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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 ANNUAL PLAN OF ACTION UNDER NATIONAL HORTICUCLTURE MISSION 2005-06......... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND INFORMATION ................................................................................................................ 1 1.2 ACHIEVEMENT OF STATES IN HORTICULTURE ........................................................................................ 1 1.3 STATUS OF HORTICULTURE DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................... 2 1.3.1 Fruit crops ........................................................................................................................................ 2 1.3.2 Vegetables......................................................................................................................................... 2 1.3.3 Floriculture....................................................................................................................................... 2 1.3.4 Aromatic plants................................................................................................................................. 2 1.3.5 Irrigation .......................................................................................................................................... 3 1.3.6 Marketing.......................................................................................................................................... 3 1.3.7 Food Processing ............................................................................................................................... 3 2 MAHARASHTRA STATE HORTICULTURE MISSION ..................................................................... 4 2.1 MISSION OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................................................. 4 2.2 STRATEGY FOR MAHARASHTRA STATE HORTICULTURE MISSION ......................................................... 5 2.3 BASIS FOR CLUSTER IDENTIFICATION .................................................................................................... 5 2.4 IDENTIFIED CLUSTERS FOR AREA EXPANSION ....................................................................................... 6 2.5 APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY ............................................................................................................ 7 2.6 GRAPES .................................................................................................................................................. 7 2.6.1 Indian Scenario................................................................................................................................. 7 2.6.2 Season of availability........................................................................................................................ 8 2.6.3 Demand............................................................................................................................................. 8 2.6.4 Marketing.......................................................................................................................................... 8 2.6.5 Domestic marketing .......................................................................................................................... 8 2.6.6 Exports and its potential ................................................................................................................... 9 2.6.7 Varieties cultivated ........................................................................................................................... 9 2.6.8 Action plan of development............................................................................................................. 10 2.7 MANGO ................................................................................................................................................ 11 2.7.1 Comparative advantages of Maharashtra ...................................................................................... 11 2.7.2 Major constraints in Mango production......................................................................................... 11 2.7.3 Action plan for development ........................................................................................................... 12 2.7.4 Marketing........................................................................................................................................ 15 2.7.5 Export potential .............................................................................................................................. 15 2.8 CASHEW NUT ....................................................................................................................................... 16 2.8.1 Demand and supply patterns .......................................................................................................... 16 2.8.2 Marketing........................................................................................................................................ 16 2.8.3 Import / Export Trends ................................................................................................................... 17 2.8.4 Action plan for development ........................................................................................................... 17 2.9 SAPOTA ................................................................................................................................................ 19 2.9.1 Comparative advantage of Sapota.................................................................................................. 19 2.9.2 Varietal status................................................................................................................................. 19 2.9.3 Action plan for development ........................................................................................................... 19 2.9.4 Marketing........................................................................................................................................ 20 2.9.5 Exports and its potential ................................................................................................................. 21 2.10 POMEGRANATE .................................................................................................................................... 21 2.10.1 Comparative advantage.............................................................................................................. 21 2.10.2 Action plan for development....................................................................................................... 21 2.10.3 Marketing ................................................................................................................................... 22 2.10.4 Exports ....................................................................................................................................... 23 2.11 BANANA .............................................................................................................................................. 23 2.11.1 State Scenario............................................................................................................................. 23 2.11.2 Comparative advantages of Maharastra Banana....................................................................... 23 2.11.3 Action plan for development....................................................................................................... 24 2.11.4 Marketing ................................................................................................................................... 24 2.11.5 Domestic marketing.................................................................................................................... 25 2.11.6 Exports and export potential ...................................................................................................... 25 2.12 CITRUS ................................................................................................................................................. 26 2.12.1 Sweet Orange ............................................................................................................................. 26
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2.12.2 Mandarin Orange....................................................................................................................... 26 2.12.3 Action plan for development....................................................................................................... 26 2.12.4 Marketing ................................................................................................................................... 29 2.13 VEGETABLE SEED PRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 30 2.13.1 Public sector............................................................................................................................... 31 2.13.2 Private sector ............................................................................................................................. 31 2.13.3 Seed Infrastructure ..................................................................................................................... 31 2.13.4 Establishment of new gardens: Flowers..................................................................................... 32 2.14 CREATION OF WATER RESOURCES....................................................................................................... 34 2.15 PROTECTED CULTIVATION ................................................................................................................... 36 2.15.1 Green house................................................................................................................................ 36 2.15.2 Mulching..................................................................................................................................... 37 2.15.3 Shade net .................................................................................................................................... 37 2.15.4 Plastic tunnels ............................................................................................................................ 38 2.16 PRECISION FARMING ............................................................................................................................ 41 2.16.1 GIS and Remote Sensing in Horticulture.................................................................................... 41 2.17 PROMOTION OF IPM/ INM................................................................................................................... 42 2.17.1 Sanitary and Phyto- Sanitary Inspection and Certification........................................................ 42 2.17.2 Phyto-sanitary certificate ........................................................................................................... 42 2.17.3 Disease Forecasting Units ......................................................................................................... 43 2.17.4 Plant Health Clinics ................................................................................................................... 43 2.17.5 Leaf / Tissue Analysis Lab.......................................................................................................... 44 2.17.6 Organic Farming........................................................................................................................ 44 2.17.7 Vermi compost unit..................................................................................................................... 45 2.17.8 Certification ............................................................................................................................... 45 2.18 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT ..................................................................................................... 46 2.18.1 Foreign Study Tour .................................................................................................................... 47 2.18.2 Human resource development in Agri Export Zone ................................................................... 47 2.18.3 HRD training for promotion of export ....................................................................................... 47 2.18.4 Pollination Support Through Bee- keeping ................................................................................ 47 2.18.5 Technology Dissemination Through Demonstrations/ Front Line demonstration ..................... 48 2.18.6 Demonstrations on farmers fields............................................................................................... 48 2.18.7 Front line Demonstrations on public sector farms..................................................................... 49 2.19 CREATION OF MARKET INFRASTRUCTURE ........................................................................................... 49 2.19.1 Wholesale/ Terminal market at Igatpuri, Nasik ......................................................................... 51 2.19.2 Rural market/ Direct Markets .................................................................................................... 52 2.19.3 Functional Infrastructure for Collection, Grading etc ............................................................... 52 2.19.4 Market led extension, awareness training and evaluation ......................................................... 52 2.20 ECONOMICS OF THE PROPOSAL ............................................................................................................ 53 2.21 CONCLUSION ....................................................................................................................................... 53

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LIST OF TABLES
TABLE 1 DISTRICT AND CROP MATRIX FOR AREA EXPANSION.................................................................................. 6 TABLE 2 AREA, PRODUCTION AND PRODUCTIVITY OF GRAPE IN INDIA .................................................................... 7 TABLE 3 PERIOD OF AVAILABILITY OF GRAPES ........................................................................................................ 8 TABLE 4 CULTIVARS OF GRAPES CULTIVATED IN INDIA .......................................................................................... 9 TABLE 5 INTERVENTION FOR GRAPES .................................................................................................................... 11 TABLE 6 INTERVENTIONS FOR MANGO .................................................................................................................. 15 TABLE 7 INTERVENTION FOR CASHEW .................................................................................................................. 18 TABLE 8 INTERVENTIONS FOR SAPOTA .................................................................................................................. 20 TABLE 9 INTERVENTION FOR POMEGRANATE ........................................................................................................ 22 TABLE 10 INTERVENTION FOR BANANA ................................................................................................................ 24 TABLE 11 INTERVENTION FOR SWEET ORANGE...................................................................................................... 27 TABLE 12 INTERVENTION FOR MANDARIN ORANGE .............................................................................................. 28 TABLE 13 INTERVENTION FOR KAGZI LIME ........................................................................................................... 29 TABLE 14 INTERVENTION FOR FLORICULTURE ...................................................................................................... 34 TABLE 15 PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL PROGRAMME FOR WATER RESOURCES ......................................................... 35 TABLE 16 PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL PROGRAMME OF COMMUNITY TANKS FOR 2005-06 .................................... 35 TABLE 17 PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL PROGRAMME FOR HITECH GREEN HOUSE ..................................................... 36 TABLE 18 PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL PROGRAMME FOR NORMAL GREEN HOUSE ................................................... 37 TABLE 19 PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL PROGAMME FOR MULCHING ........................................................................ 37 TABLE 20 PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL PROGRAMME FOR SHADE NET...................................................................... 38 TABLE 21 PHYSICAL AND FINANCIAL PROGRAMME FOR PLASTIC TUNNELS ........................................................... 38 TABLE 22 DISTRICT-WISE/COMPONENT-WISE PROPOSED PROGRAMME AND FINANCIAL REQUIREMENT UNDER NHM FOR PROTECTED CULTIVATION........................................................................................................... 39 TABLE 23 FINANCIAL REQUIREMENT FOR EACH LABORATORY .............................................................................. 42 TABLE 24 STATEMENT SHOWING THE DETAILS OF FACILITIES REQUIRED FOR PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE ISSUING AUTHORITIES .................................................................................................................................. 43 TABLE 25 PROPOSED PROGRAMME OF ORGANIC FARMING ................................................................................... 45 TABLE 26 FARMERS TRAING .................................................................................................................................. 46 TABLE 27 OFFICERS TRAINING .............................................................................................................................. 47

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ANNUAL PLAN OF ACTION UNDER NATIONAL HORTICUCLTURE MISSION 200506

1.1

Background Information

Maharashtra is the third largest state in respect of area and second in terms of population. The rural population of the state is 61.3 % (4.84 crore) of the total population and the litercy rate is 64.9 %. The geographical area of the state is 308 lakh hectares. The total gross cropped area is 224 lakh hectares of which 176 lakh hectares is under net crop. Maharashtra is basically rainfed state with 84 per cent area leaving only 16% under irrigation. Out of this around 17 % is through well irrigation. Maharashtra has always taken an initiative in adopting new technologies. During the recent past the state has emerged as one of the horticulture, states. The export of grapes, mango, flowers and vegetables have shown increasing trend. This shows the impressive achievements of state in the horticultural development. Many 100% Export Oriented Units have been established in the state mainly in the field of floriculture, tissue culture, mushrooms etc. The well organized co-operative infrastructure of Grape Growers Association has not only promoted the Viticulture in the state but also brought our state on the world map. With such achievements the thrust of farmers for newer technology and crops is ever increasing. 1.2 Achievement of States in horticulture Largest producer of seedless Grapes (78%) banana (75 %) Mandarin oranges (75 %) Onion (63%). Tomatoes (42%) of the total production in India. Alphanso Mangoes accounts for 90 % of Indias export in mangoes The highest numner of poly houses (1271) owned by small farmers for cultivation of flowers. 40 % turnover of the seed industry in the country. Strong base of technical manpower in the operational areas of four Agriculture Universities with 56 Agriculture colleges, 82 research institutes & five national level research organizations. 173 Poly clinics being operated in the State.

1.3 1.3.1

Status of Horticulture Development Fruit crops

Total area under fruit crops in the state 13.66 lakh ha. The soil and climatic conditions of Maharashtra are very congenial for cultivation of different fruit crops. Therefore an ambitious programme namely Employment Guarantee Scheme linked Horticulture Development Programme has been launched in 1990-91. Coverage under major fruit crops is as Mango37.83%, Citrus-19.13%, Cashew-13%, Pomogranate-6.92%, Sapota-5.06%, Custard Apple2.77%, Guava-2.41% and other is 13.26%. Due to massive plantation of fruit crops in the last decade production of horticultural produce in the state has increased substantially. 1.3.2 Vegetables

Maharashtra contributes 6% of production of vegetable in the country. The area under vegetable crops is about 4.10 lakh ha. The total production is 50.02 lakh M.T. per year and the productivity is more than 12.50 M.T. per hectare. Maharashtra is the largest producer of onion in the country covering an area about 1, 20,733 ha. with average production of about 14 lakh M.T. Maharashtra is exporting about 3,50,000 to 4,00,000 M.T. onion every year and recently cultivation of white and yellow onions are being promoted by the state. 1.3.3 Floriculture

Maharashtra stands 6th in respect of area under floriculture in the country with approximately 8500 ha. under cultivation. The major flower crops grown in open fields are Roses, Chrysanthemum, Aster, Tuberoses, Jasmine, Gaillardia, Marigold etc. These flowers are mainly grown in Pune, Nashik, Ahmednagar, Satara, Sangli, Kolhapur, Aurangabad, Jalna, Nanded etc. districts. Recently many private companies and progressive farmers in the State have started export oriented cultivation of flower crops. Besides this 1271 small green houses are erected on farmers field and 14 big green houses are erected under corporate sector. 1.3.4 Aromatic plants

The state has wide range of aromatic plants which offers tremendous opportunity for employment generation and exports of essential oils. The regions like Melghat, Western Ghat Zone, Kinkan, Satpuda range, Sahyadri Hill etc. are famous for cultivation of aromatic plants.

1.3.5

Irrigation

Limited irrigation is one of the important and critical constraints of Maharashtra State Agriculture. Only 15.4 % of the State's net sown area is irrigated as against 35% of country. More than 55% of the total irrigation is from ground water harvested through more than 18 lakh wells. More than 2.82 lakh hectare area has been covered under drip irrigation in the State under horticultural and cash crops. An area of 1.11 lakh hectare has been covered under sprinkler irrigation. 1.3.6 Marketing

The agro marketing activity in the state is regulated as per the Maharashtra Agriculture Produce marketing (Regulation) Act of 1963. Today there are more than 800 regulated markets in the state, 285 main market yards & 585 submarket yards. Every taluka in the state has a regulated market or an APMC. Besides regulated markets in the state have also 3500 unregulated markets or the weekly markets. The State is also involved in introducing alternative systems of marketing to make present system more responsive to needs of the changing times. Specifically the State has proposed an ' Integrated Maharashtra Horticulture Marketing Infrastructure' at an estimated cost of Rs. 1400 crores, a Terminal market or a Modern market for the millenium for Horticultural crops for Mumbai city at an estimated cost of Rs.200 crores and Farmers Markets across the State. 1.3.7 Food Processing

Food Processing Industry in Maharashtra consists of very basic processing. Traditional methods of processing are predominant. It includes Mango/ tomato, pulp, canning of fruits, Jam, pickles, Fruit Juices. Recently the with innovative technology such as vacuum preservation, aseptic, packaging, freeze drying and industrial quick freezing plants have come up. As regards to the cold storage and packing facilities are concerned, they are not sufficient and not modernized enough as per the international standards. Thus even today the growth of processing industry in the state has been guided largely by availability of infrastructural facilities and convenient markets, besides the ready availability of raw materials. The Fruit processing industry in the state is geared up introduction of Food Park concept. At present 3 Food Park and 2 wine parks are set up in the state to provide basic common infrastructural facilities to the processors and more and more processors are being motivated to get invalid in Food Park through one window scheme.

2 2.1

MAHARASHTRA STATE HORTICULTURE MISSION Mission Objectives

National Horticulture Mission (NHM) will be implemented in Maharashtra to promote holistic growth of the horticulture sector covering fruit, vegetables, root & tuber crops, mushroom, spices, flowers, aromatic plants and cashew. This is centrally sponsored scheme in which Government of India shall provide 100% assistance to the State Missions during the 10th Plan. During the XI Plan, the Government of India assistance will be 85% with 15% contribution by the State Governments. The main objectives of the mission are: To provide holistic growth of the horticulture sector through an area based regionally differentiated strategies which include research, technology promotion, extension, post harvest management, processing and marketing, in consonance with comparative advantage of each State / region and its diverse agro-climatic feature; To enhance horticulture production, improve nutritional security and income support to farm households; To establish convergence and synergy among multiple on-going and planned programmes for horticulture development; To promote, develop and disseminate technologies, through a seamless blend of traditional wisdom and modern scientific knowledge; To create opportunities for employment generation for skilled and unskilled persons, especially unemployed youth;

A im
E conomic Vaibility

Field Crops
Diversified Agriculture

Doubling Farm ers Incom e

Horticulture
Sustainability

2.2

Strategy for Maharashtra State Horticulture Mission

To meet the above stated objectives an end-to-end holistic approach is adopted covering production, post- harvest management, processing, and marketing to ensure appropriate returns to the growers. For this the state has been geographically divided into four clusters having 23 districts in total for area expansion and for development of post- harvest and marketing infrastructure whole state is taken into consideration.

