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SUMMER TRAINING REPORT SUBMITTED

TOWARDS THE PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF POST GRADUDATE DEGREE IN MANAGEMENT

Employees' State Insurance Act,1948
With special referecnce to

(DCM Shriram fertlilizers and chemicals ltd.)

Submitted By: NEETU GOUR MBA(2010-11)

Industry Guide: Mr.SUBODH JAIN

PREFACE

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ENGINEERING,JAIPUR. Human resource management plays a significant role in the organization as the blood plays its role in the human body. It not only provides energy to the business but simultaneously it is essential for the success for the any business organization easily. In this regard, I have undergone my summer internship at Human Resource Development Department at Manufacturing plant, Kota of DCM Shriram

Consolidated Ltd. The DSCL Ltd. is leading company in the field of fertilizer, Cement, PVC resigns & caustic soda. Our study discusses various aspects of the human resource management and effects there of on ultimate performance of the company.

(NEETU GOUR)

LETTER OF AUTHORITY

To, Mr. R.C.Modi Jnt.Chief President DSCL, Kota (Raj)

Subject: - ―Letter of authorisation for a project undertaken‖

Respected Sir,

I have to undertake the project for my internship under the academic curriculum of my college and was recruited as a trainee for the same in DSCL, Kota. I was under you guidance and supervision to undertake my project for the internship. As Asked by you I have work on the project ―HR Scorecard‖ and have reported for the same. I will be thankful to you for assigning me the project and also for your support, guidance and coordination.

Thanking You

Yours faithfully SONIA HIRAWAT Student Poornima College Of Engineering

This project has not formed the basis for the award of any other degree/diploma of any University/Institution.DECLARATION I hereby declare that this project has been prepared by me during the period 15th MAY. (NEETU GOUR) . 2010 to 1st july. I further declare that this project report is prepared from the information collected from the company. Place: Kota Date:15 MAY. SUBODH JAIN DCM Shriram Consolidated Ltd. Kota. We also hereby declare that all the information given in the report is true to my knowledge..2011 DCM SHRIRAM CONSOLIDED Ltd. the sources available from the Company and the same is purely for company benefits purpose. 2010 under the guidance of Mr.

R. Above all. Finally. THANKING YOU NEETU GOUR .Modi (Joint Chief Preesident DSCL. Without these people this exploration could never have been completed.ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Sitting on the seashore we thought that it was an easy task to dive but it was only when we dived into the ocean of the project. we realized how much helpful were so many people to us. Kota) for providing me the opportunity of 45 days training in the organization. I bow my head before Almighty ―GOD‖ without whose blessing my present project would not have existed and thanks for giving me patience and strength to overcome the difficulties.Miss krishma Sharma who helped me a lot to preparing and completing my project. Further I would like to thank my parents who instilled confidence and moral support various stages during the course of this training. And also to Mr SUBODH JAIN for their support. It is a great pleasure for me to acknowledge the contribution & support of a large number of individuals of this effort. I am sincerely indebted to Mr. And also to my faculty guide Ms. which crossed my way in the accomplishment of this endeavor.C. I would like to thank all those who have helped me directly or indirectly in completing the present study.

CONTENTS  PREFACE  LETTER of AUTHORITY  DECLARATION  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT  CONTENTS  Company profile  Employees' State Insurance Act. 1936  SWOT ANALYSIS . 1948  SOCIAL SECURITY (ADMINISTRATION) ACT 1999 SECT 124A  The Payment of Wages Act. 1948  ALL EMPLOYEES' PROVIDENT FUND SCHEME 1952  THE FACTORIES ACT.

Not only did Lalaji achieve great height in business enterprise. Shriram College of Commerce. he nevertheless understood how. many sugar mills. sewing machines.be it the DCM Limited. in the 79 years of his life. Bengal Potteries. While himself deprived of opportunities for higher education. heavy. pottery. Delhi School of Economics and umpteen others. But who is this Barey Lalaji? Born into a family of Agarwal banias of modest means. industrial institutes and research laboratories. Everyone is familiar with the name of multiple facets of the industries and institutions on which he left his imprint . Sir Shri Ram who began as a humble worker and went on to set up one of India's largest business houses . Barey Lalaji. sugar. the first national venture in the public sector in free India . As a result he helped to finance a network of schools. Shri Ram set for himself rigid standards of morality in his dealings with the public and government and made no compromises in order to earn more money or gain a favor. vanaspati. He was also the founder chairman of the Industrial Finance Corporation and Chairman of Sindri Fertilizers. electric motors and capacitors. Jay Engineering Works. important such education was in building the future of a nation.textiles. colleges. Shri Ram.COMPANY PROFILE Sir Shri Ram Nothing can better sum up the homage paid to great son and philanthropist of Delhi. he also participated in full measure in the crucial early stages of nation building. chemicals. alcohol. built an industrial empire manufacturing a vast variety of goods like . black marketing and tax evasion were considered a must for success in business. The industrial legacy that he left behind was valued at Rs 600 million at the time of his death. Sindri Fertilizers. Reared in milieu which graft nepotism. fans.the DCM Group. the Lady Shri Ram College.

Little is known of Shri Ram's ancestors. the post of treasurer in the Karnal Commissariat of the British Army. 1884. He assiduously cultivated men of learning and culture. a sort of built-in Geiger-counter which ticked when he came across the man he was looking for. Rattanchand was a man of influential means. Many of his friends were the members of the Muslim League. Badri Das was very mature for his age and he fared well by saving and investing in buying real estate in Firozpur and Delhi. not once did he succumb to the temptation of netting an extra buck or two in the black market or by evading tax. But most of all he admired scientists on whom he pinned his hopes for the salvation of his country. Bishambar Das had three sons . He was the grandfather of Shri Ram's grandfather. His reading included religious scriptures. He died in 1874 leaving behind four sons of whom the youngest. Khan Sahib Ahmed Islam Khan. He was an idealist who believed in raising India into an industrial nation. making money was of little consequence to him. Bishambar Das was somewhat more distinguished. At the behest of his friend in Lyallpur Cotton Mills in Pakistan. He was able to secure for his son Badri Das. Nothing more is known about him. He made many mistakes in the choice of friends but seldom did he err in the selection of a business executive. Shri Ram's choice was not based on the scrutiny of a "Curriculum Vitae" but on an inborn gift. One of Kanji Mal's descendants was Rattanchand who was a confectioner.Gopal Rai. Sanskrit classics. Urdu and Persian poetry and some English biographies. Shri Ram was born to Madan Mohan Lal and his wife Chando Devi on April 27. is the one of Kanji Mal. One of his lovable eccentricities was that he carried out experiments to produce new varieties of food in his own room and then subjected his none too robust digestive system to his new recipes. he laid the foundation of a mushaira what in the later years came to be known as the Shanker-Shad Mushaira. The secret of Shri Ram's enlightened approach to people of different faiths lay in his basic patriotism. Khuswant Singh writes in his "Shri Ram: A Biography" of the oldest family name on records. His love of India did not make him dislike or distrust Pakistan. While Shri Ram lacked formal education he read extensively. Shri Ram had this uncanny ability to spot the right man for the right job a rare quality that contributed to his success. Girdhari Lal and Madan Mohan Lal. .

Shri Ram. to mould a perfume-seller into the overall head of a vast enterprises producing precision instruments and so on. he gave that man every latitude. Raghubir Singh. He was unable to eat food unless every seat at the table was occupied. So sure was Shri Ram with this instinct that once he made up his mind about the man. Shri Ram got himself known in the industrial as well as the educational circles. Shriram Center for Performing Arts etc. He ensured that his sons Murli Dhar. who had started the Modern School in Delhi. Shri Ram began to think of problems of education in India. He also was instrumental in setting up several prestigious institutions of higher learning and arts such as the Lady Shri Ram College and Delhi School of Economics. . He was nominated to the Delhi Municipal Committee. there after his sole concern was with the results. "the more. described by his umpteen friends. to convert an engineer into an administrator. was indeed a true friend. Bharat Ram and Charat Ram went to the Modern School where children of more advanced Indian families were studying. He refused to believe that any of his friends exploited him. "His house was like a dharamshala" remarks 90 years old freedom fighter Aruna Asaf Ali. And many did quite blantantly.This helped him to pick up a humble mistry and make him a work manager." While just in his thirties. But his principle was. Through his business connections with Ram Bahadur Lala Sultan Singh and more to with that of his son. This indiscriminate hospitality at times Caused great strain to the members of his family. He made friendship into an article of faith. the merrier.

with focused businesses and robust financials.1300 crores in the past three years and plans to invest approximately Rs. DSCL is a Rupees 15. cement. delivers superior quality at low cost. openness and upholding human dignity. Integration through Integrated manufacturing facilities and thru utilization of competencies/resources across businesses is a major value enhancer. 500 crores in the next two years. outward looking. competitive. We are further integrating our business portfolio to add value added products/services and solutions to the commodity businesses. DSCL aspires to become a world-class enterprise that is responsive to change. The company has invested Rs.50 billion. textiles and sugar. entrepreneurship. based in North India with a core sector business portfolio comprising fertilizers. We are building on the above strengths to develop a business profile which enjoys strong cost competitive position and delivers superior value to our customers simultaneously. chemicals. DSCL has been built on core values of being caring. teamwork. credible and fair with all stakeholders.  Deep understanding and knowledge of Indian rural milieu developed with over 40 years of close work with farmers to improve his economics.   Well-established presence and strong brand across the entire agri-space in India. A leading Indian organization. The Company is committed to enhancing the employability of individuals through competence building via continuous training and development activities. . plastics. DSCL has built an enabling work culture and believes in releasing human energy within the organization through participation. committed to continuous improvement. and being a responsible corporate citizen. professionalism.Our strengths are:  Strong energy management expertise both in the area of generation as well as effective utilisation of energy. We have implemented plans resulting in significant volume growth in past 2-3 years in most of our existing commodity businesses and expect significant value/growth through value add businesses in longer term. public listed company. to expand its business operations. chlor alkali.

caste or religion. and targets the best professionals.DSCL believes in a pro-active Industrial Relations policy and has an enviable track record in this field. professionals opportunities to grow in a challenging of SAP R/3 ERP package Information . DSCL has initiated several management initiatives in the recent past for upgrading the organization. ISO 9000 Certification. The Company provides aspiring and up-to-date environment. are egalitarian. the major ones being Institution Building. DSCL‘s recruitment policy values merit. Quality Management. Employee welfare is given utmost priority and is institutionalized across the organization. do not differentiate on the basis of sex. and implementation Technology.

As a leading equal opportunity employer in India.with vendors. Farm inputs marketing such as DAP. Chairman and Senior Managing Director and Mr. from house builders to business owners. DSCL meets the needs of a wide range of customers from farmers to industrial users.About DSCL DSCL. Fostering enduring relationships is at the core of DSCL's business philosophy . DSCL has a strong brand equity reflective of credibility. Vikram S. business partners. Founded by Sir Shriram in 1889 (as DCM limited). Shriram. Vice Chairman and Managing Director along with a highly professional executive team. With over 30 years of experience in managing large scale process industries with sustained high level of performance. today DSCL (which spun of as a separate company in 1990) is managed by Mr.2770 crore+ diversified business group based in North India. Seeds.Haryali Kisan Bazaar) Plastics (PVC and PVC compounds) Chemicals (Chlor-Alkali) DSCL Building Products (Fenesta door and window profiles) Other business interests comprise of Cement. Its primary businesses are: Agri-Business (Urea fertilizer. . DSCL has a motivated and dynamic management team of highly qualified professionals and dedicated workmen and staff whose work has shown the way towards creating "Team Excellence". Sugar. a Rs. Textiles and Energy Services. Pesticides. Agri retailing . Ajay S. ethical values and consistent high quality product image. and customers and within the organization between employees. Shriram.

