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Northern Regional

Community Fact Book

Bergen County Edition

New Jersey Department of Labor
and Workforce Development

Division of Labor Market and
Demographic Research

June 2006
Preface

T he Regional Community Fact Book for Bergen County provides a
snapshot of its people and its economy. Included are facts and fig-
ures on current industry trends, population, unemployment and income. The
Fact Book also provides a look into the future and provides the latest popu-
lation, labor force, industry and occupational projections.

The Regional Community Fact Book series is meant to be a reference
for use in local and regional economic development planning and for employ-
ment and training providers. Fact Books will be published annually for New
Jersey’s 21 counties, grouped into three regions (northern, central and
southern).

Acknowledgements

T his publication was prepared by Walter Nyakanga and Patricia
McKendrick of the Bureau of Labor Market Information, Division
of Labor Market and Demographic Research. Layout was done by Chester S.
Chinsky.

Questions regarding information contained in this publication should be
directed to Walter Nyakanga by phone at (973) 648-3188 or by e-mail:
walter.nyakanga@dol.state.nj.us.

To obtain copies of this publication or other county editions, please
contact Lester Wright by phone at (609) 292-7567 or by e-mail:
lester.wright @dol.state.nj.us.
Table of Contents

County Snapshot .................................................................................... 1

Industry Trends, Bergen vs. New Jersey ...................................... 2

Employment ............................................................................................ 5

Employment Gains and Losses ........................................................... 6

Wages ...................................................................................................... 7

Per Capita Personal Income ............................................................... 8

Unemployment Rates ........................................................................... 8

Characteristics of the Unemployed ................................................. 9

Population ...............................................................................................10

Population Projections ......................................................................... 11

Industry Projections ...........................................................................12

Projected Occupational Demand.......................................................13

Labor Force Projections .....................................................................14
County Snapshot
Northern Region
Population (2005 estimate): 902,561
Change from Census 2000: +18,443 or + 2.1%
Sussex Passaic Percent of New Jersey Total: 10.4%
Bergen
Total Private Sector
Warren Morris Employment (2004): 400,177
Essex Percent of New Jersey Total: 12.2%
Change from 1999: -5,451
Hudson
Union
Hunterdon Largest Industry (2004): Health Care & Social
Assistance
Health Care & Social Assistance Employment: 57,715
Percent of Total County Employment: 14.4%

Private Sector Wage (2004 annual average): $50,295
Percent of New Jersey Average: 105.6%
Change From 1999: +$6,994

Industry With Highest Average Annual
Wage (2004): Management of Companies & Enterprises: $96,650

Per Capita Personal Income (2004): $53,131
Percent of New Jersey Per Capita Income: 127.6%

Number of Unemployment Insurance Claimants (2005 annual average)
average): 6,109

Unemployment Rate (2005 annual average): 3.7%
5-year High (2002 & 2003): 5.1%
5-year Low (2005): 3.7%
New Jersey Rate (2005): 4.4%

Building Permits (single-family residential,2005): 1,220
Rank Among New Jersey Counties: 8

Bergen County Community Fact Book 1
Industry Trends, Bergen vs. New Jersey
∑ Over the 1999-2004 period, total private sector employment in Bergen County fell 1.3
percent, while employment statewide increased 0.7 percent. After peaking in 2001,
Bergen County’s employment decreased each year through 2004.

∑ Employment in two Bergen County industry sectors, education and health services (+27.1%
vs. +13.9%) and leisure and hospitality (+21.2% vs. +13.9%) outperformed the state
from 1999 to 2004.

∑ From 1999 through 2004, payrolls in the county’s manufacturing (-23.9% vs. -19.8%)
and information (-38.1% vs. -20.4%) sectors declined at a faster rate than in the state.

∑ Over the five-year period, two industry sectors posted overall job losses in the county
while registering gains statewide — trade, transportation and utilities (-7.2% vs. +0.5%)
and other services (-1.2% vs. +10.7%).

