Issue 185 - February 2008 - e-mail edition

CONTENTS - USE EDIT / FIND ON YOUR TOOLBAR TO READ ARTICLES LISTED BELOW SOMETHING’S IN THE WIND - OTTERLY BRILLIANT - MAJOR ROAD MAINTENANCE WORKS A83 INVERARAY - POWER CONCORDAT - NATIONAL WOODLAND SURVEY MOVES TO ARGYLL & BUTE Father Webb and the Customs Records - VISA & MASTER CARD SCAM - MAY AFTERMATH - EKCC MEETING - SOUTH KINTYRE SENIORS FORUM - CARRADALE SURGERY SURVEY REPORT 2007 SOUP & SANDWICHES - £450 - KINTYRE INITIATIVE WORKING GROUP - BRACKLEY PROBLEMS - A BELATED REPLY - IAN MEFFAN - WIND-FARM AT COUR ? - POWER OF ATTORNEY - HOUSING OVERVIEW - PLANNING APPLICATIONS - SERVICE RECOGNITION - MRS EVELYN MACDONALD, M.B.E. - SOUTH KINTYRE SENIORS FORUM - HARBOURING - A HEALTHY PURSUIT ? - MAY AFTERMATH - GROGPORT RAINFALL - CHRISTMAS QUIZ - COMMUNITY COUNCIL MEETING HEALTH, AGE AND DISABILITY ISSUES - PENSIONERS GIFTS - NEW DOME DISCOVERED DUMPING AT CARRADALE HARBOUR - POST OFFICE CLOSURES - POST OFFICE CONSULTATION OUTCOME : JAN 2008 - HOUSING OVERVIEW - CAMPBELTOWN LOCH DEVELOPMENTS ARDCHATTAN WIND-FARM, SOUTHEND

SOMETHING’S IN THE WIND
‘Airtricity’ is proposing to apply for permission to build a wind-farm at Beinn Bhreac, near Cour, encompassing between 13 and 60 turbines with a hub height of 70m, a blade diameter of 84m and 112m to blade tip. The company has been invited to outline their plans at the East Kintyre Community Council meeting on Thursday 7th February 2008. Turbines might be brought ashore at Cour or at Campbeltown, completing their journey by crossing the B842 or using the A83 before turning east and using existing forestry tracks. If built 13 turbines would produce 29.9MW or 60 would give 138MW. In the last half of 2007 proposals by Kilchattan Wind Farm Limited were given an ‘airing through a joint venture with ‘Wind Prospect’ and ‘Ridge Wind’; details of the scheme are on page 16.

OTTERLY BRILLIANT
There have long been concerns about finding a replacement for the legendary de Havilland Twin Otter aircraft which long served Campbeltown, Islay and Barra and within the last few weeks has come the welcome news that Vancouver-based Viking Air, which acquired the type certificate and production rights to the Twin Otter from Bombardier Aerospace in early 2006, is now going to begin production of a new 19-seat Series 400 Twin Otter which will be ready for delivery sometime in 2009, it likely to sell for around £1.6 m at today's exchange rates. Incorporated in 1970, Viking Air, part of Westerkirk Capital Inc., a Canadian private investment firm with substantial holdings in the hospitality, aviation and real estate sectors, owns the Type Certificates for the de Havilland Canada DHC-1 Chipmunk, DHC-2 Beaver, DHC-2T Turbo Beaver, DHC-3 Otter, DHC-4, Caribou, DHC-5 Buffalo, DHC-6 Twin Otter and DHC-7 DASH 7 and has been providing all product support functions for these aircraft since May 2005 and a Canadian federal government Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) program, which will be administered by Industry Canada, could provide further repayable financial assistance for research and development to update the Twin Otter design for operation in the 21st century. Viking has also had positive discussions with Export Development Canada (EDC), a federal government crown corporation which can provide a number of financial services for purchasers of new Twin Otters and Viking Air has selected the interestingly named Loch Ard Otters LLC, an aircraft leasing company based in Palm Beach, Florida and owned and managed by a team with extensive experience in transportation asset financing and leasing, as their preferred partner to lease and sell the new plane. Independent market studies by Conklin & deDecker reflect a ten-year demand for over 400 new aircraft. More than 600 of the 844 de Havilland Twin Otters built between 1965 and 1988 remain in active service today and are flown by such diverse operators as commuter airlines, Antarctic and desert expeditions, inter-island and coastal taxis, para-droppers, airborne research firms and corporate transportation departments.

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The British Antarctic Survey operates four Twin Otters and, in a typical season, the planes will arrive in the Antarctic in late October and depart in early March after having flown around 1,300 hours in the Antarctic supporting some fifteen field projects and, in 2001, the Twin Otter was chosen as the only aircraft capable of performing a South Pole evacuation flight of a critical patient under extreme -60°C conditions. One of the first orders, for five aircraft, was received from Trans Maldivian Airways (TMA). The airline currently operates 16 Twin Otters built by the original manufacturer, de Havilland Canada, as seaplanes and intends to expand throughout the Maldives as tourism will cover the whole 850 kms long archipelago. TMA's managing director, Bram Steller, believes that the new Series 400 Twin Otters will allow his company to grow significantly. “Finding light, well maintained airplanes is next to impossible and often requires major refurbishing or rebuilding,” he said. “Our current fleet is wellmaintained but will benefit from the addition of new aircraft. The Twin Otter Series 400 will be perfect for our routes with more payload and more range. An additional benefit will be the standardization since all current Twin Otters on the market have all been modified out-ofstandardization." Other orders have come from Air Seychelles for two airplanes, Air Moorea for two and Zimex Aviation of Switzerland for one, these three airlines currently operating more than 25 ‘heritage’ Twin Otters. Swiss-based Zimex, whose 12 existing Twin Otters form the backbone of its current fleet, have been operating for 30 years providing reliable, worldwide aircraft support to international organizations and the oil industry in desert and remote areas. The new aircraft, on wheels, with a standard 19-seat commuter interior and basic instrumentation, will sell for around £1.6 m at today's level of exchange rates and will be offered with floats or fully amphibious or ski landing gear as customer needs demand. The new Series 400 aircraft, based on the original design of the 19-seat de Havilland Canada Series 300, will have their major components built in Victoria with aircraft assembly and customer delivery in Calgary, Alberta. It will incorporate a number of improvements based on today’s available technologies. The original Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-27 engines will be replaced by higher output PT6A-34 engines, flat-rated for better performance in all flight regimes and PT6A-35 engines and four blade propellers will be offered as optional extras. The new Twin Otter, a high winged, un-pressurized, twin engine turbine powered aircraft, will be a highly maneuverable, versatile aircraft which can be flown safely at various speeds from 80 to 160 knots. Although it is only in recent time that Loch Lomond Seaplanes has introduced 6 and 10-seat float-plane aircraft to the skies and waters of the west coast, in the 1930’s ‘British Amphibious Airlines’, founded in 1932, used two Saunders-Roe ‘Cutty Sark’ amphibious aircraft to fly from Renfrew to Greenock and Rothesay and ‘British Flying Boats Ltd.’, for a week in August 1932, operated their Saunders-Roe ‘Cloud’, named ‘Cloud of Iona’, between Greenock and Belfast and it requires little imagination now, with the prospect of the new 19-seat Series 400 Twin Otters on the way, to suggest that it might not be long before someone takes the lead and introduces a 'rail-head' service linking Glasgow and all the islands with Campbeltown, Oban, Fort William, Mallaig, Kyle of Lochalsh and inverness and with the far-flung and till now relatively isolated coastal villages of Ullapool, Gairloch and Lochinver which, in days of old, were serviced by the old MacBrayne steamers, an 'otterly brilliant' service for tourists and locals alike. Donald Kelly.

MAJOR ROAD MAINTENANCE WORKS A83 INVERARAY
WORK STARTS – THURSDAY 29TH NOVEMBER 2007 A major road maintenance contract for the A83 through Inveraray will be delivered through a £2.26M investment funded by Transport Scotland and designed and managed on their behalf by Scotland TranServ. The maintenance work which will be carried out under a 25 week contract will commence on 29th November 2007. The improvement work involves the full reconstruction of 1.5km of carriageway and most of the adjacent footways, from a point just south of the Aray Bridge through the town centre to a point 700m south of the Church. Improved drainage and street lighting forms part of the contract. The works will be phased to minimise disruption to the local community and the travelling public. In addition following extensive local consultation no work will be carried out over the Christmas, New Year and Easter holiday periods during which time the traffic management will be removed from the Trunk Road. Given the extent and nature of these works through the town centre there has been close liaison with the Community Council, Local Authority and representatives of shopkeepers and residents during the planning stage. For safely reasons the work will be regulated by traffic management and the use of temporary traffic lights. During the phases which involve footpath renewal pedestrians movements will be regulated although access to local shops will be maintained. Local businesses are aware that by contacting the onsite management team goods deliveries and uplifts will be maintained.

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Although some disruption to traffic can be expected during the works every effort will be made to minimise this. All traffic management measures are in place for the safety of residents, motorists and the workforce alike. Transport Scotland and Scotland TranServ would like to thank the public and motorists in advance for their cooperation and understanding during the planned improvement works. We look forward to delivering a new and much improved road and footpath surface which will be well served with improved drainage and street lighting.

POWER CONCORDAT
A concordat between Argyll and Bute Council and ScottishPower Renewables, was signed today (Friday 30th November) at the Here We Are Centre in Cairndow. The aim of the agreement is to get maximum benefit from renewable energy for communities throughout Argyll and Bute. Minister for Enterprise, Energy and Tourism, Jim Mather MSP, joined representatives from Argyll and Bute Council and ScottishPower Renewables to launch the concordat, marking continued collaboration in the responsible harvesting and development of renewable energy. The Council’s spokesperson for Economy, Environment and Rural Affairs, Councillor Robert Macintyre, said: "This is a very special day for Argyll and Bute. We recognise the importance of harnessing and managing in a sustainable way, our renewable resources to offset many of the problems faced by our remote and fragile areas. The Council has been extremely forward thinking in the development of renewables, with the area already producing energy from a range of sources including wind, hydro and biomass. Argyll and Bute also has many marine energy sources, both wave and tidal, and it is essential that the entire area benefits from the significant economic, social and environmental rewards which harnessing this energy has to offer. Key to ensuring that these benefits are maximised locally is the work of the Argyll, Lomond and the Islands Energy Agency (ALIenergy) which works with communities, householders, businesses and the public sector, to promote energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy. This new concordat will mark our continued commitment to comprehensive assessment of the potential for marine renewable energy in the area." Keith Anderson, Director of ScottishPower Renewables, said: “Argyll and Bute Council has been extremely proactive with the responsible development of renewables in their area and we look forward to working with them in exploring marine renewable technology for the benefit of all parties.” ScottishPower Renewables has been at the forefront of renewable development in Argyll and Bute, with pioneering projects at Beinn an Tuirc and Cruach Mhor. The company, through funding support direct to ALIenergy has also employed an Energy Education Officer since 2004, specifically to work with communities on energy saving and renewables projects and initiatives. Jim Mather MSP for Argyll and Bute said: "What a way to celebrate St Andrew’s Day. This is an innovative and much welcome partnership that will see Argyll and Bute play a leading role in developing marine renewable technology. I look forward to seeing real progress and welcome the continued commitment of ScottishPower Renewables to supporting community initiatives and energy education. This is a great example that many other areas could learn from as it will create jobs and it promises to grow the local economy and local living standards." • The first concordat between Argyll and Bute Council and Scottish Power Renewables was signed at Cruachan Power Station, Argyll, in June 2004. • ScottishPower Renewables with Iberdrola generates 500MW of energy in Argyll and Bute. 60MW of wind energy at their Cruach Mhor and Beinn an Tuirc windfarms and 440 MW hydro energy at the Cruachan Power Station, a highly popular tourist attraction in Argyll and Bute. Issued by Aileen Maclennan on 30/11/2007 13:24:02