Two new sugar mills at Hariawan and Loni were commissioned this year. which is being further expanded to 94.30. Operation & troubleshooting of Ammonia /Urea plant. Sugar Sugar is a key component of our agri-business portfolio. at Rupapur. Its well-established distribution network in North and West India allows the unit to service farmer needs effectively with a consistently high quality product.5 MW .All our sugar plants are self-sufficient to meet their own power requirements from bagasse. It is for these reasons that SHRIRAM Urea enjoys a premium position its markets.000MT/Annum DSCL's Urea operation have consistently earned production and productivity awards for its performance. in 2003 emerging as a major sugar producer in central Uttar Pradesh.Fertilizers DSCL fertilizer operations are characterized by highly optimized production process delivering high capacity utilization & proven abilities in erection. . HIGHLIGHTS: ·Date of Commissioning of plant February 1969 ·Present production capacity(Urea)3.5 MW for the grid. These sugar operations commenced in 1998 in central Uttar Pradesh. . where the first sugar mill was established through a green field project at Ajbapur. We are also exporting power to the UP state grid. commissioning.5 MW. Our sugar operations functioned as an independent company within our Group until March 2004 when they were merged in DSCL. We later acquired an existing sugar mill in the same region.000 (tonnes crushed daily and a power generating capacity (bagasse based) of 70. with an exportable surplus of 51. We now have a combined installed capacity of 33.

based on bagasse which is a sugar by-product. It is also one on India's fastest growing factory in terms of cane area. New Delhi. is a 6000 tcd sugar mill situated at Ajbapur village. in central UP. The plant has a captive power capacity of 38 MW which is used for meeting its own requirements as well as export to the UP state grid.. and capacity. This plant's capacity was increased after acquisition from 3500 TCD to 6500 TCD. Hariawan and Loni located in central UP. Manufacturing Overview: We have four sugar production facilities. ISO 14000. a unit of Ghaghara Sugar Ltd. The plant was commissioned in November 1997 with a crushing capacity of 3125 tcd. this plant's output is of premium quality. . with its main machinery and plant supplied by Krupp which is well-regarded for superior technology.Gomti sugar Gomti Sugar Ltd. It is the first sugar factory in the country to receive ISO 9000.500 TCD. crushing and recovery.125 TCD which has since been expanded to 10. Kheri district. this plant had a capacity of 3. Our Rupapur unit was acquired by us in 2003. These in turn have made us one of the most efficient crushers and producers of sugar in the country. The continued efforts in the cane development front and growth thrust of the Management have made possible to reach today‘s crushing level of 6000 tcd. All of our production facilities are completely self-sufficient with access to reliable captive power.at Ajbapur. an enterprise of DCM Shriram Consolidated Limited.In addition to having in place a technologically superior factory. we also have strong business processes in place for continuous improvement of operating efficiency parameters.. We established our Ajbapur facility as a greenfield project in 1998. JB Ganj. and are equipped with modern equipment and machinery. commanding the highest prices in our market region. Rupapur. This factory had been established in 1996. At the time of inception. It is a new and modern plant with high levels of automation and process control systems similar to a chemical plant. Our Ajbapur plant is supported by ERP resources (SAP R/3) as well as TQM and institutional bidding initiatives. Resultantly. and OHSAS 18000 certifications simultaneously.

000 TCD and making us the fifth largest player in UP. good quality cane supply are augmented by our participation in infrastructure development for facilitating cane supplies. providing means of transportation of cane. 00. and assisting in the computerization of the local banking operations. The average distance covered by growers is around 5-7 kilometres and within 48 to 72 hours cane reaches our factories after harvesting.taking our total capacity to 33. We also assist farmers with soil fertility mapping for judicious fertiliser usage. modern agricultural inputs. With a view to improve post-harvest recovery.This has significantly reduced the time taken in getting cane to our manufacturing facilities. . Our efforts towards ensuring long-term. our operating philosophy is to enhance the economic status of sugarcane farmers while pursuing our own growth objectives. resulting in improved yields per hectare. and other plant protection measures among cane growers. we invest time and resources towards training farmers and helping them in improve their yields as well as recovery. The expansion of Co-gen is being undertaken at these two units by additional 12 MW each to be commissioned by November 08. Over 2. We have also implemented an assured irrigation scheme in our cane areas. we help farmers with varietals propagation and replacement of low yield/low recovery varieties. This is also helping us popularise cost-effective irrigation methods within the farming community. Raw material Sugar cane procured from growers around our factories is the primary input for our sugar operations. In order to facilitate the procurement of sugarcane. including construction of road networks.Two new sugar mills were commissioned in February 2007 at Hariawan and Loni (8000 tcd and a 12 mw co-gen plant each). Recognizing farmers as our principal partners in progress. Our team of experts have also been engaged in popularising the use of bioferlisers.. providing irrigation means to ensure irrigation to the entire cane crop that we ultimately procure and use for sugar production. In order to ensure sustainable supply of high quality sugarcane.000 farmers supply us with cane. we have set-up over 250 cane centres at our sugar mills.

is setting up a chain of centres aimed at providing end-to-end ground level support to the Indian farmer & thereby improving his "profitability" & "productivity".000 sq ft store is a one-stop shop providing the farmer with a range of multi-brand agri inputs such as fertilizers. to cater to other needs of farmers as customers. furniture. The key constraints of the Indian farming sector. the first retail outlet was inaugurated at village Del Pandarva (Distt. Hardoi) on the Delhi-Lucknow highway near the DSCL's Gomti Sugar complex. This 10. is a pioneering micro level effort. which is creating a far-reaching positive impact in bringing a qualitative change and revolutionizing the farming sector in India. In the future. fast-moving consumer goods. micro-nutrients. electrical. Hariyali kisan bazar On 16th July 2002.We believe that our trust-based relations with farmers built on mutual respect and understanding is an intangible asset that strengthens the overall operating profile of our sugar business and allows us to also extend to them our other agri-business offerings. pesticide application services etc. After the initial pilot phase comprising of 4 stores in different parts of the country. DCM Shriram Consolidated Ltd. water testing. Hariyali Kisan Bazars plans to move beyond agri into other categories like durables. tools and farm fuels. Other value added farm services are to be added in due course. it is proposed to roll out the concept nationally. It is also an example of how well meaning corporates can contribute to development of agriculture by building sustainable business models. bio-fertilizers. "Hariyali Kisaan Bazaar" .a rural business centre. being addressed by "Hariyali" are: . agricultural implements. capitalising its over 35 years of experience in the agriinput markets & first hand knowledge of Indian farmers. The store is also geared to provide farmers with expert agronomic guidance and services like soil testing. seeds pesticides. (DSCL).

animal feed. mandi (market) prices. weather forecasts.  Farm Output Services: Farm produce buyback opportunities. seeks to empower the farmer by setting up centres. Each "Hariyali Kisaan Bazaar" centre operates in a catchment of about 20 kms. seeds.  Financial Services: Provides access to modern retail banking & farm credit through simplified and transparent processes as also other financial services like insurance etc.Apparels etc. FMCG. These centers provide the much needed respect/dignity and freedom to the Indian farmer.  Other Products and Services:Fuels. 15000 farmers. which provide all encompassing solutions to the farmers under one roof. The "Hariyali Kisaan Bazaar" chain. A typical centre caters to agricultural land of about 50000-70000 acres and impacts the life of approx. access to new markets & output related services. fair & transparent billing to farmers as well as in maintaining extensive farmer databases with micro information about the farmers' field to provide customized service to the farmers. Provides 24X7 support through a team of qualified agronomists based at the centre. pesticides. Technology as an important enabler:. multi-brand agri inputs like fertilizers. veterinary products. Hariyali Kisaan Bazaars plan to move beyond agri to meet the other needs of farmers as customers.     Lack of last mile delivery mechanism of modern agriculture know-how & practices. In the near future. Consumer Goods and Durables.  Quality Agri-Inputs: Provides a complete range of good quality. Lack of direct access to buyers of varied & high value crops. farm implements & tools. . Lack of availability of critical good quality agri-inputs. "Middlemen" driven farmer interface.IT has been a critical backbone to the chain of centres. It is being used to provide online support on latest technical advancements. Each centre is engaged in:  Bridging the last mile: Provides handholding to improve the quality of agriculture in the area. irrigation items and other key inputs like diesel. High cost credit. petrol at fair prices.

Marketed under the brand name Ecorite these products provide outstanding coagulation/flocculation properties.550 TPA based on mercury cells & 62. right doses of fertilization. which we plan to scale up to 300 by March 09 The ground-level agri-support is already yielding results in the farmer's fields. This would mean catering to cultivable land of over 30 million acres and touching the lives of over 10 million farmers. The strategic thrust of the business is to use it existing infrastructure and market presence to build value added products and services. adoption of new crops/allied occupations or adoption of new technologies like zero tillage. productivity of cattle-feed. 110. over 185 "Hariyali" outlets have been set up in different states across India.000 tpa based on membrane cells) and a market share of approx. moisture conservation measures. Future Plans Hariyali Kisaan Bazaar has plans to rapidly scale up the operations & create a national footprint covering all the major agricultural markets of the country. DSCL has moved aggressively to enter the water treatment area by setting up a state-of-theart plant situated at Kota. 8% in the Indian Chlor-alkali industry DSCL is a leading producer in the country. .000 TPA (49. With an installed capacity of approx. As a first step. Chlor alkali The Chemical Business derives its core strength from its Chlor-alkali operations. Rajasthan for a latest 3rd generation Polyaluminium Chloride (capacity 39. DSCL‘s Chemical Business provides total customer solutions with its nationally accredited Shriram Environment and Allied Services(SEAS) operations and laboratories.Farmer Response So far.000 tpa). the farmers in catchment of Hariyali centres are already way ahead of the national averages. Whether it is adoption rate of high yielding seeds.

000 tpa). Caustic soda is produced in two forms . textiles. Our caustic soda flakes are sold under the brand name "SHRIRAM". At Bharuch. At Kota. The plant also has a flaking capacity of 33. diaphragm process. detergents. toilet and laundry soaps. Solids can be in the form of flakes or granules. Bharuch offers us a strategic advantage with respect to the proximity to the markets and access to the sea port. In a subsidiary company Shriram Polytech Limited (SPL) the business operates one of India‘s largest PVC Compounds facilities (20.000 tpa). viscose yarn. Plastics DSCL‘s core plastics business is based on a state-of-the-art computer process controlled PVC Resin (33. drugs and pharmaceuticals. this makes us one of the lowest cost manufacturers of caustic soda in India. staple fiber. Dscl have a total caustic soda capacity of approx. it is produced along with chlorine. Three technologies are available world over for production of caustic soda – mercury cell process. petroleum refining. Rajasthan our capacity is 50. dyestuffs. It is mainly used in the manufacture of pulp and paper.000 tons per annum. This plant supplies customizedproductstoover200industrialcustomers. We manufacture Caustic soda through more environmentally friendly membrane technology.Caustic soda Caustic Soda is a basic product very widely used in diverse industrial sectors. cotton. we have a capacity for producing 60.110.000 tons per annum at two locations in India. This plant is a part of the integrated vinyl complex that produces PVC. As mentioned ealier. vanaspati. and membrane cell process. Based on the carbide manufacturing process this plant also generates valuable Other Products such as high purity Calcium Carbide.lye and solids. SPL has also set up an Innovative Polymer Applications Centre (IPAC) which is focusing on development of further specialty and value . Gujarat. All three processes are in use in India.000 tons of caustic soda per year. With a captive power plant. The plant is based on the state of the art membrane technology in collaboration with Asahi of Japan. Aluminum. newsprint. although there is strong trend indicating a shift towards the environmentally better membrane cell process. either as a raw material or as an auxiliary chemical.000 tons per annum of mercury (rayon) grade caustic .

the next step in plastics adding on to the value chain.valuechain DSCL has introduced a new division. . DSCL Building Products. innovative customer specific application solutions and moving in a calibrated manner uptheproduct.added polymer products.

. DSCL‘s PVC resin plant enjoys unique cost advantages with a built in flexibility to quickly respond to customer needs.PVC Resin Based on the Calcium carbide based process and closely linked with the Carbide and Chemicals operations at Kota. is India‘s largest integrated facility for manufacture of PVC Compounds. It is the only plant in India to be integrated back to raw materials and to an R&D facility (IPAC) for customized product development matching international standards. Shriram PolyTech Limited Shriram PolyTech Limited (SPL) is a wholly owned new subsidiary company of DSCL. This allows the company to service customer specific requirements both for bulk as well as in small volumes.

DSCL's core philosophy is of a caring. to lead. The continuous training and development programme further enhances the capabilities of the highly professional workforce. Marching ahead with the philosophy of the parent group DSCL. sold under the brand name . technology and process up gradation. . PolyTech is certified by UL India for ISO 9001. which started in 1964 as a pioneering venture today ranks amongst one of the most advanced plants in the country. IS0 14001 and OHSAS 18001 certifications and the facilities are fully equipped to meet the demanding needs of diversified customer applications. PolyTech is all set to establish new standards in customers satisfaction in the plastics industry. We believe in building lasting relationships. DSCL is today poised on the threshold of creating a distinct position for itself in the field of providing innovative solutions to consumers of Polymers. reach all consumption centers of the country and are now poised to reach a new focal point . With its pioneering efforts in the area of plastics business. PolyTech's wide portfolio of products meets the performance requirements of a broad range of industries. This has created exciting new opportunities of growth and diversification for the group. The company's PVC compounds. Backed by a highly qualified team of capable industry / professionals and a state-of-art application development center. iPAC. credible and ethical organization. The working philosophy is one of continuous improvement through learning initiatives.Shriram PolyTech a company that is here to perform. PolyTech believes strongly in achieving excellence through people. Other Products The plastics business also produces and markets other value added products such as: Calcium Carbide. PolyTech's world class manufacturing facility at Kota (Rajasthan). PolyTech is focused on providing enhanced value to the customers in diverse application areas through customized solutions and quick and interactive response.the global market.

