DESCENT 10 MIN LOITER TIME REMAINING FOR PLIGHT TO ZERO FUEL REMAINING 41 MIN LOITER TIME ->OURS:MINUTES TOTAL TIME AVAILABLE FOR PLIGHT TO ZERO FUEL REMAINING1 HR, 42 MIK 1. Ui military thnnt for dimb. 2. No allowance ii mod* for dtsoftnt, landing, or rirv fuol. OPTIMUM ENDURANCE ALTITUDE CLIMB GUIDE LINES FUEL REMAINING

78
.77

363 392 421

\ 1 <
SI

75
.74

450
480

73

4. Next, reenter the maximum endurance profile chart at the intersection of the 40,000-foot ALTITUDE line and the 730-pound FUEL REMAINING curve and read as shown in the sample problem to obtain time remaining. 22 minutes 5. To find fuel required for loiter at the designated altitude, subtract fuel for descent and reserve from initial fuel remaining (4,000 730) 3,270 pounds 6. To find time available for loiter at initial altitude, subtract time remaining prior to descent from the initial time for cruise to zero fuel remaining, (1 hour, 51 minutes-22 minutes) 1 hour, 29 minutes 7. To find time aloft (endurance) add descent time to time for loiter (19 minutes + 1 hour, 29 minutes) 1 hour, 48 minutes

OPTIMUM ENDURANCE PROFILE

This chart permits determination of maximum endurance (loiter time) for any quantity of fuel remaining based on loitering at optimum altitude considering fuel used for climb and descent. The area above the OPTIMUM ENDURANCE ALTITUDE line on the chart represents the conditions of altitude and fuel load for which the flight should be continued at the initial altitude to obtain maximum endurance. The area under this line indicates the altitudes and fuel loads at which a military thrust dimb should be made to the optimum endurance altitude. Curves showing fuel remaining are based upon a military thrust climb to the optimum altitude (if necessary) and loiter at altitude until all fuel is expended. No allowance is made for a landing fuel reserve. Climb path guide lines permit determination of climb time and fuel for climb to the optimum endurance altitude.

11-28

C-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

Example

Assume A mission is being planned in which the maximum attainable period of loiter (optimum endurance) is desired considering an initial altitude of 20,000 feet and with 3,500 pounds of fuel remaining. Find Altitude for optimum maximum endurance Fuel remaining after climb to optimum endurance altitude Fuel used in climb to optimum endurance altitude Optimum endurance (time aloft) if descent is made for fuel reserve of 1,000 pounds at sea level Fuel required for descent 1. Enter the sample optimum endurance profile chart at the intersection of the 20,000-foot PRESSURE ALTITUDE line and the 3,500-pound FUEL REMAINING curve and read as shown in the sample problem to obtain Optimum endurance altitude 34,500 feet Fuel remaining after climb. 3,220 pounds Fuel used during climb (3,500-3,220) 280 pounds Total time available for flight to zero fuel remaining 1 hour, 42 minutes 2. Enter the constant-speed descent chart (figure 1113) and find the fuel required to descend from 34,500 feet, the optimum endurance altitude .. 145 pounds Find fuel required for descent and reserve (145 + 1,000) : _ 1,145 pounds 3. Again enter the profile chart at the optimum endurance altitude and the 1,145-pound fuel remaining point to obtain the loiter time remaining at sea level 41 minutes : 4. From the intersection of the optimum endurance altitude and the CONSTANT-SPEED DESCENT curve, obtain the time required for descent to sea level . 10 minutes 5. Find the climb and loiter time available considering 1,000 pounds reserve fuel at sea level (1 hour, 42 minutes-41 minutes) 1 hour, 1 minute 6. Find the optimum endurance (time aloft) by adding descent time to climb and loiter time (10 minutes + 1 hour, 1 minute) 1 hour, 11 minutes 7. To find the fuel required for descent, enter the maximum-range descent chart (figure 11-12) at the optimum endurance altitude (34,500 feet) and read 200 pounds 8. Follow the climb, loiter and descent schedules tabulated on the profile chart.

operations in which the aircraft is refueled in flight. Data is provided for both constant-altitude cruise and for maximum range cruise (cruise-climb) considering refueling operations conducted at any altitude. The chart contains climb path guidelines to show military thrust climb performance from rendezvous altitude to desired cruise altitude. lines for zero fuel remaining show the maximum ranges that can be attained by cruising at various altitudes after refueling. To determine the overall range capabilities including descent, data from the air refueling profile must be supplemented with data read from the descent charts as illustrated in the example for the mission profile chart.
Example

Assume The aircraft has just been refueled to full fuel capacity in rendezvous with a tanker at 15,000 feet and that it is desired to find the maximum no-wind distance at which a second refueling operation could be conducted, allowing for a 1,000-pound fuel reserve at optimum cruise altitude. 1. Enter the sample air refueling profile at the 15,000foot ALTITUDE line and the CRUISE-CLIMB zero fuel remaining line, then follow the climb path guide lines to the CRUISE-CLIMB PATH curve to obtain Distance attainable in cruise to: zero fuel remaining, considering climb 1,635 nautical miles Time to cruise to zero fuel remaining 3 hours, 21 minutes Fuel remaining after climb approximately 8,300 pounds Initial cruise climb altitude 38,000 feet 2. Again enter the profile at the intersection of the 1,000-pound fuel remaining line and the CRUISECLIMB PATH line to obtain Cruise-climb distance remaining 240 nautical miles Cruise-climb time remaining 29 minutes 3. By subtracting the time, and distance available with 1,000 pounds fuel remaining from the initial values for cruise to zero fuel remaining, obtain Distance to next refueling point, descent not considered (1,635 - 240) 1,395 nautical miles Cruise-climb time (3 hours, 21 minutes 29 minutes) 2 hours, 52 minutes 4. Observe the cruise and climb schedules noted on the chart. To obtain total time for climb and cruise, consult the military thrust climb chart for time to climb which must be added to cruise time. Wind effects may be computed as illustrated in the examples for the mission and optimum return profiles. To find the fuel required and distance covered in descending for next inflight refueling operation, refer to the air refueling rendezvous chart.
11-2f

AIR REFUELING PROFILE

This chart illustrates the relationships of time, fuel, and distance in a convenient form for planning cruise

Section XI Performance Charts

'-501A

AIR REFUELING PROFILEr . iimr /-u.n-r r- SAMPLE CHART -

WITH Ot WITHOUT MISSUB

CoodWon Ahw> M000 PwM wling Grow WoigM 27700 Pound.

NOT TO BE USED FOR FLIGHT PLANNING


INITIAL CR ALTITUDE

CRUISE TIME REMAINING WITH 1,000 POUND FUEL RESERVE 39 WIN

CLIMB SCHEDULE MILITARY THRIFT CUMi

REMAINING REMAINING AFTER APPROXIMATELY

'o

.75

421
450 480

1 '
[
ENTER CHART *Y REFUELING ALTITUDE AND DESIRED CRUISE ALTITI All DISTANCE DISTANCE ATTAINABLE WITH ZERO FUEL REMAINING 1.635 NAUTICAL MILES CRUISE DISTANCE REMAINING WITH 1.000 FOUND FUEL RESERVE 240 NM

J4
73

SI

CRUISE SCHEDULE

FUa REMAINING 1 . Chart dm not include fu.l, iim., and 4. Rang* ii computed for ICAO standdistanc* to a c c e l e r a t e to bnt climb ard day. Chart applicable to nanHd from formating speed itandard condilioni if recommended cruise CAS is maintained. 2. No alkwone. ii included for descent, landing or rti.rv. fu.l. 5. Wind effect! not included. 3. Use miljtary thrust for dimfa. _

CRUISE-CLIMB PATH -. . . ...TIME TO CRUISE CRUISE TO ZERO FUEL REMAINING CONSTANT ALTITUDE CRUISE PATH CUMB PATH GUIDE LINES

,D

RANGE AND ENDURANCE DECISION

cluded for cases in which climb to optimum altitude is required. For instance, assume that it is desired to determine for what period an aircraft with single pylons and launchers (configuration I) can loiter in the vicinity of a carrier while the flight deck is cleared of an obstruction. Consider that flight is at 20,000 feet with 1,600 pounds fuel remaining. The desired fuel reserve is 1,000 pounds instead of the 600-pound allowance included in the table. Enter the endurance decision chart (figure 11-25) on the IF YOU ARE AT 20,000 FEET block, at the adjusted fuel remaining of 1,200 pounds (actual fuel remaining minus 400 pounds additional reserve fuel desired). The endurance at 20,000 feet with descent to sea level is 24.0 minutes. The optimum altitude is 24,000 feet and the endurance at optimum altitude with descent to sea level is 24.5 minutes. Descent should be initiated when fuel remaining is 730 pounds.

These charts present maximum endurance and maximum range data in convenient form for rapid reading in making decisions concerning the diversion of aircraft to alterate destinations. Data are presented in tabulations of endurance and range at either initial altitude or optimum altitude for a representative range under conditions of fuel remaining and initial altitude. A minimum practical fuel reserve of 600 pounds has been considered in preparing the data but approximate readings for greater of smaller amounts of reserve fuel can be made by decreasing or increasing the fuel remaining figure by the desired change in reserve fuel. The data include time and distance for a ma-rimum range descent to sea level. Climb performance is in-

11-30

Changed 15 July 1966

:LASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A


EMERGENCY RANGE AND ENDURANCE DECISION

Section XI Performance Cherts

Emergency range initial altitude sea level 1. From figure 11-14A, the range index number is 6.9. 2. From figure 11-14B, sheet 1, the range obtainable by remaining at sea level is 56 nautical miles. 3. Optimum altitude is found to be 22,500 feet from the OPTIMUM RANGE ALTITUDE chart in figure 11-14D. 4. If maximum range is required, it is necessary to climb to optimum altitude (22,500 feet). Maximum range obtainable at 22,500 feet is determined by reading up to the RANGE AT OPTIMUM ALTITUDE curve in figure 1114B, sheet 1. The answer is 76 nautical miles. This range includes distance for MRT climb from sea level and idle thrust descent to sea level. 5. The descent is initiated when the fuel level reaches reserve (600 pounds) plus fuel used in the descent. By reading up to an interpolated 22,500-foot curve, fuel used in descent is found to be 75 pounds. Start descent when fuel remaining is 600 + 75 = 675 pounds. 6. Distance and time for descent are found by reading up to the other curves in figure 11-14H and are found to be 22 nautical miles, and 6 minutes, respectively. 7. MRT climb speed varies with altitude. From figure 11-14E, it is seen that it is necessary to decrease airspeed from 180 KCAS at sea level, to 162.5 KCAS at 22,500 feet. 8. Cruise speed from figure 11-14F is 198 KCAS at sea level and 177 KCAS at 22,500 feet. 9. Descent speed, from figure 11-14G, is a constant 154 KCAS. Emergency range initial altitude 20,000 feet 1. From figure 11-14A, the range index number is 6,9. 2. Range obtainable by remaining at 20,000 feet is the range at sea level (56 nautical miles) plus an incremental range of 50 nautical miles from the INCREMENTAL RANGE FOR CRUISE AT INITIAL ALTITUDE curve in figure 11-14B, sheet 2; or 106 nautical miles. 3. Optimum altitude-is found to be 24,500 feet from the OPTIMUM RANGE ALTITUDE curve in figure 1114D. Note that the fuel weight curve used is 2,500 pounds, vice 2,000 pounds, for the reason given in note 1 of the figure.

