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CARDIFF .CITY

v VICTORIA
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OllllDpic
Vol. 12 WEDNESDAY,

Park Beeord
19th JUNE, 1968 Complimentary Issue

Alex Barr asks. . .

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WHY ARE STATE'S LEADING SCORERSNOT IN VI CTORIAN TEAM?


After Victoria's forward line failed to apply any re!j.l pressure on Cardiff in the first half of the first encounter, I cannot for the life of me understand why the two most prolific goalscorers, Armstrong and McCallum, have not been included in the team. Armstrong has already 11 goals to his credit and McCallum is breathing down his neck with nine. Surely these credentials are sufficient to warrant them a place in the team? In saying this I am not knocking Eric Norman. There is still a place in the side for this hard-worki~g player, although I must admit I was a bit concerned to see him take the field last time with a thigh heavily bandaged. M C 11 . t. 1 t 1
from what 1 term "half chances", and against. Cardiff those are; about. all that ~Ill be t! offer. He IS especIally

national Don Murray, the Cardiff pivot, this attribute would be very valuable. I k~ow that coach Mike de Bruc~yere IS aware ~f the wea.knesses In the talent provIded for hIm by the selector. In the last game there were several players who completely ignored his instructions, the flouting of which shows disrespect for de Bruckyere. What is the point of the selector appointing a coach to control a team, then sit back and allow some of the players to virtually thumb their noses at him? It strikes me that it is time the players realised that they are paid employees and, as in any other job, disobeying the boss's orders means

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c a um In par ICU ar ge s goa s

the sack.
Furthermore I feel that de Bruckyere should ha:ve more say regarding the picking of the squad. One thing
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good In the aIr and when one recalls the aerial ability of Scottish inter-~-

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CONFECTIONERY .. PRICES AT OLYMPIC PARK

CANNED SOFT DRINKS ROASTED PEANUTS CHIPS (LARGE)

15c 20c 20c

Other lines,includingCigarettes, at usualretail prices. SHEEHAN SWEETS PTY. LTD. 24-4053

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CARDIFF CITY PERSONALITIES

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GOALKEEPERS-FRED DAVIES. Played 200 games with the famous Wolverhampton Wanderers. Born in Liverpool, despite his Welsh-sounding name.

BOB WILSON. Joined Cardiff from Aston Villa and has made over 150 appearances with the team. Until Davies arrived was automatic choice as senior custodian.
FULL-BACKS-BOBBY FERGUSON. Apprenticed with Newcastle United, played with Derby County before joining the club. One hundred senior games.

DAVE CARVER. Sold by Rotherham for $22,000, lost several months with cartilage trouble. Now 100 per cent fit and raring to go. STEVE DERRETT. Cardiff-born, made his debut with the team in the European Cup against Nac Breda in Eindhoven. GRAHAM COLDRICK. Welsh under 23 international, a defensivewinghalf and utility full-back. HALF-BACKS-BRIAN "RINGO" HARRIS. Currently captain, joined the club from Everton, with which he played over 400 senior games. Won an F.A. Cup Medal in 1966. A man to watch. DON MURRAY. Scottish, under 23 international. One of Britain's

outstanding pivots. JoinedCardiff from the ScottishHighlands and has

never played senior club football in his own country. MALCOLM CLARKE. Graduatedfrom Scottishjunior soccer,to Leicester City, then Cardiff. Midfield specialist ,who will be prominent.
RICHIE MORGAN. Cardiff-born, first senior appearance was in European Cup Winners' Cup against Moscow Torpedo. Strong and robust and an amateur until two years ago. FORWARDS-BARRIE JONES. Eight Welsh international caps. Figured in $90,000 transfer deal between Swansea and Plymouth, then the record fee for a British winger. Came to Cardiff 14 months ago and is rated the ball artist of the team. NORMAN DEAN. Goal-scoring striker, with a fine record of hat-tricks. Played with Southampton. Will be a headache for the local defence. PETER KING. Veteran of 300 games with the club, during which he scored 70 goals. Covers tremendous ground and is a tireless worker. JOHN TO SHACK. Valued at $140,000, although only 19. Certain to represent Wales in the World Cup. Acclaimed in Britain as the brightest young star on the horizon. Played under 23 international already.

