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EXETER A one-year wage

freeze proposed by the Wyoming


Area School District is a primary
sticking point in contract nega-
tions with its teachers union.
If the two sides cant come to
an agreement, the teachers will
strike on Sept. 3.
Both sides made their cases to
the public at the joint work ses-
sion/regular monthly meeting
Tuesday night at the Wyoming
Secondary Center.
The sides last met on Aug. 13.
Talks broke down when district
ofcials walked out of the session
because the union wouldnt agree
to a one-year wage freeze.
The district represented by
labor lawyer John Dean, district
Solicitor Jarrett Ferentino and
Business Manager Tom Melone
presented a 13-page summary
of the most recent proposals pre-
sented on Aug. 13.
The union said that wasnt a
fair gauge, because several of its
previous plans had more savings.
Youre misleading the pub-
lic by only showing the Aug. 13
proposals, Dolman said. It says
we have not made concessions in
health care and we have.
The district says health care
and salary are linked because
savings in one can be used in the
other.
A complete package was never
accepted, Dean said. What we
save in wages we can pay in health
care. What we save in health care,
we can pay in wages. We cant
pick and choose. Everything is
timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE, PA WEdnESdAy, AuguSt21, 2013 50
6 09815 10011
NEWS
Local 3A
nation & World 4A
Obituaries 5A, 9A
INSIDE
Editorials 11A
Weather 12A
SPORTS: 1B
BUSINESS: 8B
Stocks 8B
TASTE: 1C
Birthdays 3C
television 4C
Movies 4C
Puzzles 5C
CLASSIFIED: 1D
Comics 12d
HARRISBURG UGI-Penn
Natural Gas has agreed to pay $1
million to settle a case regarding
an improperly repaired gas line in
Wilkes-Barre Township that could
have led to a disaster.
Although no serious conse-
quences resulted from this inci-
dent, the potential for serious
consequences to occur was sig-
nicant, according to the 47-page
report dated Aug. 16 and led
on the PUCs website Tuesday.
Therefore, (the Bureau of
Investigations and Enforcement)
submits that UGI-PNG s alleged
conduct is of a serious nature and
was considered in arriving at the
substantial civil penalty in this
settlement.
Though the ndings of fact
and signed agreement was led
with the state Public Utility
Commission, PUC spokeswoman
Jennifer R. Kocher said it is up
to the board to accept, reject or
modify the settlement at a future
meeting this fall.
Whistle blower
Kocher pointed out the inves-
tigation was launched thanks to
a UGI-Penn Natural Gas whistle
blower who reported that improp-
er clamps were used to repair a
leak on a high pressure gas distri-
bution line along Business Route
309 in the vicinity of the Sheetz
gas station last year. The report
found clamps meant to handle
gas mains with a maximum 100
pounds per square inch were used
on pipes with a ow of 320 pounds
per square inch.
The lengthy report details a
series of events related to the
section of 50-year old gas pipe
that included leaks, repairs and a
subsequent investigation that the
PUCs Bureau of Investigations
and Enforcement found to be inad-
equate.
UGI hit with $1 million fne
Improper clamps installed on gas line in
W-B Twp. a potential disaster, report says
ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Trafc on the Veterans Memorial Bridge
switched lanes Tuesday, and trafc will
remain one lane in each direction until sum-
mer of 2014.
According to Mike Taluto, PennDOT
spokesman, trafc over the span crossing
the Susquehanna River connecting Wilkes-
Barre and Kingston was moved to the com-
pleted new deck while work commenced on
the other two lanes of the four-lane bridge.
Taluto said minor delays can be expected
and aggers would be used to control and
direct trafc.
Drivers should pay attention to the ag-
gers and all signs, Taluto said.
The $6 million project is expected to be
completed by mid-2014, he said. The proj-
ect will also include excavation, pavement,
temporary trafc control, concrete median
barrier, cement concrete curb and sidewalk,
pavement markings, removal of portion of
existing bridge, trafc control beneath the
bridge, concrete repair and other miscella-
neous construction.
Fahs Construction Group of Binghamton,
N.Y., is the contractor.
Hazleton project
Meanwhile, in Hazleton the Broad Street
$28 million reconstruction project will con-
tinue to the end of the construction season
and into next spring.
SCRANTON
President Barack Obamas
two-day trek through New
York and Pennsylvania that
ends Friday in Scranton
will promote affordable
education and job growth.
According to a release
issued Tuesday by the
White House, the presi-
dent and Vice President
Joe Biden will deliver
remarks laying out a
plan to make college more
affordable, tackle rising
costs, and improve value
for students and their fami-
lies.
The event, scheduled
for 4:55 p.m. Friday inside
the Lackawanna Student
Union Gymnasium, 500
Vine St., is a continuation
of his Better Bargain
theme he initiated with
stops in Illinois and
Missouri last month.
Im pleased that the
president and vice presi-
dentwill beinNortheastern
Pennsylvania and spe-
cically at Lackawanna
College to discuss the need
to focus on job creation and
economic growth, said
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, who
like Biden is a Scranton
native. Lackawanna
College is a great example
of an institution that gives
graduates the skills they
need to compete for good
paying jobs.
Obamas visit
to focus on
jobs, education
President will be
joined by Vice
President Biden
during Fridays visit
to Scranton
ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Lanes change, but hassle still the same
Ongoing Veterans Memorial Bridge work one of several PennDOT projects
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Pete g. Wilcox | the times Leader
Teachers in the Wyoming Area School District gather outside Wyoming Area High School on Tuesday before the start of the final school board meeting before the new
school year begins next week.
Wage freeze stalls Wyoming Area talks
JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
Six more applicants
submitted resumes
Tuesday to ll Walter
Grifths remaining
Luzerne County control-
ler term through the end
of the year, ending con-
cern that County Council
wont have choices.
Carolee Medico
Olenginski and Karen
Ceppa-Hirko also had
applied, but both said they
are strongly considering
withdrawing their names.
Medico Olenginski has
said she doesnt want to
be accused of receiving
an unfair advantage now
that the Republican Party
has placed her on the bal-
lot in the controllers race
in November. An appoint-
ment to the temporary
seat would provide public
exposure. Ceppa-Hirko
has said she is reconsid-
ering because she did not
receive the ballot nomina-
tion.
The following
Republicans applied by
Tuesdays 4:30 p.m. dead-
line: Michael Caravaggio,
Mountain Top; Aaron
Kaufer, Kingston; Walter
Mitchell, Bear Creek
Village; John Sokolowski,
Plains Township; Peter
Gagliardi, Wilkes-Barre;
and Malcolm Hudgeon,
Wilkes-Barre.
Heres a summary of
the educational and work
experience from resumes
submitted by the six new
applicants:
Caravaggio has an
Several apply for county
controller vacancy
County Council will select
a Republican to fll Walter
Grifths remaining term
JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
ONLINE REPORT
to read the agreement go
to: http://www.puc.pa.gov/
pcdocs/1243297.pdf
Obama
TICKETS
the event is free and
open to the public and
a limited number of
tickets will be available
to the public starting
today from4-7 p.m.
at the Lackawanna
College Angeli Hall Main
Building lobby, 501 Vine
St., Scranton. tickets
will be given on a frst-
come, frst-served basis
and theres a limit of
one ticket per person.
Casey
See FINE | 12A
See OBAMA | 2A
Clark Van Orden | the times Leader
Traffic was switched Tuesday to the newly reconstructed deck of the Veterans
Memorial Bridge. Delays on the span connecting Kingston and Wilkes-Barre can be
expected to last a while longer.
See CONTROLLER | 12A
Summer been
bugging you?
you are not alone. NATION & WORLD, 4A
BUSINESS, 8B
Reinventing the
DVR? TiVo wants to
See BRIDGE | 12A
See TALKS | 12A
NEW YORK Al-Jazeera
America signed on with a brisk
hello from anchor Tony Harris
before he got down to business
with his networks rst stories:
continued turmoil in Egypt,
shots red at an Atlanta elemen-
tary school and more wildres
in the West.
With that, the network
entered the cable-news fray long
dominated by CNN, MSNBC
and Fox News Channel.
The Qatar-based Al-Jazeera
Media Network launched its
U.S. outlet only eight months
after announcing the new ven-
ture, which on Tuesday replaced
Al Gores Current TV in more
than 45 million TV homes.
An hour before settling into
its regular schedule at 4 p.m.
Eastern time, the network aired
a preview of its programming
and goals. We are here to tell
the story the way it happens,
as it happens, said anchor
Antonio Mora as the preview
began.
At the same time, the
Al-Jazeera English network was
suspended. It had been available
since 2006 online and in a smat-
tering of cable systems.
Headquartered in New York,
Al-Jazeera America has vowed
to provide unbiased, in-depth
domestic and global news.
The network hired a number
of veterans of U.S. television,
including Harris, an alumnus
of CNN, and Mora, previously
at ABC News. Other familiar
faces include Sheila MacVicar,
Soledad OBrien, Joie Chen and
John Seigenthaler.
Scheduled programs include
a nightly newscast anchored by
Seigenthaler; Consider This,
a current-affairs hour hosted
by Mora; America Tonight,
a newsmagazine described as
the networks agship telecast
anchored by Chen; and Real
Money with Ali Velshi.
Besides New York, domes-
tic bureaus are located in
Washington, Los Angeles, San
Francisco, Dallas, Detroit,
Chicago, Denver, Miami,
Seattle, Nashville, Tenn., and
New Orleans.
The new network will also
draw from the 70 bureaus par-
ent Al-Jazeera operates globally.
Al-Jazeera Media claimed
an instant U.S. foothold with
its $500 million purchase of
Current TV and the cable distri-
bution of that little-watched net-
work. Al-Jazeera America is also
available from satellite provid-
ers DirecTV and Dish Network.
Thanks to the deep pockets of
its parent, the newnetwork com-
mands considerable resources
with no urgent need to turn a
prot, as evidenced by a stated
policy to air only six minutes
of commercials each hour, less
than half the usual time devoted
to advertising by most commer-
cial networks.
The channel also has challeng-
es ahead. It will have to win over
viewers to the serious news-
casting it promises to deliver,
as well as overcome suspicion
some Americans might feel for
a news organization controlled
by a foreign government or even
see as anti-American.
PAGE 2A Wednesday, August 21, 2013 NEWS THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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OBITUARIES
Brudnicki, June
Ewonishon, Andrew
Farris, Loretta
Grabko, Dolores
Holtz, Robert Jr.
Keib, George Jr.
Lauck, Marie
Lispi, Brenda
Makuch, Catherine
Olshefski, Edwin
Schmidt, Cecelia
Wardell, Florence
Wiedlich, Terrance
Zimnicky, John
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MIKE HOUSEHOLDER
Associated Press
DETROITHe was the mas-
ter of his genre, the Dickens of
Detroit, the Chaucer of Crime.
Pretty much every novel
Elmore Leonard wrote from
the mid-1980s on was a best-
seller, and every fan of crime
stories knew his name. George
Clooney was an admirer. So
were Quentin Tarantino, Saul
Bellow and Stephen King and
millions of ordinary readers.
Leonard, who died Tuesday
at age 87, helped achieve for
crime writing what King did
for horror and Ray Bradbury
for science ction. He made it
hip, and he made it respectable.
When the public ocked to
watch John Travolta in the
movie version of Get Shorty
in 1995, its author became the
darling of Hollywoods hottest
young directors. Book critics
and literary stars, prone to dis-
missing crime novels as light
entertainment, competed for
adjectives to praise him. Last
fall, he became the rst crime
writer to receive an honorary
National Book Award, a prize
given in the past to Philip Roth,
Norman Mailer and Arthur
Miller.
Few writers so memorably
traveled the low road. His more
than 40 novels were peopled by
pathetic schemers, clever con-
men and casual killers. Each
was characterized by moral
ambivalence about crime, black
humor and wickedly acute
depictions of human nature:
the greedy dreams of Armand
Degas in Killshot, the wise-
cracking cool of Chili Palmer
in Get Shorty, Jack Belmonts
lust for notoriety in The Hot
Kid.
Leonards novels and short
stories were turned into dozens
of feature lms, TV movies and
series, including the current FX
show Justied, which stars
Timothy Olyphant as one of
Leonards signature characters,
the cool-under-pressure U.S.
marshal Raylan Givens.
Critics loved Leonards aw-
lessly unadorned, colloquial
style, as well as how real his
characters sounded when they
spoke.
People always say, Where
do you get (your characters)
words? And I say, Cant you
remember people talking or
think up people talking in your
head? Thats all it is. I dont
know why that seems such a
wonder to people, he told The
Associated Press last year.
Leonard spent much of his
childhood in Detroit and set
many of his novels in the city.
Others were set in Miami near
his North Palm Beach, Fla.,
vacation home.
He died at his home in the
Detroit suburb of Bloomeld
Township, where he did much
of his writing, from complica-
tions of a stroke he suffered a
few weeks ago, according to his
researcher, Gregg Sutter.
Crime novelist James Lee
Burke said Leonard was a
gentleman of the old school
whose stylistic techniques and
experimentation with point of
view and narrative voice had
an enormous inuence on hun-
dreds of publishing writers.
Leonards work contained
moral and political themes
without being didactic, Burke
said. And he was able to write
social satire disguised as a
crime novel, or he could write a
crime novel disguised as social
satire.
Leonard didnt have a best-
seller until he was 60, and
few critics took him seriously
before the 1990s. Now the
Library of America, which
publishes hardcover editions
of classic American writing, is
planning a three-volume set of
his work.
He had some minor success-
es in the 1950s and 60s writ-
ing Western stories and novels,
a couple of which were made
into movies. But when inter-
est in the Western dried up, he
turned to writing scripts for
educational and industrial lms
while trying his hand at anoth-
er genre: crime novels.
The rst, The Big Bounce,
was rejected many times before
it was published as a paperback
in 1969. Hollywood came call-
ing again, paying $50,000 for
the rights and turning it into
a movie starring Ryan ONeal
that even Leonard called ter-
rible.
He followed up with several
more fast-paced crime nov-
els, including Swag (1976).
Leonard was already following
the advice he would later give
to young writers: Try to leave
out the parts that people skip.
In 1978, he was commis-
sioned to write an article about
the Detroit Police Department
and shadowed police of-
cers for nearly three months.
Starting with City Primeval
in 1980, his crime novels
gained a new authenticity, with
quirky but believable characters
and crisp, slangy dialogue. But
sales remained light.
Donald I. Fine, an editor at
Arbor House, thought they
deserved better and promised
to put the muscle of his public-
ity department behind them.
He delivered: In 1985, Glitz,
a stylish novel of vengeance
set in Atlantic City, became
Leonards rst best-seller.
Hollywood rediscovered him,
churning out a succession of
bad movies, including 52 Pick-
up starring Roy Scheider.
It took Barry Sonnenfeld to
nally show Hollywood how
to turn a Leonard novel into a
really good movie. Get Shorty
was the rst to feel and sound
like a true Leonard story.
Then Quentin Tarantino took
a turn with Rum Punch, turn-
ing it into Jackie Brown, a
campy lm starring Pam Grier.
But Steven Soderbergh stayed
faithful to Leonards story and
dialogue with Out of Sight.
AP file photo
Author Elmore Leonard smiles during a 2012 interviewat his home in Bloomfield
Township, Mich. Leonard died at 87 on Tuesday.
Best-selling author Elmore Leonard dies at 87
Detroit native known for
his crime novels received
an honorary National
Book Award last year
The Qatar-based network vows to provide unbiased, in-depth domestic and global news
Al-Jazeera America enters cable-news lineup
FRAZIER MOORE
APTelevision Writer
COURT BRIEFS
WILKES-BARRE A Luzerne
County judge has denied the request
of a Philadelphia man who asked that
charges against him be dismissed or
he be given a new trial in the robbery
of a Plymouth Township strip club.
Judge Michael Vough on Tuesday
denied the request by Kevin
Williams, 31, who was sentenced
on July 8 to 10 to 20 years in prison
after being convicted by a Luzerne
County jury in May of several related
charges.
Williams claimed in a ling
Monday he should be given a new
trial or charges should be dismissed
because of inconsistent and contra-
dictory testimony during his trial.
Vough said in a one-page order
that Williams had 10 days from the
time he was sentenced to make any
post-sentence requests and he did so
beyond the 10-day period.
Also on Tuesday, Vough scheduled
the trial for Williams co-defendant,
William Gronosky, on related and
unrelated charges to begin Sept. 3 at
10:15 a.m.
LEONARD ONTHE SILVER SCREEN
While Elmore Leonard is best known as an award-winning writer,
some people might be more familiar with himthanks to the movies
based on his books.
Here is a list of some of the more successful ones:
Out of Sight (1998)
Get Shorty (1995)
3:10 to Yuma (1957/2007)
Jackie Brown (1997 based on the bookRumPunch)
Freaky Deaky (2012)
HAZLETON A male
juvenile from Hazleton
reported at noon on Sunday
he was stabbed by an
unknown person in the south-
central part of Hazleton.
He was subsequently treat-
ed for a wound that was not
life-threatening. Anyone with
information should call police
at 459-4940 or via 911.
WILKES-BARRE A
male juvenile was truck by a
car while crossing the street
Tuesday night.
Police said Jennifer
Gabriel, of Forty Fort, told
them she was driving north
near 829 S. Franklin St. at
about 8:15 p.m. when the boy
suddenly entered the road-
way and she was unable to
avoid striking him with her
vehicle.
Wilkes-Barre Medic 3 trans-
ported the boy to Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center in Plains Township.
Police said the investigation is
ongoing and no further infor-
mation was available.
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Frances Faciana reported
at 1:19 p.m. Monday that
someone stole her purse
from inside her vehicle while
it was parked in the park-
ing lot of Comfort Keepers,
224 Wilkes-Barre Township
Boulevard.
Estimated value of the
theft is $74.
POLICE BLOTTER
ANAUG. 14 ARTICLE that
appeared on Page 6Aabout
organ builder Mark Pall should
have said he attends Dallas
High School.
ANARTICLE on Page 1C
in Tuesdays edition about
Tara Pisano of Shavertown
should have explained that
her husband, Christopher
Pisano, will still receive partial
pay while he takes time of
during her medical treatments.
The family is grateful to his
employer, Wilkes-Barre Clay
Products, for understanding his
need to take time of.
Newsroom
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CORRECTIONS
AP photo
Ehab Al Shihabi, second from right, interim CEO for Al-Jazeera America, ges-
tures as he chats with newsroom staff after the networks first broadcast on
Tuesday.
Lackawanna College President
Mark Volk said the appearance
is one he and others are looking
forward to. He added that using
Lackawanna College as a focal
point on the national talk about
the ties between education and
the economy is a valid example.
President Obama has spoken
on many occasions about the
increased importance of two-
year colleges in meeting our
countrys needs for the future.
And, we know that the cost of
education is of critical interest to
the president and to us all. As an
exceptionally cost-effective col-
lege with high quality programs
and a proven track record of suc-
cess, Lackawanna represents the
New American Model for Higher
Education, Volk said.
The joint appearance, as far as
Casey can recall, is the rst one
for the pair in Pennsylvania since
they were elected.
This is quite the rare event,
Casey, a Democrat, said. Most
communities dont get this kind
of opportunity.
Casey said he received a call
about two weeks ago fromBiden,
who said the president was going
to be traveling through NewYork
and Northeastern Pennsylvania
and was looking for a venue in
this region that was a commu-
nity college in an urban setting.
Casey suggested Lackawanna
College.
Obama will start his four-
city speaking tour Thursday
when he will deliver remarks
at the University at Buffalo and
then Henninger High School in
Syracuse, N.Y. On Friday, the
president will participate in a
town hall event at Binghamton
University before heading south
to Scranton. Biden is not expect-
ed to join Obama at any of the
New York stops.
The Scranton stop will take
place in the Lackawanna Student
Union Gymnasium, which Casey
said he reminded Biden was the
Catholic Youth Center when
Biden was a boy.
Casey will be at the event,
though its unclear if hell have a
speaking role. He said he hopes
the president makes a clear cor-
relation between the importance
of an education and employment.
Its not just a talking point or
a speech, Casey said. Its essen-
tial for job growth and economy
strength.
From page 1A
Obama
KINGSTON Wyoming
Valley West School District
teacher union President Linda
Houck said Tuesday she is in
the process of ling labor griev-
ances over changes in elemen-
tary music education which
she has been teaching and
elimination of a middle school
librarian position.
Houck said that, while she
felt the cuts would hurt stu-
dents, the grievances were
based on timing, and not on the
cuts themselves. Any changes
had to be announced by the
end of April under both state
law and the union contract, she
said, but that deadline was not
met.
They called me yesterday
(Monday) and told me they
have decided to eliminate my
full-time elementary position,
Houck said.
Houck said the middle
school librarian decision was
almost as abrupt, contending
the School Board did men-
tion plans to eliminate the
post at the end of June, but
then agreed to reconsider
after the union raised several
issues. Yet the librarian, Joann
Prushinski, didnt learn the
results of that reconsideration
until last week, Houck said.
The board voted in
December on the elemen-
tary school music program.
Critics contended the vote
was to eliminate elementary
music classes, but the board,
and Superintendent Charles
Suppon, repeatedly insisted
the vote was only to study
potential changes.
But Houck said the changes
she was told about were dra-
matic. She has been teach-
ing about 35 hours of music
lessons in ve elementary
schools, with a high school
teacher chipping in another
four or ve hours. Under the
new proposal, Houck said, she
would be switched to full-time
music teacher at the middle
school a job made avail-
able by the retirement of her
husband, also a music teacher
and three other teachers
would cover elementary school
lessons.
Houck said her understand-
ing is that lessons would be
reduced to about 12 hours
a week total among the ve
schools. There is no way they
can cover the things I covered.
The librarian issue began
with the retirement of an
elementary school librarian
earlier this year. Houck said
the district has four: two at the
recently enlarged State Street
Elementary, one full-time at
Dana Street Elementary, and a
fourth splitting time among the
other three schools.
The board posted to rell
the position, but apparently
changed its mind, announc-
ing at the end of June that
Prushinski would take on the
duties. Houck said she pointed
out the need of a librarian at
the large middle school and
highlighted studies that show
students in schools with certi-
ed librarians score better in
standardized tests, and the
board agreed to reconsider.
Both changes are going to
be grieved, Houck said. The
idea is that we dont y by the
seat of our pants, and that par-
ents know what to expect.
Board President Gordon
Dussinger said the changes
were strictly a response to
a tight budget, and that the
delay in making nal decisions
stemmed fromthe rapidly shift-
ing landscape.
Sometimes you expect
things to happen and they
dont, and school is about to
open and other factors come
in, Dussinger said, conceding
Houck may have grounds for
ling a grievance. Sometimes
you say We just have to let
them grieve it and go to an
arbitrator, someone whos neu-
tral, to hear both sides.
Dussinger stressed no teach-
ers were furloughed and no pro-
grams cut, adding that an aide
likely will be appointed to help
at the middle school library.
Were trying to do the best
we can in a situation without
really hurting any programs,
he said. Were trying to keep
everything going. I think the
teachers deserve a lot of cred-
it. They step in and help plug
holes.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 3A
WILKES-BARRE
6th District GOP
committee to meet
The 6th District Republican
Committee will meet Tuesday at 7
p.m. at Norms Pizza & Eatery, 275 N.
Sherman St.
Pat Umbra is the Executive Secretary
of the committee.
SCRANTON
Violence prevention
event set for today
Volunteers from Organizing for
Action-PA will host a gun violence pre-
vention event at Scrantons Courthouse
Square at 1 p.m. today.
The group, a non-prot spin-off of
President Barack Obamas re-election
campaign, said in a release the event
is designed to tell Congress that they
wont stop ghting to protect our chil-
dren and protect our communities and
wont let leaders in Washington forget
that they can act to make our communi-
ties safer.
Volunteers will gather on the North
Washington Avenue side of the square.
WILKES-BARRE
Attorneys fle mental
infrmity defense
As promised, attorneys representing
a Forty Fort woman charged in connec-
tion with a fatal hit-and-run in 2008 have
led court papers notifying the court
and prosecutors that they will be using a
mental inrmity defense.
Megan Panowicz, 28, is charged
in the August 2008 death of Sharon
Shaughnessy, whowas killedonWyoming
Avenue in Kingston when she was report-
edly struck by three vehicles. Panowicz is
scheduled to be tried Sept. 23.
Panowiczs attorneys, her father,
Robert Panowicz, and Basil Russin, said
in a ling Tuesday that Megan Panowicz
suffers from post traumatic stress dis-
order caused by the accident that killed
Shaughnessy.
The events which caused her to have
post traumatic stress rendered her inca-
pable of appreciating the signicance or
consequences of her behavior and affect-
ed her ability to determine what was
right or wrong at that crucial moment,
the attorneys wrote.
Panowicz has a longstanding disor-
der that causes her to avoid stressful sit-
uations by attempting to over self con-
trol. The attorneys said they intend on
calling two doctors as well as Panowicz
and her mother, Cheryl Panowicz, to
prove the inrmity defense.
Prosecutors will have a chance to
respond to the ling. A hearing will then
be scheduled.
OLD FORGE
Major trafc
delays expected
Major trafc delays are expected in
the area around the Main Street Bridge
in Old Forge and a route leading to it
from Interstate 81 today and Thursday.
The Pennsylvania Department of
Transportation announced that each day
crews will deliver four beams for the new
Main Street Bridge, taking Davis Street
Exit 182 from Interstate 81 to Union
Street, and then taking Keyser Avenue
to Drakes Lane, where they will meet up
with Main Street and back down to the
bridge.
The rst beam is expected to arrive st
after noon. Motorists are advised to take
alternate routes when possible.
NOXEN
Intertribal Powwow
spots are available
Spots are available for vendors, volun-
teers and drummers at the ninth annual
Intertribal Powwow on Sept. 28 and 29
on the Noxen Fire Co. grounds at 3493
Stull Road in Noxen, Wyoming County.
Gates open at 10 a.m. and close at 6
p.m. both days. The event is a gather-
ing of all Nations, with a Grand Entry
of dignitaries and dancers in full regalia
at noon. The event is open to the public
with no admission fee.
Meals will be provided for all dancers
and vendors. There will be a chili cook-
ing contest Friday night with a cash prize
to be determined by votes at $1 per plate.
Saturday will be pot luck, so bring a dish
to share. Sunday breakfast and dinner
will be provided, but participants should
bring their own place settings.
Camping is free, but there will be a
$7-per-day charge for electricity. Anyone
interested in volunteering or being a
vendor or a drummer should call Natalie
Wisteria at 570-947-2097 or email wiste-
ria18704@yahoo.com for more informa-
tion.
WVWcuts spawn labor grievances
Teachers union president says timing
of the cuts prompted the action
MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Kingston
police 3
digits, not
7, away
KINGSTON This
municipality ended its
emergency dispatching
services in August 2010,
but that has not stopped
some residents from mis-
takenly calling the police
department seeking aid
rather than the county-
operated 911 system.
Sgt. Michael Krzywicki
urges residents of the
West Side community who
encounter an emergency to
call Luzerne County 911.
The police department
receives six or more direct
calls a day for a variety of
emergencies, he estimated,
with some callers leaving
the information on voice
mail.
Some of the calls are
for service, and when they
directly call our depart-
ment, there is a three-
to-four-minute delay in
response, Krzywicki said.
Residents need to call
911, which dispatches our
department and re.
For example, said
Krzywicki, one woman
recently called the depart-
ment and left a voice mail
message about a suspicious
person riding a bicycle and
trying to open car doors.
By the time police received
the message, the bandit
bicyclist was long gone.
If the woman had called
911 directly, he said, an
ofcer would have imme-
diately been dispatched
to the street, signicantly
increasing the odds the
culprit would have been
captured.
Also, due to a recent rash
of car break-ins, Krzywicki
urged residents to remove
valuable items from their
vehicles and to lock them.
Kingston was the last
municipality in Luzerne
County to have its own
emergency dispatching
services, which ended
nearly three years ago
when Luzerne County 911
took over on Sept. 1, 2010.
The demand for state-
mandated training and
technical standards,
including having two cer-
tied dispatchers on-duty
at all times, prompted
Kingston to turn over dis-
patching to the county.
Department reminds
residents to call 911
when reporting trouble,
seeking help
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Dr. David Cooper brought plane down safely despite failure of electrical system, landing gear
WILKES-BARRE Dr. David Cooper
said he wasnt scared at all, even though the
plane he was piloting had lost power and
he had to make an emergency landing with
its landing gear unable to lock last week.
It was like being up there all alone
like (Charles) Lindbergh, Cooper said
Tuesday. I just had to get it on the ground
without bumping into another airplane.
Cooper made the emergency landing
at Harrisburg International Airport in
Middletown late Thursday afternoon. He
was traveling alone.
Cooper, an orthopedic surgeon who
owns The Knee Center on Kidder Street,
was on his way to Hershey, where he had
scheduled surgeries on Friday appoint-
ments he kept despite the harrowing expe-
rience.
For most of the 25-minute ight from
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International
Airport to Harrisburg, Cooper said it was
uneventful. He was at about 8,000 feet and
had just received clearance to go to 6,000
feet for his approach into Harrisburg
about 10 minutes away.
After that, things started to go bad real
quickly, he said.
His single, jet-engine Beech Bonanza
converted from a piston-driven engine
began to oscillate and the electrical system
began to shut down. In a matter of minutes,
Cooper said, the plane, valued at $750,000
and one of only 40 in the world, was with-
out electrical power.
He said the jet engine never lost power,
but he was ying an aircraft with no com-
munication that was undetectable on radar.
The airport couldnt track him and other
planes in the air would not know he was
there.
Cooper used a hand-held radio to notify
the airport he was going to make an emer-
gency landing. He used a hand-held GPS
device to help get him to the airport. He
also was able to use the towers at Three
Mile Island, located adjacent to the airport,
to guide him.
Cooper said he was able to keep the
plane level as he manually cranked the land-
ing gear down. However, he was unable to
know if the gear locked in place. When he
hit the runway, the landing gear collapsed
because it wasnt locked.
I felt the best thing was to get the plane
on the ground, he said. I had a normal
approach and the airport had the re
engines out in case of a problem.
Cooper said the landing went well,
despite being unable to use aps to slow
the plane. He said the plane veered slightly
off the runway and sparks caused a small
grass re.
I came in at a higher speed than nor-
mal, he said. I was uninjured, but the
plane sustained between $100,00 and
$200,000 worth of damage.
Cooper said sheet metal was damaged,
but the largest expense will be in tear-
ing down the engine. He said the Federal
Aviation Administration will investigate to
determine what caused the electrical sys-
tem to quit.
The 25-year licensed pilot said it will
take four months to repair the aircraft at
Seamans Airport in Factoryville.
Cooper said he ies all over the U.S. and
cant wait to get back into the air.
Pilots, like surgeons, solve problems,
he said. In this case, you accept your fate
and make the most of it.
What will Cooper take away from this
experience? He said he was concerned
about encountering another aircraft.
Well, you learn how you react in an
emergency, he said. Its interesting; I
didnt panic and I had no fear just deter-
mination. I was condent I was going to
get the plane and myself on the ground
safely.
Amanda Hrycyna | For The Times Leader
Applebees waitresses Ariel Swartz and Sharell Mccollum fill up glasses with lemonade to give out to fellow employees Tuesday as part of the
National Lemonade Toast, celebrating the partnership between Applebees and Alexs Lemonade Stand Foundation launched in 2005. The Rose
Group, which operates 58 Applebees restaurants in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, has raised more than $260,000 since it
began participating in the event in 2005.
Local surgeon makes emergency landing in Harrisburg
BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Dr. David Cooper talks about having to make an emergency landing last week in the Harrisburg area
while piloting his private plane.
IN BRIEF
LOCAL
Atoast: To lemonade and a good cause
PAGE 4A Wednesday, August 21, 2013 NATION & WORLD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
CAIRO Egypts military-
backed authorities arrested the
supreme leader of the coun-
trys Muslim Brotherhood on
Tuesday, dealing a serious blow
to the Islamist group at a time
when it is struggling to keep up
street protests against the oust-
er of President Mohammed
Morsi in the face of a harsh gov-
ernment crackdown.
The Brotherhoods spiri-
tual guide, Mohammed Badie,
was arrested in an apartment
in the Cairo district of Nasr
City, close to the site of a sit-in
encampment that was forcibly
cleared by security forces last
week, triggering violence that
killed hundreds of people.
Badies arrest is the latest
move in an escalating crack-
down by authorities on the
Brotherhood, which has seen
hundreds of its members taken
into custody.
The groups near-daily pro-
tests since Morsis ouster have
diminished in recent days, with
scattered demonstrations in
Cairo and elsewhere attracting
mere hundreds, or even doz-
ens, of protesters. On Tuesday,
several hundred Morsi support-
ers staged protests in Helwan,
an industrial suburb north of
Cairo, and in Ein Shams, a resi-
dential district on the opposite
end of the city, shortly before
the nighttime curfew went into
effect at 7.
Morsi has been detained in
an undisclosed location since
the July 3 coup that ousted
him, after protests by millions
of Egyptians against his rule.
He is facing accusations of
conspiring with the militant
Palestinian Hamas group to
escape from prison during the
2011 uprising and complicity
in the killing and torture of pro-
testers outside his Cairo palace
in December.
Badies last public appear-
ance was at the Nasr City pro-
test encampment last month,
when he delivered a ery
speech from a makeshift stage
in which he denounced the mil-
itarys removal of Morsi. His
arrest followed the killing of
his son Ammar, who was shot
dead during violent clashes
between security forces and
Morsi supporters in Cairo on
Friday.
Badie and his powerful dep-
uty, Khairat el-Shater, are to be
tried later this month on charg-
es of complicity in the killing
in June of eight protesters out-
side the Brotherhoods national
headquarters in Cairo.
Badie was taken to Torah
prison in a suburb south of
Cairo, where a team of pros-
ecutors was questioning him,
security ofcials said, speak-
ing on condition of anonymity
because they were not autho-
rized to talk to the media.
Torah is the same sprawling
complex where ex-president
Hosni Mubarak, ousted in the
2011 popular uprising, is being
held, along with his two sons.
Several Mubarak-era gures
are also imprisoned there, as
are several Brotherhood lead-
ers and other Islamists.
Meanwhile, the Brotherhood
released the text of Badies
weekly message to the groups
followers. Quoting heavily from
the Quran, he warned that any-
one who supports the current
oppression, suppression and
bloodshed including Arab
and foreign governments
will soon regret their stand.
FORT HOOD, Texas
Hasan to mount
defense, maybe
Military prosecutors rested their case
Tuesday against the Army psychiatrist
accused of killing 13 people during the
2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood.
After calling nearly 90 witnesses in 11
days, prosecutors said they had complet-
ed their case during Maj. Nidal Hasans
trial. Hasan also is accused of wounding
more than 30 people at the Texas Army
post during the attack, which was the
worst mass shooting ever on a U.S. mili-
tary base.
The judge adjourned the hearing after
prosecutors rested, meaning Hasan
could begin his defense today but
whether he will seize the opportunity
remains to be seen. Hasan is acting as
his own defense attorney.
RaWaLPINDI, PakIsTaN
Ex-leader pleads
not guilty of murder
In an unprecedented ruling that tests
the militarys aura of inviolability, a court
indicted former president and army chief
Pervez Musharraf Tuesday on murder
charges stemming from the 2007 assas-
sination of ex-Prime Minister Benazir
Bhutto.
Musharraf, who became a key U.S. ally
in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror
attacks, pleaded not guilty.
Thedecisionbythecourt inRawalpindi
marked the rst time a current or former
army chief in Pakistan has been charged
with a crime.
Musharraf, a 70-year-old former com-
mando who took power in a 1999 coup
and stepped down fromofce in disgrace
nearly a decade later, now faces a string
of legal problems that in many ways chal-
lenge the militarys sacrosanct status in
Pakistani society.
MIDDLeTOWNTWP., N.J.
Blast injures 8
at naval base
An explosion during boat maintenance
at a New Jersey Naval base injured eight
sailors and civilian employees Tuesday
morning, one of them seriously.
The blast happened at the Earle Naval
Weapons Station in Middletown at
around 9 a.m. and was conned to a boat-
house where the routine maintenance
was being done, Navy spokeswoman
Beth Baker said. She did not have details
on the nature of the work that was being
conducted.
One sailor was hospitalized with seri-
ous injuries. Seven other sailors and civil-
ian employees sustained minor injuries.
CaPe CaNaVeRaL, FLa.
Spacewalker details
panicked moments
The Italian astronaut who nearly
drowned in his helmet during a space-
walk last month is sharing more details
about the terrifying experience, reveal-
ing how he felt all alone and frantically
tried to come up with a plan to save him-
self.
Luca Parmitano wrote in his online
blog, posted Tuesday, that he could no
longer see as the water sloshed around
in his helmet outside the International
Space Station.
But worse than that, the water covers
my nose a really awful sensation that I
make worse by my vain attempts to move
the water by shaking my head, the for-
mer test pilot wrote. By now, the upper
part of the helmet is full of water and I
cant even be sure that the next time I
breathe I will ll my lungs with air and
not liquid.
Parmitano, 36, a major in the Italian
Air Force, was making only his second
spacewalk.
AP photo
Mohammed Badie, the supreme leader of the MuslimBrotherhood, is seen
Tuesday after being detained by Egyptian security in Cairo.
AP photo
A Franklin covered is a Franklin preserved
Workmen wrap a statue of Benjamin Franklin
in protective covering Tuesday in preparation
for upcoming construction at the The Frank-
lin Institute in Philadelphia. The museum
plans to adjoin the memorial to the new
Nicholas and Athena Karabots Pavilion. The
Karabots donated $10 million to the institute
to fund expansion for education, conference
and exhibition space.
Egypt questions Brotherhoods top leader in prison
Arrest of Mohammed Badie just latest move
in crackdown by authorities on group
HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press
Blood pressure
falls with easier
access to care
CHICAGO New research
suggests giving patients easier-
to-take medicine and no-copay
medical visits can help drive
down high blood pressure,
a major contributor to poor
health and untimely deaths
nationwide.
Those efforts were part of a
big health care providers eight-
year program, involving more
than 300,000 patients with
high blood pressure. At the
beginning, less than half had
brought their blood pressure
under control. That increased
to a remarkable 80 percent, well
above the national average, the
researchers said.
The research involved Kaiser
Permanente in Northern
California, a network of 21 hos-
pitals and 73 doctors ofces,
which makes coordinating
treatment easier than in inde-
pendent physicians ofces.
The number of heart attacks
and strokes among Northern
California members fell sub-
stantially during roughly the
same time as the 2001-09 study.
Dr. Marc Jaffe, the lead author
and leader of a Kaiser heart dis-
ease risk reduction program,
said its impossible to know if
the blood pressure program can
be credited for those declines,
but he thinks it at least contrib-
uted.
Reductions continued even
after the study ended; in 2011,
87 percent of roughly 350,000
Kaiser patients had recom-
mended blood pressure levels.
The study was published
Tuesday in the Journal of the
American Medical Association.
Whats unique about this is
the sheer scale of what theyve
done, said Dr. Goutham Rao,
a family medicine special-
ist at NorthShore University
HealthSystem, a group of four
hospitals in Chicagos north-
ern suburbs. Rao is involved in
research on reducing obesity
and other risks for heart dis-
ease.
If we were able to keep every-
ones blood pressure under
control in the United States,
the number of new strokes and
heart attacks would go down
just exponentially, he said.
High blood pressure affects
1 in 3 U.S. adults, or 67 mil-
lion people, and the condi-
tion caused or contributed to
more than 348,000 deaths in
2009, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention.
Normal blood pressure is con-
sidered a reading of less than
120 over 80; high blood pres-
sure is 140 over 90 or higher.
High blood pressure typically
causes no symptoms, at least
initially, and can sometimes be
managed with a healthy life-
style, including physical activ-
ity plus avoiding salty foods,
heavy drinking and excess
weight. But two or more pre-
scription drugs are often need-
ed to bring high blood pressure
under control.
Patients improved when copays
dropped, meds are made
accessible, Calif. researchers fnd
LINDSEYTANNER
AP Medical Writer
No one was injured and all students and teachers were accounted for and safe, authorities said.
DECATUR A suspect was in cus-
tody after gunre at an Atlanta-area
elementary school where dramatic televi-
sion footage showed young students rac-
ing out of the building, being escorted by
teachers and police. No one was injured
and all students and teachers were
accounted for and safe, authorities said.
Television footage showed stu-
dents being evacuated from Ronald E.
McNair Discovery Learning Academy in
Decatur, a few miles east of Atlanta, and
sitting outside in a eld about 1:30 p.m.
School buses were taking them to their
waiting parents and relatives at a nearby
Walmart.
According to WSB-TVs website, a
woman in the school ofce called to say a
gunman asked her to contact the Atlanta
station and police. WSB said that during
the call, shots were heard in the back-
ground.
Numerous police are at the school and
SWAT was there for a time. The suspect
is a man in his mid-20s and didnt have
an obvious connection to the school,
DeKalb County schools Superintendent
Michael Thurmond told The Associated
Press.
WSB-TV assignment editor Lacey
Lecroy said she spoke with the woman
in the schools front ofce who said she
was alone with the suspect and the mans
gun was visible.
It didnt take long to know that this
woman was serious, Lecroy said. Shots
were one of the last things I heard. I was
so worried for her.
Jonessia White, the mother of a kin-
dergartner at the school, told AP she
talked to her sons teacher shortly after
most students were evacuated. White
said the teacher told her they were still
inside the building shortly after 2 p.m.
When I hear hes safely out of the
building, Ill be OK, White said, add-
ing she learned of the shooting when a
friend called to say helicopters were hov-
ering over the school.
DeKalb County Police Department
spokeswoman Mekka Parish said, Were
just trying to calmthe nerves of parents.
Police had strung yellowtape up block-
ing intersections near the school while
children waited to be taken to Walmart,
where hundreds of people were waiting.
Regional superintendent Rachel
Zeigler used a megaphone to say chil-
dren would be loaded onto buses by
grade level and that each bus would also
be carrying an administrator, a teacher
and a Georgia Bureau of Investigation
ofcer.
AP photo
Nicole Webb cries while waiting to be reunited with her 9-year-old son, a student at Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy in Decatur, Ga.,
after a gunman was reported on the property.
Gunman in custody after Ga. school evacuated
BILL BARROW
Associated Press
Summer has been buggier than normal
WASHINGTON The
tiny mosquito all too often has
man on the run. And this sum-
mer, it seems even worse than
usual.
You cant get from the car
to inside our house without
getting attacked, its that bad,
high school teacher Ryan
Miller said from his home in
Arlington, Va. Minutes earlier,
he saw a mosquito circling
his 4-month-old daughter
indoors.
Experts say its been a bug-
gier-than-normal summer in
many places around the U.S.
because of a combination of
drought, heavy rain and heat.
It may be worst in the
Southeast, which is getting hit
with three years worth of bugs
in one summer, said Jonathan
Day, who studies insects at the
University of Florida.
Two years of drought were
followed by incredibly heavy
rain this year. During dry
spells, mosquito eggs often
didnt get wet enough to
hatch. This years rain revived
those, along with the normal
2013 batch.
In parts of Connecticut this
summer, mosquito traps had
double the usual number of
bugs. Minnesota traps in July
had about triple the 10-year
average. And in central
California, traps had ve times
as many of one key species as
the recent average.
Humans have been bat-
tling the blood-drinking bugs
for thousands of years, and
despite mans huge advantages
in technology and size, people
are not getting the upper hand.
Just lots of bites on the hand.
We have to keep ghting
just to hold our own, said
Tom Wilmot, past president
of the Mosquito Control
Association and a Michigan
mosquito control district
chief. And in some places, he
said, the mosquitoes are win-
ning.
In southwestern Florida
around Fort Myers, Lee
County mosquito control
was getting more than 300
calls per day from residents
at times this summer, a much
higher count than usual. But
the more impressive tally was
the number of bugs landing
on inspectors unprotected
legs: more than 100 a minute
in some hotspots, said deputy
director Shelly Radovan.
SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
AP photo
Afemale yellowfever mosquito probes a piece of Limburger cheese, one
of few known mosquito attractants. Despite our size and technological
advantages, humans still cant seem to win our ancient blood battle
with the pesky and lethal mosquito.
IN BRIEF
DENVER Want to be
in the legal pot industry
in Colorado? Open your
checkbook.
Colorados pot regula-
tors opened three days
of hearings Tuesday to
lay out licensing specics
before retail sales begin in
January.
The proposed rules
require would-be ganjapre-
neurs to pay up to $5,000
just to apply to be in the
recreational pot business.
Operational licenses cost
another $2,750 to $14,000.
Successful applicants
must also pass a gauntlet
of criminal background
checks and residency
requirements.
The result is expected
to be an industry that will
have as much red tape as
green leaves. Colorado
is trying to show it can
strictly regulate and con-
trol a drug that has been
operating in the shadows
for decades, despite the
advent of medical marijua-
na more than a decade ago.
Ofcials say steep appli-
cation fees are needed to
properly screen marijuana
workers, checking nger-
prints and checking for
recent drug felons and
people with possible ties
to criminal drug cartels.
Colorado will also be
screening future marijuana
businesses to make sure no
owners live out of state, a
requirement set forth by
state lawmakers earlier
this year. The residency
requirements which
apply from owners all the
way down to so-called
bud-tenders who man
the counters and measure
out marijuana are a
holdover from Colorados
existing medical marijuana
industry.
The hefty operational
license fees, according to
state ofcials, are needed
to pay for enforcement of
the nascent industry. Plans
call for an ambitious seed-
to-sale tracking system
in which Colorado will
require video surveillance
of all plants as they grow
and are prepared, pack-
aged and sold to custom-
ers.
The Department of
Revenue aimed to use
seed-to-sale tracking for
Colorados medical mari-
juana business, but the
agency ran out of money
before getting the program
fully operational. The
Department doesnt plan
to make the same mistake
twice, so operational fees
are high. Retail stores
will have to pay $3,750 to
$14,000 a year, depending
on their size. Growers will
pay $2,750 a year.
Retail pot stores will also
have to submit detailed
oor plans to show theyre
meeting security require-
ments. Theyll have to get
surety bonds to ensure
contract completion in the
event of contractor default.
HARRISBURG
Sixty ve municipalities
in Luzerne County have
received their share of
funds collected by the
state from Feb. 1-July
31 through state liquor
license fees.
Overall, the county
received $118,240, rang-
ing from $23,400 for
Wilkes-Barre to $50 for
Slocum Township.
License fees are based
on the type of license
and the population of the
municipality in which it is
located, Stacy Kriedeman,
the state liquor control
board spokeswoman, said
Tuesday.
The fees are distributed
twice a year to munici-
palities. In the previous
round, which included
Aug. 1 through Jan. 31,
$55,600 was distrib-
uted to Luzerne County
municipalities. Statewide,
from Feb. 1-July 31, $2.4
million was distributed to
a total of 1,418 munici-
palities.
Under the Pennsylvania
Liquor Code, fees are col-
lected whenever a liquor
license application, renew-
al or validation is submit-
ted. Once approved, the
money is distributed to
the municipality in which
the licensee is located to
help defray the cost of
local law enforcement.
Heres a breakdown of
how which local munici-
palities received funds,
and how much they got:
Cities
Hazleton: $13,500
Nanticoke: $5,200
Pittston: $2,690
Wilkes-Barre: $23,400
Boroughs
Ashley: $1,200
Avoca: $1,550
Conyngham: $400
Dallas: $1,500
Dupont: $1,850
Duryea: $1,450
Edwardsville: $1,800
Exeter: $2,200
Forty Fort: $400
Freeland: $1,850
Harveys Lake: $1,600
Hughestown: $300
Kingston: $5,500
Larksville: $1,400
Luzerne: $2,100
Nescopeck: $300
Nuangola: $150
Plymouth: $2,800
Pringle: $450
Shickshinny: $150
Sugar Notch: $150
Swoyersville: $1,850
Warrior Run $150
West Hazleton: $2,300
Weast Pittston: $200
West Wyoming: $250
White Haven $500
Wyoming: $1,600
Yatesville: $150
Townships
Bear Creek: $1,200
Black Creek: $650
Buck: $150
Butler: $1,800
Conyngham: $100
Dallas: $1,600
Dennison: $300
Dorrance: $400
Exeter: $400
Fairmount: $300
Fairview: $1,400
Foster: $450
Franklin $200
Hanover: $5,150
Hazle: $2,050
Hunlock: $800
Huntington: $200
Jackson: $200
Jenkins: $1,300
Kingston: $1,400
Lake: $400
Lehman: $600
Newport: $1,100
Pittston: $1,200
Plains: $5,900
Plymouth: $400
Rice: $250
Slocum: $50
Sugarloaf: $1,400
Union: $600
Wilkes-Barre: $4,950
Wright: $400
Total $118,240
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 5A
Liquor license fees fowback to municipalities
ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
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MARIE LAUCK
Aug. 20, 2013
Marie Lauck, 94, of West
Pittston, passed away on Aug.
20, 2013, at Mercy Center in
Dallas.
Marie was born in Exeter
on Feb. 14, 1919. She was a
graduate of Exeter High School
and, prior to retirement, was
employed by the cigar industry
in West Pittston.
She was a former member of
St. Casimirs Church, Pittston,
and was presently a member of
St. John the Evangelist Church,
Pittston, and its Altar and
Rosary Society.
Marie was a member of
the Knights of Lithuania
Council 143, Pittston, and the
Lithuanian Womans Club of
Luzerne County.
Marie was an original mem-
ber of Meals on Wheels of
Greater Pittston and served 45
years with the organization.
She was presented with the
Presidential Volunteer Service
Award by President George W.
Bush. She was also recognized
in 2005 by The Times Leader
for being a gracious giver and
for dedicated and committed
service to others. She was a Red
Cross volunteer for 25 years.
Marie was preceded in death
by her husband, Paul Lauck, in
1990; her parents; her brothers
Pete, Tony, George, Clem and
her twin, Joseph; and sisters,
Dinah, Mildred and Julia.
She is survived by daugh-
ters, Mary and her husband,
John Metz, Harveys Lake, and
Anne Powers, West Pittston;
sons, Paul and his wife, Connie,
Colorado Springs, Colo., and
Robert and his wife, Rachel,
Bloomsburg; grandchildren,
Emily, Sara and Chris Walla,
Melanie and Rory Regan,
Matthew and Jamie Powers,
and Rose Marie, Samantha,
Robert Jr. and Juliet Lauck;
great-grandchildren, Avery and
Emmitt Walla; brother Al and
his wife, Angeline, Exeter; sis-
ter-in-law, Helen Parulis, Exeter;
and nieces and nephews.
The family thanks and
acknowledges the dedicated
staff of Mercy Center, Dallas,
and also Janine Messenger
of Erwine Healthcare for the
comfort and care they provided
Marie.
The funeral will be held 9
a.m. Friday at Kizis-Lokuta
Funeral Home, 134 Church St.,
Pittston.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m.
at St. John the Evangelist
Church, William Street,
Pittston. Interment will be in St.
Casimirs Cemetery, Pittston.
Family and friends may call 4 to
8 p.m. Thursday at the funeral
home.
In lieu of owers, the fam-
ily requests memorial contri-
butions be made to Meals on
Wheels of Greater Pittston, 59
S. Main St., Pittston, PA 18640;
or to Mercy Center, 301 Lake
St., Dallas, PA 18612.
More OBITUARIES | 9A
PHILADELPHIA A
Pennsylvania court will
hear arguments next
month on the governors
attempt to stop a county
outside Philadelphia from
issuing same-sex marriage
licenses.
The state Common-
wealth Court scheduled
oral arguments for Sept. 4
in Harrisburg.
Republican Gov.
Tom Corbetts admin-
istration contends that
Montgomery County
ofcials are violating the
states one-man, one-wom-
an marriage law and the
state Health Department
is seeking a court order to
halt the practice.
However, Democratic
ofcials in the afuent
county near Philadelphia
believe the law dening
marriage as the union of
one man and one woman
is unconstitutional.
They began issuing
same-sex marriage licens-
es on July 24.
Pa. court to hear gaymarriage arguments Sept. 4
Thre Associated Press
Colorados pot industry: Legal, not cheap
Fees for growers to sellers will be hefy to help
state regulate and control marijuana business
KRISTEN WYATT
Associated Press
GRANTS PASS, Ore.
Wildres burning in
Oregon, Idaho andMontana
are taxing national reght-
ing resources and helping to
push spending past $1 bil-
lion for the year.
The National Interagency
Fire Center in Boise upped
the national wildre pre-
paredness level Tuesday to
the highest level for the rst
time in ve years.
The center lists two cen-
tral Idaho wildres as the
countrys top priorities,
helping provide crews and
resources for the Beaver
Creek re, which forced
the evacuation of 1,250
homes in the resort area of
Ketchum and Sun Valley
and has cost nearly $12 mil-
lion so far.
