WHY “SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERT” IS NOT A CAREER PATH

The Evolution of Brand Communications and Tribal Commerce.

All rights reserved. ©2009 Search Marketing Optimization www.davidbreznau.com 1 Group Inc.

Index
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1 Words Matter 2 Reshuffle 3 Production Artsist, Media Expert… Webmaster, Social 4 Suggested identifiers and their definitions

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Introduction: Why I’m publishing this e-book.
“Social Media” is redundant, and doesn’t advance the conversation. There…I said it! There’s no doubt it’s about our ability to converse. In real-time, 24/7/365, about anything and with anyone we choose. The conversation, however, should also be about access, the lines of separation, and the ability to choose our degree of involvement. We’re social beings. And we’ll continue to have social conversations, political and religious conversations, personal and intimate and public conversations, and conversations of commerce. All of which will continue to become separated from each other, while at the same time being woven into the fabric of society itself. That’s what I believe. And that’s why I wrote this e-book. I’m no neophyte at this. The Book of Questions, which I co-authored with Greg Stock, became a #1 New York Times Bestseller in 1987. This is my first e-book, though. (And I apologize if it seems a bit fragmented; its partiallyexcerpted chapters are from my upcoming book, Reshuffle.) My intent, with this e-book, is to do my part in advancing the conversation now taking place within an industry that I’ve called home since 1982. Personally, I have nothing against anyone wanting to call him- or herself a “Social Media Expert.” But I do take issue with certain parts of the ongoing conversation…

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chapter 1: Words Matter
The genius of this axiom is found in the complexity of its challenge. To keep “it” simple you must understand all of its parts, all of its subtleties and nuances. You must unearth the core of the challenge, and find its relevance toward acceptance.
I’ve spent my entire adult life involved in the business of ideas. My first - and only interview right out of college was at Doyle Dane Bernbach/Los Angeles. And my first job within the communications field came two days later, in June of 1982. I was lucky to learn at the feet of some of the masters. Some of the greatest communications minds in history, in fact, helped instill in me a concept by which I still try to live today: “Keep It Simple.” The genius of this axiom is found in the complexity of its challenge. To keep “it” simple you must understand all of its parts, all of its subtleties and nuances. You must unearth the core of the challenge, and find its relevance toward acceptance. It is only then that you can articulate a message, or have a conversation that will resonate with its intended audience. Success comes from the ability to communicate in both content and context. But – as we see every day – success, especially in our discipline, is never guaranteed; communications is an art, not a science. Keeping something simple, at the same time, does not necessarily mean that “it” can’t be complex. And our ability to break down these complexities, and to then articulate our message in simpler terms, is the most basic challenge of the art of conversation. Conversation can take different forms, of course. A conversation with someone in person, for instance, is much different than doing it through the electronic written word. Anyone who has ever written or responded to an email – and whose words have been misinterpreted - can testify to that. It’s probably happened to all of us. The obvious difference is that when we’re physically conversing with someone, all of our senses are engaged, and in full view. We have the up-close-and-personal opportunity to decipher tone, facial expressions and body language, along with the actual words being spoken. For example, having someone telling you that they love you, while they’re frowning and

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For example, the recorded conversation between Rodney King and a few police officers in 1991 certainly changed Los Angeles forever.

looking anywhere but directly into your eyes, might suggest that you hear the message with some degree of skepticism. This is not to suggest that visual and tactile interactions can’t be misinterpreted. They certainly can be, and often are. My point here, however, is to simply point out their relevance to a conversation. A picture is worth a thousand words. And there is a difference between having a conversation and telling a story, and understanding how those two acts can support each other. Modern technology, for example, offers photo and video capabilities that can be used to assist in starting, continuing, or even ending a conversation. Many of us are actually now incorporating video-based conversations into our last wills and testaments, to be viewed for generations to come. And many of us enjoy showing (even though our guests may not always enjoy seeing) the visuals of our latest vacation.