LESLIE LEA. Cost the club $40,000,from Blackpool, where he played in the same forward line as Sir Stanley Mathews. An inside forward with a devastatingdrive with perfect placement. BRIAN CLARK. Spectaculardebut with the team, scored six goals in his first six games. In six seasons with Bristol City notched a century. Also played with Huddersfield Town.
RONNIE BIRD. Flies like one. Has the speed of an Olympic sprinter. Previously with Birmingham City, Bradford and Bury. Probably the most experienced forward in the squad.

CLUB OFFICIALS Director-Mr. V. H. DEWEY and his charming wife, to whom we extend a specialwelcome. Manager-The redoubtable JIM SCOULAR, a legend in his own time who will leave his mark on Australian soccer. Trainer-Mr. LEW CLAYTON. Healing handsand a friendly person who has the complete confidenceof the team, but he makes them work hard. He does himself!
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VICTORIA'S

HOPES

LIE WITH

THESE

PEOPLE

GOAL-WILLY SCHROIFF, "The Black Cat". There would not be one member of Cardiff who doesn't know this world-famous goalkeeper. A big-time player with big-time temperament, Schroiff has a wealth of world soccer experience, and any goals the Welshmen score they will earn the

hard way.
RESERVE GOAL-ANGELOS DANDRAKOS. From Greece only a few weeks ago, he is the most exciting arrival for some time. His quick breakthrough into the State team indicates the selectors have high hopes for him. BACKS-GEORGE KEITH. From Hakoah Club, where he is a stalwart. Represented Australia in South-East Asia, and was rated by his team-mates

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as a hero in defenceand a tiger in attack. His opponenttoday will have no easy task. BILLY COOK. From Port Melbourne-Slavia,normally in the pivot role, but is so versatile he could play anywhere. A regular State player with tons of tenacity.
HALF-BACKS-FRANK MICIC. Former I.U.S.T. player now with South Melbourne. regular and the Australian in Asia. A link man with a Victorian soccerbrain second to in none. Currently side scoring frequently in

9lub games. DICK VAN ALPHEN. Ex-Wilhelmina, cu~rently with Hakoah. Toured
with the Australian team and is the cagiest player in the State League, seldom puts a foot wrong.

ANDREAS TZENOS. Only three weekshere from Greece-has made his mark quickly. Undoubtedly a brilliant schemerwith perfect control. TOMMY RANpLES. Tireless forager from Port Melbourne-Slavia. Bobs up everywhere and is deadly in tackling. Will be prominent in the Victorian squadfor years. FORWARDS-ZIGGY GADECKI. Polish, and what "polish" he has. He will be a worry to his opponent. A master of anticipation, especiallyin front of goal. TOMMY McCOLL. Scot from the luventus Club. Has hair cut BeatIe A TTILA ABONYI. From the Melbourne Club - top-scorerin South-East Asia. Has been off target recently, but in big gamesthis fellow does big things. BILLY YOTIEK. A Croatia player, rated the best ball player in the squad. Has tremendouspotential as a goal-getterand never gives up trying. ERIC NORMAN, luventus. His first representativegame, but he could
be the sensation. Works like a beaver and n~ver gives the opposition one moment's peace. HAMMY McMEECHAN. A Croatia stalwart. On his day Hammy certainly is no ham with a soccer ball. A striking forward not afraid to style, and beetles around the ground to no mean order. Australian representative with lots of ability, when the pressure is on.

