Webster

Comprehensive Master Plan
September 2012

UNIVERSITY

Contents
Introduction 7 Purpose of the Master Plan A Global University Space Analysis Methodology Vision Phasing Strategy Design Guidelines Strategy Landscape Guidelines Architectural Guidelines 19 27 41 51 71 75 77 87

Acknowledgements 104

introduction

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Introduction
As Webster University approaches its centennial in 2015, the campus is at a pivotal point in its development. The 2012 Webster University campus master plan establishes a fifteen to twenty year vision that will transform the Webster Groves campus into a vibrant, well-connected, and student-oriented setting for learning and research.
Webster University, founded in 1915 with its home campus based in St. Louis, Missouri, is the only Tier 1, private, nonprofit, U.S.-based university with campus locations around the world. These locations include metropolitan, military, online and corporate, as well as American-style traditional campuses in North America, Europe and Asia. The university offers undergraduate and graduate education and incorporates a unique global perspective in its curriculum. Webster’s curriculum includes programs in business and technology, communications, education, fine arts, and arts and sciences. The master plan establishes a physical framework that will guide growth and change. The plan for the Webster Groves campus envisions a connected and attractive environment for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members that embodies the global culture and character of the University. The plan is integrally linked to the University’s mission and its strategic plan. The 20|20 Vision charts a course toward a cohesive and student-oriented campus environment that supports the University’s goals of growing undergraduate enrollment and improving campus life. Webster’s unique commitments to a global reach, high quality learning, personalized experiences, and a diverse student body are key drivers of the plan. The master plan is forward-looking and integrates innovative approaches to higher education. While Webster University has national and international locations, this master plan focuses on its historic home, the Webster Groves campus, and its commitment to its local community and partners.

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Master Plan Achievements
The plan represents achievements within six themes that the University will see realized throughout the plan’s implementation:
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››  Campus Growth and Development ››  Image and Identity ››  Academic Achievements ››  Campus Life Experience ››  Interdisciplinary Collaborations ››  Community Engagement

Growth in campus population is supported by expansion in academic facilities, on-campus housing, student life, recreation/athletics facilities, and parking that work together to create a memorable, engaging campus experience for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members.

Campus Growth and Development
Today, Webster University is home to an active student body of both daytime and nighttime students. The University’s goal to grow its traditional, undergraduate population to 5,000 students is a key driver of this master plan. This growth in campus population is supported by the required expansion in academic facilities, on-campus housing, student life and recreation/athletics facilities, and parking. These uses work together to create a memorable, engaging campus experience for students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members.
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the future east campus quadrangle

Image and Identity
The University’s Webster Groves campus is the symbolic heart of its global campus system. The master plan creates a singular and recognizable campus environment. A comprehensive landscape and campus design framework creates a system of open spaces, campus buildings, and campus connections that work together to create a cohesive campus. Although divided by city streets, two main landscape quadrangles unite the campus with a common identity in a pedestrian environment. The existing West Quad, flanked by the Sverdrup Building and Emerson Library, is re-envisioned through simple landscape improvements that clarify pedestrian circulation and retain its identity as an open, informal campus quad. A second, significant campus landscape quad will be added on the east campus and will be framed by the existing Loretto-Hilton Center, East Academic Building, and Community Music School, as well as by the addition of two new critical campus buildings: a new student center at the intersection of Big Bend Boulevard and Edgar Road and a new interdisciplinary sciences building along the northern edge of the quad. This new East Quad will be a primary focal point of Webster’s future campus, bringing together students, faculty, staff, and community members. The landscape design of these two spaces represents an expression of the mission and identity of the University and presents an overall unified visual environment to students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members.

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The campus master plan is founded on a rigorous campus space analysis that establishes Webster’s current and future space needs. The plan program is based on this quantitative space analysis and extensive stakeholder interviews. Several critical academic needs are addressed in the master plan. The space analysis and extensive stakeholder outreach identified a need for improved, state-of-the-art sciences facilities. Similarly, multiple academic departments are currently scattered in separate locations across campus, and the master plan co-locates them in improved facilities. A priority project within the master plan is the development of an interdisciplinary sciences building that includes new laboratory space, as well as general classrooms and study space to enhance the academic environment. This new building will be located in a central location on the East Quad, immediately north of the East Academic Building and adjacent to a proposed new student center. The interdisciplinary sciences building will be at the crossroads of both campus and academic life at Webster. Arts are an important and well-known facet of Webster’s academic experience. The master plan brings together visual arts and performing arts into new spaces in a renovated and expanded University Center. The renovated building includes a transparent and visible new addition at its northern end to showcase Webster’s existing galleries and to provide expanded space for the display of art from Webster’s permanent collection. Integration of the building with the West Quad creates opportunities to integrate public art into the exterior and landscape experience of campus.

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A priority project is the development of an interdisciplinary sciences building located on the East Quad that includes new laboratory space, as well as general classrooms and study space to enhance the academic environment.

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A new student center is prominently located at the intersection of big bend and edgar road.

Campus Life Experience
As the University grows its undergraduate and on-campus populations, provision of an active campus life and of recreation opportunities are increasingly paramount. The master plan provides new facilities for both the student center and athletics and recreation. A new student center is sited at a prominent location, at the intersection of Big Bend Boulevard and Edgar Road. The building’s open design activates this important campus and community corner. The student center will bring together multiple campus functions to create a gathering place on campus that can be used for studying, dining, lounging, student organizations and clubs, counseling and health services, and for large campus-wide functions. A transparent, glass facade in the dining hall of the student center faces the new East Quad, providing connections between indoor and outdoor gathering spaces. Athletics and recreation opportunities are important elements of recruitment and student life. Since Webster is a compact campus, the master plan outlines a clear strategy for athletics that includes both a new, 110,000 square foot athletics facility along Big Bend Boulevard and a recommendation for future off-campus field and fieldhouse development. An in-depth housing marketing analysis resulted in a plan to develop additional oncampus beds over the next fifteen years. In the 2011-2012 academic year, Webster had enough beds to house 731 students on campus and also had an unmet demand for an additional 40-120 housing beds. In the future, Webster’s new and renovated residential facilities will offer a diversity of housing choices, including semi-suites, suites, and apartments to undergraduate and graduate students.

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a new interdisciplinary sciences building provides state of the art labs and fosters collaboration.

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to the right: At ground level, the Interdisciplinary Sciences Building contains general Classrooms or Learning Commons to encourage crossdisciplinary learning
lab lab support office building core/ services horizontal circulation vertical circulation classroom/ auditorium/ learning commons Facilities

Four unique housing sites will offer different housing options to students and will be able to meet future demand for up to 1,600 to 1,800 total beds. Three housing districts are located on campus in Maria Hall, in a south district with dining amenities, and in a proposed livinglearning environment integrated with a newly established East Quad. A fourth housing site is proposed in a mixed use redevelopment project at Old Orchard Shopping Center. Together, these four housing districts would provide additional, needed beds and help Webster diversify the unit types it offers to ensure that its students have the ability to progress through the campus housing system.

“rooms” where different activities can take place, from outdoor classrooms to receptions for the Loretto-Hilton Center performances. With multiple disparate activities taking place within it, the East Quad will also serve as a place to bring together the many facets of Webster University’s campus community and local, national, and international visitors.

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Interdisciplinary Collaborations
A strategic goal outlined by the master plan is to improve cross-functionality within the campus and to provide environments where administrative and academic departments can work together across traditional boundaries. The campus master plan seeks to provide these settings in an interdisciplinary sciences building and in an arts center where disciplines can collaborate and where students, faculty, and staff can create new relationships. These buildings will have specialized spaces to accommodate the specific program needs of science labs and visual/performing arts studios. They will also have areas dedicated to flexible, collaborative learning. Shared classrooms, open lab areas, and public collaboration spaces such as a learning commons in the interdisciplinary sciences facility or a formal home for Webster’s art galleries in the arts center are important elements of the building programs. Webster University’s landscape will be another venue for multi-disciplinary collaboration. The new East Quad will have multiple outdoor

A strategic goal outlined by the master plan is to improve cross-functionality within the campus, and to provide environments where administrative and academic departments can work together across traditional boundaries.
Community Engagement
The Webster University master plan was developed through extensive stakeholder outreach, both on campus and within the Webster Groves community. Campuscommunity relationships and sustainable growth are integrally linked. The master plan reflects the University’s core values and mission but is sensitive to the neighborhood and community it is nestled within. Campus edges are carefully considered with appropriate land uses and buffer elements in key locations. Throughout the master plan, the process worked to build consensus among stakeholder groups. Campus and community forums were held at milestones in the planning process to solicit feedback on the plan analysis and proposals. An interactive, online mapping survey was launched and garnered 325 responses about the University’s physical environment.

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Webster hall on east lockwood avenue

Purpose of the Master Plan 
n July, 2011, Webster University engaged Sasaki Associates, Inc., with Jacobs and The Scion I Group, to create a comprehensive master plan to guide growth and development of the University’s Webster Groves campus over the next decades. Over the subsequent year, the Sasaki team worked collaboratively with the University and local stakeholders to create a master plan vision that would be inspiring and that would provide a flexible framework for future development that reinforces and enhances the Webster University identity on its main campus in St. Louis. Specifically, the master plan will accomplish the following: ›› Guide the development of academic, student life and residential facilities and infrastructure to support current and future growth ›› Identify ways to optimize physical assets in order to build the Webster University brand and achieve strategic goals ›› Provide a strategy for university-owned off-site properties to meet expanding student enrollment needs

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Strategic Plan and Master Plan Principles
The master plan supports Webster University’s institutional mission, embodied in its 20|20 Vision strategic plan, to be “a premier U.S.-based international university setting a distinct standard for global education.” Together with the University’s core values and the master planning principles outlined below, Webster’s strategic plan forms a foundation for each plan decision and helps inform priorities for future development. The master plan reinforces the 20|20 Vision plan and ensures that the future physical growth of the campus is strongly linked to the University’s current academic and global mission. The master plan principles are intended to be flexible, acknowledging that the University’s mission and campus priorities will evolve over time. Four core values, as defined by Webster University in its Strategic Plan 20|20, form a foundation for the master plan:

Students
Sustain a personalized approach to education through small classes, close relationships with faculty and staff, and attention to student life.

Learning
Develop educational programs that join theory and practice, provide an international perspective, encourage creativity and scholarship, and foster a lifelong desire to learn and actively serve communities and the world.

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the campus landscape offers opportunities for outdoor learning and collaboration.

Diversity
Create an accessible environment for individuals of diverse cultures, ages, and socioeconomic backgrounds and instill in students a respect for diversity and an understanding of their own and others values.

Master Plan Principles
Campus planning and design is guided by master plan principles that help to ensure that each physical campus development decision contributes to a cohesive, high-quality campus environment. The principles provide a guide to shape planning and design on the Webster University campus as it relates to critical elements such as academics, sustainability, student life, and campus landscape. Together, these six principles help to assure that the University will grow in a manner that is sensitive to the needs of its students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community members and is cognizant of adjacent properties and the Webster Groves community character. The principles can assist Webster in evaluating new projects and campus improvements. The master plan principles were developed in consultation with the University’s master plan Steering Committee, as well as input from the Webster University campus community, University leadership, and the Webster Groves community. ›› Academic facilities will be organized to support the core values of the strategic plan. ›› Sustainability and systems-thinking will be embedded in all aspects of campus design and development. ›› Development of the campus will improve the quality of the campus experience and enhance student life. ›› The open space and landscape framework will create a strong campus identity and sense of place, enhance campus life, and foster a living and learning environment. ›› Campus land and buildings will be used efficiently; buildings and grounds projects will contribute to improving the experience as a whole. ›› The campus master plan will identify opportunities to engage the surrounding community in an inclusive manner.

Global Citizenship
Educate a diverse population locally, nationally, and internationally, act responsibly toward the environment to foster a sustainable future, and strengthen the communities we serve.

Planning Process
The master planning process commenced in July, 2011, and culminated in a presentation to the Webster University Board of Trustees in April, 2012. The plan included four phases of work: ›› Phase 1: Data Collection and Analysis ›› Phase 2: Exploration ›› Phase 3: Master Plan Development and Documentation ›› Phase 4: Community Engagement The Data Collection and Analysis phase involved the development of a comprehensive understanding of Webster’s current strategic planning and design issues. This was accomplished through review of relevant background material such as the University’s strategic plan, housing plans, and local zoning codes. Phase 1 also included analysis of existing conditions, space analysis, housing market and demand analysis, and extensive stakeholder interviews with the University and Webster Groves communities to identify key issues and opportunities for the master plan. During Phase 2, the master planning engagement process was designed to establish a dialogue with the University and Webster Groves communities and to encourage ongoing participation throughout the planning process. Outreach included an online mapping survey called “MyWebster” that allowed users to describe how they use the Webster University campus today. Three hundred twenty-five people responded to the survey, including students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members. The findings of the campus analysis, online survey, and recurrent themes from interviews helped to define the master plan principles, as well as a campus framework, which together set the stage for development of three alternative master plan concepts during this phase of the planning process. The plan alternatives addressed factors such as use and re-use of existing facilities, new facility needs, circulation, sustainability, relationship to surroundings, place-making and overall appeal, and flexibility and ease of construction. Through input from the Master Planning Steering Committee, the team produced a second set of refined concept alternatives. Based on these alternatives, a preferred direction was selected for the campus master plan.

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The preferred plan defines an exciting vision for future growth for the campus and defines the structure for campus improvements that can be implemented incrementally according to University priorities and resource availability.
Phase 3 of the planning process focused on the development and documentation of the preferred campus master plan, as well as creation of an implementation and phasing plan, a transportation study for Edgar Road, and a campus housing business plan. Architectural and landscape guidelines were developed to support the master plan development and to guide future building, landscape, and infrastructure projects to ensure they are in line with the plan principles. Finally, during Phase 4, the master plan was shared with campus and community stakeholders for feedback and final refinements.

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below left: an online survey solicited information about webster’s campus . below right: the master plan committee debates alternative concept plans.

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to the right: Webster university is embedded within the webster groves context, surrounded by neighborhoods and other institutions.

