TOURISM MINISTER

Olga Kefalogianni explains why tourism is the way to recovery

HOME AUCTIONS
‘Red’ mortgages and home auctions split coalition members

ENERGY MARKETS
Israel, Greece, Cyprus set to redraw Europe’s energy map

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FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013 G No 3 G WEEKLY NEWSPAPER G GREECE IN ENGLISH G www.athensviews.gr G p 1.50

Setting the bar too high?
The euphoria over the PM’s visit to Washington, the prospect of US investments and the sale of a major stake in a state-controlled gambling firm is tempered by a report confirming bailout targets are at risk - suggesting, perhaps, the government may have set the bar too high » 4-5

Reuters
Konstantinos Filippidis competes in the men’s pole vault final during the IAAF World Athletics Championships at the Luzhniki stadium in Moscow. Filippidis came in tenth with 5.65 metres

ARTS IN THE MIND OF ODYSSEUS

ARCHAEOLOGY THE MARATHON DAM LEGACY

The storm in the soul of Homer’s hero, who symbolises ancient Greek patrimony

How a striking symbol of technological progress inspired Greeks and philhellenes alike » 16-17

LIFE WALKING ON WATER

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A solar-powered chair allows the disabled to ride effortlessly into the sea

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ditorial

The end of austerity?
AS GREECE enters its sixth year of recession, it is clear by now to all but a few that the Troika’s policy in Greece is not working. And if it eventually does — it’s difficult to predict what will remain standing. German leaders have repeatedly urged Greece to stay the course of austerity as the only way out of the recession. But Greece resembles a group of swimmers out at sea struggling to make it to shore. They may have worked out the right swimming method that will lead to safety but they are doomed because they are simply out of breath. Greece has been swimming for a long time now and perhaps the shore is in sight but it is now gasping for breath and there are no guarantees that it will make it. Unemployment is creating a lost generation and a brain drain, neoNazi nonsense has monopolised and demeaned the public debate while the homeless are piling up on the streets of the capital. So far, the Greeks have managed to withstand the worst effects of the recession without imploding by relying on a tradition of strong family bonds. But these bonds cannot carry the burden forever. The road of austerity has lost its allure even among northern Europeans while even Obama joined a growing chorus of critics last week pressing home the point that tough fiscal adjustments alone are not enough to put Greece back on the path of recovery. The end of fiscal adjustment does not justify the means of social and economic disintegration in order to put the country on firm fiscal ground. Ahead of next month’s federal elections, the German government has dismissed any talk of writing off another chunk of Greek debt. But Germany’s leadership and the ideal of European solidarity will suffer on moral grounds if a fellow European nation is allowed to come apart under an unsustainable debt burden.

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FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

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Politics Diplomacy Digest Culture Under the full moon Planning ahead Travel Shipping Community Sports

CONTENTS

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Hospital directors to be screened for potential fraud under an overhaul of healthcare spending Usain Bolt intensifies dispute over ERT shutdown G Pages 4-5 Premier urges Greek-Americans to invest in Greece What Samaras got from his visit to Washington G Pages 6-7 Immigrants in detention centre clash with police G Page 11 Jurgen Habermas on the rocky road to a political constitution for a world society and Umberto Eco’s New Realism G Page 12 The August full moon and the nocturnal activities at archaeological sites across the country G Pages 14-15 Euripides and how people define themselves when the world around them falls to pieces G Pages 20-21 Why pilgrims and visitors throng to the church of Panagia on the Cycadic island of Tinos every year on August 15 G Page 22 Why the world would freeze and starve without shipping G Page 23 Holy month of Ramadan comes to an end but capital’s immigrants still pray in basements G Page 25 New football season kicks off featuring a revamped 18-team top flight G Pages 26-27

ATHENS VIEWS
PUBLISHER: EDITOR: OFFICE: EMAIL: WEBSITE: TEL.-FAX: GA ORAMA-Communication Paris Ayiomamitis 107 Solonos str, Athens 106 78 athensviews@gmail.com athensviews.gr 211 407 6988

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POLITICS

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

‘The party’s over’
Hospital directors screened for fraud as Greece grapples with health cuts
By George White TATE HOSPITAL directors and senior administrators will be screened for potential fraud cases under an overhaul of healthcare spending announced by the government.  Adonis Georgiadis, the health minister, said the country was now forced to address the «party» of mismanagement and overspending at state hospitals for more than a decade as it struggles to make long-term spending cuts, with most of the EU-IMF bailout money already paid out, and any new fiscal austerity measures unlikely to have a serious impact.  «Do you know how much state spending on medicine was a year before the bailout? €7 billion. Do you know much it is now? €2.3 billion. That’s €5 billion in savings

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Most Greeks know Georgiadis for his far-right politics and late-night pitches on television, selling books on ancient Greece for the family publishing business

«There was a party going on in the health sector ... But we must view public money as sacred. We have taken money away from pensioners. And as soon as we can, we must correct this»

of strikes and claims by the political opposition that reforms were also being used as a pretext to close hospitals and hand patients and state resources over

to the private sector.  Most Greeks know Georgiadis for his far-right politics - he was a former lawmaker and spokesman for the nationalist

By Harry Papachristou and Renee Maltezou second quarter but not nearly enough to boost tax revenues to levels the government needs to meet its bailout targets, figures showed this week. The data follows a magazine report saying Germany’s central bank saw risks to the rescue package aimed at keeping Greece afloat and expects the euro member to need more aid in 2014 after it scrapes through the last aid review. As Europe’s largest economy, Germany has funded a chunk of the bailout but there has been resistance from German voters who are also facing tight budgets. The subject of Greek aid has played into the campaign for elections next month. The Greek data showed the economy shrank at an annual pace of 4.6 percent in the second quarter, according to the country’s statistics agency Elstat. The economy has slumped 23 percent in real terms since 2008, hurting tax rev-

GREECE’S recession eased slightly in the

«Recession will decelerate in the third quarter, helped by tourism, and in the fourth, helped by base effects,» said Dimitris Maroulis, an Athens-based economist with Alpha Bank

The economy shrank at annual pace of 4.6 percent in the second quarter, contributing to a slump of more than 20 percent in real terms since 2008

enues and making it hard to meet targets agreed with international lenders who backed the 2010 bailout.

The figure was slightly better than economists’ average forecast for a 5 percent contraction, but that will be cold com-

fort for Greeks, who are facing a sixth consecutive year of recession in 2013, as austerity measures have crippled private consumption, the main engine of its economy. The slump, one of the biggest peacetime recessions recorded in history, is undermining the ability of firms and households to pay taxes, separate budget figures showed on August 12. Gross tax revenues lagged targets by about 1.5 billion euros in the first seven months of the year, hit by record unemployment of nearly 28 percent and a wave of corporate bankruptcies.

Reuters

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Greece stuck in recession, bailout targets at risk

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each year,» Georgiadis said. «There was a party going on in the health sector ... But we must view public money as sacred. We have taken money away from pensioners. And as soon as we can, we must correct this,» he told Mega television.  Georgiadis said he had asked the Finance Minister to re-examine tax and income declarations of hospital directors going back to 2000.  Healthcare reform, along with major changes in public sector staffing rules, and spending controls on local government are seen by bailout lenders as key areas that will help Greece keep as balanced budget as European allies decide on how to deal with its national debt, still widely considered to be unsustainable without further relief.  Georgiadis, 40, was one of three ministers brought in by the conservative government leadership in June to usher in a more confrontational approach to reforms - together with Interior Minister Yiannis Michelakis and Public Administrative Reform Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis.  After being a few weeks in his new position, Georgiadis announced a major hospital merger programme for state facilities nationwide, spurring a new round

 

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LAOS party - and late-night pitches on television, selling books on ancient Greece for the family publishing business.  Cabinet colleagues regard him to be a hard-working eccentric, whose presence keeps the conservative New Democracy party in touch with its largely dissatisfied rightist voters.  But critics argue the new minister is presiding over the dismantling

«It is workers at hospitals, with their self-sacrifice, who are keeping the system going - working with the full knowledge that reforms and rationalization of the system are in fact being used to break it up» Syriza statement

of the welfare state, with longstanding labour and benefit rights already vanished or under threat.  Patient associations have reported that members are recently having greater difficulty receiving approval from doctors’ panels for expensive treatments, while health care is already in crisis from the surge in number of long-term unemployed have left an estimated 2 million Greeks without full medical insurance.  «It is workers at hospitals, with their self-sacrifice, who are keeping the system going - working with the full knowledge that reforms and rationalization of the system are in fact being used to break it up,» the opposition Syriza party said, adding «Mr. Georgiadis insults our intelligence when he says that the changes to the National Health System have nothing to do with the bailout agreements.»  

CONTROVERSIAL plans to ease restrictions on the We have a clear auction of homes with position. unpaid mortgages have And that is: rattled the government, with promiment memthe ban must bers of the coalition not be lifted openly opposing the measure planned to take effect next year.  The conservative-led government is planning to begin dismantling blanket protection which has been in effect since the recession started in covery. Protection supporters say the late 2008, worried that the rising number measure must remain in effect during the of failing loans - currently one-in-four - recession and with the number of jobs becould soon trigger a broader credit and ing lost still exceeding 1,000 per day in real estate crisis.  April.  But Evangelos Venizelos, the deputy prime Government spokesman Simos minister and Socialist leader, confirmed Kedikoglou said the changes to protection suspicion that the plan has split the coali- rules would target people who deliberately tion. «We have a clear position. And that avoided payments. «Those who can pay, is: the ban must not be lifted,» Venizelos will pay,» he said.  told the Proto Thema newspaper. «Homes of poor and middle-inYou’re come households must overreacting sir. I not be put in danger. It From what lost my job, wouldn’t help the I see here, we’re leavmy money, my car, banks, which would ing you with a big my wife…. prefer to restructure the chunk of debt Are you going to take loans and keep them my house as being serviced instead well? of killing off houses.» Greece is under pressure limit mortgage protection from EU-IMF rescue lenders, who argue the measure is slowing down the country’s economic re-

The government managed to plug the budget hole by cutting spending, withholding tax refunds, freezing public investment and cashing in a much higher amount of European Union subsidies than initially planned. But Athens will not sustainably fix its finances unless it boosts tax revenue, the EU and the International Monetary Fund have said. Greece may fall short of its budget targets this year because a large part of planned tax revenues has not been cashed in yet, lenders warned last month. Athens aims to have a primary budget surplus, before interest payments, in 2013, to qualify next year for additional debt relief promised by its euro zone partners. However, economists said the secondquarter GDP figures may show that the worst of the recession may be over. «Recession will decelerate in the third quarter, helped by tourism, and in the

Gross tax revenues lagged targets by about 1.5 billion euros in the first seven months of the year, hit by record unemployment of nearly 28 percent and a wave of corporate bankruptcies

Silver linings

fourth, helped by base effects,» said Dimitris Maroulis, an Athens-based economist with Alpha Bank. Manufacturing expanded at its fastest pace in five years in June and tourism revenues in May also jumped more than expected. «That means that recession will not exceed 4.2 percent this year,» Maroulis added. That would be in line with a current forecast by the government and its lenders, who have provided Athens with about 240 billion euros in bailout funds since mid-2010.

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Vangelis Papavassileiou, Eleftherotypia

The Greek economy is expected to recover at an anemic pace of 0.6 percent next year and accelerate after 2015. The forecasts help determine the country’s future finance needs and whether Athens might need even stricter austerity to meet its bailout targets. Greece, the EU and the IMF will update growth forecasts when they meet for a round of bailout talks in September and October. The outcome of these talks will determine whether Athens will needs to adopt harsher austerity measures to keep receiving bailout funds — a prospect which its fragile coalition government has repeatedly rule out. Positive growth rates and a potential primary surplus would allow Athens to return to bond markets, from which it has been excluded for four years, Greece’s finance minister Yannis Stournaras has said. The Greek statistics service does not provide seasonally adjusted figures or data on quarter-on-quarter changes. (Reuters)

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FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

POLITICS «Red mortgages» rattle government

ATHENS VIEWS

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Gambling firm Opap privatised

THE GOVERNMENT completed the sale

of a major stake in state-controlled gambling firm Opap on August 12 to Greek-Czech fund Emma Delta, a condition of the country’s ambitious asset sales programme under its multi-billion international bailout. “I am delighted that 652 million euros will flow into state coffers,” said Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras. “It is resounding message to outside of Greece, showing the country’s decisiveness, competence and settlement of differences, meaning that Greece is entering a progress track.”  Athens sealed a deal to sell its 33 percent stake in OPAP to Emma Delta for 652 million euros in May but rows among opposing investors over the fees OPAP would pay its partners for technology and printing services delayed the deal. OPAP is one of Europe’s biggest listed gambling companies, with turnover of about 4 billion euros. Its prospects have been clouded by a court appeal against its sports gambling monopoly and sharp tax increases imposed by the government. Czech investor Jiri Smejc, who controls the Emma Delta fund, told Reuters in July that he would go ahead with the deal but would later review the terms of a separate, OPAP-led lottery contract and whether they could harm the company. (Reuters)

TV battle heats up  
A TRANSITION state broadcaster has begun airing live sporting events _ with coverage of the 2013 World Athletics Championships in Moscow _ intensifying a dispute over shutdown ERT.  The government closed ERT in June and fired its 2,600 employees, promising a replacement TV and radio channels with a smaller staff within a few months. It later conceded that new broadcaster will not be opened until the end of the year.  But a transition channel, labeled only as «public television» and which fills programming with documentaries and old movies, began coverage of the IAAF Championships, including Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt’s 100 meter victory at Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium. Pantelis Kapsis, a deputy minister in charge of the state TV transition, said 80 percent of the 600 staff to be hired by the new broadcaster in the initial stages would come from ERT, adding that the number of the state TV channels would likely be reduced from three to two. 

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Invigorating the relationship with expatriate investors was a top priority for the premier during his visit to the US

«Greece is America’s best ally in the region»

DIPLOMACY

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

By Misyrlena Egkolfopoulou uring a luncheon in New York City’s Metropolitan Club, Greek Prime Minister Samaras sent a clear message to Greeks of the diaspora about the need for investing in Greece, the significance of his policies, and the light at the end of the tunnel for the Greek economy and people. Invigorating the relationship with Greek expatriates and reiterating their crucial role on Greece’s economic revival seemed to be a priority for Samaras during his trip to New York last week. After a meeting with US President Barack Obama in Washington, DC on August 8, the Greek prime minister spent Friday in New York City where he met separately with Mayor Michael Bloomberg, the editorial staff of the New York Times, and Archbishop Demetrios at the headquarters of the Archdiocese. Notably, Samaras took time out of his busy schedule to attend a luncheon as the guest of honour at the Metropolitan Club in New York, hosted by the Greek am-

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Reuters

Obama insisted that growth and job creation are the way of out of the recession

bassador to the United States, Vassilis Kaskarelis. Addressing many Greeks and Greek-Americans, including senior executives of large investment funds, Samaras described the next steps that need to be taken in order to exit the crisis. The Greek prime minister called on expats to invest in Greece and presented his government’s plans. “We will fulfil our obligations, we will achieve a primary surplus and then we will invest in the market,” he said. Among the guests attending the

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luncheon was Elias Tsekeridis, president of the Federation of Hellenic Societies of Greater New York. He reiterated that the purpose of the meeting was for Samaras to strengthen his contacts and discuss investment opportunities in Greece.

“He took the time to individually shake hands with everybody there,” said Tsekeridis. “I think he was very satisfied.” Samaras was not the only one acknowledging the power of Greeks in the US, as a day earlier President Obama expressed his

‘We are the best ally that the United States ever had in the region, especially now. If we get out of our problems and reach economic stability soon, it would be golden for Greek-American relations. A stable Greece means a lot to the United States’

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Elias Tsekeridis

respect for the Greek-American community in the US by saying “they are incredible businesspeople and political leaders and community leaders and great friends of mine.”

What the papers said
Obam a:The de canno t be pa bt id off just w ith aus terity

Ta Nea

Clear instructions to Samaras to continue the Troika prescription. Obama: Shut up and dig

Eleftherotypia

hment poveris n im e r tio Mo rticipa and pa rialist e in imp plans

Rizospas

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ge from messa le b u Do port to a. Sup Obam rp on e, sha Greec ny Germa

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s Typos

ent vernm The go Washs after e d n la th crash visit as mb ington li c loyed p m e n u 1,088 to 1,38

Avgi

Obama: Not just austerity. The American president gives support to Athens and expresses certainty that it will overcome the Efimerida Dimokratia crisis ton Syntakton The White House’s Obama’s message ultimatum to Merkel to Europe and Schauble

Kathimerini

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

DIPLOMACY

ATHENS VIEWS

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In an attempt to promote Greece’s political stability, Samaras referred to the recent coalition of two otherwise long-term political rivals, New Democracy and Pasok, saying that they have reached a joint consensus on austerity and growth focus, as ways to lead the country out of its downward spiral. “He acknowledged that they are working together for the good of the country, which is something that has not happened in Greece before,” Tsekeridis observed. “I hope they stick together, because that will be the road to stability.” Samaras also took time to justify his policy decision-making by admitting that while it may seem unfair it is crucial to resuscitate the nation. “We collect taxes from people who have nothing more to give,” he noted but stressed that most citizens are now swayed on the necessity of these measures and sacrifices in search for a better future. “Samaras said that he is doing things that he really doesn’t want to do,” Tsekeridis added, referring to the austerity measures that have led to more job and pension cuts as well as increased taxes for the majority of Greeks. Samaras also noted that more such measures could mean a surplus for the Greek economy as soon as 2014. “I think the surplus is realistic and it will happen precisely because Samaras is going after people who are not paying taxes, and there are a lot of them in Greece,” Tsekeridis added. Even though the messages sent out by President Obama regarding the philosophy behind the crisis and the questionable use of austerity to overcome it were optimistic, the possibility of influencing the EU to act otherwise still remains uncertain. Tsekeridis explained that the German federal election, which is scheduled for September, is going to be a priority, placing any attempts by the Obama administration to influence the EU lower on the agenda. “They can’t do anything right now that would tick off the Iron Lady,” Tsekeridis added, referring to German Chancellor Angela Merkel. “I’m hoping that something will change after they are done with the elections, something that will be for the greater

‘They can’t do anything right now that would tick off the Iron Lady,’ Tsekeridis added, referring to German Chancellor Angela Merkel. ‘I’m hoping that something will change after they are done with the elections, something that will be for the greater good of Greece.’

good of Greece.” Tsekeridis said that Obama and the US Secretary of Treasury Jack Lew are sincere in their invitation to help the Greek nation, mainly due to geopolitical significance.

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Mission accomplished?
Government hails image-making visit to Washington a success as Obama pledges support, stressing that austerity can only go so far to tackle Greece’s crippling debt crisis.

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The best ally in the region
“We are the best ally that the United States ever had in the region, especially now,” he explained. “If we get out of our problems and reach economic stability soon, it would be golden for Greek-American relations. A stable Greece means a lot to the United States,” he added. In an effort to focus and push for increased Greek-American cooperation, Samaras will return to the US capital in less than 45 days, this time bringing with him Deputy Prime Minister Evangelos Venizelos, who will partake in several meetings with foreign ministers as part of the UN General Assembly meeting that kicks off September 23. While the Greek prime minister will not be having a follow-up meeting with Obama, he will use this trip as an opportunity to meet with members of the US Senate and House of Representatives, both of which were in recesses during his visit. The topics on the agenda include a possible free trade agreement between the EU and the US as well as the Greek economic crisis and the role of the International Monetary Fund. Samaras’ attempts to bring in investments will be reinforced during his second trip, as he will continue his fight to attract more Greek-American money in Greece.

