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Pampa Grande and the Mochica Culture. by Izumi Shimada Review by: John R.

Topic The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Mar., 1996), pp. 160-161 Published by: Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3034640 . Accessed: 27/05/2013 23:24
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BOOK REVIEWS

Ian Morris and consumption, to production andimpressive volume, manages to stratification andpolitical arrive atseveral quite concrete historiographical economy. James Whitley andHerconclusions. The mostcompelling of them: bertHoffmann accordingly offer a tandem of classical archaeol- perspectives that thehigh distinction that notmerely on theancient market as thearchaeology capital butalsoon theancient of insymbolic symogycouldoncecommand ofgeographical ofEuropeanness' andexistential crossings. 'thecradle (cf. p. 11) hasfallen bology KarimArafat to the contemporary and Catherine legionof neo-pluralists, Morgan lumiof nously anti-imperialists, and'post-modernist' critics challenge the applicability of a worldideaof'Europeanness'. andsti- systemic of core and periphery thevery Grants modelling to pendshaveconsequently becomemorescarce, the ancientwesterncircum-Mediterranean. hasbe- SusanAlcock, and lessadequate. consensus andJack DavissucScholarly John Cherry come a genuine rarity. Withitsrarity, classical ceed in transforming their concern withan al- the'manuring itself has becomeof latenotone most comictopic archaeology hypothesis' in fact ifnotalways in into a magisterial butmany things: plural displayof distributional a fragmented and'historioarchaeological' principle; arrayof competing analysis synthesis. methodologies and scholarly agenda. Is ittime If the programme in Classical put forward - as Michael inan uneasy ap- Greece Jameson suggests is by no meansentirely novel (it has to thevolume pendix (p. 195)- to shore up,to manyechoes both of the 'New' and of the is salvageable cleaveto whatever oftheration- 'Post-Processualist'), a spirited itis nevertheless ale that thediscipline couldonce less contro- disciplinary It also has muchto provocation. versially derivefromthe postulate thatthe sayto thoseof us who, neither archaeologists achievements of theGreeks of the5thand the norhellenists, still tosneak a course manage on 4th centuries B.C.E. were uniquelygrand, Greekantiquity intoour curriculum now and uniquely worth recovering and uniquely worth again.It has much to say to anyof us who Timeto despair, to turn inone'sdis- might knowing? notbe content with ourownclassicisms, ciplinary badgeand move on to more inte- ancient or not,Greek or not.It speaks, I think, grated and less suspectspecialisms? On the mostexcitingly ofa return to thefundamental contrary, Morris asserts; timerather to 'refig- ambitions, notsimply ofarchaeology butofanure'(p. 4). as a whole.In thepasttwodecades, thropology hastoo muchofa taste Morris forthegoing especially in the United States, sociocultural has increasingly relativisms to denouncefragmenta-anthropology epistemic (and again) whatever it might laurels stillclaimon tion that hisfellow perse. He stresses contribu- rested virtues ofhaving 'beenthere'. contradict eachother'(p. 45). theparticularistic tors'frequently reduced ifnotto 'ethall of them a It hasincreasingly itself, Even so, he shares with virtually thenat least to 'idiography'. The notablecommitment to the forging and re- nography' to Classical Greece entertain no of interdisciplinary alliances. Once the contributors forging and they remind us withunis put undererasure, 'Greekmiracle' classical suchreduction; and refreshing of lucidity hasnoobvious towhich to commonliveliness archaeology rupture and thepromise ofthecomparative tojustify itslong-standing dis- thevirtues appealin order fromwhich anthropology first either from thearchaeology oftheNew imagination tance, theprehistory oftheAegean (p. sprang. World or from JAMEsD. FAUBION is putunder era14). Once the'Greek genius' sure, classicalarchaeology mightstill dwell Rice University or thebrilliance of thearteupon thebeauty as itsown,butit hasfewifany facts it claims as SHLMADA,IZUMI. Pampa Grandeand theMochica theartefacts themselves fortreating grounds from or intellectually autonomous aesthetically culture. xvi,323 pp., illus.,maps,tables,bibtheconditions oftheir their recepproduction, liogr. Austin:Univ.of TexasPress,1994. and hisfellow contionand their use. Morris $60.00 classical Izumi Shimadaframes tributors agreethat properly refigured, the discussion of the willhavereplaced itsformer ivory site archaeology ofPampa Grande broadly, resulting ina deifthere tailed towers withmuchbroader enclosures, compilation ofmaterial on theecological, at all. Nor is their accord climaticand culturalhistory are anyenclosures of the North ofletting Coastof Perucovering a matter ofblithe simply eclecticism, theperiod from about a thousand moreflowers bloom.The fashion 200 BC toAD 800. and the fashion of epistemic The datapresented of the fragment havebeen accumulated Morris andhiscon- over generations andother relativisms aside, scholars. by numerous Shia systematic andrigorous dedi- mada alternates reveal tributors betweenthe presentation of which for notartefacts,previous cation to a programme interpretations and his assessment of are the those but instead peopleand their practices The bibliography is cominterpretations. and ultimate ultimate subjects objectsof re- prehensive, a resource initself, butitis usedseof lectively: search. Hence their his assessments on his persistent juxtaposition relyheavily and historical data.Hence also ownarticles andthepublications ofa few other archaeological andcomplementary attention to scholars. Hence,theencyclopaedic presentation their persistent