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Stakeholders Consultation
Throughout the planning process, the Steering Committee, University leadership group, and Webster Groves community provided guidance and oversight for the direction of the plan. The comprehensive outreach process involved individual interviews and group meetings, work sessions, and campus and community presentations. The Steering Committee included a broad cross-section of the Webster University community, including faculty, staff and students, as well as Webster Groves community members. Milestone meetings with the Steering Committee provided consistent coordination and input at each stage of the plan development. The process began with stakeholder interviews in July, 2011, to establish goals, existing opportunities, and potential challenges. At this time, individual and small group interviews were conducted with over thirty stakeholders, representing administration, academics, student life, facilities, partner institutions such as the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis and the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, and the external community including the City of Webster Groves, neighbors, and Eden Theological Seminary. Recurrent themes from the interviews served to inform and shape development of the analysis and master plan. These early conversations revealed priorities related to the physical campus and space needs, the campus landscape, quality of instructional space, circulation conflicts, student-life issues including housing and recreation, and the relationship to Webster Groves. The stakeholder interviews established that growth of the traditional undergraduate population, toward an ultimate goal of 5,000 undergraduate students, was a major driver for the master plan. This goal to grow the

undergraduate population was coupled with a desire to expand and diversify Webster’s oncampus housing. Key ideas from the interviews also included affirmation that the Webster Groves campus is the heart of Webster’s global “campus.” The interviews identified the need to co-locate dispersed programs, to improve campus gathering spaces, and to provide spaces to encourage interdisciplinary functions. The interviews also underscored the campus community’s perceptions that expansion and improvements are needed in many existing facilities, particularly for sciences, fine arts, student life, and recreation uses. During summer 2011, an assessment was conducted on campus space needs and existing transportation, landscape, campus design, and infrastructure conditions in order to provide base information to guide plan recommendations. Weekly conference calls with the Webster University project manager provided feedback and oversight for the space analysis and campus assessment. A project kick-off meeting was held with the Steering Committee in September 2011. At this time, housing focus-group interviews with both undergraduate and graduate students were conducted to initiate the campus housing market analysis. The space analysis, campus and landscape analysis, and housing findings were presented to the Steering Committee, staff, faculty, and the Student Government Association. In November, 2011, the consultant team held a work session with the Steering Committee to review three alternative concepts for future campus growth and development. At this time, the project was also presented at an open campus community forum and at a neighborhood meeting for community members in Webster Groves. Based on feedback from the committee session,

conversations with University leadership, City officials, and the community meetings, the three concepts were refined into a second round of revised alternatives and reviewed during December, 2011. In spring 2012, the preferred direction was presented at a final Steering Committee session, as well as at a faculty forum, the Board of Trustees Building & Infrastructure Committee, an open community meeting, a full Board of Trustees meeting, and a Webster Groves City Council session.

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City of Webster Groves Community Engagement
Given the close relationship between Webster University and the surrounding City of Webster Groves, the local community was consulted throughout the master plan process. Outreach to the Webster Groves community included a range of activities including open access to the website and online mapping survey, Steering Committee representation, coordination meetings with City officials, and open public forums. Two community members, from an adjacent neighborhood and from the Webster Groves Chamber of Commerce, served on the Steering Committee and provided a perspective into neighborhood impact and benefits throughout the process. City officials, including representatives from the Planning Department, Mayor’s Office, and Public Works were consulted for feedback and direction at major project milestones in July, September and November, 2011, and February, 2012. Additionally, the analysis findings were presented to neighborhood groups in November, 2011, and the preferred direction of the master plan was presented to the City Council at a City Council work session in early March, 2012.

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loretto hall is a visitor’s front door to webster university

A Global University
Although its home campus is located ten miles southwest of downtown St. Louis, Webster University also has a strong global presence. The University is both embedded locally within Webster Groves, Missouri, and connected globally to a network of campuses and locations. Webster University in Webster Groves is the symbolic and operational “heart” of the University, but students can also study at locations across the United States and at Webster in Austria, China, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Thailand.
Webster was founded in 1915 by the Sisters of Loretto and established as one of the first Catholic women’s colleges west of the Mississippi River. The University’s broad reach and global mission became cemented due to the institution’s efforts in the 1960s and 1970s to provide a practical higher education option for working adults and particularly military personnel. In 1972, Webster opened its first metropolitan extended campus in Kansas City, Missouri. Through an invitation from the U.S. Department of Defense, Webster opened its first military extended campus program at Fort Sheridan near Chicago in 1974. The institution became increasingly global in 1978 when Webster opened its first international campus in Geneva, Switzerland. Today, the University has grown to include European campuses in Vienna, Austria; Leiden, the Netherlands; and London, England, as well as more recent campuses in Shanghai, China, and Cha-Am/Hua Hin, Thailand. Today, Webster University is the only Tier 1, private, nonprofit, U.S.-based university with a network of domestic and international campuses. This physical global presence permeates both the Webster Groves campus and the University’s vision to provide students with an education that is enhanced by an international perspective that fosters dialogue, respect and understanding across boundaries and between peoples. This uniquely global perspective has resulted in a distinctive university that currently enrolls nearly 22,000 students representing over one hundred nationalities.

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Webster Groves Setting
Webster University’s home campus, the focus of this master planning study, is located in Webster Groves, Missouri, an inner-ring suburb of St. Louis. Webster Groves has a population of 22,995 (2010 census), and contains strong residential neighborhoods with tree-lined streets and single family homes. The Pacific Railroad line, which today runs along the southern edge of the Webster University campus, contributed to the development of Webster Groves as a St. Louis suburb in the late nineteenth century. Two of Webster Groves’ local retail centers are located in close proximity to the University campus: Old Webster and the Old Orchard Shopping District. The Old Orchard Shopping Center, located in the Old Orchard Shopping District, is owned by Webster University. Community Music School and theater rehearsal spaces are located at the Old Orchard Center, and remaining retail spaces are rented out to serve retail needs for the community. Webster University is embedded within several of Webster Groves’ neighborhoods and shares its boundaries with multiple institutions and residential houses. The Webster Park neighborhood is located to the north, across East Lockwood Avenue, and the Catalina neighborhood is located to the southwest. The campus is bordered to the south by the Pacific Railroad line and Interstate 44. Webster Groves High School is located to the west, Nerinx Hall High School to the east, Holy Redeemer Catholic Church and School to the north, and Emmanuel Episcopal Church just east of Loretto Hall. Eden Theological Seminary, with which Webster has a long history of academic collaboration, is located across East Lockwood Avenue.

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on the top: public art in a local webster groves park marks the entrance to the old orchard retail district. to the right: nearby retail and dining along lockwood avenue, east of the webster university campus

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Webster University’s home campus, the focus of this master planning study, is located in Webster Groves, Missouri, an inner-ring suburb of St. Louis. Webster Groves has a population of 22,995 (2010 census), and contains strong residential neighborhoods with many tree-lined streets and single family homes. The Pacific Railroad line, which today runs along the southern edge of the Webster University campus, contributed to the development of Webster Groves as a St. Louis suburb in the late nineteenth century.

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Webster University’s campus is organized into large blocks defined by public streets. The original campus began on a block north of Big Bend Boulevard and fronting on East Lockwood Avenue. Webster Hall, Maria Hall, Loretto Hall, the Winifred Moore Auditorium, and Marletto’s comprise this mixed use district, which contains classrooms, labs, student residences, dining, administrative offices and student services. Selected student services occupy the newly refurbished first floor of Webster Hall, providing a welcoming and fresh ceremonial front door to the campus. The remainder of the campus is organized in precincts that are distinct, single-use zones. Until the introduction of the East Academic Building in March, 2012, academic uses were concentrated in Webster Hall, the Sverdrup Building, and the Visual Arts Studios. The East Academic building introduced forty new classrooms. It houses the George Herbert Walker School of Business & Technology as well as general academic space, creating a large academic magnet in the block east of Edgar Road. The H. Sam Priest Center and the Pearson House are also located in the east district and house academic programs in the College of Arts and Sciences. Student life and community uses are clustered at the campus crossroads with Emerson Library, the University Center, and LorettoHilton Center located at the intersection of Edgar Road and Garden Avenue. Webster University has 731 beds available on campus. Aside from historic Maria Hall which contains 108 beds, housing is clustered to the south in the West Village Apartments and in East and West Halls. Two hundred seventy students can be housed in the West Village Apartments

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Building Character and History
today, and 343 students can be housed in East and West Halls. Webster University contains many smaller structures that were converted from their original residential use. There is a collection of four small converted houses along Garden Avenue. These houses include the Multicultural Center and International Student Affairs, Love Foundation Alumni House, administrative support for the Community Music School, and Counseling and Student Health Services. Webster University has grown and developed incrementally over time, from Webster Hall’s construction in 1915 to the completion of the East Academic Building in 2012. The architectural character of the collection of buildings on Webster’s campus is eclectic, representing the mix of time periods that the buildings have been developed within. Through an online survey and interviews with the campus community, it was revealed that people have affection for the historic and modern architectural styles—admiring both the historic, masonry architecture of Webster Hall, as well as contemporary glass, brick, and steel architecture of Emerson Library. Examples of institutional architecture with historic character include the Webster and Loretto Halls district, as well as some of the smaller converted houses on campus, such as the Thompson House, the H. Sam Priest Center, and the Pearson House. A historic building study was conducted in coordination with the master plan to ensure that master plan decisions are in alignment with historic requirements for any significant structures. The study examined the Pearson House, H. Sam Priest Center, the Thompson House and Carriage House (including the outbuilding and retaining wall), as well as buildings the University acquired from Eden Theological Seminary in 2010. These include the Luhr building, the Wehrli Center, and the White House. The campus is governed by multiple layers of historic protection from both the National Registry and local Webster Groves historic districts. For development in these areas, a Certificate of Appropriateness and Historic Commission review is required. The Webster College—Eden Theological Seminary Historic District is designated by both the City of Webster Groves and the National Historic Register, and it encompasses the Eden Theological Seminary campus, the Webster Hall block, and much of the campus land bounded by Big Bend Boulevard, Edgar Road, Garden Avenue, and the property line with Nerinx Hall. Buildings that are affected by this historic designation include Webster Hall, Loretto Hall, the Winifred Moore Auditorium, the Thompson House and Carriage House, and the Luhr building. The Webster Park Residential Historic District, a National Registry district, is another nearby historic district that is located north of Lockwood. Included in this historic district are the Wehrli Center and the White House.

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Community Partnership Sites
Webster University shares its campus and facilities with significant St. Louis-based arts programs: the internationally-known Opera Theatre of Saint Louis and the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis. The University shares facilities, faculty, staff and technical personnel with both institutions. With their presence, the University’s Loretto-Hilton Center hosts a busy schedule of performances that attract theater and opera devotees from the local, national, and international communities to the campus. The Loretto-Hilton Center is located at the center of Webster’s campus, at the corner of Edgar Road and Garden Avenue. The offices of the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis are located in a building just north of the Center. The daily operations and performance functions of the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis are supported by an additional building, constructed in 2006, that is located in the block south of Garden Avenue and contains state-of-the-art rehearsal space, offices, and meeting rooms. Immediately east of the Loretto-Hilton Center is the Community Music School of Webster University, which provides music education for students from pre-school through adulthood and includes music studios, recital rooms, and a 472-seat auditorium.

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outdoor study spaces in the west quad

the West quad serves as a site for events and recreation.

Open Space and Landscape
The campus landscape is an integral part of the academic and student life experience at Webster. The campus character is defined by the Webster Groves environment, the neighborhood and campus buildings, and the existing landscape framework that defines open spaces, visual character, and pedestrian circulation. Although it is a small and compact campus, the landscape at Webster is varied and diverse, with many different types of spaces and plantings. The campus is comprised of formal and informal landscape types including streetscapes, campus gateways, quadrangles, foreground landscapes, gathering places, as well as some undefined open spaces. While some of the landscapes create memorable environments, such as the garden near the Loretto-Hilton Center, others lack a clear sense of identity. Individual landscape moments feel isolated and could benefit from better connectivity among the whole landscape system. Students pass through these spaces perfunctorily, rather than resting, lingering, studying, and socializing. Parking areas are centrally located and visually prominent; they must be better integrated into the open space framework. Given Webster’s eclectic architectural character and mixed-use environment, the campus landscape can be one of the most transformative elements. Many opportunities exist to reposition the campus landscapes to better support their architectural and programmatic contexts and reinforce a sense of place and campus identity. In coordination with future building projects, the University can continue to design and develop these landscapes to better respond to their architectural and programmatic contexts, as well as to support a landscape system that integrates high quality design, environmental, and academic values. For example, the West Quad near Sverdrup is surrounded by a variety of student life and academic uses and has potential to become a much better utilized and appreciated open space. While landscapes need to express their identity as individual spaces, they also need to read as part of a legible and coordinated system. Currently, the connections between campus landscapes are indirect and sometimes compromised by pedestrian pathways or road crossings. Consistent and coordinated signage and wayfinding will improve the overall campus image and access for the community. The campus contains a large retention pond south of the Garden Park Plaza garage and a smaller detention basin near the Facilities Building. Each collects rain and stormwater runoff. Stormwater management improvements were recently made to the large south retention basin that increased the size and incorporated water quality best management practices. The basin is at a maximum size allowed by the site, and further expansion will not be an option. Future projects will utilize green solutions on a per-development basis to slow, detain,

The campus landscape can be one of the most transformative elements. Many opportunities exist to reposition the campus landscapes to better support their architectural and programmatic contexts and reinforce a sense of place and campus identity.

and treat runoff. Opportunities include bioretention, pervious pavement, green roofs, rainwater harvesting, infiltration basins, and disconnection/buffer approaches. Stormwater management efforts will be integrated throughout the landscape and made visible to support campus sustainability efforts.