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rime Minister Antonis Samaras left Washington this week with exactly what he wanted an endorsement from US President Barack Obama for his government’s effort to implement its fiscal adjustment programme and bring pressure to bear on Germany to ease its austerity policies. “In dealing with the challenges that Greece faces, we cannot simply look to austerity as a strategy,” Obama said. “It’s important that we have a plan for fiscal consolidation to manage the debt, but it’s also important that growth and jobs are a focus,” he stressed. The purpose of Samaras meeting at the White House was to boost his government’s image as an agent of reform and a bastion of stability in a volatile region. Obama praised the conservative leader for “some very bold and difficult decisions to initiate the structural reforms that can help Greece reduce its debt burden.”

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The White House

Under increasing pressure from an exasperated electorate gasping for breath in an unprecedented fifth year of recession - the government has been desperately trying to convince creditors to cut it some slack. Obama acknowledged that countries experiencing growth and low unemployment “have an easier time reducing their debt burdens than countries where people are feeling hopeless.” Without an easing of austerity, the two-party coalition - hanging on to a slight majority in a fractured parliament - will face an uncertain future as unions and opposition parties brace for an-

Reclaiming Greece’s credibility is seen as essential in convincing lenders to cut it some slack. Without an easing of austerity, the coalition will face an uncertain future as unions and opposition parties brace for another standoff

What the parties said
“The visit yielded nothing good for Greek society or the economy» SYRIZA

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other autumn standoff. And the last thing the eurozone needs is for Greece to plunge back into political instability. The stakes couldn’t be higher, the American president said, stressing the global significance of Greece’s financial predicament. “The stakes are high not only for Greece but also for Europe and the world economy,” he warned. No one in the government expects anything to change before next month’s federal elections in Germany. Berlin, which has praised Greece’s fiscal adjustment progress, has repeatedly made it clear that another debt reduction is not on the table. But the governing coalition in Greece is optimistic and sees that the results of the Washington visit will inject further urgency to the IMF’s call last month for another write-down of Greece’s debt to sustainable levels.

«The only prime minister in the world who is hailing the failure of his policy, the policy of austerity» INDEPENDENT GREEKS

the crisis» DIMAR

“Obama’s opposition to excessive austerity confirms that the path that our country, and many other European countries, are following, will not lead to an exit from

«Those celebrating Obama’s comments that development will supposedly act as a counterbalance to the policy of austerity being implemented and those who are calling on the people to choose between wolves (the US and Germany) are having the Greek people on» KKE

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INTERVIEW

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Is tourism the way to recovery?
Minister Olga Kefalogianni explains the government’s plan to spur tourism and why she believes it will work
By George Gilson

or decades Greek tourism has been viewed as the country’s heavy industry. Yet as in other sectors, strategy and longterm planning have been lacking in developing this crucial area of entrepreneurship. The tales of huge amounts of red tape faced by large prospective investors has been considered a key impediment to development. In an exclusive interview with Athens Views, Tourism Minister Olga Kefalogianni outlines the government’s plans to spur tourism, largely with EU-subsidised infrastructural funding programmes, which exploiting Greece’s competitive advantages. Athens Views: Unemployment in Greece is approaching 30 percent. What is the government doing, and what are you doing to create jobs in the tourism industry? Olga Kefalogianni: The government and the ministry have set as their top priority fighting unemployment. Tourism can play an important role; it’s already contributing to employment to a significant degree. About 13-14 percent of the labour force is directly employed in tourism, 20

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Minister Tourism Olga Kefalogianni

percent if you combine direct and indirect jobs. Tourism development will certainly create new jobs, giving solutions to a large segment of the population. We are creating training and employment programmes, in a multi-pronged plan to bolster tourism and the labour market.

How will the tourism law just passed facilitate large tourist investments? We saw to it that the law avoids unjustified restrictions on investment projects. Each investment proposal will be reviewed independently, based on its charac-

teristics and on the rules of environmental and city planning laws. Clearly, organised tourism investment projects are built on large tracts of land. Naturally that includes special regimes, such as wetlands or an archaeological site. The new law provides that such special

protections will apply. For months press reports have spoken of the number of tourists going up. What is the May-July 2013 data compared to the two previous years on arrivals and on the amounts tourists spent? They confirm our projections and show that efforts by the state and by those in all parts of the tourism sector can pay off. The results have been positive to now, with an increase in both the number of tourists and in revenues. We can further bolster this trend with initiatives to introduce competitive prices. What are the competitive ad-

‘We live in the richest country in the world’. Part of a campaign to promote Greece to Greeks themselves

We hope all will help to make the VAT reduction permanent so as to boost catering and tourism and reduce the overall tourist package taxes. There are also other areas of tourism in which we would like to see tax cuts in the future

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FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

INTERVIEW

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2020) is an important tool which through our planning and proposals will offer much to tourism. Under the new law, condo hotels and youth hostels are introduced to create new types of facilities. Thus downgraded units can be restructured and that can also help revitalise urban centres. How have Greece’s ancient, Byzantine and modern cultural traditions been used to attract tourists? They have been greatly exploited. They are so well known around the world that now our work must be very specialised, the way we promote cultural elements should be different than the past. We are focusing on religious tourism and promoting our monuments, and projecting modern Greek history through local societies. We must not overlook our other works, such as the Acropolis Museum, Athens airport, the Metro, our super-modern hotels, all of which show a Greece of growth and progress. What has your ministry done to promote agrotourism? Agrotourism housing is being supported by NSRF funds. For the 2014-2020 funding period, we will draft new programmes with specific legislation. The ministry already has a draft law we are reviewing for when the time comes for the infrastructural funds to be absorbed in agrotourism. Past press reports have spoken of hugely expensive state

tourism ad campaigns with dubious results, years ago. What are the ad strategies and slogans now and how will they help grow tourism and revenues? Each period had its own conditions and choices. What is certain is that we are not in the era of large, costly campaigns. We are proceeding in a targeted manner, with extensive use of the internet, with ads to sensitise the Greek public and to project the brand name “Greece”, which on its own is a strong brand name. In tandem with academic institutions such as the University of Vancouver, we are adopting “smart applications” that allow tourists to keep informed through a mobile phone or other electronic devices. We are organising forums with academics and foreign organisations. We want to be very careful in ad development, since there is no money to waste or time to lose in experimental efforts. We want to be sure what we do will produce results. How much does state-subsidised “social tourism” help the sector, and what are the problems in implementing it? Social tourism is directed at social groups that need such support. Tourism is a right for everyone, and the state is obliged to be socially sensitive and to care for those in need. Social tourism stimulates the domestic tourism market, and it is certainly an institution with a supplementary role in growing the sector.
Kefalogianni with Finance Minister Yiannis Stournaras

vantages of Greek tourism compared to Turkey, Bulgaria and other neighbouring countries? Our country is unique in all that it offers. No one disputes it, and all of us involved in tourism focus on upgrading and projecting our competitive advantages. They are many – sites, monuments, beaches, culture, antiquities, museums, history, tradition, monasteries and churches, sports, and alternative tourism. We have everything, so we do not see our neighbours as competitors. On the contrary, we can supplement each other’s tourism sector, to benefit the sector and our national economies. We are in touch with Turkey on facilitating movement of visitors between our countries. We do the same with countries like China, India and Japan. The government has succeeded in reducing VAT tax on food and catering from 23 to 13 percent. How much more tax revenue will that bring, and how much was lost by the super-high tax rate? It is too soon to have a clear picture. I don’t want to make snap evaluations. But the measure is in place and we are in a crucial month, when foreign and domestic tourism peak, so the consumption of items with this lower VAT tax will rise. We will tally the results later. Now it is extremely important to reduce prices in practice, to see the reduction in the final price offered and to use it to promote our tourism. We can’t pinpoint losses from the higher tax rate, since a drop in consumption is

About 13-14 percent of the labour force is directly employed in tourism, 20 percent if you combine direct and indirect jobs. Tourism development will certainly create new jobs, giving solutions to a large segment of the population
year-round apartments?

not just linked to the VAT tax, but is affected by the wider economic situation. We hope all will help to make the VAT reduction permanent so as to boost catering and tourism and reduce the overall tourist package taxes. There are also other areas of tourism in which we would like to see tax cuts in the future. What are the greatest obstacles for Greek tourism? What is being done to modernise tourist facilities and services in various regions where they are lacking?

Through the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) and other programmes, money was, is and will be spent on hotel units. Modernising infrastructure, equipment, technology and quality are key growth factors for any business. Our ministry is collaborating with other ministries and agencies on NSRF. The new NSRF (2014-

I will speak of progress, not obstacles. Under the new law, we took the first steps to create a more clear and flexible framework to develop tourism. Greek tourism can take a leap forward, and everyone must contribute. With collective efforts and the organised plan we are implementing, we can succeed. We created campaigns and used technology to promote tourism. We created job training programmes, a new legislative framework, and much more. Not all problems have been resolved. But we are on the right track and soon there will be no shadows or grey zones. How will EU-subsidised infrastructural funds modernise Greek tourism? Will you remodel old units, or allow them to be turned into

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ENERGY

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Redrawing Europe’s energy map
Greece, Cyprus and Israel sign historic agreement to create new energy routes that could eventually cover half of Europe’s needs

A new support pillar of the EU’s energy security

By Costas Papachlimintzos he grand vision of Greece, Cyprus and Israel forming an “energy axis” to channel their gas reserves to the rest of Europe received a boost last week with the signing of a memorandum of cooperation, underscoring their ultimate goal of redrawing Europe’s energy map. Although the relevant details have yet been disclosed, the Greek government insists that in the near future half of the energy needs of the European Union could be met by the combined energy supply of the three countries. According to Elias Konofagos, an energy expert and former general director of exploration and production at Hellenic Petroleum (Elpe), time is of the essence. “This axis will be formed at a time when Europe is thirsty for cheap energy”, he told the Athens Views. “It is much cheaper to transfer gas to central and southern Europe from the reserves off Greece’s shores than, for example, from the ones in Siberia, where most of the Russian gas comes from,” Konofagos argues. The three-party energy memorandum of understanding (MoU) was signed on August 8 in Nicosia, Cyprus, by Israeli Energy and Water Resources Minister Silvan Shalom,

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“This axis will be formed at a time when Europe is thirsty for cheap energy”
Elias Konofagos

Samaras presses Putin on gas prices
Prime Minister Antonis Samaras reportedly sent a letter to Russian president Vladimir Putin, asking for a reduction of the price at which Gazprom supplies gas to Greece the highest for any EU country. Samaras stressed that cheaper energy prices would boost Greek competitiveness. The letter was sent after Gazprom backed down from the acquisition of state gas monopoly Depa and after a series of meeting Greek industrialists who cited high energy prices as the biggest obstacle they face

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Cypriot Energy, Commerce, Industry and Tourism Minister Yiorgos Lakkotrypis and Greek Environment, Energy and Climate Change Minister Yiannis Maniatis. The opportunities opening up to Greece in the energy game also topped the agenda of recent talks between Premier Antonis Samaras and US President Barak Obama. Washington has grown increasingly wary of Russia’s grip on European energy markets and lauded last month’s decision of the group developing Azerbaijan’s gas reserves to choose the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) via Greece to link to Europe as an important achievement. “I told the president that we have found huge energy resources in our greater region”, Samaras said speaking to the press after his meeting with Obama. “Cyprus, Israel and Greece can realign those resources in order to be able to satisfy European demand, especially for natural gas,” he explained. According to government aides, Samaras told Obama than an estimated 4.7 trillion

‘Greece will be able to exploit its natural gas reserves 10-15 years from now but can start benefitting before that period’

cubic metres of gas are located in Greece. Speaking on Skai TV on August 9, government spokesman Simos Kedikoglou revealed that Samaras told Obama that the estimated combined reserves of Israel, Cyprus and Greece are enough to cover 50 percent of the EU’s (energy) needs for the next 30 years. Greece’s emerging role in the energy market was also noted by European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, who included the Israel-Cyprus-Greece corridor in the new hydrocarbon transport routes during his presentation of the continent’s energy priorities to the European Council on May 22. The three energy ministers issued a joint communiqué regarding the MoU, in which special emphasis is given to the project for the electricity interconnection of Israel, Cyprus and Greece via a subsea cable. Shalom called the agreement a historic one, which “demonstrates the strong and tightening relations between the countries.” He added that the “electric conduit can easily become a cable that will supply and export electricity to the European energy market, and provide us with energy security.” Natural gas has been discovered offshore of Israel and Cyprus, while in Greece the Norwegian PGS has conducted seismic researches for hydrocarbons in the Ionian Sea and south of Crete. In a press release on July 4, PGS announced that “the first fast-track datasets” are available and notified potentially inter-

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ENVIRONMENT and Energy Minister Yiannis Maniatis insisted on the significance of the trilateral Memorandum of Understanding. The agreement, Maniatis told the Athens Views, «signifies the creation of a pole of stability in the wider area and of a new pillar of support of the European Union’s energy security». Maniatis, who serves also as an associate professor at the University of Piraeus, argued that «the mineral wealth, the hydrocarbon reserves, the pipelines, the liquified natural gas plants and the underwater power cable, are development programmes which contribute to the prosperity of the people of the three countries, as well as to the strengthening of their geopolitical role». Maniatis described Greece’s involvement in the trans-Adriatic pipeline (TAP) project a «significant success». «The promotion of relevant important energy investments sends a message of optimism to Greek society, but also a message abroad that our country is politically stable and investment friendly”. Maniatis was appointed Environment, Energy and Climate Change Minister in June, after the government reshuffle. He served as deputy minister at the same ministry from 2009 to 2012.   

ested companies that “seismic data including marine gravity and magnetic data can be obtained by contacting the PGS MultiClient team”. Konofagos gave credence to the government’s claim, insisting that “there is indeed a 50 percent chance that the three countries will be able to cover half of the EU’s energy needs.” He added, “This is statistical data for political use.” Konofagos, who is currently executive vice president for hydrocarbons development at Flow Energy, explains:“For example, when Obama discusses with [Russian President Vladimir] Putin the oil and gas exploration in the Arctic region, he also uses a preliminary estimate of the undiscovered reserves.” According to Konofagos, Greece will be able to exploit its natural gas reserves 1015 years from now, “but can start benefitting before that period.”

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NEWS DIGEST

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THE H ALL d edica tures ted f Parth rom the te to sculpenon mple inside of the Muse t he um. A ccord Acropolis from ing to the c oun da servic e ELS try’s statis ta more tics TAT, 1 pe 9 muse ople visite percent d Gre ums a e more visite nd 35.4 pe ce’s d its a rcent sites rcha in th the ye e first fou eological r ar co mpar months of ed to 2012 .

Santorini blacks out after power station blaze
SANTORINI, one of the country’s most popular tourist destinations, was left without lights on August 13 when a power station blaze cut off electricity to the entire island. Mayor Nikos Zorzos said on August 14 that power was being gradually restored to the island. The fire started at a power station in Monolithos, some 9 kilometres southeast of Fira, at around noon and was doused before it could cause major damage or injuries. A navy vessel and a passenger ferry were dispatched to carry two power generators to the island for use until the power station is fully operational.

Suspect in Pakistan building collapse detained
AN ARCHITECT sought on an international arrest warrant over a building collapse in Pakistan was detained on August 12 by police on the island of Zakynthos. Shaikh Abdou Hafeez, 71, who has both British and Pakistani nationalities, was the architect of the Margalla Towers residential complex in Islamabad that came tumbling down came, tumbling down killing 78 people following an earthquake in 2005. 84 people were also injured. He faces charges of homicide, destruction of public assets and corruption, according to Greek police. He was reportedly due to appear before prosecutors on August 14.

Banks cut 5,500 branches across Europe in 2012
BANKS cut 5,500 branches across the European Union last year, 2.5 percent of the total, leaving the region with 20,000 fewer outlets than it had when the financial industry was plunged into crisis in 2008. Last year’s cuts come after 7,200 branches were axed in 2011, according to data analysed by Reuters from European Central Bank statistics. Banks across Europe have been closing branches in a bid to trim operating costs and improve their battered earnings. Consumer take-up of online and telephone banking services has accelerated the trend. The data show EU banks cut 8 percent of branches in aggregate in the four years to the end of 2012, leaving 218,687 branches, or one for every 2,300 people. Greece saw one of the biggest contractions in 2012, shedding 5.7 percent of its outlets, as mergers of local banks led to 219 branch closures. The trend is expected to continue into 2013 as Piraeus shuts some of the 312 branches it snapped up from (Reuters)

Immigrants in detention centre clash with police
DOZENS of illegal immigrants being held in a detention centre hurled stones at police guards and set mattresses on fire on August 11 in protest over the extension of their detention. More than 50 out of 1,620 migrants held at the detention centre of Amygdaleza, near Athens, were arrested over the clashes, which broke out late on August 10. The detainees hurled water bottles and stones at guards and set garbage bags and mattresses on fire, injuring 10 police guards. There were no reports of injured migrants. Riot police fired teargas to disperse the crowds, ending the unrest. Police said 10 migrants had escaped, eight from Pakistan and two from Afghanistan. Greece has been long criticised by human rights groups over the poor conditions at reception centres and a very low rate of asylum application approvals, which makes its treatment of illegal migrants one of the toughest in the EU. (Reuters)

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CULTURE

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

The philosopher’s corner

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The literary or architectural post-modernism was a way to react to the Modern conceptions, mainly those of the avant-gardes of the 20th century: the post-modern artists were trying to liquidate the refusal of the past tradition, returning to a sort of revisiting classic heritage and retelling it under many forms of ironical quotations

Under the leadership of the German government, the European Council is adhering to a crisis agenda that insists on the priority of each individual state balancing its national budget on its own. In the crisis-stricken countries, this policy is adversely affecting the social security systems, public services, and collective goods...at the expense of the strata of the population that are disadvantaged in any case

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n the course of my philosophical carrier I was informed about an Old or Strong Realism, mainly because my doctoral dissertation was on the aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas and the main problem of that research was not only what beauty was for Aquinas but rather by which cognitive mechanisms we perceive beautiful objects as such – taking for granted that these objects are really in front of us and are not a figment of our imagination. Aquinas was certainly an old realist and, as we could say today, an External Realist: for him the world is there outside us, and it is such as it is independently of our knowledge. But Aquinas was also advocating a correspondence theory of truth: we are able to know the world as our mind were its mirror, by adaequatio rei et intellectus. Such a kind of realism was extolled by many other philosophers and what always flabbergast me is that the same position was also maintained by Lenin in his Materialism and empiriocriticism. Aquinas was not certainly a Marxist and it seems hard to believe that Lenin was a Thomist, but it simply means that the ideas of the Old Realism were circulating during the centuries among various thinkers. In opposition to the Old or Strong Realism I met during my life various forms of Temperate Realism, from Holism and Ontological Relativity to Internal Realism. But at this point it would still be embarrassing to recognize and define a New Realism. If I had to explain the attempts to propose a New Realism to a student I would say that the appeal to a so-called new realism is a way to react to so-called post- modern philosophy. But there we are facing a new conundrum: I confess (and I wrote at least thirty years ago about that) that I never clearly understood what is the philosophical postmodernism, since it has nothing to do neither with the literary post-modernism of John Barth, Donald Barthelme and Leslie Fiedler nor with the architectural post-modernism of Charles Jenks or Robert Venturi. The literary or architectural post-modernism was a way to react to the Modern conceptions, mainly those of the avantgardes of the 20th century: the postmodern artists were trying to liquidate

evitably ―weak‖ interpretations. Simply you can be philosophically post-modern by assuming that we cannot have a comprehensive and global vision of an unattainable Ding als sich. In this sense a post-modern philosophy is simply a Kantism without the guarantee of a transcendental form of knowledge. The difference is certainly very important but it cannot eliminate the ghost of a Thing in Itself. 