NATIONAL WOODLAND SURVEY MOVES TO ARGYLL & BUTE
Woods and forests in part of Argyll & Bute will be the next to be surveyed in the most comprehensive study of Scotland's native woods and forests ever to be undertaken. The study - the Native Woodland Survey of Scotland (NWSS) - is a six year project being carried out by Forestry Commission Scotland and Forest Research. Findings from the project will form a database of information about Scotland's native woodlands and will include key information such as; how much native woodland Scotland has; what types of native woodland they are; what condition they are in; and where they are. The Argyll & Bute survey will begin in December and over the next year will cover Gigha and Kintyre south of Portachoillan A survey team, from Forest Research, will be scouring brae, field and village to discover exactly how much native woodland there is in the identified area. The team will only be looking at areas of woodland that are greater than 0.5 hectares in size and will be using state-of-the-art technology to record information. They will be clearly identifiable and landowners are encouraged to enable access to their land to assist them during their investigations. Heading up the pioneering project is Dr Zoé Laird who said; “The survey team has recently completed similar data collection in other parts of the country and while it is too early to say what the results have revealed, it is feasible that we might find alder, ash, rowan, birch and aspen. I am delighted that the team has received positive support from local landowners while conducting their research. The main reason for this part of Argyll & Bute being the next area covered in the survey is that we have successfully mapped this area using aerial photography. We need this to help us map woodland areas on the land. The research team relies on these maps for implementing their data gathering activity. The latest technology is being used both to create the maps as well as record information on the ground. Protecting and expanding our native woodlands is important to Scotland, not just because of its nature conservation and heritage value, but for sound economic reasons as well. The data we collect will, for example, be a valuable source of information for woodland owners and managers helping them plan future management of their woods." The (NWSS) began in November 2006. Notes 2) The NWSS will help Forestry Commission Scotland meet its commitments to the UK Biodiversity Action Plan and report and deliver progress

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against the Habitat Action Plan. 3) Native woods and forests are those comprising species of trees and plants that establish themselves in Scotland without human help. Well known tree species native to Scotland include Pedunculate and Sessile Oak, Wych Elm, Downy and Silver Birch, Ash, Alder, Aspen, Rowan, Juniper and Yew. There are estimated to be between 350,000 and 480,000 hectares of native woodland in Scotland, or between 26-35% of Scotland's total woodland area. This includes remnants of ancient woodlands, and woodlands comprising of native species that have been planted more recently or regenerated naturally. The survey will greatly improve the quality of information about this woodland. 4) Forestry Commission Scotland serves as the Scottish Government's forestry department. It manages 666,000 hectares of national forest land for multiple benefits, including nature conservation, public recreation, timber production, and rural and community development; supports other woodland owners with grants, felling licences, advice and regulation; promotes the benefits of forests and forestry; and advises Ministers on forestry policy.Paul Munro, Forestry Commissions Scotland, press office, tel: 0131 314 6507

FATHER WEBB AND THE CUSTOMS RECORDS
I was delighted to read in this months Antler, the report on the early history of the Antiquarian Society, as it brought back memories of two important characters from my childhood, who kept the Society going throughout the war. Duncan Colville used to take me fishing on the Lussa Loch and regale me with stories of the flooded farm steadings with names like Stromolloch and Bord a'dubh.as we sailed across them. Father Webb, however, had a much more important role in that he saved me from having to eat chocolate cake. Reverend James Webb was an extremely small and very gentle Roman Catholic priest who lived alone at St Kiaran's manse and served his flock and the wider community with great kindness for forty years. His abiding interest however was local history and the historical relationship between Kintyre and the Irish counties just across the North Channel. He came to the Custom House, in Lochend, during my childhood, every Thursday, which seemed to be his day off, and he would spend many hours copying out notes from the voluminous copperplate tomes of the Campbeltown Customs records, which went back to the seventeenth century. At about four o'clock, he would then be invited for afternoon tea, with my mother and father and was very fond of my mother's chocolate cake. So fond was he that if it was chocolate cake that day, she would send him home with the uneaten portion because she feared his housekeeper might not be a good baker. I hated chocolate cake, indeed I still do, and was delighted that this cake, which my mother loved to bake, would not stay in the house once Father Webb had visited. He always reciprocated, however, with a very large bottle of Brandy for her at Christmas. This unlikely friendship between my rather free church (Lochend) parents and Father Webb lasted until 1960 when my father was promoted to take charge of Customs on the Irish Border, based at the land boundary at Newry. One day in, I think, 1963 or 1964, one of his particularly officious staff apprehended a Roman Catholic priest who was allegedly attempting to smuggle two altar cloths in finest Belfast linen and a pair of silver candlesticks through the railway border post at Goraghwood. Because it was a possibly politically sensitive matter, involving a man of the cloth, the officer decided to take the matter to his superiors and was very discomfited when he produced his miscreant and found that my father embraced him very affectionately and asked him to come home for afternoon tea. Father Webb had been travelling down to visit a long standing friend and fellow priest in County Meath after presenting a paper at the Glens of Antrim Historical Society. He clearly did not appreciate that he might possibly be doing anything wrong in taking a present to his friend's parish. He confided in my mother that he had said a little prayer when he was detained but even with his great faith he did not appreciate that it would be answered in such a remarkable fashion, complete with chocolate cake. For mother, whether by chance or divine intervention had made one that very morning. Ronald J Roberts, Carrick Point, Ardnacross.

VISA & MASTER CARD SCAM
Dear Editor I'm forwarding this but it seems to me that anyone would have to be rather naive to be caught by this scam. I would only give card details on the phone if I had initiated the call. I had a call some years ago telling me I had 'won' a cruise from Ft Lauderdale for only £250 for two people or something along those lines. The American guy asked for my card details and I said there was no way I was giving that information to someone who calls out of the blue. So then he put me onto his supervisor who seemed surprised when I told him the same. I believe the offer was genuine as I checked up on the cruise vessel and found it had been launched by the Queen in about 1954 in Belfast for the £10 a head emigration from UK to Australia run. I also read comments by some who had cruised on the ship and it was pretty basic to say the least. So while I'm sure none of you would fall for this you might as well read it. Brian Gee One of our employees was called on Wednesday from 'VISA', and I was called on Thursday from 'Master Card'. The scam works like this: Caller: 'This is (name), and I'm calling from the Security and Fraud Department at VISA. My Badge number is 12460. Your card has been flagged for an unusual purchase pattern, and I'm calling to verify. This would be on your VISA card which was issued by (name of bank). Did you purchase an Anti-Telemarketing Device for £497.99 from a Marketing company based in Arizona ?' When you say 'No', the caller continues with, 'Then we will be issuing a credit to your account. This is a company we have been watching

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and the charges range from £297 to £497, just under the £500 purchase pattern that flags most cards. Before your next statement, the credit will be sent to (gives you your address), is that correct ?' You say 'yes'. The caller continues - 'I will be starting a Fraud investigation. If you have any questions, you should call the 1- 800 number listed on the back of your card (1-800-VISA) and ask for Security.' You will need to refer to this Control Number. The caller then gives you a 6 digit number. 'Do you need me to read it again ?' Here's the IMPORTANT part on how the scam works. The caller then says, 'I need to verify you are in possession of your card'. He'll ask you to 'turn your card over and look for some numbers'. There are 7 numbers; the first 4 are part of your card number, the next 3 are the security Numbers that verify you are the possessor of the card. These are the numbers you sometimes use to make Internet purchases to prove you have the card. The caller will ask you to read the 3 numbers to him. After you tell the caller the 3 numbers, he'll say, 'That is correct, I just needed to verify that the card has not been lost or stolen, and that you still have your card. Do you have any other questions?' After you say No, the caller then thanks you and states, 'Don't hesitate to call back if you do, and hangs up.

You actually say very little, and they never ask for or tell you the Card number. But after we were called on Wednesday, we called back within 20 minutes to ask a question. Are we glad we did! The REAL VISA Security Department told us it was a scam and in the last 15 minutes a new purchase of £497.99 was charged to our card.

Long story - short - we made a real fraud report and closed the VISA account. VISA is reissuing us a new number. What the scammers want is the 3-digit PIN number on the back of the card. Don't give it to them. Instead, tell them you'll call VISA or Master card directly for verification of their conversation. The real VISA told us that they will never ask for anything on the card as they already know the information since they issued the card! If you give the scammers your 3 Digit PIN Number, you think you're receiving a credit. However, by the time you get your statement you'll see charges for purchases you didn't make, and by then it's almost too late and/or more difficult to actually file a fraud report.

What makes this more remarkable is that on Thursday, I got a call from a 'Jason Richardson of Master Card' with a word-for-word repeat of the VISA scam. This time I didn't let him finish. I hung up !

MAY AFTERMATH
Do you remember the heady days of May when canvassing for the new Argyll & Bute Council was an everyday occurrence and familiar and unfamiliar faces appeared At your front door. In some cases that was the first and last time you saw them. I think everyone admits that the burden on the previous administration to provide numerical parity and embrace groups with seemingly similar geographical problems, has not been a success for some rural areas. East Kintyre has certainly suffered from irregular Councillor presence under the new multi-member ward system; ‘pot luck’ is very much the order of the day. While all six ABC Councillors were sent copies of the Antler’s December issue in time for the meeting on December 6th, John Semple managed his first appearance and was very helpful, but Robin Currie and Anne Horne sent apologies. As the first Thursday in January is too close to New Years Day, the February meeting of EKCC will provide two Councillors with the unique opportunity to be present at an East Kintyre Community Council meeting for the first time since their election eight months ago ! On the other hand Community Councillors, being volunteers, have a much better record, leaving aside employment commitments and the treasurer’s propensity to attract hip problems by carrying loose Wind-farm change in his trouser pockets ! I wonder if its the same problem affecting Unitary Authority Councillors - perhaps they are ruing the day when only telephone, travelling and responsibility extras were paid, and are now handicapped for travelling by the weight of salary lose change in handbags and trouser pockets.

POSTSCRIPT : Although too late to include in the December or January Antlers, Councillor Anne Horn held a surgery in Carradale Village Hall at 5pm on Monday 10th of December 2007 - the first since her election in May 2007. Notices were put up a few days before the meeting, but she made no direct contact with the Community Council to tell members of her intention, despite being aware of the free advertising available to her through the ‘Antler’ and EKCC meetings. In the past elected councillors have found that the best time to have surgeries is just before or just after community council meetings, solving two types of problem with one visit. Like anyone else with a new job, newly elected councillors face a steep learning curve and would do well to use the statutory agency of community councils to help them fulfil their responsibilities and to keep abreast of local issues. Councillors were reminded in the January Antler that their failure to organise themselves meant that the service they offered would either be overstretched or under-manned if they failed to follow the example of other areas and designate councillors to particular community council catchments.

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EKCC MEETING
MINUTES OF THE MEETING ON NOVEMBER (2007) IN CARRADALE VILLAGE HALL 7 PM Attending - Shelagh Cameron, Lachie Paterson, Stuart Irvine, Ronnie Brownie, Andrea Hopkins and Geoffrey Page 8 members of the public. Apology - Sheena MacAlister. Chairperson welcomed all to the meeting and asked for the approval of the minutes of November meeting. Proposed - Andrea, Seconded Shelagh. MATTERS ARISING : We have had no response to the advert for the post of Minutes Sec. More enquiries to be made. Torrisdale Jetty : Donald Macalister Hall making enquiries into fate of Glenlight. Jetty was discussed and Chair confirmed to Marcus that EKCC want it removed and the beach restored. MINUTE SECRETARY : No interest in post. Stuart suggested asking Marjory Smith and mentioned that Fiona at Ashbank might be interested in helping out. SADDELL CHRISTMAS LIGHTS : Elizabeth MacMillan and Robert Strang were asked to liaise with Saddell about mix up with bulbs. Robert will give Saddell the extra bulbs. Robert buys the bulbs for the Carradale tree every year, organises and erects the tree. Stuart thanked Robert wholeheartedly for his work on behalf of the community. Thanks also to the Hurst's for their involvement and for Trish's poem. Marcus suggested that The Hotel, Glen, Dunvalanree and Ashbank may provide some festive nibbles for round the tree carol singing on 16th Dec. Marcus will liase with hotels ROAD SIGNAGE : Chairperson had yet another conversation with Donnie McLeod about passing place signs. Could we have the idiot proof signage re Portavadie and Mallaig roads? D. McLeod looking into missing signs. Lengthy discussion ensued about signage and funding. Planning permission may need to be sought for signage. Marcus pointed out that The Kintyre Way had to pay individually for each interpretative panel at a cost of £150! Red tape gone mad! Chair thanked Marcus for very interesting and relevant info. It was pointed out that some of the signs (esp at Skipness turn off) could do with replacing or scrubbing ! ROADSIDE SCRUB : Discussion about road side scrub and efficacy of clearing methods. Landowners have responsibility for front of property but few seem to bother. Could Community Service people be utilised for maintenance of Kintyre Way and/or verges ? POST OFFICE CONSULTATION : Discussion and clarification that, at present. there is no threat of closure to either office in Carradale. Email to be sent to consultative body. CORRESPONDENCE : Awards for All - Geoffrey Page has replied. Scottish Landscape Forum - brochure available. Government letter about flooding. Letter/email to Peter Peacock by Vice Chair Argyll & Bute Council One Stop Shop (Burnett Building) 01586 55 2366 PLANNING APPLICATIONS - report from Geoffrey Page. (1) Land SW of Torrisdale South Lodge (2) Land NE of Inyanga Planning sub committee activated! Stuart & Ronnie will check up and report back. AOCB : Stuart Irvine - Right of Way from Golf Course to Harbour. This path is in a highly dangerous state. Stuart proposes to restore this path with some the financial help from local residents and hopefully prick the conscience of George Leslie and Scottish Water. Stuart will investigate. Discussion about methods contractors etc. TREASURERS REPORT : The Chairperson apologised for the omission on the agenda and asked if Stuart would give a brief report! Stuart was please to report that if we had no additional expense we would finish the year with a balance of approx £1500. AOCB : Brian Gee pointed out that the new path to the Village Hall needed some attention and it was discussed that adoption by the Core path network (Argyll& Bute) was mentioned when the path was made. Chairperson to speak to Donnie McLeod about Core Paths, Lighting and Pavements Marcus Adams stated that Owen Paisley, Kintyre Way Ranger, would be willing to come to meetings to discuss the Kintyre Way. MINUTES : The Chairperson will transpose minutes from tape - Chair thanked all for attending. Stuart thanked Chairperson. Next meeting Thursday 6th December, 2007 - Shortbread and Coffee - The Meeting closed at 20.30 Shelagh Cameron

