Career Services Assessment Guide

The Follow-Up Report
Institutional Assessment Guidelines:

Career Services
(A Guides and Handbooks Report)

Todd V. Titterud
Revised 06/25/2007

The Follow-Up Report: Guides and Handbooks

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Career Services Assessment Guide

Institutional Assessment Guidelines:

Career Services
(Todd V. Titterud, Revised: 06-25-2007)

The materials in this guideline have been collated to assist your department in the institutional assessment process. The examples from similar departments in other institutions are included for comparison purposes to help you develop or revise your own department’s efforts. They are not intended as recommendations but as efforts to be reviewed and critiqued to improve your own learning and understanding. While some may be models of best efforts, others may reveal the range of understanding and interpretation which is still prevalent. Each department and institution is following their own learning curve toward the common goal of establishing a culture of evidence-based continuous improvement founded on student and institutional learning.

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Sample Mission Statements

George Mason University:
University Career Services involves students in career research and decision making, encourages the pursuit of experiential learning opportunities, prepares students for their job searches, and provides access to job leads and employers. The office supports the university’s academic units by providing information on career options and employment trends and by collaborating on programs that increase awareness of skills and competencies sought by today’s employers. Career services fosters relationships with alumni, employers, professional organizations, and others that will provide opportunities for students to develop professional competencies, integrate academic learning with work, and explore future possibilities.

Florida Institute of Technology:
The Office of Career Services strives to provide high-quality career-related services to Florida Tech students, alumni and employers to meet their employment and career development needs.

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Career Services Assessment Guide

Maui Community College:
The mission of Cooperative Education and Job Placement is to create quality career options and opportunities for Maui Community College, University of Hawaii CenterMaui students and graduates in response to the dynamic economic and workforce development needs of Maui County. The program vision for the next five years is to: • Meet and exceed the annual goals for Cooperative Education and Job Placement Services. • Upgrade the data collection, tracking and reporting system for Cooperative Education and Job Placement. • Institutionalize the job placement and workplace readiness coordination component. • Strengthen the workforce development partnerships between the campus and community.

Metropolitan State College of Denver:
The Career Services office assists students at all stages of their college experience to identify their academic and associated career options. Our services are student focused and intent upon enhancing the education experience through creative and responsible use of multiple resources and collaborative partnerships. The Career Services office accomplishes this by providing the building blocks that help students make educational career decisions, develop lifelong learning skills and thrive in an ever changing economy. Valuing continued improvement process of assessing and addressing customer’s perceptions and needs.

St. Ambrose University:
The purpose of the Career Center is to assist students and alumni to identify, and develop career goals, and to apply their achievements and learning to their professional goals.

San Jose State University:
Mission Statement The Career Center promotes professionalism by providing the tools to guide students in making career planning decisions. We satisfy the needs of the employment community and complement the academic curriculum. Our high-touch customer service approach motivates, educates, and empowers students by giving them access to: customized consulting services and programs, job and internship opportunities, and a network of industry professionals and alumni.

Texas A&M International University:
The mission of the Texas A&M International University's Department of Career Services is to assist potential, current and former students to identify, explore, select and enter career programs and employment opportunities. Career Services will assist students throught the following services and program: career exploration and
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Career Services Assessment Guide

counseling, on-campus employment, part-time employment, resume preparation, mock interviews, job searching needs, job fairs, graduate/professional school fair and on-campus interviews.

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Sample Goals

Florida Institute of Technology:
Goal 1: Increase the number of job listings, resume referrals and employer visits to the campus by improving employer relations and emphasizing employer development. Utilize professional organizations and alumni networks more effectively and develop new employer marketing materials. Expected results: Broaden the career prospects for students. Assessment Measures: Count number of jobs, resume referrals and employer visits in academic year 2004 and compare to previous year. Goal 2: Increase the number of students participating in community service programs and develop method to determine the number of students who volunteer in the community and determine ways to recognize this service. Expected results: Increase student participation in community service programs. Assessment Measures: Following the development of a method to collect data, we will report on the number of students participating in community service throughout the year. Each year, the number will be compared to previous years to gauge any increase. Goal 3: Increase student participation in co-op and internship opportunities and improve data collection to more accurately reflect the number of students actually working in major-related work experiences. Expected results: Increased student participation in co-op and internship opportunities. Assessment Measures: Student registration in co-op courses throughout the academic year and contact student and faculty to determine where they are working in the summer.