Excerpts from his speech to the Athens Philosophy Congress this month entitled «Some remarks on a New Realism»

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medium term without a joint fiscal and economic policy that would extend to other policy fields such as taxation and social policy. In the long run it will not be sufficient to provide loans to the over-indebted states so that each of them can improve its competitiveness on its own. However, a deepening of institutionalized cooperation would demand more democracy in Europe and a corresponding change in the Treaties. In fact, we are witnessing a development that is stoking the conflicts between the peoples. Europe is being drawn into the slipstream of a form of 

Excerpts from the chapter entitled «The trend towards technocracy and the lack of solidarity», his speech to the Athens Philosophy Congress earlier in the month

Jurgen Habermas

Umberto Eco

the refusal of the past tradition, returning to a sort of revisiting classic heritage and retelling it under many forms of ironical quotations. If so, what had these artistic forms of post-modernism to do with the so-called philosophical post-modernism extolled by philosophers like Lyotard? Certainly the post-modern philosophies celebrated the end of the Great Narrations, of a transcendental notion of meaning and truth, welcoming multiplicity and disenchantement, advocating forms of fragmented or ‖weak‖ thought, but it seems to me that these currents were not directly concerned with the problem of realism. As a matter of fact your thought can be polymorphous and disenchanted, you can give up with the Global Narration in order to cultivate only local forms of descripton, without casting in doubt the existence of an external world that stands in front of your in-

ather than spinning out the idea of a political constitution for a world society without a world government further, I would like to use the example of the EU crisis to show how rocky the road leading to such a constitution is. I am interested in the stumbling block posed by the lack of political solidarity, hence the narrow horizon within which, for the present, citizens can be required to take the perspectives of their fellow citizens into consideration as well. Let me proceed without further explanation from the premise that the structural imbalances between the national economies of the euro zone are forcing the member states of the European Monetary Union to take further steps toward political integration. The crisis has taught us that the European Monetary Union cannot be stabiliσed in the

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technocracy that is tailoring the individual member states without the involvement of their populations to the format of “consolidated” democracies, that is, of democracies adjusted to uncontrolled markets. Under the leadership of the German government, the European Council is adhering to a crisis agenda that insists on the priority of each individual state balancing its national budget on its own. In the crisis-stricken countries, this policy is adversely affecting the social security systems, public services, and collective goods, which means that it is being implemented at the expense of the strata of the population that are disadvantaged in any case. Changing this requires breaking with the political self-interpretation of nation states according to which each member state is formally sovereign and takes decisions in questions of budgetary, social, and economic policy without regard for their side effects on other member states, hence, exclusively from a national perspective. With this fiction of national sovereignty, the governments of the so-called donor countries above all are avoiding requiring their electorates to exhibit the requisite degree of political solidarity. A cooperative project undertaken from a joint European perspective to promote growth and competitiveness in the eurozone as a whole would require these countries to accept, in their longer- term self-interest, redistribution effects that would be to their disadvantage in the short and medium terms. Political parties avoid the issue of the reasonableness of requiring political solidarity. I take this as a sign of political timidity, if not of sheer opportunism, in the face of a challenge of historical dimensions. Perhaps even a dry philosophical analysis of the concept of solidarity can contribute something to clarifying what is at stake.

in-thenews.com

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Under the full moon
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ARTS

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

By Despina Pavlaki

Carrying on a recent tradition that seems to have taken deep root, 71 archaeological sites, museums and cultural spaces will be welcoming the most popular full moon of the year on August 21

ATHENS

The Acropolis Museum
THE ACROPOLIS Museum is the first in line to open its doors to nocturnal visitors on Wednesday, August 21, at 9:30pm, throwing a live music bash featuring the historic Army Band of Athens with a mixed repertory of local and international tunes. The Army Band was founded in 1825 and for years it was the only orchestra in the country, conducted by celebrated maestros, such as Maggel, Kalomiris and Kessaris, while nurturing some very talented soloists. The band sets all notable military events to music and has been repeatedly distinguished in army band festivals around the world. Captain Mike Hasouris will be conducting the orchestra. The Acropolis Museum will remain open from 8am to midnight (free entry for all visitors from 9pm onwards), giving people the opportunity to stroll through the manicured gardens under the charming moonlight.  For more information, visit: www.theacropolismuseum.gr/en

conductor Dimitris Mitropoulos the opportunity to shine before getting scooped up by the international symphonic community. The orchestra’s current art director is Dimitris Michas.  For more information, visit: www.cityofathens.gr

The Numismatic Museum

The Philopappos Hill
THE BRASS Ensemble of the Athens State Orchestra will sweep you off your feet in a night full of orchestral music with elements from Greek folk rhythm and melody. The performance will take place at Andiro Pikioni, on Philopappos Hill, at 9:30pm, and entrance is free of charge. The Athens State Orchestra (KOA), first established in 1893, is the principal symphony orchestra in the history of Greek music. It has been the leading institution to promote the works of local composers, often providing important figures such as

WHETHER a happy coincidence or part of the city’s organised nocturnal worship of the full moon, lyricist Lina Nikolakopoulou has chosen the Numismatic Museum’s secret garden to present a handpicked selection of her favourite songs, as well as popular local melodies from the past few decades, performed by Argyro Kaparou, on August 21. This mini-summer tour, starring our cultural heritage, her love affair with the Greek language and the fleeting nature of memory, has been exclusively performed on museum grounds with a little help from Yannis Tsolkas on the piano and Panayotis Tsevas on the accordion.  For more information, visit: www.nma.gr

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LL HAIL the full moon of August, the most charming and colourful astral view of the year, to be celebrated with a plethora of nocturnal activities at archaeological sites across the country on August 21. But before we get all romantic, it’s best to set the record straight: August 21 is not the socalled supermoon, the biggest full moon of the year. That phenomenon already sailed past on June 23, when a slightly bigger and brighter lunar display signalled the moon’s arrival at perigee, its closest distance from Earth. But that will not stop the city of Athens, along with dozens of other archaeological sites on the Greek islands and beyond, from celebrating August 21 as

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the most special night under the starry sky. And there’s a pretty good explanation for it too: “A lot of people believe that the biggest full moon actually takes place in August, but that’s just an optical illusion,” says physicist and astronomer Dionysis Simopoulos, director of the Eugenides Foundation Planetarium. “What’s happening is that during the summer months, the sun reaches the highest point above the horizon, while the moon does the exact opposite. When

sighted low on the horizon, the moon appears to be hiding behind trees, antennas and various buildings and this contrast can create an optical illusion that makes the moon seem even bigger.” The constant companionship of the moon, as well as its shape-shifting nature, has always had an almost metaphysical influence on the human race, evident in folk songs, superstitions and age-old beliefs that are often impossible to shake. And that’s despite the fact the moon

only reflects 7% of the sunlight, due to its irregular surface. Still, that’s bright enough to draw out a large portion of the stars in the night sky. Press Rewind, and you’ll find the full moon is associated with different agricultural tasks every month, not to mention it was worshipped as divinity. For ancient Greeks and Romans, Selene, the goddess of the moon, was often identified with Artemis, who was in the habit of illuminating the night for her beloved hunters. The goddess of the hunt was Homer’s ideal when it came to female beauty, while Selene/Artemis was also credited for the refreshing temperatures that cooled the earth down after the scorching Sun

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(who happened to be her brother, by the way) and often made it rain. That explains why

her sanctuaries and temples, especially in Arcadia, were usually near lakes or rivers. You can still

find remote locations in the Australian Outback and the African wilderness, not to mention In-

donesia, where she is still the object of tribal worship, recognized as a force of nature. In classical times, ancient Greek philosophers were able to dissolve a lot of the mystery shrouding the volatile moon and determine the cyclical nature of the lunar phases. They realised the light the moon emanated was nothing but a reflection of sunlight, which constantly changed depending on which portion happened to be facing the Earth at any given time. Yet, despite the theatrics, the moon never quite lost its astral mystique. Carrying on a recent tradition that seems to have taken deep root, 71 archaeological sites, museums and cultural spaces will be welcoming the

most popular full moon of the year on August 21, a number that seems to expand exponentially, according to the Central Archaeological Council. Many were expecting the government to veto opening archaeological sites across the country for the upcoming festivities due to financial strains, but Maria Andreadaki-Vlazaki, the Culture Ministry’s acting deputy general director of Antiquities and Cultural Heritage, proved them wrong: “Despite adversity, we want to offer everyone a fun night near the monuments. We believe that the full moon festivities ought to take place this year, just like any other, bringing people closer to antiquities under the August moon”.

ELEFSINA

The archaeological site of Eleusis
IF YOU feel like hailing the moon from a different geographical latitude with equal archaeological gravitas, then you can always try Eleusis, home to the Eleusinian Mysteries, one of the most famous religious events of the ancient Greek religion, and the birthplace of Aeschylus. On August 21 the famous Eleusis archaeological site will play host to an idiosyncratic quartet made up of two singers and two songwriters, Melina Kana and Vassilis Lekkas opposite Yiorgos Andreou and Yiorgos Kazantzis, combining piano skills and vocal acrobatics in a night to remember. The two pairs cross-pollinate in a creative encounter that sometimes singles them out, at other times relying on their combined talent in a repertory that doesn’t exclusively originate in their own releases, but scales the heights of recent Greek discography.

or collectively observing rare natural phenomena in what has come to be known as “astroparties”. Entrance to the Castle and use of telescopes is free of charge.

The Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL Museum of Thessaloniki has opted to take it down a notch with a much more low-profile performer, serenading the full moon with the gentle sound of his guitar. Notis Mavroudis will be strumming the chords to a musical memoir that spans his entire career with a little help from Yiorgos Tosikian (second guitar) and Morpho Tsaireli (vocals). This communion of moonlight and music will take the audiences on a lyrical journey all the way to Latin America and back, opening a direct channel of communication with the stars up above. The concert starts at 9:30pm.  For more information, visit: www.amth.gr

THESSALONIKI

TINOS

The Heptapyrgion Castle
THE 9TH EPHORATE of Byzantine Antiquities will be joining the festivities by opening the gates of the Heptapyrgion Castle from 8pm to midnight, while the Friends of Astronomy Club of Thessaloniki will be throwing in a few telescopes for some state-of-the-art stargazing. The site, popularly known by its Ottoman Turkish name Yedi Kule, is a Byzantine- and Ottomanera fortress situated on the northeastern corner of the acropolis of Thessaloniki. Interestingly, despite its name translating to «Fortress of Seven Towers», it actually features ten, and was probably named after the Yedikule Fortress in Constantinople. As for The Friends of Astronomy Club (est 1997), it’s a staple in local schools and public spaces, organising workshops

The Museum of Marble Crafts
THE CYCLADES Orchestra, led by composer Nikos Kypourgos, will present a multi-layered musical evening entitled “Inside the Museum”. The first part will feature popular songs from favourite movie soundtracks, penned by celebrated Greek songwriters, while the second half is dedicated to the well-loved «Edo Lilipoupoli” (Lilliput Here) children’s radio programme, transmitted by Greek radio between 1976 and 1980 under the artistic direction of Manos Hadjidakis, a mammoth success and a lasting influence on Greek popular culture. The music was composed by Kypourgos himself with lyrics by Marianina Kriezi. Entrance is free of charge.  For more information, visit: www.piop.gr
Last but not least, all participating archaeological sites in the Cycladic Islands will synchronize their watches to Federico García Lorca’s poetry, as they have all agreed to transmit the recording of the “Lament for Ignacio Sanchez Mejias” between 10 and 11pm, as read by Manos Katrakis.

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ARCHAEOLOGY

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

One attraction in the Athens area that until the 1940s and ’50s was considered the second most-popular place after the Acropolis for out-of-town visitors was the Marathon Dam, located just 12km inland from the historic battlefield at ancient Marathon

The Marathon dam: A forgotten tribute to
ence Dam (Switzerland) and, most recently, the Three Gorges Dam (China). What makes the Marathon Dam stand apart from these other man-made edifices, however, are its unusual design, distinctive local materials and singular construction history - all of which look, not forward to create a striking symbol of modern times and technological progress, but backward to evoke Greece’s Classical past and the inspiration that many Greeks and foreigners alike once took so deeply from that heritage. Philhellenism, as it has touched upon the history and archaeological monuments of Greece, in particular, has taken many forms. German amateur archaeologist Heinrich Schliemann’s devotion to ancient and modern Greece drove him not only to excavate important sites described in Homer’s epics, but also to contribute to the Greek state’s plans for the public presentation of the Acropolis - by providing at his own expense the funds necessary to remove a conspicuous Frankish-era tower in 1875 that until then had partly obscured the 5th century BC Propylaea and Athena Nike temple. Some 50 years later, American and British businessmen, assisted at times by archaeologists

By John Leonard uring these hot August days of Mediterranean summer, even the sun at midday does not appear to dissuade Athens’ dedicated visitors from seeking out the ancient Acropolis and other celebrated historical or cultural sites in the city centre. The Acropolis and its Classical monuments - just as they already did for Hellenistic and Roman travellers more than 2,000 years ago - represent the perpetual keystones of Greek tourism. Throughout Greece, the most frequently visited archaeological sites today also include Delphi, Olympia, Knossos and Cape Sounion. The Greek National Tourism Organization (www.visitgreece.gr) similarly reports, based on visitor feedback polled on Facebook, “Delphi, Knossos, the Acropolis of Athens and Olympia are among the archaeological sites that left the most lasting impression on those who visited them…” In Athens itself, the most popular attractions for visitors, besides the site of the Acropolis, include the New Acropolis Museum, the National Archaeological Museum, the Plaka, the Athenian Agora, the Zappeion and surrounding National Gardens, the Temple of Olympian Zeus and the Panathenaic Stadium (often called “the Kallimarmaro”, or “beautifullymarbled one”) - home to the first modern Olympics in 1896. Yet nowhere in any of these lists is mentioned one attraction in the Athens area that until the 1940s and ’50s was considered the second most-popular place (after the Acropolis) for out-of-town visitors: Marathon Dam, located just 12km inland from the historic battlefield at ancient Marathon. Such enormous engineering marvels, first appearing in the early decades of the 20th century, are still regularly admired all over the world - the Hoover Dam (USA), Aswan Dam (Egypt), Grande Dix-

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Hoplites, from the Athens Museum

Greece in the late 1920s, much like today, was heavily burdened with foreign debt, while also struggling to improve the everyday lives of its burgeoning citizenry. The great esteem held by Western countries for Greece’s ancient heritage seems to have been exploited by powerful parties on both sides of this struggle: by the Greek government itself and by foreign companies seeking favourable public relations angles

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of various national backgrounds, launched major land reclamation projects in northern Greece. They drained lakes, straightened rivers, cut canals, and constructed dykes, roads and bridges throughout central and eastern Macedonia - to provide further agricultural land for Greek refugees from Asia Minor and to reduce the threat of malaria. It was during American dredging of the Strymonas River that the marble remains of the monumental

Lion of Amphipolis were recovered, and subsequently restored, to become one of northern Greece’s most recognizable landmarks. The philhellenism of American archaeologists in Greece during the first half of the 20th century has lately become a subject of vigorous discussion at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA): first through a workshop held at the school in May 2010, entitled Philhellenism,

Philanthropy, or Political Convenience? American Archaeology in Greece, organized by then-director Jack Davis and archivist Natalia Vogeikoff-Brogan; then through the release of Susan Heuck Allen’s gripping book, Classical Spies: American Archaeologists with the OSS in World War II (University of Michigan Press, 2011); and most recently through the publication of the 2010 workshop’s papers (under the same title) in a special issue of the journal Hesperia (vol. 82.1, 2013). Archaeologist Betsey Robinson, one contributor to the workshop, relates that American archaeologists excavating at ancient Corinth became active proponents, at least as early as 1913, in a long-term drive to improve the quality of the local village’s

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

ARCHAEOLOGY

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Greek heritage and American philhellenism
What makes Marathon Dam stand apart from other man-made edifices, are its unusual design, distinctive local materials and singular construction history - all of which look, not forward to create a striking symbol of modern times and technological progress, but backward to evoke Greece’s Classical past and the inspiration that many Greeks and foreigners alike - once took so deeply from that heritage
ers capitalized on their country’s reputation as the birthplace of Western civilization, both to build an identity for the new nation and to attract external interest and investment.” Ulen & Company and John Monks & Sons were two of the well-connected American companies that secured contracts to improve Greece’s infrastructure. Between 1925 and 1931 Ulen completed the Marathon Waterworks. Beginning in 1929 - on the eve of the American Great Depression - it also joined forces with Monks in the widespread effort to rehabilitate northern Greek lands. Ulen’s Marathon project included construction of the dam, an aqueduct system between Marathon and Athens, a network of urban water mains and a water treatment plant. Ulen also cleaned, repaired and amplified the Roman emperor Hadrian’s original aqueduct, on which the city of Athens had relied for more than 1,800 years. As a further measure to conserve fresh water, Ulen installed a salt-water distribution system for sewer flushing, street sprinkling and firefighting. The design and ornamentation of Marathon Dam was largely the product of Roy W. Gausmann, Ulen’s leading engineer on the Marathon project, who, having developed a great respect for Greece and its heritage, continued to live and work in Athens until forced to flee the Nazi invasion of 1941. Over the course of 15 years Gausmann acquired a circle of friends that shared his interest in ancient Greece, including archaeologists from the ASCSA and the classically-edu-

water supply and consequently its public health. The fascinating details behind the construction of Marathon Dam and the recovery and restoration of the Amphipolis Lion, also reported by Robinson, recall a richly productive, nownearly-forgotten era in early 20th c. Greece when archaeologists, antiquarians, Big-Business tycoons, politicians, diplomats, hydraulic engineers and other members of the Greek and foreign public - all inspired or motivated in their own ways by Greece’s venerable past worked together to achieve admirable goals. In the 1920s and ’30s, for both personal and public gain, they reshaped the Greek landscape, brought water to a “thirsty Athens” and reduced disease within the borders of the newly crowded modern Greek state. Greece in the late 1920s, much like today, was heavily burdened with foreign debt, while also struggling to improve the everyday lives of its burgeoning citizenry. The great esteem held by Western countries for Greece’s ancient heritage seems to have been exploited by powerful parties on both sides of this struggle: by the Greek government itself and by foreign companies seeking favourable public relations angles. According to Robinson, “As Greece aspired to become a modern nation, and Athens a world city, Greek lead-

cated US ambassador to Greece Lincoln MacVeagh (1933-1941). Erected between 1927 and 1929, the Marathon Dam did not resemble modern, smooth-sided dams being built elsewhere, Robinson notes, but instead the stepped auditorium of an ancient Greek theatre. Furthermore, Gausmann sheathed the dam’s exterior surfaces with a distinctive “mosaic” pattern of polygonal marble blocks quarried from nearby Mt. Penteli, which bring to mind the white Pentelic marble also employed in the 5th c. BC Parthenon and other monuments built on the Athenian Acropolis during Pericles’ leadership. Lastly, Gausmann created a monumental entrance-building for access to the dam’s internal plumbing, which stands at the dam’s eastern, downstream foot and is identical to the Athenian Treasury at ancient Delphi. Gausmann reveals in his memoirs that the inspiration behind the design of the Marathon Dam entrance came from a tourist visit to Delphi by Ulen engineers. On a return visit, they took measure-

ments, made blueprints and ultimately produced an exact replica. The symbolism inherent in the Marathon Dam’s design - recalling Athenian victory over the Persians at Marathon in 490 BC, as memorialized by the Athenian treasury at Delphi and the monumental, Pentelic-marble buildings of the Athenian Acropolis - ameliorated Ulen’s difficult position in Greece. As a foreign company, with unfamiliar business practices, perceived publicly as responsible for the additional “Ulen tax” required by the Greek government to pay for the new waterworks, Ulen’s popularity wavered during the course of the Marathon project. Whether a product of Gausmann’s antiquarian interests, his philhellenic impulse, or a calculated public relations strategy, Ulen’s conspicuous embrace of classical imagery and symbolism - amplified by the world media - played well to both Greek and American audiences. Like the ancient Greeks before them, Ulen’s engineers and army of