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SOUTH KINTYRE SENIORS FORUM
MEETING HELD AT ARGYLL ARMS HOTEL, SOUTHEND 8TH NOVEMBER 2007 PRESENT : George McMillan, Ian Teesdale, Margaret Turner, Val Cannell, Ailsa Stewart, Lunda McFadyen (Argyll & Bute Council) APOLOGIES : Diana Brodie, Mary-Margaret Hanna, Douglas McKerral, Ruth Young CHAIR : George McMillan The Chair welcomed Mrs McFadyen who was representing Diana Brodie - In the absence of the Minute Secretary, Catherine Mclntyre, Ailsa Stewart volunteered to record the minutes - The minutes of the previous meeting were distributed, read and approved. George McMillan proposed the adoption of the minutes and this was seconded by Ian Teesdale. MATTERS ARISING : A letter was received by Ian Teesdale from Douglas Blades re the Tayinioan bus shelter. A meeting has been suggested for 30/11/07 at Tayinloan. George proposed that Ian, himself and Mrs Nugent should attend. This was unanimously approved. The Secretary also read a letter from Mr McKeown, solicitor confirming that he would be available to give a talk on Power of Attorney on 13.12.07 unless something else cropped up. Confirmation to be made with Mrs Mary-Ann Stewart of her talk on 10th January 2008. COUNCIL AREA COMMITTEE : It was agreed that members of our Committee should form a deputation to meet the Area Committee, principally to raise the matter of transport for patients attending Carradale Surgery. Ian Teesdale has written to the Corporate Services Manager, Alison Younger, intimating that this problem will be raised. The Chairman also suggested that Douglas Blades should be informed of the predicament that this problem causes the old and infirm. SOCIAL WORK DEPT : Hazel Mclntyre's problem with this department has been resolved. FOOD TRAIN : The Committee felt that they did not know enough about this arrangement. It was decided to ask Catherine Mclntyre at the next meeting if she could give them information on how it worked. AOB : Val Cannell raised the matter of copies of the Scottish Policy Up-date. She said it was important that copies should be made and distributed or else she feared the monies from Help the Aged would be stopped. The Chairman informed the meeting that he had tried to interest the Courier in the closure of the two Post Offices in the town, but the paper was not interested. These closures would cause much inconvenience to most people, not only the elderly. Free Personal Care : Ian Teesdale, drew the Committee's attention to Lord Macphail's Judicial Review which has thrown out a free personal care ruling by the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman against Argyll & Bute Council. Batteries for hearing aids are now available at local Surgeries. Ian Teesdale has written to Tara Anderson of Help the Aged re the fiasco of the 2007 Scottish Election and agreeing with the 13 key recommendations put forward by the Gould Report. FUTURE DATES : Please note that the December and March dates should read as follows : 13th December 2007, at 2pm in Kinloch Hall, Campbeltown 13th March 2008, Kinloch Hall, Campbeltown Ailsa Stewart 8th November 2007

EKCC DECEMBER MEETING
A PERSONAL RECOLLECTION OF TOPICS AND ISSUES Since the minutes of the December meeting will not be approved until later in February, here as some of the matters discussed by the six members of EKCC and six residents The identification of the site of a proposed house on the Torrisdale Estate. Plans for the reconstruction of the path from the harbour to the Golf Course. Financial matters including the third of three grants from EKWFT towards the cost of employing of the Warden for the Kintyre Way. The moves to obtain a new minute secretary. Comment on the ABC/Scottish Power Concordat signing at ‘Here we are’ Cairndow (reported elsewhere in this Antler). Thanks to involved in the provision erection and decoration of this year’s Christmas trees plus the need to procure new lights for the Carradale tree. Roadside scrub invasion on the B842. Progress on the Allt-na-Beiste slip. The Patients’ Support Group and Patient Survey. Imposed surgery alterations. Wheelchair and patient transport needs. Overgrown rhododendrons at the lower bend on the Bay Road. Delay in the provision of signs to encourage vehicles travelling in the same direction on the B842 to overtake. The continuing problems with access to Brackley Cemetery and flooding in the car park. Delays in Argyll & Bute Council Departments replying to letters and e-mails. G.P. The next meeting of East Kintyre Community Council takes place at 7pm on Thursday 7th February 2008 in Carradale Village Hall.

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CARRADALE SURGERY SURVEY REPORT 2007
The practice conducted its annual survey during October. Patients attending the doctor or the nurse, were offered a questionnaire to complete. 44 questionnaires were returned. A comparison of mean scores with previous years' results is shown below. Main table of mean scores as percentages, compared to the GPAQ benchmarks. Questions 2- 10h begin with the words ‘satisfaction with . . . ’

YEAR (final column GPAQ benchmark) Q2. Q3a. Q4b. Q5b. Q7b. Q8a. Q8b. Q9b. Q10a. Q10b. Q10c. Q10d. Q10e. Q10f. Q10g. Q10h. Q12a. Q12b. Q12c. Q13. receptionists opening hours availability of particular doctor availability of any doctor waiting times at practice phoning through to practice phoning through to doctor for advice continuity of care doctor's questioning how well doctor listens how well doctor puts patient at ease how much doctor involves patient doctor's explanations time doctor spends doctor's patience doctor's caring and concern how well nurse listens to what you say quality of care nurse provides nurse explanation problems/treatments overall satisfaction with practice ‘04 88 65 84 84 60 81 78 81 82 85 85 81 82 80 84 82 80 82 80 83 ‘05 91 67 87 89 66 85 69 85 90 92 87 88 89 88 92 93 88 89 88 84 ‘06 87 69 82 78 69 78 75 81 84 88 86 84 88 86 84 82 94 89 91 82 ‘07 93 65 82 84 76 86 68 77 79 81 83 81 82 82 84 82 86 87 87 85 70 65 58 67 51 62 55 68 74 75 83 78 75 70 74 74 76 78 76 78

SURGERY COMMENT The practice's scores continue to be equal or above the benchmark in all categories, although individual scores have fluctuated over the years. The practice is again delighted to have received so many positive comments. Once again one or two responses to the question regarding overall satisfaction would appear to be anomalous with the overall trend of the respondents answers. It was noted that 2 respondents had ticked Completely dis-satisfied for this question despite scoring the practice highly on all others. In previous years when this occurred it was thought it was possible this could have been accidental as the responses to this particular question were graded from right to left, whereas all others were graded from left to right. This was discussed with the Patient Group at the time, who felt that the responses for this question should be graded in the same manner as all others to avoid any confusion and this was done. Following last year's survey it was decided to introduce some earlier appointments with the doctor on a Thursday morning to alleviate waiting times particularly for patients using Red Cross Transport. The trial of this proved successful and this facility is on-going. The practice also now hopes to recruit an additional practice nurse to facilitate provision of nurse appointments. At the moment it does not intend to make any further changes to the format of open/appointment surgeries, particularly in view of the positive comments received regarding the opportunity to just turn up on the day, the increase in score for waiting times and the fact that 60% of respondents indicated that they were satisfied with opening times and do not wish the surgery to be open any additional hours. POSITIVE PATIENT COMMENT At the end of the questionnaire respondents were invited to comment on what was particularly good about their health care. These are the responses given : ‘The whole practice is a caring area and fun. Same day attention. Dispensing surgery. Medicines available day after ordering. Having moved here from a busy town practice I am very appreciative of the personal service. Ability to get treatment and/or information promptly and effectively Personal needs both medical & emotional taken into account. It is there when you need it. Appointment to see Doctor can be arranged for the same day. Monday to Friday during surgery hours is good. Excellent response from Doctor in emergency calls & general concern shown from Doctor, nurses & all the practice office staff. Being able to see the Doctor/nurse that day or following day if necessary Very warm & friendly. Having come from a city it is a refreshing change for the staff to know you & get seen straight away. It is very reassuring to know that a nurse can be contacted at weekends when the doctor is off duty. We are fortunate to have such an efficient practice in a remote place A very good team that seems to work well together Monitoring of older people's health is good. Yes having open consulting times is of great benefit rather than having to wait for an appointment you can just turn up at the specified time. Very satisfied. Extremely efficient practice. Surgery is always comfortable & clean Privacy is respected all very pleasant & welcoming. Doctor never makes you feel you have to rush. Very clean friendly surgery. We are extremely well served in this practice. A friendly surgery with pleasant staff. The regular recalls for checks are excellent’.

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SUGGESTED IMPROVEMENTS Respondents were also invited to comment on whether there was anything that could be improved. These are the responses given : ‘Weekend and evening cover. Seeing a consultant. Less questionnaires Choice of doctor. Out of hours surgeries. Weekend & evening care not good Length of time for NHS24 to be contacted & to make contact is far too long for country practice. Quicker referrals. NHS24 - hope I don't need a Doctor at weekends or evenings. There is always room for improvement. I have lived here for more than 20 yrs and have seen a vast improvement in all respects in primary care This includes facilities at the surgery for treatment & in the patients waiting room.Perhaps an open surgery starting at 9am would be beneficial. The Monday to Frid ay cover during the day is excellent but the out of hours cover is very poor & in my opinion verging on the dangerous. Open at weekends. LOCAL SURGERY’S EVALUATION Evaluating the survey as a whole, and taking into account the comments regarding scope for improvement, the practice feels that many of the reductions in scores reflect a general perception among the patient population that the service provided by NHS24 is an area of concern. For example the poorer score for satisfaction with opening times, satisfaction with continuity of care and phoning through to the doctor for advice could be a reflection of the fact that in the past patients were accustomed to being able to access Dr Elder directly for help and advice out of hours rather than contacting NHS24. Control of NHS24 for our area was transferred to Highland Hub during the summer and the practice is aware that some problems were experienced around this time. However since then we are not aware of any specific problems with regard to being seen by a Doctor when clinically appropriate, although ambulance response times are still sometimes below optimum. Of those patients who made particular comment regarding NHS24/ weekend cover 50% had used the service and 50% had not. In total, 16 respondents had used NHS24, of these 3 were completely satisfied, 2 very satisfied, 2 fairly satisfied, 1 neutral, 1 fairly dissatisfied,, 3 very dissatisfied and 4 completely dissatisfied. With regard to the comment about less questionnaires, the practice is obliged to conduct an annual patient survey using specific questionnaires. We had inquired as to whether there could be some variation in the content, but were told although we could add more we could not remove any questions. Once again the practice would like to thank all patients who completed a questionnaire. Their time, effort and many positive comments are much appreciated. EDITORS COMMENT Although one must give credence to the positive and negative aspects of this imposed annual survey, unfortunately, rather like other surveys of a similar nature, high scores in a particular year may be attributed to a large number of other factors which may have little to do with the service offered. What is particularly pleasing is that the service offered in the surgery catchment is well above the GPAQ benchmarks - whatever those letters stand for - but ‘out of hours cover’ and ambulance response times remain areas of concerns.

SOUP & SANDWICHES - £450
No this is not the quote for refreshments at one of East Kintyre’s popular hotels, restaurants or cafés, its simply the amount Saddell and Carradale Church Guild members made at their recent soup and sandwich Sunday lunch - an event which took the place of the Christmas Fayre, which seems to have lost its attraction for local children and their parents.