Maui Community College:
The goals of Cooperative Education and Job Placement are to: 1. Provide quality one – stop career services to students and graduates and the community. 2. Serve as the central clearinghouse for career and employment opportunities related to our customers’ educational, professional and personal goals. 3. Be the preferred portal for the business community to access qualified candidates for their employment needs.

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4. Act as the liaison between the College’s educational programs and the business community for assessment of institutional and program effectiveness and for workforce development.

Seattle University
University Strategic Goals: 1. Promote student involvement and leadership development. 2. Co-create a campus culture that fosters intellectual engagement and promotes integrated student learning and development. 3. Develop a campus community that values diversity and puts the care of students first. 4. Help students to develop a coherent set of values and ethical standards consistent with Seattle University’s Jesuit Catholic Mission. 5. Develop effective systems and practices that utilize assessment and technology to enhance the student learning experience. Career Development Center Goals: 1. Assisting students in making decisions about the types of careers they may want to pursue (Aligned with strategic goals 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). 2. Connecting students to employers and employment opportunities in a variety of ways (Aligned with strategic goals 1, 4 and 5). 3. Provide opportunities for students to link their academic programs to careers and the world of work (Aligned with strategic goals 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). 4. Provide training in job search strategies and job ready skills to enable students to be successful in their job search (Aligned with strategic goals 1, 3, 4 and 5).

St. Ambrose University
1. To partner with faculty to provide information and incorporate professional development with academic goals. OBJECTIVE: Approach and identify a liaison with each department on campus. 2. To help students make informed career choices and transition to professional environments. OBJECTIVE: Meet with individuals and groups to provide career assessments, counseling and career opportunities. Establish professional opportunities such as internships, Co-ops, part-time/full-time work, job shadows, and work-study programs. 3. Collaborate with employers, faculty and campus departments to enhance students’ personal development. OBJECTIVE: Provide professional events (etiquette dinners, career fairs, mock interviews, etc) and workshops. 4. To prepare and assist students to achieve meaningful employment and/or admission to graduate or professional school. OBJECTIVE: Provide students with knowledge and skills about employment, graduate and professional schools and employment opportunities through personal and electronic interaction.

Tyler Junior College
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Career Services Assessment Guide

Goal 2: Tyler Junior College will provide occupational programs designed to prepare students for employment in career fields. Objective: To track student progress toward successful employment, military service, or pursuit of a higher degree Measurement 1: Percentage of graduates employed Measurement 2: Percentage of completers who pass licensure exams within one year

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Sample Objectives

Maui Community College:
We will accomplish and fulfill the mission and goals of Cooperative Education and Job Placement by • Establishing a comprehensive accessible, responsive and proactive service center • Staffed by professionals whose experience and network form a significant bridge between the community and the campus • Offering just-in-time services such as internships, job placement, mentorships, career shadowing and other career development experiences • To guide our customers towards reaching their goals.