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more than 5,000 Greek workers (many of them refugees) had fought a modern battle at Marathon and won. In the end, the Marathon Lake and Dam became a much-beloved, scenic park, outfitted with shady picnic grounds, far from the heat and noise of urban Athens. Nevertheless, Ulen’s greater contribution to Athenian life was the new municipal water system. When the new waterworks were inaugurated in Athens on June 3, 1931, beside a temporary fountain erected near the temple of Olympian Zeus, the ceremony marked an exhilarating, emotional moment in the formative stages of Greek-American relations. As a band played the Greek national anthem and the American “Star Spangled Banner”, Prime Minister Eleftherios Venizelos turned on the tap. Robert P. Skinner, then US ambassador to Greece (1926-1932), later recorded: «The Athenians had never seen or dreamed of such a spectacle. It was too wonderful. I expected to hear roars of applause, but there was no applause, only emotion. The Athenians were too astonished at their good fortune to cheer. Many were weeping.» The large hexagonal fountain visible today in Athens opposite the entrance to the Zappeion, with its signature polygonal masonry distinctive to Ulen constructions, was a gift to the Greek State in 1932 from Henry Ulen, founder of the company, who wished to commemorate the service performed by his many Greek employees during the Marathon waterworks project. Marathon Dam is currently experiencing a revival of public interest. Although the original park with the replica of the Athenian Treasury at the dam’s foot is now closed, the southern picnic grounds remain accessible and a cool, pleasant café overlooks the dam’s northern end.

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ARTS

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

The storms in the soul of Odysseus, the king of Ithaca
Homer’s hero, the ideal man, represents a symbol derived from ancient Greek patrimony, which the poet’s spirit decoded, analysed with remarkable craftsmanship, and delivered to perpetuity
Odysseus’ personality in order to rein in his passion, to moderate the storms of his soul. But Homer personally identifies with his hero, and he himself succumbs to the same ambivalence. Hard as he tries to idealize Odysseus’ personality and ethos, he describes many elements that reveal the intense contradictions of his own psychic condition. It is not by chance that Homer selects the goddess Athena to assist and advise him. For the ancient Greeks, Athena was not only the goddess of wisdom, arts and letters, but also the goddess of war. These characteristics represent a portrait and likeness incarnate of the ideal man, “kalou kagathou”, upstanding and virtuous, beautiful in body and soul. This ideal man, therefore, the man of Homer, the hero Odysseus, represents a symbol of the people and the poet. It is a symbol derived from ancient Greek patrimony, which the poet’s spirit decoded, analyzed with remarkable craftsmanship, and delivered to perpetuity. This man/hero became the representative of the Greek nation, who always believed in contemplation,

By Panos Sykiotis omer  begins the Odyssey as follows: “Tell me, Muse, about the artful man who wandered so far after managing to take the holy city of Troy, saw the lands of many people and became familiar with their customs, and heartrendingly suffered many sorrows at sea as he tried to save himself and bring his companions back to their native land”. We notice from the very beginning that Homer sketches the personality of Odysseus in a generous way. He is clever, crafty. However, the equilibrium of his psychic condition will undergo many trials. Sometimes he will be enthusiastic, brave, euphoric, eager to try, to conquer, to fall in love, and other times he will suffer much bitterness, disappointment and frustration. From the beginning of the Odyssey, therefore, Homer prepares us for the ambivalence that will plague the heart of his hero. But the name “Odysseus’’ is not given by chance; it comes from the verb odysomai, which means, I feel pain; in other words, I am grieving, I am afflicted, I am much suffering. Homer tries to embellish

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Penelope and one of her suitors. Insert: Homer

Homer personally identifies with his hero, and he himself succumbs to the same ambivalence. Hard as he tries to idealize Odysseus’ personality and ethos, he describes many elements that reveal the intense contradictions of his own psychic condition

Odysseus and the Sirens

only with the hero’s outward representation, but more so with what is hidden in the depth of his soul, in his subconscious, whereas Homer is kind towards Odysseus. He tries to hide the catastrophic and instinctive impetuousness of the hero. Odysseus successfully repels his aggression, according to the disposition of Homer. The tragic poets, and especially Sophocles and Euripides, accustomed to analyzing the conditions of the soul of the heros in their tragedies, discover hidden in the behaviour of Odysseus the unconscious clashes and paradoxes of his personality. Sophocles, in the tragedy “Ajax”, presents him as the illegitimate son of Sisyphus: cun-

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logical analysis, but also in strength and pathos. Homer defends everywhere the moral picture of Odysseus. He presents him as respectful of the gods and the laws. His attitude towards others is portrayed usually as amicable, humane and compassionate. In contrast, the tragic poets do not accept the embellished portrait of Odysseus. They, as skillful analysts and explorers of the subconscious, are concerned in their works not

ning, scheming, arrogant, timid. But at the end of his tragedy he portrays him as virtuous, magnanimous and wise. In the tragedy Philoctetes, Sophocles describes him as hard, unhesitating, of base morality …. Again he presents him as the illegitimate son of Sisyphus, who was bought by Laertes. Euripides, in the tragedy Iphigenia in Aulis, introduces Odysseus as forcefully pressuring for the sacrifice of Iphigenia when the rest, ie Agamemnon her father, Clytemnestra her mother, Menelaus and Achilles, try to save her. In this play Odysseus is again revealed demeaningly as an illegitimate son of Sisyphus. Sisyphus is a hero of Greek mythology, famous for his cunning. According to the myth, he managed to cheat both Death and Hades. In the tragedy The Trojans, Euripides portrays Odysseus as hard and unfeeling. The Trojans refers to the aristocratic women of Troy, who, after the defeat, were destined to be divided as slaves among the Greek conquerors. Hecuba, wife of Priam, king of Troy, and mother of Hector, is given to Odysseus. Cassandra, his daughter, is given to Agamemnon. Andromache, wife of Hector, is given to Neoptolemos, son of Achilles. At the urging of Odysseus, Polyxeni, another daughter of Priam, is sacrificed on the tomb of Achilles and Astyanax, the young son of Hector and Andromache, is thrown over the city walls and killed. From The Trojans, Talthivios the

herald declares the decree to Andromache. Talthivios: “They will kill your son. See how you are informed of bad tidings”. Andromache: “Alas, it is yet worse than my new wedding”. Talthivios: “In the conference of the Greeks, the opinion of Odysseus prevailed”. Hecuba, mourning her grandson Astyanax, says, “You deserve more honour than the weapons of  the wicked and wise Odysseus”. In another tragedy of Euripides, Hecuba, the chorus declares to Hecuba the decision to sacrifice her daughter Polyxeni on the tomb of Achilles. Chorus: “Those who discussed the matter came out equal–minded, until the opinionated Odysseus, flatterer of the masses, long–winded, sweet– talker, convinced the whole army not to slight the first among the Achaeans over the slaughter of a slave. And soon Odysseus will come here to forcefully take from your embrace your tender daughter”. In this tragedy, Odysseus is portrayed as a great talker, manip-

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

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19

In search of Mona Lisa
RESEARCHERS opened a centuries-old Florence tomb last week in a search for remains that could confirm the identity of the woman whose enigmatic smile Leonardo da Vinci immortalised in the «Mona Lisa», one of the world’s most famous paintings. A round hole, just big enough for a person to wriggle through, was cut in the stone church floor above the family crypt of Florentine silk merchant Francesco del Giocondo, whose wife Lisa Gherardini is thought to have sat for the Renaissance master in the early 16th century. Theories abound about who the real Mona Lisa was, but Silvano Vinceti, a writer and researcher who heads Italy’s National Committee for the Promotion of Historic and Cultural Heritage, plans to test DNA in the bones in the dank space and try to match it with those of three women buried at a convent nearby. Historians say Gherardini - whose married name ‘Gioconda’ is used in Italy to refer to the Mona Lisa - spent her last years at the Saint Orsola convent, a dilapidated building where the hunt for her bones began last year.

Manifestations of the unconscious clashes in the soul of Odysseus guide the hero’s actions, but when they could be condemned by common logic and morals, then the poet makes plain to stress that it is not the fault of the hero but of some god or oracle

for one year; then follows the sea voyage Nekia, which ends up in Hades. There, amongst others, he sees his mother Antikleia, who informs him that she died of a broken heart at his delayed return to Ithaca. This brings him grief. When he meets Calypso his sorrow is dispelled and replaced by euphoria. He enjoys a passionate affair with her for seven years. After seven years he is again overwhelmed with sadness. He wishes to return to Ithaca, near his  wife and son. After the island of Calypso he arrives at the island of Phaiakos, where the king’s daughter Nausicaa falls in love with him. But Odysseus does not reciprocate this love. As he approaches Ithaca, his amorous instincts wane.

by decapitation, characteristic symbolism in keeping with the prohibition of incest. The disposition of Odysseus towards female persons or maternal substitutes is analogous to his identities. That is, he identifies them with the good or bad experiences of his childhood. In these female personas he seeks the imaginary good mother of his childhood, the ideal standard of faith  and devotion. At the end of every relationship, however, there is disappointment and disillusionment. The homesickness, the longing for the return to Ithaca to the good and fantasized mother Penelope, and to the narcissistic substitute of his son, are the main factors which help him sustain his

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ulator of the people, unhesitating, hard, forceful and graceless. Homer, although avoiding judgment on many of Odysseus’ actions, which in keeping with prevailing morality would come under censure, nevertheless describes them in detail, and on occasion justifies them as the result of the will of the gods, or even the pronouncement of the oracle. Therefore, manifestations of the unconscious clashes in the soul of Odysseus guide the hero’s actions, but when they could be condemned by common logic and morals, then the poet stresses that it is not the fault of the hero but of some god or oracle. Reading the Homeric epics we notice that Odysseus is associated with various female characters in different ways. At the beginning of the expedition, at Aulis, only he insists and succeeds in the killing/sacrifice of Iphigenia. After the conquest of Troy, he insists on killing Polyxeni. He takes as slave Hecuba, although she saved his life when he sneaked into Troy. From Odysseus’ behaviour towards these women, we note an unjustified and deadly aggression towards the female race emanating from his soul. Subsequently, he is attached amorously to Circe

Other passions prevail: hate, murder, revenge, destruction. In the soul of the hero, the time has come for the Apollonian order to be replaced by the Dionysian disorder. Odysseus becomes intoxicated with the desire for revenge and punishment of the suitors. The storms of his soul, which for so many years he has tried to restrain, unleash themselves uncontrollably. He is overcome by frenzy. Nothing moves him, not even the pleading of the suitors. All who tried to become lover-husbands of Penelope, in his mind  hateful paternal substitutes for the cunning treachery and faithlessness of Sisyphus, must die. But this vengeful mania of Odysseus does not stop. After the killing of the suitors comes the punishment of the unfaithful maids, the maternal or conjugal faithless substitutes. These will be killed by his son Telemachus. Not, however, with his phallic-like arms such as sword, spear or arrow, but

psychological balance. However, under this precarious balance are hidden doubt and anxiety. After the return to Ithaca, Odysseus again leaves his family and continues his wandering. It is almost certain that man throughout his entire life continues to seek, and tries to realize, the ideal mother of his childhood that he never knew. The storms within the soul of the small child carry on thoughout his whole life. The storms in the soul of the ordinary person, however, are manifest differently from those of the heroes such as Odysseus or the poets such as Homer. Certainly the subconscious clashes of the soul, the contrasts and paradoxes, are the common element of the works of the great creators, poets, writers and artists. It is the archtypical element  of the collective subconscious that is expressed in the works of these creators and which emanates from their talent. About this ability of the creators, Freud writes in his book Psychoanalysis and Literature, “Our method, that is psychoanalysis, consists of the conscious observation of the abnormal proceedings of the soul towards others in order to guess and formulate the laws that govern them. The creator surely follows in another way: he guides his attention to the unconscious inside his own soul, watches vigilantly the possible developments and gives them an artistic expression, instead of suppressing them with conscious criticism. So he derives from himself what we learn studying others, that is which laws must the function of the  unconscious follow, but he does not need to express these laws, nor does he know them with scientific assurance, as they are embodied in their works on account of their talent”. We, who specialize in the health of the mind and are preoccupied with the mysteries of the  human soul, have a vision and a purpose for our fellow men, which is expressed in the ancient Greek Delphic maxim, “Know thyself”. Panos Sykiotis, Md, Phd, is a neurologist, psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, a member of the American Psychological Society

Vinceti believes one of the three could be Lisa Gherardini. «For centuries, historians the world over have been coming up with various theories about who this enigmatic, mysterious woman could have been,» he told journalists outside the Santissima Annunziata basilica in Florence. Vinceti hopes some of the bones lying in the cramped underground room behind the Santissima Annunziata’s main altar will belong to at least one blood relation of Leonardo’s muse, probably her son Piero. Once a DNA match is made, Vinceti says an image of Gherardini’s face can be generated from the Saint Orsola skull and compared with the painting, the biggest attraction in the Louvre museum in Paris. «When we find a match between mother and child - then we will have found the Mona Lisa,» he said. (Reuters)

Dylan to exhibit artwork in London
NEW PASTEL portraits by American singer Bob Dylan will go on show for the first time at London’s National Portrait Gallery next month, the gallery said this week. The 12 new works in the «Bob Dylan Face Value» exhibition in September represent the latest portrait studies from the «Blowin’ in the Wind» singer who has sketched and drawn since childhood, but only began exhibiting six years ago. «Bob Dylan is one of the most influential cultural figures of our time,» National Portrait Gallery Director Sandy Naime said in a statement. The portraits represent characters, with an amalgamation of features Dylan has collected from life, memory and his imagination and fashioned into people, some real and some fictitious. Dylan, 72, has exhibited previous art collections of sketches, gouaches and watercolours in the past in other cities around the world.

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PLANNING AHEAD

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Gas it up!
Adding some industrial light and magic to your standard ancient Greek ruin itinerary at the Industrial Gas Museum
or those of you looking for sightseeing variety, the Industrial Gas Museum is a great way to add some industrial light and magic to your standard ancient Greek ruin itinerary. It’s been a few months since the Athens Gasworks reopened its gates to the public, 30 years after operations closed down. The company was established in 1857, in order to facilitate the urban demand for public lighting. Along with the Douroutis silk mill (est 1854), they were Athens’ first two industrial plants and subsequent landmarks for the city’s financial development. They even lent their names to the surrounding neighbourhoods: Metaxourgio (ie silk mill) and Gazohori (ie gas village). The gasworks was the first energy production unit in all of Greece and its key location soon spurred further growth, rendering Pireos Street the city’s largest industrial zone for several decades. Some 30 years after shutdown, the plant’s impressively wellpreserved facilities have come to life again, forming a part of the Industrial Museum’s rich collection, along with several objects harvested from the plant. The building complex once hosting this pow-

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The building complex once hosting this powerhouse operation was restored in 2004 and handed over to the City of Athens for cultural events, renamed the “Technopolis Park at Gazi

erhouse operation was restored in 2004 and handed over to the City of Athens for cultural events, renamed the “Technopolis Park at Gazi”. In 2011 a group of top-tier museum experts, engineers and historians was hired to create what is

now known as the Industrial Gas Museum. A quick visit before you rejoin the standard sightseeing circuit will convince you it was well worth the wait. A decadeby-decade narrative, showcasing industrial heritage, entrepreneurship, factory

THEATRE

The Trojan Women
the world around them falls to pieces? Euripides’ Trojan Women serves as a warning act in the dead calm that follows every major disaster. 32 musicians and 14 actors perform a musical reading of the ancient Greek classic, charting the triumph of the victors through the suffering and devastation of the defeated 

August 23 & 24 at the ancient theatre of Epidaurus (www.greekfestival.gr) HOW does life go on after a major defeat? How do people define themselves when

ARCHAEOLOGY

Bréal Cup

ART 

August 28 at the Acropolis Museum (15 Dionysiou Areopagitou St, tel 210-9000900, www.theacropolismuseum.gr). THE ACROPOLIS Museum presents the historic ‘Bréal Cup’ awarded to Spyros Louis, the winner of the marathon race at the inaugural Modern Olympic Games in 1896. The silver cup, donated by the famous philhellene and linguist Michel Bréal, was acquired by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation at an auction held at Christie’s. The Cup will be displayed in the Acropolis Museum foyer with free entry during Museum opening hours

Passages of Substance 
till September 8 at the Byzantine and Christian Museum (22 Vas. Sofias Ave, tel 213-2139-572, www.byzantinemuseum.gr) THE INSTALLATION «Passages of Substance» by Kalliopi Lemos engages in a mental dialogue with Soren Kierkegaard, the father of Christian existentialism. A long wooden boat carries twelve, semi-abstract haunted heads as a symbol of the lonely search for selfawareness. This work was created to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Danish philosopher and religious thinker’s birth

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working conditions and old/new forms of energy unfolds before the visitors’ very eyes through original objects, equipment, photographs, audio testimonials and video projections that will change the way you perceive industry forever.  The Industrial Gas Museum (100 Pireos St, Gazi, tel 210-3475518, 210-345-3548) is open yearround. Summertime opening hours (April-October) are: Tue – Sun, 10am -6pm. For more information, visit www.technopolis-athens.com

FRIDAY 5 AUGUST 2013

PLANNING AHEAD

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Time, Form, Concept 
till September 1 at the National Archaeological Museum (1 Tositsa St, tel 210-8217-724, www.namuseum.gr)

International Classical Music Festival of the Cyclades 
till August 24 at the Apollo Theatre (Ermoupolis, Syros, tel 22810-85192, www.festivalcyclades.com)

THIS AGGELIKA Korovessi showcase includes a retrospective selection of the artist’s works from the late 1980s to the present day, as well as works specifically created for the museum halls. Exploring the relationship between contemporary and ancient Greek sculpture, it provides the visitor with an opportunity to compare and contemplate art, not only from an artistic point of view but also from a sociological, philosophical and historical perspective

THE 9TH International Classical Music Festival of the Cyclades will be showcasing some of the world’s top talent on the island of Syros with a view to mobilizing classical music lovers to visit Greece, turning this trip into an annual pilgrimage. The festival’s programme includes a three-day tribute to Giuseppe Verdi, to be hosted at the Apollo Theatre, once a wooden house serving military troupes, now transformed into Syros’ crown jewel

50 Years Since Grigoris Lambrakis’ Assassination 
till December 31 at the Hellenic Parliament Foundation’s Exhibition Hall (14 Amalias Ave, http://foundation.parliament.gr).