.l1iovearound the ground, certain to show out. TOMMY ROBERTSON,GeorgeCross. Showsthe sameindomitable spirit that goes with the George Cross. Scottish, with the dour streak which lnak;eS him a valuable member of any team. WILLIE ARMOUR, George Cross. Added to squad for this match. A lively forward, unselfish,yet gets among the goals or lays chanceson. CLUB OFFICIALS Manager-JOHN BARCLAY. A tremendousrecord with both Victoria and the successfulAustralian team in Asia. Seldom ruffled - and sees his team stays the same way. Coach-MIKE deBRUCKYERE. Dutch international, who knows the game
inside out and backwards. Has the squad in perfect condition mentally and physically. Masseur-LOU LAZARI. The "Gentle Genial Giant". His work in the community at large has made his healing hands famous. Automatic selection for all Victorian and Australian sides.

STATE LEAGUE LADDER w.


HAKOAH .. .. . ... 7 ,6 5 4 S.l'4.-HELLAS

D.
2 ~ 3 4

L.
1 1 2 2

F.
21 21 22 18

A.
8 11 12 12

Av.
2.62 1.90 1.08 1.50

Pts.
16 15 13 12

GEORGE CROSS ... POLONIA


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Croaha.

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... ...

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5 4
4

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2

4 3
4

12 14
16

8 12
20

150 . 1.16
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11 11
10

P.M.-Slavia

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Lions.

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3 3

3 2

4 5

8 16

11 16

.72 1.00

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Ringwood City..

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Melbourne. Juventus
Fpotscray
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2 2
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3 3
,1

5 5
9

12 13
5

20 24
,24

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.20

7 7
1

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NEXT WEEKEND'S GAMES Dick Crossley, the Olympic Park curator, who does such a magnificent

Saturday
Alexander v. H ak 0 ah ,

job in, maintaining what must be the world s most overworked soccer
ground, has another achievement to his credit. With his assistance his son,

Olympic Park.

Ian, has graduated in civil engineering at Monash University.

Lions v. Polonia

Furthermore Ian was offered a post


City with t.he Boeing Aircra~t AmerIca, an opportunIty Company in which fortunately will be' lost as Ian unhas

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luventus

v.

Ringwood

Sunday

beencaughtup in the Army call-up.


All the Record can say is well done again, Dick Crossley, and the soccer

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P.M.-Slaviav. Croatia, Olympic Park, Foot~crayv. Melbourne S.M.-Hellas v. George Cross' The scoring record fo;ca. World Cup series is held by France's Just Fontaine, who netted 13 goals in the I f h 1958 .. na stages 0 t e serIes ill Sweden.

public and "The Record" wish Ian all t~e. .best. and a speedy return to civilian life. :,

~ CARDIFF CITY AUSTRALIAN' RESULTS Victoria 1 drew with Cardiff 1. Cardiff 5 d. Tasmania 1. Cardi.ff 2, N orthern N .. SW . 0. N.S.W. 1, Cardiff 1.

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TEAMS
VICTORIA
1. SCHROIFF 2. KEITH 3. COOK 4. RANDELS 5. VAN ALPHEN 6. TZENOS 7. GADECKI (Capt.)

CARDIFF CITY
1.

DAVIES

2. CARVER 3. FERGUSON 4. CLARKE 5. MURRAY 6. HARRIS (Capt.) 7. JONES 8. CLARK, 9. KING 10. TOSHACK 11. LEA 12. BIRD Reserves COLDRICK, DERRETT. B.

8. McCOLL 9. NORMAN 10. MICIC 11. VOTJEK 12. ABONYI 13. McMEECHAN 14. ROBERTSON 15. ARMOUR
Reserve Goalkeeper, DAN

Reserve Goalkeeper, WILSON.

Referee,

Mr.

HARRISON.

Linesmen,

Messrs. FINNEGAN,

YELLAND.