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Sample Performance Indicators

Dalton State College:
KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS • Job placement rates Percentage of Graduates employed within one year after graduation (The proportion of an identified entering cohort achieving a ‘marketable employable skill’ who obtain employment in a field directly related to this skill within one year of graduation) • Employer Satisfaction Composite score from annual employer survey about level of satisfaction with the skills, knowledge and behavior demonstrated by DSC graduates (The proportion of
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Career Services Assessment Guide

a sample of regional employers in a given field indicating that their employees who received training at DSC exhibit skills and job performance rates equivalent or superior to all employees) Alumni Satisfaction Composite score from periodic alumni survey about level of general satisfaction with campus academic programs and services (The proportion of a sample of alumni who respond to a survey regarding DSC educational programs and student services)

North Carolina Department of Community Colleges:
Annual Program Review Accountability Measures • Student satisfaction of program completers and non-completers (Standard: 85%) • Employer satisfaction with graduates (Standard: 85%) • Employment status of graduates (Standard: 90%, adjusted up or down based on local unemployment rates)

Bellevue Community College
Employment • Employer Ratings (90% satisfied) • Student Employment (90% employed) • Student Wages (> median starting wage)

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CSU Chico

Sample Student Learning Outcomes

1. Self awareness and self assessment to prepare for choosing a major and or a career. Success can be estimated by students' satisfaction in major selection and the pursuit of a career path that he/she is passionate about. We consider all students who graduate and pursue a satisfying career path to be successful in this regard. 2. Learning the methods of a successful career search, including research, resume preparation, interview skills, salary negotiation, networking, etcetera. Success can be measured by student feedback (e.g. students will often comment that they feel they are improving in the area of interviewing, networking, etc.), recruiter feedback (e.g. recruiters telling us that our students are well-prepared for the job search process), and ultimately the gainful employment of our registrants. All job offers reported to our office can be attributed to this learning objective. 3. Understanding the politics and the organizational structure of businesses and organizations with the goal of securing and understanding career level position.
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Career Services Assessment Guide

Success can be measured by the gainful employment of our registrants, as well as success of alumni as they prosper in various career paths. 4. How to locate and use computerized job search databases. Students learn to use our on-line database. Success can be measured by the involvement in on-campus recruitment activities, as the only way a student can participate is to master the functionality of our system. In addition, we introduce students to job search links on our website, and teach them how to research others. Success in this area, as in #2 and #3 above, can be measured by student acquisition of job offers. 5. Develop strategies for life long career searches and development. Success can be measured by job offers and satisfaction in current and future careers. 6. Learning to identify, research, and apply for graduate schools. Success can be indicated by students successfully applying to graduate schools and receiving acceptances.

George Mason University:
1. George Mason University students will 1. Know will know and use the Career Decision-Making Process Model (Identify, Clarify, Explore, Choose, Plan, Act) in making Academic/ Career Decisions 2. Undertake Self-Assessments in terms of their Interests and Abilities and Job Readiness 3. Learn to explore careers using Information Interviewing and Company and Industry search strategies 4. Gain Career-Related Experience via Internships and Coops 5. Develop career-related skills, such as Applying to Graduate/Professional School, Conducting Long-Distance Job Search, Developing Resumes, Letters, Interviews, and Portfolios, and Evaluating Job Offers 2. Students will be satisfied with Career Services programs. 3. Students will judge themselves to have learned from their participation in Career Services activities.

Georgia State University
DOMAIN: COGNITIVE MATURITY Sub-Domain: Problem-solving in context 1. Student workers who become Career Educators will be able to identify and assess a student’s/client’s needs and provide information, services, and/or proper referrals to staff, resources, and/or programming 2. Students who participate in career counseling will be able to define the next step(s) in their career development process Sub-Domain: Applying knowledge in practical ways 1. Students who attend the business etiquette dinner will be able to demonstrate that they have learned to present themselves effectively in their professional lives DOMAIN: INTEGRATED IDENTITY & PERSONAL MATURITY
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Career Services Assessment Guide

Sub-Domain: Development of personal autonomy and empowerment 1. Students who attend a UCS resume workshop and/or resume critique session will be able to create a resume that effectively presents their background and experience