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BOOK REVIEWS

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of unsynthesized data sometimes confuses. drought anda Cajamarca-Wari alliance andwas of thisproblem includea abandoned. Graphicexamples MocheV as co-terminous withthe pairof tables (p. 42) whichpresent conflicting He treats occupation ofPampaGrande. Yetthe Wari statistics on rivers anda pairofmaps(pp.58-9) brief influenced murals at La Mayanga and themulwith Mochesites. conflicting datesfor El Nifho events recorded at Galindoboth The synthesis that doesrunthrough thebook tiple that MocheV persisted after theabanas thedevelopmental treats PampaGrande cli- suggest the maxof Moche culture. Whiletextbooks typi- donmentof Pampa Grande.Moreover, of thesouthern valleys maynot a succession of cultures callypresent (Salinar abandonment as he implies: dates from and Gallinazo) before Moche,Shimada argues havebeenas complete that theMothat Moche comesdirectly out of Salinar and Viruand Santa(pp. 4-5) suggest there whilethe mayhavepersisted thatGallinazois partially contemporary with che IV style was in voguefurther north. Salinar butpersists throughout theMochepe- MocheV style compendium of inriod. He characterizes Salinar as an upper valley This book is a valuable on Mocheculture I willbe gothat culture whileGallinazo occupies thelower val- formation leys;I doubtthat thisspatial isolation exists, at ingbacktooverandoveragain. JOHN R. Topic leastin theChicamato Santaarea.His crossUniversity ofSalinar dating to Recuay, rather than theear- Trent lierHuarasculture (pp. 65-6),contributes to the confusion. He interprets the stratigraphic ofMocheI overGallinazo superposition at the STONE, PETER G. & BRLANL. MOLYNEAux (eds). siteof Moche as a Moche conquest of GalliThepresented past: heritage, museums andedunazo people(p. 74); thisbegsthequestion of cation (One Wld. Archaeol. 25). xxvi,520 pp., illus.,tables, bibliogrs. LondonNew where Mochedeveloped. York:Routledge, in association withEngShimada seesparallel development (and orilishHeritage, 1994.?75.00 Lamgins?)ofMoche in at leastthenorthern andthesouthern re- Archaeology, bayeque Moche-Chicama likeso manydisciplines, is curgions.The southern Moche,witha capital at rently at whatPj. Ucko heredescribes as 'a thesiteofMoche,expand south during Moche very difficult moment in itsdevelopment' (p. III and IV incorporating val- xxi).On theone hand, territory in eight itis attempting to open he consistently leys.Although useswordslike itself up to a widerand morediverse range of than everbefore. Atthesametime, itis intrusion, expansion andconquest, andinfers a publics increasingly self-conscious aboutthepogeopolitical strategy to landlocked highland itself andcontestable nature ofreadings ofthe that Mo- litical concludes polities (p. 114),Shimada andincreasingly cautious about presenting chewarfare is ritual in nature and past, (pp. 108-10) whichthe publicoften seemsto thatthe southern Moche were a paramount the 'reality' in this bookarea nota state. WhileI am sympatheticwantofit.The bestchapters chiefdom, discussionof this dilemma;the with thequandary he (andwe) arein,I didnot fascinating the worstare unreflective accounts of getting find newinspiration here. this toknow more about supposed 'good In MocheIV Shimada feels that thesouthern public thenorthern Mochedynas- thing'- archaeology. Mocheconquered in Thepresented The chapters pastare examties (and Gallinazopopulace).The maineviThis is concerned Mo- plesof 'worldarchaeology'. denceforthisis the'wedge'of'intrusive' as with of not so muchwiththe past'in itself' che IV sites'driven sections intothemiddle and these valleys'(p. 90). Figure3.17, though, whatthepastcan tellus aboutthepresent the told in how the past should be present. IV showsthatsix of elevenMoche sitesalso dealwithattempts to use Mostofthechapters had Moche III occupation. Then,stressed by archaeology museums in schools, educationally from theWariculture, or text and pressure drought areoften books. Whileweaker chapters are lostand the dynasty either the southern valleys polemics against thefact that archaeology thecapital moves toPampaGrande. unis notusedmoreintheeducational sphere, was a city-state Although PampaGrande (p. critical of particular descriptions pedagogical as experiments, never controlled as muchterritory 180) that ofpublicigor simplistic surveys itas thepristine norance, characterizes Moche,Shimada thestronger onesshowthecomplexstate. He seesa four-tiered socialhier- ityand politics Andean of the issuesinvolved. They a redistributive withinstitu- show, archy, economy forexample, howthelinear chronologicraft tionalized generosity, dispersed produc- cal displays in many museums of archaeology tion, and a generallabour pool of ethnic ruleout,or marginalize, andalcertain groups case ternative, Gallinazo people.He makesa reasonable notions ofhistory. non-chronological, butthecontrast with the Theyshowhowtheemphasis for all these attributes, 'evion material I think, todifferen-dence'maylikewise siteofMocheis due more, privilege particular groups. tialpreservation at thetwositesthan to devel- They also show,however, how archaeology towrithe feels, may alternative differences. an important constitute opmental PampaGrande, under from ten accountsfor 'peoples withouthistory'. suffered an internal revolt pressure

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