These charts (figures 11-14A through 11-14H) present maximum range and endurance data to cover all possible airplane malfunctions involving wing, droops, landing gear, and emergency power package. To use the charts, first enter figure 11-14A to find the range or endurance index number for the applicable configuration. Then proceed to figure 11-14B for emergency range, or to figure 11-14C for emergency endurance. These charts provide notes which serve as a guide to the other charts which must be used to obtain the desired information.
Example

Solve two emergency range and endurance problems; one involving an airplane at sea level, the other involving an airplane at 20,000 feet. Figure 11-6A presents answers to the problems in tabular form. Assume (for both problems) Configuration Wing up, landing droop extended, landing gear down, EPP extended, single fuselage pylons and launchers Fuel on board 2,000 pounds Fuel reserve desired 600 pounds Find (for both problems) Emergency Range Range at initial altitude Optimum altitude Range at optimum altitude Fuel quantity at start of descent Distance covered in descent Time for descent MRT climb speed Cruise speed Descent speed Emergency Endurance Endurance at initial altitude Optimum altitude Endurance at optimum altitude Fuel quantity at start of descent Distance covered in descent Time for descent MRT climb speed Loiter and descent speed

Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED

11-30A

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

4. Range at optimum altitude is determined by taking the range at optimum altitude for an initial altitude of sea level from figure 11-14B (sheet 1), 76 nautical miles, and adding the INCREMENTAL RANGE FOR CRUISE AT OPTIMUM ALTITUDE from sheet 2, 32 nautical miles. The answer is 108 nautical miles. 5. The descent from optimum altitude is initiated when the fuel level reaches reserve (600 pounds) plus fuel used in the descent. By reading up to an interpolated 24,500-foot curve, fuel used in the descent is found to be 80 pounds. Start descent when fuel remaining is 600 + 80 = 680 pounds. / 6. Distance and time for descent are found by reading up to the other curves in figure 11 14H, and are found to be 24 nautical miles, and 6.5 minutes respectively. 7. MRT climb speed varies with altitude between 163 KCAS at 20,000 feet to approximately 162 KCAS at 24,500 feet, from figure 11-14E. 8. Cruise speed, from figure 11-14F, is 180 KCAS at 20,000 feet, and approximately 175 KCAS at 24,500 feet. 9. Descent speed, from figure 11 14G, is a constant 154 KCAS. Emergency endurance initial altitude sea level 1. From figure 11 14A, the endurance index number is 5.3 and the range index number is 6.9 (the range index number is needed for obtaining descent information). 2. From the ENDURANCE AT SEA LEVEL curve in figure 11-14C, sheet 1, the sea level endurance is 20.5 minutes. 3. Optimum altitude is found to be 12,500 feet from the OPTIMUM ENDURANCE ALTITUDE curve in figure 11-14D. 4. If mayi'miim endurance is required, it is necessary to climb to optimum altitude (12,500 feet). Maximum endurance obtainable at 12,500 feet is seen to be 22.5 minutes from the ENDURANCE AT OPTIMUM ALTITUDE curve of figure 11-14C, sheet 1. 5. The descent is initiated when the fuel level reaches reserve (600 pounds) plus fuel used in the descent. By reading up to an interpolated 12,500-foot curve, fuel used in the descent is found to be 50 pounds.

Start descent when fuel remaining is 600 4- 50 = 650 pounds. Note that the range index number is used when entering the descent curves, rather than the endurance index number. 6. Distance and time for the descent are found by reading up to the other curves in figure 1114H and are found to be 12 nautical miles, and 3.5 minutes, respectively. 7. MRT climb speed varies with altitude between 180 KCAS at sea level to approximately 167 KCAS at 12,500 feet, from figure 11-14E. 8. Loiter and descent speed, from figure 1114G, is a constant 154 .KCAS. Emergency endurance initial altitude 20,000 feet 1. From figure 11-14A, the endurance index number is 5.3 and the range index number is 6.9 (the range index number is needed for obtaining descent information). 2. Endurance obtainable by remaining at 20,000 feet is the endurance at sea level (20.5 minutes) plus an incremental endurance of 7.5 minutes from the INCREMENTAL ENDURANCE FOR LOITER AT INITIAL ALTITUDE curve in figure 11-14C, sheet 2; or, 28 minutes. . 3. From figure 11-14D, it is seen that 14,000 feet is the computed optimum altitude. (Note that the 2,500-pound curve is used because of note 1.) However, because of note 3, initial altitude (20,000 feet) is maintained rather than descending to the lower computed optimum altitude. 4. The descent is initiated when the fuel level reaches reserve (600 pounds) plus fuel used in the descent. By reading up to the 20,000-foot curve, fuel used in the descent is found to be 70 pounds. Start descent when fuel remaining is 600 + 70 = 670 pounds. Note that the range index number is used when entering the descent curves, rather than the endurance index number. < 5. Distance and time for descent are found by reading up to the other curves in figure 1114H, and are found to be 20 nautical miles, and 5.5 minutes, respectively. 6. Loiter and descent speed, from figure 1114G, is a constant 154 KCAS.

11-30B

UNCLASSIFIED

Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

Section X! Performance Charts

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Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED

11-30C

Section XI

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

11-30D

UNCLASSIFIED

Changed 15 July 1966

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC301A
COMBAT ALLOWANCE DATA

Section XI Performance Charts


wim o* WITHOUT Mtuaa

DESCENT

c
The combat allowance charts present the fuel consumption and time for combat at various altitudes and Mach numbers for either full military thrust or maximum thrust. Generally, it is necessary to use estimates of the average Mach number and average altitude expected for a planned mission. The greatest variation in fuel consumption occurs with changes in altitudes, but a significant variation also is encountered with wide differences in speed for a given thrust setting.
ninunoPOUNDS

~\

For example, assume an altitude of 55,000 feet at a maximum thrust Mach number of 1.3 with 1,500 pounds of fuel available for combat. Enter the chart for maximum thrust (figure 11-11) at Mach 1.3 on the MACH NUMBER scale and project horizontally to the 55,000-foot altitude curve. At this intersection project downward to the 1,500-pound available fuel curve, then horizontally to the left to the MINUTES scale to obtain a combat time of approximately 10 minutes. To obtain fuel required for a desired Mach 1.0 combat time of 7 minutes at 55,000 feet, enter the chart at the assumed Mach number of 1.0 and project horizontally to the assumed altitude curve of 55,000 feet, then project downward. Enter the chart again at the assumed combat time desired, 7 minutes, and project horizontally until the two lines intersect each other. Interpolate between the fuel curves to obtain fuel required, 800 pounds.

msSUlf ALTITUDI 1000 HIT

60482-A-88

ENTER CHART AT CONSTANT MO KNOT1 CASj 3.4OO IT/KIM UTI OflpWIAL ALTITUDE 3i,000 FEET

LANDING DATA The landing data charts (figure 11-14) provide for the determination of recommended approach speed, initial stall warning speed, touchdown speed, maximum speed for brake application and ground roll distance when landing gross weight, field pressure altitude, runway air temperature and runway wind are known. Distances derived from the ground roll distance chart are dependent upon the touchdown and brake application speeds shown on the charts. Initial stall warning speed is shown on the chart to illustrate the margin of safety that is considered in the recommended touchdown and approach speeds. Under some operating conditions, fuselage attitudes at which tail scrape occurs will be encountered before initial stall warning speed is reached. However, at the recommended touchdown speeds there is no danger of tail scraping. Example Assume Runway air temperature 95eF (35C) Field pressure altitude 3,000 feet Landing gross weight 24,000 pounds Runway headwind 25 knots Find Landing ground roll distance Landing speed, recommended approach speed and initial stall warning speed
1T-31

DESCENT DATA

The descent data charts (figures 11-12 and 11-13) permit determination of fuel, distance, time, airspeed and rate-of-descent information for descents initiated at any altitude. Information is presented for a maximum range descent employing a varying speed schedule and for a descent at constant calibrated airspeed. For example, assume that it is desired to find time and fuel required and distance covered in a constant-speed descent to sea level from 35,000 feet. Enter the sample descent chart at the PRESSURE ALTITUDE scale ^and read the chart as shown to obtain

Time required 10 minutes Fuel used in descent. 150 pounds Distance covered in descent. 55 nautical miles Airspeed during descent (constant) 240 knots CAS Rate of descent (constant) ....3,600 feet per minute

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWEPS 01-45HSC301A HUNKS

RECOMMENDED APPROACH SPEED 1J1 KTS

2'ENTER CHART AT RUNWAY AIR TEMPERATURE 95F (35C)

Vatoss WBOHTIMOUS

-ENTER CHART AT E GROSS WEIGHT 24,000 IB

INITIAL STALL WARNING SPEED 134 KTS

HHH

GCOOM) toil 1^)00 FBT

GROUND ROll ON LANDING 4,500 FT

?....._ KiaUM
d itAM. odd 500faMI* M
10
100 130 !<0

I* tOO bon IAS. * apply fwfl tb * -'T oOl raMtt ta a* of aapnujMOMly 500 (w I*

6048ZA36

MAIOMO ggD 04On I U 1 I

604B2 A-19

Recommended braking speed 1. To find the landing ground roll distance, enter the sample landing distance chart at the RUNWAY AIR TEMPERATURE scale and read the chart as shown to obtain Landing roll of 4,500 feet Field density altitude 5,900 feet If the landing is made over a 50-foot obstacle or on other than a .hard-surfaced runway, the landing distance read from the chart must be modified by applying the factors shown in the notes on the chart. 2. To find the touchdown speed, enter the sample speed chart at the landing gross weight and read as shown to obtain Recommended approach speed 151 knots Initial stall warning speed 134 knots Touchdown speed . 143 knots 3. To find the recommended braking speed, enter the chart for maximum speed for brake application at the FIELD DENSITY ALTITUDE scale and read as in the sample problem to obtain speed 118 knots

SPECIFIC RANGE DATA Nautical Miles Per 1,000 Pounds Fuel

These specific range charts give the nautical miles obtained per 1,000 pounds of fuel (specific range) and the fuel consumption rate for various altitudes, airspeeds, and gross weights for each configuration. Using configuration I, for example, assume an average cruise weight (initial cruise gross weight minus onehalf of cruise fuel) of 24,000 pounds, cruise fuel of 4,000 pounds and an altitude of 35,000 feet. To obtain optimum range, enter the 35,000-foot chart for this configuration (figure 11-25, sheet 4) at the intersection of the MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED curve and the 24,000-pound gross weight curve. From this intersection, projecting horizontally to the left gives approximately 195 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel Multiplying 195 by 4 (4,000 pounds of cruise fuel) gives a cruise range of 780 nautical miles. Projecting downward from the intersection of the MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED and gross weight curves to the airspeed scales gives approximately 0.85 true Mach number, 491 knots TAS, and 293 knots CAS.

11-32

NA

1-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

To find the rate of fuel consumption, interpolate between the consumption rate lines to obtain approximately 2,550 pounds per hour. Specific range, airspeeds and rate of fuel flow for maximum endurance are obtained in a similar manner and are as follows for the case given here (reading from the intersection of the MAXIMUM ENDURANCE curve and the 24,000-pound gross weight curve): specific range of 184 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, endurance range of (184 X 4) 736 nautical miles, true Mach number of 0.76, TAS of 438 knots, CAS of 258 knots, a fuel consumption of 2,350 pounds per hour.

In planning missions flown for long distances under constant wind conditions or in rapid planning of combat missions, the flight profile charts may be employed to advantage. Sample mission plan No. 2 exemplifies the use of the mission, optimum endurance, and optimum return profiles to plan a typical simulated combat mission. Sample mission plan No. 3 describes use of the combat radius profile to plan a typical carrier-based airstrike.
SAMPLE MISSION PLAN NO. 1

REST COMPUTER
A cruise control computer is available for use with this type of aircraft. Its use provides a means for the rapid solution of mission planning problems and inflight problems involving determination of Range, Endurance, Speed and Time quantities. Operating instructions are packaged with each computer. A supply of REST computers is provided each Navy operating activity upon first procurement of each new design computer. Additional supplies may be ordered from Naval Supply Center under the following Federal Stock Number: RM 6605-703-2948-V170 (manufacturer's part number APN-72).

This sample mission plan illustrates use of the performance data charts in planning a complex tactical flight in which several cruise legs are flown on different headings and in which combat is conducted both at altitude and at sea level. For each phase of operation shown in the sample, reference is made to the charts from which the data has been determined. Work through the sample by reading each chart for the values shown.

Assume A standard day and 20 knots headwind at time of takeoff on a hard-surfaced runway. The aircraft has a fuel load of 8,657 pounds of JP-5 fuel and a total expendable armament (500 rounds of 20 mm ammunition and 2 external Sidewinder missiles) weight of 491 pounds, accounting for the aircraft takeoff gross weight of 27,700 pounds. Use charts for Configuration I. Fuel reserve of 1,000 pounds at landing. Takeoff at MAXIMUM thrust and an assumed weight of 27,450 pounds (27,700 less 250 pounds for taxiing). Climb to 40,000 feet at MILITARY thrust and cruise at recommended airspeed to an area 250 nautical miles from base. Descend to 35,000 feet and loiter on station at best endurance airspeed until contact with enemy aircraft is achieved. (Assume total loiter time amounts to 15 minutes.) Combat at MAXIMUM thrust at 1.30 MN for 3 minutes and at MILITARY thrust at 0.93 MN for 7 minutes at an average altitude of 35,000 feet. Expend both Sidewinder missiles and a small portion of 20 mm ammunition. Descend to sea level for targets of opportunity (Configuration I charts). Assume the possibility of penetrating an additional 100 nautical miles into enemy territory (350 nautical miles from base). Expend remaining portion of 20 mm ammunition.

MISSION PLANNING
Performance characteristics of the aircraft permit operation over a wide range of speeds and altitudes at considerable distances from the point of origin. The high rates of fuel consumption encountered in various phases of operation make mission planning a necessity. When actual flight performance is checked against a mission plan in terms of fuel used, the pilot will be constantly informed of deviations which can be charged against the fuel reserve expected at destination. Early detection of excessive depletion of reserve fuel will permit diversion to alternate bases with safe fuel states. Best use of the operating data charts in this section depends upon the type of mission to be flown. Basically, there are two procedures. Missions involving frequent changes of heading to fly on cruise legs over various checkpoints require leg-to-leg tabulation of performance considering changes in wind components. This type of mission is planned using the detailed performance charts as shown by sample mission plan No. 1. When temperatures and wind effects are small enough to be disregarded, values for each cruise leg may be read from the mission profile chart.