Maui Community College:
The customer, upon completion of a Cooperative Education work-based learning experience, shall be able to • Demonstrate knowledge of basic workplace expectations and related employment issues. (seminars and field work) • Apply basic principles, concepts and skills from their educational field. (field work) • Demonstrate effective communication skills. (seminars and field work) • Apply basic principles of human interaction, motivation, and learning. (seminars and field work) • Analyze and resolve common workplace situations / problems. (seminars and field work) • Identify career options in their field. (seminars and field work) • Design a basic career portfolio for use in the job search process. (seminars) The customer, upon receipt of appropriate job placement service units, shall be able to • Access and utilize basic resources in an effective job search process. (service units) • Create a functional resume, cover and thank you letters. (service units) • Respond appropriately to standard interview questions. (service units) • Interpret results of self-assessment analyses for use in career planning (service units)

Mendocino College
The SLO's listed below are what we expect our students to be able to do when they graduate from Mendocino College with an AA or AS degree. Many of these skills are taught both in the classroom and by students' interaction with college offices and activities. Please fill in the chart below indicating how your department helps students to learn these skills. Be specific and give examples. You may enter "Not Applicable" as appropriate. 1. Assume responsibility for your actions, and work effectively as an individual and as a member of a group. Career Center and Student Employment: Students are taught job skills which are required by employers such as positive attitude, attendance, and getting along with others. Cooperative Work Experience: Responsibility: By identifying and completing specific, measurable learning objectives; Group: completing these objectives while employed and generally working with others 2. Express ideas with clarity, logic, and originality in both spoken and written English. Career Center and Student Employment: Students learn how to create cover letters and effective resumes. Cooperative Work Experience: By discussing and identifying potential objectives with workplace supervisor(s) and instructor, and by writing clear, specific and measurable learning objectives
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Career Services Assessment Guide

3. Apply mathematical principles to address and solve problems. Career Center and Student Employment: Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives 4. Gather and interpret data, using a variety of scientific methods, to address and solve both practical and theoretical problems. Career Center and Student Employment: Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives 5. Analyze, understand, and evaluate diverse ideas, beliefs, and behaviors. Career Center and Student Employment: Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives 6. Access, interpret, evaluate, and synthesize information using multiple resources, including current information technology. Career Center and Student Employment: Students use EChoices to research careers, skills, and interests. They also do informational interviews and then analyze this information to make career decisions. Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives 7. Enhance physical and psychological well-being by examining and applying health and wellness concepts. Career Center and Student Employment: Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives 8. Explore and express personal creativity throughout your life. Career Center and Student Employment: Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives 9. Understand yourself and others as members of our diverse global community. Career Center and Student Employment: Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives 10. Understand and evaluate issues concerning use of the world's natural resources. Career Center and Student Employment: Cooperative Work Experience: Depends on the objectives

Metropolitan State College of Denver:
1. Learn the importance of networking & utilizing personal, business, Alumni, and print/electronic resources. 2. Learn the procedures, processes and strategies of conducting a job search. 3. Learn how to develop a resume & job search correspondence. 4. Learn interviewing strategies & techniques as well as related image management topics. 5. Gain self knowledge about self & career through assessment inventories. 6. Self/career knowledge through advising converts into proactive execution of a job search.

Oregon State University:
Goal: Build student capacity for effective career and life development Outcome: Students will learn professional etiquette Goal: Build student capacity for effective career and life development Outcome: Students will learn effective interviewing skills
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Career Services Assessment Guide

Goal: Build student capacity for effective career and life development Outcome: Students will learn effective resume writing skills

San Jose State University:
Student Learning Outcomes The Career Center provides SJSU students and alumni with numerous educational opportunities to support the development of their career goals and job search competencies. To meet this objective, the Career Center Team has developed learning outcomes in alignment with the delivery of its workshops and programs, drop in sessions, office hours and career counseling appointments. This supports the Career Center Team in its thrust to most effectively serve students and alumni while maintaining quality and relevant services via a systematic evaluation and quality assurance/improvement process. The following are the specific learning outcomes students will gain upon completion of a Center's educational opportunity. After participation in Resume Preparation workshops, students will increase their expertise in preparing targeted resumes After participation in Job and Internship Search workshops, students will gain competency in delivering an effective One-Minute Commercial to an employer After participation in Interview Workshops, students will demonstrate increased competency in answering behavioral questions asked by employers After participation in one of the Center's career counseling, drop-in or advisory office hours, students and alumni will: o understand how to use the resources available to assist them in selecting a major; o demonstrate increased levels of knowledge related to various job search strategies including resume preparation, self-promotion and communication skills, or interview capabilities; o articulate greater awareness of effective job search techniques relevant to their specific career goals; and o identify expanded awareness of career options and goals related to their interests.