Note: Use of an index facilitates comparison between two separate data elements.

Bergen County and New Jersey Bergen County and New Jersey
Total Private Sector Employment: 1999-2004 Construction Employment: 1999-2004
106 125

120
104

115
102
110
100
105

98
100
(1999=100) (1999=100)

96 95
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Bergen New Jersey Bergen New Jersey

2 New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Industry Trends, Bergen vs. New Jersey

Bergen County and New Jersey Bergen County and New Jersey
Manufacturing Employment: 1999-2004 Trade, Transportation & Utilities Employment: 1999-2004
110 110

100 105

90 100

80 95

(1999=100)
(1999=100)
70 90
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Bergen New Jersey Bergen New Jersey

Bergen County and New Jersey Bergen County and New Jersey
Information Employment: 1999-2004 Financial Activities Employment: 1999-2004
120 110

110
105
100

90
100
80

70
95
60
(1999=100) (1999=100)
50 90
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Bergen New Jersey Bergen New Jersey

Bergen County Community Fact Book 3
Industry Trends, Bergen vs. New Jersey
Bergen County and New Jersey Bergen County and New Jersey
Professional & Business Services Employment: 1999-2004 Education & Health Services Employment: 1999-2004
106 130

104
120

102
110
100

100
98
(1999=100) (1999=100)
96 90
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Bergen New Jersey Bergen New Jersey

Bergen County and New Jersey Bergen County and New Jersey
Leisure & Hospitality Employment: 1999-2004 Other Services Employment: 1999-2004
125 115

120
110
115

110 105

105
100
100
(1999=100) (1999=100)

95 95
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Bergen New Jersey Bergen New Jersey

4 New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Employment
Bergen County
Total Private Sector Employment: 1999 — 2004
420,000

415,000

410,000 B
B B B
B
405,000

400,000 B
395,000

390,000
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

∑ Total private sector payroll employment in Bergen County decreased by 5,500 or
1.3 percent between 1999 and 2004. Much of this job loss was due to contractions
in manufacturing (-14,000), trade, transportation and utilities (-8,500) and infor-
mation (-7,500). Offsetting these losses were gains in education and health ser-
vices (+13,600) and in leisure and hospitality (+6,000).

Bergen County
Total Private Sector Employment by Industry: 1999 & 2004

Construction

Manufacturing

Trade/Transp./Utilities

Information

Financial Activities

Prof./Business Services

Educ./Health Services

Leisure/Hospitality

Other Services

0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000

2004 1999

∑ In 2004, trade, transportation and utilities was the largest employment sector,
comprising 27.3 percent of Bergen’s overall employment. Retail trade made up half
of this sector’s employment. Other sectors with significant job totals were pro-
fessional and business services (18.7%), education and health services (16.0%), and
manufacturing (11.1%). The information sector was the smallest at 3.1 percent.
Bergen County Community Fact Book 5
Employment Gains and Losses
Bergen County, Private Sector
Net Job Growth by Industry: 1999 — 2004
15,000

10,000

5,000

0

-5,000

-10,000

-15,000
Construction Manufact- Trade/ Information Financial Prof./ Education/ Leisure/ Other
uring Transport./ Activities Business Health Hospitality Services
Utilities Services Services

∑ Education and health services, one of the county’s larger employment sectors, added
13,600 jobs from 1999 to 2004 and accounted for 27.1 percent of the county’s over-
all job gain. Much of this growth took place in the health care and social assistance
component. The county’s manufacturing sector lost the most jobs (-14,000).