The company also plans to set up more fabrication units in other parts of the country. . extrusion. This will confer the strengths of backward integrated and help bring process controls and quality in strict adherence to international standards. DSCL Building Products – in technical collaboration with HW Plastics. fabrication & supply chain management. Subsequently an extrusion plant will be commissioned at Kota (Rajasthan) in early 2004. This partnership brings together the DSCL's extensive knowledge in PVC resin and application-specific compounds and HW Plastics strength as one the leading window manufacturers. Europe and parts of Asia. To do this the company has set up its first fabrication unit at Bhiwadi (Rajasthan). which endeavors to provide customized solutions and innovations to the consumer. To bring out the best in UPVC window systems.DSCL Building Products DSCL's Building Products group is manufacturing and marketing UPVC window systems. In due course other related products will also be developed to become a premier full range supplier of building products to the industry. DSCL Building Products has created a world-class service driven organization. UK – has introduced Fenesta UPVC Window Systems in India. It is also a part of £650 million Heywood Williams Group and has its presence in UK. DSCL Building Products aims to provide high quality products and turnkey solutions to the consumer. Further. The DSCL-HW Plastics collaboration covers product development. These products have a very wide acceptance in Europe and America and have several advantages over existing products serving the same market. HW Plastics is the pioneer and market leader in UK for UPVC doors and window systems.

premium grade cement. Textiles The textile group comprising of Swatantra Bharat Mills and DCM Silk Mills earlier situated in 112 acres of prime land in the heart of Delhi has relocated to Tonk. Pursuant to the relocation. enjoying a premium over competitors brand. premium grade cement products. . and is recognized as a market leader in its areas of distribution. Cement manufactured by us is marketed under the ―Shriram‖ brand. The use of sludge and access to economic captive power makes this business a very efficient and competitive operation. and quick-setting features that have translated into premium pricing. Rajasthan. the modern facility at Tonk is operating successfully while opportunities for realizing value in the real estate are being explored. Converting waste in to premium-grade products Our cement business allows us to create wealth from waste generated from our calcium carbide plant. Shriram Cement is produced in a computer process controlled highly automated plant.Cement DSCL‘s Cement Business is India‘s only plant that converts waste generated at Kota into consistent quality. The product has created for itself a strong brand equity and is a recognized market leader in its areas of distribution. We have recently expanded our capacity to 400.000 TPA to profitably utilize additional sludge that is expected to be generated from the planned expansions of our calcium carbide and PVC capacities. superior strength. DSCL is the only manufacturer in the country that converts waste into consistent quality. Shriram cement has created for itself strong brand equity. The key quality parameters that differentiate cement are its high degree of whiteness.

In terms of agri outputs. insurance. distribution and services. recruited from local institutions and universities. durables. All of our agri business activities are supported by a strong ―Shriram‖ brand equity that our products enjoy in the marketplace. From about 3. Our agri business offerings comprise agricultural inputs. credit. we offer multiple products and services to the rural and farming community. We believe that the agricultural sector is a high potential area where we. we are also engaged in the marketing of a range of other agri inputs SSP. outputs. To . It is proposed to extend the offerings to other products and services over a period. agronomy advisory. diesel and petrol (under alliance with BPCL). Being implemented under our ―Hariyali Kisaan Bazar‖ initiative.Agri-business We regard our agri business as a key growth driver for us. and contract farming as a part of this initiative. scalability and growth potential. Seeds and Pesticides manufactured by us. apparels. We have a team of 102 agricultural graduates. Over the years through our various agri-businesses we have developed extensive working relationship and knowledge about the farmers. and other nutrients such as Zinc Sulphate. All our agri business units are supported by a robust and extensive distribution and retail network. Our agri-inputs include Urea. soluble fertilisers etc. With the objective to move towards providing total ― Solutions‖ to the farmers.000 retailers where all our manufactured and merchandised products are available to the country's farming community. we have initiated a ― Rural Retailing‖ initiative recently which we believe holds immense promise in terms of untapped opportunities. both manufactured and merchandised. We offer online agronomy services to farmers through 100 centres – Shriram Krishi Vikas Kendras – established by us across the country that operate with the objective to increase farmer profitability by providing them effective agronomy services. a large number of these have been with us for 3-4 decades. with our expertise and strengths accumulated over decades of presence in this sector. Additionally. including agri inputs. We also have around 900 wholesalers to distribute our agri products. consumer goods. we now have more than 6. can add considerable value and capitalise on emerging opportunities. we manufacture and market sugar and its by-products – Molasses and Bagasse.000 retail outlets five years ago. and 15 development officers who work along with farmers to assist them in their endeavours.

India. Infrastructure of over 30 sales offices. is engaged in marketing of a range of other fertilizers. Overview Leveraging a wide distribution network to build major agri-based business The agriculture sector is recognized a strategically important part of the economy and India is today the world's second largest producer of food after the United States. AP. The Shriram Krishi Vikas Kendras help upgrade farming methods and also provide assistance to the farming and rural community in the educational. education. The Agri-Business is leveraging modern management practices to realize significant value:   A strong "Shriram" brand equity. training and community development programs. hygiene and sanitation needs of the community as well as health care support for animal husbandry.ensure that our agronomists provide knowledgeable and unconditional advice. DSCL's strategic focus is to build on its existing activities & infrastructure in agri-inputs.  Shriram BioSeed Genetics India Ltd that produces high quality hybrid seeds at Hyderabad. We have a team of 102 agricultural graduates.   Operations spanning the North. food processing and agri-based end use products. DSCL agri-inputs business produces Urea fertilizer. pesticides and other agri-related products. while also exploring opportunities in agri-outputs. . 12 distribution warehouses. Over 3 decades of direct relationship with the farming community with supply of agri-inputs. We offer online agronomy services to farmers through 107 centres – Shriram Krishi Vikas Kendras – established by us across the country that operate with the objective to increase farmer profitability by providing them effective agronomy services. Such initiatives have made us one of the most reliable and trusted partners of the Indian agri community. recruited from local institutions and universities. we have not assigned any sales responsibilities to our agronomists. 200 wholesales and 4800 retail outlets. and 15 development officers who work along with farmers to assist them in their endeavours. West & South of India.

operation & troubleshooting of Ammonia/Urea plant. our urea plant benefits from access to efficiently generated captive power and robust technical resources that reduce our cost of manufacturing. .To ensure that our agronomists provide knowledgeable and unconditional advice.The necessary infrastructure for transporting gas from the source to the plant has also been put in place. Our fertiliser operations are characterized by highly optimized production process delivering high capacity utilization & proven abilities in erection. This will further reduce our cost of production. The Shriram Krishi Vikas Kendras help upgrade farming methods and also provide assistance to the farming and rural community in the educational. the Company has started running the plant on gas from Sep ‘07 onwards. Such initiatives have made us one of the most reliable and trusted partners of the Indian agri community. we have not assigned any sales responsibilities to our agronomists. commissioned in Februrary has a Production capacity of 379. Meanwhile. In line with our intent to continuously explore and adopt better manufacturing practices and feedstock options.000 TPA which includes a capacity of about 700 TPD of ammonia which is an ingredient in the Urea manufacturing process. The Company has also built up an extensive distribution network over the entire northern and central India. Located within our Kota manufacturing complex. hygiene and sanitation needs of the community as well as health care support for animal husbandry. We are amongst the first ―urea‖ manufacturers in the country starting way back in the 1960's. We are the lowest cost naphtha-based urea manufacturer in the country. our brand ‗SHRIRAM' has developed a strong presence in the rural market and is identified with premium quality reliability and high trust. Our urea operation has consistently earned production and productivity awards for its performance. commissioning. For the past several years we have been able to manufacture urea in a profitable manner with naphtha as the feedstock. we have converted the plant into dual feed. The facility can now accept dual feedstock of naphtha and gas in any proportions. Over the last 4 decades of operations. Our Urea plant.

we are now actively engaged in conducting R&D towards the development of new hybrids that possess robust disease resistance properties and offer a high and stable yield performance across varying climate conditions. Paddy. The Company also operates its seeds business in Vietnam. Bajra ( Pearl Millet). Philippines and Thailand and proposes to expand to other locations in Asia Pacific region. Currently. the Company deals in Corn. we plan to further strengthen our presence in that market. At present. Jowar. The other hybrid seeds in our portfolio include cotton. Overview DSCL offers a range of hybrid seeds in the country via its 100% subsidiary Shriram BioSeed Genetics India Ltd. Having established ourselves as one of the country's top three players in the hybrid corn seeds market. Encouraged by the initial feedback from the farming community there. Vegetables and Sunflower seeds. hybrid corn seeds account for most of our sales from this business. and paddy. Our seeds business is a strong R&D-led operation that develops. BT Cotton. SSG. . jowar. bajra. sunflower. while ensuring high grain quality.We have recently made a successful entry into the Southern region where our products are gaining acceptance. produces and markets high quality hybrid seeds.

learning organization. Social Responsibility A Responsible Corporate Citizen Continuing with the long history of social commitment projects started by the founder Sir Shriram.DSCL's core values and beliefs are a reflection of its commitment to build a world class. compassion. DSCL has been making meaningful contributions to the society in the different areas. drive excellence People Development   Continuously improve and upgrade the skills and competencies of our people Support people to realize their potential Team work   Work closely as a cohesive. develop superior customer insight Commitment to surpass expectations and deliver superior value Innovation and Excellence   Strive to think differently and promote creativity Make continuous improvement a way of life. addressing the needs of the community and environment   Conduct business ethically. striving for excellence in all its endeavors. well-knit team Inculcate a spirit of openness and collaboration Relationships and Human Dignity   Value people and partnerships Nurture understanding. Customer Focus   Be sensitive to the needs of the customer. trust and respect in all relationships Social Responsibility and Ethics  Be a socially responsible corporate. .

A recent project was the reconstruction of the Primary School building at Gandhidham in Bhuj district of Gujrat . school bags and uniforms.'The Shriram Wards'. The SKVK's provide help in meeting educational. sanitation needs for the community as well as healthcare support for animal husbandry. The company organizes healthcare camps in its adopted villages and centres to create awareness on diseases like AIDS and Cancer. which provides for support on books. Kota with a state of art intensive care unit . hygiene. DSCL has equipped Maharao Bhim Singh (MBS) Hospital.'The Shriram ICU' and Private rooms. .Agriculture Extension activity DSL‘s Shriram Krishi Vikas Kendra‘s (SKVK's) operate with the objective to impart scientific knowledge to the farmers to enhance their profitability covering crop cycle and harvesting etc. SKVK's support the farmers in their work and life through adoption of villages. Periodic Eye checkup camps are arranged and Family Planning programmes encouraged by incentive schemes for the villages around its areas of operation Education To encourage meritorious and needy students in the fields of Engineering. Medicine. Agriculture and Management. the company has instituted Scholarships at various educational institutions in Rajasthan. The company has also contributed for construction of school buildings both in cities & rural areas.2008. DSCL runs a 'Primary Education Programme' for the girl child.its building was reduced to rubble in the Earthquake in Jan. Health Care In its endeavor to serve the society around its operating locations.

H " "Excise Trophy" Star Award "SAP R-3/SAP Star Customer Award 1998" NPC Award for "Second Best Productivity Performance in Fertilisers Industry" Energy Conservation Award in "Chemical Sector" FAI‘s Runner Up Award for "Best Production Performance of Nitrogenous Fertiliser Unit" NPC Runner Award for "Best Productivity Performance in Cement Industry" NPC Award for "Best Productivity Performance in Fertilisers Industry" FAI Award for "Best Productivity Performance of Nitrogenous Fertilisers Unit" National Council of Cement and Building Materials Award for "Best Improvement in Electrical Energy Performance and 2nd Best in Energy Performance" National Award for " Public Recognition of Out-standing Activity for Prevention & Control of Pollution" Indian Bureau of Mines Best Award for " Environment Conservation in Air and Noise Pollution " 1992-93 1991-92 1990-91 .AWARDS AND TESTIMONIALS LISTS OF AWARDS 2008 1998 1996-97 1996-97 1995-96 1994-95 1993-94 1993-94 Best Assessee Award .Excise" Received by E.D & R.

1. Inudstry " FAI‘s Runner up Award for " Best Production Performance of Nitrogenous Fertilisers Unit " EAR Silver Jubilee Award for " Better Industrial Relation in the Factory " NPC Award for " Best Productivity Performance in Fert.1990-91 1990-91 1990-91 1989-90 1989-90 RPCB‘s Award for " Excellence in Pollution Abatement Measures " NPC Award for " Best Productivity Performance in Fert. SHRIRAM INDUSTRIES ENTERPRISES LIMITED . DCM LIMITED 4.Industry " Products To handle the requirements of a huge enterprise and the responsibilities of the firm as a huge industry. DCM was restructured in 1990 into the following four companies. DCM SHRIRAM INDUSTRIES LIMITED 3. DCM SHRIRAM CONSOLIDATED LIMITED 2.