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Climate and Sustainability
Sustainability includes environmental impact, social, and economic issues. Planning for sustainability provides an opportunity to identify actions and strategies that can be implemented today and that will have immediate and long-term impacts. Sustainability at Webster is a critical value for students, faculty, and staff, but it is still gaining ground and is being realized incrementally. Goals for achieving energy and waste savings will be achieved as project opportunities arise. The East Academic Building is a LEED certification candidate. Additional sustainability efforts include a recycling program, waste stream audits, and integration of lighting sensors and low flow fixtures in renovation and new construction. A graduate program for Global Sustainability reflects the integration of sustainability into the curriculum, and there is also an increasing undergraduate focus on sustainability. A Sustainability Coalition is also in place to coordinate campus sustainability endeavors. St. Louis’ climate must be taken into consideration for building design and landscape decisions. St. Louis experiences very cold winters and cold winter winds, which contribute to high heating loads and an added wind chill factor. Summers are warm with relatively high humidity levels that lead to high cooling loads.

east Lo

North B o

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Plymou t

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levar

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garden avenue

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existing landscape framework
streetscape campus gateway main quads foreground landscapes gathering places Undefined Open Space retention pond

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Plymou th

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North B ompart

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Joy

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Big Be

ule nd Bo

vard

Old Orchard Center

Big Be

ule nd Bo

vard

Old Orchard Center

garden avenue

garden avenue

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Edgar Road

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existing vehicular circulation framework
parking lots all way stop traffic signal interstate freeway arterial street community collector street local street On-Campus Route service entrance

existing pedestrian circulation framework
Pedestrian path pedestrian crosswalk

Circulation and Parking
Although the Webster University campus is compact, it is divided by roadways and interrupted by surface parking lots that create many locations for potential pedestrian and vehicular conflicts. A significant issue for the University is the lack of separation between vehicles and pedestrians. Big Bend Boulevard, Garden Avenue, and Edgar Road are county and city roads that traverse the campus and challenge pedestrian connectivity. With the addition of uses north of East Lockwood Avenue, connections across this street must also be considered. The recent East Academic Building, located east of Edgar Road, positions the University’s two major academic buildings across a main city road, increasing the frequency of pedestrians street crossings in order to travel between academic destinations. Parking on campus is approaching capacity but is not at a deficit. However, the University receives many complaints about parking supply and location. There are currently 1,775 parking lot spaces total on campus. Access to on-street parking is limited to one hundred spaces, with competition from Webster Groves High School and Nerinx Hall High School. Community and partner events at the LorettoHilton Center also generate demand. To solve evening peak demand, the University uses the Webster Groves High School lot during evening classes when there are no high school events. Parking passes are available to all students, faculty, and staff. Additional parking will need to be provided as the University grows. Transportation demand management techniques will be implemented to help reduce the demand for on campus parking. The location of parking on campus is also a challenge. The Garden Park Plaza garage is sited well at the southwest corner of campus; however, the campus core contains many surface lots that exacerbate conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles and disrupt the campus experience.

ompart

North B

east Lo

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ckwoo

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d Bou d levar
Old Orchard Center

Plymou th

Plymou th

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nd Bo

rd uleva

Old Orchard Center

n Big Be

garden avenue

garden avenue

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Edgar Road

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heating and cooling

heating cooling

building cooling connections

single boiler shared boiler/steam

Utilities
There were no critical utilities issues identified for Webster’s sanitary sewers, water capacity, or natural gas service. However, the University is currently at full capacity for electricity and heating and cooling and will have to expand capacity in combination with new projects. Electrical service to Webster University is provided by Ameren, often by utility-owned transformers. Service is provided by overhead distribution lines through campus and along Big Bend, Edgar Road, Garden Avenue, and Lockwood Avenue. The residence halls, East Hall and West Hall, are fed underground from Edgar Road. Based on the Ross & Baruzzini 2004 study, the electrical capacity restriction is not within the campus, but rather with Ameren’s utility service to the campus and will need to be solved with the utility provider. Similarly, the Physical Plant is currently operating at maximum capacity, and this is a critical concern of the University for future growth. The buildings on campus are currently connected by a series of distributed heating plants. The Physical Plant is located south of Loretto Hall and provides steam heating to Webster, Maria, and Loretto Hall. Hot water boilers in the Sverdrup Building also serve Emerson Library. The Loretto-Hilton Center and the Community Music School share a hot water heating plant. East and West Halls share a boiler and hot water heating plant. University Village, the student apartment complex, is served by a hot water heating plant. The East Academic Building is served by a standalone hot water heating plant. Other buildings on campus have independent single boiler systems. The Luhr building is currently served from Eden Theological Seminary’s heating and cooling plant, with an agreement for the University to pay a flat rate for utilities. The Physical Plant houses three chillers (at five hundred tonnes each), cooling towers and distribution pumps. It serves a chilled water

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loop, which is a primary-secondary-tertiary pumping distribution system. The chilled water loop runs from the Physical Plant to North Campus, to the Sverdrup Building, Emerson Library and Loretto-Hilton Center, to the Community Music School and East Academic Building, and down to serve East and West Halls. Provisions for future chillers and added loop capacity were made during recent construction of the East Academic Building. The Visual Arts Building, University Center, University Village, and Opera Theater of Saint Louis Building have stand-alone chillers or other independent cooling systems.

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Campus Framework
Future Growth Opportunities
Although Webster University is located within a built-out environment and land is scarce, opportunities do exist for growth within the existing campus lands. Based on building condition assessments, stakeholder interviews, and previous studies, a number of existing buildings are potential candidates for removal and redevelopment to increase campus efficiency and utilization. By planning for redevelopment of three major sites throughout the campus, it was calculated that there are fifteen acres of future redevelopment land on the core campus within the existing forty-seven acre campus.

future growth opportunities

Campus Framework
Webster University’s existing campus systems create an existing campus framework to describe how the University setting is functioning today and to set the stage for future development. Included in this framework are land and building use, open space, circulation and parking, and utilities. City streets organize a series of districts: the historic district to the north, east campus, west campus, and the south housing district.

Edgar Road is an important campus spine. Many buildings that are important to the daily campus operations are located on Edgar Road, such as the Emerson Library, the University Center, and the Loretto-Hilton Center. The academic centers of campus can be found in Webster Hall, the Sverdrup Building and, increasingly, on the east campus in the new East Academic Building. With these three separate centers, pedestrian circulation among the multiple campus districts is a defining feature of the campus experience. Landscape open spaces work together with these three academic centers to give identity to each district of campus, including the front lawn by Webster Hall, the West Quad near Sverdrup, and the two garden spaces near the East Academic Building.

Throughout the campus, there exist opportunities to redevelop low density sites and to improve the coherence of the campus. The master plan builds on this campus framework of multiple campus academic hubs, outdoor gathering spaces, and redevelopment opportunities.

Joy Aven u

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To 40 R ock Hill(Ad ministr ative)

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Ave

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garden avenue

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existing campus framework

landscape academic center student life

development opportunity campus connection Gateways

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program development

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the university center is home to the student center and recreation center

Space Analysis Methodology
A space needs analysis was prepared as part of the Webster University master plan to establish current and future space needs for a variety of space types, determine space surpluses and shortages, and identify opportunities for the reuse of existing space.
The space analysis forms the foundation for a program that must be accommodated as part of the physical master plan. Categories assessed within the analysis include classrooms, laboratories, office space, library and study space, athletics and recreation, student life, assembly/exhibition space, support, health and residential spaces. The methodology used for the space analysis builds on a model based on national and international space planning guidelines that were developed to address quantitative needs. Using existing space and schedule data from Webster University, the space model was tailored to reflect the teaching pedagogy and space use practices of the University. Assumptions incorporated in the space model and findings were reviewed and confirmed with University staff. Webster experiences two distinct scheduled periods on campus—daytime and evening; it was assumed that daytime will drive future growth due to the goals to grow the traditional undergraduate population. However, the evening also experiences high rates of utilization. The analysis examined Webster’s scheduled week as occurring both during the day on Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., as well as the evenings from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. To address qualitative issues related to space needs, the analysis incorporates input from interviews with Webster stakeholders, campus tours, and an understanding of the varied needs of the campus’ daytime and evening populations.

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Projected Growth and Enrollment Trends
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Over the next decades, the University is targeting enrollment growth on its home campus within its traditional, undergraduate student cohort to an ultimate size of 5,000 headcount (HC) undergraduate students. The graduate and non-traditional student population on the home campus was assumed to remain constant and to have minimal impact on space needs. Space needs were determined for the University’s current enrollment level and for growth over time to accommodate these undergraduate enrollment goals. Faculty and staff numbers will grow proportionately and are incorporated in the space projections. The space needs were subsequently translated into individual building programs as a basis for developing the master plan.

teaching labs in webster hall

students find study space in the hallways

Projected Enrollment for the webster groves campus ENROLLMENTS Undergraduate Current HC 3,001 2,317 5,318 629 557 Future HC 5,000 2,317 7,317 905 911

Current and Future Space Needs
Webster University has significant current and future space needs, which is in alignment with results of surveys and stakeholder interviews. At present, deficits can be seen in office space, library/study space, athletics/ special use, student life, and support (physical plant, storage, central services). The addition of forty new classrooms in the East Academic Building in 2012 has resulted in a small surplus of classrooms. Lab space also exhibits an overall surplus; however, Webster’s labs are specialized spaces that are often departmentally specific, and the lab spaces and furnishings are frequently outdated, which impacts teaching ability and the flexibility of the spaces to support multiple uses. Given the variation in lab space for different programs, the laboratory category was

Graduate Total Faculty (includes adjuncts) Staff

current and future space needs Existing Space Classroom Teaching Lab Open Lab Office/Conference Study/Library Athletics/Recreation Assembly/Exhibition Student Life Support 61,730 48,782 10,756 139,782 38,700 22,382 55,342 44,390 14,699 Future Need 51,777 53,469 16,042 236,363 77,860 70,479 34,879 75,675 32,452 Deficit ASF 4,687 5,286 96,581 39,160 48,097 31,285 17,753 deficit gsf 7,730 8,720 159,360 64,610 79,360 51,620 29,290

analyzed further to understand lab needs in greater detail by each college and school. For example, space and furnishing needs are very different for biology labs versus for visual arts labs or studios. This study demonstrated that The College of Arts and Sciences, School of Communications, and School of Education are currently operating at a deficit of labs, while the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts has a surplus. The lab needs of the George Herbert Walker School of Business & Technology were addressed in the East Academic Building construction. The College of Arts and Sciences has the greatest deficit, which supports interviews and University priorities around a new interdisciplinary sciences building. The quantitative surplus that is exhibited in Fine Arts labs may be explained by Webster’s robust community arts programs, the nature of highly specialized music, dance, performance, and studio art spaces, as well as the use of labs for non-instructional student practice and studio work. The assembly/exhibition space category also demonstrates a surplus on Webster’s campus, as a result of the unique community partnerships that Webster has with the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis and the St. Louis Repertory Theatre. The large, shared community spaces at the Loretto-Hilton Center and the space in the University’s Community Music School drive up total space on campus. However, there is a shortage of medium and large gathering spaces for meetings and nonperformance assemblies. To support a future undergraduate student population of 5,000 headcount, the University needs to increase teaching and open lab space, office space, study space, athletics and recreation, student life, and support. The additional academic spaces reflect a need to both upgrade existing science lab space and add approximately 10,000 square feet of teaching and open lab space. Office and conference space demonstrates the

A little over 30,000 square feet of new student life space will be needed and will work in concert with study space to augment the student experience on campus. Currently, both the student center and recreation/athletics needs are served in the University Center, but both of these uses need to grow beyond their current space to meet current and future space needs.
largest space need on campus; when the undergraduate population reaches 5,000 headcount, an additional 97,000 assignable square feet of office and conference space will be needed. This mirrors stakeholder interviews that surfaced a need for shared conference space and meeting space for faculty, as well as for university-wide events. The student learning experience extends beyond the classroom and generates a significant need for study, student life, and residential spaces. There is a significant deficit of student life space on campus, specifically for dining, health services, student support, student government offices, merchandising, and individual and group study. The Emerson Library was thoughtfully planned with space allowed for additional growth, so study space within the library is adequate. However, an additional 40,000 square feet of study space is needed across campus and should be integrated with future building projects, in new academic buildings and within student housing. A little over 30,000 square feet of new student life space will be needed and will work in concert with study space to augment the student experience on campus. Currently, both the student center and recreation/athletics needs are served in the University Center, but both of these uses need to grow beyond their current space to meet current and future space needs.

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Efficiency and Utilization
An important part of assessing a campus’ space needs is evaluation of classroom and teaching lab utilization. The room utilization rate is the percentage of peak use time that a classroom or lab is used for instruction; it is a ratio of scheduled classroom hours to available room hours for that space. The utilization of Webster’s teaching spaces was examined for the fall 2011 schedule to determine if the University can improve efficiencies within its existing space that would alleviate strain on peak periods. The University has two peak periods on campus: daytime from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and evenings from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Classrooms and lab spaces were examined separately. For classrooms, a target of 65% average utilization was set to account for class change periods and other low periods. On Mondays and Wednesdays, Webster’s classrooms exceed the 65% target utilization rates in the evenings and average 70-77% utilization. Higher utilization rates can be expected in the evening because most classes occur in a simple block, and there is no class change or unscheduled time. During the daytime, utilization averages only 46%. Tuesdays and Thursdays average 67-71% utilization in the evenings and 46% during the day. On Friday, classrooms are less heavily scheduled, averaging only 28% during the day and 6% in the evening. However, it may be difficult to schedule additional evening classes on Fridays to improve this rate. Labs require longer set-up and preparation time between classes and may be used for unscheduled student work, so a lower target of 45% utilization was established. Webster’s labs achieved an average of 36% utilization during daytime hours on Monday and Wednesday, and an average of 26-29% utilization in the evening. Similarly, Tuesdays and Thursdays see a 31-33% average utilization rate during the day and 27-31% utilization in the evenings. Like classrooms, labs are scheduled lightly on Fridays—30% during the day and 3% during the evenings. While overall lab utilization rates fall below accepted targets, there are exceptional spaces that are heavily utilized; and the specialization of the lab spaces reduces some of their flexibility.

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average classroom utilization on tuesdays and thursdays.

Housing Market and Demand Analysis
A campus housing market and demand analysis was conducted to assess student demand for on-campus housing today, to determine the types of housing that are desired, and to project the amount of future housing growth that will be needed and can be absorbed by the future market. The housing analysis concluded that there is strong interest among students for new or renovated housing on campus. If it were the correct product and offered at a competitive rate, the University would see high occupancy in the student housing it offers. However, there is also a wide variety of off-campus options available to students, who generally perceive these options as less expensive than on-campus choices. The main factors that influence a student’s decision about where
east hall 45

to live include cost, proximity to campus, and access to a kitchen, private bedroom, and adequate living space. The study showed that Webster currently has a shortfall of 42-123 beds on campus, which will grow to 167-288 beds by the 2016-2017 academic year. This demand is in addition to the 731 beds currently provided in on-campus housing. As the University grows toward its long term goals of 5,000 undergraduates, this demand will increase to 1,596–1,813 total beds on campus, or an addition of 865– 1,082 beds compared to today. The master plan incorporates the findings of the market and demand analysis, accommodating the recommended housing growth both on and near the core campus.