KINTYRE INITIATIVE WORKING GROUP
CAMPBELTOWN LOCH DEVELOPMENTS - HARBOUR & MARINA Council Chambers Town Hall Campbeltown 11th October 2007 ATTENDING Les Oman, Dalriada Business Action Group. Ivor Watson, Campbeltown Traders Association. Brian Keating, Royal Hotel/Machrihanish Dunes. Frank McHardy, Alistair Cousins, Michael Forman and Billy McFadyen - all of Campbeltown Sailing Club. David McAllister and John Carmichael of Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company. Michael Taylor, Mull of Kintyre Sea Tours. David Howell, M.O.D. Kevin Williams and Andrew Robertson of Argyll and Bute Council and John Semple, Vice Chair - Mid Argyll Kintyre & Isles Area Committee. APOLOGIES Col McFarlane INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND John Semple thanked everyone for coming to the meeting and outlined how he had came to explore the formation of a group as a sub group of the Kintyre Initiative Working Group and what he had hoped to achieve by developing plans to improve facilities and berthing for yachts and pleasure craft on Campbeltown Loch

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CAMPBELTOWN BERTHING CO - DEVELOPED PLANS David McAllister outlined the current position with regards to the pontoons owned and operated by the Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company. Over the 3 months of the summer the pontoons cater for 1500 visiting boats equating to approximately 6000 visitors. The company, in 1997, appointed Halcro to developed plans to double the capacity of the pontoons to cater for 60 boats at then cost of about £250K. The Company is run in the interests of the community. ARGYLL & BUTE COUNCIL - ONGOING INITIATIVES Kevin Williams outlined the initiatives which identified the potential for waterfront development in Campbeltown including The Yellow book study, Sail West; a proposal for a European funded and the Council's Corporate Plan. Funding remains the main hurdle for these however. Andrew Robertson commented on the work he was currently undertaking for the development of Kinloch road. Brian Keating identified that his interests in golf development and particularly the renovation of the Royal Hotel would be heavily dependent on attracting visiting sailors from the adjacent pontoons and would be happy for his investment to be quoted to assist marina development. OPEN DISCUSSION The main discussions focused on perception of the existing facilities, the potential for development of these and what alternatives might be included. Frank McHardy praised the work done be the berthing company but commented that many yachts avoided coming to Campbeltown because they don't like having to tie up sometimes 3 abreast and that facilities on shore were not adequate. He also suggested that the pastime was growing significantly but felt that Campbeltown was not seeing the benefit of that growth. Brian Keating indicated that he intended to improve facilities by including a shower suit specifically for yachters in the Royal Hotel development. David McAllister estimated that 200 customers had been lost as a direct result of the pollution in the loch. Kevin Williams in answer to Billy McFadyen said that the marina developments in Rothesay's inner harbour were run by a community organisation in partnership with the council and that there was potential for the development of Campbeltown’s inner harbour in such a manner. Frank McHardy circulated a paper identifying a suggested configuration for pontoons in the inner harbour. Brian Keating said that he had independently had a study done into the potential for developing a marina in the inner harbour for transit and more specifically over wintering. (WMcD)? cautioned over development in the inner harbour since the harbour was still a working harbour with potentially 20 visiting fishing boats and frequent freight movements from the new quay and the cost of sheet piling which would be required prior to dredging would cost in the region of £0.5M. David McAllister also expressed concern since the inner harbour was not sufficiently sheltered for both the comfort and protection of small craft even in relatively moderate weather the inner harbour has wave movement. It was also suggested that a breakwater could be constructed to provide better shelter and would give better value for money. POTENTIAL PARTNERSHIP WORKING The group agreed that it had been a useful meeting and that they would be prepared to meet again as plans progressed ACTION POINTS It was agreed that funding be sought to enable the plans for the development of the existing marina be implemented. That the Mid Argyll, Kintyre & the Isles Area Committee be asked to appoint a consultant to include marina developments in the town centre & waterfront developments. The group agreed to meet again when a consultant had been appointed.

KINTYRE INITIATIVE WORKING GROUP
Items from the minutews of the meeting on 29th October 2007 FERRY INITIATIVES Various correspondences from Stewart Stevenson MSP and Nigel Dodds OBE MP MLA were circulated to the Group. It was agreed to write to the various sides to try to push this matter forward positively. Councillor Donald Kelly welcomed Donald Woodrow and the Managing Director Andrew Banks from Pentland Ferries who gave a presentation on the current situation regarding his Company. He stated that he had a vessel available to do the Campbeltown to Ballycastle service from early summer 2008 and would be willing to do it for the subsidy on the table but was still waiting to hear from the Scottish Executive regarding inviting him to tender. No contact has been made with his Company, nor the other interested party since May by the Scottish Executive. The Group were concerned to hear this and agreed to write to the Scottish and Irish Governments. Various issues were discussed with Councillor Donald Kelly thanking them for attending the meeting. UPDATE ON INITIATIVES/PRIORITIES AND THEMES FROM PREVIOUS MEETING Campbeltown to Machrihanish Railway Walk - Laggan Community Council were initially tasked to talk to local farmers in the area. The response is fairly positive and they have decided to organise a meeting with farmers and the Kintyre Way Ranger. When this has taken place contact will need to be made with Campbeltown Community Council. Westport - Councillor Rory Colville stated that this is ongoing with an architect being appointed to erect a shower and changing cubicle. He advised that there will be lots of consultation regarding this. Banner Project - This project is moving forward with a funding being applied for from Awards for All. Next meeting is organised for the end of January. Art Ward from Bushmills has been contacted and will assist this project.

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Opportunity Kintyre - Mary Turner advised the Group that Lynn Hammal has 40 clients. The Summer Ball was well attended and shall become and annual event. Harbour Initiative - reported elsewhere in this Antler SYHA - Councillor Donald Kelly welcomed Mr. Legge Chief Executive of the Scottish Youth Hostel Association who gave a presentation on the work of SYHA. Mr. Legge's feelings were that at the precise moment the Campbeltown/Kintyre area did not warrant a Youth Hostel. The site of the Police Station was a suggested possibility for a Youth Hostel when they move to new premises. The SYHA was always open for discussion with partners where buildings could be made available and joint fundraising could be undertaken to convert into a hostel, however the SYHA needed approximately 9000 - 10000 bed nights per year for a SYHA hostel to break even. Bunkhouses were also discussed and Mr. Legge encouraged any potential private operators to seek advice from SYHA Pipe Band Championships 2008 - Jim Martin intimated that this event will take place on 3rd May 2008 at Kinloch Park. He stated that Kintyre and Argyll Events Limited had given the Pipe Band Committee £3000 to start its own bank account and apply for funding in their own right. INITIATIVES/PRIORITIES AND THEMES FOR FUTURE MEETINGS The implementation of Miniature Railway which has been moved from Ardrishaig requires to be carried out by a Group. It was agreed that this could run from the Putting Green to the Quarry Green. Councillor Rory Colville requested that the NHS is put on the agenda. This was agreed and that the minutes of the Redesign Group would be circulated. UPDATE/REPORT ON NEW GOLF COURSE It was reported that Brian Keating is in discussion with various businesses.

VESTAS A verbal report was given that there is 2 years work secured at Vestas. Murdina Macdonald from H.I.E. intimated that there are still concerns with Vestas Celtic in the long term if UK planning does not change. CAMPBELTOWN AIRPORT CONSULTATIVE ITEMS Councillor Donald Kelly advised the Group that David Neill was unable to attend today's meeting but it was agreed that Local Members would meet with him before the December meeting of the KIWG. He intimated that Loganair were keen on a Sunday flight but it has been a long time since a feasibility study has been done to see if this would be viable. Highlands and Islands Airports Limited - Figures circulated to Group and a copy is attached for information. Derrick Lang intimated that figures were down slightly due to bad weather in September. An 8.2% increase in total aircraft movements was due to R.A.F. training. Finally after 2 years a new landing system will be in place by 1st November with everyone concerned delighted with this news. FARMING REPORT/INITIATIVES David Brewster from SAC gave an update on the Dairy Support Scheme advising farmers will be given a payment by the end of December. Discussions are on going regarding the future sitting of the Farmers Market. Councillor Donald Kelly stated the importance of supporting Farmers Markets. Jamie McGrigor MSP advised the Group that there had been a debate in the Scottish Parliament regarding Agriculture particularly due to the recent foot and mouth outbreak. Lamb prices were discussed with Scotland being paid only £45 compared to the continent giving £75 for each lamb. It was agreed to write to Ministers regarding this. Crofting was raised and it was agreed to write to the Crofters Commission inviting them to a future meeting. TRAFFIC CALMING MEASURES TARBERT/A83/CAR PARKING A letter from Malcolm Reed, Transport Scotland to Alan Reid MP was circulated to Local Members for the Tarbert area advising that at this moment there is no plans to implant any further traffic calming measures on the A83 at Tarbert. Councillor Anne Horn reiterated the huge problem that Tarbert has. After discussions it was agreed to invite Transerve to the next meeting of the KIWG. The lack of car parking in the area was raised. A83 - Jim Martin raised his concerns over the closure of the A83 due to a landslide and urged the importance for this to be rectified promptly. A letter to be sent regarding this issue with Alan Reid MP and Jamie McGrigor MSP being sent a copy. Ian Macintyre stated that he had attended a recent meeting regarding the pier at Tarbert and was advised that the pier is being left to disintegrate. Councillor Donald Kelly advised Ian Macintyre to contact his Local Members to make this a potential priority at the Area Committee. WRITTEN REPORTS FROM COUNCIL SERVICES, JOB CENTRE PLUS, ARGYLL COLLEGE, JAMES WATT COLLEGE AND A.I.E. Council Services - Donnie McLeod advised that vehicle tests have been completed for the winter with call up screens in each vehicle for the driver's safety. A meeting was taking place later with the Traders association regarding the switching on of the Christmas lights. Surfacing

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should commence this week later than anticipated. The B842 was discussed with Donnie McLeod advising that talks were ongoing with designers with hopefully a decision being made later this week. Work will commence again this week on the Town Hall. Flooding was discussed at Dalbuie Bridge on the Southend road. TOURISM/LEISURE INITIATIVES/KINTYRE WAY Shirley Bannatyne reported the following : From 1/4/2007 to 22/10/2007 Campbeltown figures were down 16% compared to 2006. Shirley Bannatyne stated that the figures were partly due to the lack of Highland Heritage Tours being cut to Campbeltown to 2 per month instead of 4 or 5 times per week. The majority of customers felt that Campbeltown was too long a journey. Kintyre Way - John Bakes advised that the Ranger is now in place on the Kintyre Way and has noted the problems on the route. The website has been upgraded with over 100 hits per day. A catalogue has been produced and will be distributed worldwide. It is hoped that 2008 will be a busy year. Alison Younger intimated that the Dell Road Office is now closed and staff has transferred to the Burnet Building from the 22nd October. This is the first Service-point in Argyll and Bute on the mainland. The video conference has also moved to this building. It is hoped that the museum will be open between Easter and the summer 2008. Councillor Donald Kelly stated that he is still working on getting the Linda McCartney memorabilia into the building. SCOTTISH WATER REPORT Copies of letters from and to SEPA, Scottish Water and The Scottish Government sent to Alan Reid MP were circulated. After discussion it was agreed to invite Scottish Water to a future meeting. A.O.B. The Group agreed to write to the Post Office regarding the reduction of Post Offices in the area. Alan Reid MP stressed the importance of stating that Campbeltown has came off worse in the whole of Argyll and Bute and also that Campbeltown's main Post Office would struggle to cope with the increase of customers. Dates for 2008's meetings were circulated. Monday 4th February, Monday 21st April, Monday 9th June, Monday 25th August, Monday 27th October, Monday 8th December.