11-33

Section XI Performance Charts

NA

01A
LOITER-With Two Sidewinder. (Figure 11-20)

Climb to 45,000 feet at MILITARY thrust and cruise back at recommended airspeed and, when within range, make a maximum range descent at IDLE thrust.

Note
Based on meteorological estimates, the following relative winds are predicted to be encountered: At sea level over enemy territory 20 knots at 60 On course, sea level to 40,000 feet No wind On course, above 40,000 feet 60 knots from 150
TAKEOFF (Figures 11-7 and 11-8)

Fuel available (less reserve) Weight (at start of loiter) Total fuel on board__ Loiter time Throttle setting (best loiter speed) Altitude Loiter speed (CAS*) Fuel used during loiter Fuel remaining (less reserve) Net distance covered during loiter
COMBAT - (Figures 11-11)

4,997 pounds 25,040 pounds 5,997 pounds 15.0 minutes As required 35,000 feet 240 knots 620 pounds 4,377 pounds 0 miles

Fuel available (less reserve and taxiing) 7,407 pounds Takeoff weight 27,450 pounds Field elevation" Sea level Runway air temperature 50F Headwind __ 20 knots Throttle setting MAXIMUM Lift-off speed, IAS 147 knots Ground roll distance. 1,700 feet Total distance to clear 50-foot obstacle 2,000 feet Fuel used for takeoff and acceleration to climb speed (figure 11-16, sheet 4) 500 pounds Time for takeoff and acceleration 1.0 minutes Fuel remaining (less reserve) 6,907 pounds
CLIMB-With Two Sidewinders (Figure 11-16, Sheet 3)

Fuel available (less reserve) 4,377 pounds Weight (at start of combat) 24,420 pounds Combat altitude (average) 35,000 feet Time 10.0 minutes Fuel used for 3 minutes (MAXIMUM thrust) 1,300 pounds Fuel used for 7 minutes (MILITARY thrust) 570 pounds Both Sidewinder missiles (328 pounds) and part ammunition (33 pounds) expended..36l pounds Fuel remaining (less reserve) 2,507 pounds
DESCENT - Constant Speed (Figure 11-13, Sheet 1)

Fuel available (less reserve) Weight (at start of climb) Throttle setting Climb speed (See climb Distance covered during climb Time to climb (sea level to 40,000 feet) Fuel used for climb Fuel remaining (less reserve) _

6,907 pounds 26,950 pounds MILITARY speed table*) 83 naut mi 10.4 minutes 1,040 pounds 5,867 pounds

Fuel available (less reserve) 2,507 pounds Throttle setting IDLE Descent speed (CAS*) 240 knots Time to descend (35,000 feet to sea level) 10 minutes Rate of descent (average) _3,600 fpm Fuel used for descent 150 pounds Distance covered during descent 53 naut mi Fuel remaining (less reserve).. 2,357 pounds
CRUISE - With Two Single Pylons and Launchers (Figures 11-25, Sheet 1, and 11-4)

CRUISE OUT-With Two Sidewinders (Figure 11-26, Sheet S)

Fuel available (less reserve) 5,867 pounds Cruise weight (at start of cruise) 25,910 pounds Cruise altitude 40,000 feet Throttle setting (recommended airspeed)As required Mach number 0.87 Cruise droop . .. ... Extended Cruise speed (CAS*) . __268 knots TAS 500 knots Specific range 204 naut mi/1,000 pounds fuel Distance to cruise (250 less 83 less 12; refer to CLIMB and DESCENT) 155 naut mi Time to cruise (distance/TAS) 18.6 minutes Fuel used for cruise out 850 pounds Fuel remaining (less reserve) _5,017 pounds
DESCENT Constant Speed (Figure 11-13, Sheet 1)

Fuel available (less reserve) 2,357 pounds Cruise weight (at start of cruise) 22,039 pounds Cruise altitude Sea level Throttle setting (recommended airspeed) As required Mach number , 0.58 Cruise droop . ______Retracted Wind conditions 20 knots from 60 Cruise speed (CAS*)_ 385 knots TAS _385 knots Specific range 97 naut mi/1,000 pounds fuel Distance to cruise (100 less 53) 47 naut mi Range factor ... 0.973 Factor distance (47/0.973) .48 naut mi Time to cruise (factor distance/TAS) 8.5 minutes Fuel used for cruise 515 pounds Remainder of 20 mm ammunition expended . __ 130 pounds Fuel remaining (less reserve). 1,842 pounds
CLIMB With Two Single Pylons and Launchers (Figure 11-16, Sheet 1)

-5,017 pounds Fuel available (less reserve). IDLE Throttle setting Descent speed (CAS*) _ 240 knots Time to descend (40,000 to 35,000 feet). 1.4 minutes Rate of descent (average) 3,600 fpm Fuel used for descent 20 pounds Distance covered during descent. 12 naut mi Fuel remaining (less reserve)_ ..4,997 pounds

Fuel available (less reserve) 1,842 pounds Weight (at start of climb) 21,394 pounds Throttle setting . MILITARY Climb speed (See climb speed table*) Distance covered during climb 74 naut mi Time, to climb (sea level to 45,000 feet)___9.3 minutes Fuel used for climb 824 pounds Fuel remaining (less reserve). 1,018 pounds

*Convert CAS to IAS by using "Position Error Correction" (figure 11-1).

11-34

NA
CRUISE BACK With Two Single Pylons and launchers (Figures 11-25, Sheet 6, and 11-4)

1-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

Simulated combat at military thrust, average speed Mach 0.9, at 20,000 feet for 10 minutes. Loiter at optimum altitude for 30 minutes. Return to base at optimum altitude.

Fuel available (less reserve) 1,018 pounds Cruise weight (at start of cruise) 20,570 pounds Cruise altitude 45,000 feet Throttle setting (recommended) As required Mach number 0.87 Cruise droop Extended Wind conditions _ 60 knots from 150 Cruise speed (CAS*) 238 knots TAS _ _ _.497 knots Specific range 237 naut mi/1,000 pounds fuel Distance to cruise (350 less 74 less 102; refer to CLIMB and DESCENT) 174 naut mi Range factor _ 1.106 Factor distance (174/1.106) 157.5 naut mi Time to cruise (factor distance/TAS) 19.0 minutes Fuel used to cruise back. : 660 pounds Fuel remaining (less reserve) 358 pounds
DESCENT-Maximum Range (Figure 71-12)

1. Enter the mission profile (figure 11-18) at the desired range (250 nautical miles) and the cruiseclimb path line and read the following values: Recommended cruise speed .Mach 0.86 Time aloft 32 minutes Fuel used 2,525 pounds Fuel remaining (8,657-2,525) 6,132 pounds 2. From the constant-speed descent chart (sheet 1, figure 11-13), determine the performance in a descent from cruise-climb altitude (approximately 40,000 feet) to 20,000 feet. Time to descend _ 5.5 minutes Distance traveled in descent 40 naut mi Fuel used 75 pounds Fuel remaining (6,132-75) 6,057 pounds 3. From the combat allowance chart (figure 11-11), find the fuel required for the simulated combat portion of the mission. Fuel used 1,125 pounds Fuel remaining (6,057-1,125) 4,932 pounds 4. Enter the optimum endurance profile (figure 1121) at the altitude at which simulated combat is performed and find the optimum performance for prescribed loiter (4,932 pounds fuel remaining) as follows: Optimum altitude , 33,000 feet Recommended loiter speed ...240 knots, CAS Time for climb and loiter (30 + 3) 33 minutes Fuel remaining after loiter 3,500 pounds 5. From the optimum return profile chart (figure 1119), determine return cruise performance for the initial altitude of 33,000 feet and 3,500 pounds fuel remaining. Distance to travel (cruise out and descent) (250 + 40) 290 naut mi Distance available in flight to zero fuel remaining _ ...765 naut mi Time available for climb and cruise to zero fuel remaining 1 hour, 33 minutes Initial cruise-climb altitude 42,000 feet Fuel remaining over base 2,050 pounds Time remaining upon return over base 58 minutes Time for cruise-back (1 hour, 56 minutes -1 hour 21 minutes) 35 minutes Altitude upon return over base 43,500 feet

Fuel available (less reserve)., 358 pounds Throttle setting _ IDLE Average descent speed (CAS*) 205 knots Time to descend (45,000 feet to sea level)-21.0 minutes Rate of descent (average) 2,200 fpm Fuel used for descent. _ 245 pounds Distance covered during descent 102 naut mi Fuel remaining (less reserve) 113 pounds
LANDING - (Figure 11-14)

Fuel available (with reserve) Landing weight Field elevation Wind Runway air temperature Touchdown speed, IAS J Braking speed, IAS Rollout distance

1,113 pounds 19,665 pounds Sea level 20 knots 59F 127 knots 127 knots 2,200 feet
2,700 feet

Total distance to clear 50 foot obstacle

SAMPLE MISSION PLAN NO. 2 This sample mission plan illustrates the way in which several of the flight profile charts may be used in sequence to form a flight plan for a typical tactical training mission. Since the treatment of temperature and wind effects has been described in the examples for individual profile charts, these effects are not included in this sample. Assume

Configuration I (with two Sidewinder missiles). Military thrust takeoff and climb to cruise-climb altitude; cruise to a point 250 nautical miles from base. Constant speed on-course descent from cruise-climb altitude to 20,000 feet.

*Convert CAS to IAS by using "Position Error Correction" (figure 11-1).

11-35

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWEPS 01

6. From the constant-speed descent chart, find the fuel and time required for descent to sea level. Fuel required for descent _ 175 pounds Time for descent 12 minutes 7. Find total time aloft in minutes (33 + 5.5 + 10 + 33 + 35 + 12) 2 hours, 8.5 minutes If inflight refueling were to be : accomplished at any point in the mission illustrated above, the air refueling profile could be used to obtain cruise data for the cruise leg following refueling. For instance, the air refueling profile could be substituted for the optimum return profile if refueling occurred at the end of the loiter period.

1. Enter the combat allowance chart for maximum thrust (figure 1111) at average speed and altitude and read fuel required for estimated time. Combat fuel required 1,875 pounds 2. Read the combat allowance chart for military thrust (figure 11-11) in the same manner for" estimated time. Combat fuel required. ..700 pounds 3. Find total estimated combat fuel required. (1,875 + 700) 2,575 pounds 4. Enter the combat radius profile chart (figure 1117) and read the following data. Initial cruise altitude 39,000 feet Maximum radius at cruise-climb altitude (2,575 pounds combat fuel) .415 naut mi Altitude at end of cruise-out. 40,500 feet Initial altitude for cruise-back (cruise-climb altitude) 42,700 feet Altitude at end of cruise-back 44,500 feet Distance from base at which to initiate descent for landing 75 naut mi Assume that at 10,000 feet during the descent for landing, the carrier deck becomes fouled and it is necessary to loiter until the deck can be cleared. Enter the endurance decision chart (figure 11-24, sheet 1) at 10,000 feet altitude, and 1,000 pounds fuel remaining (reserve at sea level, remaining descent fuel is negligible) and read: Optimum altitude for loiter 20,000 feet Endurance with 600 pounds reserve fuel 14 minutes Endurance, no reserve (read chart for 1,600 pounds remaining and optimum loiter altitude of 30,000 feet) 33 minutes

SAMPLE MISSION PLAN NO. 3

The sample mission plan illustrates the way in which the combat radius profile chart may be used to establish performance for a combat air patrol mission flown at maximum radius from an aircraft carrier. The combat radius profile is most useful in planning missions in which a certain amount of fuel is to be reserved for combat or other operations at extreme radius of action. Assume It is desired to find the maximum radius of action that can be achieved under the following conditions: Configuration I (with two Sidewinder missiles); 1,000 pounds reserve fuel upon return to base. Estimated 5 minutes ma-gimiirrx thrust for combat operation at maximum radius, average altitude 40,000 feet and average speed Mach 1.4. Estimated 15 minutes of military thrust combat operation at same altitude and average speed of Mach 0.95.

11-36

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

ALL

CONFIGURATIONS

TAKEOFF, COMBAT ALLOWANCE EMERGENCY RANGE AND ENDURANCE DESCENT AND LANDING DATA CHARTS

DECISION

I
CONTENTS
Takeoff Combat Allowance. Descent. Landing Emergency Range and Endurance Index Numbers Emergency Range. Emergency Endurance

11-38 11-44

_ 11-50A _... 11-50B _ 11-50D

Emergency Range and Endurance Altitudes. Emergency Range and Endurance Climb SpeedsEmergency Range Cruise Speeds Emergency Range and Endurance Loiter and Descent Speeds Emergency Range and Endurance Descent.