Webster village apartments

Overall Program
Stakeholder interviews, campus tours, space analysis, and Steering Committee meetings helped to refine a master plan program for the growth and enhancement of Webster’s campus. The plan includes building projects, landscape improvements, and building renovations that together meet Webster’s needs for increased academic space to accommodate undergraduate growth, provide better quality spaces, improved programmatic adjacencies, and provide greater support for student life and athletics needs. A tenet of the program is to improve interdisciplinary academics by creating buildings that bring together different programs and users. A critical component in accommodating the program requirements to meet current and future academic goals is the development of an approximately 80,000 square foot interdisciplinary sciences building that can provide state-of-the-art lab spaces as well as shared classrooms. Similarly, there is a need to replace the Visual Arts Studio and Annex. A new arts center totaling approximately 80,000 square feet that co-locates fine and performing arts is recommended in a renovated and expanded University Center. A new student center building, with integrated dining, is also recommended and includes 65,000 square feet total. A separate dining facility should also be provided near Webster’s on-campus housing in the south campus district. The long-term program requirements for recreation and athletics must be accomplished through a strategy that includes both oncampus and off-campus improvements. An on-campus recreation element is critical for recruitment and student athlete needs; however, given Webster’s limited land availability on its core campus, a
dining outside marletto’s

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A tenet of the program is to seek to improve interdisciplinary academics by creating buildings that bring together different programs and users.
combination of on and off-campus facilities is recommended in order to address both facility and field needs. The proposed oncampus recreation facility would be 110,000 square feet, maximizing available land on Webster’s campus for this use and containing a competition gym, large multipurpose gym, indoor jogging track, fitness and strength training space, multipurpose studios, supporting offices, locker rooms, and sports medicine. Fields must be located off-campus due to space requirements and supported by an additional fieldhouse on the site. The fields should include two softball fields, two to four rectangular synthetic fields, a practice baseball field, a four hundred meter track with field events space, and eight to ten tennis courts. The associated 95,000 square foot field house should contain locker rooms, strength training and a two hundred meter track. Housing is a key driver of the master plan. A goal of Webster University is to expand and diversify its on-campus housing choices. The master plan can amply accommodate the projected housing demand of 865–1,082 net additional beds.

Renovations and Re-use
While the University plans for new buildings, Webster will also invest in its existing buildings to improve the quality of spaces and better meet its future needs. The Sverdrup Building will undergo renovations to expand the School of Communications and add additional general classrooms. An interdisciplinary arts building should also be created by renovating and expanding the University Center. This arts center would bring together visual and performing arts in an 80,000 square foot building. Additionally, renovations of the University’s older buildings—Webster Hall, Loretto Hall, the Thompson Building, the H.Sam Priest Center, and the Pearson House—should continue. During renovations, programs can be re-located to bring together administrative and student services in one place. An expansion for the Loretto-Hilton Center lobby is being studied concurrently with the master plan. It would provide additional lobby space as well as office space within an expansion to the Loretto-Hilton Center. New acquisitions also require investment. The Luhr building is envisioned as interim swing space in the short term. In the long term, uses under consideration include administrative support groups that do not have to be sited on the core campus. A proposed use for the Wehrli Center includes the Alumni Affairs offices and services.

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sverdrup building

luhr Building

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master plan framework

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living/ learning student center interdisciplinary sciences

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arts garage athletics/ recreation housing

Preferred Plan Overall View

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Vision
Webster University’s master plan establishes an exciting vision for the campus that is rooted in the academic, student life, and global missions of the institution; that employs innovative approaches to sustainable and sensitive growth; and that reinforces a strong landscape and visual identity for the campus.
The vision relies on the successful coordination of multiple planning frameworks including land and building use, campus landscape, and access and circulation. Collectively, these frameworks provide the foundation for a unified and comprehensive master plan that reinforces the values and goals of the University and creates varied and rich learning environments.

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Land Use and Building Program Framework
The future land and building use framework responds to the existing patterns of use that are occurring on Webster’s campus today. It emphasizes the need to reinforce the campus’ compact and walkable nature and introduces more mixed use districts to support a lively, active campus environment. At the long-term realization of the plan, the Webster campus would contain over 1.3 million total square feet of academic, administrative, student life, support, housing, and athletics/ recreation space, an increase from today’s inventory of approximately 720,000 square feet. This expansion will develop over time and will help the University meet its goals to increase enrollment and provide quality academic and student life experiences. The major campus districts and their components are summarized below.

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housing / retail

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living/ learning

student center

interdisciplinary sciences

lobby expansion

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the long term vision of webster university, viewed from the south

The block comprised of Webster Hall, Loretto Hall, Marletto’s, the Winifred Moore Auditorium, and the Facilities building will continue to serve as a mixed use district and Webster’s ceremonial front door. This district also includes the Luhr building and the Wehrli Center. The mix of uses in the historic Webster Hall provides a good precedent for future campus development of this campus district. Webster has already begun to create a onestop-service location for students in the renovated first floor of Webster Hall. The master plan recommends that this student services hub be expanded to include Academic Advising and Career Services from the Garden Park Plaza garage and the Registrar from Loretto Hall. The University’s property north of East Lockwood Avenue is envisioned as a second administrative center and possibly community center across East Lockwood from the Webster Hall block. Campus uses that are under consideration for this property are being carefully selected to minimize impact on the neighborhood. The Luhr building would serve multiple important uses for the University. In the near term, it would provide critical swing space as other space is renovated. The long term vision for the Luhr building is to house administrative offices or services that do not require a core campus location. The University is also interested in engaging with the Webster Groves Community to develop University/City collaborative initiatives that might be located in the Luhr building.

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housing single-family houses

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webster university Future building use
Academic Student Life/Dining Library Sports and Recreation Community Academic/Community Administrative Admin./academic/ community Parking Facility Facilities Retail Residential LIving/learning facility

living/ learning
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lobby expansion

the future student center and interdisciplinary sciences building flank a new east quadrangle.

East Quad
Two campus districts located on the east and west sides of Edgar Road comprise the academic and student life core of Webster’s campus. The future development of Webster’s east academic district—an area bounded by Big Bend Boulevard, Edgar Road, and Garden Avenue—will be truly transformative for the campus experience. Already, the addition of the East Academic Building has created a new academic center of gravity on campus, balancing the academic uses located in Sverdrup Hall and Webster Hall. The master plan recommends landscape improvements, a new student center, a new interdisciplinary sciences building, and a living learning district in the East Quad that will complement the existing academic and community uses on this block to create a vibrant, memorable area of Webster’s campus.

lab lab support office building core/ services horizontal circulation vertical circulation classroom/ auditorium/ learning commons

At ground level, the Interdisciplinary Sciences Building contains Classrooms/Auditorium or Learning Commons

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the east academic quad, viewed from the northwest

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Dining or a small cafe will activate the edgar road corner of the new student center.

The future building uses on the East Quad will center on a new, iconic landscaped quadrangle that is framed by significant academic, student life, and community buildings and enlivened by the students, faculty, staff, and community members, who have new reasons to frequent this campus area. The east landscape will open up to Edgar Road to the west, providing visual and physical continuity between the east and the western sides of campus. The East Quad is envisioned as both a single, continuous open space and a series of “outdoor rooms,” intimately-scaled landscape zones that are programmed according to the specific building uses each addresses. A proposed new student center would create a campus crossroads at the intersection of Big

Bend Boulevard and Edgar Road. The student center will have welcoming, transparent façades along Edgar Road and the new East Quad. Its design will sensitively transition the topographical changes. The student center is envisioned to include a 6,000 square foot dining hall, large campus-wide function spaces, small meeting rooms, study lounges, and student offices, ensuring that the building brings together multiple users on campus at all times of day. The Multi-Cultural Center, Health Services and Counseling offices would move into the student center, opening up land south of Garden Avenue for additional parking or future development. Development of the student center would require relocation of the Thompson Carriage House, which will be re-

located east of the Thompson Music house to create a pairing of these historic buildings. A second major building project on the East Quad is a new interdisciplinary sciences building that will contain state-of-the-art science labs, smart classrooms, offices, and student study space. The interdisciplinary sciences building will frame the northern edge of the East Quad and will be designed in collaboration with the faculty of the departments that will be located there to include active and flexible classrooms, offices, labs, and study space programmed along the southern façade. The building will have space for a large learning commons or auditorium at its western end. Together with the new East Academic Building that houses the business

and technology programs, a strong academic presence will be created on the East Quad. As science labs move out of Webster’s ground floor, space will open up for more student services. The upper floors of Webster Hall will be renovated for growth of the School of Education. Over time, as dining needs are accommodated in new sites, Marletto’s can be re-used for administrative growth. The Loretto-Hilton Center and the Community Music School will anchor the southern side of the East Quad to welcome members of the local, national, and international communities onto Webster’s campus. A study for expansion of the lobby of the Loretto-Hilton Center is underway. This would create an architectural expansion along the northern façade of the building. Future pedestrian improvements will create clear pedestrian paths from the parking garage across Garden Avenue to the northern side of the Loretto Hilton Center to help visitors access the building. A goal of the master plan is to create multiple, varied housing districts that serve different ages and types of students. This strategy will help students progress through increasing levels of responsibility and maturity during their years on the campus. In the long term, the East Quad should include livinglearning communities for upper-division students. These centers would co-locate classrooms, study and social spaces, academic departments, and student housing and would be designed in close collaboration with the faculty of the departments that will be located in the centers.

55’ Meeting Room 57 3rd floor

Offices

165’

career services

2nd floor

function space

student clubs

multi-cultural center

lounge space food service 1st floor kitchen / storage entry lobby

West Quad
Today, the west academic district contains many of the most visited and well-used buildings on Webster’s campus. The Emerson Library is revered as a campus heart; the Sverdrup Building contains a high concentration of classroom activity; and the
student center
cafe/ dining area function room office / activities space

cafe / dining area

circulation storage / kitchen

South Housing District
University Center serves multiple purposes for dining, fitness, and student gatherings. The master plan reinforces this vibrant district with proposed new buildings and renovations and improvements to the landscapes that enliven it today. Two academic anchors are located in this area: the School of Communications and the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts in a proposed new arts center. Sverdrup will accommodate the expansion of the School of Communications, allowing the Communications Annex to be demolished so that its site can serve interim parking needs and future development needs. A proposed renovation and expansion to the existing University Center Building would provide a new home for the Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts. This project would involve removal of the natatorium and interior renovations to the gymnasium and previous student center spaces to become visual arts, music and theater studios, classrooms, offices and support space. An addition on the northern edge of the building would create a new, iconic entrance for the building that embraces both the interior landscaped quad and Edgar Road. Transparent, open architecture and active programming, such as University galleries, would enliven the addition. The arts renovation project would allow the Visual Arts Studios and Visual Arts Annex to be demolished and would allow dance studios to move out of Old Orchard Center. A new housing and retail project could be developed on the Old Orchard site. Additionally, the Arts building would include the Music School, relocated from the Thompson House, and the Community Music School’s administrative offices, relocated from a small building south of Garden Avenue. The southern district of campus will continue to serve as the main housing district on campus. New residence halls will enable a diversity of housing types that can meet student needs from first-year students to advancing upper-division students. Dining will be integrated into the southern district with the campus’ second and primary dining service facility located at the highly visible Edgar Road and Garden Avenue intersection. A proposed 8,000 square foot dining facility would work together with the large dining facility in the Student Center to meet campus dining needs. Its location near student housing would help make the housing district full service and a social hub. East and West Halls will remain, and the Webster Village Apartments can be redeveloped into a campus community that can house up to 740 additional beds. Student lounges and gathering spaces will be located

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The new athletics and recreation center and renovated arts center add activity to the west quad.

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west hall

housing

housing

housing

dining

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arts
the south district will be redeveloped to accommodate a greater number of on-campus housing units.

Off Campus Sites
within each of the residential buildings. The new residence halls will include semi-suites, suites, and apartments, allowing a truly integrated housing community. The southern district of campus will also serve much of the future parking need on campus. The existing parking garage will be expanded to the east, accommodating 825900 additional parking spaces. Further, the relocation of uses from the four small houses west of the garage will allow those sites to be converted to an intensely landscaped parking lot which will achieve one hundred additional parking spaces and incorporate sustainability strategies such as pervious pavement and shade-giving canopy trees. While Webster University can accomplish many of its goals within its existing campus footprint, strategic off-site developments are also recommended. The Old Orchard Shopping Center, located within the heart of the Old Orchard Shopping District, offers a great opportunity to create a mixed use development with retail at ground level and upper-classmen or graduate housing above. Redevelopment of this site will allow the chance for the project to provide a better pedestrian environment with active uses along the street edge and parking integrated at the rear of the development. Additionally, Webster University does not have enough open land on its Webster Groves campus to meet its needs for recreation and athletics fields on-site. Several sites were toured as part of the master plan study; however, a single site has not yet been selected. As future opportunities arise, the University should assess their ability to meet the program needs outlined in chapter three of this plan.

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Although it is a compact campus, Webster offers a diverse landscape with many different types of open spaces. The campus landscape can be characterized by several open space typologies that include a variety of open spaces. These open space types can be understood in the following categories: ›› Campus-City Streets ›› Foreground Landscapes ›› Main Quads ›› Academic Gathering Spaces ›› Residential Courtyards ›› Parking Gardens

Edgar Road

Hazel Av

As Webster University develops into a more densely built out campus over the coming decades, landscape will play an important role in shaping the campus environment, reinforcing Webster’s campus identity and creating a unique sense of place. While each landscape should express its identity as an individual space, each should also contribute as part of a clear and coordinated open space system that enriches the overall campus experience. The Webster master plan conceives of the campus open space as a ‘working landscape,’ an integrated environment that fosters learning and innovation, creates attractive and comfortable spaces, and embraces an aesthetic that integrates sustainability into the campus design. The campus open space serves as an extension of the University’s educational environment, embracing academic values and utilizing the entire campus as a living laboratory.