Name of the unit Shriram Fertilisers&Chemicals Shriram Cement Works Swatantra Bharat Mill/ DCM Silk Mill Location Kota Kota Tonk Products Urea Cement Textile 4. No. 2. Shriram Alkali & Chemicals DSCL Energy Services Co. 5. 1. 3. 6.(A) DCM SHRIRAM CONSOLIDATED LIMITED-: The following are the various divisions of DSCL S. Shriram Polytech Bharuch Delhi Kota Chlor Alkali Consulting PVC Compounding Window/Door 7. Fenesta Building Systems Kota/Bhiwadi/ Mumbai/Bangalore Profiles .

were fulfilled and includes any payment to an employee in respect of any period of authorised leave. 1948 DEFINITIONS. or under this Act. whether such work is done by the employee in the factory or establishment or elsewhere.  "wages" means all remuneration paid or payable. if the terms of the contract of employment. the State Government.(a) any contribution paid by the employer to any pension fund or provident fund. strike which is not illegal or lay-off and other additional remuneration. In this Act. . but does not include . in respect of establishment under the control of the Central Government or a railway administration or a major port or a mine oilfield. lock out.  "employee" means any person employed for wages in or in connection with the work of a factory or establishment to which this Act applies and - who is directly employed by the principal employer on any work of. and in all other cases. paid at intervals not exceeding two months. .Employees' State Insurance Act. the factory or establishment.  "Corporation" means the Employees State Insurance Corporation set up under this Act. if any. in cash to an employee. the Central Government. unless there is anything repugnant in the subject or context. or incidental or preliminary to or connected with the work of.(1) "appropriate Government" means. express or implied.

(4) The contributions payable in respect of each wage period shall ordinarily fall due on the last day of the wage period. the contributions shall fall due on such days as may be specified in the regulations. and where an employee is employed for part of the wage period. - Every factory or establishment to which this Act applies shall be registered within such time and in such manner as may be specified in the regulations made in this behalf. all employees in factories. (2) The contributions shall be paid at such rates as may be prescribed by the Central Government Provided that the rates so prescribed shall not be more than the rates which were in force immediately before the commencement of the Employees' State Insurance (Amendment) Act. (1) The contribution payable under this Act in respect of an employee shall comprise contribution payable by the employer (hereinafter referred to as the employer's contribution) and contribution payable by the employee (hereinafter referred to as the employee's contribution) and shall be paid to the Corporation. . (5) (a) If any contribution payable under this Act is not paid by the principal employer on the date on which such contribution has become due.  CONTRIBUTIONS. 1989. or is employed under two or more employers during the same wage period.  ALL EMPLOYEES TO BE INSURED. or establishments to which this Act applies shall be insured in the manner provided by this Act.REGISTRATION OF FACTORIES AND ESTABLISHMENTS. he shall be liable to pay simple interest at the rate of twelve per cent per annum or at such higher rate as may be specified in the regulations till the date of its actual payment : Provided that higher interest specified in the regulations shall not exceed the lending rate of interest charged by any scheduled bank. (3) The wage period in relation to an employee shall be the unit in respect of which all contributions shall be payable under this Act. Subject to the provisions of the Act.

- (1) No employee's contribution shall be payable by or on behalf of an employee whose average daily wages [ lsa-123 during a wage period are below Such wages as may be prescribed by the Central Government. 1934 (2 of 1934). who has paid contribution in respect of an employee employed by or through an immediate employer. shall be entitled to recover the amount of the contribution so paid (that is to say the employer's contribution as well as the employee's contribution.  PRINCIPAL EMPLOYER TO PAY CONTRIBUTIONS IN THE FIRST INSTANCE. - (1) The principal employer shall pay in respect of every employee. or as a debt payable by the immediate employer.  RECOVERY OF CONTRIBUTIONS FROM IMMEDIATE EMPLOYER.(b) Any interest recoverable under clause (a) may be recovered as an arrear of land revenue or under section 45C to section 45-I. - (1) A principal employer. if any) from the immediate employer. both the employer's contribution and the employee's contribution. whether directly employed by him or by or through an immediate employer. "scheduled bank" means a bank for the time being included in the Second Schedule to the Reserve Bank of India Act. either by deduction from any amount payable to him by the principal employer under any contract.  GENERAL PROVISIONS AS TO PAYMENT OF CONTRIBUTIONS. Explanation : In this sub-section. .

cards or otherwise and regulating the manner.  METHOD OF PAYMENT OF CONTRIBUTION. times and conditions in. (2) Contribution (both the employer's contribution and the employee's contribution) shall be payable by the principal employer for each wage period. . destroyed or defaced. such stamps are to be affixed or impressed. sale. and (d) the issue. at and under which. - Subject to the provisions of this Act. custody. inspection and delivery of books or cards and the replacement of books or cards which have been lost. (c) the entry in or upon books or cards of particulars of contributions paid and benefits distributed in the case of the insured persons to whom such books or cards relate. the Corporation may make regulations for any matter relating or incidental to the payment and collection of contributions payable under this Act and without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing power such regulations may provide for (a) the manner and time of payment of contributions. (b) the payment of contributions by means of adhesive or other stamps affixed to or impressed upon books. in respect of the whole or part of which wages are payable to the employee and not otherwise. production. (bb) the date by which evidence of contributions having been paid is to be received by the Corporation.Explanation : The average daily wages of an employee shall be calculated [ lsa-125 in such manner as may be prescribed by the Central Government.

namely :(a) periodical payments to any insured person in case of his sickness certified by a duly appointed medical practitioner or by any other person possessing such qualifications and experience as the Corporation may. premature birth of child or mis-carriage. furnished or maintained in accordance with the provisions of section 44 or any Inspector or other official of the Corporation referred to in sub-section (2) of section 45 is prevented in any manner by the principal or immediate employer or any other person.  BENEFITS. (2) An order made by the Corporation under sub-section (1) shall be sufficient proof of the claim of the Corporation under section 75 or for recovery of the amount determined by such order as an arrears of land revenue under section 45B or the recovery under section 45C to section 45-I. (1) Subject to the provisions of this Act. confinement.  RECOVERY OF CONTRIBUTIONS. as the case may be. specify in this behalf (hereinafter referred to sickness benefit). the Corporation may. determine the amount of contributions payable in respect of the employees of that factory or establishment : Provided that no such order shall be passed by the Corporation unless the principal or immediate employer or the person in charge of the factory or establishment has been given a reasonable opportunity of being heard. particulars. registers or records are submitted. by regulations. by order. on the basis of information available to it. the insured persons their dependents or the persons hereinafter mentioned. in exercising his functions or discharging his duties under section 45. such woman being certified to be eligible for such payments by an authority specified in this behalf by the regulations (hereinafter referred to as maternity benefit) . Any contribution payable under this Act may be recovered as an arrears of land revenue. (b) periodical payments to an insured woman in case of confinement or mis-carriage or sickness arising out of pregnancy. shall be entitled to the following benefits. DETERMINATION OF CONTRIBUTIONS IN CERTAIN CASES. (1) Where in respect of a factory or establishment no returns.

W.  WHEN PERSON DEEMED AVAILABLE FOR EMPLOYMENT OMITTED BY THE EMPLOYEES' STATE INSURANCE (AMENDMENT) ACT. towards the expenditure on the funeral of the deceased insured person. (f) payment to the eldest surviving member of the family of an insured person who has died. and subject to such conditions as may be laid down in the regulations. .E. where the insured person did not have a family or was not living with his family at the time of his death. at the request of the appropriate Government. (2) The Corporation may.F. as are entitled to compensation under this Act (hereinafter referred to as dependents' benefit). (e) medical treatment for and attendance on insured persons (hereinafter referred to as medical benefit). W. EARLIER SECTION 47 WAS SUBSTITUTED BY THE EMPLOYEES' STATE INSURANCE (AMENDMENT) ACT.E. (d) periodical payments to such dependants of an insured person who dies as a result of an employment injury sustained as an employee under this Act. 1984. extend the medical benefits to the family of an insured person.F. 1966.(c) periodical payments to an insured person suffering from disablement as a result of an employment injury sustained as an employee under this Act and certified to be eligible for such payments by an authority specified in this behalf by the regulations (hereinafter referred to as disablement benefit). to the person who actually incurs the expenditure on the funeral of the deceased insured person (to be known as funeral expenses) Provided that the amount of such payment shall not exceed Such amount as may be prescribed by the Central Government and the claim for such payment shall be made within three months of the death of the insured person or within such extended period as the Corporation or any officer or authority authorised by it in this behalf may allow. 1-2-1991. 1989. OMITTED BY THE EMPLOYEES' STATE INSURANCE (AMENDMENT) ACT. 27-1-1985.  WHEN PERSON ELIGIBLE FOR SICKNESS BENEFIT. or.

(a) a person who sustains temporary disablement for not less than three days (excluding the day of accident). an accident arising in the course of an insured person's employment shall be presumed. the rates and period thereof shall be such as may be prescribed by the Central Government. the rates and period thereof shall be such as may be prescribed by the Central Government. - The qualification of a person to claim sickness benefit. the conditions subject to which such benefit may be given. shall be entitled to periodical payment at such rates and for such period and subject to such conditions as may be prescribed by the Central Government. SICKNESS BENEFIT. (b) a person who sustains permanent disablement.  MATERNITY BENEFIT.  DISABLEMENT BENEFIT. For the purposes of this Act. shall be entitled to periodical payment at such rates and for such period and subject to such conditions as may be prescribed by the Central Government. The qualification of an insured woman to claim maternity benefit. in the absence of evidence to the contrary. also to have arisen out of that employment. whether total or partial. .  PRESUMPTION AS TO ACCIDENT ARISING IN COURSE OF EMPLOYMENT. Subject to the provisions of this Act . the conditions subject to which such benefit may be given.

and (ii) is not being operated in the ordinary course of public transport service. and (b) the act is done for the purpose of and in connection with the employer's trade or business. An accident shall be deemed to arise out of and in the course of an insured person's employment notwithstanding that he is at the time of the accident acting in contravention of the provisions of any law applicable to him. notwithstanding that he is under no obligation to his employer to travel by that vehicle. (2) In this section "vehicle" includes a vessel and an aircraft.  ACCIDENTS HAPPENING WHILE TRAVELING IN EMPLOYER'S TRANSPORT. with the express or implied permission of his employer. (1) An accident happening while an insured person is. be deemed to arise out of and in the course of his employment. or of any orders given by or on behalf of his employer or that he is acting without instructions from his employer. . as the case may be. ETC. ACCIDENTS HAPPENING WHILE ACTING IN BREACH OF REGULATIONS. the vehicle (i) is being operated by or on behalf of his employer or some other person by whom it is provided in pursuance of arrangements made with his employer. if (a) the accident would have been deemed so to have arisen had the act not been done in contravention as aforesaid or on without instructions from his employer. and (b) at the time of the accident. if (a) the accident would have been deemed so to have arisen had he been under such obligation. traveling as a passenger by any vehicle to or from his place of work shall.

sub-clause (ia) and sub-clause (ii) of clause (6A) of section 2. ACCIDENTS HAPPENING WHILE MEETING EMERGENCY. (2) In case the insured person dies without leaving behind him the dependants as aforesaid. or to avert or minimize serious damage to property. on an actual or supposed emergency at those premises. the dependants' benefit shall be paid to the other dependants of the deceased at such rates and for such period and subject to such conditions as may be prescribed by the Central Government. to rescue. succor or protect persons who are. if it happens while he is taking steps.  DEPENDANT'S BENEFITS. (1) If an insured person dies as a result of an employment injury sustained as an employee under this Act (whether or not he was in receipt of any periodical payment for temporary disablement in respect of the injury) dependants' benefit shall be payable at such rates and for such period and subject to such conditions as may be prescribed by the Central Government to his dependants specified in sub-clause (i). . injured or imperiled. An accident happening to an insured person in or about any premises at which he is for the time being employed for the purpose of his employer's trade or business shall be deemed to arise out of and in the course of his employment. or are thought to be or possibly to be.

unless the contrary is proved. the Corporation after giving. by virtue of the powers vested in it under sub-section (3) of section 3 of the said Act. the contracting of the disease shall. not less than three months' notice of its intention so to do. (2) (i) Where the Central Government or a State Government. OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE. (3) Save as provided by sub-sections (1) and (2). 1923 (8 of 1923). as the case may be. . adds any description of employment to the employments specified in Schedule III to the Workmen's Compensation Act. (4) The provisions of section 51A shall not apply to the cases to which this section applies. or if an employee employed in the employment specified in Part B of that Schedule for a continuous period of not less than six months contracts any disease specified therein as an occupational disease peculiar to that employment or if an employee employed in any employment specified in Part C of that Schedule for such continuous period as the Corporation may specify in respect of each such employment. (1) If an employee employed in any employment specified in Part A of the Third Schedule contracts any disease specified therein as an occupational disease peculiar to that employment. may. by a like notification. by notification in the Official Gazette. no benefit shall be payable to an employee in respect of any disease unless the disease is directly attributable to a specific injury by accident arising out of and in the course of his employment. as if such diseases had been declared by this Act to be occupational diseases peculiar to those employments. (ii) Without prejudice to the provisions of clause (i). be deemed to be an "employment injury" arising out of and in the course of employment. the said description of employment and the occupational diseases specified under that sub-section as peculiar to that description of employment shall be deemed to form part of the Third Schedule. add any description of employment to the employments specified in the Third Schedule and shall specify in the case of employments so added the diseases which shall be deemed for the purposes of this section to be occupational diseases peculiar to those employments respectively and thereupon the provisions of this Act shall apply. contracts any disease specified therein as an occupational disease peculiar to that employment.