President Barack Obama
was briefed Tuesday morn-
ing on the wildres by his
homeland security adviser,
Lisa Monaco. The White
House said the administra-
tions focus is on supporting
state and local rst respond-
ers and that Obamas team
is in ongoing contact with
federal and local partners.
More than 40 uncon-
tained, active andlarge wild-
res dot the U.S. map from
Arizona to Washington
state and Alaska, the White
House said. About 17,800
people have beendispatched
to the res.
Steve Gage, assistant
director of operations for
the re center, said they
cant ll all the requests for
crews and equipment from
the 48 res that remain
uncontained around the
country.
Gage said that as re
season progresses, the cen-
ter moves crews around to
where the greatest assets
such as houses are threat-
ened, and tries to have
crews positioned to catch
new res when they are
small.
In Oregon, winds that
draw windsurfers to the
Columbia Gorge have
doubled the size of a wild-
re to 10 square miles.
The Government Flat re
burned two homes and
threatens 150 more on the
northern anks of Mount
Hood. Four days into the
battle the cost has topped
$1 million, said Oregon
Department of Forestry
spokesman Dave Morman.
About 50 homes have evac-
uated in the area of canyons
10 miles southwest of The
Dalles.
Thats one of the chal-
lenges when the re gets
into these long canyons, its
very, very difcult for re-
ghters, he said.
The boost in priority
for Idahos Beaver Creek
re gave re managers
resources they needed
to start attacking the re
more directly, said re
spokesman Rudy Evenson.
Weather conditions were
also improving. The re
was 9 percent contained
after burning 160 square
miles and had 1,750 per-
sonnel. The cost through
Monday was $11.6 million.
Nationally, federal agen-
cies have spent more than
$1 billion so far this year,
about half last years total
of $1.9 billion, according to
the re center. There have
been 33,000 res that have
burned 3.4 million acres.
Whether costs top the
10-year average of $1.4
billion or the $1.9 billion
spent in 2012 and 2006 will
depend on the rest of the
wildre season, which tra-
ditionally gets very active in
Southern California as late
as October, said Gage.
Professor Norman
Christensen of Duke
Universitys Nicholas
School of the Environment,
an expert in the environ-
mental impacts of forest
res, said res have been
particularly intense in
Colorado, California and
Idaho this year.
Certainly drought in
some areas has contributed
to the number and intensity
of re events, he said in an
email. But many of the res
have been in highly populat-
ed, wilderness-urban inter-
face areas such as Colorado
Springs, Sun Valley, Idaho,
and the west slope of the
Sierra Nevada. That adds
greatly to costs since so
many more resources are
required to protect built
structures.
Hot, dry summer pushes wildfre spending past $1B
JEFF BARNARD
Associated Press
AP photo
Firefighters with the private contract company Great Basin Fire
mop up part of the 104,457-acre Beaver Creek Fire in the Baker
Creek, north of Ketchum, Idaho, on Monday.
PAGE 6A Wednesday, August 21, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Mountain Top - Quality built
6000SF home on 3acres. Radiant
heat on 1st foor, 5 car garage, 10'
ceilings on 1st foor, 2-story FR w/
FP, in-ground pool, covered pato,
wet bar in LL. Builders own home!
One of a kind! MLS# 13-1975 JIM
715-9323 $797,500
Glenmaura - Beautful home
with all the amenites. Wonder-
ful 1st foor MBR Suite with walk
-in shower, HW foors, gourmet
kitchen plus 3 other BRs. MLS#
13-2329 PEG 714-9247 or
MARGY 696-0891 $749,900
Shavertown - REDUCED
Gorgeous 2-story in Windsor
Farms. Breathtaking granite &
cherry kitchen. Smart house!
Private backyard!
MLS# 13-3004 JOAN 696-0887
$699,000
Bear Creek - Quality abounds in
this incredible 5BR, 5 bath dwell-
ing. HW throughout, Crown Mold-
ing, Cofered Ceilings, Hardi-Plank
exterior. Top of the line applianc-
es. Upgrades Galore. Corner lot set
on 2 scenic acres. MLS# 13-367
JOAN 696-0887 $675,000
Mountain Top - Exquisite 3350SF
beauty on 7.49 mostly wooded
acres. Spacious rooms. Great foor
plan. Amazing kitchen. Lots of HW
& tle. 3 car garage. Great house!
MLS# 13-2011 TERRY D. 715-9317
$589,400
Dallas - Crafsmanship abounds in this 2-story.
Cathedral ceiling accents the kitchen w/Island, 6
burner range, formal LR & DR. FR w/FP, 4BRs, LL
FR, deck w/awning. A must see! MLS# 13-2532
JUDY 714-9230 $399,900
Shavertown - Situated on a gorgeous wooded
lot in the desirable subdivision, this spacious
4BR, 5 bath home ofers HW foors, beautful
custom built-ins. 2FPs, 1st f laundry & large
closets. Shed & lovely deck. MLS# 13-2876
TRACY 696-0723 or JUDY 714-9230 $347,000
White Haven - REDUCED Private & tran-
quil! This 4BR, 2 bath home sits on 11acres
& backs to Nescopeck Creek. Detached
30x30 garage! MLS# 13-2734
LISA 715-9335 $314,500
Kingston - Modern 4BR, 2.1 bath 2400SF home
w/eat-in kitchen w/all appliances, 1st foor FR;
MBR Suite; heated in-ground pool in lovely
setng; B-dry system; 8yr old furnace & win-
dows; C/A; security system; private driveway;
lower level ready to fnish; Lovely neighbor-
hood. MLS# 13-598 RAE 714-9234 $159,900
Luzerne - REDUCED Beautful 4BR home on a
quiet 1 way street w/1st foor laundry, perennial
gardens, garage, enclosed porches & storage.
Move right in! Nothing to do but unpack & enjoy
life! A must see! MLS# 13-2982 MARY M. 714-
9274 or CHRISTINA 714-9235 $129,900
Swoyersville - Modern 3BR, 1.2 bath; HW; LR &
DR; Eat-in kitchen w/appliances; 1st foor laun-
dry & 1/2 bath; MBR w/1.5 bath; Den; Rec rm,
Ofce; Ductless A/C; Garage; Gas heat; All new
windows! MLS# 13-2843 RAE 714-9234 $127,900
Shavertown - REDUCED 3BR Ranch situated on
level double lot. Open LR/DR, eat-in kitchen,
MBR with 3/4 bath. Quiet neighborhood. Con-
venient locaton! MLS# 13-685
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $124,900
Kingston - Chic & stylish 3BR completely
updated! New windows, brand new fur-
nace & fenced yard. A must see!
MLS# 13-3337 JOAN 696-0887 $105,000
West Pitston - REDUCED Pride of ownership
throughout! Beautful 4BR, 2 bath w/large
rooms, loads of closet space, designer ceilings &
OSP. MLS# 12-3931 MARY M. 714-9274
$95,900
Duryea - REDUCED Pride of ownership! Stun-
ning 3BR w/loads of storage, new kitchen &
bath, nice yard, quiet street. Won't last!
MLS# 13-2688 MARY M. 714-9274 $124,900
Nantcoke - Renovated 2-story, 3BR, 1 bath
home. Ready to move-in! Eat-in kitchen, LR, DR,
gas steam heat, private driveway! MLS# 13-2851
TERRY NELSON 714-9248 $69,000
DALLAS Stately home in serene 4.8 acre setng minutes from
town The expansive deck and walls of windows ofer wonder-
ful views of the manicured grounds and surrounding country-
side. The stunning kitchen features a large center island crafed
from an enormous single slab of granite and is equipped with
Wolf and Sub Zero appliances and 2 dishwashers The Master
suite includes a private deck, spectacular bath with large steam
shower, custom dressing room and laundry The bright Lower
level opens to the yard and ofers additonal living/entertaining
space with a theatre area, bar, bath and gymAtenton to detail
throughout! MLS# 13-511 RHEA 696-6677 $895,000
SHAVERTOWN NEW ON MARKET Gracious home in wonderful
Woodridge II locaton. American Cherry foors fow through
spacious rooms with walls of custom cabinets, windows &
French Doors The bright kitchen has large breakfast area
Great 4 seasons room with gas freplace opens to expansive
wrap around deck that overlooks a Sylvan pool with retractable
cover. A brick pato, additonal yard with lush trees complete
this 3.96 acre property. All bedrooms have private baths Low-
er level game room with freplace opens to pool area. Call to
see this special home! MLS# 13-3156 RHEA 696-6677
$895,000
Dallas - Outstanding custom home on
27+acres w/spacious rooms & wonderful
foor plan, 1st foor Master. Architectural
doors & windows open to beautful patos &
exceptonal landscaping. MLS# 12-2312 RHEA
696-6677 $1,280,000
Lehman - 4BRs, 4 baths, stone-wood
burning FP in LR, gas FP in kitchen.
Computer nook of kitchen w/pantry.
Sunroom or exercise rm of MBR w/
sliding doors to balcony. 3 car garage.
2.8acres! Many upgrades. Minutes
from Huntsville Golf Club.
MLS# 12-2205 EMMA 714-9223 or
RAE 714-9234 $550,000
Mountain Top - Outstanding ofering for New
Constructon! Finished lower level! 4BRs, 2.1
baths, 3 car garage. Landscaped! MLS# 13-747
CORINE 715-9331 $329,900
WILKES-BARRE
City police charged David
Boesche, 30, of Wilkes-
Barre, with endangering
the welfare of children and
a gun offense after he alleg-
edly assaulted a woman on
Marlboro Avenue at about
12:25 p.m. Monday.
Police investigated a
reported domestic dispute
at 33 Marlboro Ave. during
which Boesche allegedly
struck Chaquitta Morton
and threwher to the ground
in front of her four children.
Boesche left the resi-
dence and later returned,
intending to ght Morton
and her friend, police said.
Boesche had a pistol in his
waistband when he was
arrested, police said.
Boesche was charged
with six counts each of ter-
roristic threats and reckless
endangerment, four counts
of child endangerment and
one count each of simple
assault, disorderly conduct,
possession of a controlled
substance, harassment and
possession of a weapon. He
was jailed at the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility
for lack of $10,000 bail.
EDWARDSVILLE
Jordan L. Stevenson, 25, of
Larksville, was arraigned
Tuesday on charges he
burglarized an apartment
and stole a cellphone. Jean
Jones told police Stevenson
left her Main Street apart-
ment with her cellphone at
about 9:55 p.m. Monday.
Stevenson walked to
Hilltop Apartments, where
police allege he entered
an apartment through
a window, according to
the criminal complaint.
Stevenson told police he
was in Heathers apart-
ment but could not provide
the womans last name, the
complaint states.
Stevenson was charged
with burglary, criminal
trespass and theft. He was
released without bail.
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Township police report-
ed the following:
Joseph Bobyak report-
ed at 9:16 p.m. Sunday
that someone broke into
his Metcalf Street home
and stole various personal
items.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NEWS Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 7A
Lake-Lehman approves
natural gas purchases
SUSAN BETTINGER
Times Leader Correspondent
The Lake-Lehman
School Board on Monday
night approved a con-
tract between the school
district and UGI Services
Inc. (Gasmark) for the
period of Jan. 1 to Dec.
31, 2014, for the pur-
chase of natural gas.
This will come with a
savings of $10,500 to the
district, the school board
learned.
In addition, the board
approved the contract
between the district
and UGI Services Inc.
(Gasmark- Powermark)
for the period of Feb. 7,
2014, to Feb. 1, 2015.
This comes at a $9,500
savings to the district.
In other matters, the
board:
Accepted the resig-
nation of Barbara Baigis,
accounts payable clerk,
effective Sept. 30. Baigis
has served the district
for more than 20 years.
Board members
expressed their sincere
appreciation for Baigis
years of service and said
that she will be missed.
Approved the pur-
chase of a Melco Amaya
Bravo 16-needle embroi-
dery machine and heavy-
duty cart, at a cost of
$11,995 for the graphics
arts class.
Two days of training
are included at no addi-
tional charge.
The district will now
be able to do in-house
embroidery work on
items such as school
caps, sweatshirts and
band uniforms.
Approved the quo-
tation from Simplex
Grinnell, of Allentown,
to replace the main re
alarm control panel at the
Lake-Noxen Elementary
building at a cost of
$9,894.
The panel has failed,
and replacement repair
parts are not available,
the board was told.
The combined com-
mi t t e e - o f - t h e - wh o l e
and regular monthly
meeting for voting pur-
poses will be held in the
Lake-Lehman Junior-
Senior High Schools
library at 7 p.m. Sept. 9.
Insurance carrier owed moneytaken
byKings College employee, suit says
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE A
suit filed recently in Luzerne
County Court by an insurance
company for Kings College is
seeking to recoup more than
$50,000, alleging a former col-
lege employee took the money
for personal use.
Travelers Casualty & Surety
Co. of America filed the suit
against Erin Savitski, of
Shavertown, stating it is owed
$57,399 that Savitski allegedly
took from the college while
she was employed as the direc-
tor of human resources in
2011.
Savitski did not return a
message seeking comment.
John McAndrew, a spokes-
man for the Wilkes-Barre
college, said Tuesday the col-
lege does not comment on
pending litigation or personnel
matters.
He would not comment on
whether the college will be
notifying law enforcement or
if any safeguards have been
put in place to prevent a future
occurrence.
McAndrew did confirm
Savitski was employed as the
director of human resources
and that she left the college in
August 2011.
No criminal charges have
been filed against Savitski.
According to the suit,
Savitski allegedly took appro-
priated business funds for per-
sonal use and hid her conduct
by misleading the college
that she was using the money
appropriately.
Savitski, the suit says,
added $50,438 in unauthor-
ized stipends to her paychecks
and used another $6,961
in unauthorized disburse-
ments.
The suit does not specifi-
cally say what the money may
have been used for.
The insurance company
covered the missing money
for the college and is seeking
repayment of that money.
The suit says Savitskis
actions were uncovered on
Aug. 23, 2011, and she was
terminated six days later.
Travelers Casualty & Surety Co.
hopes to recoup more than $50,000
Trespass suspect sought
Rahdee Ahmad Johnson, 23, wanted by Edwardsville
authorities who allege he pushed a police ofcer
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
EDWARDSVILLE
Police are searching for
Rahdee Ahmad Johnson,
23, on an arrest warrant
charging him with shoving
an ofcer and trespassing.
Johnson, Timothy
Evans, 19, of Edwardsville,
and Joseph Knowlin, 19,
of Plymouth, were spotted
walking through the Eagle
Ridge apartment complex
on Friday, police said.
Johnson was holding a can
of beer and hid behind a
garbage Dumpster, police
said.
According to the police
account, this is what hap-
pened:
An ofcer asked Johnson
why he was hiding. He
replied he did not want
police to see him on Eagle
Ridge property because he
knew he was banned from
the apartment complex.
The three men gave
different answers to why
they were walking through
Eagle Ridge.
The ofcer allegedly
detected an alcohol odor
on Evans. When Evans
was asked if he was drink-
ing, he yelled at the ofcer
and continued to cause a
disturbance, police said.
As Evans was being hand-
cuffed, Johnson screamed
and pushed the ofcer
who was arresting Evans,
according to a police
report.
Johnson and Knowlin
ran away as other ofcers
arrived to assist, police
said. Knowlin was cap-
tured on Grove Street
and Johnson was last seen
running into the Hilltop
Apartment complex.
Charges of deant tres-
pass, resisting arrest,
simple assault, disorderly
conduct and public drunk-
enness were led against
Johnson with District
Judge Paul Roberts in
Kingston.
Johnson is also wanted
on an unrelated charge of
driving with a suspend-
ed license on June 30 in
Edwardsville.
Court records say
Johnson pleaded guilty to
deant trespass involving
the Eagle Ridge apartment
complex in January. He
was ned $312.
Johnson also pleaded
guilty to deant trespass
and disorderly conduct
in Luzerne County Court
regarding an incident that
also involved Eagle Ridge
in May 2012. He was
sentenced to six-months
probation, court records
state.
POLICE BLOTTER
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PAGE 8A Wednesday, August 21, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER OBITUARIES Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 9A
BALASH- Eva, funeral 9 a.m.
today at Yeosock Funeral Home,
40 S. Main St., Plains Township.
Requiemservice 9:30 a.m. in
St Johns Orthodox Church,
Edwardsville.
BENSON- Esther, memorial
service 11 a.m. Saturday in
Dorranceton United Methodist
Church, 549 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston.
CHMIL - Paul Sr., funeral 10 a.m.
today in St. Nicholas Russian
Orthodox Church, 58 Seneca St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
9 a.m. to services at Simon S.
Russin Funeral Home, 136 Mafett
St., Plains Township.
CONNELL - Jeremiah, Mass 1
p.m. Thursday in St. Nicholas
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
DEVLIN- Thomas, funeral 10:30
a.m. Friday at Howell-Lussi
Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming
Ave., West Pittston. Services
11 a.m. in Second Presbyterian
Church, Parsonage Street,
Pittston. Friends may call 4 to 7
p.m. Thursday or 10 to 10:30 a.m.
Friday at the funeral home.
GUDZ - Stanley, funeral 9:30
a.m. today at Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial
10 a.m. in Queen of the Apostles
Church, Hawthorne Street, Avoca.
JUDZIKOWSKI - Judith, funeral
10 a.m. today at S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, Plymouth.
KESTER - Edward, friends may
call 10 to 11 a.m. today at Richard
H. Disque Funeral Home Inc.,
2940 Memorial Highway, Dallas.
Funeral service to followat Bethel
Hill Cemetery, Sweet Valley.
KOCHAN- Arlene, graveside
services 11:30 a.m. Saturday in
St. Francis Cemetery, Nanticoke.
KOZIC - Gerard, celebration of
life 10 a.m. Saturday at Kresge
Funeral Home, 1763 Route 209,
Brodheadsville. Friends may call
9 a.m. to service.
LISPI - Brenda, funeral 9 a.m.
Thursday at Graziano Funeral
Home Inc., Pittston Township.
Mass of Christian Burial 9:30
a.m. in St. Joseph Marello Parish,
WilliamStreet, Pittston. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
MACKIEWICZ - Frances, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. today in
St. Basils Church, Dushore.
MAKUCH - Catherine, funeral
9:30 a.m. Friday at Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in Our Lady of
Fatima Parish at St. Marys
Church of the Immaculate
Conception, 134 S. Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday at
the funeral home.
PETROSKY - Jane, funeral 9 a.m.
Thursday at Kizis-Lokuta Funeral
Home, 134 Church St., Pittston.
Mass of Christian Burial 9:30
a.m. in St. Maria Goretti Church,
Lafin. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
RICKEY - Michael, memorial
service 11 a.m. Saturday in Sweet
Valley Church of Christ, 5439
Main Road, Sweet Valley. Friends
may call 10 a.m. to service.
SABA - James, memorial and
reception 3 p.m. Sunday at Saba
family home, 198 Idetown Road,
Dallas.
SPERNOGA - Anna, Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. today
in St. Andre Bessette Parish,
St. Stanislaus Kostka Church,
Wilkes-Barre.
TACCONELLI - Hazel, funeral
9:30 a.m. today at Palermo &
Zawacki Funeral Home Inc., 409
N. Main St., Old Forge. Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. in Prince
of Peace Parish, Grace and
Lawrence streets, Old Forge.
WACLAWSKI - Veronica, funeral
9:30 a.m. Thursday at George
A. Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 211
W. Main St., Glen Lyon. Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. in Holy
Spirit Parish/St. Adalberts
Church, Glen Lyon. Friends may
call 6 to 8 p.m. today.
WALSH - Ray, funeral Mass 10:30
a.m. Friday in Divine Mercy Parish
at St. Josephs Church, 312 Davis
St., Scranton.
WORTH- Delbert Jr., funeral
6:30 p.m. today at AndrewStrish
Funeral Home, 11 Wilson St.,
Larksville. Friends may call 4 p.m.
to services.
FUNERALS
More OBITUARIES | 5A
BRENDAA. JAMES LISPI
Aug. 18, 2013
Brenda A. James Lispi, of
Pittston, passed away Sunday,
Aug. 18, 2013, at home with her
husband, Raymond, by her side.
She was born June 9, 1955, a
daughter of the late Mary Ann
(Duke) James Daley and Chalp
James Jr.
She was a graduate of
Pittston Area High School and
Penn State University.
Brenda worked as a senior
center services director for
the Area Agency on Aging
for Luzerne and Wyoming
Counties.
Surviving, in addition to
her husband, are her son, Lee,
and Sarah Lispi, Swoyersville;
daughter, Tina Lispi, and her
ance, Donald Bird, Clarks
Summit; grandchildren, Aria
Rose Lispi and Enzo Raymond
Lispi; brothers, Mark James
and Sam Daley; sisters, Eva
Sartorio Calia, Diana Lowe,
Anita Amundson and Michele
Wagner; and many aunts,
uncles, nieces, nephews and
cousins.
Funeral services have been
entrusted to Graziano Funeral
Home Inc., Pittston Township.
The viewing will be 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
Funeral services will begin at
9 a.m. Thursday at the funeral
home. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held 9:30 a.m.
Thursday in St. Joseph Marello
Parish, William Street, Pittston.
Interment services will take
place in Italian Independent
Cemetery, West Wyoming.
Memorial donations may be
made to Hospice of the Sacred
Heart, 600 Baltimore Drive,
Wilkes-Barre; or the Pittston
Memorial Library Fund, 47
Broad St., Pittston.
For directions to the funeral
home or to express condolences
to Brendas family, please visit
www. grazi anof uneral home.
com.
EDWIN OLSHEFSKI
Aug. 20, 2013
Edwin Olshefski, 86, a
resident of Bethel Hill Road,
Shickshinny, passed away at
his home on Tuesday, Aug. 20,
2013.
He was born Oct. 15, 1926,
in Nanticoke, a son of the late
Benjamin and Martha Jankowski
Olshefski.
Edwin was a member of St.
Marthas Church, Stillwater.
He was employed for more
than 40 years at Wholesale
Auto Parts, Central Warehouse,
Scranton.
His favorite hobby was enjoy-
ing Northwest basketball and
Penn State football, and also
showing love for his family and
pet companion, dog, Rosco.
He was preceded in death by
grandson, Kyle Strish.
He is survived by his wife of
56 years, the former Elizabeth
Opishinski; son, Edwin J.
Olshefski, and his wife, Deana,
Carbondale; daughters, Brenda
Obeid and her husband, Charles,
Pittston; Cheryl Madajewski and
her husband, David, Nanticoke;
Linda Wharton and her hus-
band, Vincent, Shickshinny;
Elizabeth Strish and her hus-
band, Norman, Shickshinny;
and Sandra Olshefski, Wilkes-
Barre; grandchildren, Brian and
Amanda Madajewski, Courtney
Wharton, Kaelyn and Ashton
Strish, Matthew and Megan
Obeid, and Devin Olshefski.
The Olshefski family extends
its gratitude to Wanda and
Christine for the kindness and
compassion shown to Edwin.
Funeral services will be 9:30
a.m. Saturday at Clarke Piatt
Funeral Home Inc., 6 Sunset
Lake Road, Hunlock Creek, fol-
lowed by a Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. at St.
Marthas Church, Stillwater,
with the Rev. Louis T. Kaminski
ofciating. Interment will follow
in St. Marthas Parish Cemetery,
Stillwater. Visitation will be at
the funeral home 6 to 8 p.m.
Friday.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Blue Chip Farms
Animal Refuge, 974 Lockville
Road, Dallas, PA 18612.
ROBERT E. HOLTZ JR.
Aug. 17, 2013
Robert E. Holtz Jr., 52, of
Wyoming, passed away Saturday
evening in Jackson Township
after a deadly motorcycle acci-
dent.
Born in Pittston, he was a son
of Doris Baker Holtz of West
Pittston and the late Robert
Holtz Sr. He was a graduate of
Wyoming Area, class of 1978.
For many years, he was
employed as a parts salesman for
Kelly Auto Parts of Wyoming. He
was a member of the Wyoming
Valley Motorcycle Club and the
Sons of the American Legion
Hanover Township Post 609.
Surviving are his daughters,
Cassandra Holtz, Philadelphia,
and Nicole Holtz, Hunlock
Creek; sister, Sheree Stack,
Parsons; nephew, Jonathan
Stack, Parsons.
Funeral services will be at
the convenience of the fam-
ily from the Metcalfe-Shaver-
Kopcza Funeral Home Inc.,
504 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming.
Interment will be in the
Mountain View Burial Park,
Exeter Township. Friends may
call 5 to 7 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the Wyoming Valley Motorcycle
Club, Bikes for Tykes Run, P.O.
Box 2014, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18705.
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JUNE E. BRUDNICKI,
74, of Mountain Top, passed
away peacefully on Tuesday, Aug.
20, 2013, at Hospice Community
Care at Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre. She was born in Hanover
Township, a daughter of the
late Milton and Ellen Hughes.
June was a graduate of Hanover
Township High School, class of
1959. She was employed by Dana
Perfumes, where she worked for a
few years. She is survived by her
husband, Eugene; son, Robert,
Mountain Top; and one grand-
daughter, Kaitlyn.
Funeral services will be held
at a later date at the convenience
of the family.
DOLORES GRABKO,
84, of Wilkes-Barre, was killed in
a head-on collision on Saturday
on Route 29 in Wyoming County.
Funeral arrangements
are pending from the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township.
TERRANCE F. TERRY
WIEDLICH,
70, a resident of Plymouth, passed
away peacefully on Monday
evening at Hospice Community
Care, Inpatient Unit, Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre, surrounded
by his family. His loving wife is
Karen L. (Andrews) Wiedlich.
Together, Terry and Karen cel-
ebrated their 39th wedding anni-
versary on April 4, 2013.
Funeral arrangements are
pending and have been entrusted
to the care of the Wroblewski
Funeral Home Inc., 1442
Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort. A
complete obituary will appear in
Thursdays newspaper.
JOHN MARTIN ZIMNICKY
Aug. 16, 2013
John Martin Zimnicky, 84,
of Shavertown, passed away
on Friday, Aug. 16, 2013, at
the Veterans Administration
Medical Center, Plains
Township.
Mr. Zimnicky was born May
29, 1929, in Luzerne, and was
a son of the late Alexander and
Eva Zimnicky.
John was a graduate of
Luzerne High School and
attended both St. Louis
University and North Carolina
State University on football
scholarships.
Fondly referred to as big
Jack by friends and family, he
served in the U.S. Navy during
the Korean Conict.
As a member of the
Carpenters Union Local 514,
Wilkes-Barre, he was employed
as a master carpenter, retiring
in 1991.
Mr. Zimnicky was a member
of the American Legion Post
967, Harveys Lake.
John is survived by his wife
of 48 years, the former Jean
McLean; daughter, Cheryl
Dragon, Harveys Lake; grand-
children, Deanna, Mirina and
Derek Dragon; numerous niec-
es and nephews.
Friends may call
6 to 8 p.m. Friday at
Curtis L. Swanson
Funeral Home Inc.,
corner of routes 29 and 118,
Pikes Creek, for a time of visi-
tation with Johns family.
Funeral service will be pri-
vate.
In lieu of owers, the family
requests memorial contribu-
tions be sent to the SPCA of
Luzerne County, 524 E. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre.
Online condolences can be
made at www.clswansonfuner-
alhome.com.
CECELIAM.
SCHMIDT
Aug. 19, 2013
Cecelia M. Schmidt, 71, of
Mountain Top, went to the Lord
on Monday in the Hospice Unit
of Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre
after a valiant ght with cancer.
Born in Elizabeth, N.J.,
she was a daughter of the late
William and Janet (Jankowski)
Beym. She loved to cross-stitch,
garden and cook for her family.
Cecelia raised six children and
took care of her family above all
else. Everyone loved and respect-
ed her and called her Ma.
Prior to retirement, she
worked at the Mr. Donut shop in
Mountain Top for 10 years.
Preceding her in death, in
addition to her parents, were
her sons, Joseph and William
Schmidt.
Surviving are her husband
of 51 years and her loving high
school sweetheart, Edward
Schmidt; children, Lisa Beaver
and her husband, Dennis,
Canadensis; Edward Jr. Ace,
at home; Karen Olimpaito and
her husband, James, Piscataway,
N.J.; and Mary Schwar and her
husband, James, Annandale,
N.J.; daughter-in-law, Tracy
Schmidt, Mountain Top; sister,
Janet Walz, Parlin, N.J.; broth-
er, Robert Beym and his wife,
Nancy, Columbia, S.C.; seven
grandchildren, Shannon, Tiffany,
Joseph, Jamie, Brandon, Cortney
and Ryan; and many nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be held
11 a.m. Thursday at McCune
Funeral Home, 80 S. Mountain
Blvd., Mountain Top. Interment
will follow in Albert Cemetery.
Friends may call 9 a.m. until ser-
vices Thursday.
FLORENCE
WARDELL
Aug. 17, 2013
Florence Wardell, 63, of
Dupont, passed away after a long
and courageous battle with can-
cer on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013,
at Hospice Community Care
Center, Dunmore.
She was born in Pittston on
Aug. 5, 1950, a daughter of the
late Charles and Janet (Spencer)
Edwards.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her hus-
band, John Wardell, who died in
1998; and her brothers, Thomas
and George Edwards.
Florence is survived by her
sons, Robert and James, both
of Pittston, and Jeff, Dupont;
daughters, Lisa and Violet
Wardell, both of Pittston; broth-
ers, Bruce, Pittston; Charles,
Kingston; Robert, Scranton; and
Jack, Las Vegas, Nev.; sisters,
Janet Sweeney, New Jersey; Joan
Olmstead, Wilkes-Barre; Audrey
Morris, Yatesville; Margaret
Bosak, Duryea; and Violet
OBrien, Pittston; eight grand-
children; two great-grandchil-
dren; and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services will be held
7 p.m. Thursday at Kiesinger
Funeral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea. The Rev.
Michael Shambora of the Bradley
Memorial United Methodist
Church, Dickson City, will ofci-
ate. Friends may call 5 p.m. until
services. In lieu of owers, memo-
rial contributions may be made to
Hospice of the Sacred Heart, 600
Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18702.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuner-
alservices.com.
CATHERINE A. (MARKO) MAKUCH
Aug. 18, 2013
Catherine A. (Marko)
Makuch, 92, of Wilkes-Barre,
passed away peacefully with her
son and daughter at her side
on Sunday at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre
on March 3, 1921, a daughter of
the late John and Mary Hudak
Swatkoski. Catherine was a
graduate of Coughlin High
School, class of 1939. Prior to
retirement, she was employed
by the RCA Corp., Mountain
Top.
Catherine was a devoted
Catholic and attended daily
Mass. She was a member of
Our Lady of Fatima Parish
at St. Marys Church of the
Immaculate Conception, Wilkes-
Barre, and a longtime member
of St. Josephs Slovak Church in
Wilkes-Barre. She and her hus-
band, Paul, were chosen to lock
the doors for the nal time when
the church was closed on March
21, 2010.
Catherine was a faithful and
loving wife, mother and friend.
She especially enjoyed cooking
for her family and friends.
She was preceded in death
by her brothers, George, John,
Stephen and Joseph Swatkoski;
and by her sisters, Mary Ihnat,
Anna Hogan and Elizabeth
Swatkoski.
Catherine is survived by her
loving husband, Paul R. Makuch,
with whom she celebrated 66
years of marriage on July 5,
2013. She is also survived by
her daughter, Sister Mary Beth
Makuch, SS.C.M., Wilkes-Barre;
son, Paul S. Makuch, at home;
numerous nieces, nephews,
cousins and friends, including
her dear friend, Mary Theresa
Okal, Wilkes-Barre, and also by
her dear cat, Rusty.
Catherines family extends
their heartfelt appreciation to
the medical staff at the Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital and to
her doctors, Dr. Michael Grasso,
Dr. David Greenwald, Dr. John
Ellis, Dr. Juan DeRojas and Dr.
Sandra Pensieri, for their com-
passionate and attentive care.
Funeral services will be held
at 9:30 a.m. Friday at Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass
of Christian Burial to follow at
10 a.m. in Our Lady of Fatima
Parish at St. Marys Church of
the Immaculate Conception, 134
S. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Interment will be in St. Marys
Byzantine Catholic Cemetery,
Dallas. Friends may call 2 to 4
and 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday at the
funeral home.
In lieu of owers, contribu-
tions may be made in Catherines
memory to the Sisters of Saints
Cyril & Methodius Retirement
Fund, Villa Sacred Heart, 580
Railroad St., Danville, PA
17821.
Online condolences may be
sent by visiting Catherines
obituary at www.natandgawlas-
funeralhome.com.
LORETTA FARRIS
Aug. 14, 2013
Loretta Farris, 88, formerly
of Luzerne, died Wednesday,
Aug. 14, 2013, in Wilmington,
Del.
Born in Swoyersville,
Loretta was a daughter of the
late Stephen A. and Cecilia M.
Voitek Farris.
Loretta received a bache-
lors degree in library sciences
from Bucknell University,
Lewisburg, and a masters
degree from Marywood
College, Scranton.
She workedinthe library ser-
vices eld at the Hoyt Library,
Kingston; the Osterhout Free
Library, Wilkes-Barre; and
Wilkes College, Wilkes-Barre.
Loretta was a member of
the Wyoming Valley West
School Board and the West
Side Vocational-Technical
School Board.
She was also a member of
the Quota Club, Wilkes-Barre;
Friends of the Hoyt Library;
Slovak Heritage Society
and the former Wyoming
Historical and Geological
Society.
She was a member of the
Holy Family Parish, Luzerne.
Preceding her in death, in
addition to her parents, was a
brother, Robert C. Farris.
Surviving are her broth-
er Stephen A. Farris Jr.,
Alexandria, Va.; several nieces
and a nephew.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held at 10:30 a.m.
Saturday in Holy Family
Parish, 574 Bennett St.,
Luzerne. The Rev. Michael J.
Zipay will ofciate. Interment
will be made in Mount Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton. Friends
may call 9:30 a.m. until the
service.
In lieu of owers, memo-
rial donations, if desired,
may be made to Hoyt Library,
Wyoming Avenue, Kingston,
PA 18704; or Hospice of the
Sacred Heart, 600 Baltimore
Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702.
Arrangements have been
entrusted to the Harold C.
Snowdon Home for Funerals
Inc., 420 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston, PA 18704.
ANDREWEWONISHON
Aug. 19, 2013
Andrew Ewonishon, 60,
of Union Dale, died Monday
at Geisinger-CMC Hospital,
Scranton. His wife is the former
Alice Fino.
Born in Carbondale, son of
the late Andrew and Mary Cerra
Ewonishon, he was a graduate
of Scranton Prep. He earned his
bachelors and masters degrees
in physics from the University
of Scranton.
Andrew worked in
Carbondale Area High Schools
audio visual department before
taking a position at Kings
College, Wilkes Barre. He
started out in media services
and, at the time of his death,
he was project manager for the
information and instructional
technologies division. Andrew
was employed at Kings College
for 32 years.
He was also co-owner and
operated Stalene, an audio visu-
al repair business in Olyphant.
Additionally, he published text-
books on television and VCR
(including Betamax) repair.
In his younger days, he was
an avid bowler and was active
with the Boy Scouts of America
in the area and its Merit Badge
College held annually at Kings
College. He was treasurer of
the Lowe Lake Association for
many years.
He and his wife loved their
life together and enjoyed work-
ing on projects around their
home and collaborating on
many academic projects as well.
They enjoyed spending time
with their children and extend-
ed family and friends.
Other survivors include
sons, Keith Ewonishon and
Jonathon Ewonishon and his
ancee, Kara Chipalowsky;
stepdaughter, Christina Judith
Kolmansperger; stepson,
Joseph Kolmansperger; sister,
Ann Marie Machek, and her
husband, Joseph; father-in-law
and mother-in-law, Michael and
Judith Fino; stepsisters, Mary
Sue and her husband, Conrad
Szumski; Dr. Marsha Fino and
her husband, Dr. Ronald Lobo;
and Mary Patricia and her hus-
band, Roger Belles; his rst wife,
Kathryn Ewonishon; one grand-
son, Collin Kolmansperger;
nephews, John Michael and
Gregory Wilcha, Kevin and
Eric Scotch, Jonathan Gilpin,
Michael Wolak, Karol Szumski
and Adam Lobo; nieces, Mary
Beth Magnot, Alexandria
Szumski and Lauren Lobo;
aunts, cousin and many friends.
The funeral will be Friday
from the Lawrence A. Gabriel
Funeral Home, 74 N. Main St.,
Carbondale, with Mass at 9:30
a.m. in St. Rose of Lima Church,
Carbondale. Interment will be
in the West Pittston Cemetery,
West Pittston. Friends may call
4 to 8 p.m. Thursday at the
funeral home.
In lieu of owers, the
family asks donations be made
to Kings College, Wilkes Barre.
GEORGE KEIB JR.
Aug. 19, 2013
George Keib Jr., 94, a resi-
dent of Wyoming, passed away
Monday in the Commonwealth
Hospice Inpatient Unit of St.
Lukes Villa, Wilkes-Barre.
Born in West Pittston in July
of 1919, he was a son of the
late George and Alvera Keib.
George attended Wyoming pub-
lic schools and was a graduate
of the University of Scranton
and also Temple University,
obtaining his masters degree.
He enlisted in the infantry
on Jan. 3, 1941, serving two
years before being transferred
to the Air Force Aviation
Cadets. He completed his ight
training in 1943, receiving his
wings at Randolph Field of
San Antonio, Texas. He served
in the European Theater and
North and South Africa and
received a Bronze Star.
After his ve years of mili-
tary service, George worked
at U.S. Steel Co., Philadelphia,
for several years. George was a
teacher at White Haven School
District for 10 years before
transferring to Crestwood
School District, where he
taught for 29 years.
His wife, Barbara Marie
George Keib, passed away on
Aug. 20, 2011.
Funeral services
will be at the fam-
ilys convenience
from Metcalfe-Shaver-
Kopcza Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, with
the Rev. Harriet Sands of the
Wyoming United Methodist
Church ofciating. Interment
will be in Wyoming Cemetery.
There will be no calling hours.
PETERJACKSON
Associated Press
HARRISBURG The
U.S. Education Department
granted Pennsylvania a
partial waiver from the No
Child Left Behind school
evaluation law Tuesday,
giving state ofcials the
exibility to develop alter-
natives they say will mean
more meaningful assess-
ments of schools and stu-
dents.
Pennsylvania is the 41st
state to receive a waiver,
which eliminates the bench-
mark that relies largely
on standardized tests to
measure progress toward a
national goal of all students
reading and doing math at
their actual grade level by
2014.
The state Education
Department said new,
user-friendly school per-
formance proles will
combine standardized test
scores, the graduation rate,
the promotion rate and the
attendance rate to gauge
academic progress at all
3,200 school buildings in
the state starting this fall.
Also, a neweducator eval-
uation system will use stu-
dent achievement among
other criteria in assessing
the performance of teach-
ers starting this year and
principals in 2014-15.
State Education
Secretary William Harner
said the waiver will improve
public education statewide.
Under the states
approved waiver,
Pennsylvania citizens will
have access to quality infor-
mation about the perfor-
mance of our public schools
and students will be provid-
ed with high-quality educa-
tional programs, he said.
Wythe Keever, spokes-
man for the states largest
teacher union, said the
waiver is a step in the
right direction, but that
replacing the so-called
AYP benchmark with mul-
tiple measures of student
achievement wont solve
the statewide need for more
education funding.
If you dont provide ade-
quate resources for teachers
and schools, its like asking
(teachers) to spin straw
into gold, said Keever,
of the Pennsylvania State
Education Association.
PAGE 10A Wednesday, August 21, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Pa. partially skirts No Child Left Behind
PSU board: Student trustee wasnt forced to quit Paterno suit
Spokesman says Peter Khoury was given a choice, not an ultimatum
PETER JACKSON
Associated Press
HARRISBURG The
student trustee on Penn
States board had to
make a choice between
helping select the univer-
sitys next president or
remaining a plaintiff in a
lawsuit led against the
NCAA by the family of
the late football coach Joe
Paterno, a board spokes-
man said Tuesday.
The trustee, 23-year-
old graduate student
Peter Khoury, told the
Centre Daily Times for a
story published Tuesday
that he is withdrawing
from the lawsuit, which
seeks to overturn stiff
NCAA sanctions imposed
last year because of the
Jerry Sandusky child sex
abuse scandal. The sanc-
tions include a four-year
bowl-game ban and a $60
million ne.
The board is not a party
to the litigation.
Khoury said he was
threatened with remov-
al from the 12-trustee
presidential selection
committee if he did not
drop out of the suit. The
committee is searching
for a successor to uni-
versity President Rodney
Erickson, who plans to
retire when his contract
expires in June.
The boards spokes-
man, David LaTorre,
said Khoury and the
other four trustees who
joined in the NCAA suit
have conflicts of interest
because the suit makes
numerous allegations
and claims that are at
odds with the universitys
position. Khoury is the
only one of the five who
is also on the presidential
selection committee.
Board leadership has
had conversations with
the trustee plaintiffs in
an attempt to resolve the
conflicts, LaTorre told
The Associated Press.
In Khourys case, his
personal interests and
positions in the litiga-
tion would have required
that he recuse and absent
himself from significant
parts of the committee
deliberations and candi-
date interviews, LaTorre
said.
Trustee Khoury had
to make a choice between
his personal interests as a
plaintiff in litigation and
his role as a trustee mem-
ber of the presidential
search committee, the
spokesman said.
LaTorre denied that
Khoury was given an ulti-
matum.
It was his choice, he
said. Nobodys forcing
the issue.
Khoury, an Allentown
resident who was
appointed to the board
in 2011 by Gov. Tom
Corbett, did not return
AP phone messages seek-
ing comment.
Anthony Lubrano, one
of the trustees who is a
plaintiff in the suit, said
they all received an email
from the boards office on
Aug. 12 asking them to
withdraw from the case.
Lubrano said that he
wont withdraw and that
he was disappointed by
the boards handling of
the situation.
Its just a sad commen-
tary that we would begin
threatening the youngest
among us, he said. We
can agree to disagree
but we can do it in a way
thats less threatening, I
think.
Pa. joins efort
to track down
duplicate voters
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA
Pennsylvania has joined a
multistate consortium in an
effort to track duplicate vot-
ers outside state borders.
The state will be the 24th
to join the program, the
Pennsylvania Department
of State announced
Tuesday.
The program, called
the Interstate Voter
Registration Crosscheck
Program, is based in
Kentucky. According to
Department of State spokes-
man Ron Ruman, the pro-
gram operates county-to-
county, and similar checks
already happen among
counties. The program
centralizes voter data from
the 24 states and allows for
duplication checks between
counties in each.
When duplicates are
found, county ofcials
will attempt to contact
the twice-registered vot-
ers to verify whether
theyve moved, Ruman
said. If those voters cant
be reached, their registra-
tion will become inactive
through the next two feder-
al elections. If they show up
to vote during that window,
Ruman said, they can vote
and their registration will
be reactivated. If they arent
reached by the end of the
time limit, their registra-
tion will be canceled.
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OTHER OPINION: CALLING FROMPRISON
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
COMMENTARY: MARK GUYDISH
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SERVING THE PUBLIC TRUST SINCE 1881 Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 11A
Editorial
OTHER OPINION: GOVERNMENT REFORM
SEND US YOUR OPINION
Letters to the editor must include
the writers name, address and
daytime phone number for
verifcation. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to
one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.
com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times
Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
No strong argument for varied workweeks
Mark
Guydish
Excess phone charges
defeat prison goals
York County ofcials are under-
standably unhappy about this, but the
Federal Communications Commission
made the right call last week when it
voted to limit how much companies
can charge for phone calls made from
prison.
The FCC capped the calls at 21 cents
a minute for debit or prepaid calls and
25 cents a minute for collect calls.
Current fees nationally range from
50 cents to $3.95 to place calls, plus
additional per-minute rates of any-
where from 5 cents to 89 cents. Plus,
numerous fees are routinely tacked on.
These phone calls are a prot center
for prisons who have, well, a captive
customer base because inmates cant
have cells in their cells.
Reasonable revenue gains are OK to
provide services to people who dont
garner much public sympathy but
the key word there is reasonable.
In most cases, its families often
poor families who are punished by
high phone call costs. Mothers and
fathers, spouses, children of inmates
theyre the ones who pay to talk
to loved ones who, yes, broke the law,
but who are still needed by their fami-
lies. Allowing inmates to connect with
families increases their likelihood of
rehabilitation.
Maybe the FCC limit is too low
and it must be periodically reviewed
and revised. But some national rules
on this issue were needed.
Of course, it will leave a hole in some
prison budgets. York County Prison
received $775,277 from phone revenue
in 2012.
Its not yet clear howmuch these new
rates will cut into the county budget.
Ofcials will have to search for cre-
ative, equitable ways to make up that
revenue preferably not piling it onto
property tax payers.
But some rules needed to be set to
prevent egregious rates that essentially
resulted in some prisons (not necessar-
ily ours) stealing from the families of
inmates.
York Daily Record
These phone calls are a profit
center for prisons who have,
well, a captive customer base
because inmates cant have
cells in their cells.
Corruption crackdown
is a surprise fromChina
The newregime of Chinese President
Xi Jinping is turning up the heat on cor-
ruption there, and is making sure you
can read all about it. Stories of graft,
ofcial excess and corporate malfea-
sance abound, not only in foreign news
outlets but also in Chinas embold-
ened domestic publications and social
media.
Xi, who took ofce in March, has
responded aggressively to public com-
plaints about ofcial misconduct. He
has denounced corruption as a threat to
the existence of his ruling Communist
Party.
His crackdown has targeted compa-
nies as well as government bureaucrats.
Thats a good sign; China is overdue
for an upgrade of its shaky business
standards. The worlds second-largest
economy (after the U.S.) cant afford to
let cheaters siphon off a big share of its
wealth, as they have done for decades.
A cleanup would work in favor
of Western companies that are now
shut out of such industries as energy,
nance and real estate, where insiders
take care of their own. Western mul-
tinationals generally maintain strict
policies against bribery, kickbacks and
other improper activities. Many claim
they operate at a disadvantage in China
because they refuse to pay off bigwigs
in local government and state-owned
enterprises that dominate large sectors
of the economy.
Its good to keep a healthy dose
of skepticism about this crackdown.
Critics say its window-dressing. China
recently imprisoned a leading Beijing
anti-corruption activist, Xu Zhiyong,
who has pushed for government trans-
parency. Xi may see corruption as a
threat, but he still sees vocal opposition
to Communist rule as an even greater
threat.
Still, he seems to recognize the value
of a change in the culture, and the
Chinese public seems to welcome that.
Xi has eschewed lavish banquets,
opting for simpler meals. Four dishes,
one soup is a hot political catchphrase.
Ofcials who meet with Xi typically
leave their luxury cars and fancy wrist-
watches at home. Sales of French wine,
chic cigarettes and delicacies such as
shark n and abalone have plunged.
More than 2,200 ofcials have been
publicly disciplined this year for abus-
ing their positions for personal gain.
One collected $160,000 in gifts at his
daughters lavish wedding. Another,
who came under investigation when
a graphic sex tape leaked on to the
Internet, faces years in prison for tak-
ing bribes.
Chinese companies and foreign
enterprises operating in China stand
accused of corruption. Chinese author-
ities charge that British pharmaceutical
giant GlaxoSmithKline bribed doctors
and hospitals on a massive scale to
push its drugs and vaccines. The com-
pany has conceded that its executives
in China acted outside its policies and
appeared to have broken Chinese law.
Chinese companies that have long
operated with impunity face new
scrutiny. In a remarkable example, a
journalist using social media accused
state-owned China Resources of gross-
ly overpaying for a mining acquisition
and diverting some of the money to
executives involved in the transaction.
The giant conglomerate has denied
wrongdoing. Government watchdogs
reportedly are investigating.
The rich and powerful dont enjoy
the protection they once thought they
did. Bo Xilai, a populist Chinese poli-
tician, faces corruption charges. His
wife was convicted last year in the mur-
der of a British businessman who had
threatened to expose the familys hid-
den offshore wealth. The murder illus-
trated how some high-ranking Chinese
had felt free to operate outside the law.
Xis crackdown is a work in progress.
Unlike the tradition of the American
presidency, where the rst 100 days
typically bring a rush for change,
Chinas leaders tend to set priorities,
methodically build support and deliv-
er over the course of years. But given
Chinas historic protection of insiders
and tolerance of corruption, this effort
is a pleasant surprise.
The Chicago Tribune
Its good to keep a healthy
dose of skepticism about this
crackdown. Critics say its
window-dressing.
The indignation was likely swift and
strong for many. There are Luzerne
County employees who only work 32.5
hours a week! Typical union impu-
dence, classic govern-
ment waste!
And if youre like
most employed people
in the last decade or
so, you think of all the
hours you work beyond
40 to get all the added
work done without
extra pay just out of
concern of keeping your
job. Or you work more
than 40 hours a week
and get paid, but its all minimum
wage with no benets because youre
scrambling from part-time post to part-
time post.
So blowing your lid over Sundays
article about those county slackers
might be a justiable reaction, but Im
thinking were actually getting angry
over the wrong thing.
Statistics get messy here, but its
worth pointing out a few:
According to the U.S. Bureau
of Labor Statistics American Time
Use study in 2012, employed people
worked an average of 7.7 hours a day,
which would be a 38.5-hour workweek.
Yet in a 2008 poll, the National
Sleep Foundation, respondents
claimed to be spending an average
of nearly 4.5 hours each week doing
additional work from home on top of a
9.5 hour work day. Thats a total of 52
hours a week.
Then theres the Organization
For Economic Co-Operation and
Developments annual global report of
hours worked per year in 34 member
countries, which showed in 2011 the
average American worker put in 1,797
hours in the year, about 34.5 hours per
week which might sound low, but it
put us ahead of Germany (1,330/25.6),
The Netherlands (1,336/25.7) and the
United Kingdom (1,611/31) to name
few.
And if you think youve been
working more now than in the past for
pretty much the same pay, youll nd
support in a 2010 Center for American
Progress report that said the typical
middle-income family put in an aver-
age of 11 hours more a week in 2006
than in 1979.
I warned the statistics get messy.
So grumble about the fact that some
county union heads whine at talk of
ending the 32.5 hour work week. You
probably have a fair gripe.
But I reserve my frustration for a
far more bizarre fact: The county has
10 collective bargaining agreements,
and a week runs 32.5 hours in one, 35
in another, 37.5 in a third and 40 in a
fourth. The contract for the assistant
district attorneys and public defenders
dont mention required hours other
than a minimum of 1,000 a year for
part-timers.
Heck, theres one union that has a
32.5-hour week for employees over
here and 35 hours for employees over
there, under the same contract.
You want to talk about wasting tax
dollars: How much extra do we pay
to keep track of such a hodgepodge
of requirements? How much easier is
it for fraud or errors to slip through
the cracks? How much more is wasted
negotiating 10 different contracts with
such widely different terms over some-
thing as seemingly simple as hours in a
workweek?
Union heads quoted in Sundays
article by Jennifer Learn-Andes made
valid arguments for caution in trying
to standardize the workweek while
keeping total wages steady. The theory
sounds logical: Increase hours for each
individual and reduce staff accord-
ingly, but a clear-eyed look at hard data
needs to be done to prove it will work.
That said, streamlining govern-
ment services is not an option, its an
essential. The majority of taxpayers
clearly no longer accept and many
can likely no longer afford perpetual
property tax increases with no sign
of true spending control. The unions
need to get out in front of the issue.
Stop giving reasons why a uniform
work week shouldnt happen and start
nding ways to make it reality.
Because even if one union can justify
a 32.5 hour workweek, no union can
justify the absurdity of half-a-dozen dif-
ferent denitions of that term.
Mark Guydish, a reporter for The Times Leader,
can be reached at 829-7161 or email mguydish@
timesleader com.
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR
Advocate rebuts
water cure critics
Regarding the critical letter to the
editor of the work my wife Connie, the
water cure team and I did on the water
cure, it never would have been written
had the writer known the truth.
View the water cure TV news specials
from WYOU, WVIA, FOX TV and WJZ
Baltimore. Google water cure TV news
specials. All are on watercure2.org.
This should have been accepted long
ago, but because we are so addicted to
money we are blind to any solution to
high-prot problems.
Its disgusting that my wife and I spent
most of our lifes savings to get the proof
out when it took Iran only two weeks to
verify it and that got Dr. Batmanghelidj
released from prison. Our leaders have
ignored this free solution since 1983, but
Muslims now enjoy the solution while
Americans die from often easily cured
problems. Meanwhile, the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention and
the Journal of the American Medical
Association recognized the truth while
our government and other agencies
ignore it.