HELP FOR NEW SETTLERS IN AUSTRALIA


You'll be welcomeatBank of New

South Wales

Wales Comer

Branch

Cnr. Collins & SwanstonSts.,Melbourne Bring this programmewith you


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VICTORIA CAN WIN


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WITH EFFORT

By ALEX BARR
Victoria can topple Caf6fiff City with the proviso that every~layer in the side pulls his weight. Cardiff is a good team for sure, and the arti5try of Jones and Lea on their wings will again provide headaches for the defence, but the will to win can work wonders. Some critics "canned" George Keith and Billy Cook. ~fter the first encounter. In my opmlon they held their own with the two classy wingers, and bot!} .had the c.onfidence in t~eir own abilIty t.o swrtc~ defence mto attack, and I tipS me lId to them both.
Dick Van Alphen turned in a very

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Goals can be scored from 25 yards -have a go. Some shots will miss, some will be saved, but on the law of averages some must get through. The public want action and this is the most effective and certain way of providing it.

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34 nTLES

TO RANGERS

Glasgow Rangers have won more, national league championship titles :;;ii than any other team in Europe. Since ~
their first triumphant season in 189899, the mighty Rangers have won the

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workmanlike

display and but for a

Scottish league title 34 times. Rangers have won 10 more league championships than the next m.ost successful team in Europe, Austna's Vienna Rapid, with 24. .Next on the list come Glasgow Celtic and Denmark's Boldclub Copenhagen (22), Hungary's Ferencvaros and Czechoslovakia's Sparta Prague (17), Portugal's Benfica (16), Switzerland's Grass-

few lapseswhen he overdid the shortpassing, under pressure' held his own. :;\11 right, the ~e~e~ce, backed by Shov;"man Schrolff IS. sound, so the task IS ahead of the wmg halves and forwards.
. Tzenos, I felt,- was a success. This modest fellO;w said he should. not have !Dade the side. .Make no. mistake, he

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IS well wort.h his place !~ a?y comp;any and with F~ank M!clc m sparklIng form the midfield IS ta;ten ca~e of.. We are as good as Cardiff at this pomt. The forwards will have to smarten up. I have said elsewhere in this programme that the selection leaves

hoppers Zurich and Slavia Prague


(15). Those with 13 wins include Anderlecht (Belgium), Juventus Turin (Italy) and Servette Geneva (Switzerlano). ;;c~,;,.;,..;,!,;!,;,:,..; ;c,"?;,c;"O':"~' .,

much to be desired.However, Votjek, For up-to-the-minute comment on McMeechan, Norman and Gadecki weekendsoccer tune in to 3KZ every have talent and with Armour added the attack will, I feel, be improved. Friday I/igh./at 9.30.
Now the bitter pill for the line. The shortest distance forward between Sports Cavalcade ' prf!sented by Rod

two given points is a straight line, and this is the .course our. attac.k should take. Nothmg fancy, Just direct play with the ball doing the work.

McLeod, will, from now on, include a soccer segment presentedby A lex Barr.

In Football RIVERLANDTime is

3/4

Time

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In Soccer RIVERLAND Tim~ is 1/2 TimeI l' ri , i ' 1 , ," ..,


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For Children, Mothei;~~d'Fathers RIVERLANDTimet:l~ any 'rime ~, " J;,

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WHAT A SEASON- IN STATE LEAGUE
One hundred and seventy-six goals have been netted, which is an average of almost three goals per game. This is quite high by normal soccer standards and certainly gives the public what they come along to see. The way the League stands at present, anyone who bets on the premiership would have to be crazy, to say.the least. Anyone of seven teams could pull it off. Late-season loss of form, injuri~s, new arrivals from ~ overseas could change the picture inside the next two weeks. "The Record" feels that this is the best season ever. In the main atten-

Around the halfway mark and the premiership is wide open, with every team except Footscray having a chance to reach the top four. It is not known yet whether this will mean anything with regard to the Australia Cup'. but it .must be the closest contest m the hIstory of the League. Even Juventus and Melbourne, which occupy the second and third bottom rungs of the ladder, could conceivably make the grade. After all, they ~re only two and a half games out of business and there are 12 more rounds to be played.
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matches, there have been 15 drawn


games, certainly an all-time record for Victorian soccer. This in itself accentuates the closeness of the competition.

In 10 rounds played, involving 60

danceshave not increasedproportionately to the population increase. Could we suggest you point out to your friends how interesting the situation is.