BRACKLEY PROBLEMS
AN UPDATE Geoff I was at Amy's funeral on Saturday and have to add more remarks to the email I sent that was primarily about the gates at Brackley. With two big funerals in three days the parking area was a quagmire; reaching the actual graveyard from one's car involved taking a tortuous route and even then it was impossible to avoid the mud. As the number of women attending the internment seems to be increasing, and there were many on Saturday, they are the ones most affected because of their footwear. The parking area is the lowest part of the cemetery and all the rainwater drains down to it. I'm in the process of contacting people who are regular visitors to Brackley to try to drum up support at the next EKCC meeting. As I see it we have to put considerable pressure on Kilmory to achieve anything. You might guess my email to them hasn't generated any reply to date so it appears that one person's protest can be ignored, we need a community voice. Brian

A BELATED REPLY
GREASE, ADJUST & FILL 11th December 2007 ( in reply to Brian Gee’s first letter) Dear Mr Gee I acknowledge receipt of your e-mail dated 17th November and I apologise for the delay in my reply. The Brackley country cemetery as you say is accessed by a shared forestry/farm road which the Council has an agreement to share maintenance but only to a forestry road standard, obviously as you point out this is not to the preferred standard suitable for visitors to the cemetery, and I agree in this respect . The gate system formed when the new cemetery extension was constructed was specifically designed to maintain separate access for the local farmer and exclude his livestock, and was a condition of acquisition of the cemetery land. Again I would agree that the access system is difficult particularly for elderly visitors to the cemetery, the main gates look very grand, but are of such a design the operation and latching can be difficult - In light of your correspondence, I have asked the ground maintenance supervisor to check all the gates , adjust and grease as appropriate, and also for the Roads Superintendent to repair with stone fill the worst areas of the access road, car park and lane immediately adjacent to the cemetery. I apologise once again for the difficulty you experienced during your visit. Donnie Mcleod Roads and Amenity Manager, Mid Argyll, Kintyre and the Islands

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IAN MEFFAN
Ian was born in Airdrie in 1914. He was one of a family of 5. His father was a monumental sculptor and he joined him in the yard when he left school. He married Jean in 1938 and was called up to the army in 1940. He served in the Middle East Ian was taken prisoner in Tobruk. He was a prisoner of war for 3 years and worked in the Czechoslovakian mines. He returned home to work in his father's yard in 1945 and worked until he was in his 70's. Ian and Jean had two girls Rennie and Isobel. He was a contented family man and stayed in the same home for almost 80 years. He went to Carradale on holiday for over 50 years except for one year when the family decided to head to the Highlands for a change only to find on arrival they missed their beloved Carradale. They stayed only one night then drove the next day to the familiar Mull of Kintyre. Ian had great enthusiasm for life and for his hobbies, a few of which were breeding budgies, gardening and playing musical instruments. In later life he was a member of Airdrie Burns Club and the Probus Club. His lifelong passions were fishing and music. He was a very active member of Airdrie Angling Club for many years and enjoyed fly fishing at Carradale, often catching salmon and sometimes catching the trees by the river and losing his favourite flies. His keyboard travelled back and forward to Carradale on holiday and he was able to play any tune by ear. In later years Ian and Jean bought a caravan at Carradale and then built a house and enjoyed many years of holidays and gardening there. Everyone knew he was there if the lawnmower was turning. Ian was a very popular member of the village and made many friends over the years and an odd enemy for a night if he had beaten them at pool. He was the life and soul of many a Dashing White Sergeant at the village hall. In the last few years lan's eyesight became poor and a serious fall and then a hip fracture affected his quality of life and mobility but his family and friends will remember him for his very fine qualities. He was friendly and full of fun. He was hardworking and a very skilled monumental sculptor. He was a perfectionist in everything he did. He will be sadly missed by all who knew him. lan's wife Jean and their daughters Rennie and Isobel would like to thank their friends from Carradale for attending the funeral at Airdrie and for all their cards and messages of sympathy and comfort at this time.

WIND-FARM AT COUR ?
Airtricity’ is proposing to apply for permission to build a wind-farm at Beinn Bhreac, near Cour, encompassing between 13 and 60 turbines with a hub height of 70m, a blade diameter of 84m and 112m to blade tip. The company has been invited to outline their plans at the East Kintyre Community Council meeting on Thursday 7th February 2008. Turbines might be brought ashore at Cour or at Campbeltown, completing their journey by crossing the B842 or using the A83 before turning east and using existing forestry tracks. If built 13 turbines would produce 29.9MW or 60 would give 138MW.

POWER OF ATTORNEY
What is it ? It is a written document giving someone else authority to take actions or make decisions on your behalf. You choose the person you want to help you, called an attorney, and decide what powers the attorney should have. You also choose how you want your incapacity to be decided so that it is clear when you want your attorney to act for you. What does it do ? It lets you say who you want to look after your affairs and what you want your attorney to be able to do for you if you are incapable of doing so for yourself. What does incapable mean ? Someone's capacity could be impaired gradually or suddenly as a result of an accident or illness. A medical doctor will be able to say whether or not that person is incapable. Why would I need a Power of Attorney (PoA) ? It lets you plan what kinds of things you want someone to do for you in the future. What would happen if I did not have a PoA ? Your family or friends may have to go to court to get the authority to act on your behalf. Would my partner or family be able to help without a PoA ?

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No, no one has the automatic right to take actions on your behalf without legal authority. Is a PoA not for older people ? No, nobody likes to think that they may not be able to look after themself but accidents or illness can happen to anyone. Is a PoA not for people with lots of money ? No, it is not just about looking after money/ property it can also let you plan who should decide personal welfare issues for you. What kinds of things can I put in a PoA ? You can include things to do with money or property only (called a Continuing PoA) or just decisions about your health or personal welfare (called a Welfare PoA) or both. Who can I appoint as my attorney ? You can appoint who you want, a family member or friend, a solicitor or accountant or a combination. You can appoint someone to deal with your financial matters and someone different to deal with your personal welfare. However someone who has been declared as bankrupt cannot be appointed as a continuing attorney. How or where would I get one ? Any local solicitor should be able to assist you. There are examples of PoAs on the Public Guardian's web-site. Also stationery shops sell PoA forms. How much does it cost ? A solicitor may charge you to draw up a PoA and prices may vary. The PoA should include a certificate signed by a practising solicitor or your doctor stating that you are capable of understanding the PoA and they may charge a fee for this service. The current fee for registering a PoA with the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) is £60. What happens to my PoA ? It must be registered with the OPG before it can be used, even if you are still capable of doing things for yourself. Once you have drawn up your PoA and made sure the correct certificates are signed it is ready to be sent to the OPG along with a form saying your attorney is happy to act for you. What does the OPG do with mu PoA ? The OPG keeps your signed PoA and sends a copy with a certificate to who ever sent it in. The OPG also sends you a copy of the PoA. Can my attorney use my PoA before I become incapable ? Yes, they can help you with your finances if you want them to do so but they cannot make decisions about your welfare until you are no longer able to make those decisions for yourself. What happens if my partner is my attorney and we split up ? It depends on the wording in your PoA whether your partner can still act on your behalf or whether the PoA can no longer be used.

HOUSING OVERVIEW
The Local Housing Survey contains a detailed profile of Argyll and Bute and provides an overview of the local housing system with analysis of the key factors such as the demographic, socio-economic and housing trends which in turn form the basis of the Housing Needs Assessment for the area. In summary, Argyll and Bute is one of the largest and most sparsely populated local authority areas in Scotland. An area that is 9% of Scotland's landmass houses only 90,370 people, less than 2% of the nation's total population. It is almost entirely a "very remote rural area" within the terms of the Scottish Executive urban-rural classification and includes 25 inhabited islands. Almost 40% of the inhabitants live in settlements of less than 1,000 compared to a Scottish average of 12%. This has a significant impact on a range of services and facilities that are easily accessible, including housing, and increases delivery and development costs. There is an increasingly older population with associated health and support implications and there is an overall out-migration of younger working age people from the area, and in-migration of those of retirement age. Argyll and Bute has a relatively low average gross household income, with average earnings in 2006 being £419.70 per week which is 2.71% lower than the median for Scotland, and employment rates are generally low, with a significant reliance on seasonal work. The 2007 Annual LHS Update indicates a total housing stock of 45,964 - almost 3% increase overall since 2003/4, however 9.5% of this (a total of 4,391 dwellings) is deemed ineffective, i.e. vacant, second or holiday homes. Total social stock amounted to 8,117, which is a 9% decrease since 2003/4, although the rate of annual Right To Buys has shown a slowing down, from 274 in 2003 to only 109 in 2006/7. Demand for social housing increased significantly in 2006 (5,200 registered applicants) but dipped slightly in 2007 to c. 5,000, which was almost 15% above the 2003 baseline figure of 4,365. House price inflation has continued to affect the local housing market with certain local "hot spots" such as Helensburgh and Lomond and Mull, for instance, reflecting the situation in the more urban markets of Scotland. In 2006, the average house price in Argyll and Bute was £131,317 (excluding RTBs) although in Helensburgh & Lomond, for instance, this figure was £155,213. Latest figures, as of May 2007,

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indicate a continuing and significant upward trend in house prices (£161,676 being the average house price in Argyll and Bute for that month while on Mull, for instance, for the first six months of 2007, the average house price rose to £211,489). (Kintyre average for the same period was £80,111) Given the relatively low average gross household income in Argyll and Bute, which would require house prices of c. £80,000 or average rents of £460 per month to be considered affordable, it is clear, therefore, that affordability remains a critical issue across the authority area. Condition and quality of the local housing stock also remains a significant issue, with high levels of Below Tolerable Standard accommodation in the private sector and much of the social sector stock still failing to meet the Scottish Housing Quality Standard. The Community Planning Partnership's analysis of general need in Argyll and Bute was based on the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation for 2004 with a review of changes in indicators at prescribed data zone level in 2006. In addition, the review has been informed by the study undertaken by the Scottish Centre for Research on Social Justice which particularly focused on the rural dimension of deprivation in Argyll and Bute. The study confirmed that the highest concentration of deprivation tends to be found within the main townships of Dunoon, Rothesay, Campbeltown and Helensburgh. However, it also indicated that pockets of deprivation exist across the area within more isolated communities.

PLANNING APPLICATIONS
Application Ref : 07/02198/LIB Officer : Tim Williams Ward Details : South Kintyre Proposal : Dining room and toilet extensions to hotel Location : Craigard House Hotel Low Askomil Campbeltown Argyll And Bute PA28 6EP Applicant : Mr Roger Clark Craigard Hotel Low Askomil Campbeltown PA28 6EP Agent : Tom Grant Partnership Campbeltown 41 Longrow Campbeltown Argyll Development Type : 6Listed Bld and Conservation Area Consent Grid Ref : 173094 620807 Application Ref : 07/02200/DET Officer : Richard Kerr Ward Details South Kintyre Proposal : Renewal of previous consent (ref:05/02263/DET) Erection of temporary above ground sewer apparatus and fenced compounds Location : Land South East Of Swimming Pool Kinloch Road Campbeltown Argyll Applicant : Scottish Water C/o Agent Scottish Water Solutions Leven House Balmore Road Glasgow G22 6NP Development Type: 5B All other developments : Minor Grid Ref :172000 620620 Application Ref : 07/02240/DET Officer : Tim Williams Ward Details : South Kintyre Proposal : Erection of sunroom extension Location : 65 Sound Of Kintyre Machrihanish Campbeltown Argyll And Bute PA28 6GA Applicant : Mrs J MacKinlay 65 Sound Of Jura Machrihanish By Campbeltown Argyll PA28 6GA Agent : Gillian Wright Lochside Low Askomil Campbeltown PA28 6EP Development Type : 1 Householder Development Grid Ref : 166542 623674 Application Ref : 07/02320/NMA Officer : Kim MacKay Ward Details : South Kintyre Proposal : Erection of garage - non-material amendment - amendment to windows and door Location : The Bungalow Stewarton Campbeltown Argyll And Bute PA28 6PG Applicant : Mr D.A Livingstone The Bungalow Stewarton Campbeltown Argyll PA28 6PG

Agent : Development Type : 9 Other Consents and Certificates Grid Ref : 169640 619840
Application Ref : 07/01431/COU Officer : Kim MacKay Telephone:01546 604085 Ward Details : 02 - Kintyre And The Islands Proposal : Change of use of garage/store to residential accommodation

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Location : The Steading Grogport Carradale Campbeltown Argyll And Bute PA28 6QL Applicant : Mr Peter Dewer North Drumond Cambusmore Callander FK17 7LR Agent : Tom Grant Partnership Campbeltown 41 Longrow Campbeltown Argyll Development Type : 5B All other developments Minor Grid Ref :181054 643409

SERVICE RECOGNITION
MRS EVELYN MACDONALD, MBE. Qualified as a Registered General Nurse at Raigmore Hospital, Inverness in 1960, Eva started with the Highland Health Board and finished with the Highland Health Board ! After qualification, Eva moved to Glasgow to work at the Southern General Hospital, and after marriage, at the Western Infirmary, Glasgow. In 1966, She moved to Campbeltown to take up post as Matron at Auchinlee where she worked for almost 20 years. After Auchinlee, Eva was engaged as a private nurse by the British Nursing Assoc., receiving work assignments throughout Argyll, Helensburgh, Stirlingshire and the Renfrewshire coast and was also engaged in relief work with private patients in Rothesay, Dunoon and Arran. Eva travelled a lot, and along the way, met many interesting and some famous people; many friendships were forged, and some of these friendships are much valued to this day. Eva retired in 2002, but missed her work very much, so she applied for work as a Bank Nurse at the local Hospital. Her application was successful, and after 2 months of retirement, she was working as a Bank Nurse. This work suited her very well, mainly because she was able to choose where she worked. For almost a year now, Eva has been working mainly in the community in Carradale, and she says she is very happy doing this. In spare time over the years, she has done a lot of voluntary work. Her longest spell of voluntary work was serving on the Children's Panel which she did for 25 years. This voluntary work was recognised by the Scottish Executive in 2004 when Eva was invited to a reception in the Great Hall at Edinburgh Castle and awarded a large crystal rose bowl suitably engraved. It was a very special evening being presented to the First Minister of the day. Argyll & Bute also recognised her long service when the Convener made a presentation in the form of a quaich at a reception in Lochfyne Hotel, Inveraray, and her local fellow Panel members presented her with a personal gift at a dinner in her honour. The Kintyre Crime Prevention Panel is another voluntary pursuit - having now served on this panel for almost 22 years and as Chairperson for 14 years. Undaunted, three years ago she applied and was accepted as a volunteer with the Court Witness Service and with Victim Support, Scotland. She says that attending Court as a witness can for some people be a very daunting experience, hence the need for someone to support them. This, she found, very interesting work. Over the years, volunteering has been a great part of Eva’s life. She feels by doing this, she is able to put something back into the community in which she lives. Her investiture at Buckingham Palace, and being awarded the MBE made it all worth while. Eva’s husband,, daughter and grandson will always have an excellent memory of this very magical day when HRH The Prince of Wales pinned the Insignia on Eva’s dress