11-50F 11-50G 11-50J 11-50L 11-50M

Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED

11-37

Section X! Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS OT-45HHC-501A

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231

11-38

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

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UNCLASSIFIED

11-39

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

TAKEOFF SPEED
MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Estimates DATE: January 1960
160

ALL CONFIGURATIONS Sea Level Standard Day Landing Condition ENGINE: J57-P-16

150

NORMAL RUN

in O
140

MINIMUM RUN

O ui

120

20

22

24

26

28

30

GROSS WEIGHT1,000 POUNDS ALLOWABLE CROSSWINDS


40

\
- -> '-* TAK6 DFFS : - - - f c - - N O T RECO- AMENDED: ::::::: ...-.(

1.

O i

For non-standard conditions, increase takeoff speed 2.0 knots per 1,000 feet field pressure altitude and 0.25 knot per 1.0C above standard day temperature (15C). Takeoff speed is defined as speed at breakground Nose wheel should be raised at airspeed 10 knots below applicable takeoff speed.

2. 3. ..Z.-.-Z-.-.Z-..:-

20

a
10
. .1 . . , .1 . . . .t . . . .

: C - - - ; C S A ! 5 FOR

TAKEOFF::::;:::
MAXIMUM THRUST MILITARY THRUST

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20

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40

60

80

ANGLE OF WIND RELATIVE TO RUNWAY - DEGREES


60W2-A- 28

Figure 11-8

11-40

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

MAXIMUM REFUSAL SPEEDSMODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Estimates DATE: January 1960

ALL

CONFIGURATIONS ENGINE: J57-P-16

28

g i
2
J. O 26
I/)
24

20
: CORRECTION FOR WET OR ICY RUNWAY

<
28
GROSS WEIGHT 1,000 POUNDS

/>

2 o

22

nn

20

SB

*<
iBixo

100

120

140

160

180

MAXIMUM REFUSAL SPEED KNOTS IAS

1. For wet or icy runway, use normal refusal speed minus A Refusal Speed from chart. 2. Use refusal speed or corrected refusal speed in Velocity During Takeoff Ground Run chart to find refusal distance.

MAXIMUM THRUST MILITARY THRUST

60X82-A-40

Figure 11-9 UNCLASSIFIED 11-41

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAWVEPS 01-45HHC-501A

in ui

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11-42

tl 25 o o 2H

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SiON)t-a33dSUIV 03AVOIQNI UNCLASSIFIED

o CO

NAVWEW'Of-45HHC-501 A

Section XI Performance Charts

VELOCITY DURING TAKEOFF GROUND RUNMODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Estimates DATE: January 1960

MAXIMUM THRUST-ALL CONFIGURATIONS ENGINE: J57-P-16

Ul

GROUND RUN- 1,000 FEET

Chart applicable for non-standard conditions if airspeed used to enter chart is corrected for ambient temperature and field pressure altitude.

6O4B2A26

Figure 11-10 (Sheet 2)


11-43

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWI

501A

COMBAT ALLOWANCE-MILITARY THRUSTMODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Estimates DATE: January 1958 Standard Day Clean Condition

ALL CONFIGURATIONS
/"N.

ENGINE: J57-P-16

TIME LIMIT 30 MINUTES

I
.TIME LIMIT ONE MINUTE

1 i

Refer to section 1, part 4, NATOPS Flight Manual, for engine exhaust temperature limits.

60Z-A-II(2>

Figure 11-11 (Sheet 1)

11-44

fEP^uW^^rc3WK NAVWEI

Section XI Performance Charts

COMBAT ALLOWANCE-MAXIMUM THRUST


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Estimates DATE: January 1958 Standard Day Clean Condition

ALL CONFIGURATIONS ENGINE: J57-P-16

TIME LIMIT IS MINUTES

eo

I ui

ca

O u

Refer to section 1, part 4, NATOPS Flight Manual, for engine exhaust temperature limits.
60412A12(1)

Figure 11-11

(Sheet 2)

Section XI Performance Charts

-45HHC-501A

DESCENT

MAXIMUM RANGE DESCENT-ALL CONFIGURATIONS

o
ENGINE: J57-P-16

MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Contractor Flight Test DATE: January 1960

Standard Day Idle Thrust Cruise Condition

150

100
DISTANCE NAUTICAL MILES

200
FUEL USED POUNDS

100

TIME MINUTES

RATE OF DESCENT 1000 FPM

CAS KNOTS

200

180

10

20

30

40

50

PRESSURE ALTITUDE 1000 FEET

60M2-A-9U)

Figure

11-12

11-46

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts CLEAN AIRPLANE

DESCENT'

CONSTANT AIRSPEED DESCENT

TWO SIDEWINDER MISSILES, SINGLE OR DUAL PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS

MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959

Standard Day Idle Thrust Cruise Condition

ENGINE: J57-P-16

100
DISTANCE NAUTICAL MILES

FUEL USED POUNDS

20
TIME MINUTES

10

10

20

30

PRESSURE ALTITUDE 1000 FEET CONSTANT 240 KNOTS CAS; 3,6OO FT/MIN RATE OF SINK

Figure 11-13 (Sheet 1) UNCLASSIFIED

11-4F

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

DESCENT-

CONSTANT AIRSPEED DESCENT WITH FOUR SIDEWINDERS OR TWO OR FOUR ZUNI PACKS (WITH OR WITHOUT ZUNIS) Standard Day Idle Thrust Cruise Condition ENGINE: J57-P-16

MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: November 1960

100

DISTANCE NAUTICAL MILES

200

FUEL USED - POUNDS 100

TIME-MINUTES

10 --

PRESSURE ALTITUDE -1000

FEET

CONSTANT 255 KNOTS CAS; 4,000 FT/MIN RATE OF SINK


60482A73

Figure 77-73 (Sheet 2) 11-48 UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-50TA

Section XI Performance Charts

LANDING
MODEL F-8C DATA BASIS: Estimate. DATE: January 1960

ALL CONFIGURATIONS ENGINE: J57-P-16

"N

-50

-25

25

50 C

-58 -13 32 77 122 "F RUNWAY AIR TEMPERATURE

tt

20

DISTANCE

40 4 6 8 10 12 14

GROUND ROLL - 1,000 FEET

1 . To find the total distance required for clearing a 50-foot obstacle, touchdown, and rollout, add 500 feet to normal ground roll distance 2. The above distances are obtained only when landing and braking speeds given on sheet 2 are used.
60*82- A- 10(1)

Figure 11-74 fSheef UNCLASSIFIED

11-49

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

LANDING
MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Estimates DATE: January 1960

ALL CONFIGURATIONS Standard Day Hard Surface Runway Landing Condition ENGINE: J57-P-16

ALLOWABLE CROSSWINDS
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UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

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UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

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11-506

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UNCLASSIFIED

Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

CONFIGURATION I
CLIMB, CRUISE, RANGE AND ENDURANCE DECISION, AND SPECIFIC RANGE DATA

CONFIGURATION I STORES ARRANGEMENTS

1. 2. 3. 4.

Clean aircraft (shown) Two single fuselage pylons with launchers Dual pylons and launchers Two Sidewinder missiles

CONTENTS
Best Climb Climb Control Combat Radius Profile Mission Profile Optimum Return Profile 11-52 11-54 11-58 11-59 11-60 Maximum Endurance Profile Optimum Endurance Profile Air Refueling Profile Range Decision Endurance Decision Nautical Miles/1,000 Pounds of Fuel

11-61 11-62 11-63 11-64 11-65 11-66

UNCLASSIFIED

11-51

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11-52
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n-53

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11-54

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

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NAVWEPS 01-45

1A

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11-61

Section XI Performance diarrs

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UNCLASSIFIED

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Section XI Performance Charts

NAVA1R 01-45HHC-501A

RANGE DECISION
MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Flightiest DATE: May 1966 Cruise Condition at All Airspeeds Range in Nautical Miles ENGINE: J57-P-16

MILITARY THRUST CLIMB

BEST RANGE SPEED

MAXIMUM RANGE DESCENT. IDLE THRUST

ALT
SL

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10

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SL 10 20 30 35 40

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247 KIAS ALL ALTITUDES

IF YOU ARE AT SEA LEVEL RANGE THIS ALT NMI RANGE AT OPT AIT 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: IB FUEL ON BOARD LB

IF YOU ARE AT 10,000 FEET RANGE THIS ALT NMI


OPT AIT RANGE AT 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI

START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: LB

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133 172

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16 23 29 37 40 41

42 72 114 206 297 392

700 730 750 780 790 790

IF YOU ARE AT 20,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB RANGE THIS ALT NMI
56

IF YOU ARE AT 30,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB


800

START DESCENT RANGE AT OPT ALT WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI REACHES: LB
25 30 34 39 41 41 56 94
140 229 322 418

RANGE AT RANGE THIS OPT AIT ALT NMI ' 1,000 FT OPT AIT NMI
70 31 35 38 41 41 41 70
114 158 250 343 436

START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: LB


760 770 780 790 790 790

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250 315

735 755 770 785 790 790

1,000 1,200 1,600

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2,000 2,400

IF YOU ARE AT 35,000 FEET


FUEL ON BOARD LB RANGE THIJ ALT NMI START DESCENT RANGE AT OPT ALT WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI REACHES: LB FUEL ON BOARD IB

IF YOU ARE AT 40,000 FEET RANGE THIS ALT NMI RANGE AT OPT AIT 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: IB

800

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35 37 39 41 41 41

770 780 785 790 790 790

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81 129 177 269 360 453

40 40 40 41 41 41


271 363 460

790 790 790 790 790 790

1. Data is based upon performance with two Sidewinder missiles. 2. Range figures include distance for climb to optimum altitude and for descent to sea level. 3. Provides 600 pounds reserve fuel upon return to sea level; for greater fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly less fuel on board; for smaller fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly more fuel on board.

4. Use schedules shown for climb, cruise, and descent. 5. Distance covered in descent from 40,000 feet is 78 nautical miles. 6. Distance covered in descent from 43,000 feet is 97 nautical miles. 7. Use Range Factors chart for wind corrections.

60482-A-5ZNB

11-64

Changed 15 July 1966

NAVAIlTOl -45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

ENDURANCE DECISION
MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Flightiest DATE: May 1966 ENGINE: J57-P-16 Cruise Condition at All Altitudes Time in Minutes

MILITARY THRUST CLIMB

ALT

IMH .71 .73 . 7 7 .81 .83 . 8 4

IAS

LOITER AND IDLE THRUST DESCENT

SL 10 20 30 35 40

468 406 354 307 282 254

247 KIAS ALL ALTITUDES

IF YOU ARE AT SEA LEVEL FUEL ON BOARD IB


800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

IF YOU ARE AT 10,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB


800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

START DESCENT ENDURANCE OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT WHEN FUEL THIS 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN ALT MIN REACHES: IB 4.5 6 645 5.5 14 9.0 11.0 690 13.5 19 710 17.0 22.0 23 28.5 730 31.0 40.0 740 26 40.0 29 52.0 750 IF YOU ARE AT 20,000 FEET

ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT THIS WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN ALT MIN REACHES: LB
8.5
14.0 19.5 29.5 39.5 49.5

15 20 22 25 27 28

9.5
15.5 21.0 33.0 44.5 57.0

695 ' 715 725 735 745 750

IF YOU ARE AT 30,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB


800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2.000 2,400
ENDURANCE THIS

FUEL ON BOARD IB
800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT THIS WHEN FUEL OPT ALT MIN 1,000 FT ALT MIN REACHES: LB 12.0 20 715 18.5 22 725 24 24.0 730 24.5 35.0 26 36.0 740 46.0 28 47.5 750 57.5 29 750 59.5 IF YOU ARE AT 35,000 FEET

ALT MIN

OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN

13.5 20.5 26.5 38.5 50.0 62.0

30 30 30 30 30 30

START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: LB 755 755 755 755 755 755

IF YOU ARE AT 40,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD IB


800 1,000 1,200

FUEL ON BOARD LB
800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000

ENDURANCE THIS ALT MIN


14.5 21.5 27.5 39.5 51.5 63.5

2,400

START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN REACHES: LB 770 30-35 30-35 770 30-35 770 30-35 770 30-35 770 30-35 770

1,600 2,000 2,400

START DESCENT ENDURANCE OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT WHEN FUEL THIS 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN REACHES: LB ALT MIN 790 30--tO 15.5 790 30-40 22.5 790 30-40 28.5 790 30-40 40.5 790 52.5 30-40 790 30-40 64.5

1. Data is based upon performance with two Sidewinder missiles installed. 2. Endurance figures include time for climb to optimum altitude and for descent to sea level. 3. Provides 600 pounds reserve fuel upon return to sea level; for greater fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly less fuel on board; for smaller fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly more fuel on board.