THE HELLENIC Parliament Foundation presents an exhibition depicting the violent attack against two Greek MPs, Grigoris Lambrakis and George Tsarouhas, on May 22 1963, in Thessaloniki. The life and times of the two MPs are illustrated through digital photos, newspapers, journals, letters, handwritten notes, artworks and films. The exhibition sheds light on the literary, artistic and media aspects of the events and their significance, then and now

Bedrooms 
till September 2 at Metamatic:taf (5 Normanou St, Monastiraki, tel 210-323-8757, www.theartfoundation.gr).

Deste Prize 2013 
till September 30 at the Museum of Cycladic Art (4 Neofytou Douka St, Kolonaki, tel 210-722-8321, www.cycladic.gr).

BEDROOMS is an archive of twenty-four bedrooms photographed between June and July 2012 by decaArchitecture, documenting the prevalent typologies of Athenians’ sleeping quarters along with the emerging cultural diversity hidden inside the generic framework of the city fabric. The installation was first presented at the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale

THE SIX shortlisted artists for the Deste Prize 2013 - Marianna Christofides, Elias Papaeliakis, Michail Pirgelis, Kostas Sahpazis, Maria Theodorakis, Alexandros Tzannis - will present work in an exhibition hoping to engage a younger audience, bring the public up to date with developments in contemporary cultural production and open up a dynamic space for the exchange of ideas

Modern Greek Art: Treasures from the Averoff Museum 
till September 20 at the B&M Theocharakis Foundation (9 Vass Sofias Ave & 1 Merlin St, tel 210-361-1206, www.thf.gr).

TREASURES from the excellent Evangelos Averoff collection, along with the museum’s latest acquisitions, reveal a new aspect of Greek painting from the 19th century until today. Ancient artefacts, icons, post-Christian and religious items, jewellery, guns and books are a few of the collectibles revealing Evangelos Averoff’s love for Greek culture

Connections 
till the fall at Sofitel Athens Airport (Athens International Airport “Eleftherios Venizelos”, Spata, tel 210-354-4000, www.sofitel.com)

THE SOFITEL Athens Airport is hosting works from the “Connections” collection of internationally renowned Greek artist Mark Hadjipateras. His works are exhibited throughout the hotel (lobby, entrance, bar), while the famous Jongleur sculpture is displayed outside the front entrance, greeting hotel guests and travellers passing through Athens International Airport

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TRAVEL

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

The Miracle Worker
Pilgrims throng to the island of Tinos on August 15 to seek the blessing of the Virgin Mary
By Maria Paravantes he arrival of a ferryboat to any Greek island has always been good cause for celebration. In the late ’60s and ’70s, it meant foodstuffs and goodies from relatives in Athens. In the ’80s and early ’90s it transported tourists, their odd habits, fresh outlook and, of course, money. And today, the “vapori” (the ship) signifies change, something that will break the day’s routine and offer a welcome distraction from the often unbearably slow-paced life of the isle. The only shipload of people that begs to differ pulls into the harbour of the Cycladic island of Tinos early in the morning of August 15. This is no ordinary day and these are not your usual tourists. As the vessel’s flap door drops open, swarms of people, many dressed in black, others dragging whining children, some in wheelchairs and others with canes, barely able to walk, emerge in an eager thrust. Hardcore believers get down on their knees, one behind the other, and take their place on a dark red carpet that runs along the port, spiraling through town up the main road to the church of the Panagia (Virgin Mary). This Virgin Mother is unlike others found in Greece. She is the Miracle Worker. This is the “Panagia tis Tinou”, which since 1823, when her icon was discovered, has allegedly performed countless miracles. On this day, a feast is held commemorating the Dormition of the Virgin Mary (Koimisis tis

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The Church of the Panagia (Virgin Mary)

Theotokou, meaning Her “falling asleep” and ascension). Orthodox Christians across the globe venerate the Holy Mother. On Tinos, this day has added significance as it is here, under the massive marble church, that her icon was found.

The vision
On July 1822, a nun, Pelagia from the “Our Lady of Angels” (Kyra ton Aggelon) monastery in the village of Kechrovouni, had a vision of the Virgin who revealed the location of the icon. Legend has it that she asked Pelagia to notify authorities where to excavate. Pelagia was reluctant at first but the Virgin appeared again in two more visions and she was finally convinced to take action. Months of digging went by but no icon was to be found. Instead, ancient ruins of the temple of Dionysus surfaced. The digging would stop amid disappointment and then again divine revelations would prompt new attempts. Finally, on the morning of January 30, 1823, the icon, broken in two, partially burnt and covered in soil, was unearthed. The Panagia lay

Believers crawled all the way up from the port to the church as a “tama” (a sign of devotion) to the Virgin in return for a miracle

the icon and receive its blessing. Construction work was completed in 1880 with marble brought in from the neighbouring islet of Delos.

August 15
On this day, the church, the surrounding streets and homes are elaborately decorated. The central road paved with white marble, named “Megalocharis” (The Gift Giving), overflows with visitors while the faithful stand patiently in line to worship the icon of the Panagia. Beside them are the kneeling believers who have crawled all the way up to the church as a “tama” (a sign of devotion) to the Virgin in return for Her miracle. The word “tama” derives from the verb “tazo” which means to vow or promise something. Tiny shops lining the main thoroughfare are crammed with hanging tokens and votive candles in different shapes and sizes. Worshippers stop here to carefully select the votive that best represents their needs. At the end of the staircase, leading to the main entrance of the

Pilgrims on their way...

to work her wonder. The devout come here from all over the country. Diaspora Greeks make a pilgrimage during their summer visit to the homeland. They ask for a cure, help in find a missing relative (usually sailors), guidance, or simply to thank the Holy Mother for answering their prayers. Some of the offerings are inspired works of art. One such token of gratitude is a silver orange tree one sees upon entering the church. It is said that the man who made this masterpiece in her honour was blind. The Virgin answered his prayers and he offered an exquisitely crafted orange tree of silver as it was the first thing he saw upon gaining his eyesight. Many of the dedications (votives) are located in a specially created museum in the courtyard of the church. The museum also houses the medals of Olympic champions Stelios Miyiakis (wrestling) and Pyrros Dimas (weightlifter) who dedicated them to the Panagia for her divine “intervention”. Besides serving as a temple of prayer, the Panagia of Tinos-The

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deep in the backyard of Tinos local Antonis Doxaras’ yard. It was a miracle... The news spread like wildfire throughout a country enveloped in a bloody revolution against 400 years of Ottoman rule. It was seen as a divine sign. The villagers immediately began building a temple in her honour on the spot where the icon was found and Independence fighters rushed to the island to worship

church on your left, barely visible under the dedications (“tamata”), is the small unassuming icon. Around it hang thousands of votive offerings made of gold, silver, bronze, and wood. The offerings are in the shape of arms, legs, eyes and any other failing human organ that needs a miracle to be healed. Some are artsy, others plain, and few are kitschy. But all humbly ask for the same thing. For the Virgin

Holy Foundation of the Evaggelistria, founded in 1825, is a selfgoverned and self funded charitable institution. Utilising dedications, contributions and donations, it is active in charity work, education, scholarship and welfare and is run by a committee made up of Orthodox Tinians and presided over by the Metropolitan Bishop of the Cyclades. G On the road again… Ships to Tinos depart daily from the ports of Rafina, Piraeus or Lavrio. The trip lasts anywhere between three to five hours depending on the ferry service. Visiting Tinos is best in September or June or during Orthodox Easter. G Settle down… in any of the seaside villages of Tinos, including Ysternia, Agios Yiannis Porto, Agios Romanos, Agios Sostis, Agios Fokas. G Indulge in … “kopanisti” cheese, “louza” ham, baby artichokes with eggs (“froutalia”), tomato fritters (“tomatokeftedes”), dishes with capers and of course fresh fish. For the sweet tooth: sweet cheese pies, fritters with thyme honey, “amygdalota” (Greek macaroons), Tinos’ famed “pastel” (sesame and honey bar) wrapped in lemon tree leaves. G Don’t forget to buy… capers, baby artichokes, sun dried tomatoes, “kopanisti” cheese, “louza” ham, “pasteli”, “amygdalota”. Local producers sell in the open-air market (“laiki”) in Tinos town. Ask for directions. G Truth or dare… make sure to go to at least one “panigyri” open-air fair held usually in the church courtyard or central square with traditional instrumentalists, song, island dance, food and wine.

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

SHIPPING

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Spyros Polemis:

There is no question that during a downturn there are opportunities to be had and Greek shipowners have already demonstrated they can navigate stormy seas - according to Spyros Polemis, chairman and managing director of Seacrest Shipping, whose family involvement in the industry stretches back over 200 years. A former chairman of the International Chamber of Shipping, Polemis stresses the industry’s crucial role in global economy and is upbeat about the future of Greek shipping

‘Without shipping, the world would freeze and starve’

By Angeliki Xylaki Athens Views: Your family has been involved in the maritime tradition for more than 200 years. What business model did your ancestors have, and is it still applicable today? Spyros Polemis: My family does indeed have a history in shipping of over 200 years, from both sides of the family, my father’s and mother’s families. The business model in the early years was that they would invest as a family but they would also invite other seafarers to participate. The male members were almost always captains; brothers would sometimes serve together, rotating the position of master between them on different voyages, and whenever they could they would invest in a new vessel. The crew were almost always from the same island or area as the family, and this made for a very close-knit, small community onboard. This business model served our family well, and it has continued until today. You have been chairman and managing director of Seacrest Shipping since 1970. How has it been affected by the financial crisis? Everyone has been affected by the financial crisis, and this meant that we had to diversify from the type of investment that was more common in previous years. We had to move into a more niche-market type of ship that was not affected to the same extent. We had to adapt to the new realities and circumstances.

What is the status of the shipping industry today, particularly Greek shipping? The shipping industry is the biggest in the world. It transports over 90 percent of all raw materials and finished goods that the world’s citizens need. For example, I often say that without shipping, half the world would freeze, and the other half would starve. Globalisation would not have been possible without shipping, and this has helped to improve the standards of living for millions of people throughout the world and also created wealth. In terms of Greece, sailors and shipowners have obviously helped their country to a very great extent. From the battle of Salamis in 480 BC, to the War of Independence in 1821, to the First and Second World Wars, Greek shipping has played a very important role. Greek shipowners spent all their fortunes during the War of Independence, and Greek shipping has been contributing very large sums of money to Greece over recent years, reaching USD25 billion and more at times, and about USD180 billion during the last ten years. In addition, many shipping families have quietly been involved in many land-based projects in Greece, and have done much charitable work which is not very well known to the wider public. Do the Greeks have the same dynamic they had in previous decades to get ahead and make the most out of the recession? Greek shipping people are indeed very dynamic and very entrepreneurial, and the realities and system allow them flexibility to take initiatives and adapt to the financial crisis. There is no question that during a downturn there are opportunities, and this is something at which the Greeks excel. Overall, they have already demonstrated that they can manoeuvre well through these stormy waters and I have no doubt that they will

cause, as I said previously, the Greeks are flexible and can adapt to circumstances. Although China is a world economic power, it may not feature in shipping to the same extent it did in the past. This is because of the recent phenomenon of reverse globalisation, ie the shifting of some manufacturing closer to the wealthy consumers of the West. The replacement of existing vessels with new vessels, technologically improved and environmentally friendly, looks like a new necessity. Do you agree? You have touched upon a rather serious problem. Of course there is no question that a ship’s efficiency will continue to improve, but there has been so much hype

continue to be successful. What is the future of Greek shipping and what role will China play as a leading power in the global economy? I am optimistic about the future of the Greek shipping industry, be-

’s Who

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about the so-called new eco ships that people have not considered properly the huge CO2 footprint of building a new ship. From an environmental point of view, the CO2 emissions in creating this new vessel will be much higher than the difference in fuel consumption between an existing ship and a new, more economical vessel. This charge for new eco ships has been driven by some people who have a different agenda. As I said, it is to everyone’s advantage to continue to improve ship efficiency, as has always been the case over the past few decades, but this must be done gradually and as each existing vessel becomes obsolete. Junking perfectly good existing vessels is totally wrong. We should rather be concentrating on improving their efficiency for the rest of their useful life, as we progressively replace them with more efficient vessels. Can the shipping industry help put Greece back on the road to recovery? As I said earlier, Greek shipping has supported our country over many centuries, and this is something which has continued even during these difficult last five years; and it will not stop. What has not been publicised and is not widely known is the extent to which Greek shipping people have helped local economies around the country. This is something that has always been the case and will continue to be the case in the years to come.

BORN IN GREECE, Polemis was educated in Athens, London and the United States, where he obtained a Degree in Mechanical Engineering, majoring in Naval Architecture. Before forming Seacrest Shipping in 1970, he served with the Greek Coast Guard and later joined the family business. He is chairman and board member of several global maritime organisations, including the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Shipping Federation (ISF). Polemis conceived and spearheaded project “Hellas Liberty”, to save one of the last remaining Liberty ships in the world, originally donated to Greece by the US government, that was fully refurbished to serve as memorial to all Greek sailors who died during the Second World War. In 2009, Polemis was elected to the Board of Trustees of Stevens Institute of Technology, his alma mater, and in 2012 he was inducted to the International Maritime Hall of Fame in New York.

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ATHENSVIEWS

LIFE

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Walking on water
The disabled get to swim on their own thanks to a solarpowered chair and a fixed-track mechanism
By Karolina Tagaris and Yorgos Karahalis aralysed from the waist down, Lefteris Theofilou has spent nearly half his life bound to a wheelchair and recalls as if it were a dream the first time a solar-powered chair enabled him to swim on his own in the Greek sea. «It was unreal,» Theofilou, 52, a burly mechanic with greying hair, said as he lifted himself off his wheelchair one warm summer evening, sat on the chair and with the push of a button rode, unassisted, 20m to the shore and into the water. «It makes you feel free and able to do things you could not imagine you could do on your own,» he said. Founded by a team of Greek scientists in 2008 and covered by European and US patent laws, the «Seatrac» device operates on a fixed-track mechanism which allows up to 30 wheelchairs to be moved in and out of the water a day - all powered by solar energy. In a country with one of the world’s longest coastlines and thousands of islands, it has come as a welcome relief for many Greeks, boosting demand

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Matoula Kastrioti, 46, who suffers from multiple sclerosis, enters the sea with a «Seatrac», a solar-powered device that allows people with kinetic disabilities to enter and get out of the sea autonomously, at a beach in Alepochori, west of Athens

each year. Currently, 11 devices operate in Greece and there are plans to expand the network. But despite Seatrac’s growing appeal - it has already been exported to Cyprus and the team are in talks with architects in Croatia, France, the United Arab Emirates and Israel - it faces hur-

dles in Greece, where facilities for the disabled are poor. In the capital Athens, bumpy pavements and potholed roads make moving around difficult. Wheelchair ramps had to be installed during a July visit by German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, who is paralysed

These guys have created an incredible thing and we stumble across problems from the state. This is Third-World sloppiness

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and uses a wheelchair. Seatrac’s founders have taken advantage of Greece’s climate the country is drenched in sun almost year-round - meaning that the devices can be set up easily on beaches without an electric line to hand and taken down at the end of the season, all without damaging the environment. The team hope the device could boost tourism, the Mediterranean country’s biggest industry, but lament a lack of support by the local authorities which

bought the device for 30,000 euros each and are responsible for maintenance after the first year. Engineer Ignatios Fotiou, one of the inventors, likened the lack of support to «building a penthouse apartment without a building underneath it». At a busy beach in the coastal town of Alepochori near Athens, vandalism and theft of the solar panel are common. If something breaks, locals say it could take days for the municipality to fix it, sometimes delayed by striking workers.

Laying the tracks

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The rails of the Seatrac

Muslim faithful pray inside a makeshift mosque during Friday prayers

Often, parents watch as their teenage children use the machine as a diving board. «These guys have created an incredible thing and we stumble across problems from the state,» Theofilou said. «This is Third-World sloppiness.» Minas Georgakis, whose wife Matoula Kastrioti, 46, suffers from multiple sclerosis and is in a wheelchair, said he had to take matters into his own hands because help from the local administration «simply does not exist». With wooden planks, he built an additional ramp to allow access to the Seatrac as wheelchairs could not be driven over sand. Even so, the path leading to the device is often blocked by parked motorcycles and uncollected garbage. «I feel bitter,» Theofilou said of the lack of support to nods of agreement by Kastrioti who waited for her turn to board. «We have thousands of beaches, the most beautiful in the world, and to still not be able to swim in them?» he asked as he emerged from the crystal blue waters. (Reuters)

Still waiting for a mosque
As the Muslim holy month of Ramadan comes to an end, the capital’s immigrant worshippers still pray in basements
By Kathy Tzilivakis undreds of immigrant Muslims celebrated Eid al-Fitr, the end of Ramadan, a holy month of fasting, at the Peace and Friendship Stadium in Athens last week. The event was organised by the ministry of education and religious affairs and was attended by the ministry’s general secretary, Giorgos Kalatzis, who took the opportunity to stress the government’s commitment to diversity and shed the country’s image of xenophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment. “We welcome the cooperation with people of other religions who respect our society and our laws,” said Kalatzis. “As we Christians say, come with love and you shall find love.” According to the latest official tally, an estimated 150,000 Muslim immigrants reside in Athens; about half of them are from Pakistan. Sayed Mohammed Jamil, leader of the local Pakistani community organisation who has been living and working in Greece for more than 30 years, said: “Our philosophy and duty is to respect the traditions of our second homeland.” “It is exactly this close cooperation that serves to marginalise extremism in Greece,” added Kalatzis. Speaking about Greece’s immigrants, who make up about 10 percent of the country’s population, Kalatzis said: “The crisis is forcing many of them [immigrants] to emigrate once more - a consequence of the unfortunate events [the economic crisis and rising unemployment] in our country... Another problem is that we are losing the immigrants who have integrated into our society.” Athens is one of the few European capital cities without a mosque, even though the local Muslim community has been requesting one for nearly three decades.