- (1) The case of any insured person for permanent disablement benefit shall be referred by the corporation to a medical board for determination of the disablement question and if. on that or any subsequent reference.  REVIEW OF DECISIONS BY MEDICAL BOARD OR MEDICAL APPEAL TRIBUNAL. if it is satisfied by fresh evidence that the decision was given in consequence of the non-disclosure or misrepresentation by the employee or any other person of a material fact (whether the nondisclosure or misrepresentation was or was not fraudulent). (2) If the insured person or the Corporation is not satisfied with the decision of the medical board. REFERENCES TO MEDICAL BOARDS AND APPEALS TO MEDICAL APPEAL TRIBUNALS AND EMPLOYEES' INSURANCE COURTS. the insured person or the Corporation may appeal in the prescribed manner and within the prescribed time to .(i) the medical appeal tribunal constituted in accordance with the provisions of the regulations with a further right of appeal in the prescribed manner and within the prescribed time to the Employees' Insurance Court. it shall again be so referred to the medical board not later than the end of the period taken into account by the provisional assessment. - (1) Any decision under this Act of a medical board or a medical appeal tribunal may be reviewed at any time by the medical board or the medical appeal tribunal. . as the case may be. the extent of loss of earning capacity of the insured person is provisionally assessed. or (ii) the Employees' Insurance Court directly : Provided that no appeal by an insured person shall lie under this sub-section if such person has applied for commutation of disablement benefit on the basis of the decision of the medical board and received the commuted value of such benefit : Provided further that no appeal by the Corporation shall lie under this sub-section if the Corporation paid the commuted value of the disablement benefit on the basis of the decision of the medical board.

a claimant. (2) Subject to the provisions of this Act. or attainment of the age of eighteen years by. substantial injustice will be done by not reviewing it. remarriage or cesser of infirmity of. the Corporation may. . (4) Subject to the foregoing provisions of this section. and in particular may make a provisional assessment notwithstanding that the assessment under review was final.  REVIEW OF DEPENDANTS' BENEFIT. increased. or misrepresentation was or was not fraudulent) or that the decision is no longer in accordance with this Act due to any birth or death or due to the marriage. from the date thereof and on such a review the period to be taken into account by any revised assessment shall not include any period before the date of the application. an assessment shall not be reviewed under sub-section (2) on any application made less than five years. or in the case of a provisional assessment. direct that the dependent's benefit be continued. reduced or discontinued. - (1) Any decision awarding dependants' benefit under this Act may be reviewed at any time by the Corporation if it is satisfied by fresh evidence that the decision was given in consequence of non-disclosure or misrepresentation by the claimant or any other person of a material fact (whether the non-disclosure. six months. if it is satisfied that since the making of the assessment there has been a sub-spatial and unforeseen aggravation of the results of the relevant injury : Provided that an assessment shall not be reviewed under this sub-section unless the medical board is of opinion that having regard to the period taken into account by the assessment and the probable duration of the aggravation aforesaid. (3) Except with the leave of a medical appeal tribunal. a medical board may deal with a case of review in any manner in which it could deal with it on an original reference to it. and the provisions of section 54A shall apply to an application for review under this section and to a decision of a medical board in connection with such application as they apply to a case for disablement benefit under that section and to a decision of the medical board in connection with such case.(2) Any assessment of the extent of the disablement resulting from the relevant employment injury may also be reviewed by a medical board. on such review as aforesaid.

in relation to an insured person. (3) A person shall be entitled to medical benefit during any period for which contributions are payable in respect of him or in which he is qualified to claim sickness benefit or maternity benefit or is in receipt of such disablement benefit as does not disentitle him to medical benefit under the regulations: Provided that a person in respect of whom contribution ceases to be payable under this Act may be allowed medical benefit for such period and of such nature as may be provided under the regulations : Provided further that an insured person who ceases to be in insurable employment on account of permanent disablement shall continue. and his spouse shall be eligible to receive medical benefit subject to payment of contribution and such other conditions as may be prescribed by the Central Government. subject to payment of contribution and such other conditions as may be prescribed by the Central Government. MEDICAL BENEFIT. "superannuating". . who has attained the age of super-annotation. (2) Such medical benefit may be given either in the form of out patient treatment and attendance in a hospital or dispensary. clinic or other institution or by visits to the home of the insured person or treatment as inpatient in a hospital or other institution. Explanation : In this section. means the attainment by that person of such age as is fixed in the contract or conditions of service as the age on the attainment of which he shall vacate the insurable employment or the age of sixty years where no such age is fixed and the person is no more in the insurable employment. to receive medical benefit till the date on which he would have vacated the employment on attaining the age of superannuating had he not sustained such permanent disablement : Provided also that an insured person. - (1) An insured person or (where such medical benefit is extended to his family) a member of his family whose condition requires medical treatment and attendance shall be entitled to receive medical benefit.

except as may be provided by the regulations. hospital.  PROVISION OF MEDICAL TREATMENT BY STATE GOVERNMENT. and an insured person or. - (1) An insured person and (where such medical benefit is extended to his family) his family shall be entitled to receive medical benefit only of such kind and on such scale as may be provided by the State Government or by the Corporation. arrange for medical treatment at clinics of medical practitioners on such scale and subject to such terms and conditions as may be agreed upon. where such medical benefit is extended to his family. with the approval of the Corporation. clinic or other institution to which he or his family is allotted. or as may be provided by the regulations. (2) Nothing in this Act shall entitle an insured person and (where such medical benefit is extended to his family) his family to claim reimbursement from the Corporation of any expenses incurred in respect of any medical treatment. surgical and obstetric treatment : Provided that the State Government may. . - (1) The State Government shall provide for insured persons and (where such benefit is extended to their families) their families in the State reasonable medical. SCALE OF MEDICAL BENEFIT. his family shall not have a right to claim any medical treatment except such as is provided by the dispensary.

equipment. (3) The corporation may enter into an agreement with a State Government in regard to the nature and scale of the medical treatment that should be provided to insured persons and (where such medical benefit is extended to the families) their families (including provision of buildings.. BY CORPORATION. shall be determined by an arbitrator (who shall be or shall have been a Judge of the High Court of a State appointed by the Chief Justice of India (and the award of the arbitrator) shall be binding on the Corporation and the State Government. - (1) The Corporation may. and staff) and for the sharing of the cost thereof and of any excess in the incidence of sickness benefit to insured persons between the Corporation and the State Government. O. . with the approval of the State Government establish and maintain in a State such hospitals. dispensaries and other medical and surgical services as it may think fit for the benefit of insured persons and (where such medical benefit is extended to their families) their families. ETC.  ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF HOSPITALS. medicines. the amount of such excess shall be shared between the Corporation and the (Substituted for "Provincial" and "Province" by the A. 1950) State Government in such proportion as may be fixed by agreement between them : Provided that the Corporation may in any case waive the recovery of the whole or any part of the share which is to be borne by the State Government. (4) In default of agreement between the Corporation and any State Government as aforesaid the nature and extent of the medical treatment to be provided by the State Government and the proportion in which the cost thereof and of the excess in the incidence of sickness benefit shall be shared between the Corporation and that Government.(2) Where the incidence of sickness benefit payment to insured persons in any State is found to exceed the all-India average.

private body or individual in regard to the provision of medical treatment and attendance for insured persons and (where such medical benefit is extended to their families) their families. - (1) The right to receive any payment of any benefit under this Act shall not be transferable or assignable. as if a reference therein to the State Government were a reference to the Corporation. in consultation with the State Government. undertake the responsibility for providing medical benefit to insured persons and where such medical benefit is extended to their families. - (1) Notwithstanding anything contained in any other provisions of this Act. to the families of such insured persons in the State subject to the condition that the State Government shall share the cost of such medical benefit in such proportion as may be agreed upon between the State Government and the Corporation. the Corporation may.  BENEFIT NOT ASSIGNABLE OR ATTACHABLE. . so far as may be.  PROVISION OF MEDICAL BENEFIT BY THE CORPORATION IN LIEU OF STATE GOVERNMENT.(2) The Corporation may enter into agreement with any local authority. (2) In the event of the Corporation exercising its power under sub-section (1). in any area and sharing the cost thereof. the provisions relating to medical benefit under this Act shall apply. (2) No cash benefit payable under this Act shall be liable to attachment or sale in execution of any decree or order of any Court.

- Save as may be provided in the regulations. - A person who is in receipt of sickness benefit or disablement benefit (other than benefit granted on permanent disablement) - (a) shall remain under medical treatment at a dispensary. PERSONS NOT ENTITLED TO RECEIVE BENEFIT IN CERTAIN CASES. and (d) shall allow himself to be examined by any duly appointed medical officer or other person authorised by the Corporation in this behalf. (b) shall not while under treatment do anything which might retard or prejudice his chances of recovery. .  RECIPIENTS OF SICKNESS OR DISABLEMENT BENEFIT TO OBSERVE CONDITIONS. medical attendant or such other authority as may be specified in this behalf by the regulations. hospital. no person shall be entitled to sickness benefit or disablement benefit for temporary disablement on any day on which he works or remains on leave or on a holiday in respect of which he receives wages or on any day on which he remains on strike. without the permission of the medical officer. clinic or other institution provided under this act and shall carry out the instructions given by the medical officer or medical attendant in charge thereof. (c) shall not leave the area in which medical treatment provided by this Act is being given.

FOR EXCESSIVE SICKNESS BENEFIT. to the appropriate Government. as the case may be.. or (ii) unsanitary conditions of any tenements or lodgings occupied by insured persons and such unsanitary conditions are attributable to the neglect of the owner of the tenements or lodgings to observe any health regulations enjoined on him by or under any enactment. he shall be entitled to choose which benefit he shall receive. or (b) both sickness benefit and disablement benefit for temporary disablement. (1) Where the Corporation considers that the incidence of sickness among insured persons is excessive by reason of - (i) unsanitary working conditions in a factory or establishment or the neglect of the owner or occupier of the factory or establishment to observe any health regulations enjoined on him by or under any enactment.  LIABILITY OF OWNER OR OCCUPIER OF FACTORIES. (2) Where a person is entitled to more than one of the benefits mentioned in sub-section (1). it may appoint a competent person or persons to hold an inquiry into the matter. with a statement in support of its claim. the Corporation may refer the matter. the Corporation may send to the owner or occupier of the factory or establishment or to the owner of the tenements or lodgings. BENEFITS NOT TO BE COMBINED. . (2) If the appropriate Government is of opinion that a prima facie case for inquiry is disclosed. ETC. a claim for the payment of the amount of the extra expenditure incurred by the Corporation as sickness benefit. and if the claim is not settled by agreement. (1) An insured person shall not be entitled to receive for the same period (a) both sickness benefit and maternity benefit. or (c) both maternity benefit and disablement benefit for temporary disablement.

(5) For the purposes of this section "owner" of tenements or lodgings shall include any agent of the owner and any person who is entitled to collect the rent of the tenements or lodgings as a lessee of the owner. (2) The value of any benefits received other than cash payments shall be determined by such authority as may be specified in the regulations made in this behalf and the decision of such authority shall be final. as the case may be. - (1) Where any person has received any benefit or payment under this Act when he is not lawfully entitled thereto. the said person or persons shall determine the amount of the extra expenditure incurred as sickness benefit. if any.  REPAYMENT OF BENEFIT IMPROPERLY RECEIVED. or in the case of his death his representative shall be liable to repay the same from the assets of the deceased. and the person or persons by whom the whole or any part of such amount shall be paid to the Corporation. in his hands. (3) The amount recoverable under this section may be recovered as if it were an arrear of landrevenue or under section 45-C to section 45-I. (4) A determination under sub-section (3) may be enforced as if it were a decree for payment of money passed in a suit by a Civil Court.(3) If upon such inquiry it is proved to the satisfaction of the person or persons holding the inquiry that the excess in incidence of sickness among the insured persons is due to the default or neglect of the owner or occupier of the factory or establishment or the owner of the tenements or lodgings. he shall be liable to repay to the Corporation the value of the benefit or the amount of such payment. .

 BENEFIT PAYABLE UP TO AND INCLUDING DAY OF DEATH. except as provided under the regulations. ETC.  EMPLOYER NOT TO DISMISS OR PUNISH EMPLOYEE DURING PERIOD OF SICKNESS. discharge. . (2) No notice of dismissal or discharge or reduction given to an employee during the period specified in sub-section (1) shall be valid or operative. or reduce or otherwise punish an employee during the period the employee is in receipt of sickness benefit or maternity benefit. nor shall he. if there is no such nomination. dismiss. the amount of such benefit up to and including the day of his death shall be paid to any person nominated by the deceased person in writing in such form as may be specified in the regulations or. - (1) No employer shall dismiss. discharge or reduce or otherwise punish an employee during the period he is in receipt of disablement benefit for temporary disablement or is under medical treatment for sickness or is absent from work as a result of illness duly certified in accordance with the regulations to arise out of the pregnancy or confinement rendering the employee unfit for work. to the heir or legal representative of the deceased person. - If a person during any period for which he is entitled to a cash benefit under this Act.