Video has certainly proven its effectiveness in starting conversations about issues that affect our lives. For example, the recorded conversation between Rodney King and a few police officers in 1991 certainly changed Los Angeles forever. (And probably changed the American police and judicial systems, as well.) Some conversations, of course, are brief. And some, believe it or not, can continue for centuries. Many of us have a sort of ongoing conversation with our family members, our friends, or our neighbors. We update them on an as-needed basis. Most parents of teenagers are aware of the challenges of keeping them engaged in conversations. Today, most teenagers are - or have the capabilities to be - in constant real-time conversation, often with several friends (“friendz”) at once. (And, as their parents can attest, pretty much 24/7.) To many parents, though, it seems an ironic law of nature that if, by chance, we get them to finally put down their devices, all of a sudden…they have nothing to say.

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Our founding fathers started a conversation that continues today, and will continue for centuries to come. Dr. Martin Luther King started one, as did the founder of your own religion. Your local political officials are engaged in conversations, along with your local sports teams, and some of their individual personalities. (Of course, many sports personalities today sometimes seem to be engaged in conversations 24/7!)

All conversations find their own degree of relevance into your life, and the decision to engage is yours alone. You’re a member of society, so some conversations will have an effect on you whether you’re involved in them or not. The rules of engagement, of course, will vary. But you may want to get involved right now with an already-ongoing conversation. Or, you may want to start your own. But, whichever you choose… Keep It Simple!

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chapter 2: Reshuffle
We access our mail, check our calendars, read our news, do our banking, play games on, and search with our favorite apps for whoever and whatever, as we follow a blue ball that navigates our ground-based vehicle to places we’ve never been. And all of this, amazingly, from a wireless device we hold in the palm of our hand.
The world is now digital. A thousand years from now, when a chart illustrates the development of humankind, somewhere between walking upright and rejuvenating limbs will be a mark indicating the Twentieth Century, and the beginning of our digital world. On that same chart, of course, will be other important points of development. The age-old use of the wheel, for example, combined with the development of the internal combustion engine to give us the automobile…the significance being both the actual vehicle of change and the access it provided. As individuals – particularly as Americans - we often seem to embrace change with a rush that’s moderated only by our ability to adapt. The days of singlefunction appliances are over and gone. Knobs and buttons have been replaced by a digital touch pad that now takes us from communicating with either voice, text, or video, with our friend, friends (or “friendz”), to listening to our favorite music, or watching our favorite shows and movies. The lines of separation have so thoroughly merged that they’ve pretty much vanished. It has become - and will continue to be - about convergence and integration. We access our mail, check our calendars, read our news, do our banking, play games on, and search with our favorite apps for whoever and whatever, as we follow a blue ball that navigates our ground-based vehicle to places we’ve never been. And all of this, amazingly, from a wireless device we hold in the palm of our hand. Just as the development of our analog world’s Interstate system provided access to the past vehicles of change, today’s Internet technologies are doing the same for our current digital devices of change. Today, every individual has access to his/her own personalized multimedia soapbox, attached to chosen broadcast

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In our former analog world, we often became intolerant of intrusive and unsolicited communications. However, we couldn’t really seem to agree on what There’s an irony here. We live in a world in was to be considered intrusive. (One person’s junk is another’s treasure.) which personal control is often a priority. Yet, the technologies meant to give us Today we’re demanding that redundant that control often, actually, render that communications-delivery systems allow goal unattainable. for our own personal preferences. These available preferences will continue to As a society, we’re starting to have grow in sophistication, and they’ll give the conversations that will define the each of us the ability to determine the boundaries of this newly-developed degree of access we feel like granting. access. And these conversations will probably continue for decades. In some cases we may even apply lessons learned These technologies are allowing us from our former analog universe, in which to define the lines of access between public and private, social and political, society developed a desire to be civil. community and commerce. In a bit of an irony, because of events of the past A simple example is the evolution of few years, our demand for transparency email. Somehow we’ve come to decide that an all-caps message implies shouting, and accountability toward our stewards of industry, commerce and politics is and is frowned upon in most circles. We’ve incorporated visual cues like smiley growing dramatically. Our concerns with healthcare, employment, privacy faces and hearts to lend credence to our and public access, the environment, written conversations. channels, that are attached to our own personal agendas, with a USB connection to our own digital archive.