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Open Space and Landscape Framework

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East Quad
While each of these landscape types is defined in detail in the landscape design guidelines, the enhancement of several campus landscapes will be integral to the master plan. A new East Quad is envisioned to form a central gathering space and give definition to future development of the east campus. This significant campus landscape is already framed to the south and east by the existing East Academic Building, Loretto-Hilton Center, and Community Music School. The development of the new interdisciplinary sciences building and proposed student center will define the northern edge. The East Quad will open up to Edgar Road to the west, providing visual and physical continuity between the east and the west sides of campus.

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the future east campus quadrangle

The East Quad is envisioned as a single, continuous open space that is further defined in smaller quadrants, or “outdoor rooms“ by the specific buildings and uses it addresses. For example, the Loretto-Hilton Center currently uses the garden to its north as a staging ground for pre-show picnics and gatherings. The landscape associated with this area of the quad will continue to serve this purpose with a small terrace nestled into a stand of canopy trees that can accommodate small outdoor concerts, receptions, or provide areas for quiet daytime study in an intimately scaled setting. The zone of the East Quad south of the proposed new student center will be designed to promote student gatherings and will be a

central part of the campus. A gracious set of terraced lawn steps defined by stone or concrete seat walls will descend slowly from the East Quad down to the level of Edgar Road. The flow of the stairs will enable pedestrian circulation, connect the east and west sides of Edgar Road, and provide a setting for informal gatherings. Finally, a thickly planted grove of trees at the east end of the quad will provide a quiet, contemplative outdoor landscape to encourage studying or enable outdoor classrooms that relate to the academic buildings adjacent to it. Another significant landscape in the East Quad is the plaza in the courtyard next to the

H. Sam Priest Center. This courtyard is designed to have a hardscape plaza featuring a compass rose at its center. The compass rose is surrounded by unadorned lawn areas with groupings of deciduous trees. This plaza will complement the intimate residential scale of the historic buildings at the northern edge of this quad and will provide space for small outdoor gatherings appropriate to the residential uses surrounding it.

West Quad
With the addition of an arts center and a new athletics and recreation complex, the design and functionality of the West Quad will continue to be important for Webster’s campus. Design improvements on the West Quad will strive to maintain its openness and will help to further unify this district. Pathways between buildings will be reoriented to clearly connect building entrances and provide logical connections between the buildings that frame the West Quad. The landscape of the West Quad will be designed to have specialized landscapes integrated with the entrances to the buildings surrounding it. With the realization of a new athletics and recreation facility in the southwest corner, the University has the opportunity to introduce an outdoor rubber plaza that will extend athletic activities to the outdoors and connect the new athletic facility to the West Quad. The rubber plaza can be used for outdoor classes or informal practices. Similarly, a tailored landscape is envisioned to mark the outdoor space surrounding the future arts center in a transformed University Center. A small grove of trees between the athletics and recreation facility and the new arts center would allow for quiet study or integration of a sculpture garden.

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athletics and recreation sverdrup

arts

Emerson Library

the west quad, viewed from edgar road

Design improvements on the West Quad will strive to maintain its openness and will help to further unify this district.

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housing

south residential district landscapes

South Residential District Landscapes
The south district will be primarily devoted to on-campus residential uses, supported by a proposed new dining facility and expanded surface and garage parking. The Opera Theatre of Saint Louis office and practice building will remain as well. The landscapes designed for this district respond to the predominant residential character of the district. A proposed outdoor dining plaza at the corner of Edgar Road and Garden Avenue can be an important gathering space for the University, bringing together resident students from the south housing district and commuter students walking from the parking garage to classes or the library. Informal tree plantings, low seat walls, and movable furniture would define this outdoor dining area to provide a flexible space that is shaded from the sun. A series of small, residential courtyards will be integrated within the system of new residential buildings. Open lawn areas framed by new residential halls will be planted with a few large deciduous trees that are appropriately scaled for the individual spaces, provide shade and space for informal passive recreation and offer visual interest. As offices are relocated from the small houses in the residential district, this area off of Garden Avenue will be transformed to a larger surface parking lot to provide needed parking for both the Loretto-Hilton Center community patrons and University members. The surface lot should be designed to be a sustainable ‘parking garden’ with rows of trees and integrated stormwater management features to provide shade, environmental benefits, and improved appearance. The treatment of Garden Avenue will also impact perception of this district, and the streetscape should be conceived of as an important campus landscape. A coordinated effort by the City of Webster Groves and Webster University can transform Garden Avenue to a tree-lined, walkable street.

Edgar Roa d

Circulation and Parking
The master plan clarifies the organization of vehicular and pedestrian circulation on campus, resulting in a friendlier, walkable pedestrian environment. The landscape and campus design rationalize pedestrian pathways to connect building entrances, provide clear connections between campus districts, and encourage streetscape improvements. Parking has been largely re-located from the campus core to surface lots or garages at the periphery in order to limit pedestrian-vehicular conflicts.

Parking
Parking demand and supply were projected for the future full build-out development of the Webster University campus master plan. Parking demand was tested and compared based on both the amount of gross square footage and the total population proposed on campus, and the larger number was used. The parking space demand that is estimated at full development of the master plan and at attainment of undergraduate enrollment growth goals is 2,075 total spaces. The master plan achieves the estimated demand for parking spaces, as well as an additional 5%. This results in 2,179 total parking spaces at final development. Webster University currently has 1,775 parking spaces on campus, so the requirement represents an increase in 404 parking spaces. In addition, several existing surface lots internal to campus will be re-developed to accommodate program growth, and these spaces will need to be replaced. Through the addition of new surface lots and an expansion to the parking garage, the master plan accommodates 2,179 spaces on cam-

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primary road second road existing surface lot proposed surface lot existing parking garage proposed parking garage proposed underground parking on-street parking

pus. If desired, additional parking spaces could also be captured through the reconfiguration of existing lots to be more efficient. Expansion of the existing parking garage to the east will enable 825 to 900 more parking spaces. In addition, it is estimated that 220 parking spaces could be constructed under the proposed recreation center due to the existing topography on the site. A new landscaped surface lot west of the garage will provide 145 spaces that are conveniently located for the Loretto-Hilton Center patrons and for temporary use by students in the south residential halls. Additionally, 187 spaces are provided within the Old Orchard site redevelopment for both retail and residential use.

›› Incentives to encourage biking, car-pooling, or transit use ›› Policy changes related to parking permits on campus, allowances for on-campus residences, or parking fee structures. For Webster, a shuttle service could be contracted by Webster University or coordinated with the St. Louis Metro. A shuttle service could provide an improved connection between the Webster University campus and the Shrewsbury and/or Sunnen Metrolink Stations, improving the campus usage of the Metro transit network. A campus shuttle service could also provide service to off-campus parking (for example, the Deer Creek Shopping Center). For a compact campus like Webster, remote parking may alleviate parking demand on core

charge application and/or membership fees to users or service providers. The University can also offer incentives to students and staff to use alternative transportation. To encourage biking, the University will provide convenient bike racks on campus and coordinate with the surrounding cities and counties to identify and advocate for bike routes to the campus. Along the identified routes, bike lanes or paths can be evaluated to encourage biking and improve safety. The University can also provide incentives for carpooling or transit use by providing reserved parking spaces or adjusted parking rates for car-pool participants and subsidized transit passes.
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Transportation Demand Management
In addition to ensuring that adequate parking is provided on campus, Webster University can also implement transportation demand management strategies to help relieve demand on parking and provide students and staff with alternatives to driving to campus. Transportation demand management (TDM) is the application of strategies and policies to reduce travel demand, specifically single-occupancy private vehicles, or to redistribute this demand in space or in time. Parking is expensive to provide, and managing demand can be a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable alternative to increasing capacity. A demand management approach also has the potential to deliver improved public health and stronger communities. Transportation demand management strategies recommended for potential implementation by Webster University include the following: ›› Shuttle service linked to St. Louis transit or to off-site parking facilities ›› Car-sharing services

The master plan clarifies the organization of vehicular and pedestrian circulation on campus, resulting in a friendlier, walkable pedestrian environment.
campus land and offer a more economical, efficient solution in the future. The shuttle service could also provide a connection to off-campus sporting events for athletes and students. Car-sharing services are prominent on many campuses and in urban areas. These services allow members to reserve a shared vehicle for a short period of time and price. Car-sharing can reduce the amount of parking needed by providing students and staff an alternative to bringing their personal car to campus. To implement this program, Webster University would need to provide dedicated parking spaces for the car-sharing vehicles and may

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The campus master plan was examined for utility infrastructure requirements in both early phases and long term scenarios. New utility configurations and routes for the final plan have been established, and critical issues have been identified. On Webster’s existing campus, there are existing utility mains that would prove expensive or difficult to relocate. These locations include the campus road east of the East Academic Building, Hazel Avenue, which runs south through the housing district, and a west to east corridor that runs from West campus (at Edgar Road) and the Catalina Neighborhood to the retention basin. To minimize costs, the master plan has preserved these corridors and used them for landscape areas or campus roads.

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Critical Utilities Issues
Webster University’s electric service is currently operating at capacity. This is a critical issue that must be further investigated with Ameren, the local electricity provider, and resolved to enable the first phase of development to move ahead. As part of the master plan process, conversations with Ameren revealed that major investments will need to be made in order to meet future electricity demand. These investments could include either construction of a new customer substation or a move to 34.5 kilovolt (kV) service distributed in a loop through campus with new transformers that can handle the 34.5 kV service. A new substation is likely to be more land intensive, although both will require space on campus. The long term planning and engineering needed to expand electric service should take place soon, allowing the demolition and construction required for these service changes to progress with minimum disruption to the campus.

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future utility line locations

Gas sanitary

water upgraded 8” water lines

Webster University’s electric service is currently operating at capacity. The long term planning and engineering needed to expand electric service should take place soon, allowing the demolition and construction required for these service changes to progress with minimum disruption to the campus.

Future Utilities Investments
The master plan includes demolition of several smaller houses and buildings across the campus. Underground utility connection survey data to these small houses is incomplete at this time. After demolition of these buildings, the underground water, natural gas, and sanitary sewer lines serving them should be abandoned or removed as necessary. New connections to future buildings should be made from existing mains or lines in the vicinity. The south housing district will require infrastructure investment as it develops. A reconfiguration and update to the existing underground utilities serving the residential housing district will be necessary with redevelopment of this site. A reconfigured water loop, new sanitary sewer and new gas lines will be required. There are also a variety of storm sewer connections and pipes winding through the area that should be consolidated and improved as new development comes on. On the east campus block, underground utilities that connect to the Loretto-Hilton Center, Community Music School and East Academic Building can remain in place, since there are few proposed changes to infrastructure in this southern portion of the block. However, the northern portion of the block with the future interdisciplinary sciences building, student center, and student housing will require investment. A new sanitary sewer collection system for the Interdisciplinary Sciences Building and the new residential district on the northeast side of East Campus will empty into an existing 8” sanitary stub-out that was installed during recent construction of the East Academic Building and has adequate room for future growth. Sanitary service for the Student Center will be provided by connecting to the existing sanitary main along Edgar Road.

Storm Sewers and Management
The stormwater management system for Webster University consists of a network of underground pipes that outlet to a large retention basin at the southeast end of campus near Interstate 44. The south retention basin is currently sized to detain and treat the current amount of runoff produced on campus and cannot be expanded further due to geometric constraints. Future storm detention must be accomplished on a per-development basis to maintain the permitted outflow rates from the south retention basin. To achieve this, each project will utilize greener solutions to slow, detain, and treat runoff on-site. Strategies include bioretention, pervious pavement, green roofs, rainwater harvesting, infiltration basins, and disconnection/buffer approaches. With increased density of building development, roof drainage is a large contributor to peak runoff flow, and measures must be taken to reduce the amount of flow that goes directly in the stormwater management system. The proposed interdisciplinary sciences building, residence halls, recreation/athletics center, and student center could incorporate green roof panels into their design to mitigate runoff. Green roofs are effective at decreasing the total amount of runoff and slowing the rate by encouraging absorption and transpiration.

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Phasing Strategy
The master plan provides recommendations, including a phasing strategy and design guidelines, to direct incremental change at Webster University over the next two decades.
At final development, the master plan accommodates over 1.3 million square feet of total space, nearly doubling the amount of space that is located in the University’s existing buildings today. The master plan was planned so that this growth can occur flexibly over time. Many factors may influence the exact sequence for development of the proposed facilities and landscape improvements, so a detailed timeline for full implementation is not provided. The master plan did, however, help the University community identify priority projects that form the basis for a near term development plan. As these near term projects and future projects come to fruition, they will follow the architectural and landscape guidelines set forth in this chapter to ensure that future campus development reflects the high quality design and execution that Webster desires.

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Interdisciplinary sciences building 1-stop shopping renovations Renovate Luhr for Administrative/ Academic/Community Spaces

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surface parking demo of communications annex

Renovate Wehrli for Alumni Affairs

Near Term Development
Although it is only the first step toward realization of the master plan, the near term development plan will be transformative for the campus setting. This first phase includes implementation of the interdisciplinary sciences building, the East Quad, continuing renovations of Webster Hall and the Sverdrup Building, renovation of the Luhr building and the Wehrli Center, and parking improvements. The early implementation of the interdisciplinary sciences building will solve critical space deficits that the University is experiencing in its science labs. It will also provide a new place for interdisciplinary learning to occur among different departments. Student study space and lounges will be integrated within the building to address the existing deficit in study space outside of the library. The interdisciplinary sciences building will also help give shape to the landscape framework on the East Quad. Its east-west orientation will define the northern edge of the East Quad, which can be constructed in the first development phase too. As the East Quad becomes increasingly a part of the daily life of Webster students, with the new East Academic Building and future interdisciplinary sciences building, the landscape will become an important gathering space for the campus. The near term development phase also builds on ideas that already have momentum on campus. The University has recently renovated the first floor of Webster Hall, where many student services are concentrated. As departments in the College of Arts and Sciences move into the new interdisciplinary sciences building, space will open up in Webster Hall on the ground and upper levels. The lower level space should be renovated in the same manner as the first floor to locate all student services in a single one-stop-shopping destination. This would allow Academic Advising and Career Services to vacate space in the garage and the Registrar to relocate from Loretto Hall. Similarly, the University is undertaking renovations in the Sverdrup Building to allow the School of Communications to expand within the building. This will allow the entire school to be located within the building, and the small Communication Annex can be demolished.