Bergen County, Private Sector
Gains, Losses and Net Growth by Industry: 2003
7,500

6,000

4,500

3,000

1,500

0

-1,500
Construction Manufact- Trade/ Information Financial Prof./ Education/ Leisure/ Other
uring Transport./ Activities Business Health Hospitality Services
Utilities Services Services

GAINS LOSSES NET

Source: Local Employment Dynamics (LED) data from the US Census Bureau.
∑ Despite net losses, sectors can generate significant numbers of job openings during
a year. Trade, transportation and utilities had the largest number of job gains, but
also the most job losses in 2003 (latest available). This disparity could be explained
by the high turnover rate experienced in the retail trade component, which accounted
for almost half of the sector’s total employment in 2003.

6 New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Wages
Bergen County, Private Sector
Average Annual Wage: 1999 — 2004
$55,000

$50,295
$50,000 $48,895
$46,992 $47,397
$46,571
$45,000 $43,301

$40,000

$35,000

$30,000

$25,000
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

∑ From 1999 to 2004, the average annual wage in both Bergen County and the state
increased at about the same rate (16.2% vs. 16.7%). The county’s wage rose to $50,295
while the state’s went up to $47,639. The higher cost of living in the county tends to
keep annual average wage levels above the state’s level.

Bergen County and New Jersey, Private Sector
Average Annual Wage by Industry: 2004
Total Private Sector

Construction

Manufacturing

Trade/Transp./Utilities

Information

Financial Activities

Prof./Business Services

Education/Health Services

Leisure/Hospitality

Other Services

$0 $20,000 $40,000 $60,000 $80,000

Bergen County New Jersey

∑ In 2004, approximately 96.0 percent of all jobs in Bergen County were in industries
paying relatively high wages and were comparable or better than the statewide wage.
In the county, the information sector paid the highest annual wage of $77,664, fol-
lowed by professional and business services ($67,658) and financial activities
($62,989). “Other services”, which includes automotive repair and maintenance, ap-
pliance repair, and personal care services, had the lowest wage ($29,596).

Bergen County Community Fact Book 7
Per Capita Personal Income
∑ Incomes in Bergen County are relatively Bergen County and New Jersey
high due, in part, to well paying jobs in New Per Capita Personal Income: 1999 — 2004
$55,000
York City where many residents work. In
2004 (latest available), per capita income $50,000

in the county was $53,131, ranking it
$45,000
fourth in the state and 19th among the
$
3,111 counties in the United States. The $40,000
$ $ $
$
county’s per capita income was 27.6 per- $35,000 $
cent higher than the state average of
$41,626 and 60.8 percent above the na- $30,000
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
tional average of $33,050.
Bergen $ New Jersey

∑ Of the three components of personal income, residents of Bergen in 2004 derived 72.5
percent from wage earnings versus 72.5 percent statewide, 18.3 percent from dividends/
interest/rent versus 15.2 percent statewide, and 9.2 percent from transfer payments
(such as welfare benefits, social security and veteran’s benefits) versus 12.3 percent
statewide.

Unemployment Rates

Bergen County and New Jersey
∑ During each year of the 1999-2005 period,
Unemployment Rate Trends: 1999 — 2005 the annual average unemployment rate in
7.0 Bergen County was lower than the state’s
6.5 rate. In 2005, the county’s average unem-
6.0
J J ployment rate was 3.7 percent, compared
5.5 with the state’s 4.4 percent. Historically,
B B the county’s rate has been lower than the
5.0
J J
4.5
J B J state’s rate.
4.0
B J B B
3.5 ∑ Population growth in Bergen County has
3.0 B been accompanied by an increase in the size
1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
of its labor force. From 2001 to 2005, the
B Bergen J New Jersey county’s labor force expanded by 2,600 or
0.6 percent, which was much slower than
the state’s 3.1 percent gain.