Map 1 Cluster Identification for Area Expansion

2.3

Basis for Cluster Identification Comparative advantage Marketing opportunities e.g. seasonal advantage, local consumption, export / import substitution Favorable agro climatic conditions Scope for intensification and productivity improvement Contiguous area and similarity of cropping pattern Potential for area expansion Recommendations of State Government

2.4

Identified Clusters for Area Expansion No. of Clusters : 4 CLUSTER 1 ( KONKAN REGION ) Districts: Thane, Raigad, Ratnagiri, Sindhudurg Crops: Mango, Cashew, Sapota, Spices CLUSTER 2 ( WESTERN GHAT REGION) Districts: Nashik, Pune, Ahmednagar, Satara, Sangli, Solapur, Kolhapur Crops: Grapes, Pomegranate, Kagzi lime, Spices and Aromatic plants CLUSTER 3 (MARATHWARA REGION) Districts: Aurangabad, Jalna, Beed, Latur, Nanded, Parbhani Crops: Mango, Sweet orange, spices and aromatic CLUSTER 4 (VIDHARBHA REGION) Districts: Akola, Amravati, Wardha, Yoetmal, Washim, Nagpur Crops: Mandarin Orange, Kagzi Lime, spices and aromatic No. of Districts : 23

Table 1 District and crop matrix for area expansion Sr No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 District Mango District and Crop Matrix for Area Expansion Cashew Sapota P'granate M orange S orange K lime Grapes

Thane Raigad Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Kokan Div Nashik Ahmednagar Pune Solapur Satara Sangli Kolhapur Western Ghat Aurangabad Jalna Beed Latur Nanded Parbhani Marathwara Akola Washim Amarawati Yeotmal Wardha Nagpur Vidharbha

2.5

Approach and methodology

While selecting the clusters, comparative advantage of crops like marketing opportunities, seasonal advantage, local consumption, export/import substitutes scope for intensification and productivity improvement have been taken into consideration. Besides contiguity area potential of the area expansion have also been kept in view so that production & productivity enhancement in these regions, triggers the uptake of above on area the crops selected are Grapes, Mango, Pomegranate, Banana, Madarin orange, Kagzi Lime and Sapota in fruits, cashew in plantation crops, Ginger and Turmeric in spices and floriculture. The integrated approach would be adopted for development of plantation, creation of port harvest system and development of marketing Infrastructure marketing infrastructure. This will lead to economic development of the area as the crops selected have comparative advantages. The activities identified for this mission shall be implemented in project mode rather than generic developmental programme of state. In identified crop to make them hubs of activities for doubling the production, strengthening the PHM and enhancing marketing is discussed as under: 2.6 2.6.1 Grapes Indian Scenario

Maximum grape production takes place in Maharashtra, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.
Table 2 Area, production and productivity of grape in India State 2000-01 29,800 8,200 1,600 Area (ha) 2001-02 32,500 10,000 1,500 Production (tones) 2000-01 2001-02 7,79,200 9,11,600 1,44,100 1,69,700 31,300 29,400 Productivity (tones/ha) 2000-01 2001-02 26.10 28.10 17.60 16.90 19.60 20.00

Maharashtra Karnataka Andhra Pradesh

Source: Indian Horticulture Database-2003

The yield levels have reached to maximum in Maharashtra. In fact we need to reduce the productivity to enhance the quality aspects in grapes. Grape yields in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh, however, are slightly lesser than that obtained in Maharashtra. Comparative advantage of Maharastra grapes Cultivation of Thompson seedless variety of grapes. Grape cultivation is largely in the hands of progressive and well-to-do farmers and organized co-operatives Adoption of latest scientific production technology, which includes use of root stocks tolerant to salinity and nematodes, optimum density, drip irrigation, proper pruning.

Adoption of scientific post harvest management which includes use of sulphur dioxide releasing pads, grading, packaging, pre-cooling, cold storage and refrigerated transportation. Availability of institutional credit. Farmer friendly State Government policies 2.6.2 Season of availability

Grapes start coming to the market in middle of January and peak time of availability being during February-March. Availability season is extended further to April-May by keeping its produce in cold stores. Grape crop can be easily stored up to 6-8 weeks.
Table 3 Period of availability of grapes

State Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh Tamil Nadu

Period of availability Mid-December to May 15 December to 15 April

Peak season February to March February to March

2.6.3

Demand

There is huge demand of grapes in the northern India including Delhi. The demand is going to accelerate in the coming years with increase in population and urbanization. 2.6.4 Marketing

Marketing of grape is unique in Maharashtra because it is carried out by growers themselves, the cooperatives and also the middlemen. The grape growers have established their marketing channels directly in the countries abroad. The cooperative structure is also strong for marketing of grapes. MAHAGRAPES is one of the largest exporters of fresh grapes from India. It is a partnership firm of 16 cooperative societies and it is equipped with pre-cooling and cold storage facilities. The organisation has quality control officers which monitor fruit quality at different stages of operations beginning from cultivation in the farm to packing the fruit for export. 2.6.5 Domestic marketing

Sizeable quantity of produce of grapes comes to Delhi markets. At least 70-80% of the total production is marketed as a fresh fruit and only 10-15% of the produce is marketed after storing in cold stores. Fruit is mostly marketed in small boxes of card-board. Grapes traded from April onwards are from cold stores, as fresh produce starts decreasing in March itself.

Wholesale prices of the grapes vary from Rs.790 to Rs. 3,400/quintal in Delhi markets (2003). The prices are quite high in January and start rising in April and are at peak during

April-May. This rise is mainly because grapes at this time of the year are mainly from cold stores. 2.6.6 Exports and its potential

There is great export potential of exporting grapes to Gulf, Europe, SAARC and South East Asian countries. So far our effort has been mainly on exports to EU countries. Lately, our exports have fallen to 14,571 tonnes in 2001-02 from 20,647 tonnes in 2000-01. There is again a surge in exports during 2002-2003 which reached to 25,567 tonnes. Grape is one of the largest traded fruit in the world. Major exporters of grape are Italy, USA, Spain, Mexico, Greece, etc. Harvesting period of major grape-producing and exporting countries is from May onwards to November. Whereas, grape production in India is mainly from January to March. Other grape-growing countries which produce grapes during this period are Chile, South Africa and Israel. Europe is the biggest market for grapes, as monthly imports of grape are about 90,000 tonnes in winter and around 40,000 tonnes during summer (February-May). India is capable of meeting the requirement of European market provided we maintain the quality standards especially tracking the pesticide residues. Our main competitors are Chile, South Africa and Israel. Considering the total requirement of European Union during summer 1,20,000 tonnes, India can easily meet the target to 40,000 to 50,000 tonnes. Regarding South-East Asian countries, there is a total demand of 1,25,000 to 1,50,000 tonnes of grapes from Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore. Hong Kong alone imports up to 1, 02,600 tonnes of grapes every year. The season of supply coincides with Chile and South Africa, however, these countries being geographically at far off places, it may be possible for India to offer competitive price and penetrate the market. Thus, there is a scope of exporting 5,000 tonnes to 10,000 tonnes of grapes to these markets gradually in coming 5 years. This is possible mainly because of relaxing of trade barriers between South-East Asian countries like Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia and India. 2.6.7 Varieties cultivated

Table 4 Cultivars of grapes cultivated in India Characters White seedless Coloured seedless White seeded Coloured seeded Cultivars (s) Thompson Seedless, Tas-a-Ganesh, Sonaka, Perlette, Pusa Seedless Sharad Seedless, Flame Seedless, Beauty Seedless, Bangalore Blure Anab-e-shahi,Bangalore blue Bangalore Blue, Gulabi (Muscat)

In Maharashtra Thompson Seedless is predominant. Other cultivars that are grown in this region are Tas-e-Ganesh, Sonaka, Sharad Seedless and Flame Seedless.
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2.6.8 2.6.8.1

Action plan of development Production of planting material

For this a nursery of 4 ha is proposed to be established in Pune and one small nursery in Satara. These nurseries will multiply the imported planting material of new table varieties and wine varieties. 2.6.8.2 Area expansion

The present varieties grown in Maharastra are mainly for table purpose. There is growing demand of wine industries so further area expansion should be concentrated for wine varieties example Gelo, Creenesh, Shar- done. For table grapes the recommended varieties are Tas-a-Ganesh, Thompson seedlees, Sharad Flame, Sharad seedless. An area of 1000 ha is proposed for expansion. In table grapes also quality improvement program should be taken into consideration to enhance the quality of the grapes. 2.6.8.3 Post harvest infrastructure

To strengthen the post harvest infrastructure to meet the present level of production as well as the anticipated increase in production volumes, quality at the consumer level can be increased with appropriate post-harvest infrastructural facilities. Therefore, plan envisages infrastructure likeTwenty pack-houses: Where production and post harvest infrastructure is needed to

prevent post-harvest losses to meet the international quality standards, near to places of existing cold storages. Fully automatic, mechanized conveyer based sorting and grading system with hopper should be established Almost all the seven districts needs better handling in terms of functional infrastructural facilities like sorting, grading, packing, temporary storage etc at the rate of two groups of units in each of the district. These facilities at 7 places shall virtually lead to market upgradation and efficiency improvement. IPM practices are grapes are to be adopted for control of powdery mildew, downy mildew, botrytis and various pest and nematodes. Introduction of EUREPGAP certification along with formation of 10 PMOs An Agri Export Zone for Grapes has been set up in the districts of Nasik, Pune, Kolhapur, Satara, Sangli. They have established 90 pack houses in the state and six quality testing labs in the state. The facilities created under the AEZ which is under utilized will be used as common facility under this programme.

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Table 5 Intervention for grapes S.N0. 1. (a) Component/Activity Location/District Rate of assistance/ Unit (Rs.) Rs. 18.0 lakh(Public) Rs. 9.0 lakh Rs. 3.00 lakh each Total Cost (Rs. in lakh) 18.0 9.0 3.00

Production of planting material Model Nursery 2 Nos.(4 ha Nasik each) Private sector 4 ha Small Nursery 1 Nos. (1 ha.each) Public Plantation of new orchard (1000 ha) Post-harvest infrastructure Pack-Houses (20Nos.) Fully automatic mechanized sorting grading line Sangli

(b)

2.

Pune, Solapur, Satara, Sangli, Nasik Nasik , Sangli Pune, Solapur

22,500/- ha

112.5

3.

4.

7. 8.

9.

Processing Unit (25 Nos.) Techno economic feasibility study for winery IPM (7000 ha.) Import of planting material Introduction of new varieties (wine grapes and table grapes) EUREPGAP certification(10)

Nashik & Sangli

1000 ha in each district Special intervention

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general area and 33.33% for Tribal/Hilly areas Project based assistance would be obtained from MFPI Rs.1000/ha.

17.5

20.00

70.00

Nasik, Pune, Sangli

3 Total

30 280

2.7 2.7.1

Mango Comparative advantages of Maharashtra

The main strength of the state lies in the cultivation of the popular exportable varieties e.g. Alphonso, Banganpalli, Bangalora, Kesar, etc., with substantial production and significant share in mango export. Konkan region comprising Thane, Raigarh, Ratnagiri and Sindhudurg is the main mango producing belt. The region produces the best quality Alphonso varieties, and have adequate production base, which have scope for further improvement. Sindhudurg and Ratnagiri district of Konkan region produces largest quantity of choicest mango cultivar Alphonso. The Alphonso grown in the area are best because of the location and export market demand. These two districts have larger area under mango production then any other districts in the country. 2.7.2 Major constraints in Mango production

Fruit fly Alternate bearing Spongy tissue (Alphonso) The growers rarely use Manures and fertilizers No training and pruning of trees is practiced
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Low fruit set and high fruit drop occurs due to lack of fertilizer and plant protection measures. Old orchards are getting senile due to their age, poor management practices and excess use of paclobutrazol in some cases Latent infections of stem end and other root cause fruit loss during ripening The fruits are generally ripened with the help of calcium carbide, which was neither acceptable for good quality nor permitted Lack of integrated packing, handling and movement system for managing the fresh fruits, comprising hot water treatment, sorting, grading and packing etc. Improper harvesting stage. No treatment for fruit against fruit fly, stone, weevil, anthracnose, etc. is given. Baits are not used. 2.7.3 Action plan for development

Maharastra is the most developed state in horticulture but the productivity is quite low as compared to Andhra and Karnataka so the main emphasis should be on productivity enhancement by rejuvenation of the senile orchard, top working, gap filling etc. and these can be achieved by following programme. 2.7.3.1 Development of nurseries

As the availability of quality planting materials is the paramount need to increase productivity, two model nurseries (4 ha each) in the public sector and 2 small nurseries (one ha each) out of which one is in the private sector and rest all in public sector. Model nursery will have facilities like shed net, improved irrigation system, mother trees, propagation chambers etc and utilized for other related crops propagation also. For the scientific development of nurseries, the modern concept shall be employed wherein The foundation trees shall be maintained under the supervision of university experts whether the trees exist in the university compound on the progeny-cum-demonstration farms that are existing in most of the states. Mother trees so raised shall be in the compound of private registered nursery men to match their production capacity in relation to the demand of the area so that these may sustain. Groups of expert to be constituted (3 member team from NHB, ICAR and from Directorate of Agriculture) work as the certification agency to check the authenticity of the plants so produced, instead of becoming the sale agent itself.

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2.7.3.2

Planting of new orchard

Mango in Maharastra is cultivated in 1, 81,000 ha, but its productivity is only 3.4 tonnes/ha. Even neighbouring state like Andhra Pradesh has more than 8MT/Ha. The approach is to use modern cultivation practices as some orchardists are harvesting yields up to 15-20 tonnes/ha depending upon plant spacing used. Thus, there is an urgent need to adopt better growing practices like use of inputs, balanced nutrition, IPM practices, in the mango pockets. New plantations shall cover 10000 ha with high density concept, hybrid varieties coupled with modern system of irrigation, management etc. Simultaneously, activities of rejuvenation shall be started to increase productivity of the existing orchards of three thousand five hundreds ha. Rejuvenation of old and senile orchards shall include top-working, microfertigation and gap filling in the existing plantations in an area of 2,500 ha. Before all such intended areas are covered with plants that are available in the state (5.06 lakhs, presently), as nurseries shall take minimum two years to yield salable plants, evaluation of the existing planting material shall be undertaken by a committee of local representatives of ICAR, NHB and state government with the following mandate Quantity of the plants available Authenticity to prove true-to-type weather the scion material have been taken from the trees exhibiting true characters of the intended variety Status of disease freeness from the general conditions of the area Probable time of their availability. For processing purposes, plantations of 500-1,000 ha of Totapuri, Banganpalli, etc. need to be planted so that proper management of such plantations is taken up and yield are upgraded. This approach of increasing production through area expansion and new hi-tech plantations of disease-free quality planting material coupled with appropriate inputs will lead to increased productivity. Making disease-free quality planting material of improved cultivars available. Upgrading efficiency of orchards by gap filling and rejuvenation Providing required nutrients based on leaf analysis. 2.7.3.3 Integrated nutrient and water management

For achieving higher productivity balanced nutrition is important and single most important factor having bearing on improving productivity and setting in the bi-ennial bearing tendency. Critical nutrient level of N,P and K have already been fixed for cultivars like Alphonso by
13

CISH, Lucknow, and BSKKV, Dapoli respectively. It will be prudent to maintain those levels of nutrients. Preferably these nutrients particularly N and K if applied through drip especially in high-density planting of orchards will help in enhancing productivity. 2.7.3.4 Integrated pest and disease management practices

Integrated pest management practices for controlling mango-hopper, mealy bug, fruit fly, leaf-hopper, shoot-borer, bark-eating caterpillar and scale insects have been standardized by CISH, Lucknow, IIHR, Bangalore and SAU,s need to be adopted. Details of various practices can be obtained from CISH, Lucknow, Similarly for diseases and mango malformation, IPM practices have been already standardized need to be adopted. Post-harvest management steps that have been found useful in improving fruit quality Harvesting at right stage of maturity in the early morning hours De-sapping in shade at farm level or at pack house Sorting at pack house Washing and treatment with fungicide (Procloroz or TBZ 0.1% ) or 520C for 3 minutes to control anthracnose disease Grading Packing in cardboard boxes Pre-cooling and cold storage and maintenance of cool chain upto market 2.7.3.5 Post-harvest infrastructure

With the anticipated increase in production volumes, quality at the consumer level can be increased with appropriate post-harvest infrastructural facilities. Therefore, plan envisages infrastructure like; Eighty pack-houses: Every 1000 ha should have integrated pack house and in the first year it is considered to establish eighty pack houses. Five cold storages coupled Thane and in the Ahmednagar districts to be integrated with the existing pack houses. Post harvest facilities are proposed based on the production in the existing production areas and based on the new area expansion. But one basic parameter of complimentarily shall be followed wherein infrastructural facilities shall be shared between various crops of that command area as crops are seasonal and management of facilities shall also be easy and economic.