Housing Business Plan
A key driver of the master plan is the University’s goal to grow and diversify its oncampus housing component. To ensure that the housing strategy is feasible, financially sound, and has the correct mix of housing types to meet demand, a Campus Housing Business Plan was conducted in coordination with the master plan. The business plan recommends a phasing strategy to meet immediate housing demand and to grow oncampus units in five year increments for the next fifteen years.

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Although it is only the first step toward realization of the master plan, the near term development plan will be transformative for the Webster University campus.
The first phase of development generates an increased demand of twenty-four additional parking spaces. Additionally, construction of the interdisciplinary sciences building will displace approximately half of the spaces located in the surface lot along Big Bend. The parking need that is created can be accommodated through two surface lots on campus. The demolition of the Communications Annex building will allow the lot west of the University center to be reconfigured more efficiently, gaining approximately twenty-five spaces. Additionally, the landscaped surface lot west of the garage can be implemented at this time and will provide one hundred spaces. To enable this to happen, three small houses must be demolished and their tenants temporarily or permanently relocated. The Multicultural Center and Counseling and Health Services can find temporary homes in available swing space in Webster Hall until the new Student Center is built. Alumni Affairs can relocate permanently into the Wehrli Center.

Future Opportunities
The master plan achieves significant growth within Webster’s existing property ownership. Other opportunities may arise in the future as we continue our strategic partnership with Eden Theological Seminary. As these opportunities arise, both institutions will work closely with the City of Webster Groves in the CUP processes to ensure that uses are consistent with those historically located on the properties. The University will do the same with any other opportunities that arise in the future.

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a strong relationship between landscape and architecture at emerson library

Design Guidelines Strategy
The design guidelines ensure that campus buildings and spaces support Webster University’s core values toward students, learning, diversity, and global citizenship.
The following architectural and landscape design guidelines are intended to assist the University in achieving a cohesive, sustainable campus environment as it implements the master plan. These guidelines will assist the Webster University Design Review Committee as it reviews and evaluates future projects. The Committee will help ensure that campus buildings and spaces support the University’s core values toward students, learning, diversity, and global citizenship. The guidelines provide direction for high quality design and support responsible use of energy and natural resources. They recognize and draw from the contextual character of Webster Groves, Eden Theological Seminary and existing Webster University architecture, all of which are made up of rich and diverse architectural fabric and landscape patterns.

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Landscape Guidelines

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the west quad landscape, today

Landscape Typologies
The campus landscape can be characterized by several open space typologies. The landscape design guidance that follows provides a general design direction for the various landscape types on the Webster campus. The master plan identifies a series of distinct open spaces typologies that help define and enrich the campus experience. They can be understood in the following categories: ›› Campus-City Streets ›› Main Quads ›› Gathering Spaces ›› Foreground Landscapes ›› Residential Courtyards ›› Parking Gardens (landscaped surface parking lots)

Campus-City Streets
Working with the City of Webster Groves, the University can help to improve the character and pedestrian environment of four major streets traversing the campus: Garden Avenue, Edgar Road, Big Bend Boulevard, and East Lockwood Avenue.

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Garden Avenue
Over time, a coordinated effort by both the City of Webster Groves and Webster University can transform Garden Avenue into a canopied avenue. This central street should indicate a more distinctive entry to the campus, appropriate to the community and residential uses along it. While Garden Avenue is currently planted in some areas, there are gaps in the canopy and the overall consistency. The street should be lined with large-sized deciduous canopy trees on both sides wherever possible. It is recommended to plant the trees in a ‘verge’ that separates the sidewalk from the street to define Garden Avenue spatially as a continuous corridor, provide a sense of scale, and create a unified appearance. Uniform rows of trees, ideally of the same species, are recommended to minimize the existing variations among building setbacks, alignment, materials and style. The tree verge, preferably six feet wide where possible, should be planted with lawn or groundcover, or receive pea stone or decomposed granite paving when a more walkable, yet permeable surface is important.

Streetscapes should support a comfortable, safe pedestrian environment.

Garden Avenue divides Edgar Road into a north and south section. The character of the road should reflect the active uses located along it, including the Emerson Library, University Center, residential dining, and Loretto-Hilton Center. Improvements along Edgar Road can be phased with new development projects. Concurrent with implementation of a new dining commons and residential district in the south campus, the east side of Edgar Road south of Garden Avenue should be replanted with a compact row of large deciduous trees to frame the street. These trees should be planted on both sides to create a spatial corridor that provides a sense of scale and a shaded, pedestrian-friendly environment. Similar to Garden Avenue, the trees should be centered in a six foot wide ‘verge’ that is planted with lawn or groundcover or paved with peastone or decomposed granite if a walkable, yet permeable, surface is required. The segment of Edgar Road that is north of Garden Avenue is a highly visible thoroughfare that links the East and West Quads. It is paramount that the treatment of the visual

and physical connections across this section of Edgar Road be designed to effectively accommodate traffic and pedestrians. To complement the trees that are already planted along the Loretto-Hilton Center drop-off driveway, a single row of large deciduous canopy trees should be planted on the west side of Edgar Road so that the street is framed on both sides. In the section of Edgar Road between the library and Sverdrup, a generous set of steps and planted terraces descends from the West Quad, opening up the quad to Edgar Road and creating a clear connection to the east campus. This length of Edgar Road should not be planted and remain open so that it establishes a strong visual connection across the street to the newly configured East Quad and future set of terraced lawn steps. Along the proposed new student center at Big Bend Boulevard, Edgar Road should be lined with a single row of trees on both sides to frame the street and create a sense of enclosure before the street widens and opens up to Big Bend Boulevard.

Edgar Road
As a campus and city thoroughfare, Edgar Road is one of the most frequently experienced campus open spaces, by both Webster University and the broader community. Its design should reflect the intensity of use and centrality to campus life.

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Design of the east quad should respond to the uses surrounding it.

Big Bend Boulevard
The streetscape along Big Bend Boulevard is lined with canopy trees that are planted informally. Big Bend Boulevard is both a major vehicular road and a highly used pedestrian crossing. Future improvements to the streetscape, crossings, or roadway should balance the safety and passageway of both vehicles and pedestrians. Avenue will continue to serve the dual purpose of both moving traffic through the city, and of providing safe passage for pedestrians. Future improvements should consider ways to balance the needs of both vehicles and pedestrians. athletics and recreation complex to the west and the Sverdrup Building to the north. The design intent for the West Quad is to maintain its openness and the character of simple tree plantings in a large lawn. Existing trees will be protected to the greatest extent, unless they coincide with proposed walkways connecting the surrounding academic buildings. If trees must be removed, they will be relocated if feasible. The future plantings for the West Quad area should consist of large and medium size deciduous trees that are appropriately scaled to the larger size of the space. New trees should be strategically placed to preserve the

Main Quads
Two main academic quadrangles define the campus: the current West Quad framed by Sverdrup, the University Center and the library, and the future East Quad.

East Lockwood Avenue
East Lockwood Avenue serves as the formal “front door” for the campus. A mature tree canopy along the streetscape and within the interior landscape creates an elegant corridor and a memorable threshold to the University. Similar to Big Bend Boulevard, East Lockwood

West Quad
The West Quad is framed by the library and the future arts center to the east, the new

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future landscape improvements in the west quad should preserve existing trees.

open character and allow for long views across the West Quad. Small ornamental trees and shrubs should not be planted in the open lawn. If ornamental trees are to be used, they will be located in groups at the edges of the space outside the central lawn area. To add seasonal interest, the deciduous trees used for the west quad can be selected for autumn coloring effects.

East Quad
The master plan envisions a second large quad space at the core of the East campus. The East Quad is envisioned as one continuous open space that contains three distinct sublandscapes that relate to each other, yet respond in their character and function to the varying building uses along the East Quad. In front of the Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts, the East Quad currently has a park-like character defined by mature specimen trees planted in an open lawn. The

design intent is to preserve the character of this open space so that it continues to complement the functional needs of the adjacent music building and theater, and still allows for day-to-day passive recreation. A small terrace is proposed that will be nestled into a stand of existing and newly planted canopy trees close to the theater entrance. This terrace will be intimately scaled to accommodate small outdoor concerts or recitals, as well as receptions or outdoor gatherings. Existing mature canopy trees will be protected, and large deciduous canopy trees will be added where appropriate to foster the character of this open space. The landscape in front of the Community Music School is envisioned as an open lawn that visually connects the two sides of the East Quad with an open expanse that allows for active informal recreation. At the far eastern end of the West Quad, the master plan envisions a grove of trees that

clearly defines the outdoor space framed by the future Interdisciplinary Sciences building and the East Academic building. Large deciduous trees of a single species should be planted on a regular grid. This geometric array of trees will create a well-defined space underneath its canopy that can be used for passive recreation, outdoor study or teaching. Moveable seating should be installed for flexible arrangements. The grove is intended to add to the richness of experiences on the East Quad, as well as the overall network of campus open spaces.

Gathering Spaces
In addition to the two main quads, there are several smaller open spaces throughout campus that are proposed for outdoor gathering such as dining, studying, relaxing and informal passive or active recreation. These include the dining plaza, the open-air commuter lounge, the athletic rubber plaza,

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gathering spaces should allow outdoor dining and studying. (Georgia institute of technology, georgia)

the lawn terrace will connect the east quad to edgar road. (Bates college, Maine)

and the lawn terrace on east Edgar Road. These spaces are human-scaled and provide a more intimate landscape setting for the campus population.

Dining Plaza
With the implementation of the future residential dining commons at the corner of Edgar Road and Garden Avenue, the University has the opportunity to add a larger plaza to its network of open spaces. The dining plaza is envisioned for outdoor dining for the neighboring resident students and as an informal gathering place for the entire University community. A hardscape plaza with special paving adjacent to the dining facility transitions into peastone or lawn areas (extending toward the bordering streets) that should be planted informally with medium and large deciduous trees to provide shade and a comfortable human-scale environment. Low seat walls

and moveable furniture, such as chairs and benches, underneath the trees will help enliven the space outside the dining commons and invite people to linger, enjoy outdoor dining, meet, study or relax in a habitable and inviting environment. The single row of street trees along Edgar Road and Garden Avenue should transition to a double allée along the public walkway to shelter and frame the dining plaza.

Open-Air Commuter Lounge
The open space just north of the existing commuter lounge at the northern end of the Sverdrup Building must better mediate the level change between the sidewalk and the building, as well as acknowledge its location at the highly frequented intersection of Edgar Road and Big Bend Boulevard (by both cars and pedestrians). The master plan envisions a series of lawn terraces with seating steps that are centered on a patio adjacent to the commuter lounge in Sverdrup, creating a more usable outdoor space at this gateway

location. The lawn steps gracefully make the transition from the sidewalk to the north and along Edgar Road to the commuter lounge patio, creating a sunken plaza with an intimate character. In addition to the existing trees, a few medium and large size deciduous canopy trees are appropriate here to provide visual interest, shade, comfort and scale, as well as to help shelter the sunken terrace from the surrounding traffic along Big Bend Boulevard and Edgar Road.

Athletic Plaza
When the new athletics and recreation facility in the southwest corner of the west campus is implemented, the University has the opportunity to introduce an outdoor rubber plaza that will extend athletic activities to the outdoors and create an active, open space connection between the new athletic facility and the central green of the West Quad. The rubber plaza can be used for outdoor classes or informal recreation, providing a counter-

point to the West Quad which is intended mainly for passive recreation. Adjacent to the rubber plaza, a small grove of medium-sized deciduous trees links the athletic facility with the new arts center. The grove should be planted in a peastone surface and furnished with moveable furniture to invite and encourage informal gatherings or outdoor studying for the entire campus community.

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Lawn Terrace
The lawn terrace is the symbolic counterpart to the library steps and planted terraces along west Edgar Road, connecting the east with the west campus. The lawn steps should be defined by stone or concrete seat walls and gracefully negotiate the significant grade change from the East Quad down to Edgar Road where they meet an open lawn area. The steps are intended for passive recreation and to provide a gathering space at the junction between east and west campus. With the open lawn area as a stage, the lawn terrace is intended to be used for outdoor classes and small performances alike. While it is primarily envisioned as a campus open space, the lawn steps should be open to public use by the community for small theater or music performances given its proximity to the Loretto-Hilton Center and the Community Music School. The lawn steps should have a predominantly open character to foster the visual connection between East and West Quads; however, to provide an appropriate sense of scale and visual accents, the steps should be planted with light canopy or upright tree species such as honey locust, gingko, or birches.

mature trees mark the front lawn along e. lockwood avenue.

Foreground Landscapes (Perimeter Landscapes)
The foreground landscapes are typically existing landscapes at the edges of the campus that connect and buffer the University both visually and physically with the surrounding neighborhoods of Webster Groves. The overall objective for the foreground landscapes is to enhance the character of the existing landscapes, and - where necessary - unify the treatment of remnant landscapes to present a positive image and a well-kept landscape for the campus. These spaces are often planted with gracious trees, or open lawns that allow views to iconic buildings.

or lawn, have the proper size to match the scale of Webster Hall and allow for a graceful visual and actual transition from the street up to the building entry. The dense canopy creates a threshold for the campus and at the same time provides a sense of scale along East Lockwood Avenue. The mature tree canopy will be protected, and trees that are in poor condition will be pruned or replaced with new trees to establish a replacement generation. The replacement planting will consist of large deciduous trees to complement the character of the existing landscape.

Luhr Building
The open lawn with a few individual canopy trees in front of the Luhr building will be preserved. The lawn’s dramatic character creates a strong visual connection across East Lockwood Avenue between Webster Hall and this new extension of the campus. The lawn will be well maintained to preserve a positive image for Webster University, Eden

Webster Hall
The character of the landscape in front of Webster Hall on East Lockwood Avenue will be preserved and improved. The grand, mature trees, planted in simple planes of groundcover

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south residential district and courtyards

informal outdoor spaces. (St. Olaf College, minnesota)

Theological Seminary, and the Webster Groves community.