SOUTH KINTYRE SENIORS FORUM
Held at Kinloch Hall Thursday 13th December 2007 Present : George McMillan (Chair), Geoffrey Page, Douglas McKerral, Isabelle Johnston, Marjorie Gillies, Janet Russell, Jean Millar, Judith Falconer, Ian McAllister, Mary-Margaret Hanna, Margaret Turner, Ian Teesdale Apologies : Val Cannel, Agnes Brown, Ruth Young, Alan Briggs, Catherine & John Mclntyre, Emily McDonald, Diana Brodie Minutes of Previous Meeting : these were read and approved as a true record. Proposed by George McMillan, seconded by Ian Teesdale. At this stage the Chairman introduced the speaker for this meeting, Mrs Jan McCorkindale, para-legal staff member from Messrs C & D Mactaggart, who talked to us about Powers of Attorney in respect of persons unable through age or disability to manage their own affairs. Such persons are termed "adults with incapacity". Anyone can find him or herself in such a situation, as a result of accident or illness or simply the onset of old age, and it is in the interests of all of us, particularly those of us who are becoming elderly, to make provision for the possible onset of incapacity. Power of Attorney gives another person, chosen by you, and usually, but not necessarily a member of your immediate family, the legal right to make decisions on your behalf should it become apparent that you are no longer able to make them for yourself. Such decisions could be about your financial affairs, or your living situation and your health. Your doctor is often the person best able to decide whether or not you have reached the point where your attorney should begin to act in this way on your behalf. In 2000 the Scottish Parliament enacted that an office of Public Guardian (Scotland) be created. It is now the duty of the Public Guardian to oversee all persons upon whom Power of Attorney has been conferred, and to ensure that the arrangements for giving Power of Attorney are generally understood and properly carried out. To this end the Public Guardian has produced 3 pamphlets: "What is a Power of Attorney", "What is Guardianship" and "What is the Office of Public Guardian". These explain clearly and in simple language what the system is and how it works. Setting up a Power of attorney is a legal process that has to be registered with the Public Guardian. It is usually done through a lawyer and is likely to cost several hundred pounds. If you become an "adult with incapacity" and have not set up a Power of attorney, those concerned with your well-being may need to apply for a Guardianship Order. This can only be made by a court of law, and is a costly complicated procedure, as the Guardianship Order leaflet makes clear.

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The Forum's Secretary Ian Teesdale has copies of all these leaflets should anyone wish to see any of them. The Chairman thanked Mrs McCorkindale for her extremely clear and helpful talk on this important subject. Matters Arising : The Chairman told the meeting that Douglas Blades, Public Transport Officer, Argyll & Bute Council and Douglas Lang from the Council's Campbeltown Office had met Agnes Nugent, Ian Teesdale and himself at Tayinloan on the last day of November to discuss the question of where the service buses should stop in the village on their outward journey. A possible solution to this problem was agreed, although Mr Blades advised us that there were not funds available for this work in the current financial year. The Chairman told the meeting that he and the other Forum representatives had very much appreciated the positive way in which the Council Officers had approached this long-standing problem. Council Area Committee : The Chairman said that he expected to be able to arrange a meeting between representatives of our Forum and our local councillors, as a means of raising the topics of concern to our Forum mentioned at various Forum meetings during the previous twelve months. Details yet to be decided. Closure of Local Post Offices : Ian Teesdale read out a letter he had written on the Forum's behalf to the Post Office National Consultation Team, asking the Post Office to confirm that should the planned closures at High Street and Ralston Road take place there would be a compensatory increase in staffing levels at the main Post Office in the Co-operative Store. Date of Next Meeting : Thursday 10th January in Kinloch Hall. THIS WILL BE OUR ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING. PLEASE TRY TO
ATTEND. Christmas Party : As this was our last meeting of the year some sandwiches and home baking appeared at this point, supplemented by fresh fruit provided by Mrs Turner as a contribution from Kintyre Healthy Living Partnership; so we ended the year on a cheerful and convivial note. Those present expressed their gratitude to the providers. Ian Teesdale, Minute Secretary.

HARBOURING - A HEALTHY PURSUIT ?
Avid watchers of 24 hour news programmes on TV will have seen brave (non-Scottish) hearts taking to the water on New Year’s Day in Hyde Park, on the south coast of England, in Russia and a number of eastern European countries, where the call of cold water cannot be resisted. Carradale has long been the Scottish equivalent - local notaries take to the ‘enriched’ waters close to the harbour having just indulged in a traditional New Year’s meal. This activity, closely guarded by the secret society of ‘Shore Road Plungers’, has at last been disclosed to the Antler by a fellow traveller of the group, one who has a wide experience of water problems but is not keen to indulge in this somewhat ‘risqué’ ritual. Glowing from their exertions from Sellafield radiation and from the New Year semi-fluid votive offerings of nearby properties, they retired to their hill top residences determined to risk all again in 2009. Should we admire their courage or their faith in the wet-suit’s ability to withstand pollution from the assorted items being deposited in and around the harbour ?

MAY AFTERMATH
Do you remember the heady days of May when canvassing for the new Argyll & Bute Council was an everyday occurrence and familiar and unfamiliar faces appeared at your front or rear door. In some cases that was the first and last time you saw them. I think everyone admits that the burden on the previous administration to provide numerical parity and embrace groups with seemingly similar geographical problems, has not been a success for some rural areas. East Kintyre has certainly suffered from irregular Councillor presence under the new multi-member ward system; ‘pot luck’ is very much the order of the day. While all six ABC Councillors were sent copies of the Antler’s December issue in time for the meeting on December 6th, John Semple managed his first appearance and was very helpful; Robin Currie and Anne Horn sent apologies. As the first Thursday in January is too close to New Years Day, the February meeting of EKCC will provide two Councillors with the unique opportunity to be present at an East Kintyre Community Council meeting for the first time since their election eight months ago ! On the other hand Community Councillors, being volunteers, have a much better record, leaving aside employment commitments and the treasurer’s propensity to attract hip problems by carrying loose Wind-farm change in his trouser pockets ! I wonder if a similar problem affects Unitary Authority Councillors - perhaps they rue the day when only telephone, travelling and responsibility extras were paid, and are now ‘weighted down’ with greater concerns over justifying their salaries and their safety on ‘B’ class roads at night. POSTSCRIPT : Although too late to include in the December or January Antlers, Councillor Anne Horn held a surgery in Carradale Village Hall at 5pm on Monday 10th of December 2007 - the first since her election in May 2007. Notices were put up a few days before the meeting, but she made no direct contact with the Community Council to tell members of her intention, despite being aware of the free advertising available to her through the ‘Antler’ and EKCC meetings. In the past elected councillors have found that the best time to have surgeries is just before or just after community council meetings, solving two types of problem with one visit. Like anyone else with a new job, newly elected councillors face a steep learning curve and

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would do well to use the statutory agency of community councils to help them fulfil their responsibilities and to keep abreast of local issues. Councillors were reminded in the January Antler that their failure to organise themselves meant that the service they offered would either be overstretched or under-manned. One month later they have still failed to follow the example of other areas and designate councillors to particular community council catchments. In 2006 East Kintyre Community Council, and residents aware of the implications, objected to plans to divorce Carradale and Grogport from Saddell and Peninver in the new Councillor wards. The problems of the changes were not recognised and led to Unitary Authority Councillors from both areas attending only 3 out of 6 meetings, resulting in John Semple being asked to deal with matters affecting residents of Kintyre & the Islands - outside the area he represents. Whether he will be able to report back, or ensure that answers are provided by the appropriate Councillors at the February meeting, is open to question.

GROGPORT RAINFALL
NOV/DEC & 2007 Drip, drip, drop…… a triple dose this month with November and December records and an overall annual view of 2007. NOVEMBER Rainfall of 155mm was recorded in November. This was a low total for the month and had it not been for heavy rain on the 28th & 30th (18 and 19mm respectively), it would have been the driest November since 2000. On the five days when there was heavy rain it was easy to forget the days when it had been dry. But statistics show that during the month there were five completely dry days whilst only a trace on five more, with showers falling on the remainder. DECEMBER December brought marked contrasts. It started and ended on a very wet note, making up for the dry, relatively mild Autumn. But in the middle fortnight period between the 10th & 23rd rain fell only once, with 8mm recorded on the 12th December. Christmas Eve recorded very high rainfall (29mm, over an inch.)The December total was 175 mm… a very average total for the month. There were, on occasions, very low barometer readings accentuating the contrasting highs and lows of the weather this month. ANNUAL RAINFALL So what does it all add up to? The annual rainfall figures for 2007 were 1535 mm [or 61.4 inches for those of that persuasion]. This makes 2007 the lowest annual rainfall in the seven years of record keeping here in Grogport. Annual rainfall has over the same seven year period varied between 1535 this year and 2253 mm in 2004. [ or 61.4 inches this year and 90.12 inches in 2004.]Average annual rainfall for the 7year period is 1905mm [76inches.] Looking back, did 2007 seem a dry year? We certainly escaped the violent storms and flooding of places down south but perhaps the passing of time makes one pick up on the wet rather than the dry days; or is that just the view of an aging pessimist….. like the feeling that time seems to go faster as the years pass! The nature and contrasts of the British weather give us much food for thought & conversation and the passage of time won’t change that. Good old British Weather ! As we start a New Year I am reminded of these three sayings that : “There is no bad weather only inappropriate clothing” “Winter: slippy, drippy, nippy” and that “January brings the snow, Makes our feet and fingers glow.” We can only hazard a guess as to what January, indeed what 2008, will throw at us, The only dependable conclusion is to let the statistics do the talking. ML

CHRISTMAS QUIZ
The Christmas Quiz was held in a festively decked Village Hall on Saturday 22nd December, 2007. Thank you to all Committee members that helped with the preparations. This year, again, due to the generosity of Peter & Paula Davie, the tables were decorated with crackers, balloons and party boxes that contained novelties & sweets. These created a congenial and relaxed atmosphere. 15 teams contested the 15th of the current quiz format of written answers in ten categories with ten questions in each. The judicious use of a joker, as in past quizzes, played its part. ‘General Knowledge’ & ‘Sport’ sections proved the most demanding whilst those of ‘Walls’ & ‘Sheep & Goats’, although regarded with suspicion, were none the less answered well. Sections entitled ‘Who’ & ‘Flowers’ were answered with greatest ease and aplomb by all. Eleven teams scored 70 points or more and well done everyone…..always remembering that it’s the taking part rather than the winning that counts! However, in such events there must of course be an overall winner. Congratulations to ’Mike’s Morons’ who with 85 points won and

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retained the Christmas Quiz title. The team members comprised the Richardsons & the Davies. Each member received a china mug filled with sweets. In second place, just two points behind and earning a box of chocolates were, “Can’t cook, won’t cook”. This was especially commendable as their team had only three members. As a consolation prize a very long box of chocolate finger biscuits was awarded to the two depleted but gallant participants of the ‘Shore Road Strugglers.’ Edibles in the form of mince pies & donated shortbread were provided, and the Village Hall Committee members ran a Bar to provide liquid refreshment. There was also a huge raffle with many wonderful prizes won by many lucky winners. As intended, it proved an enjoyable community social evening; and in addition, it raised funds towards the running and upkeep of the Hall. The committee would like to convey their thanks to all those that came along to support the event and to those that pre- bought raffle tickets. The Question compiler is already working on the annual Carradale Quiz which will take place, as ever, in the Summer. It would be nice to break the record of 19 competing teams at that event. In the meantime, happy quizzing. ML