Do a Google search for Saudi Gazette,
salt a cure for 73 illnesses. Google New
York Times, Salt we misjudged you.
If doctors and prominent people
werent threatened with nancial sanc-
tions, everyone would know the truth.
The more money made on a problem,
the more impossible it is to get rid of the
problem. If it werent for memorization-
based education, students would be
better educated in half the time and be
thinkers, problem solvers and job creators
rather than memorizers who have had
their inherent genius, imagination and
creativity stolen from them. If science is
so great, why does every health problem
get worse and more protable? Could it
be to protect our $3 trillion-a-year health
care business?
Any experts care to debate our team?
Bob Butts
Moosic
Kansas resident
looking for family
I am interested in corresponding with
any descendants of Bridget F. Judge
Keeney (Mrs. Neal) and Catherine M.
Katie Judge Neuer (or Newer) (Mrs.
Roy), who grew up in Wilkes-Barre.
These women were the daughters
of Patrick and Margaret Walsh Judge,
who immigrated from Ireland in 1883.
Bridget and Catherine had at least three
brothers: Michael, John and Martin
Judge. Their brother John was my grand-
father. Im looking to make contact with
any of these Judge descendants for the
purposes of family history research.
I would be very happy to hear from
any of these family members. My email
address is sarajkeckeisen@gmail.com.
Sara Judge Keckeisen
Topeka, Kan.
tied together.
The Aug. 13 proposals
have the union seeking a
seven-year deal and the
district seeking a six-year
one.
The union proposed
raises according senior-
ity steps ranging from
1.83 percent to 3.02 per-
cent in each of the seven
years. The district offered
raises from 2.28 per-
cent to 2.86 percent for
ve years, except for the
2011-2012 school year, in
which a wage freeze was
proposed.
Despite the wage freeze
that year, each employee
would be given a $750
stipend, according to the
district.
The union also seeks
$500 for top step employ-
ees for 2010-2011 and
2011-2012.
In theory, teachers will
be paying for the freeze
until they retire, Dolman
said, because their sala-
ries for the rest of the
years will be lower.
The effect of the
freeze will effect teachers
for years, she said. A
person may work in the
district for 35 years. You
want them to take a true
freeze and pay for it the
next 35 years?
According to district
calculations, the union
wage plan costs $1.86
million or an increase of
20.42 percent, and the
districts plan costs $1.01
million or an increase of
11.51 percent.
Neither the district nor
the unions most recent
health care proposal con-
tains a premium share,
and both sides agreed
to a PPO through the
Northeast Pennsylvania
School District Health
Trust. They currently
have a more expensive
traditional Blue Cross
plan.
The deductible and
the health insurance opt-
out cost are the sticking
points.
The union proposed
$100/$300 deductibles for
individual/family plans
and the district proposed
$250/$500. The district
wants a $5,000 payment
cap if an employee opts
out of the plan, but the
district wants to continue
receiving 50 percent of
the cost of the plan, which
amounts to about $12,500
for a family plan.
The union proposal
saves $70,000 and the
district proposal saves
$260,000, according to
the district.
The union warned of
the costs to the district
associated with a strike.
Members of the sup-
port staff will need to be
brought in on the make-
up days at the end of the
year. Those employees
are guaranteed to work a
specic number of days
in their contract and will
likely require overtime.
Holland and Dean said
they plan to schedule
some new dates to nego-
tiate.
Union members have
worked under the terms
of an expired contract for
over three years.
Under state law, teach-
ers may strike twice in
one school year.
The rst strike must end
in time for students to get
180 school days in by June
15 or by the last day of the
scheduled school year. If
the rst strike threatens
that deadline, both sides
must go into mandatory,
non-binding arbitration.
If a second strike is called
after arbitration, it must
end in time for students
to get 180 school days by
June 30.
Once again, a contin-
gent of teachers staged an
informational picket out-
side the meeting.
The Wyoming Area
Education Association
represents 160 teachers,
librarians and guidance
councilors. John Holland,
the regional director of
the Pennsylvania State
Education Association
and negotiator for the dis-
trict, said it all boils down
to wages.
We have agreements
on many items, but it
seems salary is the stick-
ing point, Holland said.
They want a wage freeze,
and were seeking a mod-
est increase.
PAGE 12A Wednesday, August 21, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
92/73
Chihuahua
79/57
Los Angeles
82/64
Washington
88/73
New York
89/73
Miami
89/81
Atlanta
83/71
Detroit
86/70
Houston
94/75
Kansas City
92/69
Chicago
88/70
Minneapolis
90/66
El Paso
94/72
Denver
94/63
Billings
90/60
San Francisco
69/57
Seattle
81/56
Toronto
86/67
Montreal
88/70
Winnipeg
79/49
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
THU SAT
SUN MON
FRI
TUE
TODAY
89
67
Partly
sunny, a
t-storm
87 63
Bright sun-
shine and
nice
78 52
Sunshine
81 53
Partly
sunny
84 60
Not as
warm
80 53
Partly
sunny, a
t-storm
81 57
Fog in the
morning;
sunshine
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 7
Month to date 77
Year to date 606
Last year to date 730
Normal year to date 473
Anchorage 62/55/sh 61/56/sh
Baltimore 90/69/pc 89/69/t
Boston 89/69/s 87/67/pc
Buffalo 86/66/s 82/60/t
Charlotte 84/69/t 87/68/t
Chicago 88/70/s 83/62/t
Cleveland 86/68/pc 83/61/pc
Dallas 98/76/pc 99/77/s
Denver 94/63/pc 92/63/pc
Honolulu 89/73/s 89/74/pc
Indianapolis 86/69/s 85/67/t
Las Vegas 103/85/s 103/84/s
Milwaukee 87/71/s 79/60/t
New Orleans 90/76/t 91/74/t
Norfolk 84/73/pc 88/72/t
Okla. City 94/71/s 95/71/s
Orlando 92/75/t 92/75/pc
Phoenix 109/88/pc107/88/pc
Pittsburgh 85/65/pc 82/63/t
Portland, ME 82/61/s 83/64/pc
St. Louis 90/73/s 92/71/pc
San Francisco 69/57/pc 70/56/s
Seattle 81/56/pc 83/56/pc
Wash., DC 88/73/pc 90/72/t
Bethlehem 1.94 -0.05 16
Wilkes-Barre 2.36 -0.40 22
Towanda 1.43 -0.23 16
Port Jervis 2.84 -0.04 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Tuesday.
Today Thu Today Thu Today Thu
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Aug 28 Sept 5
Sept 12
Last New
First Full
Sept 19
6:19 a.m.
7:59 p.m.
7:54 p.m.
6:57 a.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 80-86. Lows: 60-66. Patchy fog in the morning; otherwise,
mostly sunny and warm today. Partly cloudy tonight.
Highs: 81-87. Lows: 68-74. Humid today with intervals of clouds and
sun. Mostly cloudy and humid tonight with a passing shower.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 85-91. Lows: 61-67. Patchy fog in the morning; otherwise,
mostly sunny and warm today. Partly cloudy tonight.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 89. Low: 73. Mostly sunny, very warm and humid today. Partly
cloudy, warm and humid tonight.
High: 90. Low: 73. Hot and humid today with clouds and sun. Mostly
cloudy, warm and humid tonight with a passing shower.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Tuesday
High/low 85/58
Normal high/low 80/59
Record high 96 (1899)
Record low 43 (1896)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.80"
Normal m-t-d 2.26"
Year to date 17.74"
Normal y-t-d 23.88"
89/67
88/65
90/73
89/68
85/65
88/67
86/68
84/64
88/65
86/62
84/66
88/64
88/65
88/66
89/73
Summary: Hot and humid air will stretch from Texas to Maine and Michigan
today. Spotty storms will affect the South and interior West. Locally severe storms
are forecast from the northern Plains to the upper Great Lakes.
8
1
4
8
8
4
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From page 1A
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From page 1A
Controller
According to the investi-
gation ndings, the bureaus
Gas Safety Division received
an email from a Pipeline and
Hazardous Materials Safety
Administration representative
noting a person describing
himself as a UGI-PNG employ-
ee had alleged that a leak on
a high-pressure gas distribu-
tion line had been discovered
and subsequently repaired by
the company using improper
clamps on Saturday, May 12,
2012 , and that the clamps
used for the repair blew out on
Tuesday, May 15, and that the
gas company may be trying to
cover up the release.
The report goes on to spell
out that as a result of the Route
309 incident, the Gas Safety
Division conducted an expand-
ed investigation of UGI-PNG s
leak classication, surveys and
management systems and com-
pliance with state and federal
regulations.
A review of records over a
one-year period revealed that
UGI-PNG was not compliant
with federal/state regulations,
the Bureau of Investigations
and Enforcement found. The
report states UGI-PNG inade-
quately monitored and repaired
leaks, incorrectly classied
leaks, inadequately document-
ed and maintained documenta-
tion of leak survey and dispatch
data, and improperly used
and documented its use of the
Emergency One Call System.
Investigators ndings
In all, 12 violations or omis-
sions were found by investiga-
tors, most of which were viola-
tions of state and federal laws.
In addition to the $1 million
penalty UGI-PNG has agreed
to pay, regulators are also call-
ing for additional safety mea-
sures to be taken, including
the implementation of an auto-
mated, computer-based system
of recording and tracking the
results of leak surveys that
will be utilized by UGI-PNG s
employees and outside contrac-
tors performing leak surveys,
mapping, investigations and
repairs.
The history of violations was
taken into consideration when
determining the penalty, the
ndings show, noting that in
the past ve years, UGI-PNG
or its subsidiaries have been
involved in at least nine cases
arising from alleged gas safety
violations.
The substantial civil penalty
in this proceeding is warrant-
ed, the report states.
Utility response
In its chance to make a state-
ment led as part of the report,
staff attorney Kent D. Murphy
said UGI-PNG will take neces-
sary actions to ensure future
compliance. As part of that, the
company writes in the report
that it plans to hire a substan-
tial number of employees.
High on the list of priorities
are increased numbers of con-
struction inspectors, regulatory
compliance specialists, train-
ing personnel, and additional
workers trained in corrosion
prevention and other distri-
bution integrity management
functions, UGI-PNG includes
in the report.
associates degree in electri-
cal engineering from Penn
State University and also
attended Kings College
and Wilkes University.
He has worked at Harris
Semiconductor in Mountain
Top since 1961, advancing
from a technician to vari-
ous management positions,
most recently an engineer-
ing leader responsible for
eight engineers.
Kaufer has a bachelors
degree in government/law
and international business
from Layfayette College. He
has worked as controller at
Mr. Water Inc. in Kingston
from 2007 to 2011 and
unsucessfully ran for state
representative in the 120th
Legislative District against
Phyllis Mundy in 2012. He
has worked as an academic
lecturer since 2012, has
owned Kaufer Consulting
since 2011 and is co-owner
of Tap Cleaning Solutions in
Kingston.
Mitchell has abachelors
degree in American stud-
ies from Lafayette College
and has completed masters
level courses in accounting,
taxation and nancial plan-
ning at American College.
He is the mayor of Bear
Creek Village and has been
owner/operator of Mitchell
Financial Group, an insur-
ance and nancial and
estate planning rm, for 36
years.
Sokolowski has a mas-
ters degree in public admin-
istration from Marywood
University and a bachelors
degree in business adminis-
tration from the University
of Scranton. He worked
as a branch manager for
the U.S. Small Business
Administration from 1973
to 1984, corporate admin-
istrator at Markdata Inc.
until 1986 and held various
management positions at
the Tobyhanna Army Depot
from 1986 through May
2013, most recently in busi-
ness management.
Gagliardi has a masters
degree in government and
politics from Georgetown
University, a bachelors
degree in government and
history from Kings College
and a diploma in national
security studies from the
Naval War College. He has
17 years of experience with
the federal government,
20 years as a freelance
writer and has held various
customer-service and sales
positions in private industry.
Hudgeon, Wilkes-Barre,
has a bachelors degree in
business administration
from National University.
He has worked as an electri-
cian and also was employed
as maintenance manager for
various businesses, includ-
ing The Malakite Group in
Mineola, N.Y. and Lafayette
Ambassador Bank in
Nazareth.
Mitchell had withdrawn
his application for the con-
troller ballot slot awarded to
Medico Olenginski because
he did not want to close his
business for four years if he
would be elected. He said
Tuesday he could be a full-
time controller and still keep
his business operational for
four months because he has
an assistant and can meet
with clients outside county
business hours.
He supports councils
plans to honor the home
rule charter directive to
appoint someone.
To keep the ofce vacant
until the end of the year I
think is unfair to the tax-
payers of the county who
expect an independent
voice, especially with the
upcoming establishment of
the countys 2014 budget
and tax rates for the future,
Mitchell said.
The temporary appointee
will be paid $1,406 every
two weeks through Jan. 3,
when the controller elect-
ed in November will take
ofce. Medico Olenginski is
running against Democrat
Michelle Bednar.
County Council agreed
to publicly interview the
applicants starting at 6 p.m.
Thursday in the council
meeting room at the court-
house. The applicants will
be interviewed separately
and kept out of the room
while other contenders are
being interviewed to be fair,
council decided.
Council members plan
to choose someone at their
Aug. 27 meeting.
James May, spokesman
for PennDOT, said the
project will be nearly
complete by November,
but one section
between Vince and Cedar
streets wont get a nal
coat of pavement until
early spring. PennDOT
originally had thought
the project would be n-
ished this year.
When we ripped up
the road we found pock-
ets where the concrete
under-base had dete-
riorated, May said. So
we decided to x the
concrete under-base and
a rough coat will be put
down before winter sets
in. Well have to come
back in the spring to pave
the nish coat.
May said there may be
a few cosmetic things
left to complete in the
spring as well, but he
said most of the project
will be done by early
November.
The delay wont be
as bad as some people
think, May said. If the
weather cooperates, well
get most of the project
done before the tempera-
tures drop.
May said some people
might wonder why the
project cant be nished
this year. He said that
when temperatures get
into the mid 40s and
lower, the paving will not
hold up as well as when
its applied during warm-
er temperatures.
Theres always a temp-
tation to rush to get a
project done, May said.
But our engineers feels
its better to get it done
right even if we have to
wait until spring.
He said the project
began in November 2010
with utility work that
needed to be done before
road construction began.
He said PennDOT has
been working on the proj-
ect for three years.
May and Taluto offered
updates on other major
road projects in Luzerne
County:
Route 309 Mountain
Top
Partial design/build
project for the repair of
rock slopes and removal
of rock with pre-split
blasting; pavement work,
concrete barrier, drain-
age, erosion and sedi-
ment control measures,
pavement markings and
other construction. Work
has not begun yet.
Estimated completion,
November 2014; cost,
out for bid; trafc impact,
possible single lane in
both directions, possible
slow moving trafc.
North Main Street,
Wilkes-Barre near
Public Square
Project includes the
construction of sidewalks,
granite curbing, drainage
and other construction
along North Main Street.
Estimated completion,
October 2013; cost, $
611,522; prime contrac-
tor, Popple Construction
Inc. of Lain. Trafc
impact is unknown.
Interstate 81,
Avoca: Reconstruction
of I-81, Exit 178, and
Airport Access Road;
estimated completion:
November 2015; cost:
$41.9 million.
The project will include
the construction of about
a mile of new roadway ,
paved shoulders, drain-
age, guide rail, scaling of
rock slopes and pavement
markers; replacment of a
pedestrian bridge, con-
struction of a new beam
bridge and pre-cast arch
culvert. Prime contrac-
tor is Pennsy Supply of
Annville.
Trafc impact: Daytime
work will not impact traf-
c at this time,but night
work will. Widening work
on I-81 through this area
could cause major delays
with single lane closures.
Interstate 81 bridg-
es
Replacement of bridges
over Jumper and Sunset
roads; estimated comple-
tion, July, 2016; cost,
$20.7 million; work
includes the replacement
of four existing struc-
tures; all bridges will be
replaced and widened
to allow for two lanes
of trafc in both direc-
tions on I-81 to be main-
tained during construc-
tion; prime contractor,
New Enterprise Stone
& Lime Co., Inc. of New
Enterprise; trafc impact
limited to lane shifts.
Safety improve-
ments
State Route 118 and
Idetown Road; estimated
completion, July 2014;
cost, $1 million; widen-
ing full depth of intersec-
tion ; 4-foot shoulders,
embankment, pavement
base drain, new guide
rail, drainage, erosion and
sediment control mea-
sures, pavement mark-
ings, and other construc-
tion. Prime contractor:
New Enterprise Stone
& Lime Co. Inc. of New
Enterprise; trafc impact
unknown.
Airport Road
Hazleton Airport
safety improvements;
estimated completion,
August 2014; cost, $ 9.2
million; project consists
of ve new and modi-
ed trafc signals and
construction of two box
culverts, center turn
lane, overlay of the exist-
ing road; prime contrac-
tor, Barletta Materials
& Construction Inc., of
Tamaqua; trafc impacts,
unknown.
From page 1A
Bridge
Pete G. Wilcox | The Times Leader
Wyoming Area School District solicitor Jarrett Ferentino makes his
remarks at Tuesday nights School Board meeting.
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 1B
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AP photo
Penn State quarterbacks Tyler Ferguson, left, and Christian Hackenberg throw during the
teams practice Friday in State College.
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
A month ago, the situation seemed
very clear to Bill OBrien.
Spend the rst two weeks of camp
on his quarterback competition.
Spend the last two weeks getting his
starter ready for the opener against
Syracuse.
But Tyler Ferguson and Christian
Hackenberg continue to make it a
tough decision.
In a series of interviews Tuesday,
OBrien said he would likely pick a
starter by the end of the week for the
Aug. 31 opener against Syracuse. The
Penn State coach emphasized that he
expects both players will see the eld
at some point early on.
These are two of the best young
quarterbacks Ive ever coached,
OBrien said, rst in a radio interview
on ESPNs Mike & Mike, and then
again to reporters in State College. Ive
never had more fun coaching quarter-
backs than Ive had coaching these two
guys. Theyre bright guys. They work
at it, they compete in practice, theyve
got good demeanors, theyve got good
huddle command. Ive had a lot of fun
coaching both of these guys.
OBrien said that the starter will get
most of the practice reps next week and
the majority of the snaps in the game
against the Orange at MetLife Stadium
in East Rutherford, N.J.
But where OBrien was reluctant to
pull Matt McGloin last season in any
situation, the coach concedes that it
will be different in 2013 because he
doesnt have a veteran starter.
In this situation where you have
two young guys, I think its important
for each guy to continue to earn their
stripes and continue to gain the respect
of their teammates, OBrien said. Until
I feel really good about where thats at,
Id say both guys, its very close.
The guy thats the starter is going
to be the starter. But I think its
important when you have two young
guys, its a totally different situation
than last year. Whoever the backup is
is a young guy that needs to get his
feet wet a little bit. So, why not play
him a series here or there, just to get
him into a major college football game
and let him get his feet wet?
Infirmary report
Starting right tackle Adam Gress
continues to be hampered by a knee
injury, but OBrien expects him to
return to practice soon. Converted
tight end Garry Gilliam has run with
the rst team in his absence.
OBrien: QBnamed by the end of the week
See QB | 3B
KRISTI EATON
Associated Press Writer
DUNCAN, Okla. With
the simplest of motives
breaking up the boredom
of an Oklahoma summer
three teenagers followed an
Australian collegiate baseball
player who was attending
school in the U.S. and killed
him with a shot to the back
for the fun of it, prosecutors
said Tuesday as they charged
two of the teens with murder.
As the boys appeared in an
Oklahoma courtroom, a 17-year-
old blurted out, I pulled the
trigger, then
wept after a
judge told him
that Tuesdays
hearing wasnt
the time or
place to sort
out the facts of
the case.
Prosecutor JasonHicks called
the boys thugs as he told
Stephens County Judge Jerry
Herberger how Christopher
Lane, 22, of Melbourne, died
on a city street.
Chancey Allen Luna, 16, and
James Francis Edwards, Jr.,
15, of Duncan were charged
with rst-degree murder and,
under Oklahoma law, will
be tried as adults. Michael
Dewayne Jones, 17, of Duncan
was accused of using a vehicle
in the discharge of a weapon
and accessory to rst-degree
murder after the fact. He is
considered a youthful offender
but will be tried in adult court.
Im appalled, Hicks said
after the hearing. This is not
supposed to happen in this
community.
In court, Hicks said Luna
was sitting in the rear seat of a
car when he pulled the trigger
on a .22 caliber revolver and
shot Lane once in the back.
Hicks said Jones was driving
the vehicle and Edwards was
in the passenger seat.
Edwards has had run-ins
with the law previously and
had been in court Friday, the
day of the killing, to sign doc-
uments related to his juvenile
probation.
I believe this man is a
threat to the community and
should not be let out, Hicks
said as he requested no bond
for Edwards. He thinks its all
a joke.
3 teens charged afer college athlete slain
AP photo
Sarah Harper, Christopher Lanes girlfriend, stands beside a memorial along
the road where police say Lane, an Australian baseball player, was shot and
killed in Duncan, Okla., Friday by three bored teenagers who decided to kill
someone for fun.
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Lane
JOSH DUBOW
AP Sports Writer
SAN FRANCISCO
Bostons Ryan Dempster was
suspended for ve games and
ned by Major League Baseball
for intentionally hitting
Yankees star
Alex Rodriguez
with a pitch
last weekend.
The penalty
was announced
Tuesday by
MLB senior
vice president
Joe Garagiola Jr., two days
after Dempster hit A-Rod in the
second inning at Fenway Park.
Yankees manager Joe Girardi
was ned for arguing with plate
umpire Brian ONora.
Dempsters ne was $2,500
and Girardis was $5,000,
people familiar with the dis-
cipline told The Associated
Press. They spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because the
amounts were not announced.
Dempster wont appeal the
decision.
I thought it was in the best
interest of my team to go ahead
and serve my suspension, he
said before Boston played the
Giants in San Francisco.
He was scheduled to pitch
Saturday at the Los Angeles
Dodgers, but now could be
pushed back to next Tuesdays
homestand opener against
Baltimore. He will throw a sim-
ulated game on Friday.
Earlier Tuesday, Girardi
insisted it would be open
season on Rodriguez if MLB
failed to suspend Dempster.
I think I made my feelings
pretty clear then, he said after
the suspension was announced.
Dempster
gets 5-game
suspension
for A-Rod hit
Dempster
See DEMPSTER | 5B
See ATHLETE | 5B
AP photos
Philadelphia Eagles Michael Vick passes during the first half Thursday against the Carolina Panthers in Philadelphia. Vick was named the Eagles
starter for their season opener on Tuesday.
DAN GELSTON
AP Sports Writer
PHILADELPHIA Michael Vick
took a pay cut and had to compete for
his job when he returned to the Eagles.
Part of the choice had to do with
the up-tempo offense mapped out by
new coach Chip Kelly.
I just thought, Vick said, this
was the best opportunity, the best t
for me.
Turns out, Vick was the best t for
Kelly.
With his rst chance to put his
stamp on Philadelphias offense, Kelly
named Vick the starting quarterback
on Tuesday, giving the veteran the
nod over Nick Foles after a sterling
effort in the preseason.
Hes our starter for the season, Kelly
said. Its not a one-game trial basis.
CHIPS PICK ISVICK
Coach Kelly
names Vick
starting QB
Washington Redskins linebacker Ryan Kerrigan (91) celebrates his
touchdown during the first half Monday against the Pittsburgh
Steelers in Landover, Md.
WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
PITTSBURGH Mike
Tomlin is running out of
patience. Even worse, his team
is running out of running backs.
The Pittsburgh Steelers
muddled through another list-
less preseason performance on
Monday night, losing to the
Washington Redskins 24-13
that did little to allay the coachs
concerns with three weeks to go
before the games start to count.
We need to get better in a
hurry, Tomlin said.
And get healthy too.
Rookie running back LeVeon
Bells professional debut lasted all
of four carries before he left with a
sprained right foot. Fullback Will
Johnson followed him to the side-
line with a rib injury while Baron
Batch sustained a stinger after
taking a particularly vicious hit.
The trio joined Isaac Redman,
who sat out as a precaution
after suffering a stinger in prac-
tice, on an increasingly crowded
training table.
While Tomlin expects Johnson,
Batch and Redman to return soon,
Bells status wont be determined
until later. The second-round draft
pick was scheduled to undergo
an MRI on the foot Tuesday and
a determination wont be made
until later in the week on his avail-
ability for Saturdays game against
Kansas City.
Whoever is on the eld will
be tasked with trying to build
some positive momentum head-
ing into the nal days of train-
ing camp. There wasnt much to
Halfway through preseason, Steelers still sloppy
See VICK | 4B
See STEELERS | 4B
PAGE 2B Wednesday, August 21, 2013 scoreboard www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
National League
Atlanta -140 at NewYork +130
St. Louis -125 at Milwaukee +115
Pittsburgh -115 at San Diego +105
at Philadelphia -175 Colorado +165
at Cincinnati -180 Arizona +170
Los Angeles -170 at Miami +160
at Chicago -105 Washington -105
American League
at Oakland -140 Seattle +130
at NewYork -125 Toronto +115
at Baltimore -115 Tampa Bay +105
Cleveland -135 at Los Angeles +125
at Detroit -250 Minnesota +220
at Texas -300 Houston +250
at Kansas City -165 Chicago +155
Interleague
Boston -140 at San Francisco +130
NFL PRESEASON
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Tomorrow
at Detroit 1 2 (46) NewEngland
at Baltimore 3 3 (42) Carolina
Friday
Seattle 3 2 (42) at Green Bay
Chicago 3 3 (38) at Oakland
Saturday
at Washington 3 3 (42) Bufalo
at N.Y. Giants 2 2 (39) N.Y. Jets
at Indianapolis 2 2 (42) Cleveland
at Miami 2 3 (40) Tampa Bay
at Pittsburgh 3 2 (40) Kansas City
Philadelphia 3 3 (43) at Jacksonville
at Tennessee 2 3 (42) Atlanta
at Denver 7 6 (43) St. Louis
at Dallas 2 3 (43) Cincinnati
at Arizona 4 4 (40) San Diego
Sunday
at Houston 2 2 (43) NewOrleans
at San Francisco 4 4 (40) Minnesota
LATEST LINE
baseball
football
golf
local calendar
transacti ons
what s on tv
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Rochester (Twins) 72 60 .545
Pawtucket (Red Sox) 70 60 .538 1
Bufalo (Blue Jays) 67 64 .511 4
LehighValley (Phillies) 67 64 .511 4
RailRiders (Yankees) 63 68 .481 8
Syracuse (Nationals) 62 70 .470 10
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham(Rays) 81 50 .618
Norfolk (Orioles) 69 63 .523 12
Charlotte (White Sox) 59 71 .454 21
Gwinnett (Braves) 56 76 .424 25
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates) 73 59 .553
Columbus (Indians) 64 68 .485 9
Louisville (Reds) 61 71 .462 12
Toledo (Tigers) 56 76 .424 17
Tuesdays Games
Columbus 5, Norfolk 3
Louisville 5, Rochester 1
Toledo 5, Gwinnett 0
Syracuse 3, Indianapolis 2
Durham5, Charlotte 4
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 3, Lehigh Valley 1
Pawtucket 1, Bufalo 0
Wednesdays Games
Charlotte at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre,
7:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Charlotte at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
LehighValley at Bufalo, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Columbus, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Durhamat Norfolk, 7:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre,
7:05 p.m.
EASTERN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
z-Binghamton (Mets) 80 49 .620
Trenton (Yankees) 66 62 .516 13
NewHampshire (Blue Jays)63 64 .496 16
Portland (Red Sox) 61 67 .477 18
NewBritain (Twins) 60 69 .465 20
Reading (Phillies) 54 74 .422 25
WEDNESDAY
H.S. GOLF
Berwick at HazletonArea
Coughlin at PittstonArea
Dallas at Tunkhannock
GAR at WyomingArea
Holy Redeemer at Meyers, 4 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
WyomingValley West at Crestwood, 3:30 p.m.
MENS COLLEGE SOCCER
Scranton at Kings, TBA
THURSDAY
H.S. GIRLSTENNIS
Berwick at GAR
Hanover Area at Dallas
HazletonArea at Crestwood, 4:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Coughlin, 4 p.m.
MMI Prep at WyomingValley West
PittstonArea at Wyoming Seminary
Tunkhannock at WyomingArea
FRIDAY
H.S. FOOTBALL SCRIMMAGES
Wallenpaupack at WyomingValleyWest, 10a.m.
Dunmore at PittstonArea, 5 p.m.
Holy Cross at Nanticoke, 5 p.m.
Bangor at HazletonArea, 6 p.m.
Central Dauphin at Berwick, 6 p.m.
Meyers at MidValley, 6 p.m.
Northwest at Athens, 6 p.m.
Tunkhannock at WesternWayne, 6 p.m.
Coughlin at Scranton, 7 p.m.
Crestwood at Lackawanna Trail, 7 p.m.
Dallas at GAR, 7 p.m.
Honesdale at Hanover Area, 7 p.m.
Riverside at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
Valley Viewat WyomingArea, 7 p.m.
H.S GOLF
Holy Redeemer at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at Nanticoke
MMI Prep at Hanover Area
WyomingArea at Meyers
H.S GIRLSTENNIS
Crestwood at Tamaqua, 4 p.m.
SATURDAY
H.S FOOTBALL SCRIMMAGE
Holy Redeemer at Col-Montour Vo-Tech, 10a.m.
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Truck Series, practice for
UNOH200, at Bristol, Tenn.
Noon
FS1 NASCAR, Truck Series, practice for
UNOH200, at Bristol, Tenn.
8 p.m.
FS1 NASCAR, Truck Series, UNOH 200, at
Bristol, Tenn.
CYCLING
4 p.m.
NBCSN USA Pro Challenge, stage 3, Breck-
enridge to Steamboat Springs, Colo.
LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL
4 p.m.
ESPN World Series, double elimination,
teams TBD, at SouthWilliamsport
8 p.m.
ESPN World Series, double elimination,
teams TBD, at SouthWilliamsport
MLB
1 p.m.
SNYAtlanta at N.Y. Mets
3:30 p.m.
MLBRegional coverage, Boston at San Fran-
cisco or Seattle at Oakland
6:30 p.m.
ROOTPittsburgh at San Diego
7 p.m.
CSNColorado at Philadelphia
ESPN2 Tampa Bay at Baltimore
YES Toronto at N.Y. Yankees
8 p.m.
WGNWashington at Chicago Cubs
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
WQMYPawtucket at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
SOCCER
2:30 p.m.
PLUS, ROOT UEFA Champions League, Aus-
tria Wien at Dinamo Zagreb
FS1 UEFA Champions League, Fenerbahce
vs. Arsenal, at Istanbul
2:45 p.m.
NBCSN Premier League, Chelsea at Aston
Villa
4:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Spanish Primera Division, Super-
copa, frst leg, Barcelona at Atletico Madrid
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals) 69 60 .535
Erie (Tigers) 68 60 .531
Bowie (Orioles) 65 63 .508 3
Richmond (Giants) 65 64 .504 4
Akron (Indians) 60 68 .469 8
Altoona (Pirates) 59 70 .457 10
z-clinched playof spot
Tuesdays Games
Harrisburg 3, Richmond 2, 1st game
NewHampshire 8, Portland 6
Bowie 4, Binghamton 1
Reading 2, Altoona 0
Erie 6, Akron 5
NewBritain 6, Trenton 4
Harrisburg 5, Richmond 1, 2nd game
Wednesdays Games
NewHampshire at Portland, 12 p.m.
Bowie at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Reading at Altoona, 7 p.m.
Akron at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Richmond, 7:05 p.m.
Trenton at NewBritain, 7:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Erie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
Binghamton at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
Portland at Trenton, 7:05 p.m.
NewBritain at Bowie, 7:05 p.m.
Altoona at Richmond, 7:05 p.m.
NewHampshire at Reading, 7:05 p.m.
NEWYORk - PENN LEAGUE
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
Aberdeen (Orioles) 30 27 .526
Brooklyn (Mets) 31 29 .517
HudsonValley (Rays) 28 32 .467 3
Staten Island (Yankees) 24 36 .400 7
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
Jamestown (Pirates) 36 23 .610
State College (Cardinals) 36 23 .610
Batavia (Marlins) 30 27 .526 5
Williamsport (Phillies) 29 30 .492 7
MahoningValley (Indians) 23 35 .397 12
Auburn (Nationals) 20 39 .339 16
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
Tri-City (Astros) 36 25 .590
Lowell (Red Sox) 34 24 .586
Vermont (Athletics) 29 32 .475 7
Connecticut (Tigers) 28 32 .467 7
Tuesdays Games
Brooklyn 2, Staten Island 0
Tri-City 2, Vermont 1
HudsonValley 1, Aberdeen 0
Connecticut 6, Lowell 1
Batavia 2, Auburn 1
State College 10, Williamsport 4
Jamestown 4, MahoningValley 2
Wednesdays Games
Auburn at Batavia, 5:05 p.m., 1st game
Brooklyn at Staten Island, 7 p.m.
Lowell at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Aberdeen at HudsonValley, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Vermont, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at State College, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at MahoningValley, 7:05 p.m.
Auburn at Batavia, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
Thursdays Games
Staten Island at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
Auburn at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Lowell at Connecticut, 7:05 p.m.
Aberdeen at HudsonValley, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at State College, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Vermont, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at MahoningValley, 7:05 p.m.
MONDAYS LATE BOxSCORES
Pirates 3, Padres 1
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
J.Harrison rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236
Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259
McCutchen cf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .317
P.Alvarez 3b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .234
G.Jones 1b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .243
Ju.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-R.Martin ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .249
Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Mercer ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .275
Tabata lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .265
T.Sanchez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .189
Liriano p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077
b-G.Sanchez ph-1b0 0 0 0 1 0 .237
Totals 27 3 5 1 4 4
San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Denorfa rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .275
Venable cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .263
Gyorko 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .251
Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289
Headley 3b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .237
Forsythe lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .215
Hundley c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .245
R.Cedeno ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .214
d-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .197
Cashner p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .256
a-Decker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .158
Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 33 1 6 1 2 17
Pittsburgh 000 201 0003 5 0
San Diego 000 000 0011 6 1
a-struck out for Cashner in the 7th. b-walked
for Liriano in the 8th. c-grounded out for
Ju.Wilson in the 9th. d-struck out for R.Cedeno
in the 9th.
EDenorfa (5). LOBPittsburgh 2, San Di-
ego 7. 2BDenorfa (16), Forsythe (5), Hundley
(15). HRP.Alvarez (31), of Cashner. RBIsP.
Alvarez (82), Hundley (32). CSMcCutchen (8).
SLiriano.
Runners left in scoring positionPittsburgh
1 (Walker); San Diego 5 (Venable, R.Cedeno 2,
Gyorko, Kotsay). RISPPittsburgh 0 for 2; San
Diego 0 for 7.
Runners moved upVenable. GIDPTabata.
DPSan Diego 3 (Cashner, Alonso), (Gy-
orko, R.Cedeno, Alonso), (Hundley, Hundley,
R.Cedeno).
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
LirianoW, 14-5 7 4 0 0 2 13 104 2.53
Ju.Wilson H, 12 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 1.97
Melancon S, 8-10 1 2 1 1 0 2 21 0.93
San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cashner L, 8-8 7 5 3 1 2 3 85 3.74
Boxberger 2 0 0 0 2 1 29 3.27
WPMelancon. BalkLiriano.
UmpiresHome, Paul Nauert; First, Doug
Eddings; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Dana
DeMuth.
T2:36. A24,850 (42,524).
Red Sox 7, Giants 0
Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Ellsbury cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .296
Victorino rf 4 0 3 1 0 0 .285
Pedroia 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .290
D.Ortiz 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .323
Carp 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .310
Saltalamacchia c 4 2 2 1 1 2 .272
Nava lf 4 2 3 1 1 0 .295
Drewss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .248
Middlebrooks 3b 1 0 0 1 2 0 .222
Lester p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Workman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 35 7 12 5 4 9
San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
An.Torres cf 4 0 3 0 0 0 .250
Scutaro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .300
Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .271
Posey c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .305
Pence rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282
Sandoval 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .266
Arias 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .282
Francoeur lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .194
Moscoso p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Mijares p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-H.Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .241
B.Crawford ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .272
Lincecump 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091
Pill lf 0 0 0 0 2 0 .220
Totals 32 0 6 0 2 5
Boston 030 011 0027 12 1
San Francisco 000 000 0000 6 1
a-struck out for Mijares in the 9th.
EDrew (6), Posey (6). LOBBoston 9, San
Francisco 7. 2BVictorino (20), Saltalamacchia
(34), Drew(20). 3BPedroia (2). RBIsVictorino
(38), Saltalamacchia (48), Nava (56), Drew (49),
Middlebrooks (30). SLester. SFMiddlebrooks.
Runners left in scoring positionBoston 5
(D.Ortiz, Pedroia, Lester 3); San Francisco 3 (Belt,
Scutaro, H.Sanchez). RISPBoston 4 for 12; San
Francisco 0 for 5.
Runners moved upDrew. GIDPPedroia 2,
Scutaro, Sandoval.
DPBoston 2 (Pedroia, Drew, D.Ortiz), (Drew,
D.Ortiz); San Francisco 2 (B.Crawford, Scutaro,
Belt), (Scutaro, B.Crawford, Belt).
Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lester W, 11-7 8 1-3 6 0 0 2 3 115 4.09
Workman 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 10 4.65
San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
LincecumL, 6-13 5 9 5 5 4 4 104 4.53
Moscoso 3 0 0 0 0 4 40 4.08
Mijares 1 3 2 2 0 1 25 3.80
Lincecumpitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scoredWorkman 2-0,
Moscoso 1-1. IBBof Lincecum (Middlebrooks,
Middlebrooks). HBPby Moscoso (Victorino).
WPMoscoso. BalkLincecum. Catchers inter-
ferencePosey.
UmpiresHome, TimWelke; First, Mike Everitt;
Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Bruce Dreckman.
T2:59. A41,585 (41,915).
Indians 5, Angels 2
Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Bourn cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .268
Swisher rf-1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .244
Kipnis 2b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .292
C.Santana 1b 2 1 1 1 2 0 .263
1-Stubbs pr-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242
Brantley lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .282
A.Cabrera ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .238
Giambi dh 3 0 1 1 0 0 .188
Chisenhall 3b 3 1 2 2 0 1 .224
a-Aviles ph-3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .263
Y.Gomes c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .299
Totals 34 5 10 5 5 6
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Shuck dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .295
Aybar ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .281
Hamilton lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .228
Trumbo 1b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .242
Conger c 2 0 1 0 2 0 .248
Nelson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .241
Calhoun rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .215
G.Green 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250
Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .305
Totals 30 2 6 2 3 9
Cleveland 000 400 0015 10 0
Los Angeles 000 100 0012 6 0
a-singled for Chisenhall in the 8th.
1-ran for C.Santana in the 7th.
LOBCleveland 9, Los Angeles 4. 2BA.Ca-
brera (28), Giambi (7), Aybar (21), Conger (10).
HRChisenhall (7), of Weaver; Swisher (14), of
Jepsen; Trumbo (29), of C.Perez. RBIsSwisher
(41), C.Santana (53), Giambi (29), Chisenhall 2
(28), Trumbo 2 (83). SBKipnis (23). CSAviles
(4). SFGiambi.
Runners left in scoring positionCleveland 3
(Swisher, Bourn, A.Cabrera). RISPCleveland 3
for 7; Los Angeles 1 for 3.
GIDPBrantley, Aybar, Bourjos.
DPCleveland 3 (Kipnis, A.Cabrera,
C.Santana), (Swisher, Swisher, Y.Gomes),
(A.Cabrera, Kipnis, C.Santana); Los Angeles 1
(G.Green, Aybar, Trumbo).
Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
McAllisterW,6-7 61-3 5 1 1 2 5 103 3.59
ShawH, 9 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.90
J.Smith H, 19 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 2.63
C.Perez 1 1 1 1 0 2 21 3.46
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Weaver L, 7-7 6 8 4 4 2 5 100 3.62
Kohn 1 0 0 0 2 1 22 3.79
Boshers 1 1 0 0 1 0 10 4.15
Jepsen 1 1 1 1 0 0 12 4.63
Inherited runners-scoredShaw 1-0. HBPby
Weaver (A.Cabrera).
UmpiresHome, Dan Iassogna; First, Brian
Knight; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Gerry Davis.
T3:03. A36,574 (45,483).
Athletics 2, Mariners 1
Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Miller ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .249
Franklin 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .236
Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282
K.Morales dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .290
Ibanez lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .251
Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .269
M.Saunders rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .235
Ackley cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .237
Quintero c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .261
Totals 32 1 8 1 0 8
Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246
Lowrie ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283
Reddick rf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .218
Cespedes lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .229
Moss 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .241
Donaldson 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .296
Callaspo dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .251
Vogt c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .234
Sogard 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .265
Totals 31 2 6 2 1 6
Seattle 000 000 1001 8 0
Oakland 000 100 0012 6 2
One out when winning run scored.
EReddick (5), J.Parker (4). LOBSeattle 5,
Oakland 5. 2BLowrie (33). HRMoss (19), of
Capps. RBIsK.Morales (66), Moss (55), Donald-
son (69). CSB.Miller (1). SAckley.
Runners left in scoring positionSeattle 2
(B.Miller, Franklin); Oakland 2 (Vogt, Reddick).
RISPSeattle 1 for 7; Oakland 0 for 4.
Runners moved upSeager, Ackley, Moss.
GIDPIbanez.
DPOakland 1 (Sogard, Lowrie, Moss).
Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Harang 7 5 1 1 1 3 97 5.49
Furbush 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 3.24
Capps L, 2-3 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 7 6.07
Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.Parker W, 9-6 9 8 1 1 0 8 100 3.71
UmpiresHome, Eric Cooper; First, Paul
Schrieber; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Jef
Kellogg.
T2:19. A11,112 (35,067).
Cardinals 8, Brewers 5
St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 3b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .312
Beltran rf 5 1 3 1 0 0 .304
Holliday lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .285
Wacha p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111
d-Freese ph 1 0 1 2 0 0 .267
Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Craig 1b-lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .309
Y.Molina c 5 1 4 1 0 0 .334
Jay cf 4 1 1 2 1 0 .273
Wong 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .154
Kozma ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .221
b-Descalso ph-ss 2 1 1 0 0 0 .258
S.Miller p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .098
Maness p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
S.Robinson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .256
c-Ma.Adams ph-1b1 1 1 1 0 0 .281
Totals 42 8 16 8 2 4
Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aoki rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .278
Segura ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .309
Lucroy c 4 1 3 2 1 0 .287
Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 1 2 1 1 .254
J.Francisco 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .240
Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Badenhop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-Bianchi ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .248
K.Davis lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .302
Gennett 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .321
L.Schafer cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .212
Estrada p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .238
a-Halton ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188
Wooten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Y.Betancourt 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .205
Totals 37 5 11 5 4 10
St. Louis 100 102 0408 16 1
Milwaukee 001 010 3005 11 0
a-lined out for Estrada in the 6th. b-singled for
Kozma in the 8th. c-singled for S.Robinson in the
8th. d-doubled for Wacha in the 8th. e-singled for
Badenhop in the 9th.
EWacha (1). LOBSt. Louis 9, Milwaukee
11. 2BHolliday (21), Freese (22), Y.Molina (34),
K.Davis (5). HRBeltran (21), of Estrada; Jay
(7), of Estrada; Aoki (7), of S.Miller; Ar.Ramirez
(6), of Wacha. RBIsM.Carpenter (62), Bel-
tran (65), Freese 2 (45), Y.Molina (57), Jay 2
(56), Ma.Adams (35), Aoki (29), Lucroy 2 (66),
Ar.Ramirez 2 (28). SBWong 2 (2). SGennett.
Runners left in scoring positionSt. Louis 7
(Holliday, Kozma, S.Miller, Craig 3, Descalso); Mil-
waukee 5 (J.Francisco 2, Aoki, Gennett 2). RISP
St. Louis 4 for 13; Milwaukee 2 for 9.
Runners moved upBeltran, Jay, Segura.
GIDPJay.
DPMilwaukee 1 (Y.Betancourt, Segura, Kint-
zler).
St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
S.Miller 5 1-3 5 2 2 4 8 101 2.98
Maness H, 12 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.09
WachaW,2-0BS,1-1 1 4 3 3 0 1 30 4.73
Siegrist H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.71
Mujica S, 32-34 1 2 0 0 0 0 18 1.65
Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Estrada 6 8 4 4 1 4 95 4.80
Wooten 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 0.69
KintzlerL,3-1BS,1-1 2-3 6 4 4 0 0 31 2.98
Badenhop 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 22 3.38
Inherited runners-scoredManess 2-0,
Badenhop 3-2. HBPby S.Miller (K.Davis).
UmpiresHome, Tim McClelland; First, Marty
Foster; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Wally Bell.
T3:26. A32,972 (41,900).
Rangers 16, Astros 5
Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Grossman cf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .260
Wallace 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .222
Altuve 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .277
1-Ma.Gonzalezpr-2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229
J.Castro dh-c 3 1 2 0 1 0 .270
Carter lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .214
M.Dominguez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .237
Corporan c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245
Elmore c-p 2 1 1 0 1 0 .250
Hoes rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .313
Villar ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .244
Totals 35 5 9 5 2 10
Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
L.Martin cf-rf 4 3 3 2 1 0 .280
Andrus ss 4 3 2 1 1 0 .256
Rosales ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .190
Kinsler dh 3 1 1 3 0 0 .266
A.Beltre 3b 2 1 0 1 2 0 .324
Je.Baker 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .297
Pierzynski c 5 2 4 4 0 1 .285
Rios rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .276
a-Gentry ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248
Moreland 1b 5 1 1 2 0 0 .244
Profar 2b 4 2 1 0 1 0 .243
Dav.Murphy lf 5 2 1 1 0 1 .223
Totals 38 16 14 14 5 3
Houston 010 000 4005 9 2
Texas 20(11) 101 10x16 14 0
a-fied out for Rios in the 7th.
1-ran for Altuve in the 6th.
EM.Dominguez (12), Villar (6). LOBHous-
ton 5, Texas 5. 2BGrossman (10), Wallace (9),
J.Castro (32), Carter (17), M.Dominguez (19),
Pierzynski (17), Moreland (20), Profar (8), Dav.
Murphy (23). HRPierzynski (14), of Humber.
RBIsGrossman 2 (16), Wallace (28), Carter
(63), Hoes (4), L.Martin 2 (31), Andrus (43), Kin-
sler 3 (54), A.Beltre (76), Pierzynski 4 (52), More-
land 2 (50), Dav.Murphy (40). SBAndrus 2 (33),
A.Beltre (1). SKinsler. SFKinsler.
Runners left in scoring positionHouston 2
(Hoes, Ma.Gonzalez); Texas 3 (Rios, Kinsler, Mo-
reland). RISPHouston 5 for 10; Texas 6 for 16.
Runners moved upL.Martin, A.Beltre, Dav.
Murphy. GIDPVillar.
DPTexas 1 (Andrus, Profar, Moreland).
Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Harrell L, 6-14 2 1-3 7 9 7 3 2 62 5.55
LeBlanc 2 2-3 5 5 1 2 1 67 7.11
Humber 2 2 2 2 0 0 25 9.07
Elmore 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00
Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Garza W, 3-1 6 2-3 8 5 5 1 8 112 4.32
R.Ross 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 18 2.82
Soria 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.75
Inherited runners-scoredLeBlanc 3-3,
R.Ross 1-1. IBBof Harrell (A.Beltre, A.Beltre).
WPGarza.
UmpiresHome, Gary Cederstrom; First, Ker-
win Danley; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Vic
Carapazza.
T3:06. A32,113 (48,114).
Cubs 11, Nationals 1
Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Span cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .264
Krol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Zimmerman 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266
Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-DeJesus ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .249
Harper lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .267
Werth rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .330
Ad.LaRoche 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .235
Desmond ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .272
Tracy 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .193
W.Ramos c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .296
Rendon 2b-ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .260
Zimmermann p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .122
Lombardozzi 3b-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254
Totals 32 1 6 1 0 5
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Lake cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .315
Barney 2b 2 2 1 0 1 0 .218
D.Navarro c 2 3 1 3 2 0 .291
Schierholtz rf 4 2 3 6 0 0 .277
St.Castro ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .242
Do.Murphy 3b 4 2 2 2 0 2 .318
D.McDonald lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .100
Ransom1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .191
Samardzija p 4 0 0 0 0 1 .125
Totals 32 11 9 11 3 7
Washington 000 000 1001 6 0
Chicago 301 130 21x11 9 0
a-popped out for Abad in the 8th.
LOBWashington 4, Chicago 1. 2BLake
2 (8), Schierholtz (26). HRW.Ramos (8), of
Samardzija; Schierholtz (17), of Zimmermann;
Do.Murphy (5), of Zimmermann; D.Navarro
(11), ofZimmermann; Schierholtz (18), ofAbad;
Do.Murphy (6), of Krol. RBIsW.Ramos (31),
D.Navarro 3 (25), Schierholtz 6 (58), Do.Murphy
2 (11). SBarney.
Runners left in scoring positionWashington 1
(Harper); Chicago 1 (St.Castro). RISPWashing-
ton 0 for 1; Chicago 2 for 3.
GIDPDesmond.
DPChicago 1 (Samardzija, Barney, Ransom).
Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
ZimmermannL,14-7 5 7 8 8 2 5 81 3.37
Abad 2 1 2 2 1 0 29 3.56
Krol 1 1 1 1 0 2 13 3.24
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
SamardzijaW, 7-11 9 6 1 1 0 5 105 4.12
UmpiresHome, Laz Diaz; First, Bill Miller;
Second, Mike Winters; Third, TimTimmons.
T2:14. A31,290 (41,019).
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Bufalo 2 0 0 1.000 64 36
NewEngland 2 0 0 1.000 56 43
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 54 39
Miami 1 2 0 .333 64 51
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 51 30
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 40 56
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 16 64
Tennessee 0 2 0 .000 40 49
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000 71 39
Cincinnati 2 0 0 1.000 61 29
Cleveland 2 0 0 1.000 51 25
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 26 42
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 1 1 0 .500 20 46
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 39 45
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 26 32
San Diego 0 2 0 .000 38 64
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Washington 2 0 0 1.000 46 34
N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 30 33
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 36 40
Dallas 1 2 0 .333 48 51
South
W L T Pct PF PA
NewOrleans 2 0 0 1.000 45 33
Carolina 1 1 0 .500 33 31
Atlanta 0 2 0 .000 33 61
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 37 69
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 50 52
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 32 41
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 19 24
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 29 47
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 2 0 0 1.000 29 7
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 71 20
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 21 23
St. Louis 0 2 0 .000 26 46
Saturdays Games
Arizona 12, Dallas 7
Cincinnati 27, Tennessee 19
N.Y. Jets 37, Jacksonville 13
Green Bay 19, St. Louis 7
Houston 24, Miami 17
Seattle 40, Denver 10
Sundays Game
Indianapolis 20, N.Y. Giants 12
Mondays Game
Washington 24, Pittsburgh 13
Thursday, Aug. 22
NewEngland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Baltimore, 8 p.m.
Friday, Aug. 23
Seattle at Green Bay, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Oakland, 10 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 24
Bufalo at Washington, 4:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Indianapolis, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 7 p.m.
Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Denver, 8 p.m.
Cincinnati at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Atlanta at Tennessee, 8 p.m.
San Diego at Arizona, 10 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 25
NewOrleans at Houston, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at San Francisco, 8 p.m.
BASEBALL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Suspended
Boston RHP Ryan Dempster fve games and
fned him an undisclosed amount for hitting N.Y.
Yankee 3B Alex Rodriguez with a pitch during
Sundays game. Fined N.Y. Yankee manager Joe
Girardi an undisclosed amount for his argument
over the same incident with home plate umpire
Brian ONora.
American League
CLEVELAND INDIANS Released RHP
Daisuke Matsuzaka.
HOUSTON ASTROS Designated LHP Wade
LeBlanc for assignment. Placed C Carlos Corpo-
ran on the seven-day DL. Selected the contracts
of RHPDavid Martinez fromOklahoma City (PCL)
and CMax Stassi fromCorpus Christi (TL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Released 2B Elliot
Johnson. Optioned LHP Will Smith to Omaha
(PCL). Reinstated OF Justin Maxwell from the
bereavement list.
The Royals cleared roster space for him by
sending reliever Will Smith toTriple-AOmaha.
MINNESOTA TWINS Optioned RHP Kyle
Gibson to Rochester (IL). Recalled RHP Michael
Tonkin from Rochester. Agreed to terms with 3B
Brad Boyer on a minor league contract.
NEWYORK YANKEES Recalled RHP Preston
Claiborne fromScranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
OAKLAND ATHLETICS Extended their
player development contract with Stockton (Cal)
through the 2016 season.