Additional Quad
The landscape south of the Winifred Moore Auditorium has a beautiful stand of mature canopy trees and the potential to become a small academic quad for the northern part of the campus; however, it lacks clear spatial definition. The existing canopy trees should be preserved, and complemented by a new, dense row of small trees or tall shrubs that screen the facilities parking lot and provide a spatial frame for the open space. The function of the small bioretention area will be maintained, but better integrated into the overall composition of the quad.

areas. The design intent is to preserve the natural, informal character of this landscape for its entire length along Big Bend Boulevard. The mature tree canopy will be protected, and old trees in poor condition will be pruned or, if necessary, removed and replaced by new trees to establish a replacement generation. The replacement planting will consist of large deciduous and evergreen trees that create visual richness, complement the existing landscape, and unify the appearance along Big Bend Boulevard.

identity for the residential quadrangles while adding to the overall diversity of the campus landscape network. The landscape for the housing in the east campus is envisioned as a series of formal courtyards that respond to the historic character of remaining buildings. The courtyard behind the interdisciplinary sciences building links academic with residential life and will provide outdoor spaces that can be used for both open-air teaching, as well as passive recreation. At the west end of the courtyard, a grove of medium sized deciduous trees creates a more intimate setting and mediates any difference in scale between academic and residential buildings. Due to the considerable grade change from east to west, lawn steps can be used to facilitate necessary transitions and at the same time provide seating directed toward the open lawn area to the east. The courtyard to the east of the H. Sam Priest Center will accommodate the already funded

Residential Courtyards
At full build-out, there will be two residential ‘districts’ on the core campus in addition to Maria Hall. One is in the east campus, north of the new interdisciplinary sciences building, and one is in the south campus across Garden Street from the Loretto-Hilton Center for the Performing Arts. The design objective for the residential districts is to foster a distinct

Big Bend Boulevard Landscape
The campus landscape along Big Bend Boulevard currently has a park-like character with individual or small groups of canopy trees planted informally in lawn or groundcover

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surface parking lots can be improved with plantings that help manage stormwater.

plaza featuring a compass rose at its center, surrounded by unadorned lawn areas with informal groupings of medium to large sized deciduous trees. This plaza provides a space for small outdoor gatherings, whereas the lawn areas invite informal passive recreation. The landscape for the housing in the south campus is envisioned as a series of informal courtyards. Open lawn areas planted with a few medium to large sized deciduous trees that are appropriately scaled for the individual spaces provide space for informal passive recreation and offer visual interest.

spaces. The remaining surface parking lots should be redesigned to become sustainable ‘parking gardens’ with intensive tree plantings of medium size to large canopy trees to provide shade and visual relief. Surface parking represents a significant percentage of the total impervious surfaces on the Webster campus, which impacts the quantity and quality of stormwater runoff. The surface parking lots currently are mostly impermeable surfaces, but have great potential for improvement to actively manage stormwater on campus. All surface parking lots should incorporate landscape strategies to improve the quality and decrease the quantity of stormwater run-off on campus. Bioretention swales between parking bays or along the edges, or a series of individual planting areas across the surface parking lots decrease peak run-off and treat the run-off water quality on-site.

As a planting strategy, tree cover along the edges and/or within the interior of all surface parking lots should be established or increased to buffer the parking lots from their surroundings.

Stormwater
Stormwater management will become an integral part of the campus landscape that also reinforces sustainability missions of the University. The master plan recommends integration of appropriate stormwater best management practices into the overarching design concept for each individual landscape on the Webster campus. A basic stormwater management plan will encompass three main goals: a) reduce the peak rate of stormwater run-off to predevelopment hydrological conditions, b) limit the volume of run-off to pre-development

Parking Gardens
Surface parking lots comprise large land areas on the Webster campus. The longterm implementation of an expanded parking garage will allow for the repurposing of existing lots for academic buildings and open

hydrological conditions, and c) provide treatment of water quality to meet or exceed the latest regulations. The use of landscape as means of reaching these goals can have significant aesthetic benefits while limiting the need for large detention basins or expensive subsurface structures.

General Design Recommendations
Plantings on the campus serve a host of environmental purposes, from influencing microclimates around buildings and pedestrian zones to humanizing the scale of exterior spaces. The vegetative features of the landscape define the natural character of the campus. The trees, shrubs and natural groundcovers not only contribute to the quality and aesthetic of the campus but also provide an opportunity to translate the tenets of sustainability into a clear landscape language unique to the Webster campus.

create compositional closure or to reinforce major spaces and pathways on campus. The space-defining role of plants will precede thinking about specific plant characteristics such as flower, leaf texture, and branching habit and will come before consideration of adding horticultural interest and color to the landscape. This approach recognizes that the overall spatial order and quality of campus spaces is a principle concern of campus design.

of climatic stress that may target a specific species. Plant diversity will not, however, be exaggerated at the expense of visual unity and continuity. Plants that are used on campus will be native or non-invasive and present no threat to the native flora. They will also have low-tomoderate water requirements and generally share the visual traits that characterize the dominant regional flora. The overall purpose of the planting design will be to capitalize on the inherent beauty and climatic adaptability of the native flora. The natural form and character of plants will be retained through proper design and pruning.
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Scale
The size and composition of tree groups, shrub masses and plant beds will be designed at a scale that is appropriate to their relationship with campus buildings and their landscape context, including roads and open spaces. In most campus open spaces, plantings will be simple and conceived in broad strokes that are scaled with respect to their surrounding and the larger campus landscape, particularly when adjacent to institutional buildings and in large lawns. More detailed garden-scale plantings are only appropriate and encouraged in smaller spaces and courtyards.

Spatial Definition
The spatial organization of the campus landscape is primarily determined by three major components: buildings, topographic form, and woody plants consisting of trees and shrubs. While roads and pathways also play an important organizing function, they work together with the three-dimensional presence of buildings, topography, trees, and shrubs. Trees and shrubs establish the limits of views and the structure of outdoor spaces and, in a fundamental way, define the shape, size, sequence, and hierarchy of outdoor spaces. For Webster University, trees and shrubs are selected and used deliberately to achieve desired functions and spatial effects such as limiting and directing views, creating microclimates, creating overhead enclosure for greater intimacy, and framing spaces to

Furnishings
Furniture, lighting, and signage will all be important parts of the campus landscape and built environment. The University will consider a wayfinding and signage study to determine the appropriate locations, design and installation of campus signage. Additionally, standards for campus furnishings and lighting should be developed with a sustainable approach.

Plant Suitability and Character
The majority of plants on campus will be selected for hardiness, longevity, general ease of maintenance, freedom from diseases and pests, and ornamental quality. Plant species used will be sufficiently diverse to maintain resilience to known and unforeseen disease

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east Lo ckwoo d

North B ompart Avenu

Joy Aven u

e

e

Ave

Plymouth Ave

nd Big Be

evard Boul

living/ learnin g

student center

interdisciplinary sciences

housin g/ retail

garden avenue

arts garage athletics/ recreation housing

Edgar Roa d

Hazel

Avenu e

the guidelines are defined by three distinct campus districts.

Historic Campus District South campus district old orchard shopping center

Architectural Guidelines
Introduction
Architectural Design Guidelines are an important element of a campus master plan. They outline how new buildings will engage with existing campus buildings and help ensure that future development supports the new master plan vision for street improvements, pedestrian circulation and open spaces. They also identify contextual character in the community of Webster Groves, in the neighboring buildings at Eden Theological Seminary and in existing campus architecture, all of which are made up of a rich and diverse historical architectural fabric. The guidelines are written to address distinct qualities of specific areas on campus, which are defined in the guidelines as North Campus, Main Campus and Old Orchard Shopping Center. The guidelines are intended to be implemented on all new building projects on campus. Renovations of existing buildings will reflect the general principals of these guidelines, but may yield to the nature of the renovation and recognize that not all elements of the guidelines may be appropriate to the scope of the building renovation, in particular the renovation of historic structures on campus.

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Intent
The intent of the design guidelines is to provide appropriate design choices through careful selection of complementary construction materials that will present an environment of warmth, welcome and comfort for the participants on campus. They are meant to promote a harmonious relationship between existing buildings and new buildings on campus, without requiring a particular architectural theme or style. This balance can be achieved by careful attention to architectural features, detail articulation, building massing, building openness and transparency, materials, and color. Materials will be selected for durability and ability to contribute to the campus character. They will be selected to avoid excessive maintenance requirements or short term scheduled replacement due to wear and tear. New and existing buildings will reference and respond to each other so that various architectural styles find an amicable and respectful relationship that creates a rich, authentic, and diverse architectural vocabulary across the Webster University campus.

Context
The campus is located in Webster Groves, a suburban community of St. Louis, Missouri. Some of the buildings on campus contribute to the Webster College-Eden Theological Seminary Collegiate Historical District as registered in the United States Department of the Interior Heritage Conservation and Recreation Services. Webster Groves has four additional historic districts located west and north of the University: Central Webster Historic District, Marshall Place Historic District, Old Webster Historic District and Webster Park Historic District. All five of these districts are considered important contributors to the character and identity of Webster Groves. Developments along Big Bend and Lockwood Boulevards outside of these districts have been allowed to evolve organically, resulting in an authenticity that contributes to the quaint village-like feel that distinguishes Webster Groves as an ideal living community. The varieties of architectural styles throughout the Webster Groves community are mostly traditional and historic building styles, but the community has also embraced modern architecture in some of the civic buildings. Immediately north of the University is Eden Theological Seminary, which shares a long, historic relationship with Webster University. The southwest edge of the campus abuts to residential streets; the southeast side of the campus faces Interstate 44.

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Existing Campus Character
Webster University consists of a variety of building languages and styles, which has evolved for almost a century, ranging from historical gothic styles to modern styles of architecture. There is not a singular predominant building style throughout the campus. The campus has embraced different styles to create a rich, authentic and eclectic catalog of building types. Most of the buildings on the main campus have a style reflective of the time period in which they were built, which creates a level of authenticity within the building typologies and character. The majority of the campus buildings have a predominant material of red brick with other materials, which are detailed to define and support the building’s architectural style.

Goals
The goals of the architectural guidelines are to accomplish the following: ›› Define the direction for architectural character of new buildings and additions ›› Provide direction for the material palette ›› Provide direction of the placement and massing of buildings ›› Establish the contextual relationship between both new and existing buildings ›› Establish how buildings will interact with the variety of large and intimate open spaces throughout the campus

Design Principles
The architectural guidelines will promote the overall master plan goals to encourage exposure to a variety of styles and thinking and to reinforce Webster University’s four core values that focus on students, learning, diversity, and global citizenship. These core values will be reflected in the campus architecture by promoting academic and social interaction in order to create an environment that promotes diversity, learning, and socialization. These values are already seen through the eclectic nature of the existing campus architecture. The newer styles of architecture have evolved as the campus has expanded over the years. New buildings and additions to existing buildings will draw from the scale, rhythm, and articulation of the existing campus. ››  Building mechanical and lighting systems will use alternative energy when possible. ›› Building materials will be sourced locally when possible. ›› Sustainable, recycled and recyclable materials will be used when possible. ›› Buildings will be designed with storm water management systems so that water does not shed off of site as required by the overall master plan guidelines and local building codes. ›› Flexible spaces will be created to allow many activities to share space when possible in order to decrease the building footprint. ›› Buildings will support alternative transportation and a bicycle-friendly campus. ›› Opportunities to share buildings with the local community will be considered.
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Responsible Use of Energy and Natural Resources
The University encourages LEED building commissioning as regulated by the USGBC on all buildings, but recognizes this requirement will be considered on a case-by-case basis. As a minimum, the buildings will utilize reasonable practices for sustainability of design and use of materials. The following measures are general guidelines and will not limit designers to use future sustainable practices to further benefit the building or energy design: ›› Building orientation and facades will respond to the natural environment, including sun angles, wind, natural topological features, and building context. ›› Buildings will use energy-efficient cooling and heating systems. ›› Measures to increase natural day lighting within the building will be implemented.

Integration of Signage
The design guidelines will incorporate signage in a way that is integral to building design. A comprehensive wayfinding and signage study is required to properly document and recommend the best way for signage to accomplish the following: ›› Give the campus more of a presence within the community ›› Better direct traffic and pedestrians ›› Develop a signage program in a manner that is appropriate to the style and scale of the building and appropriate to the given context of the neighboring communities ›› Identify naming opportunities throughout the campus that are both separate from and integrated into the building design

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Historic Campus District
Introduction
The Historic Campus District contains the historic and iconic structures integral to the image of Webster University. This area is divided by East Lockwood Avenue and extends south to Big Bend Boulevard, west to Plymouth Avenue and is bordered by Emmanuel Episcopal Church to the east. It crosses East Lockwood Avenue to the north to include the Luhr building and the Wehrli Center. The historic buildings’ styles include traditional brick buildings and Gothic Revival styles.

Intent
The intent of the guidelines in Historic Campus District is to respect the historic structures so that they keep the general tenor of the historic collegiate gothic architectural style in this area. Additions or new buildings do not need to imitate the historic styles. More contemporary additions will work cohesively with the historic buildings as long as the general tenor of the historical character is maintained. New buildings and additions will also promote the architectural and cultural significance of the historical style of this area. Any addition to a building will be carefully considered; the attachment of additions will occur in places that are not considered historically significant when possible. Additions will follow the Local Preservation Ordinance Enforcement procedures.

Historical Character / Architectural Style
This area of the campus makes up part of the Webster College-Eden Theological Seminary Collegiate Historical District, as registered in the United States Department of the Interior Heritage Conservation and Recreation Services and includes buildings from both Webster University and Eden Theological Seminary. The University buildings contributing to this historic zone include Webster Hall, the Winifred Moore Auditorium, Loretto Hall, Maria Hall, and the Luhr building. The Local Preservation Ordinance Enforcement guides the procedures to alter all historic buildings. The jurisdiction presiding over these procedures is the Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) of Webster Groves.

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webster hall

winifred moore auditorium

Eden Theological Seminary, SD Press Education Center

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luhr building

Building Position and Orientation
New buildings will carefully consider the position of the historically significant buildings and their street-front presence along East Lockwood Avenue. Additions should not block or impede the views of the historic structure from the street.

Building Entrances
Any new building entrances will take into consideration the historic buildings entrances and general positioning of the historic building to be sensitive and not to detract from the architectural grandeur and presence of the historic buildings.

Building Heights
New buildings will be a reasonable height and be respectful to existing historic structures. Placement of architectural features that extend beyond the main building height will be sensitive to the historical buildings.