8 New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Characteristics of the Unemployed

Bergen County
Unemployment Insurance Claimants: 2004-2005
2005 2004
Annual Annual Change 2004-2005
Category Average Average Number Percent
Total Insured Unemployed 6,109 6,806 -697 -10.2
By Gender
Male 3,329 3,755 -426 -11.3
Female 2,780 3,051 -271 -8.9
By Race
White 4,394 4,953 -559 -11.3
Black 555 596 -41 -6.9
Asian 271 336 -65 -19.3
Other 890 921 -31 -3.4
By Ethnicity
Hispanic 969 1,004 -35 -3.5
Not Hispanic 4,669 5,343 -674 -12.6
Chose Not To Answer 472 460 12 2.6
By Age of Claimant
Under 25 402 347 55 15.9
25 through 34 1,192 1,327 -135 -10.2
35 through 44 1,525 1,734 -209 -12.1
45 through 54 1,485 1,624 -139 -8.6
55 through 64 1,025 1,211 -186 -15.4
65 and over 481 565 -84 -14.9
By Industry
Construction 701 723 -22 -3.0
Manufacturing 569 688 -119 -17.3
Trade, Transportation and Utilities 1,409 1,587 -178 -11.2
Wholesale Trade 489 553 -64 -11.6
Retail Trade 712 763 -51 -6.7
Information 170 312 -142 -45.5
Financial Activities 361 404 -43 -10.6
Professional and Business Services 961 1,105 -144 -13.0
Educational and Health Services 577 667 -90 -13.5
Leisure and Hospitality 324 392 -68 -17.3
Other Services 151 177 -26 -14.7

∑ As the economy improved between 2004 and 2005, the number of persons filing for
unemployment compensation benefits in Bergen County fell 10.2 percent. Declines in
the number of filings by males (-426), whites (-559), and the 35-44 age group (-209)
led the way.

∑ In the county, every industry reported a drop in the number of unemployment claims
from 2004 to 2005. The largest numerical reduction was in trade, transportation and
utilities (-178).

Bergen County Community Fact Book 9
Population
∑ Bergen was the state’s most populous Bergen County
county in 2005 with 902,561 residents. Total Population: 1970 — 2005
950,000
Over ten percent of the state’s residents
live in the county. 900,000

∑ Over the 1970-2005 period, population
850,000

growth in the county, however, was one 800,000

of the slowest in the state (0.5% vs.
750,000
21.6%). This slow growth was the result
of a loss from net migration that c anceled 700,000

out some of the gains in natural increment
650,000
(births minus deaths) and in net interna- 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005

tional migration.

Bergen County ∑ In 2004 (latest available by race), the ra-
Racial/Hispanic Origin: 2000 - 2004 cial composition of Bergen County remained,
Percent Percent predominately white. Whites comprised
Race in 2000 in 2004 79.7 percent of the population, compared
White 82.2 79.7 with the state’s 76.9 percent. Asians, the
Black 5.7 5.8 largest and fastest growing minority group
Asian 11.0 13.1 in the county, accounted for 13.1 percent
Multiracial 1.0 1.1 of the population, higher than the state’s
American Indian/Alaska Native 0.2 0.2
7.0 percent. Blacks made up 5.8 percent in
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander 0.0 0.0
the county, significantly less than the 14.5
Total* 101.0 99.0
percent statewide. Hispanics comprised a
Hispanic Origin (may be of any race) 10.4 12.7
* May not add to 100% due to rounding smaller percentage of county population
than statewide (12.7% vs. 14.9%).

∑ From 1970 to 2004 (latest available by Bergen County
municipality), only 27 of Bergen County’s Ten Largest Municipalities 2004
70 municipalities gained new residents. Rank Municipality Population
Mahwah Township was the only municipal- 1 Hackensack City 43,681
ity to more than double in size, going from 2 Teaneck Township 39,853
10,800 to 24,682. 3 Fort Lee Borough 37,310
4 Fair Lawn Borough 31,613
5 Garfield City 29,833
6 Paramus Borough 26,624
7 Englewood City 26,353
8 Bergenfield Borough 26,210
9 Ridgewood Village 24,916
10 Mahwah Township 24,682