14

Table 6 Interventions for mango S. N0 1. (a) Component/Activity Location/ District Unit Cost (Rs.) Total Cost (Rs. in lakh) 36.00

Production of plant material Model Nursery( 2 nos. each 4 ha) ( Public sector 2) Small Nursery (1 nos. each 1 ha) (Private- 1) Plantation of New Orchards (10,000 ha.) Rejuvenation of old orchards (2,500 ha.)

Sindhudurg , Aurangabad

18.0 lakh

(b)

Sindhudurg, Ahmednagar

1.5 lakh

1.5

2.

Thane, Rajgadh, Ratnagiri, Sindhudurg, Aurangabad, Jalna, Beed Thane, Rajgadh, Ratnagiri, Sindhudurg, Solapur, Aurangabad, Jalna, Beed Nashik, Ahmednagar, Satara, Latur, Nanded , Parbhani Thane, Rajgadh, Ratnagiri, Sindhudurg, Aurangabad, Jalna, Beed, Nashik, Ahmednagar, Satara, Latur, Nanded , Parbhani Konkan region, Aurangabad, Ahmednagar, Kolhapur, Parbhani

Rs. 22500/- ha

1125

3.

Rs.15000/- ha.

375

Post-harvest infrastructure 4. Pack House (80 Nos.) Sorting Grading line

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general areas Rs 2.0 crores each subsidy @ 25% of the capital

50

5.

Cold storage units (5 Nos.)

250

6.

IPM (3500 ha.)

Konkan region 2000 ha Western Ghat 1000 ha Marathwada region 500

Rs.1000/ha.

35

Total

1872.5

2.7.4

Marketing

Mango is harvested at full mature stage. There is enough time between harvesting and full ripening during which it can be shipped to distant markets. Mango start coming in the market in March from Maharashtra besides other states like Andhra, Karnataka, Chattisgarh etc. Peak season of availability in these states is April-May. Mangoes are marked to urban areas, maximum produce sent to metropolitan cities like Mumbai and Delhi, especially Delhi meet the entire requirements of the northern region. 2.7.5 Export potential

At present from Maharastra mostly Alphonso, Kesar and Banganpalli are exported. So far, our exports were mainly through air shipments and now with standardization of protocols for sea shipping, there is much more potential of exporting mangoes from Maharastra. Mango exports are further expected to increase due to recent trade agreements with China, Thailand and South-East Asian countries in which our mangoes have yet to penetrate in their markets. At present, Europe alone is importing of 1, 74,872 tonnes mangoes per year. Targeting 30% of this quantity, i.e., exports up to 60,000-70,000 tonnes/year should not be too difficult to our country.
15

Government of India has also sanctioned Agri Export Zones one for Alphonso mango in the Konkan region and one for Kesar mango in districts of Aurangaband, Kalna, Beed, Latur, Ahmedanagar and Nasik for integrated development of these crops. 2.8 Cashew nut

Cashew is predominant horticultural crops of commercial importance in Maharashtra, cashew continues to maintain the in terms of export earnings, besides providing vocational avenues to nearly a million rural families in Maharashtra in farming sector and nearly half a million labour families in processing sector. 2.8.1 Demand and supply patterns

Cashew is one of the India's major foreign exchange earners. Till recently, India has had virtual monopoly in the world supplies of both cashew kernels and cashew nut shell liquid. But with the development of processing industries in some of East African countries, India is getting stiff competition. The entire cashew that is exported from India is not grown within the country itself. In fact, nearly three fourth of it is imported from Mozambique, Tanzania and Kenya. Though, India holds a virtual monopoly in cashew trade and supplying more than 90 per cent of the World's demand for cashew, still we are heavily depend on imports of raw cashew. Fresh plantation of cashew nut will increase the in land supply of raw cashew for processing industries and it will directly reduce the Indias import burden. 2.8.2 Marketing

Marketing of raw cashewnut in India has not yet been organized in systematic manner except in some places where co-operative marketing society is procuring raw nuts to the little desired extent. A major portion of the produce is brought by itinerant merchants and the agents of the processing units. A number of wholesale merchants and the processing factories open their collecting centres in important cashew producing areas during the harvesting period. The petty dealers who buy the nuts from the growers also dispose the nuts in these collecting centres. Cashewnut are brought for sale to the assembling markets largely by the itinerant merchants. In certain areas, the most resourceful processors contact the producers thus avoiding the commission agents role and enjoy good bargaining power by providing credit facilities to the producers. As there are a number of intermediaries operating the field between the primary producer and the processing unit. The different costs and margins in the total spread between the producer and the processing unit are quite significant and the producers share in the price paid by the processing units is generally low.

16

2.8.3

Import / Export Trends

India is the largest exporter of cashew kernels in the world. India exports cashew kernels to more than 60 countries in the world. India has long been the world s largest exporter of cashew kernel with its price and quality. In Europe, India has been preferred supplier with long standing trading relationship based on confidence in product quality and on fast and regular deliveries. Mozambiquae and Brazil are also exporter of the cashew kernel however, the quality of their cashew do not match that of Indian cashew. Brazilian nuts however have a comparative advantage in US market due to lower transportation costs and unique larger size of Brazilian cashew nut. Tanzania, Kenya and China are also reputed exporters of quality cashew kernels. Almost all of the world's raw cashew nuts are sent to India for processing, since India has an inexpensive labour force and does not produce adequate quantities of cashews to fulfill its domestic processing capacity. Approximately 25 to 40 percent of nuts processed in India originate in foreign countries. India also has a long tradition and good reputation as a high quality processor of cashew. A number of countries therefore prefer to export their raw nuts to India for processing rather than to process themselves and produce lower quality kernels. 2.8.4 2.8.4.1 Action plan for development Production of planting material

There are two nurseries existing in the state of Maharashtra exclusively for cashew in the public sector both in the Sindhudurg district. Increasing for the cahew planting material in the Konkan region will be fulfilled by the existing nursery and the new proposed nurseries. Two model nurseries have been proposed one large and one small nursery both in the public sector. These nurseries will primarily accommodate the nucleus material of varieties recommended to the state and build-up sufficient infrastructure for irrigation and nursery activity to propagate clones of such varieties in the form of soft wood grafts. 2.8.4.2 Area expansion

The area expansion activity simultaneously is now getting shifted to non-traditional areas and non-traditional tracks. Under such circumstances, our dependence on area expansion should be limited to clones. An area of 7,200 ha is proposed to be brought under plantation of new orchard programmes.

17

2.8.4.3

Rejuvenation

Declining productivity of cashew falling under senility stage with least economic advantage is a big concern. The potentially for senile area replanting is 50,000 ha against which only 2,000 ha, being a cumbersome process, have been proposed for this year. Packages of clonally propagated materials, being quite new to the farming sector, need extension practices by way of demonstrations, campaigns and training. 2.8.4.4 Post-harvest infrastructure

Pack house for cashew shall consists of collection, drying floors, manual splitting and then making it ready for processing plant. It shall cater to the needs of other crops also in that area. Out of five such numbers, four shall be in general areas and one in tribal belt. Other areas of production shall be attended by the pack houses proposed in mango belts. Other functional infrastructure in relation to cashew shall be made available to the community from the ones proposed under mango. There shall be need for cashew processing plants (2 units) that are proposed for Thane and Raigadh for which project based assistance shall be forth coming from the Ministry of Food Processing after feasibility study, taking into consideration the capacity utilization of the existing plants.
Table 7 Intervention for Cashew S. N0. 1. (a) Component/Activity Location/District Rate of assistance/ Unit (Rs.) Rs. 18.00 lakh Total Cost (Rs. in lakh)

Production of planting material Model Nursery 4 ha Sindhudurg, Ratnagiri 2 nurseries (Public sector)

36

(b) 2.

4.

Small Nursery Public Sector-1 Plantation of new Orchards (7200 hectares) Post-harvest infrastructure Pack house (Drying yard) (25 Nos.)

Ratnagiri Thane, Raigadh, Sindhudurg, Kolhapur Ratnagiri,

Rs. 3.0 lakh each Rs. 22500/- hac.

3.0 810

Thane, Ratnagiri, Sindhudurg, Kolhapur

Raigad,

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general area and 33.33% for Tribal/Hilly areas

15.62

18

S. N0. 5

Component/Activity

Location/District

Processing plants (2 no.) Feasibility study

Raigadh, Ratnagiri

Rate of assistance/ Unit (Rs.) Project based assistance from MOFPi

Total Cost (Rs. in lakh) 20

IPM (1800 ha)

Thane (100 ha) Raigadh (100 ha) Ratnagiri (200 ha) Sindhudurg (500 ha) Kolhapur (500 ha) Satara (200 ha) Nasik (200 ha)

Rs. 1000/ ha

18

Total

902.62

2.9

Sapota

Sapota (Manilkara acharas) is one of the important tropical fruit crop of Maharashtra of great nutritional value. A uniquely flavored fruit, the soft brown flesh of the sapota tastes a bit like a sweet mix of brown sugar and root beer. The sapota tree is also the source of chicle, a chewing gum component. 2.9.1 Comparative advantage of Sapota

Major production area Near to the market Potential for export to middle east 2.9.2 Varietal status

Most important sapota cultivars are Kalipatti, Cricket Ball and Kirtibarthi. Newly-developed cultivars are Co1, Co2, PKM-I and Spindle in Tamil Nadu, and DHS-I and DHS-2 from Karnataka (Dharwad). Important cultivars grown in different states are givenImportant sapota cultivars grown in Maharastra- Kalipatti*, Cricket Ball*, Murraba 2.9.3 Action plan for development

Strengthening of the PHM by introduction of sorting grading line, pre-cooling, cold storage and corrugated packaging

19

Table 8 Interventions for Sapota S.N0. Component/Activity Location/District Rate of assistance/ Unit (Rs.) Total Cost (Rs. in lakh)

1. (a)

Production of planting material Model Nursery-(2 no.) ( Public sector- 2 of 4 ha each)

Pune, Thane

Rs. 18 lac

36

(b) 2.

3.

Small Nursery (1 ha) Private Sector-2 Rejuvenation of old orchards (2000 ha) Post-harvest infrastructure Pack house (20 Nos.) Automatic Sorting Grading line, conveyer belt with hopper

Solapur, Aurangabad Thane, Pune, Aurangabad

Rs. 1.5 lakh each Rs. 15000/ha

3.0 300

Thnae, Nasik, Ahmednagar, Pune, Solapur, Jalna Aurangabad, Nanded

4.

Mobile pre cooling unit (2 no.) Cold Storage (1 no)

Ahmednagar, Thane

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general area and 33.33% for Tribal/Hilly areas 24 lakh/unit

12.5

48

5.

Thane

6.

Reefer van (1 no.)

Ahmednagar

Rs 2.0 crores each subsidy @ 25% of the capital Rs. 24 lac

50

24

7.

IPM (2900 ha)

Thane (100 ha) Raigad (100 ha) Nasik (500 ha) Ahmednagar (250 ha) Aurangabad (500 ha) Pune (250 ha) Solapur (500 ha)

Rs. 1000/ ha

29

Total

502.5

2.9.4

Marketing

Sapota is available almost throughout the year. However, its maximum arrivals in Delhi market are during January-May months. But in Azadpur market, its minimum arrival is during June-October. In Mumbai markets, its arrival starts during September, minimum arrival being June-August. Its prices ranges from Rs 742 to Rs 1,708/quintal in Delhi markets 2003, while in Mumbai, it is from Rs. 1,138-1,447/quintal.

20

2.9.5

Exports and its potential

Exports of sapota are virtually static for last 2-3 years, as it was 910 tonnes during 2000-01, 1,149 tonnes during 2001-02 and 958 tonnes during 2002-03. It is exported mainly to Gulf countries Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar, Oman and Bahrain. The sizable export of sapota has also taken place for the first time during 2002-03 to Bangladesh. Sapota is also being exported in small quantity to UK. There is a good export potential of sapota provided quality fruits are produced employing appropriate pre-harvest and post-harvest practices. For this, post harvest handling practices need to be standardized and post- harvest infrastructure needs to be created. 2.10 Pomegranate Pomegranate is an important fruit crop of Maharastra. It is cultivated in an area of 43,151 ha with a total production of 4, 31,510 tonnes producing about 85% of the total Indian production. 2.10.1 Comparative advantage Maharashtra leads in Pomegranate production in the country (43,151 Ha areas with 4, 31,510 MT productions) with 85 % of total production. Pomegranates are commercial cultivated in Solapur, Sangli, Nashik, Ahmednagar, Pune, Dhule, Aurangabad, Satara, Osmanabad and Latur districts The variety Ganesh, Bhagwa (Red Ruby).cultivated in Maharastra is suitable for export purposes. Production of Pomegranate is mainly concentrated in the Western Maharashtra region and the Marathwada region. At present fair amounts of exports of Pomegranate takes place from the State in Reefer containers by sea. 2.10.2 Action plan for development 2.10.2.1 Production of planting material For production of quality planting material one nursery of 4 ha is proposed to be established in the Solapur district under private sector and another small nursery of 1 ha in the public sector in Pune district. The new areas should be brought under Ruby, Bhagwa and Arakta varieties. 2.10.2.2 Plantation and rejuvenation programme Considering the importance of pomegranate it is proposed to bring 10,000 ha area under new plantation and rejuvenation of 5000 ha of area is proposed. Plantation of ruby variety should be encouraged for export oriented production.
21

2.10.2.3 Post harvest infrastructure Though Maharastra leads in the production of pomegranate, post harvest infrastructure of the state needs to be strengthened. The present post harvest infrastructure already existing in the state should be utilized along with proposed pack houses, cold storage and reefer vans.
Table 9 Intervention for Pomegranate S. N0. 1. (a) (b) Component/Activity Location/District Rate of assistance/ Unit (Rs.) Total Cost (Rs. in lakh)

Production of planting material Model Nursery (4 ha.) private sector 1 Small nursery (1 ha) Public sector Plantation of new Orchards ( 10,000 hectares) Rejuvenation of old orchards (5000 ha) Post-harvest infrastructure Pack house ( 20 Nos.)

Solapur Nasik

9.0 3.0

9.0 3.0

2.

Nasik, Ahmednagar, Pune, Solapur, Satara, Sangli, Nasik, Ahmednagar, Pune, Solapur, Sangli Nasik-5, Ahmednagar-3, Pune-3, Solapur-5, Sangli-3, Satara- 1

Rs. 22,500/- hac.

1125

3.

Rs. 15000/ha

750

4.

5.