4. Use schedule for climb speeds. Loiter and descent speed is 247 KIAS. 5. Time required for descent from 40,000 feet is 14.5 minutes.

60482-AS3NB

Figure
Changed 15 July 1966

11-24
11-65

Section XI Performance Charts

(U) EC-501A I

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL

SEA LEVEL

CONFIGURATION I - CLEAN AIRPLANE OR SINGLE PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS

MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959

Standard Day Clean Condition at All Speeds

ENGINE: J57-P-16

140

I/I

0.8

0.9

1.0

MACH NUMBER TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS


200 250 300

350

400 i 1

450

500 1

550

600

200

| 250

300

350

| 400

450

| i i 500 550

i in in
600 650

650 i i i 1

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

6O4B2A18(1)

Figure 71-25 (Sheet 1)

11-66

(U)

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL

15,000 FEET CONFIGURATION I - CLEAN AIRPLANE OR SINGLE PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS


Croise

o
a z

MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959

Standard Day Condition Below 0.68 MN

ENGINE: J57-P-16

160

140

120

ee
B> 1 1 1

^ u
H?

100

60 --

I I.I I I I For 100-knot headwind, increaio maximum range cruise Mach number

0.4

0.7

MACH NUMBER TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

250

300
1 1

350
1 i1 i i i |II i

400
li i

450

200

III MM i i i

1i^__-,lt ,i I i ._
350

250

300

"!L _ ., _ _ 3 I\ . . ,.T U _J ^ t - r - r._ JI___lE r T i 1 i i 1- .'- T i i-r 1 | 1 1 1- T 400 450 500


6082~A IB(4)

500

550 i i i 1i

TT _TJ.

600 t i l l

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED -- KNOTS

Figure 11-25 (Sheet 2) UNCLASSIFIED


11-67

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL'


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

25,000 FEET CONFIGURATION I-CLEAN AIRPLANE OR SINGLE PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.83 MN ENGINE: J-57-P-16

200

MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO

_ For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruite Mach number - by 0.07.

0 . 6

0.7

0.8

0 . 9

1.0

1.1

MACH NUMBER

300

350
-T+

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS


. I ....

400

450

I ....

500

I . . . .

550

I.

600 . 1

650

200

250

300 350 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

400

450

Figure 7 7-25 (Sheer 3) 11-48 UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts 35,000 FEET ENGINE: J57-P-16

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959 Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.91 MN

CONFIGURATION I - CLEAN AIRPLANE OR SINGLE PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS

240
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED i i i I I t I i i I GROSS WEIGHT19,000 Lfl MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

ti.b

220
ENGINE .PRESSURE 2.1

200
to

o
180

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

160

3 ^ <

140

120
~ For 100-knot headwind, increase . _ maximum range cruise Mach number --by 0.01.

MILITARY THRUST

100

: 0.8 :
MACH NUMBER TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

0.9

300 i I i i

350

400
I

V450
\ 1 i JL

f 500
I if I 1I

550
I 350

600 i I i

200

250 300 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

60482A I 8 (6)

Figure 11-25

(Sheet 4) 11-69

UNCLASSIFIED

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959 Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.93 MN

40,000 FEET

CONFIGURATION I-CLEAN AIRPLANE OR SINGLE PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS ENGINE: J57-P-16

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

L-M-MAXIMUM RANGE

240

220

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO

200

8
v

s I
u

180

160

140

120

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Maeh number by 0.01.

0.60

0.70

0.80

0.90

1.00

1.10

MACH NUMBER TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS 550 500 450

600 350 1 | i i i i | i i i i 1 i t | 1 i iii I t . i 1 1 1 1 I r IT * _J~ | 1 1 ...L L . LI. 1 ' ..' i | 1\ ' 250 3()0 200 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

400

TT " ir~ ,__ " ._j.j


.

ii

350
eo^A-.ac,)

Figure TT-25 fSheef 5)


11-70

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUELMODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959
280

45,OOO FEET CONFIGURATION I - CLEAN AIRPLANE OR SINGLE PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.94 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

260

'2.3-ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO

a z

i/i

240

o a,

8
220

_1

200

180

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number jr by 0.01. Q
VO A

160

0.6

0.9

NUMBER TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS


350

i i i1i i i i* i n iimi i i i i i i ii ' r ' i i r*nf

400 li

450

500

550

600

200 250 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

300

G
Figure JJ-25 rSheef 6) UNCLASSIFIED 11-71

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUELMODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959

SEA LEVEL CONFIGURATION I-TWO SIDEWINDER MISSILES OR DUAL PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS Standard Day Clean Condition at All Speeds ENGINE: J57-P-16

140

in

120
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

g o
100

_J
MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

i i i i i i i For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.07.

MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS


200 250 300

350

400

I l i ! Ii i i . I
200

'

500 l

550

600
i i

650

i l i WI
250

300

i i i i i | i i i i | i.i n | i r 350 400 450 500


CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

r i 550

i i j i ii i | 600 650

60482A19(|]

Figure 11-26

(Sheet 1)

11-72

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959 Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.68 MN

15,000 FEET

CONFIGURATION I-TWO SIDEWINDER MISSILES OR DUAL PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS ENGINE: J57-P-16

o
a

\
i
ec
ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO - ENDURANCE MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

For 100-knot headwind, increase, maximum range cruite Mach number by 0.07.

0.7

MACH NUMBER TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

ii]ijijiJiiii]iiiJiliiiji,ii.ii,iliiiriiiJi,iLii,iii|iJi,i]i,r^
. t i i -i i \ i f i f , < i. i,i II -I , i, I i. f . i i. f - i . ,
450 250 400 300 350 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

300

350

400

450 I ; .i

500

550

600

500

604IZ-A-I9U)

Figure 17-26 fSheef 2) UNCLASSIFIED

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL

25,000 FEET CONFIGURATION I - TWO SIDEWINDER MISSILES OR DUAL PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS

MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959

Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.83 MN

ENGINE: J57-P-16

180

160
Si

2
ec to

140
MAXIMUM ENDURANCE MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

120
ENGINE PRESSURE I RATIO RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

100

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Much number by 0.07.

80
0.40 0.50

0.60

0.70
MACH NUMBER

0.80

0.90

1.00

BIN INI i MM i Him niH+H+f I M I I I1I I 1I I 1 i i1 i i1 i i1u I I I I I I I I i i i i I I I I I I f


200 250 300 350

250 300 I I I I I i I ill

350

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS 400 450 500 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II

550 I I I '

600

\ 400

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS


60482 A19(6)

Figure 17-26 (Sheet 3) 11-74 UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959 Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.91 MN

3SMtmt
ENGINE: J57-P-16

CONFIGURATION I - TWO SIDEWINDER MISSILES OR DUAL PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS

220

200

180

160

140

120

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.01;

100
0.6

0.7

0.8 MACH NUMBER


TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

0.9

1.0

1.1

300

350
' I 200 '

400

450

500
'

550
| 350

600

M I M I I I I I I M 1I I I I I 1 I I I1 I I I I I I1 I I I I I 1I I I1I I I I I I I I I I 1 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJ
! ' ! ' 250 300 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS
S0482-A- It (6)

Figure 17-26 (Sheet 4) UNCLASSIFIED

11-75

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUELMODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959 Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.93 MN

40,000 FEET
ENGINE: J57-P-16

CONFIGURATION I - TWO SIDEWINDER MISSILES OR DUAL PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS

240

I
o
O

220

200

a
s

iso

3
160

140

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.01.

120

0.9 MACH NUMBER

1.2

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

350 I . .
200

400

450 I- .

500 . . . I . .
I 250
n

.1
'

550
I 300
r

600

650

350
60462-A-I9O)

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

Figure 77-26 (Sheet 5) 11-76 UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL-

45,000 FEET CONFIGURATION I - TWO SIDEWINDER MISSILES OR DUAL PYLONS AND LAUNCHERS Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.94 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: NATC Flight Test DATE: July 1959

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

GROSS WEIGHT19,000 IB MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

2
/

Si

a z
ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO

u
200

180

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.01.

160

0.6

0.8

0.9

MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS


350 400

450

500

550 1
250

600

200

300
60482-A-I9OO)

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS Figure 11-26 (Sheet 6) 11-77

UNCLASSIFIED

Section XI

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS OI-45HHC-501A

o
11-78

UNCLASSIFIED

NAVWEPS

(U) HC-501A

Section XI Performance darts

C O N F I G U R A T I O N II
CLIMB, CRUISE, RANGE AND ENDURANCE DECISION, AND SPECIFIC RANGE DATA

CONFIGURATION II STORES ARRANGEMENTS

1. Four Sidewinders (shown) 2. Two fuselage Zuni packs (with or without Zunis)

CONTENTS
Best Climb Climb Control Combat Radius Profile Mission Profile Optimum Return Profile Maximum Endurance Profile 11-80 11-81 11-83 11-84 11-85 1186 Optimum Endurance ProfileAir Refueling Profile Range Decision Endurance Decision Nautical Miles/1,000 Pounds of Fuel

11-87 11-88 11-89 11-90 11-91

11-79

Section X! Performance Charts

NAVWEPS 1rr45HHC-501 A

I/I

<j

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CO

tl/t

<J

7 s
o>

133d ooo'i-aannnv
11-80

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

I
W1_

CO

0>

S3inNIW-8WnD Ol 3WU

11-81

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

I
7
O) 00

5S e S- S

"O

= 2 ,-

sniw TVDunvN-awnD NI aaaaACO


mf:
i.'-.'/. v.;-;:;

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Ills
11-82

" oo doono CJ V 10 10

S3inNIW-SWI13 Ol 3WIJL

NAVWEPS 01^5HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

o
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'

11-83

Section XI Performance Charts

N ui

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11-84

NAVWEPS OT-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

n CO
CN

CM CO CO CO.

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11-85

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWEPS 01

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11-86

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

1 0

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v3O =

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Ul O TJ

6
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ooo'i - ganiuiv 3anss3tici

11-87

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWEP5 01-45HHC-501A

en

CO CN CN

*""*

00 CN

CN CO

K CO CO

CO O CO

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11-88

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

RANGE DECISION
MODEL F-8C DATA BASIS: Flight Test DATE: May 1966
MILITARY THRUST CUMB

Cnitse Condition at All Airspeeds Range in Nautical Miles


BEST HANOI SPEED ALT

ENGINE: J57-P-16

ALT

IMH

IAS 428 378 331 290 269 246

IMN

IAS 300 284 278 270 262 252

SI 10 20 30 35 40

. 6 3 .68 .72 . 7 7 . 7 9 .81

SL 10 20 30 35 40

.51 .60 .72 .77 .83

IDLE THRUST DESCENT

240 KIAS ALL ALTITUDES

IF YOU ARE AT SEA LEVEL

IF YOU ARE AT 10,000 FEET

I
START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: LB 685 715 735 760 770 770
START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: LB

roil

ON

BOARD IB

RANGE AT RANGE THIS OPT ALT ALT NMI 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI

80Q 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

18 36 54 90 125 161

6 14 21 32 38 40

20 49 82 162 243 327

START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: IB 640 680 710 750 765 770

FUEL ON BOARD LB

RANGE THIS ALT NMI

OPT ALT RANGE AT 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI

800 1,000 1,200 1.600 2,000 2,400

37 62 86 132 179 225

15 22 28 36 40 40

41 68 109 189 271 355

IF YOU ARI AT 20,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB


RANGE THIS ALT NMI

IF YOU ARE AT 30,000 FEET


FUEL ON BOARD IB RANGE THIS ALT NMI

800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

53 85 116 176 234 273

START DESCENT RANGE AT OPT AIT WHEN FUEL OPT ALT NMI 1,000 FT REACHES: LB 54 720 24 86 740. 30 130 755 34 212 770 39 294 770 40 380 770 40

OPT AIT RANGE AT 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI

800
1,000 1,200 1,600
2,000 2,400

66 104
142 217 289 360

31 35
37 .

40 40 40

67 105 146 230 315 402

745 755 765 770 770 770

IF YOU ARI AT 35,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB RANGE THIS ALT NMI

IF YOU ARE AT 40,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB RANGE THIS ALT NMI

OPT ALT 1,000 FT

START DESCENT RANGE AT WHEN FUEL OPT ALT NMI REACHES: IB

OPT ALT RANGE AT 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI

800
1,000 1,200 1,600
2,000 2,400

74 114 154 233 311


390

36 38 40 40 40

115 157 238 324 409

755 760 770 770 770 770

800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

80 121 164 249 333 418

40 40 40 40 40 40

- ._

START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: LB 770 770 770 770 770 770 : .

T. Data is based upon performance with four Sidewinder missiles installed. 2. Range figures include distance for climb to optimum altitude and for descent to sea level. 3. Provides 600 pounds reserve fuel upon return to sea level; for greater fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly less fuel on board; for smaller fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly more fuel on board.