10 New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Population Projections
∑ The population of Bergen County is pro- Bergen County
jected to increase by 54,646 from 2002 Population Projections: 2002 — 2012
975,000
to 949,100 in 2012. This rate of growth is
projected to be somewhat slower than the 950,000

state’s (6.1% vs. 8.1%). Even with the slower 925,000

growth, Bergen is expected to remain the 900,000
most populous county in the state.
875,000

850,000

825,000

800,000
2002* 2007** 2012**
*estimate **projection

Bergen County
∑ According to 2002-2012 projections, the
Projections for Select Age Groups: 2002 — 2012 15-24 age group is expected to grow the
300,000 fastest (+26.5%) while the 45-64 age group
250,000 is projected to increase the most
200,000 (+47,808). Possibly due to the county’s high
150,000
cost of living, especially for real estate,
the 25-44 age group is anticipated to lose
100,000
25,820 persons.
50,000

0
0-14 15-24 25-44 45-64 65+

2002* 2012**
*estimate **projection

∑ By 2012, the “other races” (+63.4%, in- Bergen County
cludes Asian, American Indian/Alaska Na- Projected Population Growth
by Race, 2002 - 2012
tive and Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islander), 70

multi-racial (+32.2%, two or more races) 60

categories, and blacks (+16.7%) are pro- 50

jected to increase, while whites are ex- 40
Percent

pected to decrease (-3.5%). 30

20

10

0
-10
White Black Other Races Multi-Racial

Bergen County Community Fact Book 11
Industry Projections
Bergen County, 2002 - 2012
Ten Industries with the Greatest Employment Growth
Change: 2002-2012
2002 2012 Percent
Industry Title Jobs Jobs Number Total Annual
Ambulatory health care services 25,500 36,700 11,200 43.8 3.6
Administrative and support services 32,000 41,050 9,050 28.2 2.5
Professional and technical services 31,650 36,200 4,550 14.4 1.3
Local government educational services 21,900 25,950 4,050 18.4 1.7
Hospitals 17,150 20,650 3,500 20.6 1.9
Food services and drinking places 23,600 26,850 3,250 13.7 1.3
Merchant wholesalers, durable goods 24,500 27,150 2,650 10.8 1.0
Merchant wholesalers, nondurable goods 16,100 18,500 2,400 15.0 1.4
Membership associations and organizations 7,300 9,450 2,150 29.1 2.5
Management of companies and enterprises 13,700 15,600 1,900 13.8 1.3

∑ From 2002 to 2012, Bergen County is projected to add 49,900 new jobs. The county is
expected to add jobs at a slightly slower rate than the state (10.6% vs. 12.0%).

∑ According to the projections, the ten industries listed in the table above will account
for 34,620 or almost 70 percent of Bergen County’s new jobs by 2102.

Bergen County, 2002 - 2012
Ten Industries with the Greatest Employment Declines
Change: 2002-2012
2002 2012 Percent
Industry Title Jobs Jobs Number Total Annual
Computer and electronic product manufacturing 4,350 3,050 -1,300 -29.5 -3.6
Food manufacturing 5,100 4,250 -850 -17.0 -1.9
Chemical manufacturing 6,050 5,250 -800 -13.5 -1.5
Publishing industries, except Internet 4,500 3,750 -800 -17.6 -2.0
Machinery manufacturing 3,250 2,500 -750 -23.1 -2.7
Paper manufacturing 3,450 2,800 -650 -19.4 -2.2
Plastics and rubber products manufacturing 3,450 3,050 -400 -11.5 -1.2
Fabricated metal product manufacturing 3,000 2,600 -350 -12.2 -1.3
Apparel manufacturing 900 600 -300 -33.4 -4.2
Clothing and clothing accessories stores 8,750 8,450 -300 -3.5 -0.4

∑ Over the projection period, the job picture in Bergen County will continue to change as
factory jobs are replaced by service jobs. The industries projected to decline have a
relatively small employment base in the county.
∑ Like the state, eight of the ten industries projected to experience employment de-
clines from 2002 to 2012 are in the manufacturing sector.