Reuters

The country is drenched in sun almost year-round meaning that the devices can be set up easily on beaches without an electric line to hand and taken down at the end of the season, all without damaging the environment

In basements and stadiums

«The crisis is forcing many of them [immigrants] to emigrate once more - a consequence of the unfortunate events [the economic crisis and rising unemployment] in our country... Another problem is that we are losing the immigrants who have integrated into our society»

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FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

COMMUNITY

ATHENS VIEWS

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Golden Dawn’s Ilias Kasidiaris has threatened to take action if plans for a mosque in Athens go ahead

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The city’s estimated 120,000 Muslim immigrants currently have to squeeze into basements and other rented spaces, which have been converted into unofficial mosques. There are more than 100 unofficial mosques scattered around the city, according to the Muslim Association of Greece. Last August, Muslims were allowed to celebrate the end of Ramadan in an indoor hall of the Olympic Complex in Athens. In 2011, the state allowed Muslim immigrants to hold open-air prayers in public squares in Athens. But some groups were reportedly harassed by members of Golden Dawn (Chryssi Avghi), a party which now holds 18 seats in parliament. Some members of this ultranationalist group reportedly tried to remove one group of Muslims, but they were stopped by police. The government and most of the opposi-

tion MPs (with the exception of Golden Dawn deputies) are in agreement about the need to have an official mosque in the capital. In fact, the New Democracy party was the first to propose establishing a mosque in Eleonas, two kilometres west of central Athens, back in 2006. But even before that, former New Democracy leader and prime minister Constantine Mitsotakis had publicly defended the plans for the mosque. He had said that even a public debate on the matter would expose the country to condemnation. “As people of the diaspora, we build Orthodox churches from Australia to America and even South America and Korea,” Mitsotakis argued in 2000. Construction firms, however, are showing little interest to bid on the one-million-euro tender that is up for grabs for the construction of a mosque in Eleonas. The Greek media are reporting the reason not a single construction firm has expressed interest in a bid is fear of a backlash. Golden Dawn, for instance, has vowed to mobilise its members to prevent construction. “If a mosque is constructed for Islamist criminals in Greece, a front of 100,000 Greeks headed by Golden Dawn will be created,” party spokesman Ilias Kasidiaris told supporters at a protest rally against the mosque held in Athens in May. Protesters included young men dressed all in black and elderly Greek women dressed in nun’s habit. They chanted: «We don’t want sharia, we want Greece and Orthodoxy».

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ATHENS VIEWS

SPORTS

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Let the madness begin
The fortunes of the Athens ‘Big Three’, Olympiakos Piraeus, Panathinaikos and AEK Athens, could not be more contrasting ahead of the start of the new football season which features a revamped 18-team top flight
By Graham Wood gmwood79@hotmail.co.uk long with a summer sojourn to a Greek island coupled with sumptuous seafood and copious amounts of ouzo, if there’s one other thing that can help to escape the everyday reality of the troubled financial climate, fill us with false hope and get one all misty-eyed and optimistic, it is of course the dawn of a new football season. Finally the waiting is over and the new 2013/14 campaign is upon us. The revamped Super League kicks off this weekend and the challenge for the teams, players and fans is clear – kick the economic crisis into touch and give the sporting public something to cheer. There have been plenty of talking points for Greece’s insatiable sports media ahead of the new season, from reigning champions Olympiakos’ annual busy transfer

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Olympiakos fans expect to wrap up another title this season

Disallowed goal raises technology issue
A CONTROVERSIALLY disallowed goal in
their opening Bundesliga match left Hoffenheim fuming last week and triggered renewed calls for goal-line technology in Germany. Hoffenheim, leading Nuremberg 1-0, looked to have scored a second on the stroke of halftime when Kevin Volland skillfully chipped the ball over goalkeeper Raphael Schaefer and into the goal. Replays showed that the ball landed well behind the goal-line before bouncing back out and into play, Nuremberg players turned away in disappointment and Volland was on his way to celebrate when referee Thorsten Kinhoefer waved play on. «For the 2-0 (lead) that wasn’t, I cannot say too much,» Hoffenheim coach Markus Gisdol told reporters. «The ball was in but I cannot change that decision, can I? «If this comes (technology) then that would help towards a fair game,» he said.
Members of the media watch referee Anthony Taylor during the Goal Decision System (GDS) presentation at the Emirates Stadium in London. A text message saying «goal» sent to the referee’s watch will end disputes over whether the ball has crossed the line in the English Premier League this season. The Premier League will become the first domestic competition to adopt the camera-based technology when it kicks off on August 17

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activity to Panathinaikos’ rebuilding on a shoestring budget, and AEK Athens’ fall from grace into the third tier. Starting at the top, aside from changes in coaching and playing staff, along with the expanded format, it is difficult to see anything other than Olympiakos adding yet another title to their bulging trophy collection. The Red and Whites took the honours at a canter last season, wrapping up their 40th league crown with six matches to spare, finishing 13 points ahead of second-placed PAOK Salonica and a massive 35 points in front of Panathinaikos, who ended up down in sixth spot. The Pireaus club are perhaps the only team in the division on a sound financial footing with shipping magnate Vangelis Marinakis continuing to delve into his deep pockets to support Spanish coach Michel. Marinakis has provided the sum-

Olympiakos are perhaps the only team in the division on a sound financial footing with shipping magnate Vangelis Marinakis continuing to delve into his deep pockets to support Spanish coach Michel

mer’s Hollywood signing with the arrival of Argentina international Javier Saviola, while a host of other Latin-orientated players have been brought in, such as midfielder Miguel Torres and goalkeeper Roberto from Spain, Argentine midfielder Alejandro Dominguez and Brazilian defender Leondro Salino. The 31 year-old Saviola, who Olympiakos will reportedly pay Saviola €1.5 million annualy, was given a hero’s welcome by over 2,500 fans on his arrival in Athens. The diminutive striker admitted he was taken aback by the greeting. “I’m so happy with the reception I received from the fans on my arPanathinaikos coach Yiannis Anastasiou

rival here, the truth is that I never expected such a warm and loud welcome,” he said. “I have never experienced anything like that at any of the clubs I have played for so far. I hope I can reciprocate the fans’ passion with my football on the pitch and try to keep Olympiakos at the top of the

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game, where it deserves to be.” “From the first moment I set my foot in Greece, I have been very happy and I want to continue like this.” Although Panathinaikos have arguably never been as weak in comparison to their bitter rivals for decades, there is still plenty of intrigue in seeing how their new setup under Giannis Anastasiou based on home-grown talent will develop. Can the Greens recover from last season’s embarrassing campaign when they failed to qualify for Eu-

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

SPORTS
Panathinaikos’ star signing Marcus Berg

ATHENS VIEWS

27

Basketball

National team shine ahead of Eurobasket
THE MEN’S basketball team showed they are in fine fettle ahead of next month’s Eurobasket in Slovenia by claiming victory on French soil in the Strasbourg Friendly Tournament, beating France in the climax on August 11. Andrea Trinchieri’s (photo) team followed up an 87-85 win over Croatia and 80-52 triumph over Germany with a powerful performance against the French, running out 79-67 winners. Trincheri said: “It’s still early to draw conclusions from such friendly matches but the important thing is the fact that we played with the right mindset and clarity. I could say that it is something we have done in all three games in this tournament so I’m happy, the signs are good but we still need to work harder.”  Eurobasket takes place in Slovenia from September 4-22.

Can the Greens recover from last season’s embarrassing campaign, when they failed to qualify for Europe for the first time since 1997?

rope for the first time since 1997? New technical director Nikos Dabizas, the former Greece star with experience of England’s Premier League during his time at Newcastle United from 1998 to 2004, is hoping the new regime can make them at least a competitive force. “We want to see Panathinaikos competitive again, this is our main goal,” he said in a press conference presenting the club’s summer signings. “We want people to leave the stadium after matches feeling happy and content. The style of player and abilities that we ask for in our players are non-negotiable. We have secured a high level of player in each of the deals we have done to go with the promising younger players already here.” Panathinaikos have followed a low profile approach in their summer rebuilding, bringing in mainly loan deals in order to try and cut costs. Their highest profile arrival is Sweden striker Marcus Berg, who will shoulder the burden of goal-get-

Hoffenheim did score a second goal in the second half but squandered their lead to draw 2-2. «Whenever people have to decide there can be mistakes,» Kinhoefer told reporters, admitting he took a wrong decision. «This was one such mistake. We referees would welcome not having to deal with this but that is not the case, so we have to take the decision and today it was wrong.» The disallowed goal also triggered calls from Nuremberg players to introduce the technology needed to avoid such mistakes. «If there was technical help then that would be a help for the referees,» said Nuremberg keeper Schaefer. «This is not about making

Usain Bolt (R) of Jamaica crosses the finish line to win gold in the men’s 100 metres race during the IAAF World Athletics Championships at the Luzhniki stadium in Moscow on August 11. Bolt was made to look human by a combination of a Russian rainstorm and a fired-up Justin Gatlin (2nd R) but the Jamaican superstar was still good enough to regain his world 100m title in a surging 9.77 seconds

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Olympiakos’ Spanish coach under pressure to deliver another title

ting for the Greens. Panathinaikos have also brought in Croatia international defender Gordon Schildenfeld and 21-yearold Algerian midfielder Mehdi Abeid, on loan from Dinamo Moscow and Newcastle United, respectively. Across the capital, AEK will be conspicuous by their absence from the top flight for the first time in their illustrious 89-year history. The darkest chapter of that history was complete last season when the cash-strapped Yellows were relegated and with massive debts reportedly reaching 170 million euros ($219 million) in taxes, opted to file for bankruptcy and ‘reformat’ the club in the third tier similar to the move Scottish club Rangers undertook last season. It appears the club is now in good hands with ultra-rich oil magnate Dimitris Melissanidis

taking over and with former Greece star Traianos Dellas – one of Greece’s Euro 2004 heroes as head coach. Melissanidis, 61, has pledged to restore the club’s tarnished reputation following relegation and bankruptcy, as it prepares to start afresh in Greece’s third division, Football League 2. «Our aim is to proceed by building a team with young players who can grow with us in our new endeavours and the stadium. The point is to focus on laying a solid foundation for the new team,» Melissanidis said. «Of course, although I want to believe that in two years we will be back in the top flight, if it takes six years, then what can we do?» As usual, the best of the rest in the Super League will be headed by PAOK Salonica, who have had an eventful start to their new era under president Ivan Savvidis, a millionaire Russian politician. He jettisoned coach George Donis in the summer despite the ending the 2012/13 season runners-up, bringing in experienced Dutchman Huub Stevens. Stevens has managed to survive despite PAOK falling to Metalist Kharkiv in the Champions League qualifiers, but it will be interesting to see if Savvidis gives the veteran coach time to mould the team to his liking. PAOK’s main summer arrivals include exciting Slovakian winger Miroslav Stoch on loan from Fenerbahce, Spanish midfielder Lucas and Spanish central defender Inigo Lopez. Asteras Tripolis and Atromitos, who finished third and fourth respectively last season, are also expected to be battling at the top end of the table as they look to punch above their modest means against the traditional order.

Mike Batiste returns ‘home’
GREEK basketball welcomed back one of its most popular players and characters with the news that Mike Batiste has re-joined Panathinaikos for the 2013/14 season. The 36-year-old American power forward, spent one year in Turkey with Fenerbachce last year after ending a nine-year previous association with the Greens where he collected three Euroleague titles in 2007, 2009 and 2011, as well as nine league titles and five Greek Cup successes. The 2.03-meter player from Long Beach, California averaged 5.4 points and 2.7 rebounds in 23 Euroleague games with Fener last season.

Football

Tough European draws for Greek sides

GREECE’S UEFA Europa League representatives received awk-

ward draws in the play-offs with PAOK Salonica to face Maccabi Tel Aviv and Atromitos pitted against Dutch club AZ Alkmaar. PAOK, who crashed out of the Champions League preliminary rounds last week after losing out to Metalist Kharkiv, will play the first match against their Israeli opponents in Tel Aviv. Maccabi have a good record against Greek teams as they have knocked both Panathinaikos and Olympiakos out of European competitions in recent seasons. Peristeri outfit Atromitos will play their first game in Athens before travelling to the Netherlands for the return leg. First-leg matches will be played on August 22 with the return legs on August 29, with the winners advancing to the group stage which will be drawn in Monaco on August 30.

Bolt made to look human
them look bad. He took a decision to the best of his abilities.» Germany has ruled out adopting any goalline technology until at least 2015 despite being at the heart of major disputed goal incidents. World football’s ruling body FIFA, which bowed to pressure and approved the use of goal-line technology last year, chose a system produced by German-based GoalControl for this year’s Confederations Cup and the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. England’s Premier League will become the first domestic competition to adopt the camera-based technology when it kicks off on August 17. (Reuters)

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ATHENS VIEWS

Weekly TV Guide
Saturday 17 August
06.00 Eden’s Secrets, GR series 07.00 Don’t be Afraid Of Fire, GR series 07.50 Women GR series 09.00 Oh Eleni, GR series 10.00 So Delicious, GR cooking 11.00 Sweet Alchemy, GR cooking 12.00 The Good Time GR series 13.20 Small Middle Class, GR series 14.00 News 14.50 My Name Is Vangelis, GR series 15.50 L.A.P.D., GR series 16.25 News in Brief 16.50 Family Hurts, GR series 18.00 The Red Room, GR series 20.00 News 21.15 Dr Cook, GR cooking 22.30 Safe Sex, GR series 00.30 News 00.45 Burn The Script, GR entertainment

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Friday 16 August
05.45 Eden’s Secrets, GR series 06.45 Morning MEGA, GR current affairs 10.00 My Morning, GR entertainment 12.00 The Good Time, GR series 13.10 Small Middle Class, GR series 14.00 News 15.00 Men No Longer Exist, GR series 15.50 Unusual Suspects, GR series 17.00 News in Brief 17.10 Oi Autheretoi, GR series 18.00 Irthe kai Edese, GR series 19.00 A Star Is Born, Turkish series 20.00 News 21.15 Fatal Beauty, Turkish series 22.30 50/50 GR series 23.40 Justified, US series 00.50 News 01.00 Unbelievable and Greek, GR satirical

Sunday 18 August
06.00 Eden’s Secrets, GR series 07.00 Don’t be Afraid Of Fire, GR series 07.50 Women GR series 09.00 Oh Eleni, GR series 09.40 So Delicious, GR cooking 10.40 Travelling, GR 12.00 The Good Time, GR series 13.10 Small Middle Class, GR series 14.00 News 14.50 My Name Is Vangelis, GR series 15.50 L.A.P.D., GR series 16.45 News in Brief 16.50 Family Hurts, GR series 18.00 The Red Room, GR series 20.00 News 21.15 Seven Deadly Mother-in-Laws, GR series 24.00 Protagonists, GR documentary 01.15 News

Monday 19 August
05.45 Eden’s Secrets, GR series, 06.45 Morning MEGA, GR current affairs 10.00 My Morning, GR entertainment 12.00 The Good Time, GR series 13.10 Small Middle Class, GR series 14.00 News 15.00 Men No Longer Exist, GR series 16.00 Deadly Beauty, Turkish series 17.00 News in Brief 17.10 Oi Autheretoi, GR series 17.50 Irthe kai Edese, GR series 18.50 A Star Is Born, Turkish series 20.00 News 21.15 Clinical Case, GR series 22.30 50/50, GR series 23.40 Justified, US series 00.50 News 01.00 Unbelievable and Greek, GR satirical

06.00 A Woman And A Car, GR series 07.00 Morning ANTENNA, GR current affairs 11.00 FTHIS, GR lifestyle 13.00 News 13.30 Family Life, GR series 14.30 Constantine and Helen’s, GR series 15.30 Hara’s Cafe, GR series 16.50 Karadayi, Turkish series 18.00 News with Sign Language 18.10 Blind Date, Argentinian series 19.10 Crimes 20.00 News 21.00 BAM, GR entertainment 22.15 Wedding Rehearsal, GR series 23.15 X-Factor Audition, GR 24.00 All Hot, GR entertainment

06.00 Waves of Love, Croatian series 07.00 Friends, GR series 08.00 Lifting, GR 09.00 My Sweetest Lie, GR series 10.00 Greek Film 12.00 You Will Find Your Teacher, GR series 13.00 News 13.30 Coneheads, US film 15.20 Litsa.com, GR series 16.50 Horoscope Wars, GR series 17.50 News with Sign Language 18.00 Working Woman, GR series 20.00 News 21.00 Greek theatre 00.45 Entourage, US series

06.00 Waves of Love, Croatian series 07.00 Friends, GR series 08.00 Lifting, GR 09.00 My Sweetest Lie, GR series 10.00 Greek Film 12.00 You Will Find Your Teacher, GR series 13.00 News 13.30 Mother, US film 15.40 Litsa.com, GR series 16.50 Horoscope Wars, GR series 17.50 News with Sign Language 18.00 Working Woman, GR series 20.00 News 21.15 Dabangg, India film, 23.50 The Godfather, US film

06.00 A Woman And A Car, GR series 07.00 Morning ANTENNA, GR current affairs 11.00 FTHIS, GR lifestyle 12.50 TV Quiz(1st part), GR 13.00 News 13.30 TV Quiz(2nd part), GR 13.40 Family Life, GR series 14.40 TV Quiz(3rd part), GR 14.50 Constantine and Helen’s, GR series 15.50 Hara’s Cafe, GR series 17.00 Karadayi, Turkish series 18.00 News with Sign Language 18.10 Blind Date, Argentina series 19.10 Crimes, GR series 20.00 News 21.00 BAM, GR entertainment 22.15 Greek series 23.15 X-Factor Audition, GR 24.00 All Hot, GR entertainment

06.00 Office: An American Workplace, US series 06.20 F+M Live, GR entertainment 08.20 Duck Dodgers 08.45 Tom And Jerry Kids 09.10 Krypto The Super Dog 09.40 Baby Looney Tunes 10.20 Xiaolin Showdown 11.00 Pokeman 11.10 A Pup Named Scooby Doo 11.40 Batman:The Brave And The Bold 12.10 Sylvester And Tweety Mysteries 12.40 Ben 10 Alien Force 13.00 Generator Rex 13.30 Road Runner Show 14.00 News 14.30 The Scarecrow, US film animation 16.00 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, US series 16.30 Mike And Molly, US series 17.30 News with Sign Language 17.45 Christine, US series 18.45 Joey, US series 19.45 News 21.00 Without A Trace US series 22.00 Spartacus, US film

06.40 Pokemon 07.00 Pirates Of Dark Water 07.30 Xiaolin Showdown 08.00 Thomas And Friends 08.10 Polly Pocket 08.15 Firehouse Tales 08.45 Peppa Pig 09.00 Tom And Jerry Kids 09.30 Lazy Town 10.00 Baby Looney Tunes 10.30 Scooby Doo 11.00 Thundercats 11.30 Bayblade Metal Fury 12.00 Max Adventures 12.30 Ben 10 Alien Force 13.00 Bugs Bunny 13.30 Wallace And Gromit: The Cruise Of the Were-Rabbit, UK film animation 15.15 Friends, US series 16.30 $ *! My Dad Says, US series 17.30 News with Sign Language 17.45 Gossip Girl, US series 18.45 House M.D., US Series 19.45 News 21.00 Take The Lead, US film 23.30 Batman, US film

06.40 Pokemon 07.00 Pirates Of Dark Water 07.30 Xiaolin Showdown 08.00 Thomas And Friends 08.10 Polly Pocket 08.15 Firehouse Tales 08.45 Peppa Pig 09.00 Tom And Jerry Kids 09.30 Lazy Town 10.00 Baby Looney Tunes 10.25 Barbie: Life In The Dream House 10.30 Scooby Doo 11.00 Max Steel 11.30 Beyblade Metal Fury 12.00 Transformers Prime 12.30 Ben 10 Alien Force 13.00 Bugs Bunny 13.30 The Goonies, US film 15.15 Friends, US series 16.30 $ *! My Dad Says, US series 17.30 News with Sign Language 18.00 National lampoon’s Senior Trip, US film 19.45 News 21.00 Killer Wave, US film 00.45 Frantic, US film