TAMPA BAY RAYS Assigned INF Ryan Rob-
erts outright to Durham(IL).
TEXAS RANGERS Placed RHPAlexi Ogando
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 14. Selected
the contract of LHP Travis Blackley from Round
Rock (PCL). Recalled RHP Matt West fromMyrtle
Beach (Carolina) and placed him on the 60-day
DL.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Recalled RHP Thad
Weber fromBufalo (IL).
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS Sent 2B Willie
Bloomquist to theAZLDiamondbacks for a rehab
assignment.
NEWYORKMETSOptioned CAnthony Reck-
er to Las Vegas (PCL). Agreed to terms with RHPs
Mitch Talbert and Daryl Thompson and assigned
themto Las Vegas (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES Optioned LHP
Raul Valdes to LehighValley (IL). Recalled RHPTy-
ler Cloyd from Lehigh Valley. Sent RHPs Roy Hal-
laday to Lakewood (SAL) andJonathan Pettibone
to LehighValley for rehab assignments.
PITTSBURGH PIRATES Sent OF Travis Snid-
er toAltoona (EL) for a rehab assignment.
SANFRANCISCOGIANTS Placed RHP Chad
Gaudin on the 15-day DL. Designated OF Jef
Francoeur for assignment. Recalled LHP Mike
Kickhamand RHPJean Machi fromFresno (PCL).
American Association
ST. PAUL SAINTS Signed C Jeremy Mayo.
Released RHPDrewGay.
Can-AmLeague
QUEBEC CAPITALES Released RHP Hugo
Lalande.
TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES Signed DH Pete
LaForest.
Frontier League
FRONTIER GREYS Traded RHP Joe Zeller to
Gary SouthShore (AA) for RHPCole Stephens.
GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Released OF Nick
DeLorenzo.
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS Acquired 1B
Trevor Whyte fromEdinburg (United) for a player
to be named.
BASkETBALL
National Basketball Association
CLEVELAND CAVALIERS Signed F Anthony
Bennett.
UTAH JAZZ Named Justin Zanik assistant
general manager.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL Suspended Denver LB Von Miller six
games for violating the leagues substance-abuse
policy.
ARIZONA CARDINALS Signed WR Mike
Thomas to a one-year contract.
BUFFALOBILLS Waived OLKeithWilliams.
CHICAGO BEARS Released WR Jerrell Jack-
son.
CLEVELAND BROWNS Released RB Brock
Bolen. Voided a trade with Seattle involving OL
John Moftt and DLBrian Sanford.
DENVER BRONCOS Signed LB Paris Lenon.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS Released LS Brad
Madison. Claimed GRicky Henry ofwaivers from
NewOrleans.
MIAMI DOLPHINS Placed TE Dustin Keller
on injured reserve. Signed LB NathanWilliams.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Signed DE Spencer
Nealy.
OAKLAND RAIDERS Signed OT Tony Hills.
Claimed LB Chase Thomas of waivers from New
Orleans.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Released OT Ed
Wang.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS Traded OL John Mof-
ftt to Denver for DTSealver Siliga.
TAMPABAYBUCCANEERS Signed DETrevor
Scott.
HOCkEY
National Hockey League
ANAHEIMDUCKS Signed DMark Fistric to a
one-year contract.
BOSTON BRUINS Promoted Keith Gretzky
to director of amateur scouting. Named P.J.
Axelsson European amateur scout and Keith
Sullivan amateur scout. Renewed their afliation
agreement with South Carolina (ECHL).
CAROLINA HURRICANES Agreed to terms
with F Zach Boychuk on a one-year, two-way
contract.
DETROITREDWINGSAgreedtoterms withF
Gustav Nyquist on a two-year contract.
MONTREAL CANADIENS Signed D Joel Ch-
ouinard to a one-year, two-way contract.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS Signed F Brandon
Segal to a one-year, two-way contract.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
CHIVAS USASigned F Bryan de la Fuente.
COLLEGE
ARMY Agreed to contract extensions with
mens basketball coachZachSpiker andwomens
basketball coach Dave Magarity through the
2017-18 season.
CALDWELLNamed Erin LeBan assistant vol-
leyball coach.
LA SALLE Named Kate Popovec director of
womens basketball operations.
LIMESTONE Named Carroll Kennedy mens
assistant lacrosse coach.
MONTANA Named Jamie Pinkerton wom-
ens softball coach.
RPI Named Dan Laughlin and John McDow-
ell assistant football coaches.
SHENANDOAH Named Quintrel Lenore
strength and conditioning coach.
STILLMAN Named Paul Bryant athletic
director.
SWARTHMORE Named Matt Chmura direc-
tor of athletic communications.
WEST ALABAMA Named Alex Caudle rodeo
coach.
Glenmaura National GC
BETTER BALLTOURNAMENT
Results: 1. Matt Dougherty/Terry McMahon
(123); 2. Bob Ames/Bob Potenza (124); 3. Jerry
Coyne/Ron Cordaro (124); 4. Jesse Viponf/Gene
Smargiassi (127); 5. Ray Lowery/Steve Hudacek
(127); 6. Harry Dowling/Ken Powell (129); 7. Gary
Grivner (129); 8. Phil Parise/Nick Parise (130);
9. Bill Bender/Jerry Garvey (131); 10. Bob Davis/
Mike Bartoletti (132).
WOMENS GOLF ASSOCIATION RAINBOW
RESULTS
Winners: MaryAnn Cherundolo/Pat Reed(93).
Closest to the Pin: Mary Ann Cherundolo
(2-8).
IremCC
MENS CLUB CHAMPIONSHIP
Championship Flight: 1. Gary Sagan Jr. (+11);
2. James Breck (+14); 3. Earl J. Thompson Jr.
(+14); 4. Donald Scott Francis (+15); 5. James
Blinn (+18); 6. Charles Brand (+19); 7. John
Konicki (+20); 8. Dom Castrignano (+20); 9.
Chris Brojakowski (+23); 10. George Elias (+24);
11. Brett Evans (+26); 11. Frank Pinnacoli Jr. (+26);
13. Jim Fronzoni (+30); 14. Joe Rubbico (+34);
15. Dave Janus (+36); 16. Mike Woosman (+41);
17. Joseph L. Ryan; 17. Marty Zimnisky; 17. Ron
Pokrinchak.
First Flight (Round 1 and 2 totals): 1. JohnA.
Sileski (+27); 2. Jack Serafn (+30); 3. John Allen
Evans (+32); 4. James Oboyle (+43).
Wilkes-Barre GC
HANOVERTOWNSHIP OPEN
Championship Flight: 1. Joe Manoski, Frank
Krasnavage, Dennis Puhalla, Pete Korba (60);
2. John Zimich, Walter Zimich, Joe Hritzik, Paul
Tomek (61); 3. Rick Gaydos, Greg Kaminski, Rob
Szmowski, Charlie Mulhern (61); 4. John Ba-
ranowski Sr., John Baranowski Jr., Joe Baranows-
ki, Jeremy Baranowski (61).
First Flight: 1. John Sander, Jerry Palmaioli,
Brian Horton (66); 2. Tony Pointek, Frank Phillips,
Jake Sholtis, Russ Singer (66); 3. Pete Steve Sr.,
Pete Steve Jr., Tyler Steve, Nick Zabritski (67).
Second Flight: 1. Tom Tryba Jr., Stan Halas,
NormTomczak, John Cherup (70); 2. Mike Mazur,
Al Bagusky Sr., Al Bagusky Jr., John Mahle (70);
3. Mark Mazur, Raed Hamad, JerryThornton (70).
Closest to the Pin: Joe Hritzik (Hole 4), Ed
Zekus (Hole 7), Joe Baranowski (Hole 12), Mike
Mazur (Hole 17).
ONTHE MARk
MARk DUDEk
For The Times Leader
Shake It Cerry is the headlining trotter leading a
large group of 2-year-old lly trotters invading The
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs for four divisions of
the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes (PASS).
The daughter of Donato Hanover has been just sen-
sational in her three lifetime starts for trainer Jimmy
Takter. Her most recent start in the $321,700 Merri
Annabelle was indeed the most impressive, as she
blasted to the lead off the wing and never looked back,
scoring in a sensational 1:53.3. She indeed has looked
just devastating, and I expect her to extend that perfect
record in tonights ninth race.
BEST BET: SHAKE IT CERRY (9TH)
VALUE PLAY: BARON YANKEE (11TH)
Post time 6:30 p.m.
All races 1 mile
First-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 2 pm races life
8 Dreams Of Thunder C.Callahan 6-8-6 Drop in class the diference 3-1
6 Boy Of Mine D.Miller 4-8-4 Does retain Miller 7-2
1 Flufer Nutter J.Campbell 1-2-3 Just broke his maiden 4-1
4 Early Boy G.Napolitano 1-3-6 Makes 2nd start for Pena 9-2
2 Vitamin Hanover A.McCarthy 6-7-5 Dave opted of 6-1
3 Order By Don J.Pavia 9-2-7 Has gait issues 8-1
9 Pee Wee Hanover D.Chellis 5-2-5 Stumbles 10-1
5 Chekov C.Norris 5-4-4 Checks in eighth 15-1
7 Gliding Boy M.Miller 7-1-8 Breaker 20-1
Second-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
6 Easton Bond M.Kakaley 3-1-7 Needed last, ready now 3-1
8 Padre Manuel E.Carlson 8-3-2 Hung to dry two wks ago 7-2
5 Dragon Spike R.Pierce 2-3-5 Newcomer fromPitt 4-1
2 Nathaniels Big Boy A.McCarthy 2-5-7 Good 2nd against similar 9-2
4 Modern Gesture G.Napolitano 5-2-5 Tioga invader 6-1
7 Buddys Hope M.Romano 4-9-4 Tires down the lane 8-1
9 Giant Sculpture L.Miller 3-7-7 Carved out of it 20-1
3 Alex In Wonderland M.Simons 6-3-8 Often a long price 10-1
1 R MBlackhawk Tn.Schadel 5-8-6 Clipped down early 15-1
Third-$66,846 PASS
5 Lifetime Pursuit Y.Gingras 2-1-1 Only one blemish on her card 2-1
6 Demanding Sam P.MacDonell 2-3-1 MacDonell with rare visist 4-1
4 Royal Tabs A.Miller 2-3-1 Fast early on 3-1
1 Passing Jetta C.Callahan 4-4-5 Still in learning curve 12-1
8 Anonyme Hanover M.Kakaley 7-2-1 Burke trained pupil 10-1
3 Noon Tea Party J.Campbell 3-3-3 JC in for the evening 5-1
2 Silent Opera K R.Pierce 7-4-6 Remains quiet 8-1
7 Lets Blame Her D.Miller 2-8-5 Dont give a chance 15-1
Fourth-$8,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $10,000
1 Cape Marj E.Carlson 2-4-2 Wins right of the claim 7-2
5 Wicked Intentions R.Pierce 4-4-4 Stays in live hands 4-1
3 Caramel Chinno A.Miller 6-6-1 Knows this track well 3-1
2 You Little Rascal A.McCarthy 8-5-1 Does get improved draw 9-2
8 Flyustothemoon M.Kakaley 5-4-1 Down a peg in price 6-1
9 BJs Skye G.Napolitano 6-4-1 Elimated early 8-1
7 Dysnomia Blue Chip M.Simons 5-4-3 Missed a fewturns 10-1
6 Windsun Countess Y.Gingras 5-2-3 Florida import 15-1
4 Kissmatt D.Miller 6-3-6 Kiss her adios 20-1
Fifth-$66,846 PASS
8 Honor Thy Daughter Y.Gingras 1-5-1 Only has to stay fat 3-1
1 Broadway Socks D.Rawlings 8-1-1 Tough contender 4-1
4 Struck By Lindy D.Miller 9-4-1 Made miscue in Meri Anna Final5-2
5 Ruby M.Miller 2-4-1 Draws a tough division 6-1
2 Abettajetta J.Campbell 5-2-2 Fails to keep up 9-2
3 Donatos Peach R.Pierce 1-1-8 Enjoyed the Hoosier state 10-1
6 Needle Pointe P.MacDonell 1-2-5 Picked on 12-1
7 Great Gwen C.Norris 6-3-3 Save your $2 15-1
Sixth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
5 Lights Go Out T.Buter 1-3-1 The brighter, the better 7-2
3 Moonless Night G.Napolitano 3-6-1 Should be in good position 3-1
4 The Real Tone T.Jackson 2-2-5 Knocking on the door 9-2
8 Rachelles Beat E.Carlson 4-2-4 Grabs a check 6-1
6 Urdabest F.Paquet 5-2-5 Fern in for the mount 10-1
1 Heavenly Way A.McCarthy 7-8-1 Wrong way 8-1
2 Take Into Account A.Miller 6-1-7 Put the mac card away 4-1
7 Ellas Twin M.Kakaley 8-6-7 Gapped last several 15-1
9 Tessla Blue Chip A.Santeramo 8-4-7 No interest 20-1
Seventh-$66,846 PASS
4 Designed To Be A.Miller 1-2-1 Ready to dominate 5-2
5 APerfect Gem M.Miller 1-1-2 Has experience edge 3-1
2 Cannonball R.Pierce 2-1-6 First time starter 9-2
1 Global Magic D.Miller 2-2-1 Been racing with stakes stock 4-1
3 Cantabs Fortune R.Zeron 2-6-1 Can be a sleeper 12-1
6 Harley Momma H.Parker 2-1-1 Solid betting afair 6-1
7 Heres Ethel D.Rawlings 6-2-3 Maiden in tough 10-1
8 Chez Mahmo C.Callahan 4-2-2 Never leaves the pylons 15-1
Eighth-$4,500 Clm.Pace;clm.price $5,000
4 Sequoia Seelster G.Napolitano 2-1-5 Holds themall of 5-2
1 C L Life Road D.Miller 3-6-4 Late on the scene 4-1
3 Winning Solution K.Wallis 6-7-3 Down in price 7-2
2 Skyway Hanover A.Siegelman 5-8-7 Has to stay closer early 12-1
5 Allstar Life M.Romano 3-8-7 Good 3rd vs similar 8-1
9 Liqueur M.Kakaley 4-4-5 Post knocks 5-1
6 Bond Blue Chip A.McCarthy 9-5-1 Hard one to fgure 6-1
7 Harper Lee E.Carlson 6-6-9 Look past 15-1
8 Happy Hour Honey J.Kakaley 9-8-2 Had one too many 20-1
Ninth-$66,446 PASS
3 Shake It Cerry R.Pierce 1-1-1 The best bet 2-1
5 Cooler Schooner J.Campbell 7-8-2 Just a matter of second 3-1
4 Vanity Matters C.Callahan 3-2-4 Corey having big season 7-2
1 Juniata Hanover M.Kakaley 4-1-1 Tries for the pocket trip 5-1
6 Steppin Out H.Landy 4-7-4 Landy in for a rare sighting 6-1
2 Violet Eyes M.Simons 7-1-5 Turning diferent colors 10-1
7 Paris Metro D.Miller 5-4-4 Sluggish 12-1
Tenth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $8,000 last 5
2 Roll On M.Kakaley 8-7-5 Barn change does it 9-2
5 Shady Breeze M.Simons 2-4-4 Has had some tough luck 3-1
7 J J Gladiator E.Carlson 8-2-3 Loves to fy early on 7-2
1 Hrubys N Luck C.Callahan 1-1-8 Impressed in comeback 6-1
8 Automatic Slims D.Miller 1-3-9 Went career mile at Tioga 10-1
4 Midas Blue Chip T.Buter 4-2-8 Back fromYonkers 4-1
3 St Lads Dude M.Romano 4-2-8 2nd start of the claim 15-1
6 Corey Road A.Miller 8-1-5 Overmatched 8-1
9 Deep Finesse G.Napolitano 5-1-4 Couldnt beat easier 20-1
Eleventh-$12,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $15,000
1 Baron Yankee G.Napolitano 6-1-2 Controls fromthe pole 8-1
2 J J S Jet M.Kakaley 3-6-2 Ofers nice late pace 4-1
3 Island Shark R.Pierce 7-6-1 Triple as easy as 1-2-3 3-1
5 Highland Bogart A.McCarthy 6-8-3 Fine training at .174 6-1
6 Mistys Delight K.Wallis 9-8-5 Does lose Pierce 7-2
9 Cruising Yankee D.Rawlings 3-6-8 Rawlings in fromMeadows 10-1
4 Slippery Sam M.Romano 9-9-2 Not worthy of 9-2 ml 9-2
7 Power Rock A.Napolitano 6-2-5 Dusted 15-1
8 Ladys Bag Man A.Miller 2-5-7 Trashed 20-1
Twelfth-$15,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 4 pm races life
5 Deadliest Catch R.Pierce 1-2-7 Invades ready to roll 3-1
2 Bromance Hanover G.Napolitano 1-5-1 Won in NY Excel series 4-1
4 Panamanian Hanover D.Miller 4-1-2 Down fromStallion stakes 7-2
7 Celebrity Gauwitz A.Miller 5-5-2 Andy-Surick a good team 6-1
3 Good Intentions M.Kakaley 8-4-1 Gurfein trainee 15-1
9 Sentry A.McCarthy 1-1-4 Looking for 3 in a row 8-1
8 Celebrity Hall T.Jackson 3-3-7 TJ still ice cold 9-2
1 Explosive Action T.Buter 7-5-5 Adud 10-1
6 Only In My Dreams M.Simons 4-7-3 Anightmare 20-1
Thirteenth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w $9,500 last 5
9 Blissfull Romance M.Kakaley 1-7-10 Looked super in win at Mea 7-2
6 Sweetheart Dance D.Rawlings 7-3-5 Another Pitt import 9-2
8 Wildfre Osborne R.Pierce 5-7-6 Allard-Pierce lethal duo 4-1
4 Queen Of Royalty T.Buter 3-3-7 Looking for a smooth trip 3-1
2 Shine N Shimmer C.Callahan 9-2-4 Corey catch drives 8-1
7 Winbak Speed G.Napolitano 5-6-1 Fails to fre 6-1
1 By All Means M.Miller 4-3-3 Been racing on the half 10-1
5 Last Minute Cindy D.Miller 6-6-1 Dull 15-1
3 All Star Player A.McCarthy 5-6-7 Demoted 20-1
Fourteenth-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $8,000 last 5
3 Frost Bites K D.Miller 4-4-8 4yr old trying to fnd stride 7-2
2 Otto A.Miller 3-9-4 Orange Crush takes mount 6-1
1 Western Credit R.Pierce 8-1-2 Bounced of that win 3-1
4 Westside Lindy A.McCarthy 4-2-2 Chose of deuce for this one 4-1
6 Eagle Say E.Carlson 5-1-8 Happy with a check 10-1
7 DreamLake M.Romano 2-5-7 All out against lesser 8-1
5 Hold On Tightly C.Norris 6-2-1 Falls of 15-1
9 Our Last Photo J.Pavia 6-3-4 Not a believer 9-2
8 R Sam T.Jackson 8-1-5 Didnt fre at Harrahs 20-1
Fifteenth-$13,000 Cond.Pace;n/w 2 pm races life
2 Secluded Beach R.Pierce 5-7-2 Starts of late double 5-2
9 Ofcially Taken D.Miller 2-2-5 Again second fddle 4-1
4 Belclare M.Kakaley 2-5-5 McArdle flly 7-2
3 Hit By Lightning T.Buter 5-2-5 Marks 2nd career start 3-1
6 Eifel Tower G.Napolitano 4-3-1 Another Meadows shipper 6-1
1 Always Amy K.Wallis 6-1-4 Cant keep up 5-1
5 Midnight Shadow E.Carlson 4-3-7 Best at the fair 12-1
7 Marathon Day T.Jackson 7-7-5 Run over 15-1
8 Keystone Shoreline M.Simons 9-9-4 One more race to go 20-1
Sixteenth-$13,000 Cond.Trot;n/w 2 pm races life
6 Blocking The Way M.Kakaley 5-2-3 Antonacci trainee is hot 3-1
1 Jetta Liner D.Miller 1-2-1 Interesting colt 7-2
8 Marathon Man R.Pierce 4-8-6 Ron the newreinsman 10-1
3 Simply Impressive D.Ackerman 7-5-4 Been racing with better 4-1
7 Millertown Road G.Napolitano 2-3-3 Take another ave 8-1
2 Bartizan D.Chellis 6-5-4 Drewowns and steers 9-2
4 Dribbling K.Oscarsson 7-5-5 Not hoops season yet 6-1
5 Continuous Hanover A.McCarthy 6-8-8 Of stride 15-1
9 Poppas Pick T.Jackson 4-2-1 See you Friday 20-1
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 3B
From page 1B
QB
Top tailback Zach Zwinak
(wrist) is no longer wearing
a red no-contact jersey and
should be full-go for Syracuse.
Linebacker Ben Kline
(shoulder) has been able to
progressively do more at prac-
tice as camp goes on.
Radio team stays intact
The radio broadcast team
of Steve Jones and Jack Ham
has signed on for at least three
more years of calling Penn
State football on the Penn
State Sports Network.
Jones and Ham will begin
their 14th consecutive season
of calling Nittany Lions games
when Bill OBriens squad
meets Syracuse on Aug. 31.
Loren Crispell returns as
the sideline reporter and
Roger Corey will host the pre-
game show.
Jones has served as the
play-by-play voice of Nittany
Lions basketball since 1982,
and Penn State football since
2000. He co-hosts the Penn
State Football Show and
Penn State Basketball Show
on Thursday at 6:05 p.m.,
from late August through
March.
Ham was a rst-team All-
America linebacker for the
Nittany Lions. He is an NFL
Hall of Famer and earned nine
consecutive All-Pro selections
during his 12-year career with
the Pittsburgh Steelers. He
also serves as an analyst on
NFL Network radio broad-
casts.
The Centre Daily Times contributed to
this report.
WyomingArea dominates doubles in opener
TheTimes Leader staf
HUGHESTOWN Teams of Julia Banas
and Lauren Perry, and Maddie Ambruso and
Sam Williams, won their matches to lead
Wyoming Area to a doubles sweep and a 3-2
win over Pittston Area.
Kierstin Grillo earned the lone singles
victory for Wyoming Area, defeating Elaina
Menichelli 6-2, 6-4.
Haleigh Zurek and Claudia Shandra won
singles matches for Pittston Area.
H.S. GIRLS TENNIS
Berwick 3, Tunkhannock 2
Kayla Davis and Linda Thelemeyai each
won their singles matches in straight sets
to help Berwick eke out a victory over
Tunkhannock.
Xiomara Salazar and Bennet Lipski
chipped in a doubles win for Berwick.
Haley Puterbaugh earned the lone singles
victory for Tunkhannock in a straight-set win.
Crestwood 4, Hanover Area 1
Crestwood swept the singles matches en
route to a victory over Hanover Area.
Stephanie and Christine Malchin added a
doubles victory for Crestwood.
Shelby Tencza and Carmen Cesari earned
the lone win for Hanover in their doubles
match.
Dallas 5, GAR 0
Haley Wilcon and Grace Shaub won singles
matches to lead Dallas to a shutout victory
over GAR.
Dallas also swept the doubles matches en
route to the win.
Coughlin 5, Hazleton Area 0
Dana Schneider, Alia Sod and Kristi
Pearage each won their singles matches in
straight sets to lead Coughlin to a shutout
victory over Hazleton Area.
Jade Matusick teamed up with Kassie
Cebula and Chloe Hutter teamed up with
Teagan Bigelow to win both doubles matches
in three sets.
Wyoming Seminary 5, MMI Prep 0
Nathalie Joanlanne, Madison Nardone and
Jacqui Meuser lost just two games combined
and earned straight set victories in their sin-
gles matches to lead Wyoming Seminary to a
shutout win over MMI Prep.
H.S. GOLF
Pittston Area 175,
Wyoming Area 178
Tyler McGarry earned medalist honors,
shooting a 40, and helping Pittston Area edge
Wyoming Area.
David Cydko added a 45 for Pittston Area,
while Braulio Garcia chipped in a 45 in the
win.
Anthony Saitta led Wyoming Area, logging
a 42.
Lake-Lehman 192, MMI Prep 200
Adam Motovidlak shot a 36 and earned
medalist honors to lead Lake-Lehman to a
win over MMI Prep.
Nick Egan added a round of 48, while
Adam Dizbon and Alex Hoyt chipped in 54s.
Sam Harmon led MMI Prep with a score
44 in the loss.
Wyoming Seminary 150, Meyers 208, GAR 211
Jon Zirnheld shot even par as Wyoming
Seminary defeated both Meyers and GAR at
Hollenback Golf Course.
Andrew Golden added a round of 37 for
Wyoming Seminary, while Marc Lafond
chipped in a 39.
Lee Falzone led Meyers with a 44, while
Sean Paul Williamson logged the lowest score
for GAR with a 46.
Lake-Lehman 183, Hanover Area 204
Adam Motovidlak earned medal-
ist honors, shooting 4-over to lead
Lake-Lehman to a victory over Hanover Area
at Wyoming Valley Country Club on Monday.
Nick Egan and Alex Hoyt each shot a 46
for Lake-Lehman, while Ben Pilch and Adam
Simmonette both logged a score of 52 in the
win.
Matt Kuhl and Fred Schiel Jr. led Hanover
Area, each shooting 8-over.
Wyoming Valley West 170, Hazleton Area 191
David McCue earned medalist honors with
a 3-over round to lead Wyoming Valley West
to a win over Hazleton Area on Monday.
Derrick Heffelnger added a score of 43 for
Wyoming Valley West, while Tyler Yankosky
and Leanne Dellurte logged 44s in the vic-
tory.
Rich Gawel shot a 40 to lead Hazleton Area
in the loss.
***
H.S. GIRLS TENNIS
Wyoming Area 3, Pittston Area 2
Singles: HaleighZurek (P) d. AnnaThomas 1-6, 6-3, 6-3; Kierstin Grillo (W) d.
Elaina Menichelli 6-2, 6-4; Claudia Shandra (P) d. Julia Gober 6-3, 6-2.
Doubles: Julia Banas/Lauren Perry (W) d. Tatiana Supinski/Kari Scull 6-3,
6-2; Maddie Ambruso/Sam Williams (W) d. Kristen Capitano/Sara OHop 6-3,
6-0.
Berwick 3, Tunkhannock 2
Singles: Kayla Davis (B) d. Jill Patton 6-4, 7-5; Linda Thelemeyai (B) d. Bri-
anna Grey 6-1, 6-1; Haley Puterbaugh (T) d. ZoeZajack (B) 6-2, 6-4.
Doubles: Xiomara Salazar/Bennet Lipski (B) d. Natalie Markovitz/Caitlyn
6-1, 6-2; Ellie Kuzma/Jamie Smith (T) d. Felicia Canouse/Gabby Tompco 6-1,
6-4.
Crestwood 4, Hanover Area 1
Singles: Kristi Bowman(C) d. Emily Rinehimer 6-4, 6-0; Brittany Stanton(C)
d. Elise House 6-1, 6-0; Jennie Snyder (C) d. Gabrielle Keating 6-0, 6-2.
Doubles: Stephanie Malchin/Christine Malchin (C) d. Lauren Richmond/
Sara Biller 6-0, 6-1; Shelby Tencza/Carmen Cesari (H) d. Becky Price/Devon
Distasio 7-6 (4), 7-6 (6).
Dallas 5, GAR 0
Singles: Haley Wilcon d. Raquel Sosa 6-1, 6-0; Grace Shaub d. Leticia Izagu-
irre 6-2, 6-1; Dallas by default.
Doubles: Maddle Jones/Lauren Butruce d. Diane Lopez/Josmarlyn Rivas 6-1,
7-5; MichelleLeonard/CaitlynLandaud.JessicaValencia/HuerteroGiselle6-1, 6-3.
Coughlin 5, Hazleton Area 0
Singles: Dana Schneider d. Alexa Austin 6-4, 6-0; Alia Sod d. Mira Wise 6-4,
6-2; Kristi Pearage d. Hifza Saeed 6-0, 6-1.
Doubles: Jade Matusick/Kassie Cebula d. Grazia Devita/Rachel Ferguson
6-2, 4-6, 7-6 (3); Chloe Hutter/Teagan Bigelow d. Daisy Cabral/Brooke Malore
6-2, 3-6, 6-1.
MMI Prep 5, Wyoming Seminary 0
Singles: NathalieJoanlanned. StephaniePudish6-1, 6-0; MadisonNardoned.
Claire Sheen 6-0, 6-0; Jacqui Meuser d. Gaby Becker 6-0, 6-1.
Doubles: MeganObeid/ChloeXingd. KelsyDonaldson/JessicaSmith6-2, 1-6,
6-4; Alex Cuddy/Megha Sarada d. Haylee Kirchner/Soprina Guarneri 6-0, 6-1.
H.S. GOLF
Pittston Area 175, Wyoming Area 178
at Fox Hill Golf Course, par 35
PITT(175) Tyler McGarry 40, David Cydko 44, Braulio Garcia 45, Tyler Mul-
len 46.
WA (178) Anthony Saitta 42, Madilyn Wharton 44, Bill Peck 45, Ryan
Wruble 47.
Lake-Lehman 192, MMI Prep 200
at Wyoming Valley Country Club, par 35
LEH(192) AdamMotovidlak36, NickEgan48,AdamDizbon54,AlexHoyt 54.
MMI (200) Sam Harmon 44, Joe Yamula 57, Devan McCarroll 49, Emily
Serrach 50.
Wyoming Seminary 150, Meyers 208, GAR 211
at Hollenback Golf Course, par 33
SEM (150) Jon Zirnheld 33, Andrew Golden 37, Marc Lafond 39, Jarod
Godlewski 41.
MEY(208) Lee Falzone 44, Billy Norton 54, Paul Fox 54, Rocco Rodano 54.
GAR (211) Sean Paul Williamson 46, Eric Krzwicki 53, Angelo Najera 54,
StevenTyson 58.
Lake-Lehman 183, Hanover Area 204
at Wyoming Valley West Country Club, par 35
LEH (183) AdamMotovidlak 39, Nick Egan 46, Alex Hoyt 46, Ben Pilch 52,
AdamSimmonette 52.
HAN(204) Matt Kuhl 43, FredSchiel Jr. 43, MikeSteve53, Tyler Demko65.
Wyoming Valley West 170, Hazleton Area 191
at Sugarloaf Golf Course, par 36
WVW (170) David McCue 39, Derrick Hefelfnger 43, Tyler Yankosky 44,
Leanne Dellurte 44.
HAZ (191) Rich Gawel 40, Josh Provost 48, AdamGrula 49, Anthony Sidari
54.
Photos by Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Pittston Areas Haleigh Zurek returns the ball against Wyoming Areas Anna Thomas in a Wyoming Valley
Conference girls tennis season opener in Hughestown on Tuesday afternoon.
Wyoming Areas
Anna Thomas
returns the ball
against Pittston
Areas Haleigh
Zurek in a
Wyoming Valley
Conference
girls tennis sea-
son opener in
Hughestown on
Tuesday
afternoon.
PL3 signs with WBS Penguins
TOM VENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Penguins signed forward Pierre-
Luc Letourneau-Leblond to an
American Hockey League con-
tract Tuesday.
A seven-year veteran from
Levis, Que., Letourneau-
Leblond skated with the Norfolk
Admirals during the 2012-13
season, recording three goals,
ve assists and 98 penalty min-
utes in 33 games.
Letourneau-Leblond, 28,
has appeared in 275 AHL con-
tests between time spent with
Abbotsford, Albany, Lowell and
Norfolk, compiling 47 points
(21g-26a) and 1,061 PIM.
Originally drafted by New
Jersey in the seventh round
(216th overall) of the 2004
NHL Entry Draft, Letourneau-
Leblond played in 37 NHL
games from 2008-11 as a mem-
ber of the Devils. He has also
appeared in three matches with
the Calgary Flames.
Pens Bylsma out of jury duty
PITTSBURGH Pittsburgh
Penguins coach Dan Bylsma
was excused from jury duty in
two separate trials because of
concerns he might miss a Team
USA Hockey Camp scheduled
this weekend in Washington,
D.C.
The Pittsburgh Post-
Gazette reports Bylsma, who
will coach Team USA at the
Winter Olympics in Sochi
in February, was summoned
for jury duty Monday in
Allegheny County. Pittsburgh
is the countys seat.
Bylsma was considered for
duty in a homicide trial and
a drug case, but was excused
over concerns those trials
could last more than a couple
of days.
Bylsma tells the newspaper
he was very interested in being
part of the process of jury selec-
tion but also says the week-
end camp will be the only time
he can see his Team USA play-
ers before February.
Flyers fans watch paint dry
Ever watch a movie thats
so bad its good? The Flyers
attempt to drum up excitement
for their upcoming season is
exactly like that.
Thanks to a diligent social
media campaign, reportedly
more than 100 people showed
up at the Wells Fargo Center
on Monday morning to par-
ticipate in an event that invites
comparisons to some of minor
league baseballs most absurd
promotions. In this case, fans
and their families gathered to
help the club set a Guinness
World Record for the most
people to simultaneously watch
paint dry.
While the world-record
aspect of the promotion is iffy
at best it doesnt appear
there is a standing record
for people watching paint dry,
so presumably one person
showing up would have created
a record fans seemed to gen-
uinely enjoy the opportunity to
get into the hockey spirit.
One lucky fan even won a con-
test that earned him the privi-
lege of painting the goal crease.
The Associated Press and McClatchy
News Service contributed to this report.
AP photo
New Jersey Devils Pierre-Luc
Letourneau-Leblond, left, fights with
NewYork Islanders Trevor Gillies dur-
ing the third period in Newark, N.J., in
April 2010. Letourneau-Leblond will
be a member of the WBS Penguins
this season.
Washington, Panama win LLWS elimination games
JOHNWAWROW
APSportsWriter
SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT
A six-run third inning proved just
enough for Sammamish, Wash.,
to stay in contention at the Little
League World Series.
Austin Oh drove in the nal two
runs of the rally and the Northwest
champions hung on for 6-5 win
over Nashville, Tenn., in an elimi-
nation game Tuesday night.
Aguadulce, Panama, avoided
elimination with far more air,
scoring four times with two outs in
the bottom of the sixth to pull out
an 8-7 win over Taoyuan, Taiwan.
Panamas winning run came home
when Jose Gonzalez was struck by
a pitch with the bases loaded.
In knocking off Taiwan, Panama
(3-1) advances to face one of the
two other remaining International
Division teams Tijuana,
Mexico, or Tokyo on Thursday.
Sammamish (3-1) moves on to
a matchup Thursday against one
of the two other teams remaining
in the U.S. bracket Chula Vista,
Calif., and Westport, Conn.
Ohs single to center drove
in Will Armbruester and then
Jack Matheson, who scored on
an errant throw by center elder
Robert Hassell.
Armbruester, Jack Carper
and Dalton Chandler each had
RBI singles during the rally that
put Sammamish ahead 6-2. The
Washington team had six of its
eight hits in the third inning and
the rally came after the teams rst
six batters were struck out by Trae
McLemore.
Ben Pickman had two hits,
including a solo home run in the
fth that rounded out Nashvilles
scoring.
In the International bracket
elimination game, getting hit
in the foot never felt so good to
Gonzalez.
As the inelder limped his way
toward rst base, Edgardo Rosales
was celebrating on his way home
from third with the decisive run
for Panama, which overcame a 7-4
decit.
The only thing I was think-
ing was to try to get on base
one way or another, Gonzalez
said through interpreter Gilbert
Monell. And after being hit by the
pitch I felt very happy.
Jordan Agrazal had three RBIs,
including a two-run single in the
sixth. And Rosales would not have
been in a position to score had he
not reached base because of a two-
out error by Yeh Tung-Jua, who
bobbled a grounder to third.
It was a difcult game. It was
important that we won, man-
ager Luis Gonzalez said through
Monell. I congratulate all the kids
on the other team for their effort.
Our team never gave up, and that
made us get the victory.
For Taiwan, it was a shock-
ing turn of events for the tour-
naments youngest team, which
includes ve 11-year-olds the
most of any squad. Several Taiwan
players, including catcher Lee
Chen-Hsun, broke down in tears
following the game.
Panama catcher Juan Crisp and
several teammates went over to
console their opponents.
I saw a couple of players on
their team crying, and even a
couple on our team, manager
Gonzalez said. It was a great
game. Theyre kids. You can
expect that.
Pitching propels RailRiders past IronPigs
Fromstaf, wire reports
LEHIGH VALLEY
After giving up eight runs
a day earlier, the Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre pitching staff
cooled Lehigh Valleys
bats, allowing no extra-
base hits as the RailRiders
defeated the IronPigs 3-1
on Tuesday at Coca-Cola
Park.
The IronPigs only run
came on an error in the
bottom of the second when
Ronnier Mustelier misred
on a throw to third off a
single to right eld.
The error allowed
the advancing Cesar
Hernandez to score
and give Lehigh
Valley a 1-0 advan-
tage.
Scranton/Wilkes
starting pitcher
Chase Whitley
settled in after the
unearned run, allow-
ing just one hit
over the next three
innings. Whitley
earned the win striking
out four in ve innings of
work.
In the top of the
fth, the RailRiders
offense started to
click. Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre com-
piled four hits,
including run-
scoring singles
by Mustelier and
Alberto Gonzalez to
give the RailRiders a
2-1 lead.
The RailRiders
added an insurance
run in the top of the sixth
when Randy Ruiz laced
an RBI-double to left eld
to increase the Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre lead to 3-1.
Dellin Betances replaced
Whitley in the bottom of
the sixth, allowing just
one hit and no runs while
striking out four in three
innings of work.
Jim Miller shut the door
on the IronPigs, allowing
no hits and securing his
fth save of the season.
The RailRiders will
return home today to face
Pawtucket at 7:05 p.m.
Fan with ALS wins funeral
The Lehigh Valley
IronPigs announced the
winner of its funeral give-
away during Tuesday
nights game.
Steve Paul of
Freemansburg got a stand-
ing ovation as he was
wheeled onto the eld and
announced as the recipient
of a funeral package valued
at nearly $10,000.
Fans had to submit a 200-
word essay describing their
ideal funeral, and explain
why they deserved a free
one. More than 50 essays
were submitted.
Paul wrote an essay
explaining that he was
diagnosed with ALS, also
known as Lou Gehrigs dis-
ease, in June.
The team came up with
the unusual promotion for
one of its sponsors, a near-
by funeral home.
RailRiders 3, IronPigs 1
RailRiders Lehigh Valley
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Patterson lf 4 0 1 0 Orr 2b 4 0 0 0
Adams 2b 5 0 1 0 Galvis ss 4 0 1 0
Mesa cf 3 0 0 0 Susdorf dh 4 0 1 0
Johnson 1b 4 1 2 0 Overbeck 1b 4 0 0 0
Ruiz dh 3 0 1 1 Henson 3b 4 0 1 0
Murphy c 4 1 2 0 Hernandez cf 3 1 2 0
Mustelier rf 4 0 3 1 Castro rf 3 0 1 0
Lillibridge 3b 4 1 1 0 Lerud c 3 0 0 0
Gonzalez ss 4 0 1 0 Gillies lf 3 0 0 0
Totals 35 312 2 Totals 33 1 6 0
RailRiders 000 021 000 3
Lehigh Valley 010 000 000 1
E SWB Mustelier (6); LEH Henson (3), Lerud
(7). LOB SWB 8, LEH 6. TEAM RISP SWB
3-for-11, LEH0-for-6. 2BSWBMurphy (17), Ruiz
(14), Lillibridge (8). SB SWB Lillibridge (9); LEH
Hernandez (31).
RailRiders IP H R ER BB SO
Whitley (W, 3-2) 5 5 1 0 0 4
Betances 3 1 0 0 0 4
Miller (S, 5) 1 0 0 0 0 2
Lehigh Valley IP H R ER BB SO
Pettibone (L, 0-2) 6 10 3 3 0 1
Aumont 1 1 0 0 0 2
Johnson 1 1 0 0 2 0
Robles 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBPSWB Patterson; LEHHernandez
Umpires HP: Jef Gosney; 1B: Carlos Torres;
3B: Ben May.
T2:39. A10,100.
3
RailRiders
1
IronPigs
MARK PODOLSKI
McClatchy News Service
Its the time of the year when
fantasy football drafts rule the week-
ends.
Many leagues will be won on draft
day, but just as many, maybe more,
will be won by being a savvy fantasy
owner throughout the season.
Heres 10 tips to help you this
season:
1. Draft a top-notch running
back immediately: Youve heard
this song and dance for years now,
but take notice this season. The
quarterback and receiver position
are big-time deep, and with dura-
bility of running backs always a
concern, owning a back with top-
10 value is a must. You dont want
Steven Jackson or DeMarco Murray
as your No. 1 RB.
2. Wait on quarterbacks, but
not too long: If your league con-
sists of 12 teams, its conceivable
every owner in your league would
be ne at QB if the top 12 went, in
no particular order, like this: Aaron
Rodgers, Peyton Manning, Drew
Brees, Tom Brady, Cam Newton,
Matt Ryan, Matthew Stafford, Cam
Newton, Andrew Luck, Russell
Wilson, Colin Kaepernick and Tony
Romo. Thats a solid group of fan-
tasy QBs.
3. Have some humility: If youre
too proud to admit you messed up
on draft day, thats on you. Dont
wait on your under-performing
players to turn the fantasy season
around. Own up to your mistakes,
then explore all avenues to improve
your team.
4. Always look to trade: You will
be surprised by what trades fantasy
owners are willing to pull the trig-
ger on. The key: Youll never know
unless you inquire about them.
5. Dont get emotionally
involved: If you insist on drafting a
Browns player just to have a Browns
player on your roster, thats ne.
That line of thinking rarely works
in fantasy. Ultimately, its your team
and how you construct it is up to
you. The goal in fantasy is to win
money, so unless one of your favor-
ite player(s) is a fantasy star, resist
the temptation. Especially if hes a
kicker.
6. Work the waiver wire: Three
players I acquired after draft day
last season: Redskins running back
Alfred Morris, Packers receiver
Randall Cobb and Raiders tight end
Brandy Myers. If youre not aware
of what players are available, nine
times out of 10 you wont be in the
running for league cash.
7. Dont overvalue your own
players: Theres nothing more frus-
trating in fantasy football than deal-
ing with an owner who wont budge
on a fair trade offer or insists on
more in return. You knowwho those
fantasy owners are, so just move on
to the next.
8. Dont give up on your sea-
son: Afewseasons ago, I sat 1-6 but
rallied to a 5-1 nish and just missed
out on the playoffs. Last year, I
was 1-4, made a bevy of trades, n-
ished 7-6 in the regular season and
advanced to the seminal round. It
doesnt matter if its pretty. The goal
is to make your playoffs.
9. Never pick a defense until
the second-to-last round: Good
luck trying to gure which teams
defense/special teams will be No. 1
this season. Take a yer on a run-
ning back or wide receiver in the
mid-rounds and wait.
10. Never pick a kicker until
the last round: If you think youre
pulling a fast one on your fantasy
cohorts by drafting last years top
scoring kicker in the mid-rounds,
youre not.
There wasnt a lot of
suspense with Kellys
decision, which was
announced after practice
on Tuesday, and after the
coach met with both play-
ers. About the only sur-
prise was the timing
Kelly had hinted he might
not name a starter until
closer to the opener. But
Kelly, in his rst season
after coaching at Oregon,
ended the mystery and
will have Vick taking the
snaps when Philadelphia
opens the regular season
at Washington Sept. 9.
Im not surprised at
all, Vick said. I told
him, Thank you, I appre-
ciate it and I wont let you
down.
Vick has been solid in
two preseason games, and
Foles, in his second sea-
son with the Eagles, has
struggled to grasp Kellys
multifaceted offense. Vick
has thrown for 199 yards
this preseason and will
take a 113.2 quarterback
rating into Fridays game
at Jacksonville (0-2).
Foles has been sacked
six times in two games,
and has a quarterback rat-
ing of 65.5, after showing
ashes as a rookie last
season while Vick was
injured. Vick played in
just 10 games last season,
while Foles topped 340
yards twice as a rookie.
The Eagles (1-1) are
coming off a 4-12 season,
coach Andys Reids last,
and havent made the
playoffs since they won
the NFC East at the end
of the 2010 season.
We had a good amount
of tape, a good amount
of us seeing them on the
eld, Kelly said. And
seeing them in a lot of
different situations, and
wanted to put a guy in
place, if we could, in
enough time to get us to
prepare the season.
Kelly has only shown
ashes of his up-tempo
offense in the rst two
preseason games and
defenses already seem
tired and confused while
the Eagles are moving
the ball with ease. The
rst-team offense led by
Vick and Foles has four
touchdowns on eight-plus
possessions in two games.
One drive ended with an
end-zone interception and
two others ended with
fumbles.
Behind Foles will be
Matt Barkley, a rookie
from Southern Cal.
The competitor in me,
you always want to be
the one on the eld play-
ing, Barkley said. At the
same time, I love Mike.
Weve gone about it the
right way. Weve kept our
great friendship and weve
pushed each other. Im
proud of him. Im going
to do anything I can to
help him become the best
quarterback possible.
Im excited for him.
Nothing changes in my
preparation. Im going to
prepare the same way.
Vick had a breakout
year under Reid in 2010,
leading the Eagles to the
division title, winning
The Associated Press
Comeback Player of the
Year award and starting
in the Pro Bowl. But hes
battled injuries and incon-
sistency the last two years.
Vick could earn up to
$10 million in 2013 if he
meets all performance
incentives. He was slated
to earn about $16 million
this season, including a
$3 million roster bonus.
PAGE 4B Wednesday, August 21, 2013 football www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Steelers
From page 1B
Vick
From page 1B
be found on a night the Steelers
committed eight penalties,
turned it over three times and
failed reach the end zone until
the starters were standing on the
sideline in baseball caps.
I would say we did a good job
of messing it up on our own,
offensive tackle Mike Adams said.
Not exactly the step forward
Tomlin was looking for follow-
ing a nondescript loss to the New
York Giants in the preseason
opener. He stressed the need to
cut down on penalties only to see
Pittsburgh draw95 yards in ags.
Tomlin said hell look at having
NFL ofcials visit practice this
week to help his team get its act
together.
Poor execution, Tomlin
said. I just told the guys were
not going to provide lip service.
Were going to practice how we
intend to play.
Quarterback Ben Roethlis-
berger completed 5 of 6 passes
but his lone incompletion was an
interception Washingtons Ryan
Kerrigan returned for a touch-
down. Roethlisberger led the
Steelers on a lengthy drive span-
ning the rst and second quarters
only to have it result in a eld
goal after penalties to Adams and
guard David DeCastro.
Another drive later in the
rst half ended with a eld goal
when the offense again bogged
down inside the Washington 20.
Through two games the Steelers
and second string offense has yet
to produce a touchdown.
Running back Jonathan Dwyer
did his best to take advantage
of the opportunity provided by
the injury to Bell, running for
68 yards on 14 carries. He also,
however, fumbled in the second
quarter, a miscue that led to a
Washington touchdown.
Dwyers miscue was one of
three turnovers committed by
Pittsburghs starters against a
defense that isnt exactly lights
out. Yet Washington looked
dominant at times as it con-
stantly brought pressure against
Roethlisberger or backup Bruce
Gradkowski. Rarely did either
quarterback appear comfortable.
Pittsburghs defensedidnt have
to deal with injured Washington
star Robert Grifn III yet had
a bit of trouble stopping third-
stringer Rex Grossman, who
completed 10 of 16 passes for
133 yards and a score. DaMon
Cromartie-Smith intercepted
Grossman early in the third quar-
ter and rookie Jarvis Jones found
his way around a turnover for the
second straight game when he
forced Grossman to fumble in the
second quarter to end a scoring
threat.
Too much Steelers beating
ourselves, safety Ryan Clark
said Even on the two big plays
by the offense while we were in,
we had guys who we didnt blitz
and guys who were supposed to
be in a blitz that coach (Dick)
LeBeau called. You cant do that.
We wont in football games play-
ing that way.
Time to get your player lists together
AP photo
Some folks dont believe Atlanta Falcons running back Steven Jackson is a quality
pick for this upcoming fantasy football season.
Weeden named Browns
starting quarterback
TOMWITHERS
AP Sports Writer
BEREA, OhioBrandon
Weeden had a lot to prove.
Before his second NFL sea-
son began, he had to con-
vince some teammates, a
newcoaching staff and front
ofce and many skeptical
Cleveland fans he deserved
to start.
He desperately wanted
to be their quarterback, the
guy.
On Tuesday, Weedens
efforts were rewarded.
Browns coach Rob
Chudzinski named Weeden
his starter, an announce-
ment that erased any uncer-
tainty and there wasnt
much that the second-
year QB would be behind
center for the Sept. 8 sea-
son opener against Miami.
Weeden has spent the past
few months doing every-
thing he possibly could to
win the job, and he did
fair and square.
Brandon has earned
this, Chudzinski said, and
thats extremely important
to me that he did. He has
gained my complete trust.
He has gained his team-
mates complete trust and
this organizations trust.
Were all behind him and
well all be behind him to
support him.
Weeden, who survived a
bumpy rookie season, took
the news that he had beaten
out veteran Jason Campbell
in typical stride.
Unlike a year ago, when
he was essentially anointed
as Clevelands No. 1 from
the moment he was select-
ed in the rst round of the
draft, Weeden had to ght
for this. He immersed him-
self in the playbook to learn
the Browns newsystemand
performed at a high level
during spring practices and
summer training camp.
If there was any doubt,
Weeden removed by com-
pleting 18 of 25 passes for
229 yards with three touch-
downs and no interceptions
in two preseason games.
Case closed.
Ive taken the steps that
I needed to take to better
myself, Weeden said. But
I have to keep continuing
to work, keep continuing to
do the things that Ive done
all along up until this point
to become that player that I
want to be. Imnot satised.
I feel like I have a lot of work
to do, and thats kind of my
mindset moving forward.
AP photo
Cleveland Browns quarterback Brandon Weeden has earned the
starting job for the team this season.
Gonzalez rejoins Falcons after time spent with son
PAUL NEWBERRY
AP Sports Writer
FLOWERY BRANCH,
Ga. While the Atlanta
Falcons hustled their way
through a drill Tuesday,
Tony Gonzalez grabbed a
clipboard from an assis-
tant coach, a bit perplexed
about what was going on.
Yep, even after 17 sea-
sons in the NFL, he need-
ed a bit of a refresher.
Not surprising, though,
given he hasnt been
around a whole lot during
the preseason.
Of course Im a little
rusty, Gonzalez conced-
ed after a more than two-
hour practice. Theres
nothing like playing the
games to get you ready.
The 37-year-old tight
end will nally play in
his rst preseason game
Saturday night, when
the Falcons (0-2) visit
Tennessee to take on
the Titans (0-2). He was
excused for three full
weeks to spend extra time
with his family and watch
his 12-year-old son, Nikko,
get started on his football
career.
It was all part of a deal
Gonzalez struck with
team ofcials in exchange
for putting off retirement
for one more year.
Everybody is bust-
ing his chops a little bit,
quarterback Matt Ryan
said. Thats the nature of
the locker room. But its
all in good humor.
Coach Mike Smith has
always been willing to let
players especially the
veterans skip practices
if they need to address per-
sonal issues. But hes never
come close to allowing a
three-week break in the
middle of training camp.
For a player of
Gonzalezs stature, how-
ever, the coach was will-
ing to make an exception.
I dont think its an
issue, Smith said. I dont
think it will ever become
an issue.
Gonzalez returned to
the Falcons last weekend,
and Tuesdays workout
was only the fourth day of
practice hes taken part in
since camp began on July
25.
He insisted its not a big
deal. Gonzalez has always
been passionate about his
tness, so there was no
chance of him not report-
ing back in top condition.
To stay in some sem-
blance of football shape,
he worked out with a local
high school team. To keep
up with what the offense
was doing, he watched
videos of practice each
night on his iPad.
Its the same ver-
biage. The offense hasnt
changed. Its the same
thing Ive been doing for
ve years, said Gonzalez,
referring to his time
with thae Falcons. Sure,
theres a few little tweaks,
some new things here and
there. But when you
come back, its like riding
a bike.
Gonzalez never intend-
ed to come back for a 17th
season, saying through-
out 2012 he was 95 per-
cent sure it would be his
nal year. Even after the
Falcons came up 10 yards
short of the Super Bowl,
losing to San Francisco in
a thrilling NFC champion-
ship game, the future Hall
of Famer sounded like his
career was over.
But, after spending a
few weeks reecting on
how close he came to a
title, and knowing the
high-powered Falcons had
a chance to make another
deep run in the playoffs,
Gonzalez began to recon-
sider. When Nikko gave
his blessing for dad to play
another season, Gonzalez
couldnt resist the chance
to take one more shot at
his rst championship.