COMMUNITY COUNCIL MEETING
MINUTES OF THE MEETING HELD ON 1ST NOVEMBER 2007 IN CARRADALE VILLAGE HALL AT 7PM ATTENDING : Shelagh Cameron, Lachie Paterson, Stuart Irvine, Ronnie Brownie, Andrea Hopkins, Geoffrey Page, 8 members of the public. Apology - Sheena MacAlister. WELCOME : The Chairperson welcomed all to the meeting and asked for the approval of the minutes of November meeting. Proposed Andrea, Seconded - Shelagh. MATTERS ARISING : We have had no response to the advert for the post of Minutes Sec. More enquiries to be made. Torrisdale Jetty : Donald Macalister Hall making enquiries into fate of Glenlight. The Jetty was discussed and the Chair confirmed to Marcus that EKCC want it removed and the beach restored. MINUTE SECRETARY : No interest in post. Stuart suggested asking Marjory Smith and mentioned that Fiona Lavery at The Ashbank might be interested in helping out. SADDELL CHRISTMAS LIGHTS : Elizabeth MacMillan and Robert Strang were asked to liaise with Saddell about mix up with bulbs. Robert will give Saddell the extra bulbs. Robert buys the bulbs for the Carradale tree every year, organises and erects the tree. Stuart thanked Robert wholeheartedly for his work on behalf of the community. Thanks also to the Hurst's for their involvement and for Trish's poem. Marcus suggested that The Hotel, Glen, Dunvalanree and Ashbank may provide some festive nibbles for round the tree carol singing on 16th Dec. Marcus will liaise with hotels. ROAD SIGNAGE : Chairperson had yet another conversation with Donnie McLeod about passing place signs - Could we have the idiot proof signage re Portavadie and Mallaig roads? D. McLeod looking into missing signs. Lengthy discussion ensued about signage and funding. Planning permission may need to be sought for signage. Marcus pointed out that The Kintyre Way had to pay individually for each interpretative panel at a cost of £150! ‘Red tape gone mad’! Chair thanked Marcus for very interesting and relevant info. It was pointed out that some of the signs (especially at the Skipness turn off) could do with replacing or scrubbing ! ROADSIDE SCRUB : Discussion about road side scrub and efficacy of clearing methods. Landowners have responsibility for front of property but few seem to bother. Could Community Service people be utilised for maintenance of Kintyre Way and/or verges ? POST OFFICE CONSULTATION : Discussion and clarification that, at present. there is no threat of closure to either office in Carradale. Email to be sent to consultative body. CORRESPONDENCE : Awards for All - Geoffrey Page has replied. Scottish Landscape Forum - brochure available. Government letter about flooding. Letter/email to Peter Peacock by Vice Chair Argyll & Bute Council One Stop Shop (Burnett Building) 01586 55 2366 PLANNING APPLICATIONS - report from Geoffrey Page. (1) Land SW of Torrisdale South Lodge (2) Land NE of Inyanga Planning sub committee activated! Stuart & Ronnie will check up and report back.

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AOCB : Stuart Irvine - Right of Way from Golf Course to Harbour. This path is in a highly dangerous state. Stuart proposes to restore this path with some the financial help from local residents and hopefully prick the conscience of George Leslie and Scottish Water. Stuart will investigate. Discussion about methods contractors etc. TREASURERS REPORT : The Chairperson apologised for the omission on the agenda and asked if Stuart would give a brief report! Stuart was pleased to report that if we had no additional expense we would finish the year with a balance of approx £1500. AOCB : Brian Gee pointed out that the new path to the Village Hall needed some attention and it was discussed that adoption by the Core path network (Argyll& Bute) was mentioned when the path was made. Chairperson to speak to Donnie McLeod about Core Paths, Lighting and Pavements, Marcus Adams stated that Owen Paisley, Kintyre Way Ranger, would be willing to come to meetings to discuss the Kintyre Way. MINUTES : The Chairperson will transpose minutes from tape The Chair thanked all for attending. Stuart Irvine thanked the Chair.

HEALTH, AGE AND DISABILITY ISSUES
MATTERS DISCUSSED AT A MEETING OF THE KINTYRE SERVICE RE-DESIGN STEERING GROUP
ATTENDING : Donnie Cameron, Clinical Services Manager (Chair). Michelle Armour, Delayed Discharge Co-ordinator. Helen McLachlan, Occupational Therapist. Rory Colville, Councillor, Argyll & Bute Council. John Semple, Councillor, Argyll & Bute Council. Alison Hunter, Area Manager, Community Care Resources. lain MacPherson, Ward Manager, Acute W ard. Gillian Robertson, Charge Nurse A&E. Jill Slater, Manager, Auchinlee Residential Home. Susan Paterson, Kintyre Forum on Community Care. Louise Burke, CNS Older Peoples Services. Janet Armour, Integrated Community Nursing Team Leader. Lorna McKinnon, Argyll & Bute Council & Morag Robins, Mid Argyll Volunteer Drivers Scheme.

VOLUNTEER DRIVERS SCHEME Donnie Cameron introduced Lorna MacKinnon of Argyll& Bute Council and Morag Robins of the Mid Argyll Volunteer Drivers Scheme who gave a talk on the successful volunteer drivers scheme being run in Mid Argyll. The scheme is funded by the Scottish Executive and is limited to the use of over 60s. Mid Argyll Scheme has 22 volunteers covering Inveraray, Ardfern, Tayvallich, Kilmartin and Tarbert. A discussion followed and it was agreed that a similar scheme would be of great benefit to Campbeltown and surrounding rural areas and if established could be run as a pilot project for one year. Councillor Colville will take this proposal to the Area Development Group. CAMPBELTOWN ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY UNIT lain MacPherson and Gillian Robertson gave a short presentation on the plans to deliver services in the new A&E Department. They also described the layout of the new department which includes a holding room for seriously ill and seriously disturbed psychiatric patients, redesigned nurses station and cardiac room. All casualties will be seen at the hospital and a dedicated A&E nurse will be on duty at all times. The new department will be officially opened by Nicola Sturgeon on 21st April 2008. TELECARE/TELE HEALTH UPDATE Network Centre has two vacancies which have been advertised. Telecare and Older Peoples Services post has been offered to most suitable candidate who hopefully will be in post by Christmas. This post will work alongside the integrated care team when it is set up. There is funding for the project until March 2008. Hopefully this will be resolved. Campbeltown to be pilot site for tele-medicine for next year. OLDER PEOPLES SERVICES REDESIGN Donnie reminded the meeting that the NHS intends to withdraw from providing continuing care for the elderly by 2010. This decision has been taken at national level and therefore cannot be influenced locally. In light of this we should now be looking at what we want to do with the facilities at the hospital. A discussion followed and the following points noted: John Dreghorn is proposing to the CHP Board that a Rehabilitation Ward should be retained within Campbeltown Hospital. Rory Colville proposed that we write letter to Donnie Kelly who is leading Council Group looking at long term elderly care and invite him to attend meetings of this group. This was agreed. John Semple and Rory Colville to lobby group about their concerns re future of long term elderly care. Josephine Bowen organising seminar on 7th November to discuss rehabilitation and day care. Independent providers have been invited to attend. Use Public Partnership Forum to express our views to CHP. It was agreed to invite Peter Cartwright and Sandra Greer to attend next meeting. KINTYRE HEALTHY LIVING PROJECT Donnie reported that Diana MacKenzie, Project Co-ordinator, is leaving her post at the end of October. Sustainability of the project in Kintyre is not looking good. The Consultancy will work with the management and provide administration support until the project winds up. INTEGRATED CARE TEAM Louise Burke reported that the team is still not functioning. It is ready to go in theory, data base has been set up but there is an Argyll wide union issue about Argyll & Bute Council outreach workers.

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INTEGRATED COMMUNITY NURSING TEAM Donnie introduced Janet Armour, who has taken up post of Integrated Community Nursing Team Leader and is responsible for taking forward the recommendations in the Review of Nursing in the Community. There is to be a radical reshape of the community nursing service with an amalgamation of the community nurse, health visitor, family health nurse, public health nurse into one role. NHS Highland has been chosen as a development site for this. Janet is currently looking at ways in which the district nursing teams can work more closely together. A steering group has been set up for MAKI with representatives from each discipline, GPs, Practice Nurses and members of public. Susan Paterson has agreed to be a member of this group. It was agreed that Janet will return to update group on progress made. SLEEP OVER HOUSE Alison reported that the house would most probably be de-registered. Suggestions for the use of the house have been looked at but none had proved to be efficient enough. House may be handed back to ACHA or may be used by Woodlands. A decision will be made before the next meeting and Alison will update then. ANY OTHER BUSINESS Kintyre Community Care Forum is holding a conference and exhibition on 6th March 2008 looking at several themes such as transport, housing, home care and money. Would like as many groups as possible to attend. DATE OF NEXT MEETING Tuesday 29th January, 2008
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PENSIONERS GIFTS
Carradale Primary School children, parents and staff provided generous hampers to selected pensioners in the area this Christmas. Because of the number of pensioners, a lottery was held to select who would benefit. Those who received the gift wish to thank everyone involved in this very generous initiative.

A NEW DOME DISCOVERED
Those of us who visited the Festival of Britain in 1951 may have somewhat mixed memories of the ‘attractions’ fifty-seven years later. Memories of whirling propellers the ‘skylon’ and the ‘Dome of Discovery seemed adventurous at the time but now seem little more than symbolic gestures of a new age. However the copy of Angus Macdonald’s on this page sends us back nearly a hundred years to a time when a local ‘dome’ featured on top of the village’s water hydrant’ whgile the photograph on page one records a recent attempt to restore it. The Victorian hydrant near the War Memorial was long an essential part of village life but no longer serves its original purpose, but this hasn’t stopped Mrs Elizabeth Ross from providing a replacement ‘dome’ and others from adding a little paint to make this village symbol a little more decorative. Congratulations and thanks to everyone involved. Although many locals will be aware of Angus’s contribution to recording the local scene, others may not be aware that he lived in the ‘gap’ beside Paterson’s bakers shop and in part of what is now Carradale East Post Office. Known as much for his for his unusual preference for discarding shirts, vests propensities under an old jacket. Many of his pictures on pieces of ply wood from and oil paint were often based upon postcard photos of the area. Employed exemplifies what Campbeltonians often consider to be an essential characteristic the centre of their world. and socks, as his ability with a paint brush, he hid his packing cases show a natural feeling for both water-colour at various times as a forester and as a fisherman, he of a somewhat unusual species living at a distance from

DUMPING AT CARRADALE HARBOUR
The Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) and Argyll & Bute Council Environmental Services Department have been advised that bags of rubbish are being dumped into the sea at Carradale Pier on a frequent basis. Local residents are keeping records of each illegal action and photographic evidence is being sought. Anyone else who has evidence of this environmentally unfriendly action is asked to contact SEPA on 01546 602876, Argyll & Bute Council’s Environmental Services Department via 01586 552366 or Mary Stewart, Environmental Warden on 01586 552236. The latest episode involved plastic bags, thought to contain food or household rubbish, being carried past rubbish bins and thrown over the pier wall.

POST OFFICE CLOSURES
POST OFFICE LTD’S VIEW The Government has recognised that fewer people are using Post Office® branches, partly because traditional services, including benefit payments and other services are now available in other ways, such as online or directly through banks. It has concluded that the overall size and shape of the network of Post Office® branches (“the Network”) needs to change.

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In May 2007, following a national public consultation, the Government announced a range of proposed measures to modernise and reshape the Network and put it on a more stable footing for the future. A copy of the Government’s response to the national public consultation (“the Response Document”) can be obtained at www.dti.gov.uk/consultations/page36024.html Post Office Ltd has now put in place a Network Change Programme (“the Programme”) to implement the measures proposed by the Government. The Programme will involve the compulsory compensated closure (subject to EU State Aid clearance) of up to 2,500 Post Office ® branches (out of a current Network of 14,300 branches), with the introduction of about 500 service points known as “Outreaches” to mitigate the impact of the proposed closures. Subject to EU State Aid clearance, compensation will be paid to those sub-postmasters whose branches are compulsorily closed under the Programme. To support the necessary changes to the Network and put it on a more stable footing and to support the reshaped Network of the future, the Government has proposed an investment of up to £1.7bn as a funding package. This funding package is subject to State Aid clearance by the European Commission. The majority of Post Office® branches - more than 80% - will not change as a result of the Programme. Post Office Ltd is seeking to implement those changes that do take place as efficiently and sensitively as possible. One of the key ways in which Post Office Ltd will make sure that people continue to have the best possible access to Post Office® services is by applying the minimum access criteria prescribed by the Government in the Response Document : Nationally :  99% of the UK population to be within 3 miles and 90% of the population to be within 1 mile of their nearest Post Office® branch.  99% of the total population in deprived urban1 areas across the UK to be within 1 mile of their nearest Post Office® branch.  95% of the total urban2 population across the UK to be within 1 mile of their nearest Post Office® branch.  95% of the total rural3 population across the UK to be within 3 miles of their nearest Post Office® branch. THE AREA PLAN PROPOSAL FOR GREATER GLASGOW, CENTRAL SCOTLAND, ARGYLL & BUTE Post Office Ltd is acutely aware of the concerns that changes - including closures - affecting Post Office® branches in Greater Glasgow, Central Scotland, and Argyll & Bute will cause. In fulfilling the UK Government's requirement to reduce the overall size of the Post Office® network ("the Network") - and to do so in a way which creates similar results across the UK and ensures that no group of inhabitants at an area level is more adversely affected than any other - we are proposing to retain a total of 264 Post Office® branches across the area, but to close 44 existing branches and install 3 outreach services. If these proposed changes take place, Post Office Ltd will remain the largest retailer by Network size in the area, and will still have more branches open than the number of branches of major banks and building societies combined. 99.9% of customers will retain their existing branch or live within one mile of an alternative branch. At present the area's 1.1 million residents are served by a total of 308 branches. Use of Post Office® branches is falling, in line with national trends, as more customers utilise services at other places, make more use of the internet and have their Government benefits paid directly into bank accounts. This Area Plan Proposal supports achievement of the national accessibility criteria set by the UK Government, forms part of an overall reduction in the number of branches by up to 2,500 across the UK as set out by the Government, and does not disproportionately affect the area relative to other parts of the UK. In addition to meeting these criteria, when preparing this Area Plan Proposal Post Office Ltd has considered factors relating to geography, the availability of local transport and alternative access to key Post Office® services, local demographics and the impact on local economies. All branches where changes are proposed have been visited by a member of Post Office Ltd's team to make sure that local factors that need to be considered in developing an Area Plan Proposal have been assessed first hand. The area's communities are diverse in nature - 75% of the population live in urban areas and 25% in rural communities. The Area Plan covers a large region spanning from Carnpbeltown and the Isle of Gigha to Lochgilphead, Oban, Mull, Dunoon and the Isle of Bute. It includes the central belt town of Falkirk, and the city of Stirling and their neighbouring villages. It also includes Greater Glasgow, covering the densely populated city of Glasgow, Clydebank, stretching out towards Dunbartonshire and over to East Renfrewshire. In order to meet the Government's access criteria and avoid undue hardship Post Office Ltd is proposing a future Network in the area of 132 branches in rural areas and 132 branches in urban towns and cities. The needs of those living in communities defined as deprived have been carefully considered in this Area Plan Proposal, reflecting the specific national criteria set by the Government to give greater safeguards on the accessibility of branches in these communities. 29% of the area's total population live in deprived communities, 90% of them in urban areas and 10% in rural areas. In the proposal set out for the Network in the future, 56 branches will be located in urban deprived communities.