12 New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development
Projected Occupational Demand
Bergen County
Occupations With The Most Projected Job Openings, 2002-2012
2004
Annual Average Job Openings Annual Skill
1 2
Occupation Total Growth Replacements Wage Level Outlook

Retail Salespersons 720 110 610 $27,750 Low Good
Cashiers 640 110 530 23,570 Low Good
Registered Nurses 480 300 180 62,280 Low Good
Combined Food Preparation and Serving
Workers, Including Fast Food 450 130 320 15,880 Low Good
Waiters and Waitresses 370 80 280 16,470 Low Good
Laborers and Freight, Stock, and
Material Movers, Hand 310 0 310 16,400 Low Good
Office Clerks, General 300 40 270 24,200 Low Good
Sales Representatives, Wholesale and
and Manufacturing 300 80 220 34,570 Moderate Good
Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids
and Housekeeping Cleaners 290 130 160 19,940 Low Good
Stock Clerks and Order Fillers 270 0 270 16,400 Low Good
Home Health Aides 250 200 50 20,180 Low Good
Elementary School Teachers, Except
Special Education 240 90 150 48,560 High Good
Receptionists and Information Clerks 240 110 130 15,900 Low Good
Customer Service Representatives 230 120 110 31,790 Moderate Good
Medical Assistants 220 180 50 25,250 Low Good
General and Operations Managers 200 70 130 120,000 High Average
Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical
and Executive 190 0 190 34,400 Low Good
Child Care Workers 190 70 120 19,800 Low Average
Tellers 170 20 150 21,300 Low Good
Packers and Packagers, Hand 170 40 130 15,760 Low Good
1. "Growth" and "Replacements" may not add to "Total" due to rounding.

2. High Skills: Associate's degree or higher.
Moderate Skills: Long-term on-the-job training, work experience or post secondary/vocational/technical training.
Low Skills: Short-term or moderate-term on-the-job training, including up to 12 months of on-the-job experience and informal training.

∑ Bergen County is projected to have 17,690 annual job openings per year through 2012,
or 11.5 percent of the statewide annual openings. The county’s top twenty ranked
occupations by annual job openings are anticipated to account for 35.2 percent of all
annual job openings.

∑ Many of the top-ranking occupations in the table have lower skill levels and a good
outlook, indicative of a large number of entry-level positions and the need for re-
placement workers. In comparison, the three high skill jobs listed earn the highest
annual wage of the top 20 occupations.

Bergen County Community Fact Book 13
Labor Force Projections
∑ Between 2002 and 2012, the “other races” Bergen County
category is projected to account for 85.9 Projected Labor Force Growth
percent of the change to Bergen County’s by Race, 2002 - 2012
labor force. The black and multi-racial cat- Multi-Racial

egories are expected to make up 9.3 per- Black
4.8%
cent and 4.8 percent, respectively, of the 9.3%

projected labor force growth.

Note: Multi-racial refers to persons who are Other Races
of two or more races. “Other races” includes 85.9%
Asian, American Indian/Alaska Native, and
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander.

Bergen County
∑ Hispanics will account for 67.9 percent of
Projected Labor Force Growth by the growth in the labor over the 2002-
Hispanic Origin, 2002 - 2012 2012 period. The growth rate for Hispan-
ics is projected to be 44.5 percent in
Bergen County and 38.9 percent statewide
Non-Hispanic from 2002 to 2012.
32.1%
Hispanic
67.9%

∑ Males will account for 58.4 percent of the Bergen County
labor force growth (32,700) from 2002 to Projected Labor Force Growth by
2012. The projected male rate of growth Gender, 2002 - 2012
in the county’s labor force is projected to
be 7.9 percent compared with 6.6 percent
for females.
Female
41.6%
58.4%
Male

14 New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development