The Falcons made it
easy, basically allowing
a very grateful Gonzalez
to set his own terms for
how much time he would
spend at training camp.
That means everything
to me, he said.
AP Photo
Atlanta Falcons 17-year veteran tight end Tony Gonzalez catches a
pass during practice Tuesday in Flowery Branch, Ga.
Broncos Miller to serve six-game suspension
The Associated Press
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.
Broncos linebacker Von Miller
received a six-game suspension
under the NFLs substance-abuse
policy Tuesday, taking away the
best defensive player from a
team many expect to make a run
at the Super Bowl.
The league wanted a longer
penalty for the third-year line-
backer, but the sides agreed to
less than half the season, a per-
son familiar with the negotia-
tions between the linebacker and
the NFL told The Associated
Press.
The person who spoke to the
AP did not want to be identied
because details about the nego-
tiations were not public.
Broncos executive vice presi-
dent John Elway said the team
was frustrated with what hap-
pened and, I think, disappoint-
ed in Von.
Well live with that decision,
Elway said. What Id like to do
is try to do everything we can to
prevent any other situations.
According to the NFL, Miller
is eligible to play and practice
through the last two preseason
games. His suspension, without
pay, will begin Aug. 31, and will
cost him more than $800,000
of the nearly $2.3 million hes
scheduled to make this season.
Hell be allowed at the team
facility, but not at practice dur-
ing the suspension. He can
return to the eld Oct. 14, the
day after Denvers home game
against Jacksonville, and will be
eligible for an Oct. 20 contest at
the Indianapolis Colts.
After being notied of the
decision, Miller released a state-
ment saying, although my sus-
pension doesnt result from a
positive test, there is no excuse
for my violations of the rules.
I made mistakes and my
suspension has hurt my team,
Broncos fans, and myself, he
said. I am especially sorry for
the effect of my bad decisions on
others. I will not make the same
mistakes about adhering to the
policy in the future.
The NFL has two drug policies
one that covers use of per-
formance-enhancing substances
and the Policy and Program
for Substances of Abuse that
applied to Millers case.
There are ways to violate the
drug policy without necessarily
testing positive. They include
missing a test, refusing to test,
tampering with tests or giving a
diluted urine sample.
The Broncos had been oper-
ating throughout the preseason
as if Miller would be with them
for their regular-season opener
Sept. 5.
I made mistakes and my suspension has hurt my team,
Broncos fans, and myself.
Von Miller
Broncos linebacker
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Dempster threw one
pitch behind A-Rods
knees and two more inside
during the second inning.
Then his 3-0 pitch struck
Rodriguezs left elbow
pad and ricocheted off his
back.
Girardi sprinted onto
the eld, screaming at
ONora for not ejecting
the pitcher. Girardi was
tossed as the benches and
bullpens emptied, and
Rodriguez homered off
Dempster to spark a sixth-
inning rally that lifted New
York to a 9-6 win.
Dempster maintained
he was pitching inside
The two younger boys
were held without bond;
Bond was set at $1 million
for Jones.
Family and friends on
two continents mourned
Lane, who gave up pur-
suit of an Australian foot-
ball career to pursue his
passion for baseball, an
American pastime.
His girlfriend Sarah
Harper tearfully laid
a cross at a streetside
memorial in Duncan,
while half a world away,
an impromptu memorial
grew at the home plate he
protected as a catcher on
his youth team.
We just thought wed
leave it, Sarah Harper
said as she visited the
memorial on Duncans
north, well-to-do side.
This is his nal spot.
Flowers, photos and an
Australian ag already
adorned the roadside in a
tribute to Lane.
I dont know anybody
whos left this. It means a
lot, Harper said.
Police Chief Dan Ford
Dempster
From page 1B
Athlete
From page 1B
and wasnt trying to hit
Rodriguez.
That baseball is a weap-
on. Its not a tennis ball. Or
its not an Incrediball thats
soft. Its a weapon, and it
can do a lot of damage to
someones life, Girardi
said before a doubleheader
against Toronto. And thats
why I was so upset about
it. You can express your
opinion and be upset with
someone, but you just cant
start throwing baseballs at
people. I mean, its scary.
Girardi said his profane
rant at ONora probably
was the angriest hes been
on a ball eld.
has said the boys wanted
to overcome a boring end
to their summer vaca-
tion classes in Duncan
resumed Tuesday and
that Jones told ofcers
that they were bored and
killed Lane for the fun of
it.
Lane played at East
Central University in Ada,
85 miles east of Duncan,
and had been visiting
Harper and her parents
after he and his girlfriend
returned to the U.S. from
Australia about a week
ago.
His old team, Essendon,
scheduled a memorial
game for Sunday to raise
funds for Lanes parents
as they worked to have
their boys remains sent
home.
At Essendon Catholic
School, Lane will
be remembered at a
November Mass in which
all former students who
have died are mourned
and celebrated, former
school captain David
Ireland told The Age
newspaper in Melbourne.
He was the sort of guy
at school who everyone
knew and knew quite
well, Ireland said of
Lane. He loved his footy
(Australian football) and
his sport and spent a lot
of time with mates.
Melbournes Herald Sun
newspaper reported that
roses and a baseball were
placed Monday on the
home plate where Lane
played as a youth with
the message, A wonder-
ful young man taken too
soon. Why?
Former deputy prime
minister Tim Fischer criti-
cized the National Rie
Association and asked
Australians to avoid the
U.S. as a way to force its
Congress to act on gun
control.
Tourists thinking of
going to the USA should
think twice, Fischer told
the Herald Sun.
PAGE 6B Wednesday, August 21, 2013 baseball www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 74 53 .583 4-6 W-1 40-23 34-30
Tampa Bay 72 52 .581 6-4 W-3 41-23 31-29
Baltimore 67 58 .536 6 4 3-7 L-2 35-28 32-30
NewYork 66 59 .528 7 5 8-2 W-3 36-27 30-32
Toronto 57 69 .452 16 15 3-7 L-3 31-32 26-37
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 73 52 .584 4-6 L-1 40-22 33-30
Cleveland 67 58 .536 6 4 5-5 W-1 38-25 29-33
Kansas City 64 60 .516 8 7 4-6 L-3 33-29 31-31
Minnesota 55 69 .444 17 16 4-6 W-1 28-33 27-36
Chicago 50 74 .403 22 21 7-3 W-4 28-32 22-42
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas 73 53 .579 7-3 W-2 37-27 36-26
Oakland 71 53 .573 1 6-4 W-2 39-23 32-30
Seattle 57 67 .460 15 14 4-6 L-1 31-32 26-35
Los Angeles 55 69 .444 17 16 3-7 L-2 31-35 24-34
Houston 41 84 .328 31 30 4-6 L-2 19-43 22-41
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 76 49 .608 6-4 L-1 44-18 32-31
Washington 61 64 .488 15 9 6-4 W-1 36-29 25-35
NewYork 58 66 .468 17 12 5-5 W-2 26-32 32-34
Philadelphia 55 70 .440 21 15 3-7 L-1 31-30 24-40
Miami 48 76 .387 27 22 5-5 L-1 28-35 20-41
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 73 51 .589 3-7 W-1 42-22 31-29
St. Louis 72 53 .576 1 6-4 L-1 36-23 36-30
Cincinnati 71 55 .563 3 7-3 L-1 38-21 33-34
Milwaukee 55 71 .437 19 16 5-5 W-1 30-34 25-37
Chicago 54 71 .432 19 16 3-7 L-1 25-39 29-32
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 73 52 .584 8-2 W-1 37-25 36-27
Arizona 65 59 .524 7 5 6-4 W-1 36-26 29-33
Colorado 59 68 .465 15 12 6-4 W-1 36-27 23-41
San Diego 56 69 .448 17 14 4-6 L-1 33-30 23-39
San Francisco 55 69 .444 17 15 4-6 L-2 31-32 24-37
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Mondays Games
N.Y. Mets 6, Minnesota 1
Tampa Bay 4, Baltimore 3
Texas 16, Houston 5
Cleveland 5, L.A. Angels 2
Oakland 2, Seattle 1
Boston 7, San Francisco 0
Tuesdays Games
N.Y. Yankees 8, Toronto 4, 1st game
Tampa Bay 7, Baltimore 4
N.Y. Yankees 3, Toronto 2, 2nd game
Minnesota 6, Detroit 3
Texas 4, Houston 2
ChicagoWhite Sox 2, Kansas City 0
Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Boston at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Seattle (Iwakuma 11-6) at Oakland (Grifn 10-8),
3:35 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 8-6) at San Francisco (Zito
4-8), 3:45 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 13-9) at L.A. Angels (Wil-
liams 5-9), 7:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 10-6) at Baltimore
(W.Chen 6-6), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 9-11) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte
8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 8-9) at Detroit (Ani.Sanchez
11-7), 7:08 p.m.
Houston (Bedard 3-9) at Texas (D.Holland 9-6),
8:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 0-0) at Kansas City
(Guthrie 12-9), 8:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mondays Games
N.Y. Mets 6, Minnesota 1
Philadelphia 5, Colorado 4
Cincinnati 5, Arizona 3
Miami 6, L.A. Dodgers 2
Chicago Cubs 11, Washington 1
St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 5
Pittsburgh 3, San Diego 1
Boston 7, San Francisco 0
Tuesdays Games
Colorado 5, Philadelphia 3
Arizona 5, Cincinnati 2
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 3
L.A. Dodgers 6, Miami 4
Washington 4, Chicago Cubs 2
Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 3
Pittsburgh at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
Boston at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Wednesdays Games
Atlanta (A.Wood 2-2) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 5-6),
1:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Westbrook 7-8) at Milwaukee (Gorz-
elanny 3-4), 2:10 p.m.
Boston (Doubront 8-6) at San Francisco (Zito
4-8), 3:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 6-5) at San Diego (Kennedy
4-9), 6:40 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 7-6) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee
10-6), 7:05 p.m.
Arizona (McCarthy 2-7) at Cincinnati (Leake 10-
5), 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 11-3) at Miami (Eovaldi
2-3), 7:10 p.m.
Washington(Ohlendorf 2-0) at ChicagoCubs (Ar-
rieta 1-0), 8:05 p.m.
MLB STANDINGS STATS
NATIONAL LEAGUE ROUNDUP
AMERICAN LEAGUE ROUNDUP
Game 1
Yankees 8, Blue Jays 4
Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Reyes ss 4 1 2 0 1 0 .294
R.Davis cf-rf 4 0 1 2 1 2 .270
Bautista rf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .259
Gose cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .263
Encarnacion dh 4 0 1 0 1 0 .277
Lind 1b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .283
Lawrie 3b 3 1 0 0 0 0 .259
M.Izturis 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .238
Thole c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .139
Pillar lf 4 0 0 1 0 1 .000
Totals 34 4 9 4 5 4
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Gardner cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .271
I.Suzuki rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .274
Cano 2b 4 1 4 4 0 0 .307
A.Soriano dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .292
A.Rodriguez 3b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .320
Granderson lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .274
Overbay 1b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .256
a-Mar.Reynolds ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 2
.218
J.Nix ss 2 2 1 0 2 0 .232
C.Stewart c 4 1 1 3 0 0 .230
Totals 33 8 11 8 4 9
Toronto 040 000 0004 9 1
NewYork 003 003 11x8 11 0
a-struck out for Overbay in the 6th.
EWeber (1). LOBToronto 9, New York 6.
2BR.Davis (11), I.Suzuki (13), Cano (25). HR
Cano (23), of E.Rogers; C.Stewart (4), of Wag-
ner. RBIsR.Davis 2 (14), M.Izturis (32), Pillar
(1), Gardner (43), Cano 4 (80), C.Stewart 3 (23).
SBJ.Nix (13). SFGardner.
Runners left in scoring positionToronto 6
(Encarnacion 3, Lawrie 3); New York 4 (J.Nix,
A.Soriano, Mar.Reynolds 2). RISPToronto 3 for
12; NewYork 2 for 8.
Runners moved upBautista, Gose, Pillar,
Granderson. GIDPThole, J.Nix.
DPToronto 1 (Lawrie, M.Izturis, Lind); New
York 2 (Cano, Overbay), (J.Nix, Overbay).
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.Rogers 5 7 4 4 2 4 97 5.02
Cecil H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.78
Wagner L, 2-4 BS, 1-12-3 1 2 21 2 20 3.38
Weber 2 3 2 1 1 2 31 3.00
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Nova W, 7-4 61-3 9 4 4 2 2 88 3.17
Logan H, 9 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.83
Kelley H, 8 1-3 0 0 0 2 0 19 3.38
D.Robertson H, 30 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.71
Chamberlain 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 14 4.78
M.Rivera 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.35
E.Rogers pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scoredCecil 1-0, Wagner
1-1, Logan 1-0, Kelley 1-0, M.Rivera 1-0. HBPby
Nova (Lawrie). WPE.Rogers. PBC.Stewart.
UmpiresHome, Scott Barry; First, Adam
Hamari; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Mike DiMuro.
T3:18. A40,248 (50,291).
Game 2
Yankees 3, Blue Jays 2
Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
R.Davis rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .274
M.Izturis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .236
DeRosa 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230
Encarnacion 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .278
Lind dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280
Lawrie 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .262
Arencibia c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .211
a-Reyes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .297
Thole c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .139
Gose cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .238
Pillar lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .050
Kawasaki ss 3 1 2 0 0 1 .213
Totals 33 2 10 1 2 8
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Gardner cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .269
V.Wells rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .246
Cano 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .308
A.Soriano lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .283
A.Rodriguez dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .296
Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .216
1-I.Suzuki pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .274
Nunez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244
J.Nix 3b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .236
Au.Romine c 3 1 3 0 0 0 .231
Totals 31 3 8 3 3 5
Toronto 100 010 0002 10 1
NewYork 001 000 1013 8 0
One out when winning run scored.
a-singled for Arencibia in the 9th.
1-ran for Mar.Reynolds in the 9th.
ELoup (3). LOBToronto 8, New York 7.
2BV.Wells (15), Au.Romine (8). 3BKawa-
saki (5). HRJ.Nix (3), of Buehrle. RBIsR.Davis
(15), Cano (81), J.Nix 2 (24). SBR.Davis (37),
M.Izturis (1), I.Suzuki (18). CSLawrie (4). SKa-
wasaki, Nunez. SFR.Davis.
Runners left inscoringpositionToronto6(En-
carnacion 2, Gose 2, DeRosa, R.Davis); New York
4 (A.Soriano 2, Gardner, A.Rodriguez). RISPTo-
ronto 0 for 9; NewYork 2 for 7.
Runners moved upM.Izturis, Gardner. GIDP
Lind, A.Rodriguez.
DPToronto 1 (Kawasaki, DeRosa, Encarna-
cion); New York 1 (Mar.Reynolds, Nunez, Mar.
Reynolds).
Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Buehrle 6 2-3 6 2 2 1 5 110 4.23
Loup 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 12 2.52
S.Santos 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.92
Oliver L, 3-4 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 8 3.92
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
P.Hughes 6 7 2 2 2 6 100 4.88
Claiborne 2 1 0 0 0 1 25 2.74
M.Rivera W, 4-2 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 2.30
P.Hughes pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scoredLoup 1-0, S.Santos
2-0, Claiborne 1-0. IBBof Loup (A.Soriano).
WPP.Hughes. PBArencibia, Au.Romine.
UmpiresHome, Alfonso Marquez; First,
Ted Barrett; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Adam
Hamari.
T2:56. A37,190 (50,291).
Diamondbacks 5, Reds 2
Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Pollock cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .249
Prado lf-3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .282
Goldschmidt 1b 3 1 1 4 1 0 .297
A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .316
Davidson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167
Eaton lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Nieves c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .329
G.Parra rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268
Pennington ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .235
Corbin p 3 1 1 0 1 0 .145
Totals 33 5 7 5 2 4
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275
Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234
Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .314
Phillips 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .268
Ludwick lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .190
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Hanigan ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .198
Mesoraco c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .248
Cozart ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .237
Cingrani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231
Simon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
a-C.Izturis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .175
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Heisey lf 1 1 1 2 0 0 .218
Totals 32 2 6 2 0 10
Arizona 000 100 0405 7 0
Cincinnati 000 000 0202 6 1
a-struck out for Simon in the 6th. b-fied out for
Ondrusek in the 9th.
EPhillips (8). LOBArizona 4, Cincinnati 4.
2BA.Hill (19), Mesoraco (12). HRPrado (12),
ofCingrani; Goldschmidt (31), ofHoover; Heisey
(7), of Corbin. RBIsPrado (59), Goldschmidt 4
(100), Heisey 2 (18). CSGoldschmidt (5). S
Pollock, Cingrani.
Runners left in scoring positionArizona 2
(Davidson, Goldschmidt); Cincinnati 3 (Choo,
Bruce, Mesoraco). RISPArizona 2 for 5; Cincin-
nati 0 for 5.
Runners moved upPrado, Votto, Phillips.
Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
CorbinW, 13-3 9 6 2 2 0 10 103 2.45
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cingrani L, 6-3 32-3 2 1 1 1 1 54 2.76
Simon 2 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 34 2.86
LeCure 1 1-3 3 3 3 0 2 30 3.19
Hoover 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 12 2.85
Ondrusek 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.34
Inherited runners-scoredSimon 1-0, Hoover
3-3.
UmpiresHome, Jerry Meals; First, Chris Con-
roy; Second, Will Little; Third, Gary Darling.
T2:36. A20,092 (42,319).
Dodgers 6, Marlins 4
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
C.Crawford lf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .290
M.Ellis 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .281
Withrowp 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-HairstonJr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Belisario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
P.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Punto 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .263
Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .298
H.Ramirez ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .346
Ethier cf 4 1 2 0 1 2 .271
Uribe 3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .283
Schumaker rf-2b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .268
Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Federowicz c 3 1 2 1 2 0 .238
Capuano p 2 1 0 0 1 0 .045
League p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Puig rf 2 1 1 1 0 0 .352
Totals 40 6 16 5 5 3
Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Yelich lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .286
D.Solano 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .267
Stanton rf 5 1 3 1 0 0 .247
Morrison 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .283
Lucas 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .237
Ruggiano cf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .208
Hechavarria ss 3 0 1 1 1 1 .233
Mathis c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .201
Ja.Turner p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111
Caminero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
a-Dobbs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Da.Jennings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
c-Pierre ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243
d-Marisnick ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190
Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
Totals 35 4 10 4 3 7
Los Angeles 000 400 0116 16 0
Miami 100 201 0004 10 2
a-fied out for Caminero in the 6th. b-lined
out for Withrow in the 8th. c-was announced for
Da.Jennings in the 8th. d-struck out for Pierre in
the 8th.
EHechavarria 2 (13). LOBLos Angeles 12,
Miami 8. 2BAd.Gonzalez (26), H.Ramirez (19),
Schumaker (13), Yelich (6), Stanton (18). HR
Puig (12), of Da.Jennings. RBIsC.Crawford
(21), M.Ellis (41), Ad.Gonzalez (77), Federowicz
(13), Puig (28), Stanton (39), Ruggiano (38),
Hechavarria (29), Mathis (23). SBUribe (4).
SJa.Turner.
Runners left in scoring positionLos Angeles 8
(H.Ramirez 4, Capuano 2, Federowicz, Puig); Mi-
ami 6(D.Solano 3, Ja.Turner, Morrison, Ruggiano).
RISPLos Angeles 4 for 17; Miami 2 for 14.
Runners movedupD.Solano, Stanton, Mathis.
GIDPH.Ramirez, Uribe, Schumaker 2, Lucas.
DPLos Angeles 1 (Uribe, Schumaker,
Ad.Gonzalez); Miami 4 (Morrison, Mathis, Lucas),
(D.Solano, Hechavarria, Morrison), (Hechavar-
ria, D.Solano, Morrison), (Hechavarria, D.Solano,
Morrison).
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Capuano 5 6 3 3 1 1 81 4.70
League BS, 5-19 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 13 5.24
Howell 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 11 2.36
WithrowW, 2-0 11-3 2 0 0 0 2 23 2.45
Belisario H, 17 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.13
P.Rodriguez H, 171-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 1.94
Jansen S, 20-23 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.01
Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Ja.Turner 5 10 4 3 5 0 89 3.02
Caminero 1 2 0 0 0 0 17 0.00
Da.Jennings L, 2-42 2 1 1 0 2 33 4.35
Webb 1 2 1 0 0 1 18 2.85
Inherited runners-scoredHowell 2-0, With-
row 3-0. IBBof Ja.Turner (Federowicz, Federo-
wicz). WPJa.Turner.
UmpiresHome, Quinn Wolcott; First, James
Hoye; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, John Hirsch-
beck.
T3:29. A25,690 (37,442).
Rays 7, Orioles 4
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De.Jennings cf 4 2 1 0 1 1 .258
Zobrist 2b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .271
Longoria 3b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .273
Joyce lf 2 2 1 3 2 0 .251
W.Myers rf 5 0 2 2 0 1 .312
Loney 1b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .311
Y.Escobar ss 5 0 3 1 0 1 .268
J.Molina c 5 0 1 0 0 0 .241
Ke.Johnson dh 3 1 2 0 1 0 .254
Totals 38 7 15 7 5 4
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
McLouth lf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .268
Machado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .294
C.Davis 1b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .306
A.Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .300
Markakis rf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .277
Wieters c 3 3 1 2 1 1 .236
Hardy ss 2 0 1 0 2 0 .259
Flaherty 2b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .220
B.Roberts dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .257
Totals 30 4 5 3 6 7
Tampa Bay 012 000 0047 15 1
Baltimore 010 000 1024 5 1
ELongoria (8), Mig.Gonzalez (1). LOBTam-
pa Bay 10, Baltimore 6. 2BZobrist (28), Joyce
(18). HRWieters (19), of W.Wright. RBIsZo-
brist (59), Joyce 3 (41), W.Myers 2 (39), Y.Escobar
(51), Wieters 2 (61), Flaherty (19). SFJoyce.
Runners left in scoring positionTampa Bay 7
(W.Myers, De.Jennings, Loney 2, Zobrist, J.Molina
2); Baltimore 1 (B.Roberts). RISPTampa Bay 7
for 15; Baltimore 1 for 3.
Runners moved upZobrist, Y.Escobar. GIDP
Loney, J.Molina 2, A.Jones, B.Roberts.
DPTampa Bay 3 (Loney), (Longoria, Zobrist),
(Y.Escobar, Zobrist, Loney); Baltimore 3(Flaherty,
Hardy, C.Davis), (Machado, Flaherty, C.Davis),
(Machado, C.Davis).
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
CobbW, 8-2 6 3 2 1 4 5 92 2.85
Al.Torres H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.32
J.Wright H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.04
W.Wright 0 1 2 2 2 0 18 4.15
Rodney S, 29-36 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.83
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
M.Gonz. L, 8-6 52-3 8 3 2 4 4 112 3.81
McFarland 22-3 4 4 4 1 0 34 4.68
Ji.Johnson 2-3 3 0 0 0 0 19 3.58
Cobb pitched to 3 batters in the 7th.
W.Wright pitched to 3 batters in the 9th.
Inherited runners-scoredAl.Torres 3-1, Rod-
ney 1-0, McFarland 2-0, Ji.Johnson 2-2. IBBof
McFarland (Longoria). HBPby Cobb (C.Davis).
UmpiresHome, Rob Drake; First, Joe West;
Second, SamHolbrook; Third, Andy Fletcher.
T3:33. A26,158 (45,971).
Twins 6, Tigers 3
Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Dozier 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .242
C.Herrmann rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .222
Willinghamdh 3 0 0 0 2 2 .216
Morneau 1b 5 1 4 4 0 1 .267
Doumit c 4 0 1 0 1 1 .244
W.Ramirez lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .267
Ploufe 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .234
Thomas cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .223
Florimon ss 3 2 1 1 1 2 .218
Totals 35 6 10 6 5 12
Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Jackson cf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .263
Tor.Hunter rf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .306
Mi.Cabrera 3b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .359
Fielder 1b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .260
V.Martinez dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .284
Dirks lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .245
Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .311
B.Pena c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .309
1-Holaday pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Iglesias ss 3 0 2 0 0 0 .321
Totals 36 3 11 3 2 4
Minnesota 000 321 0006 10 0
Detroit 000 101 1003 11 0
1-ran for B.Pena in the 9th.
LOBMinnesota 8, Detroit 9. 2BMorneau
(31), Ploufe (15). 3BTor.Hunter (4). HRMor-
neau (15), of Porcello; Florimon (8), of Bonder-
man; Fielder (20), of Pelfrey. RBIsMorneau 4
(72), Ploufe (42), Florimon (36), A.Jackson (29),
Fielder 2 (87). SC.Herrmann.
Runners left in scoring positionMinnesota 4
(Thomas, Ploufe 2, Morneau); Detroit 6 (Infante
3, Tor.Hunter 2, Mi.Cabrera). RISPMinnesota 2
for 8; Detroit 1 for 9.
Runners moved upFielder, Dirks. GIDP
Ploufe, A.Jackson, Tor.Hunter.
DPMinnesota 2 (Florimon, Morneau),
(Ploufe, Dozier, Morneau); Detroit 1 (Mi.Cabrera,
Fielder).
Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Pelfrey W, 5-10 62-3 7 3 3 1 2 96 5.19
Roenicke H, 11 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.02
Burton H, 21 1 2 0 0 0 1 20 2.95
Perkins S, 29-32 1 1 0 0 1 1 23 2.36
Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Porcello L, 9-7 41-3 7 5 5 2 6 87 4.52
Coke 0 1 0 0 1 0 5 5.00
Bonderman 22-3 1 1 1 2 2 47 4.50
Alburquerque 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 5.00
B.Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 3.52
Coke pitched to 2 batters in the 5th.
Inherited runners-scoredRoenicke 2-1, Coke
3-2, Bonderman 3-0. IBBof Coke (Doumit).
HBPby Pelfrey (Iglesias). WPPorcello. PB
Doumit.
UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth; First,
Jordan Baker; Second, Bill Welke; Third, Brian
ONora.
T3:16. A37,964 (41,255).
Mets 5, Braves 3
Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Heyward rf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .254
Simmons ss 3 0 1 3 1 0 .242
F.Freeman 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .311
Gattis lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .243
McCann c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .272
C.Johnson 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .334
J.Schafer cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .290
Janish 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .136
d-B.Upton ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .186
Beachy p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .125
a-Terdoslavich ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .255
D.Carpenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
S.Downs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Ayala p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
e-G.Laird ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .277
Totals 34 3 8 3 3 6
NewYork AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
E.Young lf 4 2 1 0 0 1 .247
Dan.Murphy 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .275
Byrd rf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .287
I.Davis 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .206
Flores 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256
Hawkins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Lagares cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .258
T.dArnaud c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .091
Quintanilla ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226
Z.Wheeler p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .167
C.Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Rice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
b-Baxter ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .210
c-A.Brown ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .291
Germen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Ju.Turner 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .275
Totals 33 5 8 4 2 7
Atlanta 000 000 3003 8 2
NewYork 100 003 01x5 8 1
a-walked for Beachy in the 7th. b-was an-
nounced for Rice in the 7th. c-singled for Baxter
in the 7th. d-struck out for Janish in the 9th. e-
grounded out for Ayala in the 9th.
EMcCann (3), Simmons (9), Quintanilla (8).
LOBAtlanta 7, New York 6. 2BSimmons (18),
Janish (1), T.dArnaud (1). HRByrd (21), of
Beachy; I.Davis (8), of Ayala. RBIsSimmons 3
(43), Byrd 2 (70), I.Davis 2 (29). SBE.Young 2
(28), Dan.Murphy (15).
Runners left in scoring positionAtlanta 2
(Gattis, F.Freeman); NewYork 4 (Z.Wheeler, Byrd
2, Quintanilla). RISPAtlanta 1 for 3; New York 2
for 8.
Runners moved upByrd, T.dArnaud. GIDP
C.Johnson.
DPNewYork 1 (Flores, Dan.Murphy, I.Davis).
Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Beachy L, 2-1 6 5 4 3 0 4 86 4.50
D.Carpenter 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 10 1.85
S.Downs 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 18 1.17
Ayala 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 22 2.66
NewYork IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Z.Wheeler W, 6-2 6 2-3 6 3 3 35 114 3.49
C.Torres 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 3.00
Rice H, 15 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.40
Germen H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.84
Hawkins S, 5-8 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.93
C.Torres pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scoredS.Downs 1-0, Ayala
3-0, C.Torres 3-3, Rice 1-0.
UmpiresHome, Alan Porter; First, Greg Gib-
son; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Hunter Wendel-
stedt.
T3:05. A25,863 (41,922).
Rockies 5, Phillies 3
Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Fowler cf 3 0 2 1 2 1 .267
LeMahieu 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .270
Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .216
R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Tulowitzki ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .315
Cuddyer rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .324
Helton 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .251
W.Rosario c 4 1 1 1 0 2 .284
Arenado 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .262
Blackmon lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .265
J.De La Rosa p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .043
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
J.Herrera 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .296
Totals 36 5 10 4 2 6
Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Rollins ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .245
Ruiz c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .266
Utley 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .277
D.Brown lf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .275
M.Young 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .268
Ruf rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .262
Asche 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .197
Mayberry cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .243
Cloyd p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Miner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Frandsen ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233
C.Jimenez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 29 3 3 2 4 5
Colorado 311 000 0005 10 1
Philadelphia 003 000 0003 3 0
a-fied out for Miner in the 7th. b-fied out for
Brothers in the 9th.
EHelton (1). LOBColorado 6, Philadelphia
5. 2BCuddyer (24), Arenado (21), Blackmon
(7). HRTulowitzki (22), of Cloyd; W.Rosario
(18), of Cloyd. RBIsFowler (40), Tulowitzki 2
(68), W.Rosario (66), Utley (46), D.Brown (79).
CSFowler (8). SCloyd. SFD.Brown.
Runners left in scoring positionColorado 3
(Tulowitzki, J.De La Rosa, Culberson); Philadel-
phia 3 (M.Young 2, Rollins). RISPColorado 1 for
7; Philadelphia 1 for 6.
Runners moved upHelton, Blackmon, J.De
La Rosa.
Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.De La Rosa W, 13-6 6 1-3 3 3 2 3 3 100 3.21
Belisle H, 20 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.99
Brothers H, 11 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 24 1.54
R.Betancourt S, 16-17 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.93
Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cloyd L, 2-3 6 8 5 5 1 6 99 4.02
Miner 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.12
C.Jimenez 2 1 0 0 1 0 30 0.00
Inherited runners-scoredBelisle 2-0, Broth-
ers 2-0. WPCloyd, C.Jimenez. BalkBrothers 2.
UmpiresHome, Jef Nelson; First, Jim Wolf;
Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, JimJoyce.
T3:06. A34,018 (43,651).
Major League Baseball Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTINGMiCabrera, Detroit, .359; Trout, Los
Angeles, .333; ABeltre, Texas, .324; Mauer, Min-
nesota, .324; DOrtiz, Boston, .323; Loney, Tampa
Bay, .311; Cano, NewYork, .308.
RUNSMiCabrera, Detroit, 89; CDavis, Balti-
more, 89; Trout, Los Angeles, 88; AJones, Balti-
more, 85; Bautista, Toronto, 82; Encarnacion, To-
ronto, 76; Ellsbury, Boston, 75; AJackson, Detroit,
75; Machado, Baltimore, 75.
RBIMiCabrera, Detroit, 120; CDavis, Bal-
timore, 115; Encarnacion, Toronto, 92; AJones,
Baltimore, 89; Fielder, Detroit, 87; Trumbo, Los
Angeles, 83; Cano, NewYork, 81.
HITSMiCabrera, Detroit, 161; ABeltre, Texas,
158; Machado, Baltimore, 158; Trout, Los Angeles,
156; AJones, Baltimore, 155; Ellsbury, Boston,
149; Pedroia, Boston, 146.
DOUBLESMachado, Baltimore, 43; CDavis,
Baltimore, 36; Mauer, Minnesota, 35; Saltalamac-
chia, Boston, 34; Trout, Los Angeles, 34; Lowrie,
Oakland, 33; JCastro, Houston, 32; AlRamirez,
Chicago, 32.
TRIPLESEllsbury, Boston, 8; Trout, Los An-
geles, 8; Gardner, New York, 7; Drew, Boston, 6;
AGordon, Kansas City, 5; DeJennings, Tampa Bay,
5; Kawasaki, Toronto, 5; LMartin, Texas, 5; BMiller,
Seattle, 5.
HOME RUNSCDavis, Baltimore, 45; Mi-
Cabrera, Detroit, 40; Encarnacion, Toronto, 31;
Trumbo, Los Angeles, 29; Bautista, Toronto, 28;
ADunn, Chicago, 28; NCruz, Texas, 27.
STOLEN BASESEllsbury, Boston, 44; RDa-
vis, Toronto, 37; Andrus, Texas, 33; Altuve, Hous-
ton, 30; McLouth, Baltimore, 28; Rios, Texas, 28;
Trout, Los Angeles, 28.
PITCHINGScherzer, Detroit, 18-1; MMoore,
Tampa Bay, 14-3; Tillman, Baltimore, 14-4; Co-
lon, Oakland, 14-5; CWilson, Los Angeles, 13-6;
Masterson, Cleveland, 13-9; Darvish, Texas, 12-5;
FHernandez, Seattle, 12-6; Verlander, Detroit, 12-
9; Guthrie, Kansas City, 12-9.
ERAKuroda, New York, 2.41; AniSanchez,
Detroit, 2.50; FHernandez, Seattle, 2.62; Dar-
vish, Texas, 2.68; Sale, Chicago, 2.78; Scherzer,
Detroit, 2.82; Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.95; DHolland,
Texas, 2.95.
STRIKEOUTSDarvish, Texas, 214; Scherzer,
Detroit, 185; FHernandez, Seattle, 182; Master-
son, Cleveland, 175; Sale, Chicago, 175; Verlander,
Detroit, 160; DHolland, Texas, 157.
SAVESJiJohnson, Baltimore, 39; Nathan,
Texas, 36; MRivera, New York, 36; MRivera, New
York, 36; GHolland, Kansas City, 34; GHolland,
Kansas City, 34; AReed, Chicago, 32.
NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS
BATTINGYMolina, St. Louis, .334; CJohnson,
Atlanta, .334; Cuddyer, Colorado, .324; McCutch-
en, Pittsburgh, .317; Votto, Cincinnati, .314; MCar-
penter, St. Louis, .312; FFreeman, Atlanta, .311.
RUNSMCarpenter, St. Louis, 92; Votto,
Cincinnati, 84; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 82; Choo,
Cincinnati, 80; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 79; JUpton,
Atlanta, 79; Holliday, St. Louis, 78.
RBIGoldschmidt, Arizona, 100; Phillips, Cin-
cinnati, 92; Craig, St. Louis, 88; PAlvarez, Pitts-
burgh, 82; FFreeman, Atlanta, 82; Bruce, Cincin-
nati, 81; DBrown, Philadelphia, 79.
HITSMCarpenter, St. Louis, 150; Segura, Mil-
waukee, 150; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 145; Votto,
Cincinnati, 144; Craig, St. Louis, 142; DanMurphy,
New York, 140; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles, 138;
Pence, San Francisco, 138.
DOUBLESMCarpenter, St. Louis, 41; YMo-
lina, St. Louis, 34; Bruce, Cincinnati, 33; Des-
mond, Washington, 33; McCutchen, Pittsburgh,
32; Rizzo, Chicago, 32; Pence, San Francisco, 31.
TRIPLESSMarte, Pittsburgh, 10; CGomez,
Milwaukee, 9; Segura, Milwaukee, 9; Span, Wash-
ington, 7; CGonzalez, Colorado, 6; Hechavarria,
Miami, 6; Venable, San Diego, 6; DWright, New
York, 6.
HOME RUNSPAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 31; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 31; DBrown, Philadelphia, 27;
CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; Bruce, Cincinnati, 24;
JUpton, Atlanta, 23; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 22.
STOLEN BASESECabrera, San Diego, 37;
Segura, Milwaukee, 36; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 35;
CGomez, Milwaukee, 30; EYoung, New York, 28;
McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 26; Revere, Philadelphia,
22.
PITCHINGLiriano, Pittsburgh, 14-5; Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 14-7; Zimmermann, Washington,
14-7; Corbin, Arizona, 13-3; Lynn, St. Louis, 13-6;
JDe La Rosa, Colorado, 13-6; 5 tied at 12.
ERAKershaw, LosAngeles, 1.80; Harvey, New
York, 2.25; Fernandez, Miami, 2.41; Corbin, Arizo-
na, 2.45; Wainwright, St. Louis, 2.66; Bumgarner,
San Francisco, 2.82; Locke, Pittsburgh, 2.90.
STRIKEOUTSHarvey, New York, 187; Ker-
shaw, LosAngeles, 182; Wainwright, St. Louis, 173;
Samardzija, Chicago, 168; HBailey, Cincinnati,
161; Latos, Cincinnati, 160; Lincecum, San Fran-
cisco, 157; Fernandez, Miami, 157; Bumgarner,
San Francisco, 157.
SAVESKimbrel, Atlanta, 39; Mujica, St.
Louis, 32; AChapman, Cincinnati, 31; RSoriano,
Washington, 31; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 30; Romo, San
Francisco, 30; Cishek, Miami, 27.
This Date in Baseball
Aug. 21
1919 Bert Adams of the Philadelphia Phillies
tied a National League record for catchers as he
recorded seven assists in one game.
1926 Ted Lyons of the Chicago White Sox
pitched a no-hitter over the Boston Red Sox at
Fenway Park. The 6-0 victory was achieved in 1
hour, 7 minutes.
1931 Babe Ruth hit his 600th home run as the
Yankees beat the St. Louis Browns 11-7.
1947 The frst Little League World Series was
at Williamsport, Pa. The Maynard Midgets of Wil-
liamsport won the series.
1972 Steve Carlton of Philadelphia had his 15-
gamewinningstreaksnappedwhenPhil Niekroand
theAtlanta Braves beat the Phillies 2-1 in 11 innings.
1975Pitchingbrothers RickandPaul Reuschel
of the Chicago Cubs combined to throwa 7-0 shut-
out against the Los Angeles Dodgers. Rick went 6
1-3 innings and Paul fnished the shutout for the
frst ever by two brothers.
1982Milwaukeepitcher RollieFingers became
the frst player to achieve 300 career saves as the
Brewers beat the Seattle Mariners 3-2.
1986 Spike Owens had four hits and became
the frst major league player in 40years to score six
runs in a game as the Boston Red Sox routed the
Cleveland Indians 24-5 with a 24-hit attack.
1999 Sammy Sosa hit his major-league lead-
ing 50th and 51st home runs to lead the Chicago
Cubs to an 8-6 victory over the Colorado Rockies.
Sosa, who hit 66 homers last season, became the
fourth player to post consecutive 50-homer sea-
sons, joining Mark McGwire, Ken Grifey Jr. and
Babe Ruth.
2005 MikeJacobs of the NewYork Mets hom-
eredinhis frst major leagueat-bat duringa7-4loss
to Washington. Jacobs is the 90th player to homer
in his frst major league at-bat.
2007 Garret Anderson of the Los Angeles An-
gels drove in a team-record 10 runs in an 18-9 rout
of theNewYorkYankees.Andersonhit agrandslam,
a three-run homer, a two-run double and an RBI
double to become the 12th player in major league
history to have 10RBIs in a game.
2007 Arizonas Mark Reynolds tied the major
league record for consecutive strikeouts by a non-
pitcher when he fanned in his ninth straight plate
appearance in a 7-4 loss to Milwaukee. Reynolds
struck out in his frst two at-bats against Dave Bush
to match the record. Bush hit Reynolds with a pitch
in the sixth, ending the streak.
2010 Washingtons Stephen Strasburg was
injured for the second time in a month and exited
early, this time wincing with a strained tendon in
his right forearm, as the Nationals beat the Phila-
delphia Phillies 8-1.
2011 Johnny Damon lost a grand slam to a
video reviewin the seventh inning, then hit a game-
ending home run in the ninth that lifted the Tampa
Bay Rays over the Seattle Mariners 8-7. Damon
connected for a leadof shot in the ninth on the
frst pitch from Dan Cortes. The Rays trailed 5-4
in the seventh when Damon launched a drive to
right-center feld. First ruled a home run, the um-
pires changed the call to a three-run double after a
video review.
2011 Luis Perez pitched brilliantly in his frst
big league start, combining with Casey Janssen on
a one-hitter, and Jose Bautista connected for his
majors-best 36th home run to give Toronto a 1-0
win over Oakland.
AP photo
Philadelphia Phillies Carlos Ruiz is safe at home on a sacrifice fly ball to center field by Domonic
Brown before Colorado Rockies catcher Willin Rosario can make the tag in the third inning Tuesday
in Philadelphia.
Rockies dig deep
to down Phillies, 5-3
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA Troy Tulowitzki
and Wilin Rosario homered to lead the
Colorado Rockies past the Philadelphia
Phillies 5-3 on Tuesday night.
Jorge De La Rosa (13-6) pitched into
the seventh to win his third straight
start. Dexter Fowler also drove in a run
to help the Rockies jump out to a 5-0
lead.
Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado
made a fantastic backhanded stop and
in-the-air throw to rst in the seventh
inning to rob Jimmy Rollins of a run-
scoring hit. Rafael Betancourt tossed a
scoreless ninth for his 16th save.
Tyler Cloyd (2-3) allowed ve runs in
six innings in his rst major league start
since June 12.
Mets 5, Braves 3
NEW YORK Rookie Zack Wheeler
beat NL East-leading Atlanta for the
third time, pitching shutout ball into
the seventh inning and sending the New
York Mets past the Braves.
Wheeler improved to 3-0 this year
against the team with the best record
in the majors. Helped by his midseason
promotion from Triple-A, the Mets hold
an 8-7 edge over the Braves.
Marlon Byrd and Ike Davis homered
and speedy Eric Young Jr. sparked the
Mets, stealing two bases, scoring twice
and making a diving catch in left eld.
Catcher Travis dArnaud doubled for his
rst hit in the majors, ending an 0-for-10
rut.
Wheeler (6-2), raised in the Atlanta
suburbs, defeated the Braves at Turner
Field in his big league debut in June,
then topped them at Citi Field in July.
Dodgers 6, Marlins 4
MIAMI With his first swing of the
night, Yasiel Puig snapped a slump and
silenced speculation hes in the dog-
house.
The rookie sensation came off the
bench to hit a tiebreaking home run
in the eighth inning and help the Los
Angeles Dodgers beat the Miami
Marlins.
Puig was held out of the starting
lineup after going hitless in his past 11
at-bats.
He also drew a fine when he arrived
late for pregame drills, raising more
questions about the 22-year-olds matu-
rity and comportment.
He entered in the sixth inning in a
double switch, batted for the first time
leading off the eighth and needed only
one pitch to break a 4-all tie.
Diamondbacks 5, Reds 2
CINCINNATI Paul Goldschmidt
set a Diamondbacks record with his
third grand slam of the season on
Tuesday night and became the first NL
player to drive in 100 runs, powering
Arizona.
Goldschmidt connected in the eighth
inning off J.J. Hoover, ending the reliev-
ers streak of 23 scoreless appearances.
His 31st homer tied him with
Pittsburghs Pedro Alvarez for the NL
lead. All of his career grand slams have
come this season.
Left-hander Patrick Corbin (13-3) sty-
mied Cincinnatis lefty-dominated line-
up, pitching a six-hitter, including Chris
Heiseys two-run homer, during his sec-
ond complete game. Corbin matched his
career high with 10 strikeouts.
Ichiro nears milestone
as Yankees sweepJays
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Jayson Nix hit a tying
homer in the seventh inning and a game-
ending single in the ninth, lifting the
Yankees to their second comeback victory
over the Toronto Blue Jays on Tuesday, 3-2
in the nightcap for a doubleheader sweep.
In the opener, Robinson Cano and Chris
Stewart each hit three-run homers to rally
the Yankees from four runs down to beat
the Blue Jays 8-4. Toronto lost slugger
Jose Bautista to a sore hip early in the
game. Cano had an RBI single in the sec-
ond game and had six hits and ve RBIs
for New York in the two games.
Ichiro Suzuki singled and doubled in
the rst game, leaving him one shy of
4,000 combined hits during his careers in
Japan and the major leagues.
With fans standing and chanting Ichi-
ro! in the eighth, he grounded out. Suzuki
pinch ran in the second game and scored
the winning run.
With a full moon hanging over the right
eld rafters, Darren Oliver (3-4) walked
Mark Reynolds to start the ninth.
Suzuki pinch ran and advanced on
Eduardo Nunezs sacrice bunt. Suzuki
stole third before scoring on Nixs line
drive to left that gave the Yankees their
eighth win in 11 games.
Mariano Rivera (4-2) worked out of a
two-on jam in the top of the ninth for the
win. Anthony Gose failed to get down a
sacrice bunt in the top of the ninth.
The Blue Jays extended their record
with an 11th straight loss in New York.
Mark Buehrle was on track to end an
eight-decision losing streak to New York
but he gave up a tying homer in the sev-
enth to Nix, the inelders rst homer
since June 25th.
Nix was the Yankees second unlikely
long ball hitter of the day. Stewart con-
nected off Neil Wagner (2-4) in the sixth
inning for his rst homer since May 15
thats 173 homerless at-bats to put New
York ahead in the opener.
Just 1-10 in his career against the
Yankees, the left-hander shut down a reju-
venated lineup by allowing two runs and
six hits in 6 2-3 innings. He struck out
Alex Rodriguez all three times he faced
him.
Rajai Davis had a two-run double in the
rst game, and was responsible for the
Blue Jays rst two runs in Game 2. He
scored on Phil Hughes wild pitch in the
rst inning and had a sacrice y in the
fth inning to put Toronto up 2-1.
In the opener, Cano got his 200th career
home run off Esmil Rogers in the third and
had four hits. His drive in the third pulled
New York to 4-3 after Toronto went up
4-0 in the second against Ivan Nova (7-4).
Cano added an RBI double in the seventh.
Rays 7, Orioles 4
BALTIMORE Alex Cobb took a two-
hitter into the seventh inning, Matt Joyce
drove in three runs and the Tampa Bay
Rays beat the Baltimore Orioles for their
sixth win in seven games.
Twins 6, Tigers 3
DETROIT Justin Morneau had a
season high four hits, including a two-
run homer and a two-run double, and
Glen Perkins struck out Miguel Cabrera
with two on for the nal out to help the
Minnesota Twins hold off the Detroit
Tigers.
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 7B
NEW YORK The farm-to-table
movement has become farm to facial
for some in the spa industry, with more
locations offering fresh herbs and ow-
ers from their own gardens for treat-
ments.
And guys are being treated to pam-
pering tweaked just for them as the
number of men turning up at spas
increases, according to a new survey
by PricewaterhouseCoopers for the
International Spa Association.
Overall, the industry has made gains in
revenue, visits and locations, according
to the survey, released at the spa groups
Aug. 16 trade show.
A look at whats new and interesting in
the spa industry:
PLANTS ANDFLOWERS
Spas have long made use of local ingre-
dients. Now, some are clipping and crush-
ing Mother Natures booty right from the
ground.
The Omni Mount Washington Resort
in New Hampshires White Mountains
allows guests to stroll the grounds and
choose their own plants as part of the
full body, 75-minute Herbal Garden
Treatment for $175.
Travaasa Austin in Texas has a working
farmfromwhich to pluck spa ingredients.
THE MEN
The spa association has tracked male
guests for about 10 years, said Lynne
McNees, the groups president. Their
ranks had been steady, between 30 and 33
percent, but rose last year to 47 percent,
according to the latest survey.
A lot of that has to do with spas being
much more open and catering to men,
changing the services menu a little bit,
McNees said. Spas have become much
more men-friendly.
In Hawaii, Four Seasons Resort Maui
at Wailea offers the Alpha Male, a
50-minute facial for $175 with green tea
and green algae options.
ANIMAL FRIENDS
Along with ora and fresh produce for
spa treatments and culinary experiences
at resorts are farmencounters with animal
friends. Keith Moon, the head cowboy and
agriculture overseer at Travaasa Austin,
and his staff teach chicken-keeping at the
coop that supplies the resorts restaurant
with eggs. Theres also a two-hour horse
encounter free with a spa day pass. Moon
and his cowboy team use horses to help
guests learn more about themselves.
You dont ride the horse. Its about
how your interactions with the animal
can tell you about your nonverbal com-
munication and body language, he said.
The horse picks up on your intentions. If
youre nervous and frustrated hes going
to mirror that.
Sound highfalutin? Hop on one of the
resorts Fender Blenders instead. Its a
stationary bicycle that powers a juicer
attached at the handlebars. Pick your own
ingredients and have at it.
BY THE NUMBERS
The International Spa Associations
survey of more than 1,400 spas of all
types in the U.S. showed a 4.7 percent
increase in revenue last year at $14 bil-
lion. Thats up from $13.4 billion in 2011.
Spa visits in the same time period were
up 2.8 percent, to 160 million from 156
million. Locations were up slightly, to
19,960 from 19,850. Revenue per visit
went to $87 from $86 the year before.