Mobile pre cooling unit (2 no.) Cold Storage*

Nasik, Solapur

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general area and 33.33% for Tribal/Hilly areas 24 lakh/unit

12.5

48

6.

Solapur

7.

Reefer Van

Solapur

Rs 2.0 crores each subsidy @ 25% of the capital Rs. 24 lac each

50

24

9.

IPM (3200 ha)

Nasik (1000 ha) Ahmednagar (250 ha) Latur (500 ha) Solapur (500 ha) Sangli (700 ha) Satara (250 ha)

Rs. 1000/ ha

32

Total

2053.5

* Multi commodity cold storages

2.10.3 Marketing Most of the pomegranate is marketed as a fresh fruit, although some quantity of its produce is also stored in cold stores since it has good shelf-life. Maximum arrivals of pomegranate in Delhi markets are during January February but prices are usually the lowest during November December. Lowest arrivals in Azadpur market, Mumbai, Ahmedabad and

Bangalore are during April to June months. It costs from Rs. 971-2016 / quintal in Delhi markets (2003).
22

2.10.4 Exports Exports of fresh pomegranates have increased from 4,773 tonnes in 2001-02 to 6,303 tonnes during 2002-03. It is exported mainly to Gulf and SAARC countries. Its export to European countries has just started. It is expected that it will further accelerate with the availability of superior fruits of Mridula, Ruby, Arakta, Bhagwa, etc. India is the largest producer of pomegranates in the world, but it has only 7% share of total world exports. Total world trade of pomegranate is 1,00,000 -1,12,000 tonnes. Spain is biggest exporter to European Union and to some extent to Gulf countries, trading 60-70% of the total world exports. Iran exports about 15,000 tonnes every year. At present, excellent cultivars with good quality fruits are available, thus India can supply almost throughout the year and can become a good player in its export. Spain exports pomegranates from September to December months which decrease from January onwards. Major exports from Spain are to European Union. Iran exports are mainly to Gulf countries and supplies are at peak during October-December and it decreases from January onwards. In India, its peak production is during December-March and continues up to April-June. Thus, India can export pomegranates from February to June months when there will be no competition from Spain. To enhance exports, increasing production of exportable quality fruits and providing post-harvest handling facilities, are required to be taken up. Then only Indias share in exports of pomegranates can increase to 20% in next 7-10 years. An AEZ for Pomegranate has been set up in districts of Solapur, Sangli, Ahmedanagar, Pune, Nasik Osmanabad and Latur for integrated development of this crop. 2.11 Banana Banana is the most important fruit crop in terms of nutritive value, which has large scale demand for table purpose. It is not seasonal in nature like many other fruits crops and is available in large quantity through out the year. 2.11.1 State Scenario
State Maharastra Gujarat Area (000 ha) 57.4 35.2 Prod. (000 MT) 3607.6 1403.1 Pdy (tones/ha) 62.9 39.9

2.11.2 Comparative advantages of Maharastra Banana Highest productivity Jalgaon district has the maximum hectares under this crop (Over 45,000 hectares) Extended harvesting season throughout the year
23

Maharashtra stands first in the country with a production over 30 lakh M.T. of banana which is more than 40 per cent of the banana production of our country. The area under banana cultivation is 62 thousand hectares in Maharashtra. The banana is commercially cultivated in Thane district of Konkan having this crop 911 hectares area, which is mainly conceatructeal in Vasai and `Palghar tehsils. The main cultivars grown in the state are- Grand Naine, Dwarf Cavendish, Basrai, Robusta, Lal Velchi, Safed Velchi and Nendran. 2.11.3 Action plan for development 2.11.3.1 Production of planting material There are seven tissue culture labs in the public sector and 9 in the private sector. However, some of the infrastructural facilities need to be created in these labs. In these programme seven tissue culture labs has to be taken for rehabilitation. New Plantations- With improved and export oriented varieties new plantations on 1250 ha in the districts of Jalgaon, Solapur, Pune, Nanded, Parbhani, Buldana, Wardha and Nandurbar. 2.11.3.2 Post harvest infrastructure: These districts comprising of specific pockets shall also have eight ripening chambers and 20 pack houses based on the production which will help in facilitating the post harvest management of banana.
Table 10 Intervention for Banana S.No Component/Activity Location Rate of assistance per unit (Rs) Rs. 8.0 lakh/unit Rs. 4.0 lac/unit 24.0 Rs. 22,500/ha 281.25 Total Cost (Rs in lakh) 32.0

1.

2.

Production of planting/material Re-habitation of existing Tissue culture lab 4 in public sector 6 in private sector Plantation of new orchard (1250 ha)

Ratnagiri, Parbhani Akola Pune Jalgaon

Jalgaon,

Jalgaon, Solapur, Pune, Nanded, Parbhani, Buldana, Wardha, Nandurbar, Jalgaon Solapur PuneNanded ParbhaniWardha Akola RatnagiriNandurbar Buldana Pune

Post harvest management Pack house ( 20 Nos.)

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general area

12.5

Ripening chamber (8 no.)

IPM 500 ha)

Jalgaon

5.0 lakh /unit Subsidy @ 25% for Rs. 1000/ ha Total

40.0

5 394.75

2.11.4 Marketing Maximum arrivals in North India are from Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh. Cavendish group of cultivars, Dwarf Cavendish and Giant Cavendish types, have maximum trade.
24

Some quantity of cooking types is also available in the market. Bananas are packed in green condition in its producing areas and it ripens at the destination. Moreover, entire banana marketing is done for fresh fruit as it can-not be stored in cold stores. 2.11.5 Domestic marketing As most of the banana is cultivated either in southern or central India under tropical or subtropical conditions, it is available throughout the year with slight decrease in availability in December and January . Entire north Indian markets comprising Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal, Delhi, Punjab, Haryana and parts of Uttar Pradesh are met by Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat. Bananas come to north Indian markets as full bunches and are riped, cut into hands and then marketed. Ripening methodology used at most of the places is very conventional using smoking. During 2003, wholesale prices of banana varied from Rs 401 to Rs.758/quintal. Highest prices prevail during April-May and these prices start declining from September onwards. 2.11.6 Exports and export potential At present, mainly cooking banana, i.e. Nendran is exported to Gulf countries by air. Its demand cultivars, mainly, among ethnic population in Gulf countries. During 2001-02, as much as 8,100 tonnes of was exported at a value of Rs. 1,587 lakhs. Exports of cooking banana can increase many times, if protocol for shipping green cooking banana is made available and its ripening is arranged at the destination. As far as table bananas are concerned, virtually no export is done at present. Only trial shipments of Grand Naine banana have been done from Maharashtra and Gujarat. One container was sent from Maharashtra during 2002-03, while 3 containers were sent from Gujarat during 2003-04. All shipments were made to UAE (Dubai). Considering Gulf region alone, there is a vast scope of exports, as Saudi Arabia alone imports up to 119,000 tonnes. Besides this, UAE imports 101,000 tonnes and Oman 2,741 tonnes every year. Russian Federation also imports to a level of 5,02,952 tonnes every year. Major supplies especially to Saudi Arabia and UAE are from the Philippines, Malaysia some quantities of banana to Saudi Arabia come from Ecuador also. However, geographically India is better placed compared to South-East-Asian and Central American countries for exports to Gulf countries. An AEZ for banana is established in Jalgaon, Dhule, Nandurbar, Buldhana, Parbhani, Nanded and Wardha.

25

2.12 Citrus In citrus most of the things are common so we have given common description while sectorial have been described in the table. 2.12.1 Sweet Orange Sweet oranges are cultivated in several states of India covering 1, 26,400 ha with a total production of 12,10,400 tonnes. Highest from 85,100 ha cultivation of Mosambi (sweet orange) takes place in a sizable area in Maharashtra (35,500 ha) with a production of 5,18,100 tonnes. Highest productivity is in Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh, the lowest being in Rajasthan and Himachal Pradesh. 2.12.2 Mandarin Orange Mandarins are cultivated in 1, 98,900 ha with a total production of 16, 60,100 tonnes (200102) of mandarins from Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh. It is proposed to extend the area under mandarins by another 26,300 ha increasing its total production to 24, 43,900 tonnes in next 10 years. Out of this targeted production, 2, 96,900 tonnes is contemplated to be achieved by extending the area and 21.47 ha by increasing the productivity of existing plantations. The technology to be adopted for achieving targeted production is planting of newer cultivars, use of tolerant rootstocks, better nutrient and water management practices and appropriate control measure of insects and pests through use of IPM practices. 2.12.3 Action plan for development 2.12.3.1 Production of planting material For new plantation and for rejuvenation of the old senile orchards production of planting material is required. For this nurseries are required to be set up in main citrus producing districts. It is proposed to set up one big nursery in Auragabad for Sweet orange and two nurseries in Amravati, and two small nurseries in Amravati and Wardha. 2.12.3.2 Area expansion and rejuvenation programme It is proposed to increase an area of 6000 in Sweet orange, 3000 ha in Mandarin orange and 3000 ha in kagzi lime. For rejuvenation programme an area of 1000 ha is proposed in Sweet orange and Kagzi Lime and 3000 ha in Mandarin orange. 2.12.3.3 Post-harvest management to improve fruit quality Post-harvest quality of fruits depends, largely upon pre-harvest management practices like application of required nutrients, timely control of pests and diseases, and management of
26

crop load on trees, etc. At post-harvest stage, following steps need to be kept in mind for maintaining good fruit quality. Harvesting the fruits at the right maturity stage in morning or evening hours Harvesting with the help of clippers Careful handling of fruits after harvesting in the field and during transportation Quick transportation to pack-houses Proper washing, fungicide treatment and waxing without giving much gap after harvest Drying, grading and packing in cardboard boxes Precooling and storing fruits at the required temperatures For the post harvest management of sweet oranges the facilities proposed are establishment of the pack house, cold storages, reefer vans and functional infrastructure at the marketing end.
Table 11 Intervention for sweet orange S.N0. 1. (a) Component/Activity Production of planting material Model Nursery 1 Nos.(4 ha each) Public Sector-1 Location/District Rate of Unit (Rs.) assistance/ Total Cost (Rs. in lakh)

Aurangabad/Jalna

Rs. 18.0 lakh(Public)

18.0

(b)

Small Nursery 1 Nos. (1 ha.each) Private Sector - 1

Nanded

Rs. 1.50 lakh each

1.50

2. 3.

Plantation of New Orchards (6000 ha.) Rejuvenation of Old orchards (1000 ha.) Post-harvest infrastructure Pack-Houses (7 Nos.) (Sorting Grading Waxing Packing line)

Jalna, Aurangabad, Beed, Nanded, Parbhani Jalna, Aurangabad, Nanded, Parbhani, Jalgaon Jalgaon, Ahmednagar, Aurangabad, Jalna, Nanded, Parbhani, Yoetmal

Rs.22500/ ha. Rs. 15000/ ha

1350 150

3.

Cold Storage (1 Nos.)

New cold Storage would be set up at Jalna and also the existing cold storages will be utilized for citrus group. Jalna

4.

Refrigerated Vans (1 Nos.)

5.

Functional infrastructure (7 Nos.)

in each District

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general area and 33.33% for Tribal/Hilly areas Rs. 2.00 crore/unit Credit linked backended subsidy @ 25 % of the capital cost of the project Rs.24.00 Lakh/unit Credit linked backended subsidy @ 25 % of the capital cost of the project Proposed assistance upto Rs. 15.00 lakhs @ 25 %.

4.375

50

24

26.25

27

S.N0. 6.

Component/Activity Processing Unit (1Nos.) ( Techno Economic Feasibility Study)

Location/District Jalna

Rate of assistance/ Unit (Rs.) Project based assistance would be obtained from MFPI

Total Cost (Rs. in lakh) 20

7.

IPM (500 ha.)

Jalna

Rs.1000/ha.

5.00

Total

1617.625

Table 12 Intervention for Mandarin orange S.N0. 1. (a) Component/Activity Production of planting material Model Nursery 2 Nos.(4 ha each) Public Sector Location/District Rate of Unit (Rs.) assistance/ Total Cost (Rs. in lakh)

Amravati, Nagpur (Virus free nursery Nagpur)

Rs. 18.0 lakh(Public) in

36

(b)

Small Nursery 1 Nos. (1 ha.each) Private Sector - 1 Plantation of New Orchards (4000 ha.) Rejuvenation of Old orchards (3000 ha.) Post-harvest infrastructure Pack-Houses (10 Nos.) (Sorting Grading Waxing Packing line) Cold Storage (1 Nos.)

Wardha

Rs. 1.50 lakh each

1.50

2. 3.

Washim, Amravati, Yeotmal, Wardha, Akola, Amravati, Yeotmal, Wardha, Nagpur Akola, Amravati, (3)Yeotmal, (2) Wardha, Nagpur (2) Nanded (1)* Parbhani New cold Storage would be set up at Amravati and also the existing cold storages will be utilized for citrus group. Amravati

Rs.22500/ ha. Rs. 15000/ ha

900 450

Rs 2.5 lakh each. Subsidy @ 25% for general area Rs. 2.00 crore/unit Credit linked backended subsidy @ 25 % of the capital cost of the project Rs.24.00 Lakh/unit Credit linked backended subsidy @ 25 % of the capital cost of the project Proposed assistance upto Rs. 15.00 lakhs @ 25 %. Project based assistance would be obtained from MFPI

6.25

3.

50

4.

Refrigerated Vans (1 Nos.)

24

5.

Functional infrastructure (7 Nos.) Processing Unit (1Nos.) ( Techno Economic Feasibility Study for rehabilitation of existing unuits)

in each District

26.25

6.

Amravati

20

28

S.N0. 7.

Component/Activity IPM (1000 ha.)

Location/District Amravati

Rate of assistance/ Unit (Rs.) Rs.1000/ha.

Total Cost (Rs. in lakh) 10.00

Total

1524

Table 13 Intervention for Kagzi Lime S.N0. 1. (a) Component/Activity Production of planting material Small Nursery 1 Nos. (1 ha.each) Public sector -1 Private Sector - 1 Location/District Rate of Unit (Rs.) assistance/ Total Cost (Rs. in lakh)

Akola

Rs. 3.0 lac each Rs. 1.50 lakh each

3.00 1.50

2.

Plantation of New Orchards (3000 ha.) Rejuvenation of orchards (1000 ha.) Old

3.

AKola, Washim, Amravati, Yeotmal, Wardha, Ahmednagar, Pune, Jalna Ahmednagar, Pune, Amravati, Solapur, Buldana, Akola

Rs.22500/ ha.

675

Rs. 15000/ ha

150

3. 6.

Post-harvest infrastructure Pack-Houses (5 Nos.) (Sorting Grading Waxing Packing line) Cold Storage (1 Nos.) Processing Unit (1Nos.) ( Techno Economic Feasibility Study)

Jalgaon (2) Akola Rs 2.5 lakh each. (1)Ahmednagar (1), Subsidy @ 25% for Buldana (1) Solapur (1) general area Exisitng cold storages will be utilized for the crop Amravati Project based assistance would be obtained from MFPI

3.125

20

7.

IPM (500 ha.)

In the cluster

Rs.1000/ha.

5.00

Total

857.625

2.12.4 Marketing Season of availability of citrus fruits depends upon type as Mosambi/Sathgudi and lime is available throughout the year; however, mandarins are available from October onwards up to April. Largest arrivals of mandarin in Delhi market are in February, March and April, although quite significant arrivals of mandarin do take place in November-December. Sale price of mandarin although is highest is April, however, is arrival during this month is insignificant. Prices of mandarin are much higher during February - April than OctoberNovember. This is because the mrig bahar crop is of better quality than ambia bahar crop harvested during October - December.

