Southern Regional Community Fact Book

Burlington County Edition

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development Division of Labor Market and Demographic Research

October 2006

Preface
he Regional Community Fact Book for Burlington County provides a snapshot of its people and its economy. Included are facts and figures on current industry trends, population, unemployment and income. The Fact Book also provides a look into the future and provides the latest population, labor force, industry and occupational projections. The Regional Community Fact Book series is meant to be a reference for use in local and regional economic development planning and for employment and training providers. Fact Books will be published annually for New Jersey’s 21 counties, grouped into three regions (northern, central and southern).

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Acknowledgements
his publication was prepared by Paul Bieksza and Patricia McKendrick of the Bureau of Labor Market Information, Division of Labor Market and Demographic Research. Layout was done by Chester S. Chinsky. Questions regarding information contained in this publication should be directed to Paul Bieksza by phone at (609) 292-2742 or by e-mail: paul.bieksza@dol.state.nj.us. To obtain copies of this publication or other county editions, please contact Lester Wright by phone at (609) 292-7567 or by e-mail: lester.wright @dol.state.nj.us.

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Table of Contents

County Snapshot .................................................................................... 1 Industry Trends, Burlington vs. New Jersey ................................ 2 Employment ............................................................................................ 5 Employment Gains and Losses ........................................................... 6 Wages ...................................................................................................... 7 Per Capita Personal Income ............................................................... 8 Unemployment Rates ........................................................................... 8 Characteristics of the Unemployed ................................................. 9 Population ...............................................................................................10 Population Projections ......................................................................... 11 Industry Projections ...........................................................................12 Projected Occupational Demand.......................................................13 Labor Force Projections .....................................................................14

County Snapshot
Southern Region

Camden Gloucester Salem

Burlington

Population (July 1, 2005 estimate): 450,700 Change from Census 2000: +27,300 or + 6.5% Percent of New Jersey Total: 5.2% Total Private Sector Employment (2004): 167,154 Percent of New Jersey Total: 5.1% Change from 1999: +15,661 Largest Industry (2004): Retail Trade Retail Trade Employment: 28,676 Percent of Total County Employment: 17.2%

Atlantic Cumberland

Cape May

Private Sector Wage (2004 annual average): $41,518 Percent of New Jersey Average: 87.2% Change From 1999: +$5,916 Industry With Highest Average Annual Wage (2004): Utilities: $75,450 Per Capita Personal Income (2004): $38,575 Percent of New Jersey Per Capita Income: 92.7% average): Number of Unemployment Insurance Claimants (2005 annual average) 3,410 Unemployment Rate (2005 annual average): 3.7% 5-year High (2002 & 2003): 4.8% 5-year Low (2001): 3.6% New Jersey Rate (2005): 4.4% Building Permits (single-family residential,2005): 1,290 Rank Among New Jersey Counties: 6

Burlington County Community Fact Book

1

Industry Trends, Burlington vs. New Jersey ∑ In Burlington County the number of private sector jobs covered by unemployment insurance increased by 10.3 percent from 1999 to 2004. This compares with a 0.6 percent gain recorded by the state. Burlington added jobs in each year of the period while the state lost employment in 2002 and 2003.

∑ Financial activities employment in the county rose by 26.9 percent, over four times the

state’s rate of increase. Much of the gain was due to hiring by mortgage brokers, which benefited from the housing and refinancing boom in the first half of the decade. PHH Mortgage is headquartered in Mt. Laurel and is one of the county’s largest employers.

∑ Business and professional services payrolls expanded by 16.9 percent in the county ∑ Manufacturing jobs in the county declined by 7.0 percent, only about a third of the

compared with 0.7 percent for the state. Much of this growth resulted from the expansion of office parks along Routes 38 and 73 in Mt. Laurel and Evesham townships.

state’s rate of loss (-19.8%). Factory payrolls fared better partly because the county’s two largest manufacturers produce unique products that are in demand. Burlington County’s largest factory employer is Lockheed Martin, which produces electronic surveillance systems for the Navy. The second-largest plant, Viking Yacht, employs 1,400 workers making luxury boats starting at $1 million.