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Sample Other Outcomes

George Mason University:
Faculty Learning Outcomes 1. Faculty will make use of available Career Services offerings (i.e., Career Services or will increase/maintain the number of collaborations with academic departments)

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Career Services Assessment Guide

2. Faculty will agree that Career Services programs achieve the faculty’s intended student learning outcomes 3. Faculty will be satisfied with the Career Services campus and in-class services. External Constituents Outcomes (Career services fosters relationships with alumni, employers, professional organizations, and others that will provide opportunities for students to develop professional competencies, integrate academic learning with work, and explore future possibilities) 1. Career services will provide opportunities for alumni, employers, professional organizations, and others to support Mason students’ career exploration and development

University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana
Affective Outcomes: Our students feel: • Hopeful in their career and professional journey • Encouraged in their life pursuits • Confident in their ability to achieve desired results • Committed to carrying out their choices Behavioral Outcomes: Our students can: • Explore Self & Options: Students discover their passions, values, interests, skills and strengths. Students examine career and educational options that compliment their self discovery. • Manage Education: Students are proactive in choosing majors and exploring course options, while having a back-up plan in mind. Students also consider appropriate graduate and professional school options. • Use Resources: Students find, evaluate and employ a wide variety of print, electronic and interpersonal resources in making educational and career choices. • Gain Experience: Students “try out” careers and interest areas through student organizations, • class projects, volunteer programs and/or summer jobs and internships. Within these activities, students build skills and networks. • Communicate Accomplishments: Students understand their strengths, interests and skills, and can communicate them within resumes, cover letters, personal statements and interviews. • Conduct a Search (Job / Intern / Grad School / Professional School): Students can effectively research and pursue their options via various resources offered both by the university and via their personal networking. Cognitive Outcomes: Our students know: • Self: Students know their own passions, interests, skills, values and strengths. Students understand and appreciate the importance of professional and ethical standards. • Options: Students know how to find, access, and evaluate options for career decision making and professional development.
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Decision-Making: Students understand and can employ effective strategies and tools for identifying and evaluating options, as well as executing their choices. • Career Process: Students know that career development is a life-long process, and that lifework balance is an important part of career. Expect To See Outcomes • Increased awareness and knowledge of career options and opportunities • Increased job search skills (i.e., resume writing, interviewing, career exploration, employer research) • Increased awareness of the multiple and varied The Career Center (TCC) resources • Increased level of comfort in approaching career counselors and using TCC resources for exploring, choosing and preparing for careers (from A to Z) Like To See Outcomes • Increased willingness or desire to explore alternative options and expand their world views • Increased understanding of and enjoyment of learning about life-long preparation for future employment • Increased ownership and taking action in their career planning • Increased levels of emotional self awareness, accurate self-assessment, selfconfidence Love To See Outcomes • All University of Illinois undergraduate students will graduate empowered to be lifelong learners actively planning their futures as contributing members of a global community.

University of Arizona:
General Outcomes: 1. Students will be knowledgeable about the career-planning process 2. Students will have the tools to gain career-related experience prior to graduation and to develop post graduation plans. 3. Employers will have services to meet their recruitment needs Specific Outcomes: Student usage of services: 1. Increase the number of students utilizing Career Services by 15 % this year (20042005) over the previous year and ensure that 55% of the total student population will take advantage of services offered through Career Services. 2. Increase the number of minority students utilizing Career Services by 5% this year (2004-2005) over the previous year and ensure that 50% of the total minority student population will take advantage of services offered through Career Services.