29

Maximum arrivals of mosambi in Delhi market are during August and September, whereas in Mumbai, its arrivals are maximum during September - October. However, prices are lower during peak arrival seasons both in Delhi and Mumbai markets. The arrivals limes and lemons in Delhi market start increasing during March-Apri, maximum being in May continues up to July. Maximum surge in prices take place during April and lasts from March to June. Export and its potential Exports of citrus fruits comprises mainly of mandarins, limes and lemons. Mandarin exports have been almost static during last 3 years at 27,000 - 28,000 tonnes (2001-03). Major export of mandarin take place to Bangladesh (24,869 tonnes), Nepal (1,561 tonnes), Cameroon (277 tonnes), Ghana (407 tonnes) and France (115 tonnes). The largest exports of limes/lemons take place to Oman (1,388 tonnes), UAE (1,021 tonnes), Saudi Arabia (525 tonnes) and to Nepal (111 tonnes). Mandarin is mostly exported to SAARC countries, while limes/lemons are to Gulf countries. There is ample scope to export of mandarins especially at Eid festival to Bangladesh and also other neighboring countries, i.e. Sri Lanka, Nepal, etc. The present day requirement is for further enhancing the trade by offering quality fruits with appropriate post-harvest treatments. Since, Nagpur mandarin is a par excellent table fruit with easily peelable skin will also be acceptable. Advantage of bilateral South Asian Free Trade Agreements (SAFTA) needs to be taken to enhance export of both Nagpur mandarin as well as other citrus fruits. Regarding Gulf countries, there is a seasonal demand for mandarins at Eid festival. At least 80,000 - 90,000 tonnes of mandarins are imported by Saudi Arabia, UAE, and Baharain. It should not be difficult to target 10 to 15% of these imports within a period of 5-7 years. Presence of ethnic population in regions will further help in promoting acceptance of the product. However, continuous nurturing of markets is required. Similarly, export of limes to Gulf counties can be further enhanced by improving postharvest management practices, i.e. proper washing, fungicide treatment, grading and packing in proper cardboard boxes. 2.13 Vegetable seed production The State Horticulture Mission will ensure the timely availability of the good quality seeds and planting material to the farmers at nominal price. For vegetable seed production as well as production of seedlings, the approach would be as follows:

30

2.13.1 Public sector MSSC and SAUs will do the production of vegetable seeds on the lands being owned by the universities or on lands taken up by MSSC in a contract farming mode belonging to seed growers. The total area taken would be 500 ha. The four agriculture universities will utilize total area of 200 ha. And thus, area of approximately 50.00 ha. will be utilized by each university. Maharashtra State Seed Corporation will cover an area of 300 ha. 2.13.2 Private sector The private seed companies engaged in vegetable seed production will be assisted. An area of approximately 1000.00 ha. is proposed under this component. Thus the total area is 1500 ha including public and private sector. 2.13.3 Seed Infrastructure In order to establish/ strengthen infrastructure facilities for production and distribution of quality seed, assistance for creating facilities of seed cleaning, grading processing, packing and seed storage is proposed. 100% assistance is provided to the public sector and the assistance to the private sector is credit linked back ended subsidy limited to 25% of project cost. Maharashtra being the seed capital of the country, there are large number of public and private sector seed growers who need the assistance for proper handling, storage and packaging of seeds. Therefore, MSSC already has a programme for creation of seed infrastructure. The program will be implemented through public as well as private sector. Public Sector :- The four agriculture universities and Maharashtra state seeds corporation Ltd. in the state will implement this program. For each organization a single unit will be provided. Thus the total units will be 5.Out of five units one big unit will be constructed by Maharashtra state seeds corporation Ltd. with financial assistance of Rs. 125.00 lakhs.One unit will be constructed by each agriculture university with financial assistance of Rs. 20.00 lakh, thus the total financial outlay for seed infrastructure will be Rs. 145.00 lakh. Private Sector:- The private seed companies engaged in vegetable seed production and seed processing will be assisted. During the year 2005-06 assistance will be given to eight vegetable seed infrastructure units. Though the Government of India has proposed 100 % assistance for seed infrastructure, there are various kinds of processing units such as small, medium, large and also different kinds of crops, it is suggested that, maximum assistance of Rs.2.00 lakhs will be given to each unit in private sector. The equipments proposed are seed drier, pre cleaner, gravity separator, seed treatment machine, auto weighing machine, sealing machine etc. Thus the total financial out lay for private sector will be 16.00 lakh.
31

The total outlay required will be 161.00 lakhs. The break up of physical and financial provision proposed for production of seedling and seed infrastructure is as under.
Sr.No 1 Component Production of vegetable seedlings Proposed assistance A) @ Rs. 0.50 lakh/ha for public sector B) @ Rs. 0.25 lakh/ha for private sector A) @ Rs. 125.00 lakh/unit for public sector(MSSC Ltd) B) @ Rs. 5.00 lakh/unit for public sector(Agril.University) C) @ Rs.2.00 lakh/unit for privatesector Phy. Target 500 ha. 1000 ha Fin. Target (Rs.lakh) 250.00 250.00

Seed infrastructure

1 Nos.

125.00

4 Nos.

20.00

8 Nos.

16.00

Total

661.00

2.13.4 Establishment of new gardens: Flowers Maharashtra ranks foremost on the horticulture map of the country. The horticulture scenario in the state has metamorphosed from traditional open cultivation to commercial and hi-tech cultivation of flowers. The State has 8500 ha. under traditional and commercial flowers with production of about 45650 M.T. The state has varying soil types and agro-climatic conditions which offers tremendous scope for commercial floriculture. The principal flowers grown in Maharashtra are Rose, Gladioli, Carnation, Chrysanthemum, Marigold, Aster, Jasmine etc. In poly houses the important flowers grown are Rose, Gerbera, Carnations, Chrysanthemum, Lilium etc. The climate of Deccan plateau is most suitable for growing roses, jasmine, gladioli, carnation, gerbera, chrysanthemum etc while costal climate is suitable for orchids and Anthuriums. Under Horticulture Mission it is proposed to establish new flower gardens in the state. Flower growing districts in the state are as under:
Pune Ahmednagar Nashik Kolhapur Satara Sangli Sholapur Thane Raigad Aurangabad Amaravati Akola Nagpur : : : : : : : : : : : : : Roses, Jasmine, Chrysanthemum, Marigold, Gladiolus, Tuberose, Aster, Golden rod etc. Chrysanthemum, Roses, Marigold, Jasmine etc. Roses, Jasmine, Chrysanthemum, Marigold, Tuberose, Aster, etc. Marigold, Roses, Tuberose, Gladiolus, etc. Gladiolus, Roses, Marigold, Aster, etc. Gladiolus, Roses, Marigold, Aster, etc. Marigold, Aster Jasmine, Roses, Gladiolus, etc. Jasmine, Roses, Gladiolus, etc. Marigold, Gladiolus, Chrysanthemum Tuberose, Gladiolus, Marigold, Aster, Gaillardia, Roses, etc. Tuberose, Gladiolus, Marigold, Aster, Gaillardia, Roses etc. Roses, Chrysanthemum, Gladiolus, Marigold, Aster, Tuberose, Wardha Roses, Tuberose, Gladiolus, Marigold, etc. 32

2.13.4.1 Cut flowers The demand for cut flowers is increasing day by day. There is tremendous market for cut flowers. There is wide scope to increasing the area of cut flowers around the cities like Aurangabad, Akola, Satara, Sangli, Ahmednagar.. The cut flowers like Roses, Gerbera, Carnation, Chrysanthemum, Aester, Bird of Paradise, Heliconias etc. will be promoted under this component. An assistance @ 50% of the cost of cultivation subject to maximum Rs. 35,000.00 will be provided to the small scale farmers. One beneficiary can avail an assistance for 2 ha. area. While an assistance @ 33% of the cost of cultivation subject to maximum Rs. 23,100.00 will be provided to other farmers. One beneficiary can avail assistance for 4 ha. area. 2.13.4.2 Bulbous flowers The bulbous flowers like Lilium, Gladiolus, Tube rose, lilies, Cala-lily, Delia etc. are used as cut flowers and will be promoted with cut flowers. The improved varieties of these bulbous flower crops will be collected from different Research stations and abroad and multiplied at Govt. Nurseries and given to the farmers under this component. An assistance @ 50% of the cost of cultivation subject to maximum Rs. 45,000.00 will be provided to the small scale farmers. One beneficiary can avail an assistance for 2 ha. area while an assistance @ 33% of the cost of cultivation subject to maximum Rs. 29,700.00 will be provided to other farmers. One beneficiary can avail an assistance for 4 ha. area. 2.13.4.3 Loose flowers Loose flowers like Marigold, Aster, Gaillardia, helicrysum, Chrysanthemum, Jasmine, etc will be promoted around cities as well as around holy places of the State. An assistance @ 50% of the cost of cultivation subject to maximum Rs. 12,000.00 will be provided to the small scale farmers. One beneficiary can avail an assistance for 2 ha. area while an assistance @ 33% of the cost of cultivation subject to maximum Rs. 7,920.00 will be provided to other farmers. One beneficiary can avail an assistance for 4 ha. area. While establishment of new flower gardens it is proposed to promote hi-tech cultivation of flower crops by using advanced technology such as use of tissue cultured saplings, drip irrigation, fertigation, use of micronutrients and plant growth regulators, Integrated pest management, training and pruning techniques etc. Flower gardens at field level will be established on project basis. One flower crop as per its agro-climatic requirement will be selected and minimum 5 ha. area will be utilized for establishment of flower garden. The beneficiary with minimum 0.20 ha. will be selected for
33

the programme. Assistance for establishment of flower garden will be given from the mission. Under new plantation programme of flowers assistance will be extended for cultivation of cut flowers, bulbous flowers, loose flowers. An assistance of Rs. 243.80 lakh is proposed.
Table 14 Intervention for floriculture Sr. No. 1 Component a) Cut flowers i)Small scale farmers ii) Other farmers Proposed Assistance Rs. 70000/-ha. 50 % of the cost @Rs.35000/- ha.limited to 2.00 ha. per beneficiary 33 % of the cost @ Rs.23100/- ha.limited to 4.00 ha. per beneficiary Rs. 90000/-ha. 50 % of the cost @ Rs.45000/ha.limited to 2.00 ha. per beneficiary 33 % of the cost @ Rs. 29,700/ha.limited to 4.00 ha. per beneficiary Rs. 24000/- ha. 50 % of the cost @ Rs. 12000/ha.limited to 2.00 ha. per beneficiary 33 % of the cost @ Rs. 7920/- ha.limited to 4.00 ha. per beneficiary Rs. 2.5 lakh each . Subsidy @ 25 % for general area . 100 (ha) 45 100 (ha) 100 ( ha) 35 23.1 Phy. Target ( ha.) Fin.Target ( Rs. lakh)

b) bulbulous flowers i)Small scale farmers ii) Other farmers

300 (ha)

89.1

c)Loose flowers i)Small scale farmers ii) Other farmers 2 3. 4. Sorting line Grading

100 (ha) 500 (ha) 20 20

12 39.6 17.5

Pre- cooling units Cold Storage Total Rs. 2.0 crores each subsidy @ 25 % of the capital

100.00 243.8

2.14 Creation of Water Resources Maharashtra being drought prone and the large area of horticulture being under rainfed plantation, the creation of water source as a component is to be taken up in a big way. State is already having a scheme under EGS for individual farm ponds. The guidelines for the community water tanks do not indicate a definition of the community and the number of farmers who will have to come together for such a community tank. It is presumed that a group of more than one farmer qualifies for such an assistance on a pro-rata basis if the area of 10 ha. and assistance of Rs.10 lakhs per unit is proportionately reduced to the smaller area. Lesser assistance at a rate of Rs.1 lakh per ha. of plantation would be provided for the water source. The farmers in Maharashtra are already taking up water reservoirs with plastic lining and it is suggested that the assistance could also be extended to the individual farmer having water tank with plastic linine. The water stored in community
34

tanks will be effectively used for horticultural crops through micro irrigation technologies. Looking to the scarcity of water, low rainfall in most parts of Maharashtra., community tanks with plastic lining would be of immense use for giving protective irrigation to the orchards of mango,orange, grapes, sweetlime, pomegranates etc. The physical and financial programme proposed is as under.
Table 15 Physical and financial programme for water resources Programme Community tanks with use of plastics Estimated cost Rs. 10.00 lakh per unit Proposed assistance Upto Rs.10.00 lakh per unit of 10 ha. Physical target (Nos.) 50 Financial target ( Rs. In lakh) 500

The district-wise break up of physical and financial programme for the year 2005-06 is given.
Table 16 Physical and financial programme of Community Tanks for 2005-06 Sr. No. District Communitry tanks with use of plastic Phy. No. Fin. ( Rs. in Lakh ) 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 4.00 40.00 3.00 30.00 2.00 20.00 1.00 10.00 2.00 20.00 8.00 80.00 2.00 20.00 2.00 20.00 3.00 30.00 7.00 70.00 2.00 20.00 3.00 30.00 2.00 20.00 7.00 70.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 3.00 30.00 2.00 20.00 2.00 20.00 2.00 20.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 8.00 80.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 2.00 20.00 1.00 10.00 5.00 50.00 2.00 20.00 1.00 10.00 2.00 20.00 1.00 10.00 1.00 10.00 0.00 0.00 8.00 80.00 50.00 500.00 35

1 Thane 2 Raigad 3 Ratnagiri 4 Sindhudurga Division Total 5 Nasik 6 Dhule 7 Nandurbar 8 Jalgaon Division Total 9 Ahmednagar 10 Pune 11 Solapur Division Total 12 Satara 13 Sangli 14 Kolhapur Division Total 15 Aurangabad 16 Jalna 17 Beed Division Total 18 Latur 19 Usmanabad 20 Nanded 21 Hingoli 22 Parbhani Division Total 23 Buldhana 24 Akola 25 Washim 26 Amravati 27 Yeotmal Division Total 28 Wardha 29 Nagpur 30 Bhandara 31 Gondiya 32 Chandrapur 33 Gadchiroli Division Total State Total

2.15 Protected Cultivation Activities like Greenhouse construction, mulching, shade net and plastic tunnels will be promoted with assistance available under Mission. 2.15.1 Green house 2.15.1.1 Green house (Hi tech) The green houses will be mainly used for growing of seasonal crops and high value vegetable and flower crops. They will also be used for hardening of tissue cultured plantlets. In the green house the temperature, humidity are kept under control by using mini/ micro irrigation and fogging system as per the need of crops which are to be grown in the green house. The estimated cost of construction is Rs. 650/- per sq mt. The assistance @ 50 % of the cost subject to a maximum of Rs. 325 per sq. m. will be available to small and marginal farmers for a unit area of 1000 sq mts, and for other categories of the farmers, the

assistance will be @ 33.3% subject to maximum of Rs. 215 per sq mt.for a unit area of 1000 sq mts. per beneficiary. The physical and financial programme proposed is as follows.
Table 17 Physical and financial programme for hitech green house Programme Geeen (Hitech) house Estimated cost Rs.650/- per sq mt Proposed assistance A) 50% to small and marginal farmers B)33.3% to other farmers Physical target (Nos.) 25 Financial target ( Rs. In lakh) 81.25

Rs.650/- per sq mt Total

25 50

53.75 135

The emphasis will be placed on cultivation of Carnation, Gerbera, Roses, Capsicum, Tomato, plantlet hardening in the Thane, raigad, ratnagiri, , Nasik, Pune, Satara, Kolhapur, Sangli, Amravati, Yavatmal districts. 2.15.1.2 Green house ( Normal ) In these type of greenhouses , dependence on electricity or other conventional fuel is eliminated. These greenhouses will be operaterd with only natural ventilation provision for maintaining favourable temp.,humidity and carbon dioxide concentration . The plastic net will be used to prevent entry of insects and pests . The film to be used will be ultraviolet stabilized and will be conforming to standards of IS 2508. The estimated cost of such green house is Rs. 250 per sq mt . The assistance @ 50 % a i.e Rs.125 per sq mt will be

provided for a unit of 1000 sq mt, per beneficiary for small and marginal farmers. The other categories of farmers will be given 33.3% i.e Rs. 83.25 per sq.mt, assistance for a unit of 1000 sq mt per beneficiary.
36