Note: Use of an index facilitates comparison between two separate data elements.
Burlington County and New Jersey Total Private Sector Employment: 1999-2004
115
120 115

Burlington County and New Jersey Construction Employment: 1999-2004

110
110

105

105 100

100
95
(1999=100)
(1999=100)

95 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

90 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington

New Jersey

2

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Industry Trends, Burlington vs. New Jersey
Burlington County and New Jersey Manufacturing Employment: 1999-2004
120 110 100 105 90 80
(1999=100)

Burlington County and New Jersey Trade, Transportation & Utilities Employment: 1999-2004
115

110

100
(1999=100)

70 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

95 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington County and New Jersey Information Employment: 1999-2004
120 110 100 90 80
(1999=100)

Burlington County and New Jersey Financial Activities Employment: 1999-2004
140 130 120 110 100
(1999=100)

70 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

90 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington County Community Fact Book

3

Industry Trends, Burlington vs. New Jersey
Burlington County and New Jersey Professional & Business Services Employment: 1999-2004
125 120 115 110 105 100
(1999=100)

Burlington County and New Jersey Education & Health Services Employment: 1999-2004
125 120 115 110 105 100
(1999=100)

95 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

95 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington County and New Jersey Leisure & Hospitality Employment: 1999-2004
125 120 115 110 105 105 100
(1999=100)

Burlington County and New Jersey Other Services Employment: 1999-2004
125 120 115 110

100 95 90 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
(1999=100)

95

Burlington

New Jersey

Burlington

New Jersey

4

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Employment
Burlington County Total Private Sector Employment: 1999 — 2004
175,000

170,000

165,000

160,000

B B
1999

B

B

B

155,000

150,000

B
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

145,000

∑ Total private sector employment in Burlington County increased by 15,661 or 10.3
percent over the 1999 to 2004 period. In fact, the county’s private sector payrolls have increased each year since 1992.

Burlington County Private Sector Employment by Industry: 1999 & 2004
Construction Manufacturing Trade/Transp./Utilities Information Financial Activities Prof./Business Services Educ./Health Services Leisure/Hospitality Other Services 0 10,000 20,000 2004 30,000 40,000 1999 50,000

∑ Trade, transportation and utilities was Burlington County’s largest sector in 2004,

employing 28.4 percent of workers in the private sector. Although this sector has lost employment share since 1999 when it accounted for 29.8 percent of payrolls, the number of jobs in the county’s stores and distribution centers increased during this time (+2,400).

Burlington County Community Fact Book

5

Employment Gains and Losses
Burlington County Net Job Growth by Industry: 1999 — 2004
4,500 4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 -500 -1,000 -1,500
Construction Manufacturing Trade/ Transport./ Utilities Information Financial Activities Prof./ Business Services Education/ Health Services Leisure/ Hospitality Other Services

∑ The financial activities sector added the most jobs (+4,200). Employment rose partly

because mortgage brokers added workers during this time when interest rates on loans were low and homes were selling across the nation at a rapid pace. Another factor was the growth of Commerce Bank which grew from a local bank with several dozen branches to a company with over 400 locations, extending from New England to Florida. Several “community banks” or small locally-based banks that emphasize low fees and customer service also added branches and staff.
Burlington County, Private Sector Gains, Losses and Net Growth by Industry: 2004
12,000 11,000 10,000 9,000 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 -1,000
Construction Manufacturing Trade/ Transport./ Utilities Information Financial Activities Prof./ Business Services Education/ Health Services Leisure/ Hospitality Other Services

GAINS

LOSSES

NET

∑ Within each of Burlington County’s sectors, new jobs were created, while other positions were eliminated. In 2004, the sector with the most new job openings was trade, transportation and utilities (+11,100). Many of these openings were in the highly competitive retail trade component where new stores often draw customers away from older establishments. Job contraction due to retail business closings and staff reductions produced a loss of 9,000 jobs, leaving a net gain of 2,100 positions.

Source: Local Employment Dynamics (LED) data from the US Census Bureau.

6

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Wages
Burlington County, Private Sector Average Annual Wage: 1999 — 2004
$45,000 $41,518 $40,000 $37,337 $35,602 $35,000 $38,558 $39,465 $40,094

$30,000

$25,000 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

∑ Between 1999 and 2004, Burlington County’s private sector average annual wage in-

creased by 16.6 percent. The largest single-year increase, 4.9 percent or $1,735 occurred in 2000. In 2004, Burlington County’s annual average private sector wage was 87.2 percent of the statewide wage ($47,639).

Burlington County and New Jersey, Private Sector Average Annual Wage by Industry: 2004
Total Private Sector Construction Manufacturing Trade/Transp./Utilities Information Financial Activities Prof./Business Services Education/Health Services Leisure/Hospitality Other Services $0 $20,000 $40,000 $60,000 $80,000

Burlington County

New Jersey

∑ In 2004, the industries in the county with the highest average annual private sector
wages were information ($63,471), manufacturing ($56,778) and financial activities ($55,350). All of these industries had lower average annual wages in the county than in the state.