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And as a result, we are no longer just consumers of the media. We are the media.

governmental oversight, our methods of commerce, our banking system and its checks and balances, are all greater than ever before. In our former analog world, we developed communications vehicles that enabled us to have conversations with audiences outside of our personal reach. The development of newspapers, radio, and television all extended the conversations that helped society advance in many fields. And the more the media became integral to our daily lives, the more we became reliant on it for our sense of connection. As the lines between news and entertainment continue to blur, and editorial integrity seemingly is replaced by bias, we’re finding alternative ways of having conversations and gathering information. Exhibit A might be “nightly news,” which seems, to many of us, to be an antiquated relic of the Twentieth Century.

Each of us, these days, has the ability to decide for ourselves what’s newsworthy. Our agendas are no longer established only by events that are broadcast into our living rooms. That’s not to suggest, as some have, that news organizations themselves have become invalid. What’s become antiquated are their delivery systems, and their business model. The centralized powerbase of the media itself is dissipating. And as a result, we are no longer just consumers of the media. We are the media. Our need to be connected will continue to grow, because information provides insight…and that will always be a critical element in our lives. Our ability to gather, articulate and disseminate relevant and unbiased information, however, will forever be a challenge. The sources providing access to this information will become the collective stewards

This fundamental shift in our ability to access these sources, and to establish our individual and collective agendas, will prove to be the greatest catalyst toward the redistribution of wealth for centuries to come.

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of society. The difference is that, now, sources can now be anyone, anywhere, at any time. This fundamental shift in our ability to access these sources, and to establish our individual and collective agendas, will prove to be the greatest catalyst toward the redistribution of wealth for centuries to come. But - as with every advancement there are challenges. Our collective and individual abilities to produce and broadcast information will be offset by our ability to manipulate its content. Ideally, the same digital tools that provide us this new access will also provide us with the ability to search, question, and converse with the sources of the information. Our fundamental need for transparency, and our desire to find our own truths, will be an ongoing challenge. Like it or not, we are all social beings. Some of us are more private than others, and all of us are selective in our

choice and degree of communication. As a society we must come to terms with the responsibilities, challenges and opportunities offered by these new technologies. So, where do we draw the lines? What should be considered private? What should be considered public? If we demand that society has a right to know where all of its convicted child molesters are located, and if we have the ability to track and broadcast their every move, should that information be accessible by society in general, or only law enforcement officials? How will these lines of access relate to individual members of society who still keep a driver’s license even though they’ve been convicted of DUI? What are the rules of access by employers toward their employees? Should that same access be provided to the employees? What about our medical records? Our credit reports? Privacy issues – already a great concern - will continue to grow. Anyone with

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the ability to form a coherent sentence now has access to this real-time global database. If a nine-year-old decides to leverage her available access to harm or inspire, or to pursue the challenges of commerce, our only hope is that they also have access to parental and social guidance. It’s been a rough few years for business, and for the established business structures that we’ve taken for granted for so long. The transparency that we now demand from our corporations is causing “brands” to rethink their societal responsibilities. And the reason is clear. All of us now have access to business information that allows us to make moreinformed decisions on their corporate agendas, and on their ethical and environmental footprints. Our degrees of control have never been better…and they’ll continue to get better. There’s more opportunity to make our own individual choices. I can choose my own personal “influencers,” by choosing what I watch or read and with whom I converse…and when and where I do it.

I no longer need to deal with a bank teller, a line at the post office, loud talkers in the movies, stale popcorn, stamps, pen and paper, writing checks, or balancing a checkbook. I can work from anywhere on the planet (as long as there’s broadband), and my circle of friends and business associates can follow my real-time digital footprint when and where they decide. My desktop, laptop and PDA all sync-up wirelessly and automatically. And if your name is not in my database and you try to call me, you will not be identified and you’ll go straight to voicemail. I’m not a hermit (although some say I live in a cave because my blinds are always closed). I do enjoy getting out…but I have the luxury of doing so when I decide. When I do get out, it tends to be with my Bluetooth-enabled ear buds in place and with Lady GaGa or Chris Rea dictating my pace of involvement. .

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I no longer hear my “local” anchor or weather person interrupt my favorite sitcom to say idiotic things like “seven found dead, more at 11:00”; or “it’s currently raining in Washington”(I live in Florida!).