06.00 American Idol, US talent show 07.00 MacGyver US series 07.45 TV Sales 08.00 Akata Makata Me Ta Zouzounia, GR children’s 09.45 TV Sales 10.00 La Patrona, US/Mexican series 11.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 12.00 News 12.50 What Are We Eating Today Mum? GR cooking 14.00 Glee, US series 15.00 Pedes, GR entertainment 17.25 News with Sign Language. 17.30 Family Stories, GR reality 18.30 News 20.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 21.00 Two And A Half Men, US series 22.00 Glee, US series 23.00 Real Love Stories, GR series 24.00 Constable Bekas’ Stories, GR series

06.00 MacGyver US series 08.00 Akata Makata Me Ta Zouzounia, GR children’s 10.00 Happiness, GR Entertainment 14.00 News 14.15 How Clean Is Your House? UK series 15.00 30’Meals, UK cooking 16.00 Mr Bean, UK comedy 17.00 News with Sign Language. 17.05 Ping, UK film 19.00 News 20.00 The Nanny, US series 21.00 Greek Film 22.45 Resurrecting The Champ, US Film

06.00 Office: An American Workplace, US series 06.20 F+M Live, GR Entertainment 08.20 Duck Dodgers 08.45 Tom And Jerry Kids 09.10 Krypto: The Super Dog 09.40 Baby Looney Tunes 10.20 Xiaolin Showdown 11.00 Pokemon 11.10 A Pup Named Scooby Doo 11.40 Batman: The Brave And The Bold 12.10 Sylvester And Tweety Mysteries 12.40 Ben 10 Alien Force 13.00 Generator Rex 13.30 Road Runner Show 14.00 News 14.30 Superman Doomsday, US film animation 16.00 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, US series 16.30 Mike And Molly, US series 17.30 News with Sign Language 17.45 Christine, US series 18.45 Joey, US series 19.45 News 21.00 Without A Trace US series 22.00 We Were Soldiers Once, US film 00.45 Cold Case, US series

06.00 MacGyver US series 08.00 Akata Makata Me Ta Zouzounia, GR children’s 10.00 Happiness, GR Entertainment 14.00 News 14.10 How Clean Is Your House? UK series 15.00 30’ Meals. UK cooking 16.00 Mr Bean, UK series 17.00 News with Sign Language. 17.05 Greek Film 19.00 News 20.00 The Nanny, US series 21.00 Fracture, US film 23.00 Constantine, US film

06.00 Animal Kingdom Tour, documentary 07.00 Planet Earth, BBC documentary 08.00 Predator X, BBC documentary 10.00 World’s Toughest Fixes, NG documentary 11.00 Lonely Planet, BBC documentary 12.00 How Clean Is Your House? UK reality 13.00 Top Chef, US cooking 14.00 It’s Me Or The Dog, UK/US reality 15.00 Mr Bean, UK comedy 15.45 Mythbusters, UK series 16.45 Excellent Kitchen, GR cooking 17.50 Chef on Air, GR cooking 18.45 Traction, GR series 19.30 Big, Bigger, Biggest, UK series 20.30 Deadly 60, BBC series 21.00 News 22.00 Common Law, US series 23.00 NCIS Los Angeles, US series 24.00 The Good Wife, US series

07.00 Planet Earth, BBC documentary 08.00 Megastructure Breakdown, NG documentary 09.00 Evolutions, BBC documentary 10.00 Holidays In the Danger Zone, BBC documentary 11.00 60’ Online, GR technology 12.00 Goal Without Borders, GR sport 14.00 Repairing, GR documentary 15.00 The World Upside Down, GR entertainment 16.00 Travel, GR documentary 17.00 Joy, GR magazine 19.00 Oceans BBC documentary 20.00 Lonely Planet, BBC documentary 21.00 News 22.00 I Shouldn’t Be Alive, documentary 23.00 Galapos, BBC documentary 24.00 Deadly Women, Documentary

07.00 Planet Earth, BBC documentary 08.00 Megastructure Breakdown, NG documentary 09.00 Famous Greeks, GR documentary 10.00 The New Files, GR documentary 11.30 Battles of The Greeks, GR documentary 12.30 In Action, GR current affairs 13.20 Bike Action, GR entertainment 14.00 Tastes Of Nature, GR cooking 15.00 Top Chef, Just Deserts, US cooking 16.00 Travel, GR documentary 17.00 Joy, GR magazine 19.00 Oceans BBC documentary 20.00 Wonders Of The Solar System, BBC documentary 21.00 News 22.00 Goal, GR athletic 23.00 Nature’s Great Events , BBC documentary 24.00 Ascent Of Money, BBC documentary

06.00 American Idol, US talent show 07.00 MacGyver US series 07.45 TV Sales 08.00 Akata Makata Me Ta Zouzounia, GR children’s 09.45 TV Sales 10.00 La Patrona, US/Mexican series 11.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 12.00 News 12.50 What Are We Eating Today Mum? GR cooking 14.00 Glee, US series 15.00 Pedes, GR entertainment 17.25 News with Sign Language. 17.30 Family Stories, GR reality 18.30 News 20.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 21.00 Two And A Half Men, US series 22.00 Glee, US series 23.00 Real Love Stories, GR series 24.00 Constable Bekas’ Stories, GR series

07.40 Spongebob 08.05 Spongebob 08.30 Dora The Explorer 08.55 Wonder Pets 09.20 Go Diego Go 09.45 Team Umizoomi 10.10 Bubble Guppies 10.35 Chalkzone 11.00 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 11.30 Mighty B 11.55 My Life As A Teenage Robot 12.20 Rugrats 12.55 Hey Arnold 13.20 Penguins Of Madgascar 13.45 Tuff Puppy 14.15 The X’s 14.45 Fan Boy And Chum Chum 15.15 Spongebob 15.45 Avatar 16.15 Monsuno 16.45 Kung Fu Panda 17.15 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 17.45 Tak And The Power Of Ju Ju 18.10 Tuff Puppy 18.35 Back At The Barnyard 19.00 Fairly Odd Parents 19.30 Big Time Rush 20.00 Victorious 20.30 Bucket And Skinner’s Epic Adventures 21.00 How To Rock 21.30 I Carly 22.00 Spongebob Squarepants 22.30 Monsuno 23.00 Penguins Of Madagascar 23.30 Avatar

07.15 Wonder Pets 07.40 Wonder Pets 08.05 Dora The Explorer 08.30 Dora The Explorer 08.55 Team Umizoomi 09.20 Go Diego Go 09.45 Bubble Guppies 10.10 Winx 10.35 Monsuno 11.00 Fan Boy And Chum Chum 11.30 Tak And The Power Of Ju Ju 11.55 El Tigre 12.20 Planet Sheen 12.55 Sponge Bob 13.20 Kung Fu Panda 13.45 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 14.15 Power Rangers Samurai 14.45 Penguins Of Madagascar 15.15 Marathon. Hey Arnold 16.45 Supah Ninja 17.15 The Legend Of Korra 17.45 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 18.10 Kung Fu Panda 18.35 Back At The Barnyard 19.00 Fairly Odd Parents 19.30 Big Time Rush 20.00 Victorious 20.30 Bucket And Skinner’s Epic Adventures 21.00 How To Rock 21.30 I Carly 22.00 Spongebob Squarepants 22.30 Monsuno 23.00 Penguins Of Madagascar 23.30 Avatar

07.15 Wonder Pets 07.40 Wonder Pets 08.05 Dora The Explorer 08.30 Dora The Explorer 08.55 Team Umizoomi 09.20 Go Diego Go 09.45 Bubble Guppies 10.10 Winx 10.35 Monsuno 11.00 Fan Boy And Chum Chum 11.30 Tak And The Power Of Ju Ju 11.55 El Tigre 12.20 Planet Sheen 12.55 Sponge Bob 13.20 Kung Fu Panda 13.45 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 14.15 Power Rangers Samurai 14.45 Penguins Of Madagascar 15.15 Marathon. Hey Arnold 16.45 Supah Ninja 17.15 The Legend Of Korra 17.45 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 18.10 Kung Fu Panda 18.35 Back At The Barnyard 19.00 Fairly Odd Parents 19.30 Big Time Rush 20.00 Victorious 20.30 Bucket And Skinner’s Epic Adventures 21.00 How To Rock 21.30 I Carly 22.00 Spongebob Squarepants 22.30 Monsuno 23.00 Penguins Of Madagascar 23.30 Avatar

06.00 Front Line, GR current affairs 10.00 World’s Toughest Fixes, NG documentary 11.00 Lonely Planet, BBC documentary 12.00 How Clean Is Your House? UK reality 13.00 Top Chef, UK cooking 14.00 It’s Me Or The Dog, UK/US reality 15.00 Mr Bean, UK comedy 15.45 Mythbusters, UK series 16.45 Excellent Cooking, GR cooking 17.50 Chef on Air, GR Cooking 18.45 Traction, Greek series 19.30 Big, Bigger, Biggest, UK documentary 20.30 Deadly 60, BBC documentary 21.00 News 22.00 Common Law, US series 23.00 Sport’s Issues, GR

07.15 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 07.40 Spongebob 08.05 Spongebob 08.30 Dora The Explorer 08.55 Wonder Pets 09.20 Go Diego Go 09.45 Team Umizoomi 10.10 Bubble Guppies 10.35 Chalkzone 11.00 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 11.30 Mighty B 11.55 My Life As A Teenage Robot 12.20 Rugrats 12.55 Hey Arnold 13.20 Penguins Of Madgascar 13.45 Tuff Puppy 14.15 The X’s 14.45 Fan Boy And Chum Chum 15.15 Spongebob 15.45 Avatar 16.15 Monsuno 16.45 Kung Fu Panda 17.15 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 17.45 Tak And The Power Of Ju Ju 18.10 Tuff Puppy 18.35 Back At The Barnayard 19.00 Fairly Odd Parents 19.30 Big Time Rush 20.00 Victorious 20.30 Bucket And Skinner’s Epic Adventures 21.00 How To Rock 21.30 I Carly 22.00 Spongebob Squarepants 22.30 Monsuno 23.00 Penguins Of Madagascar 23.30 Avatar

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Weekly TV Guide
Wednesday 21 August
05.45 Eden’s Secrets, GR series, 06.45 Morning MEGA, GR current affairs 10.00 My Morning, GR entertainment 12.00 The Good Time, GR series 13.10 Small Middle Class, GR series 14.00 News 15.00 Men No Longer Exist, GR series 16.00 Deadly Beauty, Turkish series 17.00 News in Brief 17.10 Oi Autheretoi, GR series 17.50 Irthe kai Edese, GR series 18.50 A Star Is Born, Turkish series 20.00 News 21.15 Clinical Case, GR series 22.30 50/50, GR series 23.40 Justified, US series 00.50 News 01.00 Unbelievable and Greek, GR satirical

ATHENS VIEWS

29

Tuesday 20 August
05.45 Eden’s Secrets, GR series, 06.45 Morning MEGA, GR current affairs 10.00 My Morning, GR entertainment 12.00 The Good Time, GR series 13.10 Small Middle Class, GR series 14.00 News 15.00 Men No Longer Exist, GR series 16.00 Deadly Beauty, Turkish series 17.00 News in Brief 17.10 Oi Autheretoi, GR series 18.00 Irthe kai Edese, GR series 19.00 Popular Lottery Draw 19.10 A Star Is Born, Turkish series 20.00 News 21.15 Clinical Case, GR series 22.30 50/50 GR series 23.40 Justified, US series 00.50 News 01.00 Unbelievable and Greek, GR satirical

Thursday 22 August
05.45 Eden’s Secrets, GR series, 06.45 Morning MEGA, GR current affairs 10.00 My Morning, GR entertainment 12.00 The Good Time, GR series 13.10 Small Middle Class, GR series 14.00 News 15.00 Men No Longer Exist, GR series 16.00 Deadly Beauty, Turkish series 17.00 News in Brief 17.10 Oi Autheretoi, GR series 17.50 Irthe kai Edese, GR series 18.50 A Star Is Born, Turkish series 20.00 News 21.15 Clinical Case, GR series 22.30 50/50, GR series 23.40 Drop Dead Diva, US series 00.50 News 01.00 Unbelievable and Greek, GR satirical

THE REAL story of a dance teacher who believed in the talent of a group of problem kids Starring: Antonio Banderas, Yaya Alafia, Rob Brown

SATURDAY STAR 21.00 Take The Lead (Drama/Music)

06.00 A Woman And A Car, GR series 07.00 Morning ANTENNA, GR current affairs 11.00 FTHIS, GR lifestyle 12.50 TV Quiz(1st part), GR 13.00 News 13.30 TV Quiz(2nd part), GR 13.40 Family Life, GR series 14.40 TV Quiz(3rd part), GR 14.50 Constantine and Helen’s, GR series 15.50 Hara’s Cafe, GR series 17.00 Karadayi, Turkish series 18.00 News with Sign Language 18.10 Blind Date, Argentina series 19.10 Crimes, GR series 20.00 News 21.00 BAM, GR entertainment 22.15 Greek series 23.15 X-Factor Audition, GR 24.00 All Hot, GR entertainment

06.00 A Woman And A Car, GR series 07.00 Morning ANTENNA, GR current affairs 11.00 FTHIS, GR lifestyle 12.50 TV Quiz(1st part), GR 13.00 News 13.30 TV Quiz(2nd part), GR 13.40 Family Life, GR series 14.40 TV Quiz(3rd part), GR 14.50 Constantine and Helen’s, GR series 15.50 Hara’s Cafe, GR series 17.00 Karadayi, Turkish series 18.00 News with Sign Language 18.10 Blind Date, Argentina series 19.10 Crimes, GR series 20.00 News 21.00 BAM, GR entertainment 22.15 Greek series 23.15 X-Factor Audition, GR 24.00 All Hot, GR entertainment

06.00 A Woman And A Car, GR series 07.00 Morning ANTENNA, GR current affairs 11.00 FTHIS, GR lifestyle 12.50 TV Quiz(1st part), GR 13.00 News 13.30 TV Quiz(2nd part), GR 13.40 Family Life, GR series 14.40 TV Quiz(3rd part), GR 14.50 Constantine and Helen’s, GR series 15.50 Hara’s Cafe, GR series 17.00 Karadayi, Turkish series 18.00 News with Sign Language 18.10 Blind Date, Argentina series 19.10 Crimes, GR series 20.00 News 21.00 BAM, GR entertainment 22.15 Greek series 23.15 X-Factor Audition, GR 24.00 All Hot, GR entertainment

(Drama/Sport) UP AND COMING sports reporter rescues a homeless man ("Champ") only to discover that he is, in fact, a boxing legend believed to have passed away. What begins as an opportunity to resurrect Champ's story and escape the shadow of his father's success becomes a personal journey as the ambitious reporter re-examines his own life and his relationship with his family. Starring: Samuel L. Jackson, Josh Hartnett, Kathryn Morris

SATURDAY ALPHA 22.45 Resurrecting The Champ

06.00 Office: An American Workplace, US series 06.20 F+M Live, GR Entertainment 08.20 Duck Dodgers 08.45 Tom And Jerry Kids 09.10 Krypto: The Super Dog 09.40 Baby Looney Tunes 10.20 Xiaolin Showdown 11.45 Pokemon 11.10 A Pup Named Scooby Doo 11.40 Batman:The Brave And The Bold 12.10 Sylvester And Tweety Mysteries 12.40 Ben 10 Alien Force 13.00 Generator Rex 13.30 Road Runner Show 14.00 News 14.30 Batman: Gotham Knight, US film animation 16.00 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, US series 16.30 Mike And Molly, US series 17.30 News with Sign Language 17.45 Christine, US series 18.45 Joey, US series 19.45 News 21.00 NCIS US series 22.00 True Crime, US film 00.30 Cold Case, US series

06.00 Office: An American Workplace, US series 06.20 F+M Live, GR Entertainment 08.20 Duck Dodgers 08.45 Tom And Jerry Kids 09.10 Krypto: The Super Dog 09.40 Baby Looney Tunes 10.20 Xiaolin Showdown 10.45 Pokemon 11.10 A Pup Named Scooby Doo 11.40 Batman:The Brave And The Bold 12.10 Sylvester And Tweety Mysteries 12.40 Ben 10 Alien Force 13.00 Generator Rex 13.30 Road Runner Show 14.00 News 14.30 Scooby Doo And The Cyber Chase, US film animation 16.00 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, US series 16.30 Mike And Molly, US series 17.30 News with Sign Language 17.45 Christine, US series 18.45 Joey, US series 19.45 News 21.00 NCIS US series 22.00 Miami Vice, US film 00.30 Cold Case, US series

06.00 Office: An American Workplace, US series 06.20 F+M Live, GR Entertainment 08.20 Duck Dodgers 08.45 Tom And Jerry Kids 09.10 Krypto: The Super Dog 09.40 Baby Looney Tunes 10.20 Xiaolin Showdown 10.45 Pokemon 11.10 A Pup Named Scooby Doo 11.40 Batman:The Brave And The Bold 12.10 Sylvester And Tweety Mysteries 12.40 Ben 10 Alien Force 13.00 Generator Rex 13.30 Road Runner Show 14.00 News 14.30 Daffy Duck’s Movie: Fantastic Island, US film animation 16.00 Fresh Prince Of Bel Air, US series 16.30 Mike And Molly, US series 17.30 News with Sign Language 17.45 Christine, US series 18.45 Joey, US series 19.45 News 21.00 NCIS US series 22.00 The Blind Side, US film 00.30 Cold Case, US series

A NEUROTIC, twice divorced sci-fi writer moves back in with his mum to solve his personal problems. Starring: Paul Collins, Laura Weekes, Albert Brooks

SUNDAY ANTENNA 13.30 Mother (Comedy/Drama)

SUNDAY ANTENNA 23.50

06.00 American Idol, US talent show 07.00 MacGyver US series 07.45 TV Sales 08.00 Akata Makata Me Ta Zouzounia, GR children’s 09.45 TV Sales 10.00 La Patrona, US/Mexican series 11.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 12.00 News 12.50 What Are We Eating Today Mum? GR cooking 14.00 Glee, US series 15.00 Pedes, GR Entertainment 17.25 News with Sign Language. 17.30 Family Stories, GR reality 18.30 News 20.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 21.00 Two And A Half Men, US series 22.00 Glee, US series 23.00 Real Love Stories, GR series 24.00 Constable Bekas’ Stories, GR series

06.00 American Idol, US talent show 07.00 MacGyver US series 07.45 TV Sales 08.00 Akata Makata Me Ta Zouzounia, GR children’s 09.45 TV Sales 10.00 La Patrona, US/Mexican series 11.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 12.00 News 12.50 What Are We Eating Today Mum? GR cooking 14.00 Glee, US series 15.00 Pedes, GR Entertainment 17.25 News with Sign Language. 17.30 Family Stories, GR Real Life 18.30 News 20.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 21.00 Two And A Half Men, US series 22.00 Glee, US series 23.00 Real Love Stories, GR series 24.00 Constable Bekas’ Stories, GR series