WORLD

CUP WINNERS 1930-66

Year

Winners 4 2 . . . 4 2 3 5 3 4

Runners-up Argentina Czechoslovakia Hungary. Brazil Hungary. Sweden. Czechoslovakia West Germany ", , 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 2

Venue Montevideo Rome Paris Rio de Janeiro Berne Stockholm Santiago London

1930 Uruguay. 1934 Italy..

1938 Italy.

1950 Uruguay.. 1954 West Germany 1958 Brazil. 1962 Brazil... 1966 Ellgland

GEORGE

CROSS

See TOP SOCCER at

ALEXANDE R

P.M. SLAVIA

OLYMPIC PARK
EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY CHOAnA

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---~=~to switch clubs at the end of each season. This happens all ?ver ~he world and the first conSIderation should be for the boy himself. Admittedly some clubs do spend quite a lot on their youngsters, but by the same token invariably t.hey do have the loyalty of the lads m return. The devoted people who look after the youngsters do so without any expectation of reward. It is obligatory on every club to foster the young stars of tomorrow but there should not be any strings' attached, as there are at present.
. It did t~e writer's heart good to see ;j :j~

The fact that juniors are to be r.epre~ent.edo~ the Players' .Associatlon IS dlsturbmg. The very Idea that they feel they should be involved suggests that all is not well in junior soccer lanks. Surely boys should be playing soccer for pleasure and enjoymen~ without becoming soccer unioni~t~ It has long been a bo.ne;of contention that youngsters who Jom a cl,;b even at tender ages are held to :4 ilfe,con::; tract as far as some are conce~d. This is of course morally wrong if not illegal. No minor ,'Can enter
into any contract, and although realise~ th.at. som~ s.<>rtof ofi(er it is mus~

be mamtamedthIs IS not the way to'


do it.
,. Boys should. be year-to-year

that magnIficentparadehere at Olympic Park on June 9. -,The soccer .f~ture of those boys must be protecte:d, but
I can~o~ see; involvement assocIatIon IS the answer. in a players'

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~ : -registered on a basIs, and shQ~Wbe free

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ALL PLAYERS AT OLYMPIC,..p-ARK ARE PROVIDED WITH RIVERLAND ORANGES.


RICH IN VIJAMIN '~ C. FOR GOqD ~ALTH.

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" I, .,-. I he , was Continued Pag&...:,1 . noted. for from as a plaYf,Lwas his

. The CIty were delig~.t~,tG. ~ec~ive a cl eous suPPl.y


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~~' Cardiff

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refusal to give up. He challenged b 11 k every a .an~ was a constant wor er. I ~now thIs IS what he expect~ from
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of Rlv.er~and orang ma~~ t.hem ' feel qutte at home. usee, Rlverland" oral;lges are av la Ie in Britai~. . and tfte-wand is f:.E~~ everywhere. ..,'
From
R . Iver

th!s squad and I hope that tonight he will get more honest hard work from h .d tesle.

Cit~Thank
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to seethese games andare en~itl~ to


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The public are paying good money


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a 100 per cent effort for theIr hardearned cash. They want and are entitledplayer to 90 on minutes' solid effort by every the field. I know they will it from asCardiff, who know theirget business professional footballers. This is a game which could make the general sporting public realise that soccer in Victoria is on the march. A victory over Cardiff would drive the message home. It can be done Victorians, so get down to your task 'and earn your money and the

, '$, . BookingsSoccer are Victorian e open ration for Grand the

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Ball, which ld on NicholAugust It, ii: 3 at the San will Remq.~a'lroom, son St., Carlton. .t-"-.j Highlights of t~vening will be the selection of M~ictorian Soccer, ' f6 Fiji, and there who will win a tr will also be rflain cent prizes for entrants in thet ','m t Dressed Table Contest". Book '" and arrange your party and organise for your

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respectof the fans.

club to enter the table contest. .


Phone 254461;

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Progress Press Pty. Ltd., 66 HiKh St., Glen Iris.

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