I choose to do my shopping when you’re not there, so I don’t have to navigate around your shopping carts or your kids. I pray to my God that my government continues to find ways to embrace the evolving technologies. I pay my taxes and my mortgage online. I even vote electronically (though I must confess that it really upsets me having to stand in line to do it!). If any one of my information sources even tries to sell me something, or, worse yet, tries to tease or entice me with some idiotic verbal hook, they’re automatically disengaged. I no longer hear my “local” anchor or weather person interrupt my favorite sitcom to say idiotic things like “seven found dead, more at 11:00”; or “it’s currently raining in Washington”(I live in Florida!). I not only Tivo, and therefore edit everything I find uninteresting, but I also have access to more accurate and reliable information channels than the traditional ones.

I choose not to insulate myself, however, from selected conversations of commerce…generally the ones that take place during televised sporting events. I still enjoy watching sportscasts in which I understand I will be bombarded with “must-have” products and services. But some of the “noise,” perhaps, will be from brands that may actually be relevant to my lifestyle. I may even choose to engage with those brands. In many ways, these new digital freedoms - and their challenges - are like the analog childhood memories of being taught by my parents to play a card game named Euchre (pronounced you-ker). We would play “open” hands until I was able to grasp the concept and rules of the game. Once I felt that I had grasped them, all that was left to do was Reshuffle and deal. But that’s another book.

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Chapter 3: Production Artist, Webmaster, Social Media Expert…
A few decades ago, the analog purveyors of commerce were incorporating digital information into what was considered the “backend.” Now, our newest digital applications will allow the completion of front-end efficiencies, as well. Thereby completing the circle of commerce.
Like many, I have read Seth Godin’s “Tribes,” and I occasionally check his blog. I often read Faris Yakob’s,” Talent Imitates, Genius Steals” blog. I find both to be intelligent, relevant, and insightful. But that doesn’t mean that I always agree with what they say. And I know, conversely, that each of them couldn’t care less about my individual opinion. We all understand that there is always – always! - at least one other opinion being offered on everything. Some suggest a brand is actually just marketing-speak created from the “top” and handed down. There are those who believe that the idea of having conversation is a newly founded religion within the circle of commerce. Still others believe that the conversations taking place will not involve their own enterprise efforts. As previously stated, the reason I’ve published this e-book is to encourage conversation, within the context of corporate communications, about the real significance of this digital evolution. The real significance, in my opinion, is not in the newly-developed social network mediums; the real significance is the access they provide. A few decades ago, the analog purveyors of commerce were incorporating digital information into what was considered the “back-end.” Now, our newest digital applications will allow the completion of front-end efficiencies, as well. Thereby completing the circle of commerce. To me, the lines between social interaction and the interaction of commerce are now being defined in degrees of exclusion and inclusion. Anyone who attempts to blindly merge the two for the sake of a hidden agenda - no matter the intent – is bound to generate a tremendous backlash. From a marketing perspective, of course, information is knowledge. Marketplace competition fosters redundancies.

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We’ve learned, often painfully, that access to our products and services is never a guarantee, even though customer relationships are – or should be - at the core of our commercial life-cycles. We understand that things can, and will, go wrong. And we’ve learned that damage control becomes most effective when it’s proactive rather than reactive.

Marketplace dynamics (acquire, consolidate, expand) will continually change the landscape of accessproviders. And time will determine the winners and losers. Our current social networks will continue to evolve…but they’ll always provide access to important information. In the fast-changing world of commerce, the rules of transparency, and brands’ relationships with society in general, will evolve at the same speed. In addition, lessons learned in our analog world of commerce will also prove relevant in our newly-acquired digital domains. Our ability to engage with someone is in direct proportion to our ability to allow them to engage with us. We’ve learned, often painfully, that access to our products and services is never a guarantee, even though customer relationships are – or should be - at the core of our commercial life-cycles. We understand that things can, and will, go wrong. And we’ve learned that damage

control becomes most effective when it’s proactive rather than reactive. Brands are currently being bombarded with an onslaught of 24/7/365 challenges that technology has delivered to their front door. In the end, your brand’s ability to survive - and flourish - will depend on the very same tool it has depended on from the very beginning: its relevance. The rules by which we measure relevance of a brand are changing faster than at any time since the advent of television. We’ll continue to demand greater access (and greater relevance) of the brands that are important to us…just as the managers of those brands will continue to position them according to their own needs. In our society, how a corporation invests its profits is becoming as important as the amount of profit itself. And as a result, we’ll continue to demand a sense of fairness and responsibility from the members of commerce, as we continue to demand it from our members of congress.