Burlington County Community Fact Book

7

Per Capita Personal Income ∑ Burlington County’s per capita personal income reached $38,575 in 2004, a gain of 19.6 percent since 1999. The county’s per capita personal income ranked 11th among the state’s 21 counties. In 2004, the county’s per capita personal income was 7.3 percent lower than the state’s ($41,626), but 16.7 percent higher than the national average ($33,050).
$50,000 $45,000 $40,000 $35,000 $30,000 $25,000 $20,000 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Burlington County and New Jersey Per Capita Personal Income: 1999 — 2004

$

$

$

$

$

$

∑ Personal

income is made up of several New Jersey $ Burlington components,When compared with the state in 2004, Burlington County residents derived a higher percentage of personal income from net earnings (75.0 % vs. 72.5%) and smaller percentages from dividends, interest and rent (13.2% vs. 15.2%) and from transfer payments (11.8% vs. 12.4%). This is because of the concentration of middle-income working people in the county’s suburban communities. Compared with the state, Social Security benefits accounted for a larger percentage of the county’s transfer payments

Unemployment Rates
Burlington County and New Jersey Unemployment Rate Trends: 1999 — 2005
7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

∑ Burlington County’s diverse economy has
enabled it to consistently maintain an unemployment rate below that of the state.

B B J B J B B J J

B J B J B J

∑ From

1999 to 2005, the county’s labor force grew by 10,900 or 4.7 percent, compared with 3.1 percent growth in the state’s civilian labor force. This expansion was fueled mainly by the influx of new residents into the county.

New Jersey

J

Burlington

8

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Characteristics of the Unemployed
Burlington County Unemployment Insurance Claimants: 2004-2005
Category Total Insured Unemployed Male Female White Black Asian Other Hispanic Not Hispanic Chose Not To Answer Under 25 25 through 34 35 through 44 45 through 54 55 through 64 65 and over Construction Manufacturing Trade, Transportation and Utilities Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Information Financial Activities Professional and Business Services Educational and Health Services Leisure and Hospitality Other Services 2004 Annual Average 3,603 By Gender 2,021 1,582 By Race 2,471 801 70 261 By Ethnicity 269 3,154 180 By Age of Claimant 279 804 956 821 532 212 By Industry 380 376 811 209 438 102 254 541 445 211 257 2005 Annual Average 3,410 1,950 1,460 2,292 805 65 248 230 2,977 203 343 762 918 762 448 177 405 304 764 188 409 60 188 541 427 208 195 Change 2004-2005 Number Percent -193 -71 -122 -179 4 -6 -13 -39 -178 24 64 -42 -38 -60 -84 -34 25 -72 -47 -21 -29 -41 -65 0 -18 -3 -61 -5.4 -3.5 -7.7 -7.2 .5 -7.9 -5.0 -14.6 -5.6 13.3 23.1 -5.2 -4.0 -7.3 -15.8 -16.2 6.6 -19.1 -5.8 -10.0 -6.6 -40.5 -25.7 -0.1 -4.0 -1.3 -23.9

∑ The number of persons filing for unemployment compensation benefits in Burlington

County decreased by 5.4 percent between 2004 and 2005. The age group with the largest number of unemployment claimants in 2005 was the 35-44 year old segment.

∑ In 2005, the sectors in the county in which the largest number of unemployment insur-

ance claimants were last employed were trade, transportation and utilities (764), professional and business services (541) and educational and health services (427). The sectors that recorded the largest percentage declines in claimants over the year were information (-40.5%), financial activities (-25.7%) and other services (-23.9%).

Burlington County Community Fact Book

9

Population ∑ From
1970 through 2005, Burlington County’s population increased by 127,600 to reach 450,700. Over this time, the rate of the county’s population gain (+39.5%) was nearly twice that of the state (+21.6%). In the five years from 2000 to 2005, the county added 27,300 people and ranked third in the state in total population increase behind Ocean and Middlesex counties. The main source of the growth since 2000 has been persons relocating to the county, both nationally (+15,900) and internationally (+3,700).
Burlington County Total Population: 1970 — 2005
500,000

450,000

400,000

350,000

300,000

250,000 1970 1980 1990 2000 2005

Burlington County Racial/Hispanic Origin: 2000 - 2005
Race White Black Asian Multiracial American Indian/Alaska Native Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Total* Hispanic Origin (may be of any race)
* May not add to 100% due to rounding

∑ In 2005, Burlington County’s population was

Percent in 2000 79.9 15.6 2.8 1.5 0.2 0.0 100.0 4.2

Percent in 2005 77.6 16.6 3.7 1.8 0.2 0.0 99.9 5.0

77.6 percent white, 16.6 percent black, 3.7 percent Asian and 1.8 percent multi-racial. In comparison, the state’s population was 76.6 percent white, 14.5 percent black, 7.2 percent Asian and 1.3 percent multi-racial.