PAGE 8B Wednesday, August 21, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
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JacobsEng 60.14 +.17 +41.3
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Dreyfus
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Eaton Vance
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NatlMuniA m 8.87 -.02 -10.9
NatlMuniB m 8.87 -.02 -11.3
PAMuniA m 8.64 -.04 -3.8
FPA
Cres d 31.73 +.05 +13.2
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.25 +.03 +1.7
Bal 22.00 +.10 +9.8
BlChGrow 59.20 +.35 +20.7
Contra 89.62 +.41 +16.6
DivrIntl d 33.18 -.09 +10.8
ExpMulNat d 24.74 +.17 +13.0
Free2020 15.05 +.03 +5.9
Free2030 15.39 +.03 +8.4
GrowCo 112.13 +.73 +20.3
LatinAm d 37.31 -.01 -19.4
LowPriStk d 47.73 +.33 +20.8
Magellan 86.28 +.62 +18.3
Overseas d 36.58 -.05 +13.2
Puritan 21.08 +.08 +9.5
TotalBd 10.46 +.02 -2.9
Value 92.89 +.87 +21.7
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 34.43 +.23 +17.0
Fidelity Select
Gold d 24.71 +.62 -33.2
Pharm d 18.30 +.09 +23.7
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 58.72 +.22 +17.4
500IdxInstl 58.72 +.22 +17.4
500IdxInv 58.71 +.22 +17.4
TotMktIdAg d 48.62 +.28 +18.3
First Eagle
GlbA m 52.59 +.12 +8.2
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.88 -.01 -6.2
Income C m 2.33 ... +6.7
IncomeA m 2.31 +.01 +7.1
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 32.86 -.04 +14.7
Euro Z 24.15 -.20 +14.2
Shares Z 26.23 +.04 +16.7
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.77 -.01 -2.2
GlBondAdv 12.72 -.01 -2.2
GrowthA m 22.66 -.05 +16.6
GMO
IntItVlIV 22.97 -.06 +10.6
Harbor
CapApInst 49.42 +.23 +16.2
IntlInstl 67.18 -.10 +8.1
INVESCO
ConstellB m 24.76 +.11 +16.7
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.36+.04 +17.4
PacGrowB m 20.58 -.18 +1.5
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 59.82 +.33 +12.6
AT&T Inc 33.87 +.08 +.5
AbtLab s 34.71 -.17 +10.8
AMD 3.63 +.03 +51.3
AlaskaAir 58.44 +1.05 +35.6
Alcoa 8.00 +.06 -7.8
Allstate 49.04 +.10 +22.1
Altria 33.77 -.16 +7.4
AEP 42.82 +.14 +.3
AmExp 74.27 -.07 +29.7
AmIntlGrp 46.92 +.60 +32.9
Amgen 105.60 +1.13 +22.5
Anadarko 89.79 +.84 +20.8
Annaly 11.03 +.37 -21.4
Apple Inc 501.07 -6.67 -5.8
AutoData 72.34 +.44 +27.1
Avnet 39.75 +.55 +29.9
Avon 20.64 +.28 +43.7
BP PLC 40.90 -.20 -1.8
BakrHu 46.84 +.40 +14.7
BallardPw 1.60 -.18+161.9
BarnesNob 14.61 -2.06 -3.2
Baxter 71.35 -.03 +7.0
Beam Inc 62.52 +.85 +2.3
BerkH B 115.01 +.71 +28.2
BigLots 33.21 -.09 +16.7
BlockHR 28.94 +.03 +55.8
Boeing 104.63 -.09 +38.8
BrMySq 41.57 -.38 +28.9
Brunswick 36.94 +.86 +27.0
Buckeye 68.82 +1.46 +51.6
CBS B 51.55 +.46 +35.5
CMS Eng 27.00 +.25 +10.7
CSX 24.82 -.07 +25.8
CampSp 46.07 +.03 +32.0
Carnival 36.16 +.27 -1.7
Caterpillar 83.86 -.34 -6.4
CenterPnt 23.31 +.38 +21.1
CntryLink 32.58 +.02 -16.7
Chevron 118.29 -.37 +9.4
Cisco 24.32 +.05 +23.8
Citigroup 49.92 +.59 +26.2
Clorox 84.39 +.42 +15.3
ColgPalm s 59.09 -.06 +13.0
ConAgra 35.00 +.09 +18.6
ConocoPhil 65.98 +.15 +13.8
ConEd 56.42 +.32 +1.6
Corning 14.47 -.25 +14.7
CrownHold 44.28 -.02 +20.3
Cummins 123.57 +.37 +14.0
DTE 67.59 +.43 +12.6
Deere 83.25 -1.27 -3.7
Diebold 30.68 +.40 +.2
Disney 61.88 +.05 +24.3
DomRescs 57.88 +.50 +11.7
Dover 86.83 +.18 +32.1
DowChm 36.95 +.32 +14.3
DryShips 2.01 +.09 +25.6
DuPont 57.53 ... +27.9
DukeEngy 66.79 +.46 +4.7
EMC Cp 25.60 -.13 +1.2
Eaton 65.12 +.29 +20.2
EdisonInt 46.74 +.15 +3.4
EmersonEl 61.56 +.44 +16.2
EnbrdgEPt 29.71 +.47 +6.5
Energen 65.31 -.03 +44.8
Entergy 63.99 +.45 +.4
EntPrPt 59.29 +.77 +18.4
Ericsson 12.17 +.03 +20.5
Exelon 30.12 +.26 +1.3
ExxonMbl 86.83 -.09 +.3
FMC Corp 65.42 +.43 +11.8
Fastenal 44.82 +.64 -3.9
FedExCp 109.21 +.54 +19.1
Fifth&Pac 24.99 +.50+100.7
FirstEngy 37.23 +.84 -10.8
Fonar 5.41 -.12 +24.9
FootLockr 35.10 +1.09 +9.3
FordM 16.31 +.19 +25.9
Gannett 24.93 +.87 +38.4
Gap 43.31 +.72 +39.5
GenCorp 15.83 +.12 +73.0
GenDynam 84.11 -.04 +21.4
GenElec 23.72 -.13 +13.0
GenMills 49.40 -.10 +22.2
GileadSci s 58.00 +.66 +57.9
GlaxoSKln 51.85 +.54 +19.3
Hallibrtn 47.35 +.70 +36.5
HarleyD 58.62 +.57 +20.0
HarrisCorp 56.36 -.08 +15.1
HartfdFn 30.55 +.10 +36.1
HawaiiEl 25.44 +.06 +1.2
HeclaM 3.73 +.15 -36.0
Heico 59.64 +.90 +33.2
Hess 73.72 +.43 +39.2
HewlettP 25.84 -.04 +81.3
HomeDp 74.29 -.92 +20.1
HonwllIntl 81.72 +.26 +28.8
Hormel 42.78 +.30 +37.1
Humana 91.69 -.02 +33.6
INTL FCSt 19.57 +.23 +12.4
ITT Corp 33.90 +.20 +44.5
ITW 72.35 +.19 +19.0
IngerRd 60.16 -.08 +25.4
IBM 184.56 +.33 -3.6
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.00 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 102.23 +.71 +21.7
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 40.77 +.06 +9.8
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 43.41 +.92 +12.1
35.15 24.06 AquaAm WTR .76 30.85 +.12 +21.4
38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 36.59 +.20 +33.6
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 424.83 +4.43 +19.9
15.03 7.83 BkofAm BAC .04 14.29 +.14 +23.1
32.36 22.11 BkNYMel BK .60 30.56 +.43 +18.9
22.68 6.58 BonTon BONT .20 14.40 +.14 +18.4
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 59.28 +.83 +22.6
79.33 43.90 Cigna CI .04 78.57 +1.14 +47.0
43.43 35.58 CocaCola KO 1.12 38.65 -.13 +6.6
46.33 33.42 Comcast CMCSA .78 42.69 +.50 +14.3
34.70 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.08 34.41 +.65 +25.8
51.29 25.47 CmtyHlt CYH .25 40.88 +.43 +33.0
66.27 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 67.26 +2.26 +42.0
62.91 47.10 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 61.56 +.44 +16.2
68.39 41.72 EngyTEq ETE 2.62 64.68 +.66 +42.2
11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 9.03 +.31 +29.4
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 12.00 +.04 -16.7
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.47 ... +4.4
21.30 15.09 Genpact G .18 19.69 +.16 +27.0
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 9.11 +.01 +54.4
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 95.25 +.67 +31.9
46.25 25.97 Lowes LOW .72 44.08 +.41 +24.1
119.54 85.09 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 116.71 +.65 +18.5
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 95.50 +.02 +8.3
32.91 24.50 Mondelez MDLZ .56 30.75 +.09 +20.8
23.25 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 22.74 +.33 +12.2
39.75 7.93 NexstarB NXST .48 30.25 +.99 +185.6
77.93 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 74.59 +.66 +27.9
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.75 +.20 +7.4
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 18.26 +.53 +3.5
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 80.29 -.59 +17.3
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 84.21 -.95 +.7
82.54 65.83 ProctGam PG 2.41 79.53 -.06 +17.1
83.67 48.17 Prudentl PRU 1.60 78.09 +.19 +46.4
3.62 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 3.48 +.08 +155.9
26.17 15.33 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.84 +.34 +45.0
74.46 46.30 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 71.45 -1.04 +34.8
54.29 40.08 TJX TJX .58 54.24 +3.49 +27.8
43.24 30.04 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 40.21 +.59 +22.9
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.06 47.91 +.41 +10.7
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 73.23 -.35 +7.3
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 48.24 -.03 +23.2
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 42.59 +.10 +24.6
USD per British Pound 1.5675 +.0020 +.13% 1.5240 1.5709
Canadian Dollar 1.0389 +.0043 +.41% 1.0181 .9884
USD per Euro 1.3419 +.0077 +.57% 1.3281 1.2348
Japanese Yen 97.25 -.35 -.36% 93.81 79.43
Mexican Peso 12.9751 -.0864 -.67% 12.7222 13.1139
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.34 3.34 +0.09 -7.38 -3.38
Gold 1373.10 1366.20 +0.51 -12.96 -16.27
Platinum 1525.50 1509.00 +1.09 -7.38 +1.17
Silver 23.07 23.16 -0.41 -19.39 -21.60
Palladium 748.75 752.00 -0.43 +1.73 +20.07
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.56+.03 -2.7
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.49 +.04 +7.6
LifGr1 b 14.96 +.05 +11.1
RegBankA m 18.10 +.23 +27.5
SovInvA m 18.05 +.06 +13.3
TaxFBdA m 9.52 -.02 -6.8
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 17.74 -.06 -9.2
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.88 +.01 +1.1
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.55 ... +0.2
MFS
MAInvA m 25.11 +.03 +17.1
MAInvC m 24.19 +.02 +16.5
ValueI 30.42 +.07 +20.6
Merger
Merger b 16.02 +.02 +1.2
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.50 +.03 -1.6
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.63 +.02 +17.0
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 24.19 +.33 +25.9
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.07 ... +12.5
Intl I 25.26 ... +20.7
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 47.70 +.23 +12.7
DevMktA m 34.54 -.10 -2.1
DevMktY 34.20 -.11 -1.9
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.00 +.01 -3.1
AllAuthIn 10.15 +.02 -6.9
ComRlRStI 5.74 -.01 -12.5
HiYldIs 9.43 -.01 +1.6
LowDrIs 10.23 +.01 -1.4
TotRetA m 10.66 +.04 -3.8
TotRetAdm b 10.66 +.04 -3.7
TotRetC m 10.66 +.04 -4.3
TotRetIs 10.66 +.04 -3.6
TotRetrnD b 10.66 +.04 -3.8
TotlRetnP 10.66 +.04 -3.7
Permanent
Portfolio 47.10 +.27 -3.2
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.92+.07 +10.6
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 35.81 +.34 +14.7
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.21 +.15 +17.6
BlendA m 21.85 +.20 +18.5
EqOppA m 19.22 +.12 +21.2
HiYieldA m 5.60 -.01 +2.1
IntlEqtyA m 6.84 -.01 +8.9
IntlValA m 21.55 -.03 +8.2
JennGrA m 24.22 +.12 +16.0
NaturResA m 46.14 +.38 +2.3
SmallCoA m 26.75 +.37 +19.3
UtilityA m 13.23 +.11 +13.4
ValueA m 18.94 +.13 +21.3
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.43 ... +19.6
IncomeA m 7.03 ... -1.4
Royce
LowStkSer m 14.76 +.18 +6.6
OpportInv d 14.84 +.20 +24.2
ValPlSvc m 16.19 +.21 +17.1
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 26.04 +.10 +17.4
Scout
Interntl 34.94 -.05 +5.8
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 53.92 +.30 +18.2
CapApprec 25.27 +.06 +13.6
DivGrow 30.46 +.11 +16.4
DivrSmCap d 21.78 +.25 +24.9
EmMktStk d 30.05 -.25 -11.8
EqIndex d 44.63 +.17 +17.3
EqtyInc 30.79 +.15 +17.4
FinSer 18.30 +.14 +22.5
GrowStk 44.05 +.24 +16.6
HealthSci 53.91 +.43 +30.8
HiYield d 6.97 -.01 +3.8
IntlDisc d 51.44 -.27 +11.6
IntlStk d 15.03 -.02 +4.4
IntlStkAd m 14.95 -.03 +4.2
LatinAm d 30.58 -.07 -19.6
MediaTele 63.70 +.43 +19.5
MidCpGr 68.70 +.60 +21.7
NewAmGro 41.86 +.29 +16.5
NewAsia d 15.45 -.19 -8.1
NewEra 44.29 +.35 +5.7
NewHoriz 42.82 +.49 +29.1
NewIncome 9.32 +.02 -3.8
Rtmt2020 19.35 +.05 +8.2
Rtmt2030 20.96 +.07 +10.8
ShTmBond 4.78 ... -0.4
SmCpVal d 45.58 +.64 +16.4
TaxFHiYld d 10.79 -.04 -7.0
Value 32.08 +.18 +21.6
ValueAd b 31.72 +.18 +21.4
Thornburg
IntlValI d 29.59 -.24 +6.4
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 26.10 -.11 +12.3
Vanguard
500Adml 152.76 +.58 +17.4
500Inv 152.74 +.58 +17.3
CapOp 42.53 +.27 +26.5
CapVal 13.98 +.14 +26.1
Convrt 14.10 +.04 +12.5
DevMktIdx 10.75 -.02 +10.3
DivGr 19.46 +.05 +18.1
EnergyInv 63.42 +.23 +7.3
EurIdxAdm 65.90 +.09 +11.5
Explr 100.37+1.20 +26.3
GNMA 10.35 +.05 -3.7
GNMAAdml 10.35 +.05 -3.7
GlbEq 21.17 +.03 +13.4
GrowthEq 14.33 +.08 +16.7
HYCor 5.91 -.01 +0.3
HYCorAdml 5.91 -.01 +0.4
HltCrAdml 74.17 +.28 +25.8
HlthCare 175.77 +.67 +25.8
ITGradeAd 9.71 +.03 -3.2
InfPrtAdm 25.97 +.15 -8.5
InflaPro 13.23 +.08 -8.5
InstIdxI 151.76 +.59 +17.4
InstPlus 151.77 +.58 +17.4
InstTStPl 37.86 +.21 +18.4
IntlExpIn 16.95 -.08 +15.2
IntlStkIdxAdm 25.87 -.08 +4.9
IntlStkIdxIPls 103.49 -.28 +5.0
LTInvGr 9.51 +.03 -9.3
MidCapGr 24.43 +.21 +19.9
MidCp 27.09 +.30 +20.6
MidCpAdml 123.00+1.34 +20.6
MidCpIst 27.17 +.29 +20.7
MuIntAdml 13.57 -.01 -3.7
MuLtdAdml 10.97 -.01 -0.5
PrecMtls 11.30 +.05 -29.1
Prmcp 84.41 +.41 +21.5
PrmcpAdml 87.60 +.43 +21.5
PrmcpCorI 18.12 +.10 +21.4
REITIdx 21.56 +.46 +0.3
REITIdxAd 92.01+1.98 +0.4
STCor 10.67 +.01 -0.2
STGradeAd 10.67 +.01 -0.1
SelValu 26.29 +.19 +25.3
SmGthIdx 30.53 +.40 +22.0
SmGthIst 30.61 +.41 +22.1
StSmCpEq 27.04 +.38 +24.6
Star 22.36 +.07 +8.2
StratgcEq 26.38 +.33 +23.0
TgtRe2015 14.18 +.04 +6.0
TgtRe2020 25.63 +.07 +7.6
TgtRe2030 25.76 +.07 +10.2
TgtRe2035 15.71 +.05 +11.5
TgtRe2040 26.03 +.08 +12.3
TgtRe2045 16.34 +.05 +12.3
Tgtet2025 14.79 +.04 +8.8
TotBdAdml 10.55 +.03 -3.2
TotBdInst 10.55 +.03 -3.2
TotBdMkSig 10.55 +.03 -3.2
TotIntl 15.47 -.04 +4.9
TotStIAdm 41.78 +.23 +18.3
TotStIIns 41.79 +.24 +18.3
TotStIdx 41.76 +.23 +18.2
TxMIntlAdm 12.19 -.03 +10.4
TxMSCAdm 38.36 +.55 +23.1
USGro 24.80 +.15 +16.7
USValue 14.33 +.10 +20.8
WellsI 24.64 +.06 +3.7
WellsIAdm 59.71 +.15 +3.8
Welltn 37.05 +.10 +10.9
WelltnAdm 63.99 +.17 +10.9
WndsIIAdm 60.94 +.21 +18.2
WndsrII 34.34 +.12 +18.1
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.70 +.07 +10.7
DOW
15,002.99
-7.75
NASDAQ
3,613.59
+24.50
S&P 500
1,652.35
+6.29
RUSSELL 2000
1,028.57
+15.32
6-MO T-BILLS
.07%
-.01
10-YR T-NOTE
2.82%
-.06
CRUDE OIL
$104.96
-2.14
q q q q q q q q
q q p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$3.44
-.02
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
FNCBto sell
some branches
First National Community Bank
customers in Marshalls Creek and
Stroudsburg will see a new letterhead on
their statements soon ESSA.
Dunmore-based FNCB agreed to sell
its Marshalls Creek and Stroudsburg
branch deposit and loan accounts to
ESSA Bancorp, The Pocono Record
reported. The deal is expected to become
ofcial by the end of the year.
ESSA is also purchasing FNCBs
Marshalls Creek building at 5120 Milford
Road. ESSAwill consolidate the accounts
at its own branches in Marshalls Creek
and Bushkill at its newly acquired FNCB
building.
Health coverage
outpaces wages
Workers saw a modest rise in the aver-
age cost of employer-sponsored health
insurance this year, but theyre probably
not overwhelmed with relief.
Coverage costs still are climbing faster
than wages. That means, in many cases,
that a bigger portion of the average pay-
check is sliced off for insurance instead
of being deposited into employee bank
accounts.
Annual premiums for employer-spon-
sored family coverage climbed nearly
4 percent this year to top $16,000 for
the rst time, according to a survey by
the Kaiser Family Foundation released
Tuesday.
The cost of single coverage rose almost
5 percent. Those are smaller increases
than the spikes of 9 percent for family
coverage and 8 percent for single record-
ed in 2011.
Penney poised
for better days?
J.C. Penney Co. on Tuesday reported
its sixth consecutive quarter of big losses
and steep revenue drops as it continued
to face challenges related to a botched
turnaround plan spearheaded by its oust-
ed CEO Ron Johnson.
But investors sent Penney shares up
six percent to nearly $14 after having
pushed the stock down nearly 70 percent
in the last 18 months in an expression
of condence that returning CEO Mike
Ullman has started to stabilize the busi-
ness.
The latest report offered some encour-
aging signs that the move is beginning
to pay off: Revenue improved from
month-to-month during the quarter, and
the decline in Penneys online business
slowed signicantly in part due to the
companys move to veer from Johnsons
strategy and go back to operating its
online businesses with its physical stores.
IN BRIEF
$3.54 $3.64 $3.67
$4.06
on 7/17/2008
Market sees August cooldown
KEN SWEET
AP Markets Writer
NEW YORK Its been a chilly
August for the stock market.
At the start of the month, the Dow
Jones industrial average and Standard &
Poors 500 index hit all-time highs. Now
the market is down 4 percent from its
peak, and August is on track to be the
Dows worst month since May 2012.
On Tuesday, the Dow posted its fth
straight day of losses, the rst time thats
happened this year. While the S&P 500
and Nasdaq composite index did rise
modestly, it was rst time in four days
those indices have seen green.
The stock market slide in the last cou-
ple of weeks reects a shift in investor
strategy that began in the bond market
and spilled into stocks. The spillover
then mixed with lingering concerns
about the U.S. economy, leading to the
last several weeks of volatility, market
observers say.
The bond market is the catalyst for
this selloff, says Quincy Krosby, market
strategist with Prudential Financial.
While most of the selloff occurred in
the last couple weeks, it had its origins
months ago.
Up until early June, bond funds had
been one of Wall Streets more popu-
lar investments particularly among
average investors. More than $1.2 tril-
lion was socked away into bond mutual
funds and bond exchange-traded funds
between 2009 and 2012, according to
TrimTabs.
People were just throwing money at
bonds, even at low rates, says Julius
Ridgway, an investment advisor with
Mississippi-based rm Medley &
Brown.
That was before Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke said the central
bank could pull back on its $85 billion-
a-month bond-purchase program, which
was designed to keep bond yields low.
Bernanke made bond investors ner-
vous in mid-June by saying that the Fed,
one of the bond markets biggest custom-
ers in the last several years, may scale
back its buying. Investors pulled more
than $65.8 billion out of bond funds in
June, according to mutual fund research
rm Lipper, the largest amount ever
on a cash basis and the second largest
outow in percentage terms since the
nancial crisis in 2008. Investors pulled
an additional $22.5 out of bond funds in
July, according to Lipper.
As the 10-year yield has inched high-
er, the selling has led to more selling,
Krosby said.
Farm to facial; guys welcome and other spa trends
LEANNE ITALIE
Associated Press
AP photo
Ashley Cothran, with Travaasa Experiential Resorts, in Austin, Texas, and Hana, Maui, Hawaii,
pedals a Fender Blender cycle a stationary bicycle that powers a juicer attached at the
handlebars.
NewTiVo unit more than just a DVR
ANICK JESDANUN
APTechnology Writer
NEW YORK TiVo Inc. wants to
give television viewers more control over
what they watch on traditional channels
and over the Internet as the pioneer of
digital video recorders unveils its fth-
generation devices.
The new devices face more competi-
tion than TiVos did when they debuted in
1999. Cable and satellite TV companies
are improving their own DVR offerings,
while stand-alone devices such as Roku,
Apple TV and Googles Chromecast seek
to simplify Internet streaming on big-
screen TVs. Meanwhile, game consoles
and smartphones now come with apps to
do much of what TiVo does. An Internet
startup called Aereo offers an Internet-
based DVR for broadcast channels.
With its new Roamio DVR, TiVo is
counting on the notion that avid televi-
sion viewers prefer one device to do it all.
What TiVo is doing here is press-
ing home their advantage. That is, they
know TV, said Colin Dixon, chief ana-
lyst at nScreen Media, a research rm in
Sunnyvale, Calif. What they are doing
here is actually very difcult for anybody
else.
Dixon said many casual television
viewers will be ne with generic offer-
ings from their cable company, but TiVos
appeal is with high-end consumers who
are already paying the most for television
packages and Internet video services.
The Roamio went on sale Tuesday and
marks the companys rst major update
in three years.
Like previous TiVos and other DVRs,
the Roamio supports basic functions such
as the ability to pause and rewind live
TV. TiVos also let you watch video from
Netix, Hulu and other Internet services
on regular TVs, as long as you have sub-
scriptions with them. (Satellite TV isnt
supported on any of the devices. AT&TS
U-verse wont work either, but Verizons
FiOS will.)
The new TiVos give you more options
for nding shows to watch. The empha-
sis in the past was on nding programs
to record, whether by title, actor, direc-
tor, genre or keyword. The Roamio offers
recommendations on whats currently on,
based in part of what other TiVo viewers
are watching and have watched in that
time slot in the past. The new devices
also let you narrow what you see in chan-
nel-by-channel listings to just movies,
sports or kids shows.
Some of the new DVRs will also come
with the ability to watch live and record-
ed shows on iPhones and iPads. Before,
a $130 device called TiVo Stream was
needed. Streaming is initially limited to
devices on the home Wi-Fi network. This
fall, out-of-home viewing will be avail-
able through other Wi-Fi networks, such
as at work, hotels and coffee shops. An
Android app also is coming by early next
year.
K
TASTE
Heaven in a can
Try a moist, healthy salmon cake
Like most Americans of
a certain age, I ate canned
tuna all the time when I
was growing up. But when
someone first suggested
that I try canned salmon?
Well, I was horrified.
Why would I even bother
with canned salmon when
fresh salmon is readily
available? But Pacific wild
salmon, the most sustain-
able choice, turns out to
be very seasonal. And then
very pricey when it is avail-
able. So, I decided to give
canned salmon a whirl,
rationalizing that most
canned salmon is of the
wild variety anyway.
Well, it turns out that
canned salmon is delicious,
and perfectly suited to swap
in for canned tuna in any of
the recipes I love. The only
downside is that it can be
dry. So for this recipe for
fish cakes I had to dream
up the ingredients required
to make the cakes moist
and still healthy.
I started with sauteed
onion, letting it get a little
caramelized to add extra
flavor. Then I added low-fat
mayonnaise, a good mois-
turizer and not bad tast-
ing, especially if you cut
its sweetness with a little
vinegar. To bind the cakes
I used crushed sesame rice
crackers. These little gems
are low in calories; 20 of
them weigh in at 110 calo-
ries. I often reach for them
during that late afternoon
hour when Im otherwise
ready to eat my hand.
Heat-wise, I went with
wasabi, which glorifies fish.
At the supermarket, youll
find two main varieties of
wasabi: the powdered kind,
which is shelf-stable (you
just add water) and wasabi
in a tube, which must be
refrigerated after being
opened. Either will work
nicely in this recipe. And
if you cant find wasabi in
your store, add some bot-
tled horseradish instead.
These salmon cakes are
topped off with cucumber
pickles flavored with rice
vinegar and fresh ginger.
The pickle liquid also helps
to bind the cakes, while the
crunch of the cucumber slic-
es provides a pleasing con-
trast to the cakes tender
texture. These little pickles
are so quick and easy to
make youre done in 10
minutes I dont know
why I dont make them
more often.

WA S A B I - S P I K E D
SALMON CAKES WITH
PICKLED CUCUMBER
Start to finish: 30 min-
utes
Servings: 6
1 1/2 cups thinly sliced
seedless cucumber
1 teaspoon grated fresh
ginger
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
4 tablespoons vegetable
or canola oil, divided
1 cup finely chopped yel-
low onion
Two 6-ounce cans bone-
less, skinless salmon
1/4 cup low-fat mayon-
naise
2 to 3 teaspoons prepared
wasabi
1 cup crushed sesame
flavored thin rice crackers
(about 32)
In a small bowl, toss
together the cucumber,
ginger, vinegar, salt and
sugar. Let stand for 10 min-
utes while you prepare the
remaining ingredients.
In a large nonstick skil-
let over medium, heat 1
tablespoon of the oil. Add
the onion and cook until
golden, about 5 minutes.
Transfer to a medium bowl.
Reserve the skillet.
Add the salmon to the
onion along with the may-
onnaise, wasabi, crushed
crackers and 1/4 cup of the
liquid from the marinated
cucumbers. Form the mix-
ture into 6 burgers.
Return the skillet to medi-
um-high heat. Add 1 1/2
tablespoons of the remain-
ing oil. Add the salmon
burgers to the skillet. Cook
until golden, about 3 min-
utes. Add the remaining 1
1/2 tablespoons of oil, turn
the cakes over and cook
until golden on the second
side, about another 3 min-
utes.
Transfer to 6 plates and
top each salmon cake with
a mound of the pickled
cucumber.
Nutrition information
per serving: 230 calories;
120 calories from fat (52
percent of total calories);
13 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 45 mg choles-
terol; 15 g carbohydrate; 1
g fiber; 2 g sugar; 16 g pro-
tein; 500 mg sodium.
SARA MOULTON
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Wasabi-spiked salmon cakes with pickled cucumber are surprisingly delicious, even when made from canned salmon.
Ice creamtreats to send summer out with a smile
The kids are back to school if
not already, then soon and sum-
mer is slowly seeping into fall. Have
one last hurrah with these ice cream
treats that will help send those sum-
mer days off with some happy memo-
ries.
BANANA SPLIT ICE-CREAM
CAKE
Turn this ice-cream parlor staple
into a make-ahead dessert that can
feed (and please) a crowd.
Servings: 18
INGREDIENTS
2 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/2 cup butter, melted, plus cup
butter
4 to 5 medium bananas, sliced into
1/2-inch-thick rounds
1 1/2 quarts strawberry ice cream,
softened
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup chocolate chips
1 cup confectioners sugar
1 cup evaporated milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 (8-ounce) container nondairy
whipped topping
DIRECTIONS
1. In a small bowl, combine the gra-
ham cracker crumbs and the melted
butter. Set aside 1/2 cup of the mix-
ture, then press the remainder into
the bottom of a 9- by 13-inch pan.
2. Place the bananas in a single
layer over the crust. Spread the soft-
ened ice cream on top and smooth.
Sprinkle the nuts on the ice cream,
then cover with plastic wrap and
freeze until rm, about 1 hour.
3. In a large saucepan, melt the
chocolate chips and the remaining
cup butter and stir until smooth. Add
the confectioners sugar and evapo-
rated milk. Cook, stirring constant-
ly, over medium heat until slightly
thickened and smooth, about eight
minutes. Remove the pan from the
heat and stir in the vanilla. Cool the
mixture, about 30 minutes, stirring
occasionally. Pour the mixture over
the ice cream and freeze until rm,
about 45 minutes.
4. Spread the whipped topping
over the chocolate layer and sprinkle
with the reserved crumbs. Freeze for
at least 3 hours. Remove the dish
from the freezer 10 to 20 minutes
before slicing.

FROZEN FRUIT BITES


A snap to assemble, these kid-size
treats combine sweet fruit and a
refreshingly tart cheesecake-like ll-
ing.
Servings: 12
INGREDIENTS
12 vanilla wafer cookies
1/2 cup vanilla yogurt
1/2 cup Neufchatel cream cheese,
softened
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon honey
Sliced kiwi, strawberries or whole
blueberries
DIRECTIONS
1. Place liners in a mini-cupcake
pan. Put a wafer cookie, at side up,
in the bottom of each well.
2. In a medium-size bowl, whisk
together the yogurt, cream cheese,
lemon juice, and honey until smooth.
Spoon 1 heaping tablespoon on top
of each cookie, then top the mixture
with the fruit.
3. Cover the pan with plastic wrap,
then place it in the freezer until the
fruit bites are rm, about 1 to 1K
hours. Remove the tray from the freez-
er for 15 to 25 minutes before serving.
FAMILY FUN MAGAZINE
Give kids happy memoies when they go to school
Aimee Dilger/The Times Leader
Chef John Hudak created this BarbecuedPork
Duet for Sue Rismondo, co-owner of
Vanderlyns Restaurant in Kingston.
CHEFS CORNER
Tangy dish
makes duet with
two cuts of pork
Hello Vanderlyns Guests!
Those of you who have read my
articles know that I cant cook, nor
do I like to.
Maybe I shouldnt say I cant
cook because I do make about five
things very well!
But, Ill let
you in on a lit-
tle secret I
do like to grill,
especially in the
summer.
I recently told
John that I was
going to grill
some sweet corn
in the husk, and
some potatoes,
but wasnt sure
what protein I
wanted to go
with it.
He suggested I use some prime
pork, so he cut me some mignons
and my dinner menu was planned.
I could make the pork mignons on
the grill and also have some pulled
pork for a sandwich if desired. I
knew this was something even I
could do, so that is what I decided
on.
Since he knows I love the sauces
he creates, he surprised me by giv-
ing me some raspberry barbecue
sauce for the pork! I love the tangy
and sweet flavor combination of
that sauce.
Easy, yet flavorful, is right up my
alley. I will say I had very satisfied
dinner guests.
The Barbecued Pork Duet is cur-
rently on our dinner menu and
is very popular with our guests.
If you enjoy pork, I would like to
invite you to Vanderlyns to try our
Barbecued Pork Duet, as it is a great
combination of prime pork mignon
and slow braised pork shoulder,
otherwise known as pulled pork,
accented with our homemade rasp-
berry barbecue sauce.
After you try it at the restaurant,
you may even want to experiment
at home.
For reservations or additional
features call Vanderlyns at 283-
6260. Our website is www.vander-
lyns.com
BARBECUED PORK DUET
Yield: 1 Serving
Ingredients
1 prime pork mignon, 8 ounces
3 ounces pulled pork
3 ounces raspberry barbecue
sauce or your favorite
parsley, chopped, as needed
salt and black pepper, to taste
Method of Preparation
1) Season pork mignons with
salt and pepper. Sear pork for 1-2
minutes on each side; transfer pork
to baking and finish cooking in 400
F oven until 140 F internal temper-
ature is achieved on an instant-read
thermometer.
2) Place pulled pork on pre-
heated dinner plate, slice mignon
and fan on plate, drizzle with rasp-
berry barbecue sauce, add whipped
Yukon gold potatoes, seasonal veg-
etables and enjoy.
EDITORS NOTE: If you are a
chef who would like to contribute
a recipe to Chef s Corner, contact
mbiebel@timesleader.com or call
570-829-7283.
SUE RISMONDO
Vanderlyns Restaurant
Sue Rismondo
www.timesleader.com
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 1C THE TIMES LEADER
READY TO GO
GUARANTEEDO
O
MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, MEDICAL, OFFICE...
PAGE 2C Wednesday, August 21, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Cocktails for The Cancer Care Foundation set
The Foundation for Cancer Care of Scranton is holding its inaugural Cocktails for The Cancer Care
Foundation from 6-9 p.m. on Friday at the Country Club of Scranton. Tickets are $100 and include top-
shelf cocktails, light fare and music by the Poets. There will also be an opportunity to win a two-year lease
on a brand new 2013 Cadillac ATS 2.5L Sedan. All proceeds benefit The Foundation for Cancer Care of
Scranton. Funds will be used to offer free lung cancer screenings to residents of Northeast Pennsylvania.
The event is sponsored by R.J. Burne Cadillac, Scranton. For more information, or to make a reservation
or donation, contact Kat Surendran at 570-558-3597 or 1-855-533-5823. Checks should be made pay-
able to The Foundation for Cancer Care. Participants, from left: Davida Sweeney, Dunmore, co-chair, The
Foundation for Cancer Care; Wendy Haggerty, Scranton, co-chair, The Foundation for Cancer Care; Margo
Opsasnick, Scranton, president, The Foundation for Cancer Care; Laura Marion, Clarks Summit; co-chair,
The Foundation for Cancer Care; Frank Gervasi, Scranton, member of The Poets; Steve Mariani, Jessup; R.J.
Burne Cadillac; and Brian Marion, Clarks Summit, R.J. Burne Cadillac.
The Dallas Harvest Festival Steering Committee is planning the event to be held from noon to 5 p.m. on Sept. 15 on Main Street, Dallas.
This years theme is Year of the Volunteer and recognizes all of the Back Mountain organizations that help make the region a better
place. Special activities have been planned, including a contest to vote on the most popular local charity, Friends Feeding Friends food
drives, a flower display contest and a Best of Open Mic contest. Entertainment will be provided by area dance school students and spe-
cial musical acts. Apetting zoo and fire truck rides will be available for children. Afarmers market will also be held. Steering Committee
members, from left, first row: Barb Roberts; Liz Martin; Rich Fufaro, chairman; and Tracey Carr. Second row: Bill Peiffer, Donna Davies,
Karen Fiorello, Robert Opel, Nancy Silvi, Darcy Brodmerkel and Carol Wall.
Dallas Harvest Festival planned for Sept. 15
Garlicky
goodness
will come
to Poconos
The annual Pocono
Garlic Festival, now in
its 19th year, will ll the
Pocono region with the
aroma of garlicky goodness
over the Labor Day week-
end.
More than 50 food and
craft vendors will offer
everything from garlic vin-
egar to garlic ice cream as
well as garlic-themed pot-
tery and paintings from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 31
and Sept. 1 at the Shawnee
Mountain Ski Resort.
Vendors who are expect-
ed include:
Awesome Specialty
with garlic potato soup,
garlic herb dips and rubs.
Aunt Jans Salsa, with
12 varieties of salsa, all
touched with a hint of gar-
lic.
Bull and Bear, with
garlic-inspired Greek and
Mediterranean selections,
among them garlic-laced
spanakopita (spinach pie),
lamb and beef gyros and
grape leaves and even the
crowd favorite, garlic ice
cream.
Chef Tims Foods, spe-
cializing in gourmet garlic-
infused marinades and
salad dressings.
Speckled Lemonade,
with freshly squeezed lem-
onades.
Sherris Fun Foods,
with handmade, garlic-
infused crab cake sand-
wiches.
Stella Jeans, with
sweet potato fries, ribbon
fries, chicken ngers in gar-
lic sauce, garlic doughnuts
and deep-fried garlic Oreo
cookies.
Sycamore Grille, with
crab cakes, garlic stew,
risotto croquettes and fried
shrimp as well as garlic cot-
ton candy.
Sherlocks Gourmet
Eats, with fried calamari,
re-roasted garlic porta-
bellas and fried garlic arti-
chokes.
Shawnee Mountain,
with foot-long hot dogs
with garlic chili sauce and
fresh hot pretzels with gar-
lic mustard.
Theres also a chance to
become king or queen for a
day by entering the garlic-
eating contest. The rst
20- contestants will get
their chance to compete
in a garlic-eating smack-
down. To pre-register, nd
the contest entry form at
Poconogarlic@gmail.com.
The annual end-of-sum-
mer festival La Festa Italiana
will brighten Courthouse
Square in downtown
Scranton with food and craft
vendors, continuous enter-
tainment, games and rides
for the kids and reworks.
Hours are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Aug. 31 and Sept 1 and 11
a.m. to 9 p.m. Sept. 2.
An Italian Mass will be
celebrated at 10 a.m. Sept. 1
in St. Peters Cathedral and
a Dean Martin tribute will
be part of the festivities on
Sept. 2.
Admission is free. For
more information, see laf-
estaitaliana.org.
La Festa
Italiana
begins Aug. 31
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Member of the National Organization of Social Security Claimants Representatives
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80016221
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Experience in recognizing and solving your unique
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER COMMUNITY NEWS Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 3C
HAPPYBIRTHDAY!
Photographs and informa-
tion must be received two
full weeks before your
childs birthday.
Your information must be
typed or computer-gen-
erated. Include your name
and your relationship to
the child (parent, grand-
parent or legal guardians
only, please), your childs
name, age and birthday,
parents, grandparents
and great-grandparents
names and their towns of
residence, any siblings and
their ages. Dont forget
to include a daytime
contact phone number.
Without one, we may be
unable to publish a birth-
day announcement on
time.
We cannot guarantee
return of birthday or occa-
sions photos and do not
return community-news
or publicity photos. Please
do not submit precious
or original professional
photographs that require
return because such pho-
tos can become damaged,
or occasionally lost, in the
production process.
Email your birthday
announcement to people@
timesleader.com or
send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250. You also may use
the form under the People
tab on www.timesleader.
com.
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free
GUIDELINES
Anna R. Vitali
Anna Rose Vitali, daughter
of Raymond and Tracy Vitali,
Parsons, is celebrating her fifth
birthday today, Aug. 21. Anna is a
granddaughter of Carl and Louise
Majeski, Hudson, and Raymond
R. and Dorothy Vitali, Parsons.
She has three brothers, Dante, 11,
Garrett, 9, and Raymond, 3.
Makeinzy L. Backley
Makeinzy Lee Backley, daughter of
Robin Backley and Eric Karvaski,
Plymouth, is celebrating her
sixth birthday today, Aug. 21.
Makeinzy is a granddaughter
of Tracy Backley and the late
Charles Backley, Sheatown, and
Cathy Hower, Ashley. She has two
sisters, Zoey and Hailey and a
brother, C.J.
Sierra L. Rosengrant
SierraLynnRosengrant, daughter of
DaveandJennyRosengrant, Plains
Township, iscelebratingher second
birthdaytoday,Aug. 21. Sierraisa
granddaughter ofAnnLisowski,
PittstonTownship; thelateRonald
Rosengrant Sr.; DonnaandFrancis
Regan,Avoca; andRichardand
PatriciaMurman, Exeter. Sheisagreat-
granddaughter of RuthMackiewicz,
Larksville, andTeresaPollard,Avoca.
Samuel A. Bellanca
Samuel Anthony Bellanca, son of
Sam and Lisa Bellanca, is cele-
brating his seventh birthday today,
Aug. 21. Samuel is a grandson of
Robert and Mary Ann Bellanca
and Ron and Diane Breznay. He
has a sister, Sophia, 3.
Avery M. Endres
Avery Marie Endres, daughter of
Eric and Kristin Endres, Nanticoke,
is celebrating her first birthday
today, Aug. 21. Avery is a grand-
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Russell
Endres Jr., West Pittston; Marie
Santone, Nanticoke; and Joseph
Santone, Bristol.
GOOD EATS!
Editors note: Please
send news for this
space by noon Friday
to people@timeslead-
er.com or by mail to
Good Eats, The Times
Leader, 15 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711. To ensure accu-
racy, information must
be typed or computer
generated.
THIS WEEK: Aug. 21
to Aug. 27
Ethnic Food Festival,
11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday,
St. John the Baptist
Orthodox Church, 93
Zerby Ave, Edwardsville.
Rain or shine under the
big tent. Grated, home-
made potato pancakes,
halupki, pierogi, goulash,
haluski, pagach and
much more. Bake sale
with homemade bread
and other homemade
baked goods, theme
baskets, crafts pic-a-tic
and childrens games.
No admission cost. Food
priced separately.
Chicken Barbecue,
noon-5 p.m. Saturday,
Parsons Baptist Church,
232 Austin Ave., Wilkes-
Barre. $8. Live Christian
music.
Family-Style Beef
Dinner, 4:30-6:30
p.m. Saturday, Sweet
Valley Volunteer Fire
Company, 5383 Main
Road, Sweet Valley.
Take outs begin at 4
p.m. $9 adults; $5 chil-
dren 6-11; free for chil-
dren younger than 6.
Chicken Barbecue,
4-6:30 p.m. Saturday,
Wyoming United
Methodist Church,
376 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming. $9 adults; $5
children 5-12. Take out,
drive through or eat in.
Picnic style. For more
information call 570-693-
2821.
Ice Cream Social,
4:30-6:30 p.m. Saturday,
Town Hill United
Methodist Church,
417 Town Hill Road,
Shickshinny. Homemade
INBRIEF
NICHOLSON: The
Nicholson Womens Club
is planning the 98th anni-
versary celebration of the
Nicholson Bridge, also
known as the Tunkhannock
Viaduct, from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Sept. 8 on Main
Street at the intersection of
Route 92 and Route 11.
Entertainment will
include animals from
the Ross Park Zoo. The
Lenoxville Community
Band will also be perform-
ing at different locations
on Main Street. There will
be vendors offering a vari-
ety of products, including
homemade items, crafts,
collectibles and food.
A chicken barbecue will
be served by the Masons
and ladies of the Nicholson
Womens Club beginning at
11 a.m.
The Nicholson Guitar
Studio will present local
players all day and there
will be entertainment and
games for children.
For more information,
call 570-942-6747.
ice cream, pies, cakes,
soups and sandwiches.
Take outs available.
Chicken Barbecue,
11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Sunday, Luzerne
Volunteer Fire
Department, 66 Tener
St., Luzerne. Eat in or
take out. $8. Includes
half chicken, baked
potato, ear of corn, roll,
dessert and drink, if
eating in the hall. For
advance tickets call 288-
2249. Limited number of
tickets will be available
at the door.
Free Dinner, 5-6:30
p.m., every Monday, for
those in need, Christian
and Missionary Alliance
Church, 317 Luzerne
Ave., West Pittston.
FUTURE:
All-You-Can-Eat
Breakfast, 8 a.m.-12:30
p.m. Sept. 1, St. Patrick
Parish Center, 411
Allegheny St., White
Haven. $8.
Chicken and Ribs,
11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept.
2, NAACP at Kirby
Park, for the Keystone
Wounded Warriors.
Chicken Barbecue,
Flea Market and Craft
Sale, noon-4 p.m. Sept.
15, Exaltation of the
Holy Cross Church, 420
Main Road, Buttonwood,
Hanover Township. Half
chicken, baked potato,
coleslaw, applesauce,
roll, dessert and drink.
$9. Additional flea mar-
ket times are 8 a.m.-2
p.m. Sept. 20, 8 a.m.-
noon and 6-7 p.m. Sept.
21 and 10 a.m.-noon
Sept. 22. 823-6242.
Patsels Restaurant, Route 6 and 11, Glenburn, is hosting a gala benefit for the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter at 5 p.m. on Sept. 15. Owners
Pat and John Atkins and Michael Bodner, executive chef, are the hosts for the Going to the Dogs! event. Donation is $100. Reservations
are required and can be made by calling 563-2000 or by visiting www.patsels.com. With dogs Yankee, Nevis, Riley and twins Rue and
Laisa, from left, are Pat Atkins, Bodner and Tara Atkins.
Patsels hosting beneft gala for animal shelter
BenjaminT. Pulliam
Benjamin Thomas Pulliam, son
of Maureen and Jay Pulliam,
Charlotte, N.C., celebrated his
ninth birthday Aug. 18. Benjamin
is a grandson of Janice and
J.C. Pulliam, Burlington, N.C.,
and Irene and Dan Wisnieski,
Shavertown. He has a sister,
Caroline Frances, 10.
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PAGE 4C Wednesday, August 21, 2013 TV www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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Schreiber, Voight enthrall in surefre hit Ray Donovan
Liev Schreiber has
long been a terrific
actor in search of a
role wholly exploiting
his rugged looks and
smoldering sexuality.
With Showtimes riv-
eting new series Ray
Donovan, hes finally
found it. And he takes
full advantage.
As the title charac-
ter, Schreiber clearly
relishes the opportu-
nity to empty his con-
siderable arsenal, a la
the late, great James
Gandolfini, by looking
as comfortable busting
heads (with a baseball
bat) in the body of a
Hollywood fixer as
he does coddling his
spoiled, social- climbing
wife and kids.
In fact, during the
first hour of Showtimes
surefire hit, debut-
ing Sunday night at
10, youd swear you
were watching Tony
Soprano incarnate.
But by hour two, when
the series created
by Southlands Ann
Biderman finds its
legs, his Ray Donovan
becomes entirely his
own man and you
cant get enough of him.
Or, his ruthless, iras-
cible father, played by
another vastly unde-
rutilized actor, the
all-but-forgotten Jon
Voight.
Yes, the man whod
become best known for
being the estranged
grandparent to the
Brangelina brood, thrill-
ingly reconnects with
the talents that made
him an Oscar-winner.
As Mickey Donovan,
an aged Boston mob-
ster just sprung from
a 20-year stretch at
Walpole, Voight is
nude, crude and on a
vengeance, as he heads
west to reunite with his
three majorly screwed-
up sons, all South
Boston transplants now
residing in a California
where the sun dont
shine.
But first, Pops stops
off at a Southie cathe-
dral to pop the priest
who bopped his young-
est, Bunchy (Dash
Mihok), during the hey-
day of the church sex
scandal.
In Mickeys mind, his
shocking act is noth-
ing more than a father
absolving the sins of a
Father.
But Ray, who quickly
gets wind of what dear
ol Dad has done, takes
exception, and plans to
use the information to
send Mickey back to
Walpole, far away from
his wife, Abby (Hunger
Games mom, Paula
Malcomson), daughter,
Bridget (Moneyball
scene-stealer Kerris
Dorsey), and son,
Conor (Devon Bagby).
Only problem is
that everyone, includ-
ing older brother and
brain- damaged ex-box-
er, Terry (the great Brit
character actor Eddie
Marsan), is glad to see
the deceptively jolly
and charming Mickey
back in the fold.
Thus, the stage is set
for a battle of wits and
stratagems between a
father harboring more
secrets than the NSA
and a son whose obses-
sion with keeping his
father at bay takes an
escalating toll on his
marriage and Michael
Clayton-like livelihood
as a fixer for the stars.
If a Laker wakes up
in bed with a dead
coke fiend, call Ray.
If a young Hollywood
stud gets caught with
his pants down in the
company of a trannie,
call Ray.
He and his team will
clean everything up nice
and tidy, either through
muscle or cash, which
his employers, the
elite law team of Ezra
Goodman (a superb
Elliott Gould) and Lee
Drexler (a hilariously
foul-mouthed Peter
Jacobson), have plenty
of, thanks to their star-
studded clientele.
They, like most of
Bidermans charac-
ters, are oblivious to
their self-absorbed
eccentricities. And
Schreiber is only too
happy to play straight
man to this kooky con-
tingent of wannabes,
has beens and fleeting
stars. He never fails to
make you feel and
empathize with the
frustrations of a fixer
who cant fix the most
important thing in his
life his family.
Same for Voight,
who never ceases to
amaze with his uncanny
ability to go from
utterly terrifying to
frightfully funny at the
turn of a dime.
If theres a complaint
about Ray Donovan,
and its a relatively
small one, its that you
cant shake the feeling
that youve seen a lot
of this before in movies
like Michael Clayton
and The Fighter,
and TV shows like
The Sopranos and
Entourage.
But Biderman, who
wrote three of the
first four episodes
available to the press,
does her pilfering dis-
creetly enough to make
her engrossing new
series very much her
own.
Not bad for a creator/
executive producer
who, at age 62, runs
refreshingly contrary to
the Hollywood norm of
young male Turks.
Yes, shes older,
but shes also wiser.
And it shows both
in her writing and in
the way she patiently
reveals the complexity
of her characters, no
matter if they are movie
stars, like Voight,
Gould and Schreiber,
or still wet-behind-
the- ears child actors
like Dorsey and Bagby.
And the more she
peels back the onion,
RAYDONOVAN
Cast includes Liev Schreiber, Jon Voight, Elliott Gould,
Eddie Marsan, Dash Mihok and Paula Malcomson.
Airs Sunday nights at 10 on Showtime and repeats
throughout the week.
Also available on On Demand the day after each show
debuts.
Grade: A-
the more your addic-
tion to Ray Donovan
and its vast array of
fascinating characters
grows and grows.
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Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
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3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
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Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Man Of Steel in RealD 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 150 min -
(12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
**Man Of Steel in RealD 3D - PG13
- 150 min - (12:15), (3:55), 7:10, 10:10
*Man Of Steel 2D - PG13 - (12:00), (1:45),
(3:40), (5:00), 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
*This Is The End - R - 110 min - (1:30),
(4:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Internship PG13 125 min
(1:00), (1:45), (3:35), (4:20), 7:00, 7:40, 9:35,
10:15
The Purge R 95 min
(12:40), (2:45), (4:50), 7:30, 9:45
Now You See Me PG13 120 min
(1:30), (4:15), 7:05, 9:35
After Earth PG13 105 min
(2:00), (4:20), 7:25, 9:45
Fast & Furious 6 PG13 135 min
(12:50), (1:30), (3:40), (4:20), 7:00, 7:25,
9:50, 10:10
Epic PG 110 min
(12:30), (3:00), 7:15, 9:40
The Hangover 3 R 105 min
(12:45), (3:00), (5:15), 7:40, 9:55
*Star Trek Into Darkness RealD 3D
PG13 140 min
(1:15), (4:15), 7:30, 10:20
Special Events
World War Z & World War Z RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Monsters University & Monsters University in RealD 3D -
8pm on Thursday, June 20th
Friday August 16th through
Tuesday August 22nd
Jobs PG-13, 2 hr 5 min 1:50p 4:30p
7:10p 9:50p
Kick-Ass 2 R, 1 hr 47 min in DBOX Motion
Code seating 1:20p 4:00p 7:20p 9:50p
Kick-Ass 2 PG, 1 hr 47 min 1:20p
4:00p 7:20p 9:50p
Lee Daniels The Butler PG-13, 2 hr
12 min 1:00p 3:45p 7:00p 9:45p
Paranoia PG-13, 1 hr 46 min 2:00p
4:30p 7:30p 7:30p 10:00p
Elysium R, 1 hr 49 min 1:00p 3:30p
7:15p 7:45p 9:45p 10:15p
Planes PG, 1 hr 32 min 1:10p 3:30p
7:10p 9:30p
Planes in 3D PG, 1 hr 32 min 2:10p
4:30p
Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters
PG, 1 hr 46 min 1:20p 3:50p 7:05p
9:30p
Were the Millers R, 1 hr 50 min
1:40p 4:15p 7:15p 9:45p
2 Guns R, 1 hr 49 min 1:45p 4:30p
7:30p 10:00p
The Smurfs 2 PG, 1 hr 45 min 1:40p
4:10p 7:30p
The Wolverine PG-13, 2 hr 6 min
7:00p 9:50p
The Conjuring R, 1 hr 51 min 1:30p
4:10p 7:05p 9:35p
Grown Ups PG-13, 1 hr 40 min 1:45p
4:20p 7:40p 10:10p
Despicable Me 2 PG, 1 hr 38 min
2:00p 4:15p
The Heat R, 1 hr 57 min 10:00p
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elysIuM (DIgItal) (R)
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Grown uPs 2 (DIgItal) (Pg-13)
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heat, the (DIgItal) (R) 11:00aM
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER PUZZLES Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 5C
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I am a
twice-divorced wom-
an who has never
been good at choos-
ing the men in my
life. Two years ago, I
met a man who is 12
years my senior. He
is sweet, thoughtful and caring, and
would do just about anything for me.
What started as companionship has
turned into a full-blown love affair.
The problem is that he is married.
His wife is not well. She has a
chronic disease and other medical
problems. The way he cares for her is
what attracted me to him. He spends
what time he can with me, but mostly
he is there for his wife.
I am OK with the situation, as I
dont want him to leave her for me.
I have tried breaking it off with him,
but he gets me to take him back, say-
ing he doesnt know what he would
do without me in his life.
Abby, I feel like Im in the back-
ground waiting for her to die so I can
take her place as his wife, and I hate
this feeling. What should I do?
Guilty in Kentucky
Dear Guilty: Your feelings are well-
founded. You ARE waiting in the
background for this mans wife to die.
But what if she doesnt?
You say you have never been good
at choosing men, and I have to agree.
Ask yourself why you chose to get in-
volved with someone who isnt avail-
able except for a few stolen moments.
If marriage is what you really want,
your priority should be to find a man
who doesnt have the kind of previous
commitment this one does.
Dear Abby: I have recently been
contacted by an old boyfriend who is
now incarcerated. He claims I was the
love of his life and he thought about
me often after our breakup. He is now
asking me to become his pen pal and
send him money occasionally.
I have bitter memories of our re-
lationship, so its hard to believe he
cared for me as much as he says. He
is begging me not to abandon him
or forget about him, but I dont want
the role of pen pal and provider. How
do I share my thoughts without hurt-
ing his feelings?
Reluctant in California
Dear Reluctant: If you are smart,
you wont respond to him at all. I
have printed letters from more than
one prison guard who wanted to warn
kind-hearted, gullible women that in-
mates send multiple solicitations of
this kind in the hope that SEVERAL
of the recipients will send money.
You are not responsible for this
mans well-being. Since your breakup,
your lives have obviously gone in po-
lar opposite directions. My advice is
to keep it that way, for your own sake.
Dear Abby: What is the proper way
to dispose of leftover milk in your ce-
real bowl? To dump it out is wasteful,
to spoon it up like soup seems a bit
much, and to drink it right from the
bowl seems rather cat-like. Does the
answer differ if you are in your own
kitchen vs. a restaurant?
Got Milk in San Francisco
Dear Got Milk: If youre in a restau-
rant, you should not lap liquid from
the bowl. If youre at home any-
thing goes. And if you have so much
milk left in your bowl after the cereal
has been consumed, you are pouring
too much in.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Twice-divorced woman considers her place in affair with married man
To receive a collection of Abbys most memo-
rable and most frequently requested po-
ems and essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check or money
order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear
Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You
offer your compassion easily to
others but not so readily to your-
self. You expect much of yourself
now, and you may forget that
people dont become experts
overnight.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). What
seems like its happening in the
spur of the moment might actu-
ally be the culmination of hours
of preparation. This is even true
of small talk. Preparation makes
for graceful articulation.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Children
arent the only ones who tend to
misbehave when they are bored.