The physical and financial programme proposed is as below:


Table 18 physical and financial programme for normal green house Programme Geeen (Normal) house Estimated cost Rs.250/- per sq mt Rs250/- per sq mt Total Proposed assistance A) 50% to small and marginal farmers B)33.3% to other farmers Physical target (Nos.) 25 5 30 Financial target ( Rs. In lakh) 31.25 4.16 35.41

The emphasis will be placed on cultivation of Gerbera, Roses, Capcicim, Tomato,Cucumber, hardning of plantlets in Thane, Raigad, Ratnagiri, Nasik, Pune, Solapur, Satara, Kolhapur, Sangli, Auarangabad, Jalna, districts. 2.15.2 Mulching It is necessary in the state of Maharashtra Plastic mulching for fruit trees and in strawberry cultivation is found very effective. Under the Mission assistance @ 50 % of the total cost subject to a maximum of Rs. 7000/- per hectare limited to 2 hectares per beneficiary is available. Plastic mulching consists of laying suitable plastic film over the soil around a plant to limit evaporation of water, to check the growth of weed and to protect crops form dirt. Only flexible films are suitable for this practice,.The materials commonly used for mulching film are PVC, LDPE and LLDPE. used green house films will also be used for mulching applications. The thickness of the film will vary with the type of crops grown. It ranges from 30 to 50 micron for short duration crops and 200 to 250 micron for fruit tree orchards. The physical and financial programme proposed is as under.
Table 19 Physical and financial progamme for mulching Programme Mulching Estimated cost Rs. 14000/- per ha. Proposed assistance 50% of cost maximum upto 2 ha. per farmer Physical target (ha.) 750 Financial target ( Rs. in lakh) 52.5

2.15.3 Shade net An assistance @ 50 % of the cost subject to a maximum of Rs. 3500/ 500 sq. m. limited to 2 hectares per beneficiary will be available under the Mission. A shadenet is a framed structure covered with plastic net instead plastic film or glass. Plastic net is stretched properly before use. Once the shadenet frame is installed the stretched plastic net is spread over the structure from one end to the other without wrinkles and keeping over crops or nursery. It protects the crops from high intensity direct solar raditation . The physical and financial programme proposed is as under.
37

Table 20 Physical and financial programme for shade net Programme Shade net Estimated cost Rs.14/- per sq mt Proposed assistance 50 % cost i.e. Rs.3500/- per 500 Sq.mt,. maximum upto 2 ha. per farmer Physical target (ha.) 25 Financial target ( Rs. in lakh) 17.5

2.15.4 Plastic tunnels An assistance @ 50 % of the cost subject to a maximum of Rs. 5000/1000 sq. m. limited to 0.50 hectare per beneficiary will be available under the Mission. Plastic tunnel is also called miniature green house, the low tunnels take full advantage of the properties of transparent plastic films. The curved shape along with minimum framework helps to maximize the illumination. Heat and water losses are reduced. The installation is rapid and low cost. Plastic low tunnels will be used in horticultural nurseries, floriculture, etc. The physical and financial programme proposed is as under.
Table 21 Physical and financial programme for plastic tunnels Programme Plastic tunnels Estimated cost Rs.10/- per sq mt Proposed assistance 50% of the cost ie Rs.5000/- per 1000 sq mt , maximum upto 0.5 ha. Physical target (ha.) 10 Financial target ( Rs. in lakh) 5

Activities like green house construction, mulching, shade net and plastic tunnels would be promoted, the assistance for which is indicated in the guidelines. The state already has more than 1000 green houses most of which grow flowers, exotic vegetables and seedlings for further propagation. The area under mulching is also picking up. Shed nets for controlled vegetables and the plastic tunnels for seedlings production are also popular in the state. The substantial area under various crops is also proposed to be taken up for green houses, mulching, shed net and plastic tunnels in the state. The crops for which such kind of protected cultivation would be taken up and the area to be taken are indicated in the project document.

38

The districtwise break up of physical and financial programme under, Green House ( Hi Tech ) , Green House ( Normal), Mulching, Shade Net, Plastic Tunnels is given under.
Table 22 District-wise/component-wise Proposed Programme and financial requirement under NHM for Protected Cultivation (Rs. in lakhs) Sr No Dist Protected cultivation 1. Green House (Hitech) b.Other a. Small & Marginal farmers (33% Farmers (50% max. Rs. max. Rs. 215/sq.m.) 325/sq.m.) Phy 3 1 1 1 0 3 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 2 5 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 Fin 4 3.25 3.25 3.25 0.00 9.75 3.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 13.00 3.25 6.50 6.50 16.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 9.75 3.25 3.25 3.25 9.75 3.25 3.25 3.25 0.00 Phy 5 1 1 1 0 3 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 2 5 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 Fin 6 2.15 2.15 2.15 0.00 6.45 2.15 2.15 2.15 2.15 8.60 2.15 4.30 4.30 10.75 2.15 2.15 2.15 6.45 2.15 2.15 2.15 6.45 2.15 2.15 2.15 0.00 Total 1. Green House (Normal) a. Small & b.Other Marginal farmers Farmers (50% (33% max. max. Rs. Rs. 125/sq.m.) 67/sq.m.) Phy 7 1 1 1 0 3 1 1 1 1 4 1 2 2 5 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 Fin 8 1.25 1.25 1.25 0.00 3.75 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 5.00 1.25 2.50 2.50 6.25 1.25 1.25 1.25 3.75 1.25 1.25 1.25 3.75 1.25 1.25 1.25 0.00 39 Phy 9 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Fin 10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.83 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.83 0.83 0.83 0.00 1.67 0.83 0.83 0.00 1.67 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2. Mulching (50% max. Rs. 7000/sq.m.) 3. ShadeNet (50% max. Rs. 14/SQ.M. i.e. Rs. 3500/500 sq.m.) 4. Plastic Tunnel (50% max. Rs. 10/SQ.M. i.e. Rs. 5000/1000 sq.m.) Phy Fin 15 16 1 0.50 1 0.50 1 0.50 1 0.50 4 2.00 1 0.50 0 0.00 1 0.50 1 0.50 3 1.50 0 0.00 1 0.50 0 0.00 1 0.50 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

2 Thane Raigad Ratnagiri Sindhudurg Konkan Division Nashik Dhule Nandurbar Jalgaon Nashik Division Ahmednagar Pune Sholapur Pune Division Satara Sangali Kolhapur Kolhapur Division Aurangabad Jalna Beed Aurangabad Div. Latur Usmanabad Nanded Parbhani

Phy 11 2 1 1 1 5 50 30 30 50 160 30 50 100 180 20 75 20 115 20 20 20 60 30 30 30 20

Fin 12 0.14 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.35 3.50 2.10 2.10 3.50 11.20 2.10 3.50 7.00 12.60 1.40 5.25 1.40 8.05 1.40 1.40 1.40 4.20 2.10 2.10 2.10 1.40

Phy 13 2 2 2 2 8 3 3 3 3 12 3 3 3 9 3 3 3 9 3 3 3 9 3 3 3 3

Fin 14 1.40 1.40 1.40 1.40 5.60 2.10 2.10 2.10 2.10 8.40 2.10 2.10 2.10 6.30 2.10 2.10 2.10 6.30 2.10 2.10 2.10 6.30 2.10 2.10 2.10 2.10

Fin 17 8.69 8.62 8.62 1.97 27.9 13.58 10.85 11.35 12.75 48.5325 11.68 20.23 22.40 54.315 10.98 14.83 10.15 35.965 10.15 10.15 10.15 30.45 10.85 10.85 10.85 3.50

Sr No

Dist

Protected cultivation 1. Green House (Hitech) b.Other a. Small & Marginal farmers (33% Farmers (50% max. Rs. max. Rs. 215/sq.m.) 325/sq.m.) 0 3 1 1 0 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 0.00 9.75 3.25 3.25 0.00 3.25 3.25 13.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 81.25 0 3 1 1 0 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 0.00 6.45 2.15 2.15 0.00 2.15 2.15 8.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 53.75

Total 1. Green House (Normal) a. Small & b.Other Marginal farmers Farmers (50% (33% max. max. Rs. Rs. 125/sq.m.) 67/sq.m.) 0 3 1 1 0 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 0.00 3.75 1.25 1.25 0.00 1.25 1.25 5.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 31.25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.16 2. Mulching (50% max. Rs. 7000/sq.m.) 3. ShadeNet (50% max. Rs. 14/SQ.M. i.e. Rs. 3500/500 sq.m.) 4. Plastic Tunnel (50% max. Rs. 10/SQ.M. i.e. Rs. 5000/1000 sq.m.) 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 1 0.50 0 0.00 1 0.50 0 0.00 2 1.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 10 5.00

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

Hingoli Latur Division Buldhana Akola Washim Amravati Yavatmal Amravati Division Wardha Nagpur Bhandara Gondia Chandrapur Gadchiroli Nagpur Division Commissionerate Maharashtra State

20 130 10 11 10 15 10 56 10 10 6 6 6 6 44 750

1.40 9.10 0.70 0.77 0.70 1.05 0.70 3.92 0.70 0.70 0.42 0.42 0.42 0.42 3.08 52.50

3 15 4 4 3 4 3 18 4 4 3 3 3 3 20 100

2.10 10.50 2.80 2.80 2.10 2.80 2.10 12.60 2.80 2.80 2.10 2.10 2.10 2.10 14.00 70.00

3.50 39.55 10.15 10.72 2.80 11.00 9.45 44.12 3.50 3.50 2.52 2.52 2.52 2.52 17.08 297.90

40

2.16 Precision Farming 2.16.1 GIS and Remote Sensing in Horticulture The changing scenario of horticultural planning and management needs a precise backup of field information. Techniques like Geological Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing ( RS ) are evolved now to meet these requirements. Use of such techniques will definitely improve the managerial performance of the NHM implementing agency. While implementing National Horticulture Mission, GIS and RS will be used for following objectives: Area enumeration of important horticultural crops. Production estimation and post harvest planning Soil moisture status Disease and pest incidence Disaster estimations Planning with clusters approach GIS techniques may also be used to store and project huge horticultural database of Maharashtra state. Use of GIS and RS for area enumaration, production assessment and disaster estimations in the field of horticulture will be established by undertaking crop based pilot projects proposed as follows. These projects will be implemented with the help of RRSSC, Nagpur and MRSAC, Nagpur. In each cluster one GIS and remote sensing programme has been proposed at an outlay of Rs. 55 lakhs.
Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 Name of Project Crops Disease Forecast Disaster Estimation Village Maps digitized up to survey No. level Development of crop signatures and other research Trainings Total Cluster Each cluster will have one disease forecast programme @ 13.75 in each cluster Hailstorm, Drought, Fire affected area Entire state Estimated cost (Rs. lakh) 55 3.00 15.00 10.00

--

1.50 84.5

41

2.17 Promotion of IPM/ INM 2.17.1 Sanitary and Phyto- Sanitary Inspection and Certification Sanitary and phyto-sanitary certification is invariable part for export consignment. In Maharashtra there are nine authorities designated under law for issuance of necessary certificates. The residue testing laboratories and other infrastructure facilities are available with the state. Presently Pesticide Residue Testing Laboratories are established at Pune & Nagpur. Farmers & Exporters are using the facilities of Pesticide Residue Testing Laboratory at Pune. Every year farmers from Nashik, Ahamadnagar, Pune, Solapur, Sangli, Satara, Latur, Osmanabad and from Vidarbha region are sending their samples at Punes laboratory and due to the analytical performance farmers are getting confidence about the Government Laboratory. Area and production wise Maharashtra occupies 70% share and Nashik & Latur division occupies 60% share of grape in area and production. In Amaravati division Sweet and loose mandarin (Santra), organically grown cotton are being exported through European & other countries. To know the level of pesticide residues from above crop the consignments are required to be tested for pesticide & heavy metal residues, but the farmers and exporters has to depend upon the private laboratory at Mumbai & laboratory at Pune to get their grapes, other fruits and vegetable samples analysed for pesticide residues. It take actual 12 to 14 hours time for transport of these samples, it may result into delay in analysis and deterioration of analyse from the samples. It is therefore very important to establish Pesticide Residue Testing Laboratory at Nashik, Latur & Amaravati. The financial requirement for Each Laboratory is given under:
Table 23 Financial requirement for each laboratory (Fig in Rs. lakhs) Sr. No. 1. a. b. 2. a. Particulars Recurring Pay & allowances Contingencies Non Recurring Construction of building, Electrification & air conditioning 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Total

15.00 20.50 45.00

15.50 20.50 55.00

16.00 21.00 0.00

16.50 21.50 0.00

17.00 22.00 0.00

80.00 105.50 100.00

2.17.2 Phyto-sanitary certificate The Export certification and issuance of Phytosanitary certificate (PSC) is undertaken in pursuance to the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) , 1951 of FAO . The purpose of IPPC is to ensure common and effective action to prevent the introduction and spread of pests and diseases of plants plant materials and to promote measures for their control.Cosidering the Agriculture export potential from Maharashtra ,Govt. of India has
42

been notifiied State Govt. officers from Pune, Nasik, Sangli, Solapur, Amravati , Ratnagiri and Sindhudurgh as a PSC issuing authorities for Export of Agriculture commodities to foreign countries.
Table 24 Statement showing the details of facilities required for Phytosanitary Certificate Issuing Authorities Sr District Xray machine No. 1 1 Amt. 30.00 30.00 IT equipments No. 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 11 Amt 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 11.00 Inspection Kits No. Amt 2 0.40 2 2 2 1 1 1 11 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.20 0.20 0.20 2.20 Basic Insfracture No. Amt 1 5.00 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Digital Video Camera No. Amt 1 1.00 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 11.00 Total Amount 38.40 04.40 04.40 04.40 03.40 03.40 03.40 61.80

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Pune Sangli Nasik Solapur Amravati Ratnagiri Sindhurgh Total

2.17.3 Disease Forecasting Units The fruit crops, vegetable crops, flowers crops etc. are susceptible to various diseases which affect the productivity of the crop, if timely preventive measures are not taken. It is proposed to establish total five disease forecasting units one in each identified cluster and one in Jalgaon which will also cover adjacent districts like Dhule, Buldana, Nandurbar to predict and forecast incidence of disease to safeguard the crop. For establishment of such units, 100% assistance limited to Rs. 4.00 lakh per unit will be given in Public Sector Units. Besides this an assistance @ of 50% of actual cost max. up to Rs. 2.00 lakh per lab will be given for private sector, NGO, growers organization, Fruit Growers Associations etc. on projectised approach. 2.17.4 Plant Health Clinics The plant health clinics will be opened one in each identified cluster with the total investment of Rs. 80.00 lakh. The facilities would be up graded with the current norm of Rs.20 lakh per unit. Such a facility can also be provided along with pesticides residue testing laboratory and at the location where bio-control labs are already existing. The functions being similar and complementary, such bio-control labs also having a plant health clinic would create centres of integrated services to be provided for detecting various diseases and offer solutions through the use of bio-pesticides. In order to ensure supply of quality planting material with the guarantee of genetic purity, it is necessary to establish plant health clinics in public
43

and private sector. The assistance for plant health clinic will be at the rate of Rs. 20.00 lakh per unit in public sector as 100% assistance and 50% of the cost maximum to Rs. 10.00 lakh in private sector. It is proposed to establish such clinics in public sector and private sector as per requirement. 2.17.5 Leaf / Tissue Analysis Lab The main purpose of such a lab is to detect the micro nutrient deficiency, the fertilizer testing labs which are already equipped for testing the micro nutrient would be the right location for using such leaf / tissue analysis lab. All the additional fertilizer testing labs would also have the facilities of leaf / tissue analysis labs in the state. The concept of such labs in private sector is also being encouraged. There will be one leaf/ tissue analysis lab in each identified cluster under public sector and 2 private labs one in each grape and citrus crop. . Hence it is essential to adopt more scientific method such as tissue/leaf analysis especially in grapes and also in citrus, mango etc. 100% assistance limited to Rs. 20 lakh will be extended to leaf and tissue analysis laboratory in public sector. While an assistance of @ of 50% of actual cost max. Up to Rs. 10.00 lakh per lab will be given for private sector i.e. NGO, growers organization, Fruit Growers Associations etc. 2.17.6 Organic Farming In Maharashtra, movement of organic farming is gaining support from farmers as well as consumers. The consumers are also becoming conscious regarding health food. One of the major concern of the farmers is increasing cost of cultivation. This can be minimized with the help of organic farming. As on today, around 5 lakh area is under organic farming, which includes area of horticultural crops also. The method of vermi composting for production of organic manure is found to be very useful. It is therefore, proposed to support farmers for adoption of organic farming on horticulture crops and also production of compost through vermi compost. In view of the growing demand for the organically produced food items worldwide the natural advantages in this regard needs to be fully exploited. In order to help the growers obtain the required certification for organically produced crops awareness has to be generated through training and distribution of information material. For adopting organic farming for perennial and non perennial fruit crops, aromatic plants, Spices etc. additional assistance is given over and above the area expansion programme @ Rs. 10,000/- per hectare subject to a limit of 4 ha per beneficiary. For organic cultivation of vegetables, the maximum assistance is limited to Rs. 10,000/- per ha. The NHM will also provide financial assistance up to a maximum of Rs. 5.00 lakhs for a group of farmers covering an area of 50 ha, duly recommended by State Govt., on a case to case basis for certification of organic process/produce.
44