Center for Assessment and Planning Support:
Intended Outcome # 1 (Services): Career Services staff will assist students with resume development skills in 2006-07. Assessment Measures, Techniques, and Target Activities: Staff will maintain a list of students using the center to develop resumes. Assessment Criteria/Expected Results:
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Career Services Assessment Guide

At least 25 percent of juniors and seniors will use Career Services for this purpose in 2006-07. Intended Outcome # 2 (Services): Career Services staff will assist students with oral presentation/interview skills in 2006-07 Assessment Measures, Techniques, and Target Activities: Staff will maintain a list of students using the center to prepare for job interviews. Assessment Criteria/Expected Results: At least 25 percent of juniors and seniors will use Career Services for this purpose in 2006-07. Intended Outcome # 3 (Satisfaction with Services): Students will report a high level of satisfaction with the assistance received from Career Services with resume development and/or oral presentation/interview skills. Assessment Measures, Techniques, and Target Activities: Students will complete a spring satisfaction survey, which contains several items related to services provided by Career Services. Institutional Research staff will evaluate students’ responses to the items. Assessment Criteria/Expected Results: At least 90 percent of survey respondents, who received assistance from Career Services with resume development and/or oral presentation/interview skills, will report a high level of satisfaction with the assistance. Intended Outcome # 4 (Student Learning): Students utilizing Career Services will demonstrate competency in resume development skills. Assessment Measures, Techniques, and Target Activities: Students will develop resumes during the junior or senior year. Staff will use an assessment rubric selected by the program assessment committee to evaluate students’ resume development skills. Assessment Criteria/Expected Results: The average rating of student achievement in each performance category will be 3 or higher on a scale of 1-4. Intended Outcome # 5 (Student Learning): After working with Writing Center tutors, students will demonstrate marked improvement in writing skill and grammar. Assessment Measures, Techniques, and Target Activities: Students will revise resumes. Staff will utilize a rubric (same one used for assessment of original resumes) to measure student performance on the revised documents. Assessment Criteria/Expected Results: The average rating of student achievement in writing skill and grammar will improve from 2.6 (on a 4.0 scale) on original resumes to 3.0 or higher on the revised documents. Intended Outcome # 6 (Student Learning): Students utilizing Career Services will display practical expertise in oral presentation/interview skills. Assessment Measures, Techniques, and Target Activities: Students will participate in a mock job interview during the junior or senior year. Staff will use an assessment rubric selected by the program assessment committee to evaluate students’ oral presentation/ interview skills. Assessment Criteria/Expected Results: The average rating of student achievement in each performance category will be 3 or higher on a scale of 1-4.
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Career Services Assessment Guide

Source: Larry Kelley Educational Services, Inc. http://www.angelfire.com/ia/kelley/noninstructional.doc

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“How to” Identify Student Learning Outcomes for Career Centers

What are student learning outcomes (SLO)?
Ruth Stiehl in her book The Outcomes Primer, asks this question: How do we reconstruct courses and programs around outcomes that are relevant to the needs of learners in the 21st century? She goes on to define Student Learning Outcomes as what the student will be able to Do, in the rest of life, with what s/he learns in this course, program and how do we measure it?

Why are SLO’s so important?
Because accreditation compliance requires California Community Colleges to include Student Learning Outcomes in their learning plans, most colleges are drafting the student learning outcomes for their respective institutions, programs and courses. That means that if you have not done so, you will soon begin to prepare the student learning outcomes for students using your career services program.

Three Questions to Ask
The Career Center at the University of Illinois documented how they went about determining SLO’s in the article, “Discovering Student Learning Outcomes and Program Strategies.” They began the process by asking three important questions: 1. How do students benefit by using our services? 2. What do we expect students to learn or acquire as a result of participating in programs and/or services in our Center? 3. When students graduate, what difference has the Career Center made in their lives?