12. No.No. to be furnished) 9. 3./factory) 5. Details of employees are furnished below :S.Proforma for Coverage ( to be submitted by an employer along with one or more of the documents mentioned below for obtaining Code Number) 1. Society. Employment Strength (i) At present : (ii)Month wise employment strength from the date of set up may be furnished in separate statement 6. Secretary etc. Details of Head Office and branches with address. Directors. if any allotted to the Head Office. Nature of business activity/ manufacturing activity 7. Details of Bankers: (Including Bank Branches & Account Number (s) 11. Details of legal set up of the establishment (Please mention whether it is an incorporated Private or Public Limited Company. Date of Incorporation/Set up (Please furnish any one of the documents mentioned overleaf in support of the proof of date of set up of the est. Name of the establishment/factory and address. Details of the employers/ownership particulars etc. Partners. Details of Code No. Income Tax Permanent A/c. Name of the employee Father‘s Name Date of Joining Wages (basic + D.) . & Cash Value of food concession) (In case you have more than 21 employees the above information in respect of the other employees may be added in a separate sheet of paper in the same format continuing the serial number. Wages disbursed for the month 10.A. 4. 2. Designation and Addresses of Managing Director. Partnership or Proprietary concern) 8. (Names.

Any agreement or other legal documents in the case of Association of persons as defined in the Income Tax Act. 2. 3. (Rate of Contribution at present is 12% by . A copy of Memorandum and Articles of Association and the certificate of incorporation issued by the Registrar of Companies. 4. A copy of Registration certificate issued by Registrar in the case of societies registered under Societies Registration Act along with a copy of the objects and Rules of the Society. A copy of Registration certificate issued by the Registrar of Co-operative societies. . It is clearly understood that we are liable for coverage from a date antecedent to the date of set up furnished above in the event of furnishing of false information. Commenceme nt of Business Certificate issued by the Registrar of Companies. employer and employees+ 0.5% towards E. Incorporation Certificate issued by the Registrar of Companies together with the report of the Managing Director to the Shareholders in the Annual Report. (Signature) Employer. 2. Details of bank draft amounting to the contribution. Draft No. Branch employees. Essential Document(s) to be submitted (For other than a proprietary concern) 1. 3. in the case of Public and Private Ltd. Partition deeds creating HUF. 6. Amount VERIFICATION The details furnished above are correct to the best of our knowledge and belief. 4.D. A list of documents which can be submitted as a proof of date of set up :(Any one of these documents has to be submitted) 1.13. . A copy of partnership deed in the case of partnerships. First Sales Invoice.15% towards administrative charges) .& Date contribution and 1.L. 5.I. Any proof regarding date of trial production. Name of the Bank & And administrative charges paid in respect of the above . Companies.

License issued by the Health Authorities. Certificate issued by Reserve Bank of India registering newly set up and non-banking financial companies. First assessment order issued by the Sales Tax Authorities. Sanction/connection of power like H. 17. 7. connection etc.5. 14. 16. Permission/approval granted by the appropriate State Govt. 8.T. 9. 15. Authorities in the case of Educational Institutions. 6. Certificate issued by the Small Scale Industries authorities registering the establishment. Any other Certificate issued by any authority under any law for the time being in force prior to the commencement of business activity/manufacturing activity. Certificate of Registration issued by the Registrar of Co-operative Societies. . First assessment order issued by the Income Tax Authorities. 11. Certificate issued by the Fire Authorities in the case of establishments coming under Explosives Act. Certificate of Registration issued under Societies Registration Act. 12. L.T. License/permission issued by the Municipal/Corporation Authorities. Reports/returns to Central Excise authorities. connection. 13. 10.

if any. 1985 and which has been declared as such by the Board for Industrial and Financial Reconstruction. Benefits: A) A member of the provident fund can withdraw full amount at the credit in the fund on retirement from service after attaining the age of 55 year. Employees' Provident Fund every year during March/April. The rate of interest for the year 1998-99 has been notified as 12%. (if any) and cash value of food concessions admissible thereon.f. Employee Provident Fund Scheme: Employees' Provident Fund Scheme takes care of following needs of the members: (i) Retirement (ii) Medical Care (iii) Housing (iv) Family obligation (v) Education of Children (vi) Financing of Insurance Polices How the Employees' Provident Fund Scheme works: As per amendment-dated 22. Full amount in provident fund can also be withdraw by the member under the following circumstance: . The contribution under the Employees' Provident Fund Scheme by the employee and employer will be as under with effect from 22. dearness allowance and retaining allowance.ALL EMPLOYEES' PROVIDENT FUND SCHEME 1952 Employee Definition: "Employee" as defined in Section 2(f) of the Act means any person who is employee for wages in any kind of work manual or otherwise.1997. both the employees and employer contribute to the fund at the rate of 12% of the basic wages. Explanation: 'Pay' includes basic wages with dearness allowance.1997 in the Act.e.25% to be notified by the Government.9. 2000-2001 CBT recommended 10. retaining allowance.'99 was 11% on monthly balances. in or in connection with the work of an establishment and who gets wages directly or indirectly from the employer and includes any person employed by or through a contractor in or in connection with the work of the establishment.97. The rate of contribution is 10% in the case of following establishments:     Any covered establishment with less then 20 employees. 1.7. Any establishment which has at the end of any financial year accumulated losses equal to or exceeding its entire net worth and Any establishment engaged in manufacturing of (a) jute (b) Breed (d) coir and (e) Guar gum Industries/ Factories. payable to employees per month. Any sick industrial company as defined in clause (O) of Sub-Section (1) of Section 3 of the Sick Industrial Companies (Special Provisions) Act. The rate of interest for 99-2000 w.9. Employees' Provident Fund Interest rate: The rate of interest is fixed by the Central Government in consultation with the Central Board of trustees. The interest is credited to the members account on monthly running balance with effect from the last day in each year. for establishments cover prior to 22.9.

from Exempted Provident Fund Trust to Unexampled Fund in a region and vice-versa can be done as per Scheme. Withdrawal before retirement: A member can withdraw upto 90% of the amount of provident fund at credit after attaining the age of 54 years or within one year before actual retirement on superannuation whichever is later. The statement of accounts in the fund will show the opening balance at the beginning of the period. the total amount of interest credited at the end of the period or any withdrawal during the period and the closing balance at the end of the period. Accumulations of a deceased member: Amount of Provident Fund at the credit of the deceased member is payable to nominees/ legal heirs. 1947. Transfer of Provident Fund account: Transfer of Provident Fund account from one region to other. which is not covered under the Act: Where a member is discharged and is given retrenchment compensation under the Industrial Dispute Act. Claim application in form 20 may be submitted to the concerned Provident Fund Office. . The member may furnish the particulars concerning himself and his family.    A member who has not attained the age of 55 year at the time of termination of service. the payment of provident fund be made after complementing a continuous period of not less than two months immediately preceding the date on which the application for withdrawal is made by the member:   Where employees of close establishment are transferred to other establishment. B) In the case of the following contingencies. Nomination: The member of Provident Fund shall make a declaration in Form 2. a nomination conferring the right to receive the amount that may stand to the credit in the fund in the event of death. annual statements of accounts will de sent to each member through of the factory or other establishment where the member was last employed. Transfer Application in form 13 may be submitted to the concerned Provident Fund Office. Annual Statement of account: As soon as possible and after the close of each period of currency of contribution. On migration from India for permanent settlement abroad or for taking employment abroad. A member is retired on account of permanent and total disablement due to bodily or mental infirmity. In the case of mass or individual retrenchment. Claim application in form 19 may be submitted to the concerned Provident Fund Office. Member should satisfy themselves as to the correctness f the annual statement of accounts and any error should be brought through employer to the notice of the correctness Provident Fund Office within 6 months of the receipt of the statement. These particulars furnished by the member of Provident Fund in Form 2 will help the Organization in the building up the data bank for use in event of death of the member. amount contribution during the year.

It is hereby enacted as follows:Interpretation. and in any part of which a manufacturing process is being carried on without the aid of power. or were working on any day of the preceding twelve months. any workroom from the provisions of this section. so far as compliance with the provisions of any rules made under sub-section of section 13 will allow.] (c) "child" means a person who has not completed his fifteenth year of age. if any.. (2) In every factory all glazed windows and skylights used for the lighting of the workrooms shall be kept clean on both the inner an outer surfaces and. natural or artificial. or were working on any day of the preceding twelve months. Lighting. 1948 ACT NO. 4*[(bb) "calendar year" means the period of twelve months beginning with the first day of January in any year.but does not include a mine subject to the operation of any other effective method from provisions of that sub-section and specify alternative methods for keeping the factory in a clean state. (1) In every part of a factory where workers are working or passing there shall be provided and maintained sufficient and suitable lighting.Lighting. Interpretation. subject to such conditions. 17. 63 OF 1948 1* [23rd September. unless there is anything repugnant in the subject or context.THE FACTORIES ACT.(a) "adult" means a person who has completed his fifteenth year of age. or both.] An Act to consolidate and amend the law regulating labour in factories. In this Act. 1948. as he may think fit to impose. or is ordinarily so carried on. so far as is practicable. (m) "factory" means any premises including the precincts thereof(i) whereon ten or more workers are working. 2. (3) In every factory effective provision shall. WHEREAS it is expedient to consolidate and amend the law regulating labour in factories. and in any part of which a manufacturing process is being carried on with the aid of power. (b) "adolescent" means a person who has completed his fifteen year of age but has not completed his eighteenth year. or (ii) whereon twenty or more workers are working. if he is satisfied that compliance therewith in respect of the rooms is unnecessary in the interest of the health of the workers employed therein. be made for the prevention of- . (4) The chief Inspector may by order in writing exempt. free from obstruction. or is ordinarily so carried on.

being an examination or operation which it is necessary to be carried out while that part of the machinery is in motion. (ii) the headrace and tailrace of every water-wheel and water turbine. namely. either directly from a source of light or by reflection from a smooth or polished surface (b) the formation of shadows to such an extent as to cause eye-strain or the risk of accident to any worker. Drinking water. (1) In every factory effective arrangements shall be made to provide and maintain at suitable points conveniently situated for all workers employed therein a sufficient supply of wholesome drinking water. substantially interfered with by the stoppage of that part of the machinery). to carry out lubrication or other adjusting operation while the machinery is in motion. shall be securely fenced by safeguards of substantial construction which 1*[shall be constantly maintained and kept in position] while the parts of machinery they are fencing are in motion or in use: 2*[Provided that for the purpose of determining whether any partof machinery is in such position or is of such construction as to be safe as aforesaid. it is necessary to make an examination of such part of the machinery while it is in motion or. account shall not be taken of any occasion when(i) it is necessary to make an examination of any part of the machinery aforesaid while it is in motion or. and (iv) unless they are in such position or of such construction as to be safe to every person employed in the factory as they would be if they were securely fenced. and (c) every dangerous part of any other machinery. a motor or rotary convertor. or (ii) in the case of any part of a transmission machinery used in such process as may be prescribed (being a process of a continuous nature the carrying on of which shall be. namely.(a) glare. (iii)any part of a stock-bar which projects beyond the head stock of a lathe. (b) every part of transmission machinery. the following.-(i) every moving part of a prime mover and every flywheel connected to a prime mover whether the prime mover or flywheel is in the engine house or not. (4) The State Government may prescribe standards of sufficient and suitable lighting for factories or for any class of description of factories or for any manufacturing process. or is likely to be. (2) All such points shall be legibly marked "drinking water" in a language understood by majority of the workers employed in the SAFETY Fencing of machinery. to carry out any mounting or shipping of belts or lubrication or other adjusting . 21. Fencing of machinery. (1) In every factory the following.-(a) every part of an electric generator. as a result of such examination. as a result or such examination. 18.