4. Use schedules shown for climb, cruise, and descent. 5. Distance covered in descent from 40,000 feet is 72 nautical miles. 6. Applicable for non-standard conditions recommended KIAS is maintained. when

7. Use Range Factors chart for wind corrections.


60482-A-69NB

Figure 11-35 Changed 15 July 1966 UNCLASSIFIED ll~8f

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

ENDURANCE DECISION'
MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: night Ted DATE: May 1966 Guise Condition at All Altitudes Time in Minutes ENGINE: J57-P-16

MILITARY THRUST CLIMB

ALT

IMN

IAS

SL 10 20 30 35 40

. 6 5 .68 .72 . 7 7 . 7 9 .81

428 378 331 290 269 246

LOITER AND IDLE THRUST DESCENT

MO KIAS ALL ALTITUDES

IF YOU ARE AT SEA LEVEL FUEL ON BOARD IB ENDURANCE OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT THIS 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN ALT MIN START DESCENT CACHES: LB FUEL ON BOARD LB

IF YOU ARE AT 10,000 FEET ENDURANCE OPT ALT- ENDURANCE AT IJJJLD5gl" THIS ALT MIN 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN BEACHE,._IB

800

4.0 8.0
12.5 21.0 29.5 38.0

1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

5 12 17 22

5.5
11.0 16.5 27.5 38.0 49.0

25 27

635 670 695 715 725 730

800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

7.5
12.5 17.5 27.5 38.0 47.5

14 18 21 24 26 27

8.5
14.5 20.0 31.0 42.5 54.0

680 700 710 720 730 730

IF YOU ARE AT 20,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD IB ENDURANCE >* IIT OPT ALT THIS AAA fr I,000 FT ALT MIN
10.5 16.5 21.5 33.0 44.0 55.0

IF YOU ARE AT 30,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD IB ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT THIS 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN , ALT MIN IEACHES: IB 12.5 30 740
18.5 24.0 35.5 47.0 58.5

>uii_.ur START DESCENT ENDURANCE AT umcu run M*IV AIV uiu - vVrlCn FUEL OPT ALT MIN REACHEJ._IB

800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

20 21 23 25 27 28

17.5 23.0 34.0 45.5 57.0

705.

710 720 725 730 735

800 1,000 1,200

1,600
2,000 2,400

30 30 30 30 30

37 47 58

740 740 740 740 740

IF YOU ARE AT 33,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB START DESCENT ENDURANCE OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT WHEN FUEL THIS 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN ALT MIN REACHES: IB
13.5 19.5 25.0 36.5 48.5 59.5

IF YOU ARE AT 40,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD IB ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT THIS WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN ALT MIN BEACHES: LB
14.5 20.0 26.0 37.5 49.5 60.5

800 1,000

uoo
1,600
2,000 2,400

30-35 30-35 30-35 30-35 30-35 30-35

755 755 755 755 755 755

800 1,000 1,200

30-35 30-35 30-35 30-35 30-35 30-35

1,600 2,000 2,400

770 770 770 770 770 770

1. Data is based upon performance with four Sidewinder missiles installed. 2. Endurance figures include time for climb to optimum altitude and for descent to sea level. 3. Provides 600 pounds reserve fuel upon return to sea level; for greater fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly less fuel on board; for smaller

tuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly more fuel on board. 4. Use schedule for climb speeds. Loiter and descent speed is 240 KIAS. 5. Time required for descent from 40,000 feet is 14 minutes.
60482-A-70NB

Figure 11-36

11-90

UNCLASSIFIED

Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


SEA LEVELCONFIGURATION MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four-Sidewinder drag data based on NPE and Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, March 1961. II Standard Day Clean Condition at All Speeds ENGINE: J57-P-16

120

u. O 100

---,

GROSS WEIGHT

80

60
MAXIMUM ENDURANCE RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.07. MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

40

20

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6
MACH NUMBER

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

200

11i
' M 250

250

i ii
300

300

350

1 1i
1

400

450

500

550 i i I i i

600 i I i i 600

650 i I 650

200

350

I ' 400

I 450

fH+H500 550

i I i i i i I

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

60452A71 (1)

Figure 11-37 ('Sheet UNCLASSIFIED

11-91

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


15,000 FEET CONFIGURATION II MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four-Sidewinder drag data based on NPE and Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, March 1961. Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.68 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

I
a
O a.

160

140

120

100

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

80

60
For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.07.

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7
MACH NUMBER

0.8

0.9

1.0

250

t i
200

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 I i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1I I I i I i i i i I i i

250

r i i i r r . i i i i i i . i i i i i i i 300 350 400 450


CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

500

60482-A-7I (2)

Figure J J-37 (Sheet 2)

11-92

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


25,000 FEET CONFIGURATION II MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four-Sidewinder drag data based on NPE and Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, March 1961. Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.83 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

180

ui

2
a

160

2
UI

140

a.

120

SPEED

MAXIMUM -M- ENDURANCE

-4 ENGINE

100
RECOMMENDED '. MINIMUM SPEED

80
For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.07.

60

0.40

0.50

0.60

0.70

0.80

0.90

1.00

MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

250

300

350
I L t

400

450 l I i

500 550 600 l I i 'i i i I i i i i i i

1,11 i I i I i 11,1 ii T n ,11 i r T

200

250

300

350

400
60482A71(3)

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

Figure M-37 (Sheet 3) UNCLASSIFIED

11-93

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUELMODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four-Sidewinder drag data based on NPE and Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, March 1961.

35,000 FEET CONFIGURATION II Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.91 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

240

MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

220

ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO

in

200

o
180
MAXIMUM ENDURANCES

160

< u
140

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

120
For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.01.

100
0.8 0.9

1.1

MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

300

350

400

450

500

i j

\ . . t,

550

600

rniiiiiiii
350

i I i i i i

650

200

250

300

400

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS


60462A 71 (4)

Figure J J-37 (Sheet 4)


11-94

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-SOTA

Section XI Performance Cherfs

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL'


40,000 FEET CONFIGURATION II MODEL- F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine end batic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four-Sidewinder drag data based on NPE and Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, March 1961.
260

Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.93MN

ENGINE: J57-P-16

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

240

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.01.

ENGINE PRESSURE ACROSS WEIGHT

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

0.8

0.9

1.0

MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS


350 400
l i i i

i^ II i i l ij i i ii
200

i I i i i i i _i \- i i i i^ i i it

450

500

550

600

i i ii

i i
350

650

250

300

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

Figure 11-37

(Sheet 5)

UNCLASSIFIED

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NHUIIUHL miLLo rin iyuuu fuunuo ur ruci


45,000 FEET CONFIGURATION II MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four-Sidewinder drag data based on NPE and Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, March 1961. Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.94MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

*>An
.

iiiiiii
MAYIMIIM

II
LI

?ANF SPEED " Til t I III Mil j 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III f MAXIMUM - 1 11 4 ENDURANCE TprHV'cnOSS i1 M i 1 1 1

OOQ

o
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V ^y . In yri^v .->3i- - JC->J i iPn>* -rfSdi-&j 1 BJiLfT rir II l/afi 1 Ji.t.1-. ,000 LI \ v '\Jr \\ ?VJi%-x']9 /_/ lyfi \ /f ^i'JP J --Z.-A ^\ J\ * / j* T 1 \V a_j L O> ^^ X 1 1 4x &J ^y J. HT " ' v jrr .y ^:-J^ X 4 --Vr- -,$<>V >?>- W1K"ra :z'fe&j o> fl_ur iMl i \\ / j L _ _ C V. 2 *1 ,0001 B ' n^, ryi i V f ' ->lT 1 ' . \X. _Z,iL_ 2 ,<j!__ ^ ^j T ' ' Q>Sj' 1I I , 1LI V- 4 + ' n u \RT - A \ , * T _ _ >y L n l\lll X ^3,\ n ^.v , jw , ni ) 11 1 ^ -fXIt ,000 LB ft *j ;VL _ . "^ IZ 3 . vr -,'n , ^.-rj i i i i i ,-. B: _ i . + vs^IS t J/niB x . jr s! >si - ::::::v--jt 3 Tf>>r . . t ^.. vS/r ie'ii^ft <V; L . TF :_ i ' ^S f
AJ
t'V\

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s "iiETwEIGHTJkrTi ^: RA n r> A-A \ / 1 \x.


3 DDCC

ENC;\ ^E
IDC

'

rT" , ^/

\\\

f*

t f

II r^

i^

160

T--

-. v?y MX : : . : : : : : For 100knot headwind, increase


maximur n range cruise Mach number by 0 01

M' A L\S>>v!p> (-<^> _

L>?-y l

--

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS

350 400 450 1 i ill i i i i ill I, i . u If-.-Jl--

500 lit
- _ - .__

550 i i

600 i i 1i i i
1 !"

,_

II

'

'

200

250

1 300

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

OM82-A-7I (6)

c:~.,.n ii
11-96

vj /ciua* xi

UNCLASSIFIED

NA

'(II) C55HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

C O N F I G U R A T I O N III
CLIMB, CRUISE, RANGE AND ENDURANCE DECISION, AND SPECIFIC RANGE DATA

CONFIGURATION III STORES ARRANGEMENTS

1. Four fuselage Zuni packs (with or without Zunis)

CONTENTS
Best Climb '. Climb Control Combat Radius Profile Mission Profile Optimum Return Profile . Maximum Endurance Profile 11-98 11-99 11-101 11-102 11-103 11-104 Optimum Endurance Profile Air Refueling Profile Range Decision Endurance Decision : 11-105 11-106 11-107 11-108 11-109

'.

Nautical Miles/1,000 Pounds of Fuel

G
11-S7

Section XI Performance Qiarts NAVWEPS IC-501A

IX

ui
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51 s i
133d ooo'i -aaruuiv
11-98

NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

n
o

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111!
CO

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III! liJi
1131 c -o g
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3 2 o t> E ^ ES 5 = * -i

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01
11-99

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWEPS

O
2 O

I
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O -3

o u
I
(A

3 X <

Siiiw iVDiinvN-awnD NI

11-100

501A

Section XI Performance Charts

^ ^ n

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CN 5? o> CN

CM CO

3 fe

CN

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CN

CO CO CN

O CO

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D c . T3 O C -TO o c

11-101

Section XI Performance Charts

-45HHC-501A

U)

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CM CO CN

^3 *O

oo
CM

CO

CO

CO CO

00 10 CO

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11-102

01A

Section XI Performance Charts

CO

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G
11-103

Section XI Performance Charts

NAVWI

501A

2
8

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X O 00

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11-104

Section XI Performance Charts

-45HHC-501A

CH

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ii
11-106

Section XI Performance Charts

-45HHC-501A

u,
U
Ul

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iiiii
11-106

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

RANGE DECISION
MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Right Test DATE: May 1966 Cruise Condition at All Airspeeds Range in Nautical Miles ENGINE: J57-P-16

MILITARY THRUST CLIMB

BEST HANOI SPIED

AIT
SL 10 20 30 35 40

IMN . 5 8 .61

IAS 384 340 301 267 253 229

AIT
SL 10 20 30 35 40

IMN

IAS 282 266 259 254 247 235

IDLE THRUST DESCENT

. 6 6 . 7 2
75 . 7 5

JS7
. 6 8 . 7 3 . 7 7

225 KIAS ALL ALTITUDES

IF YOU ARE AT SEA LEVEL FUEL ON MAID U RANETH OFT ALT RANGE AT ALT HUH 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI
START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES! U

IF YOU ARE AT 10,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD U RANGE THIS OPT ALT RANGE AT AIT NMI 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES! U 670 700 720 740 745 750

800 . 1.000 UOO 1,600 2.000 2,400

16 32 48 80 112 144

5 M 20 31 36 39

20 A3 75 141 209 280

630 660 695 730 740 750

800 1,000

uoo
1,600 2,000 2,400

33 55 77 120 161 202

14 21 27 35 38 39

38 67 99 163 233 307

IF YOU ARE AT 20.000 FEET

IF YOU ARE AT 30,OOO FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB RANGE THIS OPT AIT RANGE AT ALT NMI 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: IB 730 735 740 750 750 750

ran ON
BOARD U

800 1.000

uoo
1.600 2,000 2,400

HART DESCENT RANGE THIS OPT AIT RANGE AT WHEN FUEL ALT NMI 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI REACHES: IB 50 705 47 23 82 29 725 78 116 33 735 106 187 745 160 37 258 210 39 750 39 332 262 750 IF YOU ARE AT 33,000 FEET

800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

60 95 128 194 256 320

30 33 36 39 39 39

99 136 205 276 349

IF YOU ARE AT 39,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB


RANGE THIS ALT NMI

FUEL ON BOARD LB

800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2.400

START DESCENT RANGE AT RANGE THIS OPT ALT WHEN FUEL ALT NMI 1,000 FT OPT ALT NMI REACHES: LB 67 35 740 103 740 35 144 37 745 138 214 207 39 750 285 39 750 276 39 345 358 750

OPT AIT 1,000 FT

RANGE AT OPT ALT NMI

START DESCENT WHEN FUEL REACHES: LB

800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

69 107 145 217 289 362

39 39 39 39 39 39

750 750 750 750 750 750

1. Data is based upon performance with four loaded Zuni packs installed. 2. Range figures include distance for climb to optimum altitude and for descent to sea level. 3. Provides 600 pounds reserve fuel upon return to sea level; for greater fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly less fuel on board; for smaller

fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly more fuel on board. 4. Use schedules shown for climb, cruise and descent. 5. Distance covered in descent from 39,000 feet is 62 nautical miles. 6. Use Range Factors chart for wind corrections.
60482A-8SNB

Figure 11-46 Changed 15 July 1966 UNCLASSIFIED 11-107

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A

ENDURANCE DECISION
MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Flight Test DATE: May 1966 Cnrise Condition at All Altitudes Time in Minutes ENGINES: J57-P-16

MILITARY THRUST CLIMB

AIT
SL 10 20 30 . 35 40

IMN

IAS 384 340 301 267 253 229.