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Those of us who’ve always felt that a brand was a living and breathing entity have been waiting for this evolution.

Conversations, of course, have been taking place since time began. They’ve helped advance our ideas, ideals, and our society in general. The conversations now taking place within the corporate world should be about the access these new digital tools afford…not about the conversation itself. Brands that understand the importance of conversation have developed strong customer relationships. And the fields of marketing, advertising and public relations have been developed specifically to help conceive, produce and distribute the conversations of business. Those of us who’ve always felt that a brand was a living and breathing entity have been waiting for this evolution. Real-time capabilities, of course, certainly present a unique set of new challenges. But, in reality, they’re really an evolution of the current matrix, rather than a new discipline needing to be defined.

Take Ben & Jerry’s, for example. How did you know I was referring to ice cream? It’s because you’ve been having a conversation, although perhaps indirectly, with the company and its brand. That same conversation, however, has been going on since long before you were born; since, in fact, the first barter or sale took place. The conversation, regarding Ben & Jerry’s, might sound like this… Ben & Jerry’s: We make ice cream. Our ice cream is different from other ice creams. And we’ve developed some “fun” communication tools that allow you to tell us exactly what you think about our ice cream. Consumer: This ice cream tastes really good. I love the quirky names of all the different flavors. I’ve never been to Vermont, but this packaging allows me to imagine fields of green, dotted with cows giving milk to make the ice cream.

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Accordingly, SEO (Search Engine Optimization) and its advancing 2.0 version, DAO (Digital Assets Optimization) capabilities will continue to be the greatest assets to both social and commercial agendas.

It says “all natural” on the packaging, and I’ve heard that the company is environmentally “friendly.” In fact, when I went to the beach last summer, all the trash cans were painted like cartons of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. It’s a little more expensive than other ice creams, sure. But I’ve developed such an emotional attachment to our “relationship” that I’ll just keep buying this product. At least, until something gives me reason to stop. The point of this conversation is very simple. From product development through customer relations, Ben & Jerry’s does a hell of a job in promoting the conversation with consumers. The newest digital trends (perhaps “craze” would be a better word), “social media,” is a striking example of the importance of conversation in our society. We can now have these conversations in “real-time” – and we can have them with potentially hundreds of participants.

For those of us in marketing, finding ways to incorporate these developing technologies into a brand’s life-cycle, as well as allowing access and exchange of opinions and ideas into the culture of these living corporate brands of commerce, is a formidable challenge. In this brave new world, finding ways to separate noise from conversation, and conversation from relevant conversation, will also be a challenge. Our ability to search for relevant information already includes real-time conversation. Search engines have become an integral part of our daily lives. And they have the capacity to search for, find, and deliver relevant information at speeds unimaginable just a few years ago. Accordingly, SEO (Search Engine Optimization) and its advancing 2.0 version, DAO (Digital Assets Optimization) capabilities will continue to be the greatest assets to both social and commercial agendas.

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Of course, our current search engines can’t produce new information; they can only access information that already exists. The folks over at Wolfram/Alpha are getting well-deserved attention for their efforts toward computable knowledge. As of this writing, it hasn’t yet been released to the public. But it’s creating quite a stir. And what about the real-time collective database of society itself? What if we could find a way to tap into the available living knowledge with regard to our daily activities? We have, actually…and it’s called Twitter. This seven-letter word has become one of the most frequently-used in the English language over the past few months. Just imagine, for a moment, that your car suddenly stalls out, or you’re in a fenderbender. The normal routine would be to get on your PDA (I’m assuming we all have them now), and after you’ve called all the people that this event will affect,

you proceed to make phone calls trying to alleviate the actual problem - a broken down automobile. With applications like Twitter, you have the ability to notify all of your followers at once, and actually have them become part of the solution. Finding a garage or towing service would probably take only minutes, if several people are working on the problem. From both a law-enforcement and a commerce point of view, combining this capability with the capacity to track the Twitter universe based on keywords and the PDA’s embedded GPS, the potential applications are unlimited. Think, also, of the potential applications for business. Real-time information relevant to our individual activities is now commonplace. And we’ve probably only touched the tip of the iceberg. Digital drive-bys will soon become common in our digital world. We will need to apply lessons learned from our former