The good news is that once
everyone has something inter-
esting to do, good behavior will
be a given.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Getting
comfortable in relationships
takes time, especially for those
who have standards as high
as yours are lately. Keep your
expectations high, though.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Most people
dont like to be confronted with
criticism, but youre different.
You want to know whats work-
ing and whats not working for
others so you can become as
effective as possible.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Try not
to overthink things, be skepti-
cal or read too much into every
result. Not everyone harbors a
hidden intention. Some people
are just going along acting on
natural inclinations.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Others
wont be observing you as close-
ly as you are looking at them
right now. Its a relief unless
youre particularly proud of what
youre bringing to the table.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Youre
supportive of people regardless
of whether they are supportive
of you. Youre used to making
the first move, and youll make
it again today. Returns on your
investment come later.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
Skills worth acquiring involve
hours of practice and mopping
up after making many, many
mistakes. While attempting a
trial-and-error process, dont for-
get that most of the learning will
come from the error part.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
Someone close to you is still try-
ing to figure out how to show
love to you in the way you would
prefer. In the meantime, youll
smile and put up with the well-
intended misses.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
You do what it takes to please
people. Sometimes you even
state the opinion that others
want to hear instead of the one
you really have. Only those who
know you very well will know the
difference.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Your
action is guided by a sincere
devotion to another person. Its
easy for you to cooperate and
work very hard. Without a sec-
ond thought, you do what needs
doing.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Aug. 21).
Your ambitions will lead you to
leadership and the limelight!
New relationships will motivate
you toward health and fitness
goals in September. June brings
reunions and wedding bells.
Libra and Pisces people adore
you. Your lucky numbers are: 7, 1,
22, 19 and 39.
PAGE 6C Wednesday, August 21, 2013 COMMUNITY NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
The Holy Cross Mens Club of
Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church presented the Thomas
Tryba Award to Kyle Cunard and
George Evans after a recent 10
a.m. Sunday Mass. A breakfast
was held at the Wyoming Valley
Country Club after the service.
The award is given to a graduat-
ing senior for continuous and
dedicated service to the parish.
This year two seniors quali-
fied for the award named after
ThomasTryba, adedicatedmem-
ber of the club. At the breakfast,
from left: Barry Kaminski, presi-
dent, Mens Club; the Rev. Kevin
Mulhern, pastor; Cunard; Evans;
and the Rev. Vincent Dang,
senior priest.
Holy Cross Mens Club presents awards
Benton Foundry receives honors
The Luzerne-Wyoming Counties
Employment Coalition recently
honored the Benton Foundry, Inc.,
Benton, for its support of Brian
Doty, a nine-year employee with
developmental disabilities. Doty
is asuccessful full-timeemployee
of Benton Foundry who assists
in grinding and preparing cast-
ings for shipment. For more
information on the Employment
Coalition, contact Judy Welch
at 825-9441 or 1-800-816-1880
or email jwelch@mhmr.luzerne.
pa.us. At the ceremony, from
left: Heather Nelson, Office of
Vocational Rehabilitation; Jeff
Hall, president, Benton Foundry;
Doty; and Steven Elston, Sarah
Walker and Judy Welch, Luzerne-
Wyoming Counties Mental Health
andDevelopmental Services.
Three newmembers were inducted into the Plymouth Kiwanis Club as the
result of a recent membership drive. Newmembers are Charlie Dancheck,
Edwardsville; Betty Minucci, Wilkes-Barre; and Marianne Pietraccini,
Larksville. They were inducted into the club by Pennsylvania Kiwanis
Division 15 Lieutenant Governor Megan Kuffa, a member of the Wyoming
AreaKiwanis Club. Shegaveabrief presentationontheconcept, goals and
objectivesofKiwanis.Thenewmembersreceivedpinsandaninformational
orientation packet from Plymouth Kiwanis President James Mahon. The
club meets the first and third Wednesday of each month at Happy Pizza,
40W. MainSt., Plymouth. For moreinformation, or tojointheclub, contact
Rich at 288-1849 or John at 287-0582. At the induction ceremony, from
left: JohnGavenonis, Kiwanissecretary; CharlieDancheck; Mahon; Minucci;
Pietraccini; RichardSchall, Kiwanis president-elect; andKuffa.
Plymouth Kiwanis Club
installs newmembers
Avariety of fairs are
planned in the region
From kielbasa and wine to
goulash and pagach, you can
nd plenty of food and drink
to whet your appetite over
the next several weeks at fairs
and festivals that have been
plannedthroughout theregion.
Here is some information
about some of them:
Plymouth Kielbasa
Festival, the annual street
festival with music, enter-
tainment, car show, parade,
food vendors and a kielbasa
contest. Main Street in down-
town Plymouth. 10 a.m. to
10 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Info at plymouthalive.org.
Ethnic Food Festival,
with homemade foods,
games, gift baskets, cash
rafe and entertainment by
Farmers Daughter (Friday),
Sweet Pepper & the Long
Hots (Saturday) and the
Wannabes (Sunday). St.
Lawrence Church, 620 S.
Main St., Old Forge. 5 to 10
p.m. Friday and Saturday; 4
to 10 p.m. Sunday. 457-5900.
Ethnic Food Festival,
with homemade potato pan-
cakes, halupki, pierogies,
goulash, halushki, pagachand
a bake sale including home-
made bread. Also: theme
baskets, crafts pic-a-tic and
childrens games. St. John
the Baptist, 93 Zerby Ave.,
Edwardsville. 11 a.m. to 6
p.m. Saturday. 472-8748.
Jessup Wine Festival,
with icy summer wines and
wine slushies along with a
pig roast, food vendors, live
music, handcrafted items,
wine accessories and more.
Jessup Carnival Grounds,
333 Hill St. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday. 836-5253.
Sullivan County Fair, the
162nd edition of the agricul-
tural event with tractor pulls,
amusement rides, miniature
horse pulling and plenty of
fair foods; Sullivan County
Fairgrounds, 4430 Route 154,
Forksville. Noon to 10 p.m.
Aug. 28; 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Aug. 29-31; 11a.m. to10p.m.
Sept. 1; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept.
2. $6. 924-3205.
Luzerne County Fair, the
51st annual agricultural event
with amusement rides, Kiddie
Land, the high-ying Dialed
Action Sports Team, 4-H Fun
Horse Show, Fair Princess
Contest, line dancing,
Barnyard Olympics, Tractor
Obstacle Rodeo, Fireworks
Finale and plenty of fair food,
Luzerne County Fairgrounds,
Route118, Dallas. 4to11p.m.
Sept. 4-5; 4to11:30p.m. Sept.
6; 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Sept.
7; 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sept. 8.
$8. 675-3247.
Bloomsburg Fair, the
annual agricultural event with
more than 1400 animals,
amusement rides, carnival
midway, Big Cat Encounter,
Sky Ride, helicopter rides, con-
certs, and plenty of fair foods.
at the Fairgrounds, 620 W.
Third St., Bloomsburg. 7 a.m.
to 10 p.m. Sept. 21 to 28. 387-
4145 or bloomsburgfair.com.
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80019904
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 1D
Special Notices
OCTAGON FAMILY RESTAURANT
375 W Main St. Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Weekend Special
$13.95 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Auctions
ESTATE AUCTION
Chuck's Auction Service
Friday Aug. 23, 2013, 5:00 PM
1144 Exeter Avenue, Exeter
Lovely open pine hutch, cedar closet, 2 bedroom sets, maple
server, desk, bookcases, mahogany dining room table &
chairs. Sofas, retro chaise, Maytag washer & dryer, refrigerat-
or, file cabinet, and more. Noritake set, lots of Lenox, crystal,
and more. New kitchenware, toys, collectibles, linens. Freid-
rich 17,000 BTU air conditioner unit, Lathe, radial arm saw,
wheelbarrow, tools, box lots and much more.
See web sites for detailed list and pictures Information:
570-693-0372, chucksauction.com,
auctionzip.com #4156, AU001433
Special Notices
Free Books:
Normal Christian Life
By Watchman Nee
Economy Of God.
By Witness Lee
http://Www.Bfa.Org/
Newbooks
Christian Friends of
Brother Watchman Nee
Want to meet and share
thoughts with you.
Call 570-267-8250,
sdekw@yahoo.com.
Pearls are produced when
foreign material is trapped in-
side the shell.
oysterrestaurant.com
570-820-0990
All Junk
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Amazing family for your
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Miscellaneous
PURSE (Kathy VanZeeland),black
& new w/ tags;$40. New black
Suede Tignanello purse;$30. Black
& gr ey Dooney & Bour k e
purse;$20.Like new camel color
Etienne Aigner purse;$20.Gun met-
al colored Tignanello purse;$10.
570-603-1195
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
Daniel R. Edwards, Deceased,
l ate of Lehman Townshi p,
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania,
who died on July 20, 2013. All
persons indebted to said Es-
tate are required to make pay-
ment, and those having claims
or demands to present the
same without delay to the Ex-
ecutor, David D. Onzik, c/o
Jannell L Decker, Esq., 1043
Wyoming Ave. , Forty Fort, PA
18704
EXECUTOR'S NOTICE
Estate of RUSSELL CIRKO,
late of the Township of Han-
over, County of Luzerne, State
of Pennsylvania, Deceased.
Letters Testamentary on said
Estate having been granted to
the undersigned, all persons
indebted thereto are reques-
ted to make payment, and
those having claims or de-
mands against the same will
present them without delay for
settlement to:
FIRST NATIONAL TRUST
COMPANY, Executor
Attn: Karen A. Kenderdine
396 South Centre Street,
PO Box 1223
Pottsville, PA 17901
or
JAMES C. BOHORAD,
ESQUIRE
Lipkin, Marshall, Bohorad
& Thornburg, P.C.
1940 West Norwegian Street
P.O. Box 1280
Pottsville, PA 17901-7280
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters of Administration
have been issued to Carolyn
Martin, 170 Old East End Blvd,
Bear Creek Twp., PA 18702 in
the Estate of Stanley Pointek,
Deceased, who died on Janu-
ary 27, 2013, late of the City of
Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania. All creditors are
requested to present thei r
cl ai ms and al l persons i n-
debted to the decedent will
make payment to the afore-
mentioned Administratrix or
her attorney.
ROSENN, JENKINS &
GREENWALD, L.L.P.
15 South Franklin Street
Wilkes Barre, PA 18711-0075
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that, on Monday, August 19,
2013, at the Forty Fort Bor-
ough Municipal Building, 1271
Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort
Borough, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, the Council of
the Borough of Forty Fort ,
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania,
enacted an Ordinance author-
i z i n g t h e i s s u a n c e o f
$3, 541, 500. 00 pr i nci pal
amount of the General Obliga-
tion Note and the private sale
thereof to Franklin Security
Bank, Lender, at par, bearing
interest at the rate of 2.25%
per annum. The note is a gen-
eral obligation of the local gov-
ernment unit and its officers
are directed to do all acts ne-
cessary and proper for the is-
suance and securing of said
Note. No amendments were
made during the final passage
of this Ordinance.
A copy of the full text of the Or-
dinance, as enacted, may be
examined by any citizen in the
Office of the Secretary of the
local government unit at Forty
Fort Borough Municipal Build-
ing, 1271 Wyoming Avenue,
Forty Fort Borough, Luzerne
County, Pennsylvania, on any
busi ness day (except Sat-
urdays and Sundays) between
the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
4:00 p.m. prevailing time.
Barbara Fairchild
Manager
Borough of Forty Fort
ESTATE NOTICE
Decedent: Norma J. Moyles
DOD: August 31, 2012
Administrator: Robert A.
Moyles, 154 Almond Lane,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 (also
the Decedent's last address)
Attorney: Cynthia M. von Sch-
lichten, Esquire RJ Marzella &
Associates, 3513 North Front
Street, Harrisburg, PA 17110
Grant of Letters: June 26, 2013
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
Edward S. Zukauskas, De-
ceased, late of Exeter Bor-
ough, Luz er ne Count y ,
Pennsylvania, who died on Ju-
l y 1, 2013. Al l persons i n-
debted to said Estate are re-
quired to make payment, and
those having claims or de-
mands to present the same
without delay to the Executor,
PNC BANK, NATIONAL AS-
SOCIATION, c/o Jannell L.
Decker, Esq., 1043 Wyoming
Avenue, Forty Fort, PA. 18704
Lost & Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
Vito &
Gino's
FREE
PICKUP
570-288-8995
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
-CALL ANYTIME
-HONEST PRICES
-FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
COMPANION/CARE GIVER
Reliable, Pleasant, Experi-
enced Woman seeking posi-
tion as companion. Appts, er-
rands, etc. 570-823-8636.
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fish-
ing & tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
MOTOWN THE MUSICAL
Wed., Oct. 16th
$149. (Mezz Seats)
WICKED
Wed., Oct. 16th
$169 (Orchestra seats)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
Monday, December 2
$99.
orchestra seats
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
OCT. 5 & 6 SAT/SUN
Frank LLoyd Wright's
Fallingwater/Clayton/911
Memorial @ Shanksvillle
NOV.. 3 SUN
Chocolate World Expo
White Plains, Lyndhurst
Castle Tarrytown
NOV. 14 THURS. NYC
Vermeer Exhibit
@ the Frick
Dinner @ Four Seasons
Restaurant
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
FUN GETAWAYS!
1,000 Islands
Sept 16-19
Meals, Cruises,
Wine Tasting
Yankees/Orioles 9/1
White Sox 9/2 & 9/4
Giants Broncos 9/15
Eagles 10/6
Sight & Sound
"Noah" 9/7
Broadway:
"Newsies" 9/14
Matilda 9/14
1-800-432-8069
Travel Entertainment
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED. Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Its a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Administrative / Professional
Legal Secretary/
Receptionist
Full time. Legal experience
preferred but will train the
right candidate. Excellent
phone etiquette is necessary.
Must be able to work inde-
pendently, computer know-
ledge is a must. Duties will in-
clude answering telephones,
typing, billing, general office
functions. Send resume and
cover letter to:
The Times Leader
Box 4490
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre,PA 18711
Customer Support / Client Care
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
PROFESSIONAL
Growing manufacturer has a
position open for a Customer
Service Professional in a fast-
paced environment. The ideal
candidate must possess
excellent communication skills,
along with computer experi-
ence. Must be a team player
with a can-do attitude and
have excellent follow-up skills.
Must have MS Excel, Word
knowledge. Comprehensive
benefit package, including
vacation, medical, dental, and
401K.
Send resume to:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
Drivers & Delivery
DRIVER
Experienced Roll Off,
Class A or B CDL Driver. Full
Time, Over Time available.
Benefits include, paid
healthcare, vacation, 401K.
Apply in person
7:30am-3:30pm
Louis Cohen & Son, Inc
9 Fellows Ave
Hanover Twp, 18706
DRIVER
with own Mini Van or Cargo
Van. Immediate start, $600+
per week, contract as an IC
for a courier company.
Call 484-482-2047
DRIVER
Clarks Summit Area.
Courtesy Driver for
Kost Tire & Auto Service.
Ask for Erwin Jr.
570-586-3078
Education
Pre-K Counts Sub/
Toddler Teacher
Must be certified in ECE!
Starting Part Time will move
to Full Time with benefits
quickly. Email resume to
bloomearlyed@yahoo.com
THE WYOMING VALLEY
WEST SCHOOL DISTRICT
is accepting applications for
the following positions:
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
The Wyoming Valley West
School District is seeking a
full-time, Occupational
Therapist for the 2013-2014
school year. The position is
within the collective bargain-
ing unit and the selected can-
didate will work directly with
students and/or in collabora-
tion with staff. Responsibilit-
ies include screenings, evalu-
ations, team collaboration,
IEP development and other
duties. Must possess current
PA state occupational therap-
ist license, current clear-
ances, valid drivers license
and personal vehicle. Send
letter of interest, resume, ap-
plication, three current profes-
sional references, copy of
current PA state occupational
therapist license and
clearances
(Act 34 Criminal Record
Clearance, Act 151 Child
Abuse Clearance, Act 114
FBI Fingerprinting).
Send applications to:
The Personnel Office
Wyoming Valley West
School District
450 N. Maple Avenue
Kingston, PA 18704
Application deadline is Friday,
August 23, 2013.
YOUNG TODDLER
TEACHER
Full Time position
Experience preferred
Send resume to:
mark@littlepeopleWB.com
or apply in person:
280 Hanover Street
Wilkes-Barre
Food Services
Is now hiring for the
following part time positions:
Security Officers
and
Produce Clerks
Previous experience
preferred.
Apply at:
400 South Main St.,
Wilkes Barre
E.O.E
Help Wanted General
LOT ATTENDANT
Part Time. Valid PA
Drivers License.
Call 570-824-0903
after 3pm
DRAFTSPERSON
Entry level position with
knowledge of CAD required.
Home design, material take
offs and truss review.
*Health and Dental Insurance
*Vacation and Personal Days
*401K Retirement Plan
Send resumes to:
Fine Line Homes
596 Susquehanna Blvd.
Hazle Township, PA 18202
KUNKLE KENNELS
is currently looking to hire
*Part Time working Kennel
Manager
*Groomers, professional &
certified
Please send resume to:
kunklekennels@epix.net or call
570-675-1111 for application
Help Wanted General
LANDSCAPE HYDROSEED
PERSONNEL
Hydroseed and soil erosion
control experience helpful.
Valid drivers license a must.
Top wages paid. Unlimited
overtime. Apply in person
9am-3pm, Monday through
Friday and bring ID:
1204 Main Street
Swoyersville
Varsity Inc.
No Calls Please
E.O.E
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
FORKLIFT
MECHANIC
Action Lift, Inc., located in
Pittston, PA, is the exclusive
dealership for Crown and
TCM forklifts for NEPA. We
are seeking a full time forklift
mechanic to troubleshoot, re-
pair and diagnose Crown and
other makes of lift trucks.
Good written and verbal com-
munication skills, as well as
customer care skills are
necessary. A valid drivers li-
cense and the ability to safely
operate lift trucks are re-
quired. Previous forklift mech-
anical experience or technic-
al school graduate will be
considered. We offer an
excellent wage and benefits
package, as well as 401K
Retirement Savings Plan,
paid holidays, paid vacation
and much more.
E-mail your resume to
mermar@actionliftinc.com
or fax to 570-603-2880
Logistics/Transportation
DRIVERS
NEEDED (2)
CDL CLASS A
Full time. Home Daily.
Monday-Friday, night work.
Must have clean MVR & back-
ground with minimum of 1 year
experience. Must have doubles
endorsement. Benefits
available. Call Todd
570-991-0316
CLASS A CDL
DRIVERS
Local, Regional, & Shuttle
Routes
Minimum 1 year experience
and 23 years of age
required.
Benefit package including
family.
Apply in person, call or
email:
CDS TRANSPORTATION
Ron Woznock
Bldg 7, One Passan Drive,
W.B. Pa
570-654-6738
rwoznock@
cdstransportation.com
Drivers: Hazleton, PA.
Local and Regional Runs
Available
CDL-A, 1yr Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply: www.goelc.com
1-866-213-1065
Maintenance / Supervisory
CARPET + TILE
CLEANERS
Stanley Steamer is hiring.
Drivers license required; must
work Saturdays, 7 am - done;
100% commissions paid. Call
Ted at 570-332-8168 to
inquire about employment
opportunities.
EOE.
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call 829-5000
to start your
home delivery. timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
PAGE 2D Wednesday, August 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Medical/Health
LPN
Per Diem
CNA
FT, PT, Per Diem All Shifts
(PA Certification Req.)
*Competitive Pay Rates*
Jump Start Your Career Today!
Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for information
Email resumes to Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Or apply in person at:
Birchwood Nursing & Rehab Center
395 Middle Rd
Nanticoke, PA 18634
Medical/Health
RN SUPERVISOR
*$2,500- Sign On Bonus*
LPN-CNA
Full Time-Part Time Positions!
*Competitive Salary + Benefits*
To apply for our amazing career opportunities
Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for info
Email resumes to: Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Subject Line: ATTN-Riverside
Or apply in person at:
Riverside Rehab & Nursing Ctr.
500 West Hospital Street Taylor, PA 18517
Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
KINGSTON
SWOYERSVILLE
WILKES-BARRE
LEE PARK
PLYMOUTH
WAPWALLOPEN
SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
Trucksville
Shavertown
Lehman/Harveys Lake
Lee Park
Hilldale
Wyoming
Glen Lyon
South Wilkes-Barre
Production/Operations
PRODUCTION
AEP Industries, Inc.,
manufacturer of flexible packaging films in Mountaintop hiring
MACHINE OPERATORS FOR NIGHT SHIFT ONLY
Starting at $ 10.50/hr. PLUS .50 /hr. for night shift;
60-90 day evaluation provides increase $$ based on
YOUR performance, attendance etc.
Full-time 12 hours shifts alternating / 3 & 4 day work weeks
(overtime pay every other)
EVERY OTHER WEEKEND A MUST
As a Machine Operator you will remove, inspect, and pack
finish product to specifications with strong opportunity for
promotion. You must be able to do some heavy lifting, MUST
know how to use a tape measure and scale,
and be a TEAM PLAYER.
Previous mfg. experience preferred.
Benefit Pkg. includes:
Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Ins., Vacation, Holiday pay
Applications accepted daily @
AEP INDUSTRIES, INC.
8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
20 Elmwood Avenue
Crestwood Industrial Park
Mountaintop, PA 18707
Email: grullony@aepinc.com
EOE * A drug free workplace
Production/Operations
SHEETFED/WEB
SUPERVISOR
Local printer is looking for an experienced press production
shift supervisor. Candidate will supervise the shift activities of
our Sheetfed Dept. and is responsible for department's safety,
quality and productivity. Weekend and holiday work may be
required as needed. Union shop supervisory experience is
desirable. Salary pending experience.
Minimum qualifications:
High school diploma or GED
Vocational/technical degree or equivalent experience
Front-line supervision experience plus technical and
interpersonal skills
Problem solving experience with four color lithograph and
paper problems
Good mechanical trouble shooting skills
Proactive thinker and good team builder.
Please send resume to:
The Times Leader
Box 4490
15 N. Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
E/O/E
Houses For Sale
(570) 885-2474
3 Bedrooms, 2 tile baths, hardwood oors, granite counter tops
Conveniently located just o Route 315
Minutes to Route 81, the Cross Valley Expressway or Wilkes-Barre
$199,900
NOW AVAILABLE!
Residential Lots Also Available
80020231
Marketing/Product
SOCIAL
MEDIA
TEAM LEADER
Positive Results Marketing,
Inc., Old Forge, PA. Is look-
ing for a highly energetic in-
dividual with a background
in social media. Candidate
shoul d have experi ence
posting to Facebook, Twit-
ter, Google+, YouTube and
Pinterest. Creative writing
skills required and Blog-
ging Experience is a defin-
ite plus! The ability to work
under tight deadlines is re-
quired. If you love the world
of Social Media, Dont let
this career opportunity pass
you by. Come and join our
marketing team! Send re-
sume and cover letter to:
sherry@positive
resultsmarketing.com
Medical/Health
Community Options
Community Support Staff
(Direct Care Staff) to support
adults with developmental
disabilities in our
White Haven, PA area group
home locations. FT/PT/Sub
available with daytime,
afternoon, evening, and
weekend hours! Responsibilit-
ies include assisting individu-
als with maintaining their
independence and with daily
living skills, administering
medication, and having a life
in the community. Direct Sup-
port Staff will also assist each
individual with goals and out-
comes, submit documentation,
and accompany individuals to
medical and other appoint-
ments. HS Diploma/GED,
valid DL with reliable trans-
portation, and a satisfactory
background. Submit resumes
to: Resumes-LHAllentown@
comop.org
(P) 484-221-8806
(F) 484-221-9637. EOE
RESIDENTIAL
WORKER
Full and per-diem work at a
personal care home, located
in Drums, giving assistance
to residents with all aspects
of their care. HS diploma or
equivalent needed along with
a valid PA driver's license.
Hours vary. Benefit package
offered to full time. Please
send resume to: Northeast
Counseling Services, HR
Dept. 130 W Washington
Street, Nanticoke, PA 18634
or via email to:
ncsjobs@ptd.net EOE
www.northeastcounseling.org
Production/Operations
MATERIAL
HANDLING
OPERATORS
Valley Distributing & Storage
Co. is seeking experienced
stand up and sit down operat-
ors for our Laflin facility. Must
have strong math & counting
skills, write legibly, able to lift
50 lbs, responsible work
habits & pass any pre-em-
ploy tests. Computer parcel
shipping skills a plus. Full
time with benefits, health,
dental, vision, 401K with co.
match.
Apply in person:
Valley Distributing &
Storage Co.
One Passan Drive,
Laflin, Pa 18702
Or Email to:
khaller@valleydist.com
Restaurants
MANAGEMENT
TRAINEE
This person must be custom-
er oriented, motivated, and
energetic with good com-
puter skills. Flexible shifts.
Weekends a must.
Apply in person with resume:
AUNTIE ANNE'S
LAUREL MALL HAZLETON
PIZZA BAKER &
KITCHEN HELP
At least one yr experience for
Pizza Baker.
Full Time & Part Time
available for both positions.
Apply at: Dave Colarusso's
105 West End Road, Hanover
570-822-0181
ask for Dave or Grace
Sales / Business Development
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE
EXPERIENCED
Positive Results Marketing,
Inc., Old Forge, PA Is look-
ing for a highly energetic in-
dividual with a Background
in sales. Candidate will have
outside B2B sales experi-
ence. Must be willing to cold
Call, develop new business
as Well as service existing
clients as needed. Your abil-
i t y t o achi eve mont hl y
budgets and assist Manage-
ment in developing budgets
will guarantee Your success!
The ability to work under
tight deadlines is a must.
This is a Full Time position.
Base mont hl y sal ary Of
$1,500, plus 5-20% commis-
sion on sales. Health Insur-
ance after 90 days. Come
and j oi n our outstandi ng
team! Send resume
and cover letter to:
sherry@positive
resultsmarketing.com
TELEMARKETER
ENTHUSIASTIC
TELEMARKETER
NEEDED
Positive Results Marketing,
Inc., Old Forge, PA Is look-
ing for a highly energetic in-
dividual with a Background
in inside sales. Candidate
will call businesses off of
our extensi ve Database
and set appointments for
our outside Sales execut-
ives. No travel is required.
The ability to work under
tight deadlines is a must.
This is a Part Time position.
Qualified candidates will
Earn $15-25 per hour de-
pending on performance.
Come and j oi n our out-
standing team! Send re-
sume and cover letter to:
sherry@positive
resultsmarketing.com
JOIN OUR TEAM!!
We are looking for energetic
SALESPEOPLE with little or
no experience, who are look-
ing for an excellent working
environment with great
earnings!
WE WILL TRAIN
YOU!!
SUBARU/KIA
560 PIERCE ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
PLEASE APPLY IN
PERSON
Technical Trades
Experienced Heavy
Equipment Mechanic
Class B CDL required. Must
have 3 years experience &
own tools. Working on
engines, electrical, hydraulics,
power train, welding.
Machine Shop experience a
plus. Apply in person:
703 S Township Blvd,
Pittston, PA 18640
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
Commercial
HUNLOCK CREEK
Turn Key and come to this
beautiful quiet area with a
stream that runs between the
properties. Great yard for sit-
ting on the deck & watching
nature all for a great price.
This place has been remodel
and updated. A great place to
live. Do not let this house
pass you by. This is by ap-
pointment only. 24 Hour no-
tice.
MLS# 13 2668
$85,000
Please call Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, sideby-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
NANTICOKE
212 E. Main Street
Building on Main St. near Anto-
nio's. Former business & res-
idential combination with 4
floors containing 3000+ sq. ft.
Walk-in street level entry both
front and back. Small off street
parking area in rear. Great op-
portunity with new Main St.
projects and foot traffic nearby.
$ 40,000. 570-760-7888 or
570-735-6879.
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOULL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
TANNING SALON
Established West Side tanning
sal on. Turn key busi ness.
Send letter of interest to P.O.
Box 1652, Ki ngst on, PA
18704.
Commercial
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
SCRANTON
INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
FOR SALE
$65,000 - $110,000
Five (5) investment buildings
for sale throughout Scranton,
each less than 5 minutes to the
downtown area. Each build-
ing is priced at a reasonable
rate, but can be negotiable.
Please call 570-346-3328 or
570-336-8192 for more details
and for an appointment to see
the buildings.
SUB SHOP &
RESTAURANT
Established Luzerne County
sub shop & restaurant. Great
business. newly remodeled. All
new equipment. Complete in-
vent ory. Pri ce i ncl udes 4
months rent $16,500. Will ac-
cept 60% down. 570-417-9200
SWOYERSVILLE
Great i nvestment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major high-
ways & conveniences. Bring all of-
fers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done. MLS #13-1983.
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901 or 696-2468
WEST NANTICOKE
$139,900
30 E. Poplar St.
Multi - Family
5 apartments and a 2 car garage,
all rented. Off street parking for 8
cars. Great investment.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-680
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
For Sale By Owner
BACK MOUNTIAN
AREA
MOBILE HOME
with addition on 4+ acres. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, nice deck,
enclosed heated sun porch. All
appliances and washer & dry-
er included. Private peaceful
set t i ng. Locat ed hal f way
between Dal l as & Harveys
Lake. $75,000. Must sell look-
ing for offers. 570-499-4150
For Sale By Owner
DALLAS
For Sale By Owner
41 Pine Crest
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath ranch,
Large living and family
rooms, 2 car garage. Large
lot on quiet street. $139,900.
Call 570-675-0937
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
PLAINS TWP.
29 Jay Drive
2 story, 4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, on half acre. Fenced
yard with heated in ground
pool. $250,000.
570-235-1624
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage
on 1.09 acre. Finished base-
ment with laundry room.
Hardwood floors and
carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located
on a quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
WILKES-BARRE
8 Mill St. (Parsons)
**REDUCED**
3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
Large yard with 2 tier deck.
Spacious driveway, garage,
and storage shed. Conveni-
ent location for shopping,
casino, hospital, school bus
stops. Asking $90,000
(NEG.) Call: 570-824-8665
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
DUPONT
250 Main Street
$79,900
Affordable brick ranch home
with 3 bedrooms, deck over-
looking fenced in yard. de-
tached two car garage. a low
mai ntenance home i n very
convenient location with new
propane furnace.
MLS #13-3009
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Colleen Turant
570-239-4293
Houses For Sale
BEAR CREEK
2,000 sq. ft. Cedar 3 BR home
nestled on 3.5 acres. Hard-
wood floors in DR & LR, stun-
ning great room with tile floor,
cathedral ceiling & gas fire-
place. Modern kitchen with
stainless steel appliances &
granite counter tops, detached
2 car garage 24x48 w/kitchen
& 3/4 bath, covered pati o.
Large rec room in lower level.
C/A & gas heat.
One Year Home Warranty .
MLS #13-1702
$384,900
Call Matt Hodorowski
714-9229
EXETER
40 Lincoln Street
$119,900
Remodeled home has some
great sur- prises! Two mod-
ern baths, first floor laundry,
three nice size bedrooms,
large new kitchen with gran-
ite counters and tile floor,
corner l ot wi th ni ce yard.
Everything is new, so you
don't have anything to do but
move in!
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS #13-3008
Call Colleen
Houses For Sale
BENTON
A RARE OPPORTUNITY
665 CREST AVE.
Make your full or part-time
home at beaut i f ul LAKE
GANOGA on top of Red Rock
Mtn. Truly a gem! 112 of lake
frontage with dock. 2700+ sq.
ft. of energy efficient living
space with open floor plan,
vaulted ceilings and great nat-
ural lighting. Expansive deck
provides fabulous views of
the l ake. Four bedrooms,
three plus baths, fireplace
and more. Community beach,
tennis courts, helipad and
2000 acres are all available to
association member for hunt-
ing and fishing or just plain
walking. Come see it!
#13-1857
$599,000
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
283-9100
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
209 Constitution Avenue
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 3D
Part-Time/Temporaries
THE TIMES LEADER
DATE: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21
TIME: 11 AM - 2 PM
The Times Leader Distribution Center
90 East Market Street
Wilkes-Barre
INSERTER/PACKAGERS
- PART TIME -
Day and night shift positions available in our Packaging Department. Experience is preferred, but we
will Train the right candidate. This position reports directly to the Packaging Supervisor.
Duties include but not limited to:
Opening of insert skids
Feeding of circulars into assigned hoppers
Stackdown of ROP
Clean up Packaging Department at the end of the assigned shift
Must be able to work flexible hours, be able to lift at least 25 lbs and have reliable transportation. pre-
employment drug screening & background check required.
Automotive
339 Highway 315 Pittston
New and used car dealership is now looking for an experienced
Auto body Technician for a growing dealership.
The technician should be able to perform all aspects of damaged vehicles to pre accident
condition.
- Must have minimum of 5 years experience in the industry
- Must have current drivers license
- Must have own tools
- Excellent working conditions
- Salary based on experience
- Must be dependable
- Full time position 40 plus hours per week
- Excellent benefts, medical, dental, 401K
- Immediate openings available
Apply in person or email resume mwynn@kpautogroup.com
Houses For Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Brick ranch with natural wood-
work, stone fireplace with gas
logs, newer carpet over HW
floors, gas heat, central aid.
Modern kitchen w/Corian coun-
tertops. Beautiful sun room
opens to large, level, private
yard. Updates include newer
roof, panel box, water heater &
more!
MLS 13 3416
$173,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
715-7733
474-6307
DALLAS
Beautiful, well kept 2 story Co-
lonial features 3,900 sq. ft. 5
bedrooms, 3.5 baths, hard-
wood & tile floors, gorgeous
ent ry f oyer, bui l t -i n pool ,
fenced yard, 3 car garage.
MLS# 13-1932
$459,000
ONE YEAR HOME
WARRANTY INCLUDED
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied. MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
DALLAS
Newberry Estate Exceptional
4 bedroom, 3 bath townhouse.
Hardwood floors. Bright & airy
kitchen. Finished lower level
with walk-out to patio. Enjoy
carefree living with swimming,
golf & tennis amenities.
MLS#13-2185. $199,000
Call Geri 570-862-7432
DALLAS
WOODLAWN AVE
Fully renovated inside and out!
Home has many features in-
cluding: 3 or 4 bedrooms with
a fully finished attic, 2 full and
1 half bath, Laundry room on
the first floor.
MLS#13-2316
$220,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
PRICE CUT
9 Westminster Drive
4 bedroom brick ranch. 2,800
sq. ft. Totally renovated. 2 1/2
car garage. Low taxes, corner
lot. Walking distance to Dallas
school & medi cal cent er .
$251,000. See ZILLOW for de-
tails. Call 570-878-3150
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
DALLAS
19 Glen Riddle Lane
Peacef ul surroundi ngs over-
whelm the senses when you step
foot on this lovely property. Tudor
style 2 story with 4 bedrooms and
2.5 baths, family room with fire-
place. Accessible outdoor deck
from kitchen, family room Base-
ment area can be finished off for
additional living space.
MLS 13-1818
$284,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DUPONT
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 1-3
Remodel ed cont empor ar y
home wi t h new ki t chen &
baths. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
great outdoor living space with
fenced yard, above ground
pool & detached garage.
MLS#PM-2459
Call George Zygmunt
646-706-2934
570-629-6100
GOULDSBORO
BIG BASS LAKE
NEW PRICE $105,000
This large Chalet has a full kit-
chen on the ground floor with
full bath. Great for two families
to share, or in-laws quarters.
In Big Bass Lake Community
with indoor & outdoor pools,
club house, gym & lakefront
beaches. Conveniently loc-
ated near Rts. 380, 435 & 307.
Call Tom cell 516-507-9403
ONE SOURCE REALTY
570-842-3200
Houses For Sale
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$89,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
FORTY FORT
56 Oak Street
A Lovely Single family house
with hardwood floors,
throughout. 3 season side
porch, large closets in all 3
bedrooms. Walk-up attic for
additional storage space, and
so much more. Check it out!
MLS# 13-3149. $145,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
HANOVER
Ideal location in Hanover Township.
Close to high school and shopping.
This duplex offers a new furnace,
newer roof, most replacement win-
dows, large yard, garage with work
area and off-street parking for a
great price. MLS# 13-757
$55,000 Call Cindy King 570-690-
2689 www.cindykingre.com
570-675-5100
Houses For Sale
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor family room, Large
master bedroom (15x16) with
lots of closet space.
Aluminum siding.
Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$119,900.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
Houses For Sale
GLEN LYON
194-196 E. Main St.
Large home with mother in law
suite that can either be open to the
rest of the house or closed off with
its own entrance and used as an
apartment. This home has vinyl sid-
ing, newer electrical, replacement
windows, large yard and 2 car gar-
age. Home offer a 1st floor master
and bath, 3 fireplaces and tons of
room. Come check out all the pos-
sibilities for yourself.
MLS 13-2419
$84,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
Houses For Sale
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
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Questions?
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Adress:
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Suite 200
Moosic, PA 18507
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Customer Service Representatives
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
7 ALLENBERRY DR.
Ready to move in this 3 bed-
room town house in Allen-
berry is also the most afford-
able unit currently for sale.
New hardwood floors & in-
cluded LG washer & dryer.
Over sized lot with patio &
private wooded surroundings.
Convenient location. One of
the first units in Allenberry.
Easy in & out.
MLS#13 403
$98,900
Call Paul at 760-8143
or Gail at 760-8145
to schedule your
appointment.
696-2600
HANOVER TWP
Affordable 2 story home fea-
turing nice size living room,
dining room, eat-in kitchen,
1/2 bath on 1st floor, 3 rooms
on 2nd floor with full tile bath.
Updated gas heating system.
Off street parking for 2 cars.
Little grass to cut! Mortgage
payment will be less than
most rents.
MLS #13 2100
$44,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
HANOVER TWP
Lovely home in the Korn Krest
section of Hanover Twp. Open
downstairs floor plan. 3 bed-
rooms, l arge deck, above
ground pool . Out of fl ood
zone. Beautiful views. Very
low heating costs.
MLS #13-1358
$94,900
David Krolikowski
885-6731
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
288-0770
HANOVER TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY AUG. 25
12:00 to 2:00
Nice bungalow ranch style
home containing (6) rooms, 3
bedrooms. Rooms in lower
level. New bath, upgraded ap-
pliances, new parquet & car-
peted floors, new windows.
Close to grade school & high
school. Property is close to all
amenities. Nice view from up-
per deck. Home is next to 501
High St. which can be pur-
chased as a package deal.
DIR: From W-B to San Souci
Parkway, left on Willow, right
on High.
#13-697
$67,500
Your Host: Louise Laine
283-9100 x. 20
283-9100
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP
291 Vanessa Drive
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Aug 25, 2:30 to 4:30
Scenic view of the Wyoming
Valley. Located at the end of a
nice private road. Minutes to
Wyoming Valley Country Club,
Industri al Park & school s.
Close to Rtes. 81 & 309. Cus-
tom bui l t, 4 bedrooms & 4
baths. 1st floor family room
with wood burning fireplace.
formal dining room off the liv-
ing room. 1st floor laundry,
large enclosed patio with tile
floor, hardwood floors on first &
second f l oors. Large t wo
vehicle garage. Lower level re-
creation room with bar, extra
room with coal/wood burning
stove which can be used as
5th bedroom. Lots of closet
space.
Must See to Appreciate
MLS #12-4610
$269,900
Louise Laine 283-9100 x 20
HANOVER TWP.
501 High Street
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY AUG. 25
12:00 to 2:00
Looking for an affordable home
in excellent condition, close to
grade school and high school,
this is the home for you! Re-
modeled throughout, private
driveway, fenced-in yard, new
ki t chen, f r eshl y pai nt ed
throughout, new windows, new
parquet floors and carpeting.
Property at 503 High St. also
for sal e. Sel l er wi l l accept
package deal. DIR: From WB
to San Souci Parkway, left on
Willow, right on High.
#13-691
$74,500
Your Host: Louise Laine
283-9100, x 20
283-9100
HANOVER TWP.
Maintenance free townhome
in Ledgewood Estates. 2
story great room, hardwood
floors, maple glazed kitchen
wi th grani te counters and
stainless steel appliances.
gas fireplace. 3 BRs on 2nd
floor with 2 full tiled baths.
Master boasts a separate
shower & Jacuzzi tub. Laun-
dry on 2nd floor. Full base-
ment, gas heat & central air.
nice deck, 2 car garage. Loc-
ation near all interstates & the
Hanover Industrial Park.
MLS 13 1960
$245,000
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HUNLOCK CREEK
Commercial - Residential -
Land
All for One Price
$259,900
40' x 60' clear span pole barn
with concrete floor, 19.5 acres,
two story, 12 year new resid-
ential home featuring 1st floor
master bedroom & bath, Jac-
uzzi tub & separate shower in
master bath. Great room with
floor to ceiling stone fireplace.
Large eat-in kitchen, 2 BRs
and Jack & Jill Bath on 2nd fl.
finished lower level - walk out!
Half bath in lower level & 1st
floor. Large rear deck. Work,
live & enjoy your land without
leaving home!
MLS# 13 1591 & 13 1607
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
Houses For Sale
HUNTINGTON MILLS
2 story home in Huntington
Mills offers quiet country liv-
i ng. Features l i vi ng room,
den, dining room, eat in kit-
chen. 3 bedrooms, bonus
room, full bath. 2 car garage.
All situated on 1.12 acres.
MLS #13-2799
$105,900
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
JENKINS TWP.
46 Old Mill Road
Stunning English Tudor in a
desirable neighborhood. Mod-
ern kitchen with cherry cabin-
ets, stainless steel appliances,
island with Jenn air & tile floor.
Separate glass surrounded
breakfast room. Family room
with gas fireplace & hardwood
floors. Formal dining room with
bay wi ndow. French doors
throughout. Master bedroom
suite with master bath, walk-in
closet & separate sitting room.
Lower level rec-room and of-
fice. Two car garage. Pittston
Area School District.
MLS#13-1076
Price Reduced
$285,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
UNDER CONTRACT
This 3 bedroom, 4 bath brick
town home offers a spacious
floor plan, high ceilings, re-
cessed lighting & rich hard-
wood floors. Cherry cabinets,
a large island, granite coun-
ters, stainless steel appli-
ances & over sized sink high-
l i ght the ki tchen. Cori an
counters & European style tile
& vanities accent the baths.
Finished lower level (above
ground). 2nd floor has new
hardwood Brazilian cherry
f l oors. New l andscaped
pat i o, al l f enced i n.
Owner Will Consider Rent
with "Option"
$279,900.
Call Ruth K Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
Great location - This 3 bed-
room 2 bath home is waiting
for i ts new owners. Entry
opens to living room/dining
room combo lovely large
rear yard garage with lots of
storage.
MLS #13-2659
$124,000
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
NANTICOKE
For Sale by Owner
1/2 double, 3 bedrooms, large
living room, dining room, kit-
chen, laundry, laminate floors
on 1st floor, new hot water bol-
ier, fenced yard. $13,000.
570-735-1058
or 570-704-8099
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room & re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
counter tops. Tile floor in foy-
er and kitchen, master bed-
room and master bath with a
whirlpool tub. The home has
Pella windows throughout.
MLS#13 3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
KINGSTON
19 Church Street
Lovely Kingston home that
will ''capture'' you upon entry!
From it's inviting 10 x 6 foyer
with hardwood floors to the
modern kitchen with pristine
white cabinetry, this house is
an absolute ''doll house!''
Master Suite on 2nd floor with
two additional bedrooms and
another room on the 3rd floor
+ 3 season porch, off-street
parking with 2 car garage and
so much more! Call today!
MLS# 13-2893. $144,900
Don Crossin 570-498-3287
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, f ormal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$273,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Houses For Sale
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
REDUCED $219,900
7 Concord Drive
Beautifully maintained 2 story
in Oakwood Park. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths with 2 car garage
and private rear yard. Mature
landscaping, gas/electric heat
with central air.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-2215
Call Charlie
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
Houses For Sale
LAKE SILKWORTH
(LEHMAN TWP.)
Exceptionally well maintained
ranch home with spacious
landscaped yard. Three bed-
rooms, amazing spa room
with hot tub. Large eat-in kit-
chen, finished basement with
bar and fireplace. Oversized
t wo-car at t ached garage,
deck, patio and screened in
porch. Short walking distance
to the lake with deeded lake
access.
MLS#13-2053
PRICE REDUCED TO
$149,000
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
283-9100
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$59,000
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$194,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
Houses For Sale
PITTSTON
MLS 13-3293
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570 592 3966
MOOSIC
REDUCED
$87,500
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home with endless
possibilities. 3-4 bedroom, 1
bath, central air, plenty of stor-
age. Enclosed porch, garage
with carport. Situated on 3 lots.
Di recti ons: 1-81, Exi t 180
Moosic (Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile. Turn R onto
8th St., up hill, turn left, house
3rd on right.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
MOUNTAIN TOP
Immaculate 3/4 bedroom bi-
level on half acre lot offers
privacy & outdoor beauty.
Convenient U shaped kit-
chen opens to dining area.
Hardwood floors in much of
house. Family room in lower
level has tile floor & brick
mantle ready for wood burn-
er. Office can be 4th bed-
room. Perennials comprise
extensive outdoor landscap-
ing, along with a 10x17 deck,
15x 16 pat i o & 20x 12
Studi o/offi ce. Home War-
ranty.
MLS#13 2914
$189,000
Call Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
PITTSTON
$64,900
62 Pine St.
Enjoy the warm weather in this
3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home
with great curb appeal, sun
room and patio. New roof and
newer windows.(Traveling N.
on Main St. Pittston turn R.
onto Pine St., home is on left).
MLS 13-1897
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 5D
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Houses For Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
ALBERDEEN ACRES
Beautifully appointed and up-
dated home. Large lot with
mature l andscapi ng. Huge
amount of storage with abund-
ant shel vi ng & cl oset s.
Screened i n deck & pati o.
Amazing finished lower room
with walk-out patio doors & a
fireplace. Generous room sizes
throughout. Remodeled kit-
chen with granite appliances
included. Move in condition
with little wear and tear.
#13-2917
$420,000
Gail Pukatch 760-8145
Paul Pukatch 760-8143
696-2600
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car detached garage.
This home features a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, furnace, hot water heat-
er, replacement windows, fenced
yard and large covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
cently painted & move-in
ready. This 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
level lot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
tos online, go to.
www.
prudentialrealestate.com &
enter PRU7R4L5 in the
Home Search.
MLS 13 3363
$142,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
NANTICOKE
101 Honey Pot St.
$72,000
Well cared for and desirable
corner lot with replacement
windows, private driveway in-
cluding a carport, and recent
updates to the kitchen and
bath. MLS #13-3243
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $47,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
Houses For Sale
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE
Large 2 story, 4 bedrooms, 1
bath, new wi ndows, l arge
porch, updated i nteri or.
MLS #11-4369
$59,900
Call Joe
613-9080
PITTSTON
47 Wine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
PITTSTON
REDUCED $109,000
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
90 River Street
$57,900
This traditional 2-story prop-
erty features a large fenced in
yard, private driveway, re-
placement windows, large
laundry room and an eat-in
kitchen. MLS#13-3269
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
FIXER UPPER
HEAVY LIFTING DONE
3 BR, 1 bath 2 story, eat in
kitchen, concrete basement
floor.
MLS#13-2642
$25,000
Call Mike Griffith
570-954-8434
mikegriffith@comcast.net
RUBBICO REAL ESTATE
570-826-1600
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
433 FAIRVIEW ST.
Your COOL oasis awaits, both
inside and out. When its hot
outsi de, rel ax i n ai r condi -
tioned comfort. Or venture out-
doors to sit under the shade
trees or catch a breeze from
the front porch. This home is
high above the valley, well out
of the flood zone. Updated 2-
story with modern kitchen with
vaulted ceiling, modern bath,
LR, DR and 2 generous bed-
rooms. Updates include new
roof, windows, front door, light-
i n g , w- t o - w c a r p e t i n g,
interior/exterior painting & se-
curity system. OSP & large
level yard.Details at:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
SEARCH: PRU5B4G9.
#13-2080
$79,000
Walter or Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor. MLS 13 2814
$48,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
NEW LISTING!
22 BLAIR ST.
An i mpeccabl y mai ntai ned
town home inside & out. Three
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, living,
dining & family rooms, galley
kitchen. 3-season sun room
over l ooks a l evel yar d
bordered by flowering bushes.
Many upgrades include ceram-
ic flooring, new kitchen coun-
ters & several new appliances.
Private off-street parking. This
home is move-in ready & you
can probably own it for less
than your current rent. Now is
a good ti me to make your
dream of home ownership a
reality! For more details and to
view the photos online, go to:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
& enter PRU2A8T2 i n the
Home Search. Call today to
schedule a private showing.
#13-3274
$94,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral dcor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful remolded home in the
Back Mountain. This home has
everything, 4 bedrooms, up-
dated kitchen, AMAZING, RE-
LAXING yard that offers a 2
tier deck, beautiful landscap-
ing, stone wall with water fea-
ture and a side deck. Plenty of
off street parking, partially fin-
ished LL with bar and built in
tv. Close to everything yet
tucked away in its own para-
dise. Great opportunity don't
miss out!!
MLS#13-2617
$174,900
Call or text Donna Cain 947-
3824
or Tony Wasco 855-2424
901-1020
SHAVERTOWN
HARFORD AVE.
Beautifully kept home with 4
bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Thi s
home features a gas fireplace,
finished basement, hardwood
fl oors and a 4-season sun
room. There is a first floor
laundry and the modern eat-in
kitchen come with all the appli-
ances included.
MLS#13-2372
$229,000
Everett Davis
570-417-8733
696-2600
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained Home, Great
location in Dallas School Dis-
trict. 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths,
vaulted ceilings, finished base-
ment with wood burning fire
place. Over sized 2 car gar-
age. Gas heat, mature land-
scaping. Must see. $259,000.
All buyers agents welcome.
Call for App. 704-906-6165
Houses For Sale
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazi ng, wel l mai ntai ned.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049
Vieve 570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
WILKES-BARRE
83 Lawrence Street
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer
appl i ances and gas heat.
Nice level backyard and off-
st reet parki ng. Mot i vat ed
sel l er!
#13 2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
Houses For Sale
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
SWOYERSVILLE
$118,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in this roomy
Cape Cod in a desirable neighbor-
hood. Large eat in kitchen with
new flooring. Finished basement
with theater/rec room. Large level
yard. Priced to sell!
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
Houses For Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x 188
lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
TRUCKSVILLE
Elegance & comfort combine
to give you all you dream of.
1st floor mater,guest suite
with full bath,fabulous break-
fast room overlooking private
wooded yard. Plenty of built
ins and plantation shutters
gi ve thi s home wonderful
character.
MLS#13-2678
$459,000
Tracy Zarola
570-574-6465
570-696-0723
WEST PITTSTON
All brick ranch home, im-
maculate condition, 2 mas-
ter bedrooms, marble & tile
throughout. custom kitchen.
Professionally landscaped.
Move in condition.
$299,900.
570-417-9200
timesleader.com
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PAGE 6D Wednesday, August 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Apartments /Townhouses
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
Martin D. Popky Apartments
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
Apartments /Townhouses
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
Rentals
Heather Highlands
A Quality Manufactured Housing Community
New and Pre-Owned Homes for Sale!
Rentals Available
Select Homes for Lease with Option to Purchase
Financing Available to Qualified Buyers
109 Main Street, Inkerman
Jenkins Twp., Pa 18640
Rental Office: 570-655-9643
Sales Office: 570-655-4301
www.umh.com
Licensed by the Pa. Dept. of Banking NMLS 200331
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story. Very
nice neutral decor, new floor-
ing & roof, all appliances are
included, private driveway.
Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$74,000
Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
$87,500
Carl Georinger
696-5429
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
MULTI-FAMILY
Two houses for the price of
one! Two story i n front &
double-wide in rear. Great for 2
families or investor opportunity.
Off street parking & NOT in
flood zone. MLS #13-97.
$139,000
Call Cindy King Today!
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road. Single family
two story - a place for kids!
Four bedrooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has formal din-
ing room, living room, family
room & laundry room. Master
bedroom & bath added to the
1st floor. Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre.
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict.
$115,000
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
It's all about location. 2 story
home featuring living & family
rooms, eat-in kitchen, laun-
dry on 1st floor & updated 3/4
bath. 2nd floor has 3 bed-
rooms, full bath. gas hot air
heat & central air on the 1st
floor. Fenced rear yard.