How to use a PLO’s Template
You may find this Program Outcome (PLO) Guide Template from The Outcomes Primer, helpful as you begin building your PLO’s. Ruth Stiehl insists that when using this template you must always plan backwards beginning with the outcomes. From there you can answer the questions in any order.

Program Learning Outcome Guide Template
#4 Prerequisites What must a student be able to do before engaging in this work? #3 Learning Experiences What learning experiences are necessary to include in our #2 Assessment Tasks What can we have students do in this program to show final evidence of the #1 Intended Outcomes What do students need to be able to Do “out there” for which this program
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Career Services Assessment Guide

program to prepare students?

intended outcomes?

will prepare them?

Example: Complete a self assessment of skills, strengths, interests

Example: Participate in Career Workshop Series

Example: Number of successful job placements

Example:
Students successfully market themselves by identifying and communicating their skills, strengths and education

An Example of SLO’s
Check out the Mission Statement and Student Learning Outcomes from San Jose’s Career Center. Learn more about the affective, behavioral and cognitive Student Learning Outcomes for Career Programs in: Q: The Ultimate Techno Student-Info Scene Handout 1 Handout 2 Source: Career Development Advisory Committee, Chancellor’s office, California Community Colleges, http://www.careerdevelopmentadvisory.org/CDA/uploads/SLO.html

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Sample Assessment Plans

Center for Assessment and Planning Support:
Intended Outcome # 4 (Student Learning): Students utilizing Career Services will demonstrate competency in resume development skills. Assessment Measures, Techniques, and Target Activities: Students will develop resumes during the junior or senior year. Staff will use an assessment rubric selected by the program assessment committee to evaluate students’ resume development skills. Assessment Criteria/Expected Results: The average rating of student achievement in each performance category will be 3 or higher on a scale of 1-4.
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Assessment Rubric for Career Services Intended Outcome # 4:

General Resume Rubric
Student Name: Category 1
Resume is difficult to read. Organization is confusing - no categories or headings. Poorly written, difficult to understand. Mistakes in grammar, spelling, punctuation. Little effort given to include information. Handed back for correction. One reference, not all information complete or lined up. Poor effort given to accuracy of information. Not complete.

2
Resume is somewhat difficult to read. Some organization, but uneven lines or inconsistent fonts. Some mistakes in grammar, spelling and punctuation. Minimal effort in word usage and information. Handed back for correction. Two to three references, but information not complete or lined up. Some effort given to include important information, but not complete.

3
Resume is easy to read. Categories and headings are used for organization.

4
Resume is easy to read and visually pleasing. Categories and headings are well defined. No mistakes in grammar, spelling, punctuation. Strong effort given to word choice and information included was valuable.

Format

Writing Skill & Grammar

No mistakes in grammar, spelling, punctuation. Good effort given to word usage and information.

References

Three references with information accurate and lined up. Information accurate and complete.

More than three references all accurate and lined up. Strong effort given to include pertinent information. Very complete.

Quality of Information

Adapted from the original rubric (ID: 1082570) made using RubiStar (http://rubistar.4teachers.org, Copyright © 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000 ALTEC)

Source: Larry Kelley Educational Services: Center for Assessment and Planning Support http://www.angelfire.com/ia/kelley/supportpresentation.doc

Georgia State University
Intended Outcome # 1: Graduating students who participate in a UCS Interview Workshop can explain to an employer how their background and skills match the employer’s needs Effectiveness Indicators: Using a rating form on-campus recruiting employers will evaluate how well individual graduating students explain how their background and skills match the employer’s needs, using a standardized measurement scale. Success Criteria: During the fall semester 2004/205, eighty five percent (85%) of students who have attended a UCS Interview Workshop and have had at least two oncampus interviews will receive an average score of 3.5 on a 5 point scale. If fewer than 85% of such students receive an average score of 3.5, there is a need for