∑ In 2005, a smaller proportion of county

residents were of Hispanic origin (5.0%) than in the state (15.2%). Since 2000, Hispanics accounted for a smaller share of the county’s population gain (+17.3%) than the state (+70.5%).

∑ Since 1970, the municipalities in Burlington

County that added the most population were Evesham Township (+33,500), Mount Laurel (+29,400), Medford (+15,200) and Burlington Township (+11,300). Since 2000, the fastest-growing municipalities were Mansfield Township (+55.6%), Hainesport Township (+48.3%) and Bordentown Township (+23.1%). These townships are located in the northern part of the county near I-295 and are within a short commute of Trenton, Mount Laurel and Cherry Hill.

Burlington County Ten Largest Municipalities 2005
Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Municipality Population

Evesham Township Mount Laurel Township Willingboro Township Pemberton Township Medford Township Burlington Township Moorestown Township Maple Shade Township Delran Township Cinnaminson Township

46,960 40,635 33,127 28,895 23,516 21,915 20,011 19,502 17,414 15,149

10

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Population Projections ∑ Burlington County’s population is projected
to increase by 45,500 persons from 2002 to 2012. Its rate of growth (10.4%) is expected to be higher than the state’s (8.1%) and to rank tenth among New Jersey’s 21 counties over the period.
Burlington County Population Projections: 2002 — 2012
500,000

480,000

460,000

440,000

420,000

400,000 2002*
*estimate **projection

2007**

2012**

Burlington County Projections for Select Age Groups: 2002 — 2012
150,000 125,000 100,000 75,000 50,000 25,000 0 0-14 15-24 2002*
*estimate **projection

∑ By age group, the largest and fastest popu-

lation gains are projected for 45-to-65year olds (30,100 or 28.3%) and for persons over 65 (13,600 or 24.7%). The population of older residents in the county is likely to grow as current residents age and as more age-restricted housing developments are built.

25-44

45-64 2012**

65+

∑ By 2012, Burlington County is projected to

become more racially diverse as minority populations post more rapid gains than whites. Although the white population is projected to increase at a slower rate (+6.1%) than other racial groups, it is expected to grow by 21,000 and account for 46.2 percent of the gain. In this chart, “other races” are Asian, American Indian/ Alaska Native and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander.

60 50 40
Percent

Burlington County Projected Population Growth by Race, 2002 - 2012

30 20 10 0
White Black Other Races Multi-Racial

Burlington County Community Fact Book

11

Industry Projections
Burlington County, 2002 - 2012 Ten Industries with the Greatest Employment Growth
Industry Title 2002 Jobs 2012 Jobs Change: 2002-2012 Percent Number Total Annual
2.8 3.5 1.6 2.3 1.2 1.4 3.0 1.7 1.6 2.8

∑ According to industry projections, Burlington County’s employment is projected to
increase by 26,900 jobs from 2002 to 2012. This 13.4 percent increase ranks eighth among the state’s 21 counties.

Administrative and support services 11,050 14,700 3,600 32.7 Social assistance 4,400 6,350 1,900 43.3 Food services and drinking places 10,700 12,550 1,850 17.2 Ambulatory health care services 6,800 8,600 1,800 26.6 Local government educational services 13,500 15,250 1,750 13.0 Credit intermediation and related activities 10,700 12,350 1,650 15.5 Nursing and residential care facilities 4,550 6,150 1,600 35.4 Merchant wholesalers, durable goods 7,000 8,300 1,350 19.0 Hospitals 7,250 8,550 1,300 17.6 Merchant wholesalers, nondurable goods 3,600 4,800 1,200 32.7 Note: Employment data are rounded to the nearest fifty. Percentages and percent changes are based on unrounded data.