. 5 8 .61 . 6 6 . 7 2 . 7 5 . 7 5

LOITER AND IDLE THRUST DESCENT

225 KIAS ALL ALTITUDES

IP YOU ARE AT SEA LEVEL FUEL OH BOARD IB


800

IP YOU ARE AT 10,000 FEET FUEL ON BOARD LB


800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

1.000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT WHEN FUEL THIS 1,000 FT OFT ALT MIN ALT MIN REACHES: IB 4 4 5 625 8 10 10 655 12 15* 15 675 20 20 695 25 28 23 705 35 36 25 45 710 IP YOU ARE AT 30,000 FEET

ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT AIT ENDURANCE AT THIS WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN ALT MIN REACHES] IB 7.5 12 8.0 665 12.0 15 13.5 675 17.0 19 19.0 690 26.5 22 29.0 700 35.5 25 39.0 710 44.5 26 49.0 715 IP YOU ARE AT 30,000 FEET

FUEL ON BOARD LB
800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT WHEN FUEL THIS 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN REACHES! LB ALT MIN 20 695 10.0 20 15.5 695 21.0 20.5 21 700 24 31.5 31.0 710 42.0 41.0 25 710 52.0 51.0 26 715 H> YOU ARE AT 33,000 FEET

FUEL ON BOARD LB
800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

WHEN FUEL ENDURANCE OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT START DESCENT THIS 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN REACHES] LB ALT MIN 12.0 725 30 30 725 17.5 22.5 30 725 33.5 30 725 43.5 30 725 54.5 30 725 IP YOU ARE AT 39,000 FEET

FUEL ON BOARD LB
800 1,000 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

ENDURANCE OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT START DESCENT THIS WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN ALT MIN REACHES: LB 12.5 30-35 740 18.5 30-35 740 23.5 30-35 740 34.5 30-35 740 45.0 30-35 740 55.5 30-35 740

FUEL ON BOARD LB
800 1,000

1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400

ENDURANCE START DESCENT OPT ALT ENDURANCE AT THIS WHEN FUEL 1,000 FT OPT ALT MIN AIT MIN REACHES: LB 13.5 30-39 750 19.0 30-39 750 24.5 30-39 750 35.0 30-39 750 45.5 30-39 750 56.5 30-39 750 -

1. Data is based upon performance with four loaded Zuni Packs installed. 2. Endurance figures include time for climb to optimum altitude and.for descent to sea level. 3. Provides 600 pounds reserve fuel upon return to sea level; for greater fuel reserve, .use figures for correspondingly less

fuel on board; for smaller fuel reserve, use figures for correspondingly more fuel on board. 4. Use schedule for climb speeds. Loiter and descent speed is 225 KIAS. 5. Time required for descent from 39,000 feet is 12-5 minutes.
60482-A-86NB

Figure 77-47 11-108 UNCLASSIFIED Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS UF FUEL

SEA LEVELCONFIGURATION III WITH FOUR ZUNI PACKS (WITH OR WITHOUT TUNIS) MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four ZUNI-pack drag data based on Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, January 1963. Standard Day Clean Condition at All Speeds ENGINE: J57-P-16

I
/>

o.
111

u
p

z
40

20
0.3 0.6

0.

MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED - KNOTS


200 250 300 350 400
l

450

500

14
| 1 1 11

550 600 650 1 'J . ' . t M I. ',', I ,', .I 550 600 650

200

250

300

350

400

450

500

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED - KNOTS

>482-A-87(l)

Figure 77-48 (Sheet 1) UNCLASSIFIED 11-109

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


15,000 FEETCONFIGURATION III WITH FOUR ZUNI PACKS (WITH OR WITHOUT ZUNIS) MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four ZUNI-pack drag data based on Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, January 1963. Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.68 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

I
a. in
GROSS WEIGHT

U
MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED MAXIMUM ENDURANCE RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED ENGINE PRESSURE

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.07.

0.6

0.7

MACH NUMBER TRUE AIRSPEED - KNOTS


200 250 300 350
1

400

450

500

550

600

150

200

250

I ' 300

I 350

400

450

500

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS


60482-A87(2)

Figure 11-48 11-110

(Sheet 2)

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four ZUNI-pack drag data based on Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, January 1963.

25,000 FEETCONFIGURATION III WITH FOUR ZUNI PACKS (WITH OR WITHOUT ZUNIS) Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.83 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO

GROSS WEIGHT

o O

MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

< u
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range crime Mach number i by 0.07

0.6

0.7 MACH NUMBER

0.8

TRUE AIRSPEED - KNOTS


250 300

350

I . . . . I.

400 450 500 550 600 i i i I i i i i I i i i i i i i i I i ii i I I II I I I i i i i i.


400
60482A87(3)

200

250 300 350 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED - KNOTS

Figure M-48 (Sheer 3) UNCLASSIFIED 11-111

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four ZUNI-pack drag data based on Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, January 1963.

, , . ^^^

...
O

WITH FOUR 2UNt

PACKS (WITH OR WITHOUT ZUNIS) Standard Day ENGINE: J57-P-16 Cruise Condition Below 0.91 MN

220

I
O

MAXIMUM RANGE SPEED

ENGINE PRESSURE RATIO

in

s
_l

RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

120

For 100-lcnot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.01.
100

0.9 MACH NUMBER 350 400 I . . 450


TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS 500 550

r i

j l

i i i t I i i i i
I I I I 300 " l
350

600 I i i

650 i I
I I 400

I
200

| 250

CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS Figure 11-48 (Sheet 4)

11-112

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Section XI Performance Charts

NAUTICAL MILES PER 1,000 POUNDS OF FUEL


40,000 FEETCONFIGURATION III WITH FOUR ZUNI PACKS (WITH OR WITHOUT TUNIS) MODEL: F-8C DATA BASIS: Engine and basic aircraft drag data based on NATC Flight Tests, July 1959. Four ZUNI-pack drag data based on Contractor F-8D Flight Tests, January 1963. Standard Day Cruise Condition Below 0.93 MN ENGINE: J57-P-16

220
RECOMMENDED MINIMUM SPEED

For 100-knot headwind, increase maximum range cruise Mach number by 0.01. ENGINE PRESSURE MAXIMUM HANOI SPEED

in

200

I'

I
p

i
MAXIMUM ENDURANCE

120 0.8 0.9 MACH NUMBER

TRUE AIRSPEED KNOTS


350

I i

400 I I I
T 200

450 500 I 1 I I I I I I I I

550 I I I I

600 I I I I
I

1 1

250 300 CALIBRATED AIRSPEED KNOTS

>

-a7 (9)

Figure JT-48 (Sheet 5) UNCLASSIFIED 11-113

Section XI Performance Charts

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

11-114

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

INDEX
Abbreviations and symbols, 11-2 Acceleration limitations, 1-3 acceleration v*. gron weight, 1-6 Air refueling profile, 11-29
configuration I, 11-43 configuration II, 11-88 configuration III, 11-106 sample planning chart, 11-30 Altitude, density, 1 1 1 1 chart, 11-12 landing data, 11-49, 11-50 Air temperature, runway, landing, 1149 Airspeed climb control, maximum thrust, configuration III, 11-100 climb control, military thrust, configuration I, 11-54,11-56 climb control, military thrust, configuration II, 11-81

climb control, military thrust, configuration III, 11-99 Climb planning, 11-21 Climbs, zoom, 4-7 typical, 4-8 Combat allowance data, 11-31
maximum thrust, all configurations, 1145 military thrust, all configurations, 1144 Combat radius profile, 11-22 configuration I, 1158 configuration II, 11-83 configuration III, 11-101

'

conversion, 11-2 operating limitations, 1-2


operating limitations, hot day, 1-9. operating limitation*, standard day, 18

sample planning chart, 1123 Computer, REST, 11-33 Configuration I


air refueling profile, 11-63 best climb, 11-52, 11-53 climb control, 11-54, 11-55, 11-56, 11-57 combat radius profile, 11-58

position error correction, 11-3


position error correction chart, 114 through 11-8

vs. grass weight, 11-50 Airspeed-Mach. number conversion, 11-3


chart, 11-9, 11-10

Allowable crasswincfs, landing, 1150 Angle of attack, flight characteristics, 4-8 chart, 4-11,4-12, 4-13 Armament, flight characteristics, 4-8 Sidewinder missile firing, 4-8 Atmosphere, standard, 1 1 1 1
chart, 11-13, 11-14

contents of climb, cruise, range and endurance decision, and specific range data charts, 11-51 description, 11-51
endurance decision, 11-65 maximum endurance profile, 11-61 mission profile, 11-59 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, 11-66 through 11-77 optimum endurance profile, 1162 optimum return profile, 11-63 range decision, 11-64 Configuration I I air refueling profile, 11-88 best climb, 11-80 climb central, 11-81, 11-82 combat radius profile, 11-83

B
Best climb, 11-21
configuration I (clean aircraft or single pylons), 11-52 configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-53 configuration II, 11-80 configuration I I I , 11-98 sample planning chart, 1121 Braking speed, landing, 11-50

contents of climb, cruise, range and endurance decision, and specific range data charts, 11-79 description, 11-79
endurance decision, 1190 maximum endurance profile, 1186 mission profile, 11-84 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, 11-91 through 11-96 optimum endurance profile, 1187 optimum return profile, 1185 range decision, 11-89 Configuration I I I air refueling profile, 11106 best climb, 11-98 climb control, 11-99, 11-100 combat radius profile, 11101

Characteristics, flight (seeflightcharacteristics) Climb, best (see best climb) Climb control, 11-20
maximum thrust, configuration I (clean aircraft or single pylons), 11-55 maximum thrust, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-57 maximum thrust, configuration II, 11-82 maximum thrust, configuration I I I , 11100 military thrust, configuration I (clean aircraft or single pylons), 11-54 military thrust, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-56 military thrust, configuration II, 11-81 military thrust, configuration I I I , 11-99 sample planning chart, 1120 Climb data

contents of climb, cruise, range and endurance decision, and specific range data charts, 11-97 description, 11-97
endurance decision, 11108 maximum endurance profile, 11104 mission profile, 11102 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, 11-109 through 11-113 optimum endurance profile, 11105 optimum return profile, 11103

range decision, 11-107 Constant airspeed descent


clean aircraft, 11-47

best climb, 11-21


best best best best climb, configuration I, 11-52, 11-53 climb, configuration II, 11-80 climb, configuration III, 11-98 climb, sample planning chart, 11-21

climb control, 11-20


climb control, maximum thrust, configuration I, 1155, 1157 climb control, maximum thrust, configuration II, 1182

with external stores, 1148 Control, climb (see climb control) Conversion, airspeed, 11-2 Conversion, airspeed-Mach number, 113 chart, 11-9, 11-10 Correction, position error, 11-3
airspeed (after incorporation of ASC 335), 118

(Boldface Type Denotes Illustration) UNCLASSIFIED Index -1

Index

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A


index numbers, 11-50A loiter and descent speeds, 11SOL

airspeed (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-5 altitude (after incorporation of ASC 335), 1 1 7 altitude (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-4 combined data (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-6 Mach number (after incorporation of ASC 335), 11-8 Mach number (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-5

sample problems, 1130C Endurance decision


configuration I, 11-65 configuration II, 11-90 configuration III, 11-108

Crosswind, 1 1 1 1
aDowable values, 11-50 chart, 1 1 1 6

range and endurance decision, 11-30 Endurance profile, ma-gimnfn, 11-27


configuration 1,11-61 configuration II, 11-86 configuration I I I , 11-104

Cruise-climb procedure, 1122 Cruise data, 11-22 cruise-climb procedure, 11-22 effect of wind, 11-22 level flight cruise, 11-22 Cruise, level flight, 11-22 Cruise performance, effect of wind, 11-22

sample planning chart, 1127 Endurance profile, optimum, 11-28


configuration I, 11-62 configuration II, 1187 configuration I I I , 11-105

Data climb, 11-20 cruise, 11-22 combat allowance, 11-31 descent, 1 1 3 1 landing, 11-31 performance (see performance data) specific range, 11-32 standard (see standard performance data) takeoff, 1 1 1 7 Decision, endurance
configuration 1,11-65 configuration II, 11-90 configuration I I I . 11-108

sample planning chart, 1128 Engine operating limitations, 1-3 operation, 1-3 External stores, operating limitations, 1-3
chart, 1-7