(d) a representative of the State Board appointed under section 4 of the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. (ii) a representative of the local authority within whose jurisdiction the factory is to be established. and such examination or operation is made or carried out in accordance with the provisions of sub-section (1) of section 22. 31 1981 (14 of 1981). (b) a representative of the Central Board for the Prevention and Control of Water Pollution appointed by the Central Government under section 3 of the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. for purposes of advising it to consider applications for grant of permission for the initial location of a factory involving a hazardous process or for the expansion of any such factory. Constitution of Site Appraisal Committees. the State Government shall coopt in the Site Appraisal Committee a representative nominated by the Central Government as a member of that Committee. (c) a representative of the Central Board for the Prevention and Control of Air Pollution referred to in section 3 of the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. (3) Where any process relates to a factory owned or controlled by the Central Government or to a corporation or a company owned or controlled by the Central Government. appoint a Site Appraisal Committee consisting of-(a) the Chief Inspector of the State who shall be its Chairman.operation while the machinery is in motion.] (2) The State Government may be rules prescribe such furtherprecautions as it may consider necessary in respect of any particular. and (iii)not more than three other persons as deemed fit by the State Government. 1981 (14 of 1981). (2) The Site Appraisal Committee shall examine an application for the establishment of a factory involving hazardous process and make its recommendation to the State Government within a period of ninety days of the receipt of such applications in the prescribed form. (g) a representative of the Meteorological Department of the Government of India. . (e) a representative of the State Board for the Prevention and Control of Air Pollution referred to in section 5 of the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. 1974 (6 of 1974). 1974. (f) a representative of the Department of Environment in the State. (6 of 1974). (1) The StateGovernment may. and (i) a representative of the Town Planning Department of the State Government. and not more than five other members who may be co-opted by the State Government who shall be-(i) a scientist having specialised knowledge of the hazardous process which will be involved in the factory. (4) The Site Appraisal Committee shall have power to call for any information from the person making an application for the establishment or expansion of a factory involving a hazardous process. (h) an expert in the field of occupational health. PROVISIONS RELATING TO HAZARDOUS PROCESSES Constitution of Site Appraisal Committees.

lay down measures for the handling. to the workers employed in the factory. including health hazards and the measures to overcome such hazards arising from the exposure to or handling of the materials or substances in the manufacture. 41B. (5) Every occupier of a factory shall. with the previous approval of the Chief Inspector. within a period of thirty days of such commencement. at such intervals as may be prescribed. and (b) if such factory proposes to engage in a hazardous process at any time after such commencement. inform the Chief Inspector of the nature and details of the process in such form and in such manner as may be prescribed. inform the Chief Inspector and the local authority of any change made in the said policy. 41C. (2) The occupier shall. 1974 (6 of 1974) and the Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) A Act 1981 (14 of 1981). 41B. (6) Where any occupier of a factory contravenes the provisions of sub-section (5). transportation. draw up an on-site emergency plan and detailed disaster control measures for his factory and make known to the workers employed therein and to the general public living in the vicinity of the factory the safety measures required to be taken in the event of an accident taking place. storage and other processes. usage. the licence issued under section 6 to such factory shall.(5) Where the State Government has granted approval to an application for the establishment or expansion of a factory involving a hazardous process. with the approval of the Chief Inspector. Specifice responsibility of the occupier in relation to hazardoueprocesses. (1) The occupier of every factory involving a hazardous process shall disclose in the manner prescribed all information regarding dangers. 1987. be liable for cancellation (7) The occupier of a factory involving a hazardous process shall. (3) The information furn ished under sub-section (1) shall include accurate information as to the quantity. it shall not be necessary for an applicant to obtain a further approval from the Central Board or the State Board established under the Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act. the local authority within whose jurisdiction the factory is situate and the general public in the vicinity. 41C. within a period of thirty days before the commencement of such process. (4) Every occupier shall. at the time of registering the factory involving a hazardous process lay down a detailed policy with respect to the health and safety of the workers employed therein and intimate such policy to the Chief Inspector and the local authority and. Specifice responsibility of the occupier in relation to hazardoue processes. specifications and other characteristics of wastes and the manner of their disposal. transportation and storage of hazardous substances inside the factory premises and publicise them in the manner prescribed among the workers and the general public living in the vicinity.-(a) if such factory engaged in a hazardous process on the commencement of the Factories (Amendment) Act. thereafter. the Chief Inspector. notwithstanding any penalty to which the occupier or factory shall be subjected to under the provisions of this Act. Compulsory disclosure of information by the occupier. Every occupier of a factory involving any hazardous process shall-- . Compulsory disclosure of information by the occupier.

Emergency standards. (c) provide for medical examination of every worker-(a) before such worker is assigned to a job involving the handling of. (1) The maximum permissible threshold limits of exposure of chemical and toxic substances in manufacturing processes (whether hazardous or otherwise) in any factory shall be of the value indicated in the Second Schedule. (3) The recommendations of the Committee shall be advisory in nature. Power of Central Government to appoint Inquiry Committee. and (b) while continuing in such job.General of Factory Advice Service and Labour Institutes or any institution specialised in matters relating to standards of safety in hazardous processes. and after he has ceased to work in such job. at intervals not exceeding twelve months. toxic or any other harmful substances which are manufactured. Permissible limits of exposure of chemical and toxic substances. appoint an Inquiry Committee to inquire into the standards of health and safety observed in the factory with a view to finding out the causes of any failure or neglect in the adoption of any measures or standards prescribed for the health and safety of the workers employed in the factory or the general public affected or likely to be affected.(a) maintain accurate and up-to-date health records or. it may direct the Director. (2) The emergency standards laid down under sub-section shall. in the event of the occurrence of an extraordinary situation involving a factory engaged in a hazardous process. as the case may be. 41E. 41D. Power of Central Government to appoint Inquiry Committee. 41F. 3*[41F. of the workers in the factory who are exposed to any chemical. Permissible limits of exposure of chemical and toxic sub-stances. (1) Where the Central Government is satisfied that no standards of safety have been prescribed in respect of a hazardous process or class of hazardous processes. medical records. Emergency standards. or working with. the decision of the Chief Inspector shall be final. (1) The Central Govern (2) ment may. until they are incorporated in the rules made under this be enforceable and have the same effect as if they had been incorporated in the rules made under this Act. a hazardous 33 substance. due to such failure or neglect and for the prevention and recurrence of such extraordinary situations in future in such factory or elsewhere. stored. (2) The Committee appointed under sub-section (1) shall consist of a Chairman and two other members and the terms of reference of the Committee and the tenure of office of its member shall be such as may be determined by the Central Government according to the requirements of the situation. 41D. or where the standards so prescribed are inadequate. to lay down emergency standards for enforcement of suitable standards in respect of such hazardous processes. in such manner as may be prescribed. handled or transported and such records shall be accessible to the workers subject to such conditions as may be prescribed (b) appoint persons who possess qualifications andexperience in handling hazardous substances and are competent to supervise such handling within the factory and to provide at the working place all the necessary facilities for protecting the workers in the manner prescribed: Provided that where any question arises as to the qualifications and experience of a person so appointed. 41E. .

manager or any other person who is incharge of the factory or the process concerned directly or through their representatives in the Safety Committee and simultaneously bring the same to the notice of the Inspector  It shall be the duty of such occupier. manager or the person incharge of the factory or process to take immediate remedia action if he is satisfied about the existence of such imminent danger and send a report forthwith of the action taken to the nearest Inspector. Washing facilities. agent. in respect of any factory or class or description of factories or of any manufacturing process.] 41G. they may bring the same to the notice of the occupier."] WELFARE 42. 41H. (2) The State Government may. make suitable changes in the said Schedule. or where hazardous substances are used or handled. set up a Safety Committee consisting of equal number of representatives of workers and management to promote cooperation between the workers and the management in maintaining proper safety and health at work and to review periodically the measures taken in that behalf: Provided that the State Government may. Workers' participation in safety management. nevertheless. Right of workers to warn about imminent danger. for the purpose of giving effect to any scientific proof obtained from specialized institutions or experts in the field. at any time.(2) The Central Government may. (1) The occupier shall. manager or the person incharge referred to in sub-section (2) is not satisfied about the existence of any imminent danger as apprehended by the workers. in every factory where a hazardous process takes place. agent. agent. the tenure of office of its members and their rights and duties shall be such as may be prescribed. (c) such facilities shall be conveniently accessible and shall be kept clean. by notification in the Official Gazette. exempt the occupier of any factory or class of factories from setting up such Committee. refer the matter forthwith to the nearest Inspector whose decision on the question of the existence of such imminent danger shall be final. (b) separate and adequately screened facilities shall be provided for the use of male and female workers. Right of workers to warn about imminent danger. 41G. (3)If the occupier. 42. by order in writing and for reasons to be recorded. 34 Workers' participation in safety management.  Where the workers employed in any factory engaged in a hazardous process have reasonable apprehension that there is a likelihood of imminent danger to their lives or health due to any accident. 41H. (2) The composition of the Safety Committee. prescribe standards of adequate and suitable facilities for washing. Washing facilities. (1) In every factory-(a) adequate and suitable facilities for washing shall be provided and maintained for the use of the workers therein. . he shall.

43. Facilities for storing and drying clothing. The State Government may, in respect of any factory or class or description of factories, make rules requiring the provision therein of suitable places for keeping clothing not worn during working hours and for the drying of wet clothing.

WORKING HOURS OF ADULTS Weekly hours. 51. Weekly hours. No adult worker shall be required or allowed to work in a factory for more than forty-eight hours in any week. Weekly holidays. 52. Weekly holidays. (1) No adult worker shall be required or allowed to work in a factory on the first day of the week (hereinafter referred to as the said day), unless— (a) he has or will have a holiday for a whole day on one of the three days immediately before or after the said day, and (b) the manager of the factory has, before the said day or the substituted day under clause (a), whichever is earlier,-(i) delivered a notice at the office of the Inspector of his intention to require the worker to work on the said day and of the day which is to be substituted, and (ii) displayed a notice to that effect in the factory: Provided that no substitution shall be made which will result in any worker working for more than ten days consecutively without a holiday for a whole day. (2) Notices given under sub-section (1) may be cancelled by a notice delivered at the office of the Inspector and a notice displayed in the factory not later than the day before the said day or the holiday to be cancelled, whichever is earlier. (3) Where, in accordance with the provisions of sub-section (1), any worker works on the said day and has had a holiday on one of the three days immediately before it, that said day shall, for the purpose of calculating his weekly hours of work, be included in the preceding week. Compensatory holidays. 53. Compensatory holidays. (1) Where, as a result of the passing of an order or the making of a rule under the provisions of this Act exempting a factory or the workers therein from the provisions of section 52, a worker is deprived of any of the weekly holidays for which provision is made in sub-section (1) of that section, he shall be allowed, within the month in which the holidays were due to him or within the two months immediately following that month, compensatory holidays of equal number of the holidays so lost. (2) The State Government may prescribe the manner in which the holidays for which provision is made in sub-section (1) shall be allowed.

Daily hours. 54. Daily hours. Subject to the provisions of section 51, no adult worker shall be required or allowed to work in a factory for more than nine hours in any day: 1*[Provided that, subject to the previous approval of the Chief Inspector, the daily maximum specified in this section may be exceeded in order to facilitate the change of shifts. Intervals for rest. 55. Intervals for rest. 2*[(1)]3*[The periods of work] of adult workers in a factory each day shall be so fixed that no period shall exceed five hours and that no worker shall work for more than five hours before he has had an interval for rest of at least half an hour. 4*[(2) The State Government or, subject to the control of the State Government, the Chief Inspector, may, by written order and for the reasons specified therein, exempt any factory from the provisions of sub-section (1) so however that the total number of hours worked by a worker without an interval does not exceed six] Spreadover. 56. Spreadover. The periods of work of an adult worker in a factory shall be so arranged that inclusive of his intervals for rest under section 55, they shall not spreadover more than ten and a half hours in any day: Provided that the Chief Inspector may, for reasons to be specified in writing, increase the 5*[spreadover up to twelve hours]. Night shifts. 57. Night shifts. Where a worker in a factory works on a shift which extends beyond midnight,-(a) for the purposes of sections 52 and 53, a holiday for a whole day shall mean in his case a period of twentyfour consecutive hours beginning when his shift ends; (b) the following day for him shall be deemed to be the period of twenty-four hours beginning when such shift

EMPLOYMENT OF YOUNG PERSONS Prohibition of employment of young children. 67. Prohibition of employment of young children. No child who has not completed his fourteenth year shall be required or allowed to work in any factory. Non-adult workers to carry tokens. 68. Non-adult workers to carry tokens. A child who has completed his fourteenth year or an adolescent shall not be required or allowed to work in any factory unless-(a) a certificate of fitness granted with reference to him under section 69 is in the custody of the manager of the factory, and (b) such child or adolescent carries while he is at work a token giving a reference to such certificate. Certificates of fitness. 69. Certificates of fitness. (1) A certifying surgeon shall, on the application of any young person or his parent or guardian accompanied by a document signed by the manager of a factory that such person will be employed therein if certified to be fit for work in a factory, or on the application of the manager of the factory in which any young person wishes to work, examine such person and ascertain his fitness for work in a factory. (2) The certifying surgeon, after examination, may grant to such young person, in the prescribed form, or may renew-(a) a certificate of fitness to work in a factory as a child, if he is satisfied that the young person has completed his fourteenth year, that he has attained the prescribed physical standards and that he is fit for such work; (b) a certificate of fitness to work in a factory as an adult, if he is satisfied that the young person has completed his fifteenth year, and is fit for a full day's work in a factory: Provided that unless the certifying surgeon has personal knowledge of the place where the young person proposes to work and of the manufacturing process in which he will be employed, he shall not grant or renew a certificate under this sub-section until he has examined such place. (3) A certificate of fitness granted or renewed under sub-section (a) shall be valid only for a period of twelve months from the date thereof; (b) may be made subject to conditions in regard to the nature of the work in which the young person may be employed, or requiring re-examination of the young person before the expiry of the period of twelve months. (4) A certifying surgeon shall revoke any certificate granted or renewed under sub-section (2) if in his opinion the holder of it is no longer fit to work in the capacity stated therein in a factory. (5) Where a certifying surgeon refuses to grant or renew a certificate or a certificate of the kind requested or revokes a certificate, he shall, if so requested by any person who could have applied for the certificate or the renewal thereof, state his reasons in writing for so doing. (6) Where a certificate under this section with reference to any young person is granted or renewed subject to such conditions as are referred to in clause (b) of sub-section (3), the young person shall not be required or allowed to work in any factory except in accordance with those conditions.