∑ It is likely that much of the projected increase in administrative and support services

will be for workers hired through employment agencies as companies rely more on temporary staff. The increase in social assistance employment is likely to be at nonprofit organizations that provide services and assistance to those in need.
Burlington County, 2002 - 2012 Ten Industries with the Greatest Employment Declines
Industry Title
Federal government, excluding postal service Local government, excl. hospitals & schools Heavy and civil engineering construction Fabricated metal product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Telecommunications Postal service Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Machinery manufacturing

2002 Jobs
5,000 6,300 1,150 1,400 350 1,750 1,200 900 750 1,200

2012 Jobs
4,750 6,100 1,000 1,250 300 1,700 1,100 800 700 1,100

Change: 2002-2012 Percent Number Total Annual
-250 -200 -150 -150 -100 -100 -100 -100 -50 -50 -4.8 -3.2 -12.3 -11.0 -21.4 -4.7 -8.4 -11.0 -5.6 -6.0 -0.5 -0.3 -1.3 -1.2 -2.4 -0.5 -0.9 -1.2 -0.6 -0.6

Note: Employment data are rounded to the nearest fifty. Percentages and percent changes are based on unrounded data.

∑ Government on all levels are likely to outsource more work to private companies in

order to reduce costs. Privatization is expected to result in employment declines at the federal government. Some of these losses are projected for the US Postal Service, while most will be at other federal employers, such as civilian positions at Fort Dix and McGuire Air Force Base. The county and municipalities are also expected to reduce staffing as more services are privatized.

12

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Projected Occupational Demand
Burlington County Occupations With The Most Projected Job Openings, 2002-2012
Annual Average Job Openings Occupation
Cashiers Retail Salespersons Registered Nurses Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand Waiters and Waitresses Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Stock Clerks and Order Fillers Office Clerks, General Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Sales Representatives, Wholesale and and Manufacturing Customer Service Representatives Teacher Assistants Child Care Workers Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants Food Preparation Workers Receptionists and Information Clerks Social and Human Service Assistants

2004 Annual Wage
$17,860 24,690 56,670 15,940 23,530 15,420 38,200 23,070 24,730 23,480 56,650 29,870 18,740 16,990 55,920 65,830 22,870 18,210 23,960 28,390

Skill Level
Low Low High Low Low Low Low Low Low Low Low Low Low Low High High Low Low Low Low
2

Total
410 320 210 200 190 180 170 140 140 120 110 110 110 110 100 90 90 90 90 80

1

Growth Replacements
100 80 130 70 40 50 90 0 30 60 50 60 60 50 40 70 60 40 50 60 310 240 80 130 160 130 80 140 110 70 60 50 50 60 60 20 30 60 40 30

Outlook
Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good

1. "Growth" and "Replacements" may not add to "Total" due to rounding. 2. High Skills: Associate's degree or higher. Moderate Skills: Long-term on-the-job training, work experience or post secondary/vocational/technical training. Low Skills: Short-term or moderate-term on-the-job training, including up to 12 months of on-the-job experience and informal training.

∑ Burlington County is projected to have 8,040 job openings per year through 2012. The ∑ Overall, 23.8 percent of Burlington’s annual job openings are projected to have high

county’s top 20 ranked occupations by annual job openings are anticipated to account for 38.1 percent of all annual job openings. educational and training requirements. However, many of the top-ranking occupations by annual openings have a lower skills level and a good outlook. Many of these are for entrylevel positions created by the need for “replacement workers”, or workers to fill job vacancies created as members of the workforce retire or change occupations.

Burlington County Community Fact Book

13

Labor Force Projections ∑ From 2002 to 2012, Burlington County’s
labor force is projected to increase by 28,700 or 12.4 percent. By race, the largest contributions will be made by whites (+48.3%) and blacks (+31.2%).
Burlington County Projected Labor Force Growth by Race, 2002 - 2012
Multi-Racial Other Races 14.9% 2.3% White Black 31.2% 48.3%

Note: Multi-racial refers to persons that are of two or more races. “Other races” includes Asian, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander.

Burlington County Projected Labor Force Growth by Hispanic Origin, 2002 - 2012
Hispanic 20.2% Non-Hispanic 79.8%

∑ Non-Hispanics are projected to account

for about four-fifths of the labor force gain. Although Hispanics are expected to account for 20.1 percent to the gain, the rate of growth of the Hispanic labor force (+68.2%) is projected to be significantly higher than for the non-Hispanic labor force (+10.0%).

∑ Burlington County has been attracting more

affluent couples with wives who plan to be full-time homemakers while raising their children. As a result, males are projected to account 61.3 percent of the county’s labor force gain, the third highest percentage among New Jersey’s 21 counties.

Burlington County Projected Labor Force Growth by Gender, 2002 - 2012

Female 61.3% Male 38.7%

14

New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

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