Flight characteristics, 4-2 angle of attack, 4-8


angle of attack relationship, 4-11, 4-12, 4-13

armament, 4-8
dive recovery, 49, 410

level flight, 4-3 maneuvering flight, 4-3 maximum speed, level flight, 4-4, 4-5
rolling puilouts, 4-6

range and endurance decision, 1130 Decision, range


configuration I, 1164 configuration II, 11-89 configuration I I I , 11-107

speed brake, 4-2


stick forces, 4-3 typical zoom climb, 4-8

range and endurance decision, 11-30 Decision, range and endurance, 11-30 Density, altitude, 1 1 1 1
chart, 11-12

unit horizontal tail, 4-2 Flight operating limitations, 14, 1-5

landing data, 11-49, 11-50 Descent, constant airspeed


dean aircraft, 11-47

with external stores, 11-48 Descent data, 1 1 3 1


constant airspeed (clean aircraft), 11-47 constant airspeed (with external stores), 11-48 maximum range, all configurations, 11-46 sample planning chart, 1131 Descent, maximum range, all configurations, 11-46 Distance, takeoff, 1 1 1 7 maximum thrust, all configurations, 1139 military thrust, all configurations, 11-38 Dive recovery 4g puuout. 4-9 6g pullout, 4-10 Dives, 4-8

Ground roll, landing, all configurations, 11-49 Ground run, takeoff, velocity during, 1118 maximum thrust, all configurations, 11-43 military thrust, all configurations, 11-42 sample planning chart, 1119

Landing data, all configurations, 11-31


airspeed vs. gross weight, 11-50 allowable crosswinds, 11-50 bralunj speed, 1150 density altitude, 11-49, 11-50 ground roll, 11-49 runway air temperature, 11-49

sample planning chart, 1132 Landing ground roll, all configurations, 1149 Level flight cruise, 11-22 Level flight, flight characteristics, 4-3 Limitations (see operating limitations)

Effect of wind on cruise performance, 11-22 Emergency endurance, 11SOD Emergency range, 11SOB cruise speed*, 1150J Emergency range and endurance decision, 11-30A
altitudes, 11-SOF climb speeds, 11-50G descent, 11-50M

M
Mach number-airspeed conversion, 11-3 chart, 11-9,11-10 Maneuvering flight, flight characteristics, 4-3 climbs, 4-7
dive recovery, 49, 410

(Boldface Type Denotes Illustration) Index-2 UNCLASSIFIED Changed 15 July 1966

UNCLASSIFIED NAVAIR 01-45HHC-501A dives, 4-8 rolling pullouts, 4-6


rolling pullouts, chart, 4-6

Index

external stores, 1-3


extemol stores, chart, 17 flight, 1-4, I-S

rolls, 4-6 symmetrical pullouts, 4-3


typical loom climb, 4-8

zoom climbs, 4-7 Maneuvering limitations, 1-2 Maximum endurance profile, 11-27
configuration I, 11-41 configuration II, 11-86 configuration 111,11-104 sample planning chart, 1127 Maximum rang* descent, all configurations, 11-46 Maximum refusal speed, 11-18 all configurations, 11-41

maneuvers, 1-2 , power control inoperative, 1-2 trim and stabilization system, 1-2 Optimum endurance profile, 1128
configuration I, 11-62 configuration II, 11-87 configuration III, 11-105 sample planning chart, 11-28 Optimum return profile, 11-25 configuration I, 11-60 configuration II, 11-85 configuration III, 11-103 sample planning chart, 11-26

sample planning chart, 1118 Maximum speed, level flight, 4-3


chart, 4-4. 4-3

Missile firing, Sidewinder, flight characteristics, 4-8 Mission planning, 11-33 sample mission plans, 11-33, 11-35, 11-36 Mission plans, sample, 11-33, 11-35, 11-36 Mission profile, 11-24
configuration I, 11-58 configuration II, 11-84 configuration III, 11-102 sample planning chart, 1124

N
Nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, 11-32
sea level, configuration I (clean aircraft or sinalo pylons), 11-66 sea level, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-72 sea level, configuration II, 11-91 sea level, configuration III, 11-109 15,000 feet, configuration I (clean aircraft or single pylons), 11-67 15,000 feet, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-73 15,000 feet, configuration II, 11-92 15,000 feet, configuration III, 11-110 25,000 feet, configuration I (clean aircraft or single pylons), 11-68 25,000 feet, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons) 11-74 25,000 feet, configuration II, 11-93 25,000 feet, configuration III, 11-111 35,000 feet, configuration I' (clean aircraft or single pylons), 11-69 35,000 feet, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-75 35,000 feet, configuration II, 11-94 35/100 feet, configuration III, 11-112 40,000 feet, configuration I (clean aircraft or single pylons), 11-70 40,000 feet, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-76 40,000 feet, configuration II, 11-95 40,000 feet, configuration III, 11-113 45,000 feet, configuration I (clean aircraft or single pylons), 1171 45,000 feet, configuration I (two Sidewinders or dual pylons), 11-77 45,000 feet, configuration II, 11-96

Performance charts mission planning, 11-33 REST computer, 11-33 using, 11-17 Performance charts, use of air refueling profile, 11-29 best climb, 11-21 climb control, 11-20 climb data, 11-20, 11-21 climb planning, 11-21 combat allowance data, 1131 combat radius profile, 11-22 cruise data, 11-22 cruise-climb procedure, 11-22 descent data, 11-31 effect of wind on cruise performance, 11-22 landing data, 11-31 level flight cruise, 11-22 maximum endurance profile, 1127 maximum refusal speed, 11-18 mission profile, 11-24 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, 1132 optimum endurance profile, 1128 optimum return profile, 11-25 range and endurance decision, 11-30 specific range data, 11-32 takeoff data, 11-17 takeoff distance, 11-17 takeoff planning, 11-18 takeoff speed, 11-18 velocity during takeoff ground run, 1118 Performance data airspeed conversion, 11-2
airspeed-Modi number conversion, 119, 1110

arrangement, 11-2
crosswind, 1116 density altitude, 11-12 position~error correction, 114 through 118 range factors, 1115 standard atmosphere, 1113, 1114

Operating limitations acceleration, 1-3 acceleration vs. gross weight, airspeed, 1-2 airspeed, hot day, 19 airspeed, standard day, 1-8 engine, 1-3

standard data, 11-11 Performance, cruise, effect of wind, 11-22 Planning climb, 11-21 mission, 11-33 takeoff, 11-18 Position error correction, 11-3
airspeed (after incorporation of ASC 335), 11-8 airspeed (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-5 altitude (after incorporation of ASC 335), 11-7 altitude (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-4 combined data (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-6

(Boldface Type Denotes Illustration) Changed 15 July 1966 UNCLASSIFIED

Index 3

Index

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A


configuration II, 11-85 configuration III, 11103 sample planning chart, 1126

Moeh number (oftar incorporation of ASC 335), 11-8 Modi number (before incorporation of ASC 335), 11-5 Power control hydraulic system, operating Procedure, cruise-climb, 11-22 Profiles

12

air refueling, 11-29


air refueling, configuration I, 11-63 air refueling, configuration II, 11-88 air refueling, configuration III, 11106 air refueling, sample planning chart, 1130

Rolling pullouts chart, 4-6 high KIAS, subsonic, 4-7 low KIAS, subsonic, 4-7 supersonic, 4-7 Rolls, 4-6
Runway air temperature, landing, 11-49

combat radius, 11-22


combat radius, configuration 1,1158 combat radius, configuration II, 1183 combat radius, configuration III, 11-101 combat radius, sample planning chart, 1123

maximum endurance, 11-27


maximum endurance, configuration I, 11-61 maximum endurance, configuration II, 1186 maximum endurance, configuration III, 11104 maximum endurance, sample planning chart, 1127

Sample mission plans, 11-33, 11-35,11-36 Sidewinder missile firing, flight characteristics, 4-8 Specific range data, 11-32 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, 11-32
nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, configuration I, 11-66 through 11-77 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, configuration II, 11-91 through 11-96 nautical miles per 1,000 pounds of fuel, configuration III, 11109 through 11-113

mission, 11-24
mission, configuration I, 1159 mission, configuration II, 11-84 mission, configuration III, 11-102 mission, sample planning chart, 1124

optimum endurance, 11-28


optimum endurance, configuration I, 11-62 optimum endurance, configuration II, 11-47 optimum endurance, configuration III, 11105 optimum endurance, sample planning chart, 1128

Speed brake, flight characteristics, 4-2 Speed, braking, landing, 11-50 Speed, maximum refusal, 11-18
all configurations, 11-41 sample planning chart, 1118 Speed, takeoff, 11-18 all configurations, 1140 sample planning chart, 1118 Standard atmosphere, 11-11 chart, 11-13,11-14 Standard performance data crosswind, 1 1 1 1 . crosswind chart, 1116 crosswind landing data, 11-50

optimum return, 11-25


optimum optimum optimum optimum return, configuration I, return, configuration II, return, configuration III, return, sample planning 11-60 11-85 11103 chart, 11-26

Prohibited maneuvers, 1-2 Rollouts high KIAS, subsonic, rolling, 4-7 low KIAS, subsonic, rolling, 4-7 rolling pullouts, 4-6 supersonic, rolling, 4-7 symmetrical, 4-3

density altitude, 11-11


density altitude chart, 11-12 density altitude landing data, 11-49, 11-50

range factors, 11-11


range factors chart, 1115

standard atmosphere, 11-11


standard atmosphere chart, 11-13, 11-14 Stick forces vs. Maeh number, 4-3 Stores, external, operating limitations, 1-3 chart, 1-7 Subsonic rolling pullouts

Radius profile, combat, 11-22


configuration I, 11-58 configuration II, 11-83 configuration 111,11-101

sample planning chart, 1123 Range and endurance decision, 11-30 Range decision
configuration I, 11-64 configuration II, 11-89 configuration III, 11-107

high KIAS, 4-7 low KIAS, 4-7 Supersonic rolling pullouts, 4-7 Symmetrical pullouts, .4-3

range and endurance decision, 11-30 Range factors, 11-11 chart, 11-15 Refueling profile, air, 11-29
configuration I, 11-63 configuration II, 11-88 configuration III, 11-106 sample planning chart, 1130 Refusal Speed, msrrimnm^ 1118 all configurations, 1141

Tail, unit horizontal, flight characteristics, 4-2


stick forces, 4-3 Takeoff data, 11-17

distance, 11-17
distance, maximum thrust, all configurations, distance, military thrust, all configurations, 11-38 distance, sample planning chart, 1117

maximum refusal speed, 11-18


maximum refusal speed, all configurations, 11-41 maximum refusal speed, sample planning chart, 1118

sample planning chart, 1118 REST computer, 11-33 Return profile, optimum, 11-25
configuration I, 11-60

speed, 11-18
speed, all configurations, 11-40 speed, sample planning chart, 1118

velocity during takeoff ground run, 11-18 (Boldface Type Denotes Illustration)

Index4

UNCLASSIFIED

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A


velocity during takeoff ground ran, maximum thrust, all configurations, 1143 velocity during takeoff ground run, military thrust, all configurations, 11-42 velocity during takeoff ground run, sample planning chart, 1119 Takeoff distance, 1 1 1 7 maximum thrust, all configurations, 1139 military thrust, all configurations, 11-38

Index

u
Unit horizontal tail, flight characteristics, 4-2 stick forces, 4-3

sample planning chart, 1117 Takeoff ground run, velocity during, 11-18
maximum thrust, all configurations, 11-43 military thrust, all configurations, 11-42

Velocity during takeoff ground run, 11-18 maximum thrust, oil configurations, 11-43 military thrust, all configurations, 11-42 sample planning chart, 1119

sample planning chart, 1119 Takeoff planning, 11-18 Takeoff speed, 11-18
all configurations, 11-40

w
Wind, effect on cruise performance, 11-22 Zoom climbs, 4-7 typical, 4-

sample planning chart, 1118 Trim and stabilization system, operating limitations, 12

(Boldface Type Denotes Illustration)

G
UNCLASSIFIED

Index -5

Index

UNCLASSIFIED NAVWEPS 01-45HHC-501A

Index6

UNCLASSIFIED