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analog universe. Recently, there’s been some talk of how “social media” came to the “rescue” of Domino’s Pizza. This seems like over-simplification to me. For one thing, quality-control, public relations, and human resource challenges have been around since the beginning of commerce. One isolated incident can cause temporary havoc to a brand. But strong brands generally don’t get blown away by one incident; the degree of damage will ultimately be determined by the strength of the brand itself. If the brand has already established riskmanagement practices like the local franchise owner had, the solution is already in place. And then it becomes only a matter of response content and response time, dissemination and access. One good example of effective brand stewardship, in my opinion, is Best Buy. It’s a big-box brand that’s successfully leveraging the opportunities of access, and incorporating its messages throughout all disciplines. From the

“Blue Shirt Nation” and “The Geek Squad,” through integrated relationships between brick-and-mortar and online sales, this company seems to recognize the importance of developing (and maintaining) a relevant brand.
Through the leadership of CMO Barry Judge, Best Buy’s forward-thinking should be an inspiration to all marketers. My bet is that people like Barry Judge are already anxious for Twitter-like applications to incorporate voicerecognition. Imagine no more conference room meetings, just an ongoing stream of relevant thoughts and ideas with members of your internal tribe. This capacity to continuously be engaged, without dragging everyone out of their offices, presents great opportunities for the future. Part of what we do in this business is re-invent. We take proven products and services and then upgrade them and reposition them, in various ways, back

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into the marketplace. And, in so doing, we help a brand guard itself against becoming stale. So, whatever type of corporate-speak you apply in identifying people engaged in conversation with Best Buy - a tribe, its customer base or its posse or peeps - it makes no difference to me. Whether you start replacing the word “brand” with “culture” or “living brand,” again, matters little to me. The realities of commerce, and its relevance to society, will never change. But, as we’ve seen recently, they will be challenged. And that’s a healthy thing for all of us.

If we do our jobs correctly, we’ll help find ways of keeping people engaged in conversation for decades to come. Our digital world, by default, has now become a non-linear, 24/7/365-accessible world. (See chart) As a result, the

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degrees of access, and the capabilities allowing the exchange of information, are demanding a re-examination of protocols by everyone involved. As an industry, we certainly have plenty to think about. But I believe strongly that the latest tool-sets of commerce are nothing more than the simple evolution of an ongoing matrix. Many important conversations are taking place within our industry…but not, quite yet, to the degree of awareness that will

benefit the communities of commerce. Too many people are too focused on what makes a “Social Media Expert.” How’s this for an answer?...Now, everyone is a “Social Media Expert.” So there goes the business model!

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Chapter 4: Suggested identifiers and their definitions
Re-distributor – Anyone or anything Prank Media Expert – Anyone or Remix engineer – Anyone or thing that anything that uses available media to perthat re-distributes previously published content.

Social Media Expert – Anyone or anything that is considered social.

has a following or more than one other person and is providing non-original content in an original format.

form a prank. Example: An influencer with 12,000 “peeps” has them all flush a toilet simultaneously.

has developed a dedicated “following” of more than a hundred, and has demonstrated an ability to effect action or actions.

Influencer – Any person or thing that

Publisher – Anyone or anything that develops and disseminates original content.

anything that uses the available media to instigate a criminal activity. Example: An influencer with 2000 “peeps” has them create a diversion that allows a “perp” to “get away.”

Crime Media Expert – Anyone or

thing that develops speech-recognition Peep – Anyone or anything that executes software for dogs…and provides them a required action within a conversation access to the media. with any of the above. This allows anyone with a dedicated following the ability to My small attempt at humor! Thanks for refer to them as “My peeps.” listening. And please don’t hesitate to send me your feedback.

Pet Media Expert – Anyone or any-

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Resources
Without these people and their conversations this book would not exist.

Steve Winston,

Winston Communications

Bryan Gordon, BGD Peter Kay, Innovations86 Inc.

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