06.00 American Idol, US talent show 07.00 MacGyver US series 07.45 TV Sales 08.00 Akata Makata Me Ta Zouzounia, GR children’s 09.45 TV Sales 10.00 La Patrona, US/Mexican series 11.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 12.00 News 12.50 What Are We Eating Today, GR cooking 14.00 Glee, US series 15.00 Pedes, GR entertainment 17.25 News with Sign Language. 17.30 Family Stories, GR reality 18.30 News 20.00 Avenida Brasil, Brazilian series 21.00 Two And A Half Men, US series 22.00 Glee, US series 23.00 Real Love Stories, GR series 24.00 Constable Bekas’ Stories, GR series

THE AGING patriarch of an organized crime dynasty transfers control of his empire to his reluctant son. Starring: Marlon Brando, Al Pacino, James Caan

The Godfather (Crime/Drama)

06.00 Front Line, GR current affairs 10.00 World’s Toughest Fixes, NG documentary 11.00 Lonely Planet, BBC documentary 12.00 How Clean Is Your House? UK reality 13.00 Top Chef, US cooking 14.00 It’s Me Or The Dog, UK/US reality 15.00 Mr Bean, UK comedy 15.45 Mythbusters, UK series 16.45 Excellent Kitchen, GR cooking 17.50 Chef on Air, GR Cooking 18.45 Traction, Greek series 19.30 Big, Bigger, Biggest, UK documentary 20.30 Deadly 60, BBC documentary 21.00 News 22.00 Common Law, US series 23.15 NCIS Los Angeles, US series 24.00 The Good Wife, US series

06.00 Front Line, GR current affairs 10.00 World’s Toughest Fixes, NG documentary 11.00 Lonely Planet, BBC documentary 12.00 How Clean Is Your House? UK reality 13.00 Top Chef, US cooking 14.00 It’s Me Or The Dog, UK/US reality 15.00 Mr Bean, UK comedy 15.45 Mythbusters, UK series 16.45 Excellent Kitchen, GR cooking 17.50 Chef on Air, GR Cooking 18.45 Traction, Greek series 19.30 Big, Bigger, Biggest, UK documentary 20.30 Deadly 60, BBC documentary 21.00 News 22.00 Common Law, US series 23.15 NCIS Los Angeles, US series 24.00 The Good Wife, US series Wife, US series

06.00 Front Line, GR current affairs 10.00 World’s Toughest Fixes, NG documentary 11.00 Lonely Planet, BBC documentary 12.00 How Clean Is Your House? UK reality 13.00 Top Chef, US cooking 14.00 It’s Me Or The Dog, UK/US reality 15.00 Mr Bean, UK comedy 15.45 Mythbusters, UK series 16.45 Excellent Kitchen, GR cooking 17.50 Chef on Air, GR Cooking 18.45 Traction, Greek series 19.30 Big, Bigger, Biggest, UK documentary 20.30 Deadly 60, BBC documentary 21.00 News 22.00 Common Law, US series 23.15 NCIS Los Angeles, US series 24.00 The Good Wife, US series Wife, US series

THE STORY of the first major battle of the American phase of the Vietnam War and the soldiers on both sides that fought it Starring: Mel Gibson, Madeleine Stowe, Greg Kinnear

(Action)

MONDAY STAR 22.00 We Were Soldiers Once

07.15 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 07.40 Spongebob 08.05 Spongebob 08.30 Dora The Explorer 08.55 Wonder Pets 09.20 Go Diego Go 09.45 Team Umizoomi 10.10 Bubble Guppies 10.35 Chalkzone 11.00 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 11.30 Mighty B 11.55 My Life As A Teenage Robot 12.20 Rugrats 12.55 Hey Arnold 13.20 Penguins Of Madgascar 13.45 Tuff Puppy 14.15 The X’s 14.45 Fan Boy And Chum Chum 15.15 Spongebob 15.45 Avatar 16.15 Monsuno 16.45 Kung Fu Panda 17.15 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 17.45 Tak And The Power Of Ju Ju 18.10 Tuff Puppy 18.35 Back At The Barnayard 19.00 Fairly Odd Parents 19.30 Big Time Rush 20.00 Victorious 20.30 Bucket And Skinner’s Epic Adventures 21.00 How To Rock 21.30 I Carly 22.00 Spongebob Squarepants 22.30 Monsuno 23.00 Penguins Of Madagascar 23.30 Avatar

07.15 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 07.40 Spongebob 08.05 Spongebob 08.30 Dora The Explorer 08.55 Wonder Pets 09.20 Go Diego Go 09.45 Team Umizoomi 10.10 Bubble Guppies 10.35 Chalkzone 11.00 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 11.30 Mighty B 11.55 My Life As A Teenage Robot 12.20 Rugrats 12.55 Hey Arnold 13.20 Penguins Of Madgascar 13.45 Tuff Puppy 14.15 The X’s 14.45 Fan Boy And Chum Chum 15.15 Spongebob 15.45 Avatar 16.15 Monsuno 16.45 Kung Fu Panda 17.15 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 17.45 Tak And The Power Of Ju Ju 18.10 Tuff Puppy 18.35 Back At The Barnayard 19.00 Fairly Odd Parents 19.30 Big Time Rush 20.00 Victorious 20.30 Bucket And Skinner’s Epic Adventures 21.00 How To Rock 21.30 I Carly 22.00 Spongebob Squarepants 22.30 Monsuno 23.00 Penguins Of Madagascar 23.30 Avatar

07.15 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 07.40 Spongebob 08.05 Spongebob 08.30 Dora The Explorer 08.55 Wonder Pets 09.20 Go Diego Go 09.45 Team Umizoomi 10.10 Bubble Guppies 10.35 Chalkzone 11.00 The Adventures Of Jimmy Neutron 11.30 Mighty B 11.55 My Life As A Teenage Robot 12.20 Rugrats 12.55 Hey Arnold 13.20 Penguins Of Madgascar 13.45 Tuff Puppy 14.15 The X’s 14.45 Fan Boy And Chum Chum 15.15 Spongebob 15.45 Avatar 16.15 Monsuno 16.45 Kung Fu Panda 17.15 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 17.45 Tak And The Power Of Ju Ju 18.10 Tuff Puppy 18.35 Back At The Barnayard 19.00 Fairly Odd Parents 19.30 Big Time Rush 20.00 Victorious 20.30 Bucket And Skinner’s Epic Adventures 21.00 How To Rock 21.30 I Carly 22.00 Spongebob Squarepants 22.30 Monsuno 23.00 Penguins Of Madagascar 23.30 Avatar

CAN an over the hill journalist uncover the evidence that can prove a death row inmate's innocence just hours before his execution?. Starring: Clint Eastwood, Isaiah Washington

TUESDAY STAR 22.00 True Crime (Drama/Mystery)

BASED on the 1980's TV action/drama, this update focuses on vice detectives Crockett and Tubbs as their respective personal and professional lives become dangerously intertwined. Starring: Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Li Gong

WEDNESDAY STAR 22.00 Miami Vice (Crime)

30

ATHENS VIEWS

Playing this week!

CINEMA

FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

Action/Drama/Sci-Fi SET IN the year 2154, where the very wealthy live on a man-made space station while the rest of the population resides on a ruined Earth. A man takes on a mission that could bring equality to the polarized worlds. Starring: Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, Sharlto Copley

ELYSIUM

Action/ Thriller A DISGRACED black agent is dispatched to a remote CIA broadcast station to protect a code operator. Soon, they find themselves in a life or death struggle to stop a deadly plot before it's too late. Starring: John Cusack, Malin Akerman, Liam Cunningham

THE NUMBERS STATION

Comedy /Crime A VETERAN pot dealer creates a fake family as part of his plan to move a huge shipment of weed into the U.S. from Mexico. Starring: Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis, Emma Roberts

WE'RE THE MILLERS

Drama/Thriller A FSB officer falls in love with his agent, an American woman, who works as a trader in a Russian bank. Starring: Jean Dujardin, Cécile De France, Tim Roth

MOBIUS

Action /Adventure /Sci-Fi AFTER the crew of the Enterprise finds an unstoppable force of terror from within their own organization, Captain Kirk leads a manhunt to a war zone world to capture a oneman weapon of mass destruction. Starring: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Zoe Saldana

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

Animation /Adventure A TEENAGER finds herself transported to a deep forest setting where a battle between the forces of good and evil is taking place. She bands together with a rag tag group characters in order to save their world and ours. Starring: Colin Farrell, Josh Hutcherson, Beyoncé Knowles

EPIC

For more information

G www.stercinemas.gr G www.odeon.gr G www.villagecinemas.gr G www.cinemax.gr

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Glyfada, near golf course, 120m2, fire place, independent heating, a/c, electrical appliances, roof terrace 100m2, €1,500 per month, 210 9629056, 6978 059405

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Athens, Pangrati, 50m2, fully furnished, a/c, renovated, bright, cosy apartment. Near buses and centre. €450, all inclusive, except electricity. 210 9629056, 6978 05940

1. Transfer the cost of the classified to our bank account, through online banking or by visiting your local branch Bank: Piraeus Bank Account: ATH. TATSIS & SIA E.E. (ΑΘ. ΤΑΤΣΗΣ & ΣΙΑ Ε.Ε) Account no: 5046057981006 IBAN: GR1001720460005046057981006 BIC: PIRBGRAAXXX

Kastella, Pireaus, town house (for house and/or business use) 4 storey 365m2, verandas 165m2, full basement 45m2, 3-car parking, roof garden, sea view, 3 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, Jacuzzi tubs, 3 kitchen all built-in appliances, 3 living room, fireplaces, inox elevator on all floors, air conditioning, heat fan cool, central gas or electricity. High tech security, Dionysos marble and hardwood floors. Tel. 697 7078196

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LESSONS
Native Greek teacher tutors modern Greek as a second/ foreign language and EFL in all levels. Experienced in SEN and autism. Familiar with british KS1 and KS2 curriculum. contact tea3838@msn.com or 0044-7510710816

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FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 2013

INFORMATION
DERMATOLOGICAL HOSPITAL ANDREAS SYNGKROS tel 210 7265000 Open 24 hours daily OPHTHALMOLOGICAL HOSPITAL OPHTHALMIATRIO ATHINON tel 210 3623191/2 THESSALONIKI AGIOS DIMITRIOS tel 2310-203-121 PAPANIKOLAOU tel 2310- 357-602 PAPAGEORGIOU tel 2310-693-000 AHEPA UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL tel 2310- 993-310 YENNIMATAS tel 2310- 211-221/2 HIPPOCRATIO tel 2310-837-921/9 AGIOS PAVLOS tel 2310-493-400

ATHENS VIEWS

31

HOSPITALS 
For emergency hospitals call 1535, ambulance 166 ATHENS - PIRAEUS AGIA ELENI – SPILIOPOULIO tel 210 6410445-7, 213 2023400 AGIA OLGA – KONSTANTOPOULIO tel 210 2776612-7, 210 2799265-7 AGIA VARVARA tel 210 5301100, 210 5613468 AGII ANARGYRI tel 210 3501500, 210 3501340 AGIOS SAVVAS tel 210 6409000 AMALIA FLEMING tel 210 8030303 ASKLIPIOU VOULAS tel 213 2163000 ELPIS tel 210 6494000 ERRIKOS DYNAN tel 210 6972000 EVAGELISMOS tel 210 7201000 IPPOKRATIO tel 213 2088000, 210 7769000 KAT tel 210 6280000 KORGIALENIO BENAKIO(Erythros Stavros) tel 210 6414000 LAIKO tel 210 7456000 NIKAIA GENERAL HOSPITAL tel 213 2077000 PAMMAKARISTOS tel 210 2284855 POLIKLINIKI tel 210 5276000 SISMANOGLIO tel 210 8039911 fax 210 6137328 SOTIRIA tel 210 7763100 THRIASSIO tel 210 5534200, 210 5551501-8 TZANEIO tel 213 2081000 YIORGOS YENNIMATAS tel 210 7778901, 210 7768000 CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL AGIA SOFIA tel 210 7467000 AGLAIA KYRIAKOU tel 213 2009000 Open 24 hours , alternate days PAIDON PENDELIS tel 210 8036200 Open 24 hours on Monday and Thursday MATERNITY HOSPITAL ALEXANDRA tel 213 2162000 EL. VENIZELOU tel 210 6402000 Open 24 hours , alternate days

MUSEUMS

EMERGENCY NUMBERS
G Emergency call 112 G Police 100 G Ambulance 166 G Fire Brigade 199 G Tourist Police 171 G Forest Fire Brigade 191 G Athens Traffic Police 210 523-0111/5 G Coastguard 108 G Air Police 210 964 2000 G Greek Police (General Info) 1033 G National Helpline for missing & Exploited

Children SOS 1056
G Support Line for Children Internet Users

80011 80015
G Health Line 1535 G Doctors SOS 1016 G Doctors at Home 1151 G Useful Information OTE 14944 G Poison First Aid 210 779 3777 G Drug Squad 109 G Medical Advice 197

ACADEMY OF ATHENS, 28 Panepistimou st tel 210 336 4700 info@academyofathens.gr NEW ACROPOLIS MUSEUM, 15 Dion Areopagitou st tel 210 900 0900 info@theacropolismuseum.gr ACROPOLIS STUDIES CENTRE, 2-4 Makriyanni st tel 210 923 9381 ANCIENT AGORA, 24 Adrianou st, Thissio tel 210 321 0185 ATHENS CITY MUSEUM, 7 Paparigopoulou st, Klathmonos Sq, Athens tel 210 3231397 mveathen@otenet.gr ATHENS UNIVERSITY HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 5 Tholou & Klepsydras sts, Plaka tel 210 368 9502-54 museum@uoa.gr BENAKI MUSEUM, 1 Koumbari st & Vas Sofias, Athens tel 210 367 1000 benaki@benaki.gr BYZANTINE MUSEUM, 22 Vas Sofias, Athens tel 210 729 4926 info@byzantinemuseum.gr CENTRE FOR FOLK ART AND TRADITION 6 Ang Hatzimihali st, Plaka tel 210 324 3987 CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF TRADITIONAL POTTERY 4-6 Melidoni st, Psyrri tel 210 331 8491-6 CHILDREN’S ART MUSEUM 9 Kodrou st, Plaka tel 210 331 2750 contact@childrensartmuseum.gr CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 14 Kydathineon st, Plaka tel 210 331 2995-6 info@hcm.gr CYCLADIC & ANCIENT GREEK ART MUSEUM 4 Neofytou Douka st, Kolonaki tel 210 722 8321-3 museum@cycladic.gr DIONYSSUS THEATRE SITE Dion Areopagitou st, Athens, tel 210 322 4625 DODECANESE HOUSE OF VASSILIS & IRINI MOSKOVIS 119 Dodonis st, Sepolia tel 210 512 6611 DROSINI MUSEUM Ag Theodoron & Kyriakou sts, Kifissia, tel 210 801 2642 ELEFTHERIOS VENIZELOS MUSEUM Eleftherias Park, Vas Sofias, Athens, tel 210 722 4238 EPIGRAPHICAL MUSEUM 1 Tositsa st, Athens tel 210 823 2950 ema@culture.gr FRISSIRAS MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY

PAINTING 3-7 Monis Asteriou st, Plaka tel 210 364 7333 frissiras@lawfrissiras.gr GREEK HISTORICAL COSTUME MUSEUM 7 Dimokritou st, Kolonaki tel 210 362 9513 GOULANDRIS NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM 13 Levidou st, Kifissia tel 210 801 5870 GOUNAROPOULOS MUSEUM 6 Gounaropoulou & Frigias sts, Ano Ilissia tel 210 777 7601 info@gounaro.gr HERAKLEIDON - EXPERIENCE IN VISUAL ARTS MUSEUM 16 Herakleidon st, Thissio, tel 210 346 1981 info@herakleidon-art.gr JEWISH MUSEUM OF GREECE 39 Nikis st tel 210 322 5582 info@jewishmuseum.gr KANELLOPOULOS MUSEUM Theorias & Panos sts, Plaka tel 210 321 2313 KATINA PAXINOU MUSEUM 20 Agiou Konstantinou & 52 Menandrou sts, tel 210 522 1420 KERAMEIKOS MUSEUM 148 Ermou st, tel 210 346 3552 KAISARIANI MONASTERY Ethnikis Antistaseos Ave, Kaisariani, tel 210 723 6619 LALAOUNIS JEWELLERY MUSEUM 4 A Karyatidon & 12 Kallisperi ave, Acropolis, tel 210 922 1044 info@lalaounis-jewelrymuseum.gr MARITIME (NAUTICAL) MUSEUM Akti Themistokleous st, Piraeus, tel 210 451 6822 MELINA MERCOURI CULTURAL CENTRE 66 Iraklidon & Thessalonikis sts, Thissio, tel 210 345 2150 MUSEUM OF GREEK FOLK ART 17 Kydathineon st, Plaka tel 210 322 9031 melt@melt.culture.gr NATIONAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM 44 Patission st, tel 210 821 7724 eam@culture.gr NATIONAL ART GALLERY AND ALEXANDROS SOUTZOS MUSEUM 60 Vas Sofias & 1 Mihalakopoulou st, (close to the Hilton) tel 210 723 5857 NATIONAL GARDENS BOTANICAL MUSEUM Vas Amalias, Zappeio tel 210 721 1178 NATIONAL HISTORY MUSEUM 13 Stadiou & Kolokotroni sts, tel 210 323 7617 info@nhmuseum.gr

NATIONAL WAR MUSEUM 2 Rizari st & Vas Sofias, tel 210 724 4464 NUMISMATIC MUSEUM 12 Panepistimiou st, tel 210 364 3774 OLYMPIC ZEUS’ TEMPLE 2 Vas Olgas & Amalias st, tel 210 922 6330 OTE MUSEUM 25 Proteos st, Nea Kifissia tel 210 620 1899 ote-museum@ote.gr PARLIAMENT 2 Vas Sofias, tel 210 370 7000 infopar@parliament.gr PERANDINOS MUSEUM 14 Eforionos, Pangrati tel 210 751 3653 PHILATELIC (POSTAL) MUSEUM 2 Fokianou & 5 Panathinaikou Stadiou Sq, tel 210 751 9066 postmuseum@elta-net.gr PIRAEUS ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM 31 Harilaou Trikoupi st, Piraeus tel 210 452 1598 POPULAR (FOLK) MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS MUSEUM 1-3 Diogenis st, Aeridon Sq, Plaka tel 210 325 0198 info@instruments-museum.gr RAILWAY/TRAIN MUSEUM 4 Siokou st, Sepolia tel 210 512 6580 ROMAN FORUM SITE Pelopida & Aeolou sts, Athens tel 210 324 5220 SPATHARION MUSEUM OF SHADOW THEATRE Vas Sofias & Dimitriou Ralli st, Kastalias Sq, Maroussi tel 210 612 7245 info@karagiozismuseum.gr THEATRICAL MUSEUM 50 Akadimias st, tel 210 362 9430 TOWER OF WINDS Beginning of Aeolou St, Roman Agora, Plaka tel 210 324 5220 TSAROUHIS MUSEUM 28 Ploutarhou st, Maroussi tel 210 806 2636-7 TSIDARAKI FOLK CERAMIC MUSEUM (OLD MOSQUE) 1 Areos st,Monastiraki Sq, tel 210 324 2066 YANNIS AND ZOE SPYROPOULOS FOUNDATION 5 Phaedra st, Ekali, tel 210 921 8150 secretary@spyropoulosfoundation.org 

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