MLS# 13 2586
$59,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
Houses For Sale
WEST PITTSTON
218 Warren St.
$159,900
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Aug. 18, 12-2
Move in ready and wonder-
fully renovated. Hardwoods,
Granite, Stainless and char-
acter- this corner lot in West
Pittston has it all!
MLS# 13-3310
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WHITE HAVEN
178 Woodhaven Drive
Relaxing views on 200 ft.
lakefront, 2 fireplaces, 2 split
system A/Cs, 2 driveways.
Whole house generator. Over-
size garage with workshop.
Shed, paved and lit basketball
court. Walk in attic. Don't
Miss! 13-3189. $314,900
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Smith Hourigan Group
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
37 Flick Street
Nice 2 possibly 3 bedroom home
with a large driveway and garage.
This home has a newer kitchen
and a full bath with laundry area
on the 1st floor. There is a nice
yard and deck for your outside en-
joyment. There is a newer fur-
nace and roof. This unit is tenant
occupied for you investors out
there. Come and check it out.
MLS# 13-2103
$33,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS REALTY
570-542-2141
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
NEW LISTING
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer ap-
pliances and gas heat. Nice
level backyard and off-street
parking. Motivated seller!
#13-2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED PRICE
$232,00
75 Mercedes Drive
Beautifully kept split level in
desirable Barney Farms. 3 car
attached garage, fin- ished
basement & at t i c. Land-
scaped lot, covered deck with
custom pul l down shades.
Hard- wood living room, form-
al dining room both freshly
painted, cathedral ceilings in
living room & kitchen. Full wet
bar in fin- ished basement,
walk out patio for your
parties/cookouts.
Option to Rent to Buy
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
Locat ed on Madi son St .
between Li nden & Mapl e.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
$89,900. MLS# 13-2431
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
WILKES-BARRE
55 Nicholson Street
Enclosed rear porch 22x10,
and side enclosed porch
5x11. A very nice large yard.
Large walk-in hall closet.
Nice clean home.
MLS 12-3899 $40,000
Castrignano Real Estate
570-824-9991
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCTION
Charming 1,000+ sq. ft. 2 bed-
room, 1/1/2 bath with separate
driveway on a quiet street.
Lower level was finished for
former business - has separ-
ate entrance, 1/2 bath & elec-
tric baseboard heat (not in-
cluded in total sq. ft).
MLS #13-1592 $49,000
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING
(FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP)
1705 W. 8TH STREET
There is plenty of summer left
to enjoy the 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. Then watch the
leaves change color around
your large country lot. A well-
maintained 2-story with 3 BRs
and 1.5 modern baths is wait-
ing for its new owners. This
charming home has a modern
kitchen with breakfast nook,
formal dining room, large liv-
ing room and an added family
room with vaulted ceiling and
fireplace. 2-car detached gar-
a g e . Ch e c k i t o u t a t :
www.prudentialrealestate.com.
SEARCH: PRU7W7A3
Listed at $228,900
MLS#13-2539
Call to schedule a private
showing.
Walter or Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9 Pinewood Dr
Build your new home in a great
neighborhood. Convenient loc-
ation near highways, airport,
casino and shopping
156 x 110 x 150 x 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315 to laflin
Rd; make left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is on corner
of Pinewood Dr. and Hickory-
wood Dr. MLS 13-23
atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
Bui l d your dream home i n
Goodleigh Manor. Beautiful
Views - Your choice of builder
All underground utilities. 2.02
acre corner lot - MLS #13-2090
priced at $152,500 or 2.06
acre lot MLS 13-2088 priced at
$135,000 The neighborhood
has over 2 acres of walking
trails Great place to live. Call
Rhea Simms at 570-696-6677.
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman Outl et
Road. 470 front, over 1,000
deep. Wooded. $125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100 frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 frontage 158 deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Build your dream home on this at-
tractive 1.2 acre level lot with lake
privileges. Priced to sell. HOA FEE
IS $140 YEARLY.
MLS#13-40
$50,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
WYOMING/EXETER
BUILDING LOTS
FOR SALE
$35,000 - $39,900
Build your new home here. 2
new developments, prices
range from $35,000 to
$39,900. Public water sewer
& gas available. NOT in flood
zone. Lot sizes range from
50x100 to 80x105.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
CALL CHARLIE
Lots
ACREAGE FOR SALE
No Closing Costs
No Time Frame to Build
Dallas School District
10% Down Financing
Lots of Elbow Room for Privacy
3ac 425 ft. rd. Frontage $49,900
7ac 700 ft. rd. Frontage $89,900
Call 570-245-6288
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. Water & sew-
er included. 1st, last & secur-
ity. No pets. Available 9/1/13.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
AVOCA
3 room, 1st floor, wall to wall
c a r p e t , a p p l i a n c e s ,
washer/dryer hookup. Off
street parking. INCLUDES
ALL UTILITIES. Security. No
pets. $650 month. Call
570-655-1606
Back Mountain
2 bedroom, large modern eat in kit-
chen, bath, carpeting, large deck,
ample parking, No Pets. $595.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
2,300 sq. ft. apartment with 2
full baths, huge kitchen living
room, full laundry room, rear
deck. Ideal location for Miseri-
cordia or Penn State, Lehman
campus, students. No pets.
Security & references required.
570-406-5128
DALLAS
2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Includes
heat, water & garbage. Off street
parki ng. No pets/no smoki ng.
$650/month + 1 month security.
570-690-1591
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly & mo-
bility impaired; all utilities in-
cluded. Federally subsidized
program. Extremely low in-
come persons encouraged to
appl y. I ncome l ess t han
$12, 450. 570- 675- 6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DALLAS
Townhouse
3 bedroom, 3 1/2 baths in a
quiet country setting. Central
air and vacuum, 2 car garage.
Includes range, water, trash &
al l ext er i or mai nt enance.
Ameni t i es i ncl ude gol f i ng,
s w i m m i n g & t e n n i s .
$1, 475/ mont h + ut i l i t i es.
Call Bernie
655-4815
ROTHSTEIN
REALTORS
888-244-2714
EDWARDSVILLE
2 story, 2 bedroom. Hardwood
floors, full basement, stove &
refrigerator included. No yard,
no pets, non smoker preferred.
Tenant pays al l ut i l i t i es.
$560/ mo+ secur i t y.
570-825-6259
EDWARDSVILLE
Spacious, clean, 2 brdm, 1st
f l oor apt . New car pet i ng
throughout. No pets. Electric
heat. $525 monthly. Sewer &
water included in rent. Back-
ground check required.
570-899-9140
FORTY FORT
2 APTS AVAILABLE
1693 Wyoming Ave
1st floor, spacious 3 bedroom
apt. Oak hardwood fl oors,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, living room with fire-
p l a c e , t i l e b a t h r o o m.
Washer/dryer hookup in base-
ment, 1 stall garage, big back
yard. No pets. No smoking.
$900 mo. plus electric.
570-239-1010
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Cozy 1st fl oor, 1 bedroom
apartment. New carpet, lamin-
ate & tile flooring. Washer/dry-
er hook up. Nice neighbor-
hood. Section 8 Welcome. No
pets. $595 + security, with all
utilities included. 570-606-9917
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities,
garbage & sewer included. 1st,
last & security. Available Now!
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
Apartments /Townhouses
HARVEY LAKE
1 BEDROOM APARTMENT
Located off the lake.
Stackable washer & dryer, all
utilities included. $735/mo.
Lease, Deposit and last
months rent. 570-639-2331
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
JENKINS TWP
Nice 2nd floor. 5 rooms. En-
closed knotty pine porch.
Ceiling fans, new windows,
kitchen, gas stove. Off street
par ki ng. Sec. , r ef . No
Pets/No Smoking. $425+
utilities. 570-655-1907
KINGSTON
Bennett Street
1 bedroom, living room, eat in
kitchen, full bath. Convenient
l ocati on. Tenant pays gas,
el ect r i c, t r ash. No pet s.
$400/month. Application, se-
curity deposit & first months
rent at signing. 1st & 2nd floor
available. 570-675-4938
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom,
2nd floor, 1.5 baths & office. All
appliances, washer/dryer in unit.
Wall-to-wall, C/A, garage, attic, no
pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
KINGSTON
Large 2 bedroom, remodeled,
stove, refrigerator, dish wash-
er. $675/month, heat included.
Call 570-814-0843
KINGSTON
Market Street, 2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, cozy wi t h spaci ous
rooms. Hardwood floors & sun
porch. $475/month + utilities &
security. No pets.
570-542-7740
KINGSTON
Nice neighborhood, close to
schools, shopping & parks. Two
modern modern 5 room 2 bed-
room apartments available 9/1.
Both have dining & living rooms,
ample closets, front & back
porches and yard. Washer/dryer
hookup. $575 includes fridge,
stove water & sewer. Non smoker
preferred. 570-545-6057
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES
HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $585 + utilit-
ies, security & references.
No pets, no smoking.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON
WYOMING AVE.
2nd floor, 1 bedroom, appli-
a n c e s , l a u n d r y r o o m.
$375/month + electric. Secur-
ity & references. No pets.
570-696-1600
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor.
Archi tectual l y desi gned.
Central air. Off street park-
ing. Quiet residential neigh-
borhoods, utilities & heat by
t enant , no pet s , no
smoking. 1 month security,
1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
timesleader.com
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 7D
80022014
PAGE 8D Wednesday, August 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Autos For Sale
80002979
Apartments /Townhouses
LUZERNE
378 Miller St. 2nd Floor
1 bedroom, kitchen, appli-
ances, bath, parlor, attic, sun
porch, parking. Non-Smoker,
No Pets. $520/includes gas
heat and water. 570-288-9843
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
1 Studio Apt, 2 Bed,
and 3 Bed $475, $550,
$650 and $900.
Call 570-901-1020
LUZERNE
2nd floor, modern 4 rooms &
bath. carpeting, stove & fridge,
garage, washer/dryer hook up.
No pets. $500/month + utilities
& security. 570-406-2789 or
570-675-3867
DALLAS
Meadows
Senior Living
Community
200 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-9336
One Bedroom
Apartment Available!
Included: All utilities, air
conditioning, maintenance,
and free parking.
Restaurant and Beauty Shop
on site.
Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
MINERS MILLS
1 & 1/2 bedrooms, completely
redone, washer/dryer hook up,
heat & water included. Quiet
neighborhood with yard and
screened in back porch. No
pets. $575/month + security. 1
year lease. 570-430-0175
MOUNTAIN TOP
3200 sq. ft. turn of the cen-
tury two story home. Beauti-
ful pine floors, working stone
fireplace, large eat-in kitchen
with cherry cabinets, butlers
pantry, formal dining room, 2
sl eepi ng porches, 4 bed-
rooms, 3 1/2 baths. Great
floor plan for entertaining.
Private community amenities
include a lake, tennis courts
and trails for hiking & biking.
O n e y e a r l e a s e .
$ 1 , 3 0 0 / m o n t h .
Call Maribeth Jones
510-2384
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 BR IMMEDIATELY
1 & 2 BEDROOMS.
No pets. Rents based on in-
come start at $405 & $440.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
570-474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
Immaculate 1st floor, 1 bed-
room, 2 covered porches, kit-
chen, bath, living room and
basement. Appliances, range
with self-cleaning oven, mi-
crowave, refrigerator, dish-
washer. Off street parking, No
Smoking and No Pets. Secur-
ity, References and Lease.
$535+utilities. 570-477-5959
NANTICOKE
1 bedroom, 1 bath, living room
& kitchen. Refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer $520/month,
includes heat & water.
735-4074, leave message.
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartments.
Refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher &washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
Apartments /Townhouses
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
NANTICOKE
Very clean, modern 2 bed-
room. Heat & hot water in-
cluded. Large rooms, closets,
attic. All appliances including
washer/dryer. 2 air condition-
ers. Off street parking. No
pets/No smoking. $695 + se-
curity. Call 570-542-5610
NANTICOKE
Immaculate 2nd floor, private
entrance, bath, bedroom and
living room. Wall to wall carpet,
large kitchen with range and
fridge. Large attic storage. Sun
por ch, No pet s and no
smoking. Security, reference
and lease. $460 + utilities.
570-477-5959
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, refrigerator & stove
included, $300/month + utilit-
ies. 2 bedroom. $400 + utilities.
3 bedroom 1/2 double. $500 +
uti l i ti es.Off street parki ng,
lease, 1 month security depos-
it, no pets. 570-654-8318
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
PITTSTON
Furnished studio includes, sky-
light, decks, French doors, ap-
pliances, kitchen set, living &
bedroom furniture. Mirrored
closet doors. Heat, hot water,
trash & sewer included. $480 +
security. 570-883-7458 or
202-986-4430
PLAINS TWP.
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, heat,
water & hot water included.
Off street parking, pets al-
lowed. $700/month one year
lease & references.
570-406-8218
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLAINS/HUDSON
Clean and efficient first floor.
One bedroom, off street park-
ing. Incl. stove, fridge, sewer
and garbage. Laundry facilit-
ies. Security and references no
pets. $550/month plus utilities.
570-466-4176 or
570-388-6468
PLYMOUTH
1 bedroom. No Smoking, heat
and water included. Security
and references. $450.
570-379-2336
*Corrected Number*
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 2 bedroom, 2
floors, central air, 1 baths,
new kitchen, dishwasher,
stove, refrigerator, washer-
dryer, off street parking, No
smoking/No pets. $550
month plus utilities.
570 814-6620
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable..
dishwasher/off street parking
and sewer included.. no
smoking indoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570 855 3329.
PLYMOUTH
Newly remodeled, parlor, 1
bedroom, kitchen & bath. Heat,
hot water, garbage, sewage,
electricity, stove refrigerator in-
cluded. Close to bus stop &
stores. $560/ month, $560/ se-
curity. 1 year lease. No Pets.
570-779-4537
SHAVERTOWN
1 bedroom, 2nd floor private
setting with a pond.
Completely renovated, with
plenty of closet space and
storage, hardwood floors
throughout. A new deck and
private driveway. $750/month.
570-760-2362
SHAVERTOWN
Back Mountain
36 Roushey St
2nd floor, 2 bedroom, recently
remodeled, all appliances, off
street parking, ample storage.
$595 + security & utilities.
WILKES-BARRE
135 Westminster St.
1st floor, 3 bedroom. $595+
utilities. Section 8 Welcome.
Call 570-780-0000
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility impaired;
all utilities included. Federally
subsidized program. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor 1 bedroom, new car-
pet & tile floors, washer/dryer
hook up. $425/month + utilities.
No pets. 570-881-2285
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
Apartments /Townhouses
WEST PITTSTON
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, hard-
wood f l oors, l i vi ng/ di ni ng
combo, refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer hookup, off-street
parking, no pets. Front & back
por ches, f ul l basement .
$650/month + utilities & secur-
ity deposit.
Call 570-655-8928
WEST PITTSTON
$635 a month. Heat, Water
and Sewer included. 1 bed-
room, living room, dining
room, wall to wall carpeting,
washer/dryer, refrigerator and
stove. Modern kitchen and
bath. 2nd floor. 1 month se-
curity with 1 year lease. Ref-
erences required, No Pets.
570-446-7682
WHITE HAVEN
Route 940. Large 2 bedroom
near I-80 & PA Tpke. Fresh
paint, w/w carpet, stove & refri-
ger at or . Wat er , sewer &
garbage included. No pets.
$550 + electricity & security
deposit. 570-443-9639
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
30 Susquehanna
First floor, five room, 2
bedroom apt.. with deck
& porch. Stove & refri-
gerator provided. Ten-
ant s pay wat er, gas
heat, electric & garbage.
$525/month.
MLS #13-860
Call Louise Mary Gresh
570-455-8521
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE
GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood. 2 bedroom
apartments available for immediate
occupancy. Heat & hot water in-
cluded.
1 Bedroom $550.
2 Bedroom $650.
Call Jazmin 570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment near
General Hospital. No Pets. $495 +
utilities, first, last + security deposit.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, off street parking,
washer & dryer hook up.
freshly painted No pets. $575
+ utilities & security.
570-822-7657
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
at el y , was her / dr y er on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
i ty camera presence & al l
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom -
$550. Water & sewer paid
1 month security deposit.
Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/ month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
CENTER CITY
200 BLOCK OF
S. FRANKLIN ST.
Luxury apartment in historic-
al building. Newly renovated,
1500 sq. ft., 2 bedrooms, 2
baths, granite kitchen, dining
room, living room, laundry
room. Off street parking. No
pets. $850 month + utilities.
570-905-7234 after 5 pm
WILKES-BARRE
LODGE
Formerly The Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting at:
Daily $49.99 + tax
Weekly $199.99 + tax
Microwave, Refrigerator
w/charge WiFi, HBO.
570-823-8881
www.WilkesBarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE
Near General hospital 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. $575 + utilities.
1st, last & security.
570-417-3427
WILKES-BARRE
Near Kings, 2 BR heat & wa-
ter included. $675/month. No
pets. 570-693-0285
WILKES-BARRE
Near Wilkes University
1 & 3 bedroom apartments.
$400 & $625/month + utilit-
ies, 1st & last month's rent &
1 month security. Section 8
OK. No pets. 570-606-9432
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13 x 21 living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
Small room with bath at 281 S.
Franklin St.; 2nd floor; heat &
water included in $295 month
rent. Call 570-333-5471 with
references.
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
WILKES-BARRE
Studio near Wilkes
Wood floors, parking, no pets,
short term OK. $425, all utilit-
ies included. 570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Available 9/1
Cozy one bedroom, modern
kitchen & bath, wall to wall car-
pet. Tenant pays electric heat.
$475/month. 570-236-3786
WILKES-BARRE
VICTORIAN CHARM
34 W. Ross St. Fully furnished,
Delightful 2nd floor, excellent
condition, brand new queen bed,
Secure, private off street park-
ing. Historic building is non-
smoking/no pets. Base rent
$700/month. Security,
references required. View at
houpthouse.com
570-762-1453
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m. 8
0
0
2
1
5
8
1
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WYOMING
1st floor, 1 bedroom, appli-
ances, laundry, utilities by ten-
ant. No Pets. Smoke Free.
$525/month. Security, lease &
references. 570-839-3252
WYOMING
2nd floor, 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Very clean. Must See.
Applianaces, air & washer/dry-
er. Off street parking. No pets.
$650/month + utilities & secur-
ity. 570-693-3473
Commercial
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Commercial
EDWARDSVILLE
612-616 Main St.
Bring back clam night. Unlim-
ited potential in the once icon-
ic location. Space can be used
as restaurant, (coolers &
equipment on site) bar & grill.
Includes office and living space
the possibilities are endless!
Call agent to make an appoint-
ment and a deal.
MLS 13-2445
$79,500
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE/KINGSTON
5 Unit, 2 completed and ren-
ted, 2 started, new plumbing,
sheet rock and electrical. Call
for more information. $86,900.
570-550-1222.
EXETER
A & A Self Storage
1,050 sq. ft. office space for
lease. 3 offices + reception
& restroom, gated access,
ample parking, convenient
location. Perfect for con-
tractor's office. $900/month
utilities. 570-287-5343
www.joeamato
properties.com
Storage units also available
in sizes from
5 x 10 to 10 x 30
KINGSTON
GARAGE, 2 bay wi t h l i f t .
$750/month. 570-814-8876
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PA CLUB
LIQUOR LICENSE
For sale.
Call 570-574-1002
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
WEST PITTSTON
GARAGE
1 car, secure parking, 9 x 12.
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Lease 20,000 sq. ft.
I-81 on Casey Ave.
Mfg/Warehouse Space
Gas heat, sprinkler.
21' ceilings,
1 drive in &
3 dock doors.
Can be subdivided
Call Bob Post
570-270-9255
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$1, 100/ mont h 7605095
BENTON
Minutes from Shickshinny. 4
bedrooms, 1 bath. Country set-
ting, partially furnished. Wash-
er . Hunt i ng pr i v i l eges .
$750/month + security. & refer-
ences. 570-854-0984
DALLAS TWP.
3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath home
with 1 car garage. Close to
309. Large yard. Cats allowed.
$950/month + security deposit.
Call Barbara Mark @
570-696-5414
Smith Hourigan Group
570-686-1195
HARDING
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Home. College stu-
dents welcome after August 20th
Wi-fi, Direct TV, lake rights, wash-
er/dryer. $1,200/month + utilities.
570-639-5041
KINGSTON
2 bedroom, eat in kitchen, hot
& cold water included. No pets.
Section 8 OK. $595/month.
570-209-6783
KINGSTON
Spacious half double. 3 br, liv-
ing room, dining room, fenced
yard, no pets, $775/month.
Credit background check, se-
curity deposit. 570-235-0377
PITTSTON
Lovely 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
house. Pri vate parki ng,
yard, washer/dryer hookup,
cable & satellite ready, en-
closed back porch. $650 +
utilities, security & refer-
ences. No pets or smoking.
570-239-4293
Houses For Rent
LARKSVILLE
Pace Street
5 room single family home with
2 + b e d r o o ms , 1 b a t h,
washer/dryer, deck & yard.
$760/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
LUZERNE/Kingston
3 bedroom, gas heat, stove
and washer included. New
rugs, yard, no pets. $750 plus
utilities and security
570-430-7901
MOUNTAIN TOP
3 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors throughout, living room
with fireplace, eat in kitchen, 4
season sun porch, pri vate
wooded setting. Crestwood
Sch. Dist. Attached garage.
Pet friendly. Large fenced
property, ideal for children &
pets. $1,050/month.
570-472-3277
NANTICOKE
Hanover Section, Espy Street.
Single family home, 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths. All appli-
ances included, off street park-
ing. No smoking. $650/month
+ utilities & security. 570-574-
4692 between 11am & 8 pm
PITTSTON
Available Sept. 1
80 River Street
Newly remodeled two story,
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove & dryer,
washer hookup, two car
driveway, fenced yard, no
pets. $800/month + utilities.
1st, last & security.
Call 570-417-9781
To view house go to
www.wilkesbarredjs.com/
789PhotoAlbum
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath newly re-
modeled single home. $660 +
utilities. 1st, last & security.
570-417-3427
SUGAR NOTCH
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath newly re-
modeled single home. $660 +
utilities. 1st, last & security.
570-417-3427
WILES-BARRE
MINERS MILLS
5 room, 2 bedroom home. The
l ast qui et nei ghborhood i n
Wi l kes-Barre. Refri gerator,
stove, washer/dryer included.
Sewerage & recycling fees
paid, other utilities by tenant.
Of f st r eet par ki ng, non-
smokers. References & em-
ployment verified. $650/month
& security. 570-824-7392
WILKES-BARRE
Remodeled 3 bedroom home,
featuring fresh paint, dish-
washer, washer/dryer hook-up,
deck and yard. No Pets. No
Smoking. $685+utilities. Call
570-466-6334
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom, 1 bath, 2 story
home. Large rooms, off-street
parking. Nice neighborhood,
near school . 1 year l ease.
$ 7 5 0 / m o n t h + s e c u r i t y .
Washer/Dryer hook-up, dish-
washer and range included.
570-362-1820
Land (Acreage)
LUZERNE
699 Miller St
Land for sale
50 x 150. $38,000
Quiet neighborhood, Ready
to build on. Call
570-693-3427.
Land (Acreage)
SWEET VALLEY
GRASSY POND ROAD
6.69 wooded acres. Great
building site and/or ideal hunt-
ing property. No utilities.
REDUCED $65,000.
Call Pat Doty
570-394-6901 696-2468
Storage
PLAINS TWP.
2 GARAGE/STORAGE UNITS
14 x 24
Automatic overhead door.
Heat & electric included.
$205/month each.
Available separate or together.
Call 570-823-1466
Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
3 bedrooms, washer/dryer
hook-up, new floors, Fenced
yard, gas heat, No Pets.
$600/month + utilities & 1st
months rent. Pets Welcome.
Call 570-313-5414
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $525 month +
security. 570-714-1296
GLEN LYON
Large 1/2 double, 3 bedrooms,
n e w a p p l i a n c e s , n e w
washer/dryer. Freshly painted,
new carpeting. $600/month +
utilities. Call 570-881-0320
HANOVER TWP.
1/2 double 3 bedrooms, vinyl
siding, steel insulated entry
doors with deadbolts. Gas
heat. Located on small, quiet
lane. Close to bus stop &
shopping. Available 9/1/13.
Now showing. Lease, refer-
ences checked. $525 monthly
+ utilities. 570-650-3803
KINGSTON
Clean, large 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath, wash area. 1st, l ast
month rent & security. Call
570-817-0601.
Will Return Calls.
KINGSTON AREA
3 Bedroom, 2 full baths, stove,
refrigerator. Washer/dryer, wa-
ter/sewer included. Quiet, dead
end street. $800/month. 1st
month+security. Section 8
welcome. 570-313-6066
KINGSTON
HALF-DOUBLE
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerator
and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
off-street parking. No Smoking,
No Pets. $650+ utilities
& security. 570-639-1796
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled
older charm, stained glass
windows, front & rear
porches, Living room/din-
ing room combo, eat-in kit-
chen with laundry alcove, 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by
t enant , no pet s , no
smoking. 1 month security,
1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up, air conditioning, new bath.
$525/month. Security &
references required.
570-954-7919
NANTICOKE
5 rooms, 3 bedrooms, w/w car-
peting. washer/dryer hookup,
yard. $475 + security deposit.
All utilities by tenant. Call
570-472-2392
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 9D
Autos For Sale
NEW 2013 FUSION CLEARANCE
OVER 100TO CHOOSE FROM
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR
24
Mos.
WAS................................................................$27,995
FORD BONUS REBATE...................................$1000
OFF LEASE REBATE..........................................$500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP..................$1000
$
25,499
NEW2013 FORD FUSION HYBRID
2.0L HYBRID Engine, Auto. Headlamps, CD, 17Alum. Wheels, Tilt, Safety
Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad, Pwr. Drivers Seat, SYNC
$
279
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR 24
Mos.
$
27,495
NEW2013 FORD FUSION TITANIUM
2.0 Eco Boost, 2.5L, Auto, CD, 18Polished AL Wheels, Push Button Start,
Rear View Camera, Remote Start, PDS, Power Leather Heated Seats, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/keypad, Safety Pkg, Side Impact Air Bags,
1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft System, SYNC, Message Center, Cruise
Control, Auto Headlamps
$
279
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR 24
Mos.
Was..................................................................$24,625
Ford Rebate.........................................................$500
Ford Bonus Rebate ...........................................$1000
Ford Credit Rebate .............................................$500
Off Lease Rebate ................................................$500
Coccia Discount off MSRP.................................$626
Was..................................................................$30,995
Ford Rebate ........................................................$500
Ford Bonus Rebate........................................... $1000
Ford Credit Rebate .............................................$500
Off Lease Rebate ...............................................$500
Coccia Discount Off MSRP .............................$1000
$
21,499
NEW2013 FORD FUSION SE
2.5L, Auto, CD, 17 Aluminum Wheels, Power Drivers Seat, Sirius Satellite Radio,
Keyless Entry w/keypad, Safety Pkg, Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains,
Anti-Theft Sys, SYNC, Message Center, Cruise Control,
Keyless Entry, Auto Headlamps
$
199
LEASE FOR LEASE FOR
24
Mos.
Was ....................................................... $22,695
Ford Rebate .............................................. $500
Ford Bonus Rebate ............................... $1000
Ford Credit Rebate ................................. $500
Off Lease Rebate..................................... $ 500
Coccia Discount Off Msrp..................... $ 196
$
19,999
NEW2013 FORD FUSION
2.5L. Auto., CD, 16Steel Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air
Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., SYNC, Message Center,
Cruise Control, Keyless Entry, Auto. Headlamps
$
189
37
MPG
47
MPG
37
MPG
37
MPG
Tax and tag extra. Security deposit waived. Al factory rebates applied including off lease rebate. " Lease payments based on 24 months lease 21,000
allowable miles. First months payment, $645 bank fee, and $2,500 down patent (cash or trade due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments
subjected to credit approval by the primary lending source. " Photos of vehicles are illustration purposes only. Coccio Ford is not responsible for any typographi-
cal errors. No security deposit necessary. See dealer for details. Sale Ends 9/3/13.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/3/13.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/3/13.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/3/13.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied including Off Lease Rebate. **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $645 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 9/3/13.
OUR
NAME
MEANS
A GREAT
DEAL COCCIAS
APR
0
60
APR %
M
O
S. 60 60
Plus $1500
Plus $1500
APR
0
60
APR %
M
O
S.
Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Plus us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Pl Plus us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us us
0000000000000000000000000000 00000000000000000000000000000000 5555 15 $$$$$$$
60 60
Plus $1500
APR
0
60
APR %
M
O
S. 60 60
Plus $1500
Half Doubles
PITTSTON
2 bedroom. 1.5 baths, eat in
kitchen with appliances, living
room, office/den, laundry. Off
street parking. $500 + security
& references, water, sewer in-
cluded. 570-702-3538
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, living &
dining rooms, large eat in kit-
chen i n a ni ce, tree l i ned
neighborhood. Washer/dryer,
refrigerator, double sink, stove,
water, sewer, recycl i ng i n-
c l u d e d . Ni c e g a r d e n .
$800/month, 1 year lease, rent
& deposit. 570-820-7049
WILKES-BARRE/EAST END
4 bedroom, 1.5 bath, wall to
wall carpet. Stove, dishwash-
er, washer/ dryer hook up.
Heat. garbage & sewer in-
cluded. Many Extras!. No
pets. $975 + security & refer-
ences. 570-824-4288
Lots
SLEEPY HOLLOW
KINGSTON TWP
Limited Time Only!
priced Reduced!
Starting at $69,900
All Public Utilities
Dallas School District
Great neighborhood.
Summit Pointe Builders
Call 570-675-7900
Sales
PITTSTON TWP.
RENT TO OWN
2 bedroom, clean, needs no
work. remodeled throughout.
Minutes from I- 81 & PA Turn-
pike. $550/month.
570-471-7175 or 610-767-
9456
Horses
HORSE BOARDING
Full care or Field board, Lay-
ups, rehab, retirement, local
transport. Springdale Farms
925-5323 or 441-2288
Redrock Area
Pets
4 KITTENS! 1 black & white
stripe short hair male, 2 tor-
toise hair females, and 1 black
& white stripe male. Approx. 8
weeks old. FREE.
570-283-1675
KITTENS! Five left to go to a
good home. There are 2 who
are 14 weeks old & 3 who are
8 weeks old. FREE.
570-575-9984
KITTY CLOSE OUT
4 Adorable Kittens, free to "lov-
ing home". 3 black, 1 gold &
white all 10 weeks old. Litter
box trained and eating on their
own. Just want to be loved.
Seriously inquiries only. Please
contact Donna, Edwardsville,
at 570-814-2175.
MALTESE PUPPIES
7 Weeks Old. White and
Cream. Fathers 4 pounds,
Mothers 10 pounds. 1st Shots.
$800. 570-239-1846
St. Bernards, Poms, Yorkies,
Chihuahuas Labs & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
YORKIE PUPPY
Female, AKC. champion
bloodlines. Dew claws done,
wormed, 1st shots. $950.
570-332-4739
Autos Under $5000
CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LS
02' Four wheel drive. 116,000
miles. Asking $4,700 OBO.
Very good condition.
570-388-6001
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2007 Harley 883 5363............................................ $6,989
2003 BMWZ4 3.0i Convertible 53232..................... $17,989
2002 CORVETTE Z06 13295.................................... $28,879
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840...................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167.......................................... $26,986
2006 COBALT LS Coupe 68286.................................. $5,900
2008 SILVERADO CREWLT2 74414.......................... $18,999
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014............................... $17,999
2004 F150 XCAB FX4 100506.................................. $13,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500.................... $18,999
2006 F150 XCAB 4X4 62084....................................$16,999
2006 F350 SUPER DUTY W/PLOW29662...................$16,495
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569............................ $17,495
2008 F150 CREWKING RANCH 50457...................... $28,896
2008 MUSTANG GT Coupe 2665.............................. $24,999
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332.................... $17,999
2009 Honda CR-V EX SUV 42978............................. $17,990
2009 Honda CIVIC Si 45585.................................. $17,495
2006 Hummer H3 SUV 50591................................. $19,999
2011 SONATA SE Sedan 51600................................ $15,999
2007 Mini COOPER S 46153................................... $13,999
2006 350Z Convertible 22128............................... $19,990
2007 GRAND PRIX GXP 82306............................... $11,495
2004 Subaru WRX STi 60721.................................. $18,898
2010 Subaru Outbac Wagon 25683........................ $19,890
2012 Subaru Sedan 33059....................................$17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SX-4 30482................................ $12,999
2005 TACOMA CREW Truck 87132........................... $19,898
2006 RAV-4 Limited AWD 123109.......................... $10,990
2010 RAV-4 I4 AWD 34739..................................... $17,499
2010 Volkswagen TIGUAN 22065........................... $17,499
2012 Volkswagen JETTA SE Sedan 32392.................$14,999
2012 Volkswagen BEATLE 2.5L Hatchback 30751..... $14,999
FORD '04 TAURUS SES
Power windows, power locks,
seat, air, One Owner, 42k.
Must See! $6,850.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
BMW '07 X5 4.8 Liter
71,000 miles, showroom condi-
tion, sport package, every op-
tion that BMW offers. Silver/
grey. $29,500. 570-417-9200
Autos For Sale
ACME AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 Convertible, Sprint
blue, black / brown leather
interior, navigation, 7 spd auto
turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX blue,
auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 AUDI A8L grey, black leather,
navigation, AWD
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
05 INFINIT GX35 AWD grey, black
leather, sunroof
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS, TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT blue, tan
leather, sunroof, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO green, grey leather,
sunroof, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 FORD EXPLORER XLT
blue, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
grey, V6, AWD
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 KIA SORRENTO LX silver,
V6 AWD
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE gold,
7 passenger mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 NISSAN PATHFINDER black
V6 4x4
03 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER XLX
red, V6, 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
00 FORD F150 SUPER cAB
blue, 4X4 truck
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
Autos For Sale
CHEVY '02 PRIZM
Power windows, locks, air,
72K. Economical!
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 10 IMPALA LT
V6, Auto, all power, cruise,
CD. Very clean. Balance of
GMs Warranty.
SPECIAL $11,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
Mercury Grand
Marquis GS 2005
Two tone white, leather interi-
or,one owner, garage kept,
139K highway miles,CD and
security system. New tires
and current inspections.
$8000 570-239-8110
NISSAN '03 ALTIMA SL
Power windows, power locks,
seat, air, 77k. One Owner.
Gorgeous! $7,825.
570-825-7577
Freshly state inspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
VITOS
&
GINOS
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming Ave,
Forty Fort
288-8995
00 Toyota Corolla
4 door, 4 cylinder, auto.
Runs great. $2,995
Grand Cherokee V8. Runs
great. Power windows &
doors.
$2,495
96 F150 Pickup. auto, runs
good.
$1,995
96 Pontiac Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows & brakes,
4 door, runs good, 106K.
$2,395
01 Ford Taurus SES
4 door, air, power
doors & windows.
$2,995
99 Chevy S10 Blazer 4
door, power windows,
doors & seats. 126,000
miles.
$2,995
03 Ford Wind-star 4 door,
all power options. 96,000
miles $3,400
04 Nissan Armada, 7 pas-
senger. 4wd. Excellent con-
dition. $10,900
09 Mercedes GL450, 7 pas-
senger. Too many options
to list. 30K miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff. $42,500
FINANCING AVAILABLE
Buying Junk
Cars
Used Cars &
Trucks
Highest Prices
Paid
288-8995
Boat Parts /Supplies
DURATECH 12' ALUMINUM
BOAT Semi "V" bow 54" W at
widest point of boat. Comes
with set of oars, 2 anchors, 3
flotation boat seat cushions.
Mercury Outboard 9.8 hp
Model Merc 110 2 cylinder, 2
cycle engine, remote 5 gallon
gas tank. Excellent running
condition. Ready for the water.
Selling price for boat & engine
$1,000. 570-654-3805
Miscellaneous
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires &
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming
Ave. Forty Fort
288-8995
Motorcycles
FORD "11 ESCAPE XLT
Aut omat i c, 4 wheel dri ve,
moon roof, sync, grey, excel-
lent cond, 4 cylinder, 30,500mi,
$18,000. 654-3326/479-3646.
HARLEY '09 DAVIDSON,
Sportster 883
Mint Showroom Condition!
Only 340 original miles,
inspected, extras. Purchased
at Noto's. Only $5,000, OBO.
570-285-3469
HONDA '88 GL1500
Motorbi ke FREE to a re-
sponsible person due to my
son's sudden death. If inter-
ested contact:
tomdaniel125@hotmail.com
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
CHEVY VAN, High Top
With Wheel Chair Lift-350.
Automatic, Air, Cruise, Tilt,
Steering, Low Miles. $3,500.
OBO. 570-760-0243
FORD '03 F150 XLT
Auto, air, power windows,
power locks, bedliner. 80k.
Excellent! $6,825.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $11,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
OLDS '01 BRAVADA
AWD, 4 door, 6 cyl., auto,
leather, sunroof, CD. Fully
equipped. Red.
Very good condition.
$1,850
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
OLDS '99
BRAVADA
New parts.
Needs some body work.
$3,400.
(570)760-2791
Auto Parts
Vito &
Ginos
LIKE NEW
USED
TIRES &
BATTERIES
$20 & uP
570-288-8995
Forty Fort
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Antiques & Collectibles
$ Antiques
Buying $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
German stamps for sale or
trade for US stamps. Call
Terry at 570-338-2041
REFRIGERATOR MONITOR
(general electric) cooling unit
on top outside. Type- D.R.-2-
T16, SOR # 42- 953- 799,
CI RCA 1942. $475. 00.
570-779-4228
or
570-262-1032
VINTAGE "KOKEN" BARBER
CHAIR. St. Louis model, ori-
ginal black leather, & in very
good condi ti on. Hydraul i cs
work. B-3688 original headrest,
l eat her st r ap, & br ush.
$750. 00.
570-779-4228
Appliances
GAS FRYER, commerci al
heavy duty, Cecilware, $400.
570-574-2967
VI TA- MI X COMMERCI AL
BLENDER. The quiet one, on
counter. Model 36019.
570-562-1801
Building Materials
BARN WOOD PLANKS (de-
constructed) that are 2" thick, 7
1/2" to 12" wide, & 5'-6" to 6'-0"
long. Approx. 55 planks. Short-
er 2" planks and also many full
2"x 4" boards. $510.00.
570-779-4228
DOOR One 36"x80" sol i d
wood, 6 panels ext or int door,
neutral oak finish with hinges
$100. MAILBOX, handmade,
solid wrought iron. $100.
570-735-8730
DOORS. 24 - Used Solid Core
Doors 32" x 79"-----$25 each.
Mahogany Stained. Call:
570-287-1161
MARBLE, special list color, 1
s et $500. HARDWOOD
FLOOR, Cherry and Oak nat-
ural color. $2. 215-932-5690
Clothing
JACKETS - 2 men' s sport
jackets, 1 is light blue and the
other is navy. Both size 46 &
like new. Asking $20.00 each.
570-313-5214
SCRUBS, assorted colors &
sizes, approximately 50. Excel-
lent condition. $1.00 each.
570-823-4941
Clothing
SWEATSHIRTS, never worn;
Eleven for $25.
570-313-5214
Exercise Equipment
IMPEX TECH ROD TR-2 GYM
similar to Bo Flex gym. Excel-
lent condition. Used approxim-
ately 10 times. $129.00 or best
offer.
570-829-4776
Furnances & Heaters
COAL STOVE. Old fashioned
white Dickson with warming
closet & six lids. Great for
heating & cooking! $500.00.
570-735-2081
HIGH EFFICIENCY
OUTDOOR WOOD
FURNACE from Central
Boiler burns less wood. 25
year warranty.
B & C Outdoor Wood
Furnaces LLC
570-477-5692
Furniture & Accessories
CHAIRS (2) padded with arm
rests, etc. $5. each.
570-540-0175
QUEEN WING CHAIRS (2)
(Ann Hallagan). In excellent
condition. $149.00 each.
570-540-0175
BEDROOM SET : Full sized
headboard, dresser with mir-
ror, and chest of drawers. Real
wood. $150.00.
570-603-1195
CHERRY TABLE w/ painted black
legs & 4 arrow black chairs. Very
good condition; $350.00. Corner
curio cupboard w/ mirrored back;
$50.00. Hunt board w/ painted 3
shelf hutch; $300.00. Leather otto-
man i n excel l ent condi t i on;
$200. 00.
570-406-4092
COFFEE TABLE that is glass
& brass w/ two end tables. All
in perfect condition. $25.00 for
each.
570-288-0060
END TABLES (2). One has a
pull out drawer. FREE. 570-
540-0175
FISH TANK 12"x48"x21" $75.
Kitchen table, 4 chairs, glass
3' d $100. 570-735-8730 or
332-8080
GLASS VASE, hand blown,
$45. GLASS SCULPTURE,
hand bl own, $55.
570-288-2949
MEDICAL CHAIR for shower
or bath. Used twice. $20.00.
570-696-9005
SOFA & love seat with floral
pattern & pillow back. In good
condition. $100.00.
570-674-9716
COFFEE TABLE (solid cherry)
& two solid cherry end tables
w/ dr awer s, 3 pi ece set ;
$250. 00.
570-779-4228 or 570-855-
2506
BUNK BEDS wood, excellent
condition. Twin over twin. Me-
dium stain wood. Can be sep-
arated into two twin beds. In-
cludes ladder, rails, 2 match-
ing comforters, mattress cover,
& more. 570-696-6986
Landscaping & Gardening
ROTO TILLER Earthquake
Gear Drive 5hp Briggs & Strat-
ton. Rear gear driven clock-
wise rotating tines. 12" tires,
16" tilling width. Can operate
tiller with one hand while tilling.
$350. 570-654-3805
Medical Equipment
CHAIRLIFT/RECLINER with
remote control, green cloth, ex-
c el l ent c ondi t i on 30" w
x40"hx30:deep $200. Cash
only. 570-825-5080
Miscellaneous
BOOKS diabetic books, hard
covers, (8) - $2. each. Air
compressor to pump up car
tires $5. 570-654-8902
Miscellaneous
MOTOR '55 Evinrude 3HP out-
board, very good condition. All
in working order & does run
ni ce. Out board has a f ew
scratches but other then that is
ready for water or man cave.
$250. OBO. 570-394-7159
570-301-3602
CALL US! TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
BEST PRICES IN
THE AREA
Ca$h on the $pot
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
AIR COMPRESSOR for car.
12 volt, new & in box. $10.00.
570-655-2154
AIR PURIFIER, Aerus Guardi-
an. In great condition. Origin-
ally paid over $1,000 & selling
for $399.00.
570-822-6258
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
ANTIFREEZE & COOLANT
(2) - $5.00 Each.
570-655-2154
ARTI FI CI AL FI REPLACE.
Home made. White and golden
stone l ook. 50" l ong x 15"
wide. Rack & logs included.
$100.00.
570-735-2081
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
CANES AND WALKI NG
STICKS. 25 available. Made
from sl i ppery mapl e trees.
Many different shapes & sizes.
$5 to $6 dollars each.
570-735-2081
LINER REPLACEMENT KIT
complete for 15x30 above
ground pool. Includes full prin-
ted liner, foam underlay, sides,
ski mmer basket & gaskets
/ accessor i es. Pai d $800.
sel l i ng f or $350. OBO.
570-881-2311
LADDER STAND for deer
hunti ng (12 ft.) - $50.00.
Neoprene chest waders (L) -
$20. 00. Neopr ene chest
waders (M) - $20.00. Fi ve
office waiting room chairs -
$100.00.
570-693-6267
DI RT BI KE, Schwi nn 26"
Formans 26 speeds w/ front
suspension. Paid $390.00 &
selling for $99.00.
570-655-2154
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
EVENFLO BOOSTER child re-
straint system that meets all
requirements for motor vehicle
saf et y. Gr eat condi t i on.
$20. 00.
570-288-0060
FABRIC 16 cuts of fabric, as-
sorted lengths. $1.50 per yard.
570-696-9086
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
PAGE 10D Wednesday, August 21, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL AN
E
X
P
E
R
T
To place an ad call
829-7130
Air Conditioning & Heating
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Appliances
MICROWAVE : over the stove
mount. Whirlpool, white, & in
good condition. $50.00.
570-406-5661
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
FIND OUT HOW
TO BECOME A
MEMBER
OR CALL FOR
A QUALIFIED
CONTRACTOR
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
www.bianepa.com
570-287-3331
For All of Your Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
Bathrooms, Kitchens, Roofing,
Siding, Decks, Windows, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 332-7023
Shedlarski
Construction
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA registered.
Kitchens, baths, vinyl siding &
railings,replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Estimates
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys.
All types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Gift Certificates Available
570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-793-4773
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
L & A
CONCRETE
WORKS
Why Live With
Ugly Concrete?
Try Concrete
Resurfacing,
Stamped or Stenciled
Overlays
Licensed & Insured
PA088910
570-840-0803
NEPA Masonry, Inc.
Stonework - stucco -
concrete - patios - pavers -
brick - block - chimneys
www.nepamasonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
Concrete & Masonry
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
SS PAINTING INC.
Drywall, Spackling, Painting,
*Aluminum Siding*
Get Your Whole House Painted
for under $1,200.
570-956-3560
www.iwantpainting.com
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
Electrical
GTL
ELECTRIC
Service/Upgrades
570-542-4455
NORTHEAST ELECTRICAL
SERVICES
Call For All Your Electrical
Needs. Lic. & Ins.
570-954-3013 570-299-5471
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
GUTTER
RESTORATION
Clean, Seal, Refinish
10 Year Warranty
570-417-1538
Handyman
ALL PHASE
HANDYMAN SERVICE
You Name It,
We Can Do It!
Over 30 Years Experience
in General Construction
Licensed & Insured
570-704-8759
570-497-1821
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
SUMMER CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
DEMOLITION
ESTATE CLEANOUT
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Property & Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
Cheaper Than a Dumpster!!
Same Day Service
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
HAULING &
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Ginos
570-288-8995
Hauling & Trucking
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk & Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 704-8846
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Interior Decorating
SLIPCOVERS by SANDRA
Draperies + Shades
Boat Covers + Upholstery
COSTUMING Theater, Opera
Residential & Commercial &
Institutional Sewing for any
reason since 1977
Call 570 519 0214
Landscaping
ARE YOU TIRED
OF BEING RAKED?
Specializing In Trimming &
Shaping of Bushes,
Shrubs, Trees.
Bed Cleanup, Edging,
Mulch & Stone.
Call Joe.
570-823-8465
Meticulous and Affordable.
Free Estimates
KELLER'S
LAWN CARE
Cleanups
Landscaping, mowing,
mulching, trimming, planting.
Commercial & Residential.
570-332-7016
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming, Mulching
Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Cant Lose! 570-822-3943
Daniels Paint and Wall Covering
Lic. PA100671 & Ins.
20 YEARS EXP.
570-604-2961
danielspaintandwallcovering.com
DAVE WITKOSKY
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior. Free Est.
30 years experience
826-1719 675-1719
H & D PAINTING
Wall papering, drywall, all
types of carpentry, handyman
work. Free Estimates. Insured
570-831-5013
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S
ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
APEX TREE AND EARTH
Tree Removal, Pruning,
Stump Grinding, Hazard
Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
Serving Wyoming Valley,
Back Mountain &
Surrounding Areas.
570-550-4535
TOM'S AFFORDABLE
Tree & Shrub Trimming
& Removal. Chipper service.
Gutter Cleaning
References available.
Free estimates. 570-814-9132
Miscellaneous
FREE AD
POLICY
The Times Leader will
accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
GIRLS CLOTHING, size 5, ap-
prox. 50 items, price varies
with quantity bought. Excellent
condition. 570-239-1638
CYLINDER PILSNERS (glass)
for flowers, beautiful & elegant
for a wedding. $15.00 each, if
buy all 30 then $300.00 cash.
570-779-4325
GPS ( TomTom model #
4ET03) with 4 & 1/2" screen.
Needs power cord;$39.00.
Jeep (grey) - Li berty/Ni tro
Fl oor Mates. New & never
used;$70.00.
570-654-1969
HUSH PUPPY PURPLE
SUED SHOES, size 8m, $10.
ANN TAYLOR metallic look
shoes, size 8, $10.
INSULATION, 6x23, 4 rolls;$25 a
roll. Curio cabinet; $75. Plastic
chair mat; $30. Sofa, chair, and ot-
toman; $75. BF Goodri ch ti re,
215/75/R14; $20. Stone laundry
t ub; $45. Met al t ool - box f or
truck;$45. Oak coffee table; $75.
Single bed complete; $20.00.
570-868-4444
LADDER for in ground pool;
$75.00 or best offer.
570-822-6258
LAMP SHADES (2) that are
12" high, white, & bell shaped.
Perfect condition. $3.00 each
or 2 for $5.00.
570-288-0060
LIGHTING SYSTEM for outdoors
that is Malibu low voltage. New.
Was $248.00 & asking $35.00.
VCR movi e tapes, 50 movi es;
$15.00. Walker for handicap w/
wheels & in new condition; $6.00.
Umbrella stroller; $4.00. Material,
large box of remnants; $5.00. 570-
779-9791
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
STOVE i n excel l ent condi ti on.
Bisque or off white. Frigidaire Gal-
lery Series. Electric ceramic cook
top. Self cleaning, speed bake
oven; $225.00. Dishwasher in great
condition. Bisque or white whirl-
pool quiet wash plus; $125.00.
570-926-1726
Miscellaneous
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
NASCAR, coca-cola advertise-
ment with Dale Earnhart Sr,
and other crew, $15. BAS-
SETT WOOD DRESSER,
hand painted, 31"x43"x18",
$250. 23 GOOSEBUMPS
BOOKS, $35 570-735-2661
PATIENT HYDRAULIC LIFT.
New. Polyester mesh sling &
commode opening to help with
transfers. $300.00.
570-474-6549
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
RECLI NER/ Swi vel r ocker
( bei ge) - $90. 00.
570-696-4020
RE F RI GE RAT OR, d o r m s i z e
Emerson;$25. Kling 5 drawer chest,solid
wood & 40"Wx35" Hx19"D; $50. Casio
keyboard (76 full size keys) w/ stand,
tone response,power adapter cover,&
books in box;$75. Antique child's small
roll top solid oak desk;$99. Electronic in-
sect bug zapper,one acre coverage,still in
box;$10.
570-675-4617
REGULATION POOL TABLE.
4 1/2 x 9. Three piece 1 inch
slate. Three sets of balls 4
cues. Must be disassembled.
$400.00.
570-288-9003
RUG DOCTOR CLEANING
MACHINE that was used 3
times; $250.00. Leaf Vacuum
wood chipper, made by mtd &
like new; $150.00.
570-829-2035
SHEET MUSIC - About 30
pieces for piano, guitar, & har-
monica. Religious music in-
cluded; $15.00.
570-655-1808
WEST BEND ELECTRONIC
SOUND MIXER, new in box;
$25.00. Black leather Tyler
Rodan purse;$10.00. Multi-
col ored Dol ce & Gabbana
purse;$10.00.
570-603-1195
Musical Instruments
O R G A N & b e n c h ,
Wur l i t z er , wor k s . FREE.
570-540-0175
Sporting Goods
BIKE 24" Mongoose Mountain
bike $50. 570-793-5416
Televisions /Accessories
65" OLIVIA TV LCD that is 5
years old; $500.00.
570-256-3983
Tickets
PENN STATE
TICKETS
Set of 4 seats,
6 season games,
Section EGU, on 20 yard line.
570-954-5237
Tools
YARD VACUUM (craftsman
power propel l ed) 6.5 hp -
$300.00. Craftsman 10" radial
arm saw, master mechanic tool
- $50.00. Three drawer chests
w/ bottom storage - $30.00
each.
570-675-3503
Toys & Games
MILLENNIUM BARBIE in ori-
gi nal package. Thi s i s the
"Special 2000 Edition Celebra-
tion Barbie." All indications
show that it never was open.
$20.00 OBO.
570-394-7159
V-SMILE V-Tech electronic TV
game used once & in box w/ 3
games;$20. Wood castle w/ wood
f i g u r i n e s b y A n a t e x
Castlemania;$20. Sit & spin with
musi c; $5. Pogo st i ck grow t o
pro,used once;$10. Five Thomas
the Tank VHS tapes;$5. Barbie
plastic kitchen;$5. 570-603-1195
Stereo /TV /Electronics
SONY TV : 22 i nch Wega
Trinitron flat screen in excel-
lent condition. Was $625.00 &
selling for $75.00.
570-819-4951
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Wednesday, August 21, 2013 PAGE 11D
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