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improvement. If fewer than 50% of all interviewing students achieve an average score of 3.0, Career Services will institute immediate interventions. Data Collection and Analysis Procedures: Data will be collected from both students and employers. Employers will rate each student’s performance in “explaining how their background and skills match the employer’s needs” using a standardized assessment question with a five point response scale ( 5 equals “exceptional”, 3 equals “average” and 1 equals “poor”) which will be incorporated into the student evaluation form. Before the interview, each student waiting to be interviewed will complete a short survey concerning their interview preparation. One of the questions on that survey will ask whether the student has attended a UCS Interview Workshop. At the end of the semester, Career Services staff will compile the data collected from students and employers and calculate average results. The scores of students who attended a UCS interviewing workshop will be compared with the scores of students who did not. Utilization of Results: If more than 15% of students who attended a workshop and had two campus interviews achieve an average score below 3.5, UCS will review and improve the content and delivery of its Interview Workshops. In addition, individual students who have attended a workshop and fall below an score of3.5 will be contacted by a career counselor and offered an individual counseling session on improving interview skills. UCS will also calculate the aggregate data for all campus interviewing students (including both students who did attend a UCS Interview Workshop and those who did not); if more than 50% of all students fall below a score of 3.0, UCS will in the next semester require an online or in person workshop before participation in Campus Interviewing. If more than 80% fall below 3.0, UCS will recommend a required course in Career Development and Job Search which teaches students how to integrate their past experiences into future goals to the University administration. Intended Outcome # 2: Students who participate in UCS programs and events will report satisfaction with the experience Effectiveness Indicators: UCS will measure the degree of student satisfaction with each of its programs and events using a standardized scale on evaluation forms provided at the end of the program/event. Success Criteria: The following results will indicate success: Students who participate in UCS sponsored programs will report an average satisfaction score for all categories of programs of 3.5 on a 5.0 scale. If the average satisfaction score for any category of programs is less than 3.5, there is a need for improvement in that group of programs. If the average satisfaction score for any category of programs is less than 3.0, there is a need for immediate intervention. Data Collection and Analysis Procedures: Career Services will collect data from students who attend any UCS sponsored program during the fall semester 2004/2005. At the end of each program, Career Services staff will distribute evaluation forms that include a question designed to measure satisfaction (on a five point Likert scale, from very dissatisfied to very satisfied) and an open-ended question for areas of improvement. This form will also give students the opportunity to provide their contact information for further follow-up. The coordinator of each program or event will be responsible for distributing the forms and for collecting, analyzing and reporting on the
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Career Services Assessment Guide

data. At the end of the semester, Career Services staff will collate the results of all events and produce an overall report on student satisfaction Utilization of Results: Feedback from the evaluation forms and student follow-up will serve as the primary source of information to drive our improvement effort. Programs and events that receive a 3.0 – 3.4 satisfaction rating will be reviewed for enhancement. Programs and events that receive a 2.5 – 2.9 satisfaction rating will undergo immediate review and Career Services will make significant content, format, and /or delivery changes. Programs/events that receive a 2.0 satisfaction rating will be reviewed for total rework or elimination. Intended Outcome # 3: Students who participate in career counseling can describe three steps involved in making career decisions. Effectiveness Indicators: During academic year 2004/2005, UCS will use a standardized evaluation form to measure students’ ability to describe three steps involved in making career decisions at the conclusion of each career counseling session. Success Criteria: The benchmark for success will be that 85% of students participating in a career counseling session are able to describe three steps involved in career decision-making. If fewer than 85% of students can describe three such steps, there is a need for improvement. If fewer than 70% of students can describe three steps, immediate intervention is indicated. Data Collection and Analysis Procedures: At the end of each career counseling session time will be allocated for the completion of a written evaluation survey which will ask students to describe three steps in career decision making. On a quarterly basis career development staff will review and collate students’ responses and report on the results to determine which step(s) student’s have the greatest success or most difficulty describing.

The Follow-Up Report: Guides and Handbooks

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