It is proposed to undertake organic farming programme on 5000 hectare area for which an assistance of Rs. 500 lakhs will be required. 2.17.7 Vermi compost unit The method of vermi composting for production of organic manure is found to be very useful. It is therefore, proposed to support farmers for adoption of organic farming on horticulture crops and also production of compost through vermi compost.It is proposed to install 000 vermi compost units for which an assistance of Rs. 300 lakhs will be required. 2.17.8 Certification It is very difficult to identify organic produce from general produce. Therefore it is necessary to introduce some certification methodology to certify organically grown food viz. fruits, vegetables and others. In Maharashtra authorized agencies like ECOCERT, Ion Exchange, INORA etc. are looking after the certification of organic produce. Such certification programme is proposed to be assisted. Financial assistance up to a maximum of Rs. 5.00 lakhs for a group of farmers covering an area of 50 ha, is recommended on a case to case basis for certification of organic process/produce.It is proposed to formulate 40 groups of farmers covering 50 hectare area of each group for certification for which an assistance of Rs. 200 lakhs will be required
Table 25 Proposed Programme of Organic Farming (Rs. In lakh) Sr. No. 1 Component Crops Location Phy Fin 500

2 3

Adoption of Fruits : pomegranate, Nasik, Solapur, Pune, Konkan 5,000 organic farming grapes, mango etc. division, Aurangabad division Vegetables : All vegetable growing districts cruciferous, mainly districts from w. solaneceous, Maharashtra, Marathwada, malveceous, Leafy and Amaravati and Nagpur vegetables, peas and districts of Vidharbha region beans Spices : chilli, ginger, Amaravati and Nagpur turmeric, others , districts of Vidharbha region, Sangli, Satara, Kolhapur, Nasik, Dhule, districts from W. Maharashtra region Vermi compost The districts proposed for 1,000 units adoption of organic farming Certification The districts proposed for 40 adoption of organic farming Total

300.00 200.00 1000.00

45

2.18 Human Resource Development Maharashtra is one of the leading state in the country for Horticulture Development. With the increasing area under horticultural crops, the need for trained/semi-trained manpower is growing . Also there is need to guide farmers about latest knowhow in the field of horticulture. The Government of India has sanctioned Agri Export Zones for mango, banana, grapes, winery also Food parks in the state. Thus there is need to give focus on export quality production. For this it is essential to impart training to the departmental staff/officers. Training would be imparted on the aspects like improved cultivation practices, IPM, INM, post harvest management practices and processing, export etc. is necessary. Human resource development through trainings and demonstrations will be an integral part of the State Mission. Under this programme, training of the farmers, field level worker and officers will be taken up. Programme for providing appropriate training to the farmers for the adoption of high yielding varieties of crops and farming system will be taken up. Programme for training of the officials concerned with the implementation of the programme and the field level workers who will in turn train, guide the farmers will also be taken up. An important activity under the training is to provide resource materials to the farmers and to acquaint them about various farming techniques through exhibitions and demonstrations. ln order to ensure wider and full participation, publicity about the training programmes will also be required.
Table 26 Farmers traing (Rs. In lakhs) Sr. No. 1 2 3 Duration of Training One day training Three days training Five days training Norms @ Rs. 100 per head @ Rs. 300 per head @ Rs. 500 per head Total No. of participants 20000 15000 10000 45000 Provision required 20.00 45.00 50.00 115.00

It is proposed to extend benefit of such exposure educational tours to 4000 farmers with a financial assistance of Rs. 100 lakhs. Training for gardener, supervisor and entrepreneur Training program for gardeners, supervisors and entrepreneurs is envisaged with a financial outlay of Rs. 100 lakhs.

46

Table 27 Officers Training (Rs. In lakhs) Sr. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Duration of Training One day training Three days training Five days training Two weeks training One months training Three months training Norms @ Rs. 1000 per head @ Rs. 2500 per head @ Rs. 5000 per head @ Rs. 10000 per head @ Rs. 20000 per head @ Rs. 50000 per head Total No. of participants 1000 500 500 500 50 20 2570 Provision required 10.00 12.50 25.00 50.00 10.00 10.00 117.50

2.18.1 Foreign Study Tour It is proposed to extend benefit of such exposure to 20 beneficiaries for which a provision of Rs. 40 lakhs is proposed. 2.18.2 Human resource development in Agri Export Zone Government of India has sanctioned Agricultural Export Zones (AEZ) for Mango ( Alphanso & Kesar),Pomegranate , Onion, Grapes, Flower, Oranges and Banana. It is, therefore necessary to educate the farmers regarding production technologies, quality standards, Awareness residue standards requirement of different importing countries required need for packaging, processing etc. Pattern of assistance will be Rs. 50/- per farmer per day and provision of Rs. 20.00 lakh is proposed. These trainings will be organised in AEZ areas by the concerned nodal agencies like MSAMB, MIDC, Department of Agriculture or service provider. 2.18.3 HRD training for promotion of export Government of India has sanctioned Agricultural Export Zones (AEZ) for Mango ( Alphanso & Kesar),Pomegranate , Onion, Grapes, Flower, Oranges and Banana. It is, therefore necessary to educate the farmers regarding production technologies,quality standards, awareness residue standards, requirement of diffrent importing countries in respect of packaging, processing etc. Pattern of assistance will be Rs. 50/- per farmer per day and provision of Rs. 150 lakh is proposed. These trainings will be organised in AEZ areas by the concerned nodal agencies like MSAMB, MIDC, Department of Agriculture or service provider. 2.18.4 Pollination Support Through Bee- keeping In order to maximize agricultural production, honeybee can be used as an important input. The overall responsibility of coordinating the beekeeping development programme in the State would be vested in the identified State Designated Agency (SDA) KVIB. The KVIB has been implementing the beekeeping programmes, it will be integrated in the NHM.
47

The bee breeders from corporate/private sector shall be registered with SDA, and they will be selected based on their technical expertise, qualified personnel and infrastructure. The registered bee breeders shall be eligible for financial assistance in the form of grant-in-aid to a maximum of 50% of the cost of the additional facilities required limiting to Rs.2.50 lakhs per breeder mainly for strengthening infrastructure facilities. Each bee breeder will be required to multiply and produce a minimum of 3000 colonies per annum for a period of five years. If, however, a breeder is not in a position to meet the above target, the SDA will take appropriate steps to reduce the assistance proportionately.
Area Nasik Nandurbar Pune Amravati Satara Kolhapur Chandrapur Gadchiroli Talukas Surgana, Peth, Dindori Entire district Mulshi, Maval, Velha, Bhor Melghat, Paratwada Mahabaleshwar, Wai, Patan Ajra, Gadhinglaj Gond Pimpri, Rajura Gadchiroli, Kurkheda Total Bee-hives to be distributed 100 100 300 50 100 200 100 50 1000 Outlay (Rs. lakhs) 0.80 0.80 2.40 0.40 0.80 1.60 0.80 0.40 8.00

2.18.5 Technology Dissemination Through Demonstrations/ Front Line demonstration Latest technologies will be promoted or crop specific cultivation, use of IPM/INM, protected cultivation, organic farming through farmer participatory demonstration in a compact area of one ha. This will be organized at strategic locations in farmers field for which assistance will be limited to 75% of the cost. For green house cultivation, the area will be limited to 500 Sq. m. Farms in the public sector, SAUs would be sites for front line demonstrations, for which 100% assistance will he provided. It is proposed that demonstrations at 75% assistance at farmers fields and @ 100% assistance at TSF, agro-polyclinics, fields of SAU / KVK's would be organised in a big way. 2.18.6 Demonstrations on farmers fields Demonstrations are very effective tool to disseminate latest technologies in the cultivation of different crops. The farmers get convinced once the technologies are demonstrated on their own farms. The programme of demonstrations is essential for rapid spread of latest technologies involved in the production of fruits, vegetables, flowers, spices and aromatic plants. The detailed programme of demonstrations of technologies is planned under the mission based on the critical constraints of gapson the farmers fields. The vegetable demonstrations are based on the technologies of IPM, organic farming and the demonstrations on white / yellow onion. The spices demonstrations are based on IPM and organic farming. The demonstrations of floriculture include various types of flowers viz. bulbous, grafts, seeds. The demonstrations of fruits involve latest technologies involved in
48

export quality production. The aromatic plant demonstrations are based on improved cultivation practices including seed production. The physical and financial programme planned for 2005-06 is as under.
Sr. No. 1 2 Crop Type of Demonstration Cost norm Asst. @ Rs. 75% / ha. 30000 3000 15000 10000 90000 70000 24000 15000 15000 Total 22500 2250 11250 7500 67500 52500 18000 11250 11250 No. of Provision ( Demonstrations Rs. in lakh ) 444 888 133 133 4 5 29 133 222 1991 100.00 19.98 15.00 15.00 2.50 2.40 5.20 15.00 25.00 200.08

Fruit crops Vegetables

Technology demonstration IPM Organic farming White / yellow onion

Flowers

Bulbous Cut flowers Loose flowers

4 5

Aromatic plants Spices

2.18.7 Front line Demonstrations on public sector farms The protected cultivation of horticultural crops is capable of bringing about substantial productivity and quality improvement. The research by ICAR and SAUs indicate huge possibilities in this regard. The controlled atmosphere in the green houses helps to reduce the negative impact of biotic and a-biotic stresses on the production. It is therefore necessary to demonstrate the results of protected cultivation of horticultural crops to the farmers in a big way. These frontline demonstrations will be organized on the farms of SAUs, KVKs, TSFs, Agro Polyclinics, etc. These will be supported with organization of field days of farmers for maximum effect. The physical and financial break up of the programme proposed for 2005-06 is as under.
Sr.No Crop Type Demonstration Green cultivation of Cost norm Rs. per 0.05 ha. house 500000 Asst. @ 100% Rs. 500000 No. of Provision( Rs. Demonstrations in lakh ) 25 12 3 4 6 Total 50 125 60 15 20 30 250

1 2 3 4 5

Fruit crops Vegetables Flowers Aromatic plants Spices

2.19 Creation of Market Infrastructure The programmes for marketing are project based. States Missions, after approval of the Executive Committee of the State Mission is to submit viable projects to EC. Such projests as proposed by MSAMB are included in the document.

49

The main objectives of providing assistance under this component are (a) to induce investments from private and cooperative sectors in the development of marketing infrastructure for horticulture commodities (b) Strengthen existing horticulture markets including wholesale, rural haats; (c) focus on promotion of grading, standardization and quality certification of horticulture produce at farm /market level to enable farmers to realize better price; and (d) create general awareness among farmers, consumers, entrepreneurs and market functionaries on market related Agricultural Practices including contract farming. Assistance under the scheme is provided on the following norms: Credit linked back ended subsidy @ 25% of the capital cost of the project is provided for new infrastructure projects for marketing of horticultural commodities and for strengthening and modernization of existing horticulture markets such as wholesale or rural haats . There are 3000 such rural markets in Maharashtra. Few such markets are taken up initially under SHM. Marketing Infrastructure for the purpose of this Scheme may comprise of any of the following: Functional infrastructure for collection/assemblage, drying, cleaning, grading and standardization, SPS measures and quality certification, labeling, packaging, ripening chambers, retailing and wholesaling, value addition facilities (without changing the product form). Market user common facilities in the project area like shops/offices, platforms for loading/un-loading/assembling and auctioning of the produce, parking sheds, internal roads, garbage disposal arrangements, including drinking water, sanitation arrangements, weighing and mechanical handling equipments. Infrastructure for Direct Marketing of horticulture commodities from producers to consumers/processing units/bulk buyers. The above is included in the form of a terminal market in the Mission. Assistance for setting up markets is linked with market reforms and preference is to given to those States which amend their State Agricultural Produce Marketing Acts for facilitating alternate marketing by farmers/farmer groups involved in horticulture. Such amendments have already been made for direct marketing of fruits & vegetables by for setting up terminal markets. Other amendments are planned for contract farming, single liecensing etc. for Monsoon session of the State assembly. Assistance is available to individuals, Group of farmers/growers/ consumers,Partnership/ Proprietary firms, Non- Government Organisations (NGOs), Self Help Groups (SHGs), Companies, Corporations, Cooperatives, Cooperative Marketing Federations, Local bodies, Agricultural Produce Market Committees & Marketing Boards and State Governments. In Maharashtra, this work is entrusted to MSAMB.
50

Cost of land in infrastructure projects will be restricted to 10 percent of the project cost in rural areas and 20 percent in Municipal areas. The entrepreneur will not alienate the land during the period of the loan for any purpose other than the purpose for which the project is sanctioned. The size of the project will be determined on the basis of economic viability and commercial considerations;. 2.19.1 Wholesale/ Terminal market at Igatpuri, Nasik Project based proposals are being prepared in the State to induce investments from private and co-operative sectors in the development of marketing of horticulture commodities. In this context a modern market for fruits and vegetables are planned for Mumbai city (project report prepared and submitted in 2004 by Global Agri Systems a leading New Delhi based consultancy firm) and Nasik (Project report prepared presented to Secretary Agriculture, GoI, by NIAM, Jaipur, in May 2005) and Nagpur (Project report likely to be ready by end of June 2005 from NIAM, Jaipur). The proposed markets are on the lines of the NDDBs Safal market for Bangalore city, already functional. horticulture markets including wholesale markets and rural haats. The modern markets (also known as Terminal markets) promote grading, standardization and quality certification of horticulture produce, and support the farmers in realizing better prices. It will also create general awareness among farmers, consumers, entrepreneurs and market functionaries on market related Agriculture Practices including contract farming. Marketing infrastructure proposed to be developed in the State include the following: Infrastructure for collection/assembling, drying, cleaning, grading and standardization, SPS measures and quality certification, labeling, packaging, ripening chambers, retailing and wholesaling, Market user common facilities in the project areas like shops / offices, platforms for loading/ unloading/assembling and auctioning of the produce Infrastructure for direct marketing of horticulture commodities from producers to consumers/processing units/bulk buyers. Assistance for setting up markets will be linked with market reforms Facilitating alternate marketing During 2005-06 & 2006-07, the development of Wholesale /Terminal market at Igatpuri, Nasik, at a cost of Rs 60 crores with a total financial outlay of Rs 15 crores is proposed. The outlay proposed for year 2005-06 is Rs. 5 crores. Summary sheet is enclosed as Annexure. It will strengthen existing