except with the previous permission in writing of the Chief Inspector. be deemed to be a child for all the purposes of this Act. be changed more frequently than once in a period of thirty days. however. and who while at work in a factory carries a token giving reference to the certificate.] (2) An adolescent who has not been granted a certificate of fitness to work in a factory as an adult under the aforesaid clause (b) shall. 70.] 1*[(1A) No child worker shall be required or allowed to work in any factory unless his name and other particulars have been entered in the register of child workers.M. and 7 P.(7) Any fee payable for a certificate under this section shall be paid by the occupier and shall not be recoverable from the young person. in any factory-.M. Explanation. that no such section shall authorise the employment of any female adolescent (ii) grant exemption from the provisions of this sub-section in case of serious emergency where national interest is involved. Working hours for children. Effect of certificate of fitness granted to adolescent. 2*[(b) during the night. notwithstanding his age.-(i) vary the limits laid down in this subsection so. 71. Hours of work to correspond with notice under section 72 and . (3) The provisions of section 52 shall apply also to child workers and no exemption from the provisions of that section may be granted in respect of any child. his parents or guardian. and each child shall be employed in only one of the relays which shall not. the manner in which it shall be maintained and the period for which it shall be preserved. in respect of any factory or group or class or description of factories. 3*[(5) No female child shall be required or allowed to work in any factory except between 8 A.M.--For the purpose of this sub-section "night" shall mean a period of at least twelve consecutive hours which shall include the interval between 10 P. shall be required or allowed to work in any factory except between 6 A. and 7 P.] (2) The period of work of all children employed in a factory shall be limited to two shifts which shall not overlap or spread over more than five hours each.] (2) The State Government may prescribe the form of the register of child workers. shall be deemed to be an adult for all the purposes of Chapters VI and VIII: 1*[(1A) No female adolescent or a male adolescent who has not attained the age of seventeen years but who has been granted a certificate of fitness to work in a factory as an adult.(a) for more than four and a half hours in any day. and 6 A. by notification in the Official Gazette. (4) No child shall be required or allowed to work in any factory on any day on which he has already been working in another factory. (1) An adolescent who has been granted a certificate of fitness to work in a factory as an adult under clause (b) of sub-section (2) of section 69. (1) No child shall be employed or permitted to work.M.M: Provided that the State Government may.M. Effect of certificate of fitness granted to adolescent.

by Act 25 of 1954.74. ANNUAL LEAVE WITH WAGES Application of Chapter. s. (1) Every worker who has worked for a period of 240 days or more in a factory during a calendar year shall be allowed during the subsequent calendar year. Hours of work to correspond with notice under section 72 and register under section 73. who are governed by leave rules approved by the Central Government. agreement or contract of service. agreement (including settlement) or contract of service provides for a longer annual leave with wages than provided in this Chapter. (ii) if a child. shall apply. (b) in the case of a female worker. the quantum of leave. but in relation to matters not provided for in such award. maternity leave for any number of days not exceeding twelve weeks.--The leave admissible under this sub-section shall be exclusive of all holidays whether occurring during or at either end of the period of leave. 1*[agreement (including settlement)] or contract of service: 2*[Provided that if such award. (1) The provisions of this Chapter shall not operate to the prejudice of any right to which a worker may be entitled under any 1. so far as may be. shall be in accordance with such award. 78. . leave with wages for a number of days calculated at the rate of-(i) if an adult.--For the purpose of this sub-section(a) any days of lay off. VIII. one day for every fifteen days of work performed by him during the previous calendar year. for the former Ch. Explanation 1. the provisions of sections 79 to 82. and (c) the leave earned in the year prior to that in which the leave is enjoyed.] (2) The provisions of this Chapter shall not apply to workers 3*[in any factory] of any railway administered by the Government. one day for every twenty days of work performed by him during the previous calendar year. 20. No child shall be employed in any factory otherwise than in accordance with the notice of periods of work for children displayed in the factory and the entries made beforehand against his name in the register of child workers of the factory. agreement or contract of service or matters which are provided for less favourably therein. Explanation 2. by agreement or contract or as permissible under the standing orders. Application of Chapter. Annual leave with wages. but he shall not earn leave for these days. Subs. 75 other law or under the terms of any award. 79. shall be deemed to be days on which the worker has worked in a factory for the purpose of computation of the period of 240 days or more. Annual leave with wages. which the worker shall be entitled to.

or in respect of. with a further fine which may extend to 2*[one thousand rupees] for each day on which the contravention is so continued: 3*[Provided that where contravention of any of the provisions of Chapter IV or any rule made thereunder section 87 has resulted in an accident causing death or serious bodily injury. the fine shall not be less than 2*[twenty five thousand] in the case of an accident causing death. or in all probability will . General penalty for offences.-In this section and in section 94 "serious bodily injury" means an injury which involves.SPECIAL PROVISIONS Power to apply the Act to certain premises. Save as is otherwise expressly provided in this Act and subject to the provisions of section 93. declare that all or any of the provisions of this Act shall apply to any place wherein a manufacturing process is carried on with PENALTIES AND PROCEDURE General penalty for offences. and 2*[five thousand rupees] in the case of an accident causing serious bodily injury. Explanation. Power to apply the Act to certain premises. and if the contravention is continued after conviction. if in. 92. (1) The State Government may. any factory there is any contravention of any of the provisions of this Act or of any rules made thereunder or of any order in writing given thereunder. by notification in the Official Gazette. the occupier and manager of the factory shall each be guilty of an offence and punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to 2*[two years] or with fine which may extend to 2*[one lakh rupees] or with both. 85.

for the operation of a school. includes attendance at a place. at a school. . to which the definition of attendanceapplies.SOCIAL SECURITY (ADMINISTRATION) ACT 1999 SECT 124A Enrolment and attendance at school In this Part: "attendance" . and (b) a person responsible for schooling (or for the administration of schooling) in relation to which alternative enrolment of a kind mentioned in the definition of enrolment applies. for the purpose of schooling. other than a school. that is acceptable under a law of a State or Territory as an alternative to a requirement under that law to attend a school. includes anything. "person responsible" . includes: (a) a person responsible for schooling (or for the administration of schooling) at a place. "enrolment" . that is acceptable under a law of a State or Territory as an alternative to a requirement under that law to enrol at a school. at a school. for the purpose of schooling.

(f) workshop or other establishment in which articles are produced adapted or manufactured with a view to their use transport or sale. (g) establishment in which any work relating to the construction development or maintenance of buildings roads bridges or canals or relating to operations connected with navigation irrigation or to the supply of water or relating to the generation transmission and distribution of electricity or any other form of power is being carried on. (h) any other establishment or class of establishments which the Central Government or a State Government may having regard to the nature thereof the need for protection of persons employed therein and other relevant circumstances specify by notification in the Official Gazette. . 1936 2. (c) inland vessel mechanically propelled. (b) dock wharf or jetty. (e) plantation. (ib) "factory" means a factory as defined in clause (m) of section 2 of the Factories Act 1948 (63 of 1948) and includes any place to which the provisions of that Act have been applied under subsection (1) of section 85 thereof. (ii) "industrial or other establishment" means any (a) tramway service or motor transport service engaged in carrying passengers or goods or both by road for hire or reward (aa) air transport service other than such service belonging to or exclusively employed in the military naval or air forces of the Union or the Civil Aviation Department of the Government of India. (ia) "employer" includes the legal representative of a deceased employer.The Payment of Wages Act. (d) mine quarry or oil-field. (iia) "mine" has the meaning assigned to it in clause (j) of sub-section (1) of section 2 of the Mines Act 1952 (35 of 1952). Definitions In this Act unless there is anything repugnant in the subject or context (i) "employed person" includes the legal representative of a deceased employed person.

(iii) "plantation" has the meaning assigned to it in clause (f) of section 2 of the Plantations Labour Act 1951 (69 of 1951). (3) any contribution paid by the employer to any pension or provident fund and the interest which may have accrued thereon. (c) any additional remuneration payable under the terms of employment (whether called a bonus or by any other name) (d) any sum which by reason of the termination of employment of the person employed is payable under any law contract or instrument which provides for the payment of such sum whether with or without deductions but does not provide for the time within which the payment is to be made. or (6) any gratuity payable on the termination of employment in cases other than those specified in sub-clause (d). (b) any remuneration to which the person employed is entitled in respect of overtime work or holidays or any leave period. . (v) "railway administration" has the meaning assigned to it in clause (6) of section 3 of the Indian Railways Act 1890 (9 of 1890). (iv) "prescribed" means prescribed by rules made under this Act. and (vi) "wages" means all remuneration (whether by way of salary allowances or otherwise) expressed in terms of money or capable of being so expressed which would if the terms of employment express or implied were fulfilled by payable to a person employed in respect of his employment or of work done in such employment and includes (a) any remuneration payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a court. (5) any sum paid to the employed person to defray special expenses entailed on him by the nature of his employment. (2) the value of any house-accommodation or of the supply of light water medical attendance or other amenity or of any service excluded from the computation of wages by a general or special order of the State Government. (e) any sum to which the person employed is entitled under any scheme framed under any law for the time being in force. (4) any travelling allowance or the value of any travelling concession. but does not include (1) any bonus (whether under a scheme of profit sharing or otherwise) which does not form part of the remuneration payable under the terms of employment or which is not payable under any award or settlement between the parties or order of a court.

a frozen readymade company learns that there is a growing demand for fresh ready made but does not know much about the area of fresh food & so has to carry out research in order to gain a better understanding. . It os quantitative uses surveys & panels & also the use of probability sampling. The existing phenomena facts are not known to the persons. The main goal of this type of research is to describe the data & characterstics about what is being studies. The details of the facts won‘t be known.TYPE OF RESEARCH The research which I completed is based on secondary data. It is descriptive in nature. Descriptive research is mainly done when a researcher wants to gain abetter understanding of a topic for example. Descriptive research is also called Statistical Research. Through this project I understand many phenomena about many facts. Descriptive research exploration of the existing certain phenomena. it does not gather the causes behind a situation . Although this research is highly accurate.

premium grade cement products. plant that converts waste generated at Kota into consistent quality.SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGTHS: having its own power plant. thus reducing plant fulfills 905 requirement of power at lowest cost. Budgetary control is not implicated properly. . Actual performance is very far from budgeted estimates. improvement program at Kota plant improves the quality of the product. thus increase in profitability of different plants. ‟s only WEAKNESSES: Wet process of cement production consumes high power cost.

custom duty. DSCL may commission more power plant at Kota and at other locations & sale the power to other factories. Freight.e. New players may offer more innovative sales for both the dealers & producers for . electricity. Increase in diesel price encourages the major components of cement cost i. Overall growth of Indian economy is very less comparison to other developing countries. infrastructure efforts provide good fortune for cement industry. Good financial help provided by banking sector is also a good opportunity for cement industry. By the permission of the government. THREATS: Large plants are big problem in India. The low per capita cement consumption in India also opens the way for extra progress. excise duty and power production is a big threat for cement industry in determining cost structure.OPPORTUNITIES: Govt. Good monsoon in this year have grate push to disposal income of the people rural area. policy regard to tariff. Change in govt.

g. This may have adverse on the DSCL traditional market.e. . new company to consolidate its base may offer free gift on the product.

I learned team work there with colleagues. Information studies etc . Some old trainees helped me to make me aware about the work culture which was really important for me. expectation. experience in organization and also some experience out of the organization. . There is some difference in summer trainees and employees but trainees are not treated as labour in the organization because they are showcase of organization with two months experience. I really experience that practical experience is far different than theoretical learning.THE LEARNING EXPERIENCE It was really a learning experience for me to do Summer Internship training in the organization DCM Shriram Consolidated Ltd. I learned various things apart from my project studies like Organizational Behaviour. I really observed that different one have different qualities and combination make stronger. The learning experience includes my hypothesis. The more important is that we can observe the processes in between and can look at outputs and fold processes in between. System Thinking. It was my first experience to work in such a big organization with few guidelines and with liberty. This training taught me that the classroom learning is very different from real life situations. The practical seems easier than reading and analysing in theories. I felt that it is important to apply the classroom learning in the work in your own way as each individual is different and have some qualities in own to do some in his own style. It was like training before training by the colleagues. Management Process. Initially I was loaded with a lot of perceptions and worried about the way summer trainees are treated in the organizations. This experience changed my perspective of looking at things. But . I found the reality completely different from what I heard before. I got the liberty to plan out my activities by my own but restricted by some boundaries.

This foundation can be used by Indonesian public sector particularly regional hospital to improve its performance so in the end it might produce scorecard report regularly that is reliable. Therefore future research should be more generalized to other public hospitals or other public sectors in Indonesia . and Job Performance Scorecard can be easily followed as a standard for implementing the BSC into the public health sector. Job Description.Conclusion It is not surprising that Indonesian public hospital still provide minimum medical service with minimum funding support from the government. All steps from making Activity Value Chain. Job Specification. However. Job Performance Standard. Balanced Scorecard has provided a foundation for both private and public sector to measure both sector performances. However. this paper is only limited on success story at three Indonesian public hospitals in Nusa Tenggara Province. Public Hospital as a public service institution needs a condusive human resource performance measurement system to determine its worker effectiveness and efficiency weaknesses so it can achieve good corporate governance in the future.