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Post Office Ltd has engaged with various stakeholders when preparing this Area Plan Proposal. We have already consulted with the independent consumer watchdog on postal services, Postwatch, both nationally and at a regional level, and have asked all local authorities within the area to provide information and views relevant to the factors which we are able to consider in producing the most effective overall proposal for the future.

POST OFFICE CONSULTATION OUTCOME : JAN 2008
CAMPBELTOWN: HIGH STREET BRANCH A relatively small amount of feedback was received in relation to this branch. The main point raised was that the alternative branch would not be able to cope with additional customers. Feedback during consultation has been noted and taken into account. The nearest alternative branch is 0.5 of a mile away and Post Office Ltd believes the branch has the capacity to absorb the extra customers. This was carefully considered before any proposal was put forward. There is reasonable public transport between the two branches and parking is available for approximately 50 cars. Having considered these and all other relevant factors, the final decision is to proceed with the closure of this branch. CAMPBELTOWN: RALSTON ROAD BRANCH A relatively small amount of feedback was received regarding our proposal for this branch. The nearest alternative branch is 0.8 of a mile away, in the main shopping area of the town and there is a reasonable bus service, providing free travel to the over 60's and disabled customers. Having regard to these and all other relevant factors, Post Office Ltd has decided to proceed with the closure of this branch.

HOUSING OVERVIEW
The Local Housing Survey contains a detailed profile of Argyll and Bute and provides an overview of the local housing system with analysis of the key factors such as the demographic, socio-economic and housing trends which in turn form the basis of the Housing Needs Assessment for the area. In summary, Argyll and Bute is one of the largest and most sparsely populated local authority areas in Scotland. An area that is 9% of Scotland's landmass houses only 90,370 people, less than 2% of the nation's total population. It is almost entirely a "very remote rural area" within the terms of the Scottish Executive urban-rural classification and includes 25 inhabited islands. Almost 40% of the inhabitants live in settlements of less than 1,000 compared to a Scottish average of 12%. This has a significant impact on a range of services and facilities that are easily accessible, including housing, and increases delivery and development costs. There is an increasingly older population with associated health and support implications and there is an overall out-migration of younger working age people from the area, and in-migration of those of retirement age. Argyll and Bute has a relatively low average gross household income, with average earnings in 2006 being £419.70 per week which is 2.71% lower than the median for Scotland, and employment rates are generally low, with a significant reliance on seasonal work. The 2007 Annual LHS Update indicates a total housing stock of 45,964 - almost 3% increase overall since 2003/4, however 9.5% of this (a total of 4,391 dwellings) is deemed ineffective, i.e. vacant, second or holiday homes. Total social stock amounted to 8,117, which is a 9% decrease since 2003/4, although the rate of annual Right To Buys has shown a slowing down, from 274 in 2003 to only 109 in 2006/7. Demand for social housing increased significantly in 2006 (5,200 registered applicants) but dipped slightly in 2007 to c. 5,000, which was almost 15% above the 2003 baseline figure of 4,365. House price inflation has continued to affect the local housing market with certain local "hot spots" such as Helensburgh and Lomond and Mull, for instance, reflecting the situation in the more urban markets of Scotland. In 2006, the average house price in Argyll and Bute was £131,317 (excluding RTBs) although in Helensburgh & Lomond, for instance, this figure was £155,213. Latest figures, as of May 2007, indicate a continuing and significant upward trend in house prices (£161,676 being the average house price in Argyll and Bute for that month while on Mull, for instance, for the first six months of 2007, the average house price rose to £211,489). (Kintyre average for the same period was £80,111) Given the relatively low average gross household income in Argyll and Bute, which would require house prices of c. £80,000 or average rents of £460 per month to be considered affordable, it is clear, therefore, that affordability remains a critical issue across the authority area. Condition and quality of the local housing stock also remains a significant issue, with high levels of Below Tolerable Standard accommodation in the private sector and much of the social sector stock still failing to meet the Scottish Housing Quality Standard. The Community Planning Partnership's analysis of general need in Argyll and Bute was based on the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation for 2004 with a review of changes in indicators at prescribed data zone level in 2006. In addition, the review has been informed by the study undertaken by the Scottish Centre for Research on Social Justice which particularly focused on the rural dimension of deprivation in Argyll and Bute. The study confirmed that the highest concentration of deprivation tends to be found within the main townships of Dunoon, Rothesay, Campbeltown and Helensburgh. However, it also indicated that pockets of deprivation exist across the area within more isolated communities.

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CAMPBELTOWN LOCH DEVELOPMENTS
HARBOUR & MARINA : A KINTYRE INITIATIVE MEETING IN
THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS, TOWN HALL, CAMPBELTOWN 11 OCTOBER 2007 ATTENDING Les Oman, Dalriada Business Action Group. Ivor Watson, Campbeltown Traders Association. Brian Keating, Royal Hotel/Machrihanish Dunes. Frank McHardy, Alistair Cousins, Michael Forman and Billy McFadyen - all of Campbeltown Sailing Club. David McAllister and John Carmichael of Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company. Michael Taylor, Mull of Kintyre Sea Tours. David Howell, M.O.D. Kevin Williams and Andrew Robertson of Argyll and Bute Council and John Semple, Vice Chair - Mid Argyll Kintyre & Isles Area Committee. APOLOGIES Col McFarlane INTRODUCTION & BACKGROUND John Semple thanked everyone for coming to the meeting and outlined how he had came to explore the formation of a group as a sub group of the Kintyre Initiative Working Group and what he had hoped to achieve by developing plans to improve facilities and berthing for yachts and pleasure craft on Campbeltown Loch CAMPBELTOWN BERTHING CO - DEVELOPED PLANS David McAllister outlined the current position with regards to the pontoons owned and operated by the Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company. Over the 3 months of the summer the pontoons cater for 1500 visiting boats equating to approximately 6000 visitors. The company, in 1997, appointed Halcro to develop plans to double the capacity of the pontoons to cater for 60 boats at then cost of about £250K. The Company is run in the interests of the community. ARGYLL & BUTE COUNCIL - ONGOING INITIATIVES Kevin Williams outlined the initiatives which identified the potential for waterfront development in Campbeltown including The Yellow book study, Sail West; a proposal for a European funded and the Council's Corporate Plan. Funding remains the main hurdle for these however. Andrew Robertson commented on the work he was currently undertaking for the development of Kinloch road. Brian Keating identified that his interests in golf development and particularly the renovation of the Royal Hotel would be heavily dependent on attracting visiting sailors from the adjacent pontoons and would be happy for his investment to be quoted to assist marina development. OPEN DISCUSSION The main discussions focused on perception of the existing facilities, the potential for development of these and what alternatives might be included. Frank McHardy praised the work done by the berthing company but commented that many yachts avoided coming to Campbeltown because they don't like having to tie up sometimes 3 abreast and that facilities on shore were not adequate. He also suggested that the pastime was growing significantly but felt that Campbeltown was not seeing the benefit of that growth. Brian Keating indicated that he intended to improve facilities by including a shower suit specifically for yachters in the Royal Hotel development. David McAllister estimated that 200 customers had been lost as a direct result of the pollution in the loch. Kevin Williams in answer to Billy McFadyen said that the marina developments in Rothesay's inner harbour were run by a community organisation in partnership with the council and that there was potential for the development of Campbeltown’s inner harbour in such a manner. Frank McHardy circulated a paper identifying a suggested configuration for pontoons in the inner harbour. Brian Keating said that he had independently had a study done into the potential for developing a marina in the inner harbour for transit and more specifically over wintering. (WMcD)? cautioned over development in the inner harbour since the harbour was still a working harbour with potentially 20 visiting fishing boats and frequent freight movements from the new quay and the cost of sheet piling which would be required prior to dredging would cost in the region of £0.5M. David McAllister also expressed concern since the inner harbour was not sufficiently sheltered for both the comfort and protection of small craft even in relatively moderate weather the inner harbour has wave movement. It was also suggested that a breakwater could be constructed to provide better shelter and would give better value for money. POTENTIAL PARTNERSHIP WORKING The group agreed that it had been a useful meeting and that they would be prepared to meet again as plans progressed ACTION POINTS It was agreed that funding be sought to enable the plans for the development of the existing marina be implemented. That the Mid Argyll, Kintyre & the Isles Area Committee be asked to appoint a consultant to include marina developments in the town centre & waterfront developments. The group agreed to meet again when a consultant had been appointed.

ARDCHATTAN WIND-FARM, SOUTHEND
The proposal consists of sixteen 850kW wind turbines, each with 55m high towers and blades that are 26m long, giving an overall maximum height of 81m, and associated infrastructure including internal access tracks, crane hard-standings, a switchgear building, a permanent anemometer mast and a potential borrow pit”.

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The developers state that “the proposed development would supply, on average, as much clean green electricity in a year as is used by around 7,600 homes whilst preventing the emissions to atmosphere (when compared to fossil fuel powered generation of the equivalent energy) of several thousand tonnes of carbon dioxide per annum. In addition to the environmental benefits, associated with the non-polluting sustainable energy generation technology, the direct benefits for the local community will include a Local Trust Fund which would be financed from a proportion of the revenue generated by the proposed wind farm. The Trust Funds objective is to provide a locally controlled community resource to help fund local energy efficiency/sustainability projects and general environmental enhancement projects”. The extent of the Trust Fund would be £13,600 based on a 13.6MW project. After examining the possible impact on a number of resident and migratory birds and local wildlife, the ecological assessment concludes “Overall, no ornithological or other ecological impacts are likely to occur as a result of the development that would be considered significant under the EIA Regulations, nor would it result in any breach of the Habitats Regulations. On noise the summary states that “ it can be concluded that noise from he wind-farm would not be detrimental to the amenity of local residents”. The comment continues in relation to other received threats ELECTRO-MAGNETIC SIGNALS In order to establish the location and nature of microwave, broadcast and other radio links in the vicinity of the site, numerous bodies and operators have been consulted. There is a possibility that links operated by 0 2 and Crown Castle International may be effected by the proposed Kilchattan Wind Farm development. Although the possibility of degradation of signals would appear unlikely, Wind Prospect is prepared to resolve any such problems should they arise as a result of the construction of the wind farm. AVIATION The Ministry of Defence (MoD), Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), NATS En Route Pic ("NERL") and Highlands and Islands Airports Limited were consulted in relation to potential impacts upon aviation in the area. Following consultation with the MoD no objections were raised to the development on the basis of military air safely. Although the proposal lies within an area where wind farm developments are likely to interfere with the operational infrastructure of NERL no consultation response has been received. Neither the CAA or Highlands and Islands Airports Limited raised objections to the proposal. However, Wind Prospect are prepared to further investigate the potential impacts of the proposal on the operations of NERL.

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