51

2.19.2 Rural market/ Direct Markets The present haats or weekly bazaars which constitute first contact point with commercial circuits for the producers do not provide even the most basic of amenities and facilities such as shelter, water, electricity, roads etc. Bringing about an improvement in market facilities at rural level has a direct impact on farmers income. Once developed the rural markets provide improved services for buyers and create an element of market security for the growers. Haats need to be provided with mobile banks on haat days by Gramin Banks. There are 3500 rural haats in the State today, where the farmers sell directly to the consumers, without any middle men. The trading generally takes place in a dusty space with no infrastructure whatsoever, with the produce brought mainly from surrounding areas, and some times over distances. The market place is unhygienic and lacks sanitation. There are no drainage, toilets, drinking water source and shelter against sun, rain or wind. This is detrimental to the farmers produce, especially the highly perishable horticultural produce. It is suggested that minimum basic infrastructure be set up in haats in the State such as sheds, auction/sale platforms, proper flooring, drainage, provision for drinking water, internal roads, electricity etc. At an average cost of Rs.15 lakhs per rural haat, the cost of construction of infrastructure facilities in 400 haats in the State over the next 2 years is estimated at Rs. 60 crores. During 2005-06 & 2006-07, the development of rural markets /apni mandi /direct marketing at a total financial outlay of Rs 15 crores is proposed. The outlay of Rs.500 lakh is proposed for the year 2005-06 2.19.3 Functional Infrastructure for Collection, Grading etc For collection fresh produce on large scale from different part of the collection centers projectized approach is essential. For value addition of the fresh agricultural produce specially designed van for transport and proper grading facilities at collection centers are proposed, financial assistance on actual basis (100% of actual project cost.) is proposed for this component. It is proposed to have a total financial outlay of Rs 375 lakhs of which outlay of Rs.150 lakh is proposed for year 2005-06. 2.19.4 Market led extension, awareness training and evaluation To educate and update the field functionaries and farmers on latest and new trends in the National and International market i.e. Quality management , Eurepgap, GMP, HACCP, Tractability and advance packing specification etc. financial assistance on actual basis (100% of actual project cost .) is proposed for this component. Total proposed financial outlay is 60.00 lakh of which an outlay of Rs.20 lakh is proposed for year 2005-06.
52

2.20 Economics of the proposal The programmes proposed under the Action Plan 2005-06 for implementation are for integrated development of the selected crops like increased availability of quality planting material/seed, cultivation/ rejuvenation of crop with recommended package of practices, provide post-harvest infrastructure and marketing facilities. This would lead to increase productivity of each selected crop. Under the action plan 42,450 ha area has been proposed for area expansion and 14,500 ha area under rejuvenation programme. This would provide additional production of 5, 32,140 MT of different crops as mentioned in the table given below. Thus the total production would increase from 75.70 lakh tons to 81.02 lakh tons after commercial production of new plantation/ rejuvenation. The details are given in the table belowCrops Present Scenario Scenario after the completion of mission

Present area (ha)

Present prod(tons)

Area expansion (ha)

Yield from area expansion (tons)

Rejuvenation (ha)

Yield from rejuvenation (tons)

Grapes Mango Cashew nut Sapota Pomegranate Banana Sweet orange Mandarin Kagzi Lime Total

32,500 164400 160000 18000 43151 57400 34500 124200 10000 644,151

911000 559000 150000 180500 431510 3607600 518100 1117500 94800 7570010

1000 10000 7200 10000 1250 6000 4000 3000 42450

32000 70000 8640 130000 77500 102000 44000 33000 497140

2500 2000 5000 1000 3000 1000 14500

6000 4000 15000 2000 6000 2000 35000

Total prod from area expansion and rejuvenation (tons) 32000 76000 8640 4000 145000 77500 104000 50000 35000 532140

Total production (tons)

943000 635000 158640 184500 576510 3685100 622100 1167500 129800 8102150

The gross value of additional production with average price of these selected crops out to be Rs 383 crores per annum. 2.21 Conclusion The programme formulated in the annual action plan 2005-06 are need based for integrated development of horticulture in selected district and fulfill the objective of National Horticulture Mission. These programmes are to be implemented in the project mode so that clear impact of these interventions is visible in the state. The total outlay proposed for the the annual action plan 2005-06 comes to Rs 161 crores only. The details of physical and financial plan are given in Annexure I.

53

Annexure I PROPOSAL FOR ASSISTANCE UNDER NHM 2005-06, MAHARASHTRA (Rs in lakh)
Sr. No. A. Programme RESEARCH Estamited Cost Proposed assistance Research needs of Maharashtra will be submitted to Central Government Institutes under ICAR, CSIR and others through SAUs to take up need based research and development works Phy Fin

B. 1

PLANTATION INFRASTRUCTURE & DEVELOPMENT Production of planting material a) Public sector i. Model nursery (4 ha) ii, Small Nursery (I ha.) iii. Rehab of existing Tissue culture units iv. Rehab of TC labs and related units in SAUs b) Private sector i. Model nursery (4 ha) ii. Nursery (1 ha.) Sub-total iv. Vegetable seed production a. Public Sector ( SAUs & State Depts.MSSC.) b.Private sector i) Seed Rs. 18.00 lakh/unit Rs. 3.00 lakh per unit Rs. 18.00 lakh/unit Rs. 3.00 lakh per unit Rs. 8.00 lakh/unit Rs. 8.00 lakh/unit Maximum of Rs. 18.00 lakh per nursery Maximum of Rs. 3.00 lakh per nursery Maximum of Rs, 8.00 lakh/unit Maximum of Rs, 8.00 lakh/unit Credit linked back ended subsidy 50% of cost limited to Rs. 9 lakh/nursey 50% of cost limited to Rs. 1.50 lakh/nursey 10 10 2 4 180.00 30.00 16.00 32.00

4 8

36.00 12.00 306.00

Rs. 50,000 per ha Rs. 50,000 per ha

100% of cost 50% of the total cost subject to max of Rs. 25000/ha limited of 5 ha. ascredit linked back ended subsidy 50% of the total cost subject to max of Rs. 25000/ha limited of 5 ha. ascredit linked back ended subsidy 100% of cost

500 200

250.00 50.00

ii) Seedling

Rs. 50,000 per ha

800

200.00

v Seed infrastructure a. Public sector Project based 5 145.00

54

b. Privates sector Sub-total 2 Establishment of new gardens (ha.) i. Fruits (Perennials) ia- Perennials i-b) other perennials ( like grapes)

Project based

25% of cost as credit linked back ended subsidy

16.00 661.00

Rs. 22500/ha Rs. 30,000/ha (average) 75% of cost subject to max of 22500/ ha/ beneficiary limited to 4 ha

40200 1000

4522.00 112.50

ii. Fruits (NonPerennials) (Banana 1250) iii. Flowers (a) Cut Flowers a. Small Scale Farmers

Maximum of Rs. 15,000 per ha subject to limit of 4 ha/beneficiary Rs. 70,000/ ha 50% of the cost @ Rs. 35,000/ha subject to limit of 2 ha/beneficiary 33% of the cost @Rs. 23,100/ba subject to limit of 4 ha. 50% of the cost @ Rs 45,000/ha subject to limit of 2 ha. 33% of the cost @Rs. 29,700/ha subject to limit of4 ha/beneficiary 50% of the cost @ Rs. 12,000/ha ubject to limit of 2 ha/beneficiary 33% of the cost @Rs. 7920/ha subject to limit of 4 ha/beneficiary Rs. 2.5 lakh each . Subsidy @ 25 % for general area . Rs. 24 lakh each . Subsidy @ 25 % for general area . Rs. 2.0 crores each subsidy @ 25 % of the capital 50% of the total cost subject to limit of Rs. 15,000/ha to a limit of 2 ha

1250

93.75

100

35.00

b. Other farmers

-do-

100

23.10

(h) Bulbulous Flowers a. Small Scale Farmers

90,000/ha -do100 45.00

b. Other farmers

-do-

300

89.10

(b) Loose Flowers a.Small Scale Farmers

24,000/ha 100 12.00

b. Other farmers

500

39.60

Sorting Grading

20

17.5

Pre cooling

20

120

Cold Storage

100

Rejuventation / productivity enhancement 3 Sub-total D Creation of water resources sources

Rs. 30,000/ha (average)

10,000

1500.00

6709.55

55

Community tanks on farm ponds on farm water resorvoirs -(No.) with use of plastics-100% assistance Protected cultivation 1. Green House (Hitech) a. Small & Marginal Farmers

Rs. 10.00 lakh/unit

upto Rs. 10 lakh /unit of 10 Ha.

50

500.00

Rs. 650/ Sq. m

b.Other farmers

-do-

50% of the cost limited to max of Rs.325/Sq.m for hi-tech GH maximum of 1000 Sq.m./beneficiary 33.3% of cost subject to a max of Rs.215/Sq.m for hi-tech GH subject to limit of 1000 Sq.m./beneficiary

25

81.25

25

53.75

1. Green House (Normal) a. Small & Marginal Farmers

Rs. 650/ Sq. m

b.Other farmers

-do-

2. Mulching

Rs. 14,000/ha

3. ShadeNet

Rs. 14/Sq. m.

4. Plastic Tunnel

Rs. 10 / Sq.m.

50% of the cost limited to max ofRs.125/Sq.for normal GH maximum of 1000 Sq.m./beneficiary 33.3% of cost subject to a max ofRs.67/sq.m for normal GH subject to limit of 1000 Sq.m./beneficiary 50% of the total cost limited to Rs. 7000/ha max. upto 2 ha/beneficiary 50% ofcostmaxof Rs. 3500/ 500 Sq.m max. upto 2 ha/beneficiary 50% of cost max of Rs.5000/1000Sq.m max. upto 0.5 ha

25

31.25

4.16

750

52.50

25 ha

17.50

10 ha.

5.00

Sub-total E Precision farming development and extension through PFDCs GIS and Remote Sensing Other Programmes for disaster forecast and mapping Promotion of INM/IPM i. Sanitary and Phytosanitary (Public Sector) Project based Project based 3 pesticide residue labs 7 PSC 1200

245.41

Rs. 30 lakh/unit

55.00 29.50

6 7

300.00

Project based b) Subsidy on fee of pesticide residue sample testing 50% and 75 % for inorganically and organically grown fruits & vegetable crops

61.80 48.00

56

ii. Promotion of IPM

Rs. 2000/ha

50% of cost subject to Rs 1000/ha subject to a limit of 4 ha. per Beneficiary Upto Rs. 4 lakh/unit Upto Rs. 80 lakh/unit,( For enhancement of existing biocontril lab ) 100% of cost upto Rs. 80 lakh/unit 50% of cost upto Rs. 40 lakh/unit as credit linked back ended subsidy Upto Rs. 20 lakh/unit 100% Upto Rs. 20 lakh/unit 50% of cost upto Rs. 10 lakh/unit as credit linked back ended subsidy Upto Rs. 20 lakh/unit 100% of cost upto Rs. 20 lakh/unit 50% of cost upto Rs. 10 lakh/unit as credit linked back ended subsidy

20,900

209.00

iii. Disease fore casting units (PSUs) iv. Bio-control labs

Rs. 4 lakhs/unit Rs. 80 lakhs/unit

20.00

a) Public sector b) Private sector

5 10

50.00 100.00

v. Plant Health Clinics a) Public sector b) Private sector

Rs. 20 lakhs/unit

160.00

vi. Leaf/Tissue analysis labs. (PSUs) a) Public sector b) Private sector

Rs. 20 lakhs/unit

8 2

160.00 20.00

Sub-total Organic Farming 8 1. Adoption of organic farming Rs. 20,000/ba 50% of cost subject to a max of Rs.10000/ha subject to limit of 4 ha.per beneficiary. 50% of cost subject to a max of Rs.30000/unit Rs.5 lakhs for a cluster of 50 ha. 100% assistance 5,000

1128.80 500.00

2. Vermi compost units 3. Certification Sub-total G HRD including horticulture institute 8 a) Farmers training

Rs. 60,000/ha Project based

1000 40

300.00 200.00 1000.00

Project based

i) One day ii) Three day iii) Five day b) Farmers Study tour c) Officers training i) One day ii) Three day iii) Five day
57

@ 100 per day per head do do @ 2500 per farmers for 7 days tour @ 50000 per participants @ 1000 per participants @ 2500 per participants @ 5000 per participants

20000 15000 10000 4000

20.00 45.00 50.00 100.00

1000 500 500

10.00 12.50 25.00

iv) Two week ii) One Month iii) Three month iv)Training of gardeners, entrepreneurs d) Foreign Study tour e) HRD Training in AEZ f) HRD Training for export Sub Total Pollination support through beekeeping 9 Technology Dissamination through demonstration/ front line demonstration 1.Font line Demonstration a) Public sector (Dept./ SAU/ M. Board / KVK/ 2.Generel Technology Demonstration on farmers field v) Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) demo. Farms Sub Total POST HARVEST MANAGEMENT C. I. Pack houses Rs. 2.50 lakh/unit Rs. 1600 per colony

@ 10000 per participants @ 20000 per participants @ 50000 per participants Lumpsum

500 50 20

50.00 10.00 10.00 100.00

20

40.00 20.00 150.00 642.50

Project based

50% of the cost subject to max. of Rs.800/colony with bee hive 75 % of cost

1000

8.00

10

100% , @ Rs. 500000/ 500 sq.m. unit 75% @ Rs.10000/0.40 ha

50 2000

250.00 200.00

Proposal from MSAMB

20.00

470.00

2. Cold storage units 3. Ref. Vans/containers 4. Market Intelligence 5. Buy back intervention ( Contract Farming) 6. Est. of of Marketing Infrastructure for horticultural produce in Govt/Private/ Cooperative sector a) Wholesale markets i. General areas b) Rural Markets/Apni Mandis/Direct Markets c) Functional Infrastructure for collection, grading etc.

Rs. 2.00 crore/unit Rs. 24.00 lakh/unit Project based Project based

Credit linked back-ended subsidy @ 25% of the capital cost of project in general areas and 33.33 % in case of hilly and tribal areas -do-doProject based Project based Credit linked back-ended subsidy @ 25% of the capital cost of project in general areas and 33.33 % in case of hilly and tribal areas do do do -

207

129.38

10 4 8 5

500.00 24.00 40.00 50.00

upto Rs. 100.00 crores Rs. 15.00 lakh Rs. 15.00 lakh

1 133 40

500.00 500.00 150.00

58

d) Extension, quality awareness & Market led extension activities for fresh processed products Sub Total Innovative projects including ongoing programme

Project based

100 % asst.

20.00

1913.38 a) Self employment and Value addition on field (asst. to processor or for common facilities , Self employment in hort. (cashew processing, aromatic distillation, spices grinding units, backyard nutritional gardens, etc.) b) Activities for prmotional measures i) Asst. for participation in Internationl exhibition ii) Meeting chalanges of WTO iii) Strengthening of Hort. Nurseries iv) Udyan Pandit Puraskra v) Horticulture exhibition / shows c) IT based Technology dissemination I) Technology Dissamination ii) Market facilitation centre 25% of investment capital 100 150.00

25.00

60.00 126 Nurseries 375.00

8.50 @ 25000 per show 100 25.00

@ 10 lakh or 50 % @ 10 lakh or 50 %

8 8

80.00 80.00 100.00 903.50

Inmport of planting material for grapes Sub-total MISSION MANAGEMENT (i) State & Districts Mission Strucutre including additional manpower & project preparation cost (ii) Support to cooperatives for infrastrucural requirement (iii) Institutional Strengthening, ire/purchase of vehicles, hardware/software

5% of total annual expenditure on the basis of appraised needs Project based

900.00

100.00

Project based

300.00

59

(iv) Technical Support group (TSG)

Project based subject to a ceiling of Rs. 5 crore per annums Project based subject to a ceiling of Rs. 5 crore per annums

150.00

(v) Collaboration with international agencies like FAO, World bank etc. Sub-total GRANT TOTAL

50.00

1500.00 16127.64

60