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Exterior Materials and Façade Articulation
Additions or new buildings will complement adjacent historical buildings. Reproductions of historic styles are not encouraged; rather the scale, rhythm, and materials of new buildings will be studied to complement historic neighbors. The style, scale, and proximity of the neighboring seminary buildings will be considered. Finishes will complement the warm red brick found throughout the campus. Similar brick will be selected as part of the building material palette on all new buildings in this area. Other materials may be used that complement the red brick finish; these materials need to be selected for durability as well as their aesthetic qualities to ensure the building will be long lasting and will contribute to the future of the campus. The articulation of the building façades will be sensitive to the context of the existing buildings and community. The color and palette of materials will complement the existing historic detailing and general character of the building.

Top: Schultz hall is shared by Webster university and eden theological Seminary. middle: A contemporary building that works with the traditional rhythm and articulation of traditional buildings (Diana Center at Barnard College). bottom left: Example of complementary addition to a historic building (perkins Library at Duke University).

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South Campus District
Introduction
This campus district is primarily comprised of two building types – academic and residential. The northern and western edges of the south campus start at Big Bend Boulevard. The southern edge of campus is bordered by Catalina Avenue and Interstate 44. Edgar Avenue runs north/south through the center campus and Garden Avenue runs east/west. The academic buildings occur mainly north of Garden Avenue and residential buildings are south of Garden Avenue.

Intent
The intent of the guidelines is to continue the eclectic collection of buildings, so as to provide a series of unique experiences to ensure that new buildings continue the rich, authentic and diverse architectural vocabulary throughout the campus. Red brick is a common material of the historic buildings on campus and has continued to be used in the new buildings on campus. This material is used on all the buildings in the south campus in conjunction with other building materials. The intent is to continue similar relationships on future developments, allowing the interplay of materials and textures to contribute to the diversity of the campus.

Architectural Style
The buildings in the south campus have a variety of styles, ranging from traditional Tudor to modern. There is not a singular style that will dictate future building styles. Buildings built within the past few decades use brick as the main façade material, but have a distinctly modern approach to detailing. This trend on campus to design buildings in a more modern style with contextual materials usage will be considered, but this approach will not limit the architectural style or a building’s contextual response. Reproductions of traditional or historic building styles are not encouraged. Innovative and interesting use of both modern and traditional building materials is encouraged in order to create an eclectic, yet appropriate architectural style that relates to the existing context on and off campus.

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Top left and bottom Left: The Sverdrup Building (bottom) and East Academic building (top) use brick as the predominate facade treatment, but use other materials to detail the building in a modern way. Right top, middle, and bottom: The Thompson house (top), The community Music school (middle) and the Emerson Library (bottom) are examples on campus of how brick is used as part of a broader material palette that gives the buildings distinct style and character.

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Massing studies demonstrate how the height of the Arts building addition (left) and Interdiscplinary Sciences Building (right) could step down toward the quads to work with the scale of the open space.

Heights of Structures
Height requirements for proposed structures will respond to the campus master plan and surrounding context. Building heights will be appropriate given their relationship to buildings immediately adjacent to them. Architectural features such as atriums, shade, and screening devices, flags, towers, or other architectural detail features must take in account shadow zones and preservation of views from adjacent buildings or communities. Rooftop mechanical equipment and elevator overruns must be screened and aesthetically appropriate to the building’s architectural style. These architectural features may not exceed 20% of the building footprint and must be reviewed by the building committee for visual or physical impacts on adjacent buildings and open spaces. The following are recommended heights of proposed buildings, as shown in the master plan: ›› Arts Building Addition: The building mass will step down along the east side along Edgar Road and on the quad side to respond to the scale of the open green space. ›› Athletic Complex: The main building masses will be less than forty feet above grade. The larger massing will be connected to each other by lower masses not to exceed thirty feet above grade and will be set back from the main building façade in order to break down the building mass and provide for a more interesting building type. ›› Student Center: A portion of the building mass will step down along west and south sides of the building to respond to the scale of the historic Thompson House and Carriage House and the open space south of this building. ›› Interdisciplinary Sciences Building: A portion of the building mass will step down along south side of the building to respond to the open space south of this building. ›› North Living/Learning Centers along Big Bend Boulevard: Any connections between the main building wings will be lower than the main building mass to break up the overall mass of the buildings to create more intimate spaces within the housing community.

Building Position and Orientation
Buildings will be positioned and oriented in accordance with the overall master streetscape guidelines and will work to enhance campus presence on streets and support the larger open spaces that are intended to link the campus in a succinct and meaningful way. They will also create smaller courtyard spaces to achieve a sense of place for the buildings.

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Indoor/outdoor spaces will promote gathering and other activities appropriate to the campus atmosphere. Service courts should not be seen from the street or quad. They need to be positioned or screened as to not interrupt the connectivity of the streetscape or landscape. The student housing areas will be placed far enough from each other to give proper light, yet close enough to give a neighborhood feel. Housing areas will be placed to create courtyards between the buildings and to break up the space in a variety of ways to create more intimate spaces within the housing community.

pedestrian experiences. Buildings adjacent to the East Quad and West Quad open spaces will create a transition from the streetscape along Edgar Road to the larger green spaces by pulling the main building mass back from the street. The student housing buildings north of West Hall should maintain the same setbacks as

top: the proposed buildings on either side of the Thompson House are placed to allow room for each building to not to feel compressed or crowded. middle right: the housing buildings are linked by a series of bridges bottom right: student housing courtyards create small open spaces between buildings, providing places for studying or socializing. (stanford university, california)

Street Setbacks
Edgar Road
Buildings along Edgar Road will be placed to allow appropriate landscape and better

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A portion of the proposed arts addition is designed to create an active entrance that connects to the quad.

the proposed Student Center pulls the building back along the quad to allow the streetscape to engage with the quad.

West Hall to create a strong street edge along Edgar Road. The Arts building addition should consider the setbacks from the existing building.

South Property Line at Interstate 44
Buildings should be set back the same distance from the property line as East and West Hall buildings.

Garden Avenue
A large landscaped area is planned south of Garden Avenue. Building setbacks should work with the landscape to create a foreground for the buildings. The addition to the parking garage should hold the same setback line as the existing garage.

Building Entrances
Buildings will be designed to celebrate their main entrance, giving the buildings orientation will as part of the wayfinding strategy. This can be accomplished through massing, articulation, or building materials. The entrances will take into consideration the ‘front door’ landscape and streetscape to support the idea of promenade with well-proportioned open spaces for gatherings and activities. Building entrances of the building should act as pre-function spaces, understanding that students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members will use both the indoor and outdoor spaces in formal and informal ways.

The map on the opposite page demonstrates the desired locations and orientations of building entrances in order to activate outdoor spaces and work with pedestrian circulation routes. The academic buildings placed along the quads will have main entrances that face the quads or occur at the intersection of the quads and streetscape. These entrances will be designed to act as wayfinding devices and be prominent enough to be recognizable from across the quads. Entrances will be designed to be safe, visually supervised and well lit; there will be no hidden alcoves or screened areas. Street entrances will be designed to work with the streetscape. Street-facing building entrances will be prominent yet scaled appropriately to the context. Architectural elements will be designed to create a presence and marker for the building along the street. The main entrances for the student housing

Big Bend Boulevard
Buildings east of Edgar Road should provide an ample front yard, with a setback of at least sixty feet from the road. Buildings west of Edgar Road should be at least thirty feet from the road. These distances are approximations and will be reviewed with the appropriate committees to provide the most integrated design for the campus and community.

east Lo

ckwoo
rd

d Ave

buildings will be placed off of the shared courtyards and open spaces.

Plymouth

Big Be
student center

nd Bo

uleva

living/ learning housing/ retail

Exterior Materials
The use of a variety of materials is encouraged to create a visually rich palette. As noted previously, materials will present an environment of warmth, welcome and comfort. Red brick should be used on all buildings in some way to contribute to an overall campus style. This guidance will not be limiting, but a launching point for the material palette to be explored in a creative and unique way. Academic buildings will be distinctive from each other to create visual variety. Repetitive use of materials between buildings is
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interdisciplinary sciences

arts athletics/ recreation dining

garden avenue

garage

housing

left: building entrances diagram N below left and right: Examples of buildings that celebrate entry and arrival. The entries act as way-finding devices for the campus and create indoor/outdoor space. (left: university of houston, texas. Right: university of new haven, connecticut)

BUILDING ENTRANCES in future buildings

Edgar Road

Main entrance secondary entrance

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discouraged, yet the palette will be sensitive to the immediate and surrounding contexts. The student housing cluster should be developed with a family of materials that is consistent throughout the buildings. The desire is to create a neighborhood of buildings with a variety of façade treatments. There should be a strong formal and rhythmic relationship between the buildings, yet no two buildings should be identical. Creative use and application of materials is encouraged. Academic buildings will be distinctive from each other to create visual variety. Repetitive use of materials between buildings is discouraged, yet the palette will be sensitive to the immediate and surrounding contexts. The student housing cluster should be developed with a family of materials that is consistent throughout the buildings. The desire is to create a neighborhood of buildings

with a variety of façade treatments. There should be a strong formal and rhythmic relationship between the buildings, yet no two buildings should be identical. Creative use and application of materials is encouraged.

Buildings will be programmed to create active façades that relate to other active areas of the campus and surrounding community. To support this, façades will be designed to be transparent and open in these areas to promote visibility into and from the buildings. Development of the building façades will take into consideration light and sound issues produced by the adjacent highway and roads in order to provide a good living and learning environment for the students. New buildings that occur along the property lines will be sensitive to the scale and context of the Webster Groves community.

Façade Articulation
The design of building façades will be sensitive to the context of the existing buildings and community. The intent is to provide a palette of materials / colors, rather than a singular material on one side in order to break up the mass. A single type of material may be used but should have variety in color, rhythm, and articulation to provide detail in an interesting and unique manner. There will be some relief or change in plane or other massing to reduce the mass of a singular plane along the building and to create a dynamic façade that works with the scale of the surrounding context.

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Example of façade activation to correspond with the building program within. (colorado state university, colorado)

Example of a buildingthat uses both traditional and nontraditional materials to achieve different façade articulation. (california college of arts and crafts, california)

example of a long facade that is broken down through syncopation and rhythm of the fenestration system. (drexel university, pennsylvania)

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Old Orchard Shopping Center
Introduction
This area is located at East Lockwood Avenue and S. Old Orchard Avenue. This area strongly contributes to the commercial district that primarily is comprised of one- and two-story retail shops. A three-story senior living facility is located south, and Nerinx Hall High School is located west of the complex. Immediately north of East Lockwood Avenue is a small park that contains some public amenities, including benches, picnic tables, and public art.

Intent
The intent of this mixed-use development is to relate to the character of the commercial district and adjacent residential low-rise buildings in Webster Groves.

Architectural Style
The style of this development may depart from the predominant campus character to allow more freedom to coordinate with the scale and contribute to the quality of the street life of Webster Groves.

Height of Structure
The building will be aware of the low rise commercial buildings in this area as well as the building’s immediate adjacency to the senior living building and high school. These multi-story buildings give precedent for this mixed-use building to be taller. The building should step down along the street sides to accommodate the lower commercial buildings.

Building Position and Orientation
The building should be positioned to contribute to the active street life in a similar manner to the existing commercial zone as already established. The main parking area for this building should occur behind the building so that the retail spaces are close to the street and contribute to the village-like experience.

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SENIOR LIVING PHOTO
left top and middle: examples of low rise buildings along big bend boulevard. left bottom: the multi-story senior residences located across big bend boulevard from old orchard center. Top right: a massing study of old orchard site shows a sensitively scaled development that engages the street, with parking at the side and incorporated within the structure. right bottom: nerinx hall high school is a multi-story structure located within the commercial district.

Acknowledgements
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Office of the President
Dr. Elizabeth Stroble, President Webster University 470 East Lockwood Avenue Webster Groves, Missouri 63119 Barb Ehnes, Director of Community and Public Relations Bill Barrett, Professor, Director May Gallery Ralph Olliges, Chair and Associate Professor, Coordinator-MA Education Tech/President of the Faculty Senate Stephanie Schroeder, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Biological Sciences Michelle Loyet, Assistant Director, Academic Advising Center and former Chair, Webster Staff Alliance Lauren Meyer, Graduate Student Loren Douglass, Undergraduate Student Mr. Charles Downs, Webster Groves Chamber of Commerce Mrs. Nancy Klepper, Neighborhood Advisory Board Kris Knapstein, President, Alumni Association and Board of Trustees Oren Yagil, Special Assistant to the President Steve Strang, Senior Project Manager

Master Planning Source Selection Team
Julian Schuster, Provost and Senior Vice President Greg Gunderson, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Ted Hoef, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students Laura Rein, University Secretary Dan Hitchell, Associate Vice President for Resource Planning and Budget Ken Creehan, Director of Process Improvements David Stone, former Director of Facilities Planning and Management Steve Strang, Senior Project Manager

Master Planning Steering Committee
Julian Schuster, Provost and Senior Vice President and Chair of the Master Planning Steering Committee Greg Gunderson, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Paul Carney, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Affairs William Kenneth Freeman, Vice President for Information Technology Barbara O’Malley, Associate Vice President and Chief Communications Officer Dan Viele, Associate Vice President and Online Learning Director Betsy Schmutz, Associate Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer

Webster University Design Review Board
Greg Gunderson, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Faith Maddy, Vice President for Development and Alumni Programs Ted Hoef, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students Peter Sargent, Dean, Leigh Gerdine College of Fine Arts Ralph Olliges, Chair and Associate Professor, Coordinator-MA Education Tech/President of the Faculty Senate Courtney Turner, President, Student Government Association Steve Strang, Senior Project Manager

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City of Webster Groves
Mayor Gerry Welch Steven J. Wylie, City Manager Roger Grow, Director of Planning and Development Paul Verheyen, Director of Public Works

Jacobs
Michael Mindlin Barrett Burdick Adam Garms Alison Newell Jennifer Reynolds

Webster Groves School District
Superintendent Dr. Sarah Booth Riss

Harry Ferris

Eden Theological Seminary
The Reverend Dr. David M. Greenhaw, President and Professor of Preaching and Worship The Reverend Rick Walters, Executive Vice President

The Scion Group
Eric Luskin Jason Taylor Sarah Samuels

Emmanuel Episcopal Church
The Reverend Dan Appleyard, Rector

Sasaki Associates, Inc.
Dan Kenney Janne Corneil Nicole Gaenzler Brie Hensold Mary Anne Ocampo Kui Xue Chris Sgarzi Katia Lucic

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