Course Syllabus

Title: Introduction to Writing Across the Disciplines with Technology Credits: 3 Instructor: Mary Elizabeth Meeting dates and times: July 13–17, 2009 Location: M T W R F 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Computer Lab at UVM

Course Description:
This course, designed for educators, explores how technology can support and enhance writing across the disciplines to ―update‖ the writing process for the 21st century classroom. Using readily available technology (both online tools and resources as well as software applications) to address the Vermont Framework Communication Standards for Writing and Technology, educators will review the writing process as it is affected by discipline, genre, and the individual writer; gain insight into the relationship of the writing process and the reading process; and learn specific technology resources and techniques to match specific writing process situations and needs. The instructor has extensive experience in writing with technology, having been a professional writer for 28 years, and used technology in a variety of ways in her writing process for 25. She has written an opera with a composer in Sydney, international instructional content for music education for Sibelius Software, Ltd. in London, teacher and student material in secondary language and literature for many of the major US textbook publishers (along with materials for math and social studies), over a thousand web articles on subjects ranging from caraway to Paraguay, 10 books published by Barron’s Educational Series, Inc. and Garlic Press, Inc., and five books that she has self-published—all from her home in Essex, Vermont.

Goals:
To equip educators to better fulfill the Vermont Framework Communications Standards for Writing and Technology in the 21st century classroom by integrating technology into the writing process as appropriate in their own academic discipline(s). To provide review of and instruction in the writing process as it applies to various disciplines, genres of writing, and individual writers. To demonstrate the connections between writing process elements and the creation of ―considerate‖ text, i.e., the relationship of the writing process and the reading process as well as to consider the role of reading in the writing process. To provide instruction in the basic operations of cross-platform technologies that are a) commonly available in schools and b) that can meet writers’ needs to perform specific tasks in the writing process. For course registrants to feel confident in using the course content—both insights into the writing process and skills in technology—to adapt their classroom instruction as appropriate.

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Learning Outcomes:
Students will understand the writing process in terms of: • the stages involved in the writing process and the interactions between stages • how the writing process relates to the reading process both for the writer and for the audience of the writing • the similarities and differences in the writing process across disciplines, genres, contexts, and individuals • how to adapt the writing process for their classroom assignments • how available technology can enhance and support writing in their classrooms Students will have the ability to perform as well as instruct their students in the writing process skills of: • setting a purpose, audience, context, and topic • researching • organizing • composing/drafting • reviewing/critiquing • revising • editing • publishing Students will have the ability to perform as well as instruct their students in the technology skills of: • bookmarking for saving website locations for future reference and for TOC and index use in publishing • checking readability • checking spelling and grammar • citing online sources • creating keyboard shortcuts • creating a personalized proofreading checklist • creating graphs and charts • commenting in both synchronous and asynchronous environments • downloading documents (from reputable websites) • evaluating and using websites • highlighting changes • linking for publishing • making file attachments • morphing an outline into a writing framework • online collaboration • outlining for organizing • programming your mouse buttons • searching techniques to find quality sources • simple drawing for illustrations • simple image editing • simple layout for organizing, mixing media, and creating attractive and ―considerate‖ texts • simple text styling for organizing and creating attractive and ―considerate‖ texts • using a search engine to locate sources • using an online card catalogue • using online reference works, such as dictionaries, thesauri, encyclopedias, etc. • versioning using commonly found, cross-platform resources such as these:

-3Software Applications Microsoft Word Microsoft Excel Microsoft PowerPoint Adobe Acrobat Online Tools Firefox browser http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/central/ Search Englines (Google, Yahoo, etc.) Skype Instant Message/Videochat program http://www.skype.com/ ThinkFree Office http://www.thinkfree.com/ Writeboard http://writeboard.com Online References The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language http://www.bartleby.com/61/ Merriam-Webster Online http://www.merriam-webster.com/help/faq/etymology.htm The Free Dictionary http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ One Look Dictionary Search http://onelook.com/ Thesaurus.com http://thesaurus.reference.com/ Answers.com http://www.answers.com/ Infoplease http://www.infoplease.com/ as well as newspapers, college and university websites, government websites such as NASA and the Library of Congress, etc. Students will work collaboratively as well as individually. Students will confidently adopt technological solutions for discrete writing process needs in their classroom. Students will confidently address—at a minimum—the following Vermont Framework Communication Standards as applicable in their classrooms, incorporating insights, knowledge, and skills gained in this class:
WRITING Writing Dimensions 1. 5 Students draft, revise, edit, and critique written products so that final drafts are appropriate in terms of the following dimensions:
Purpose Intent is established and maintained within a given piece of writing. Organization The writing demonstrates order and coherence. Details Details contribute to development of ideas and information, evoke images, or otherwise elaborate on or clarify the content of the writing. Voice or Tone An appropriate voice or tone is established and maintained.

Writing Conventions 1. 6 Students’ independent writing demonstrates command of appropriate English conventions, including grammar, usage, and mechanics. Reports 1.8 In written reports, students organize and convey information and ideas accurately and effectively. Narratives 1.9 In written narratives, students organize and relate a series of events, fictional or actual, in a coherent whole. Procedures 1.10 In written procedures, students relate a series of steps that a reader can follow. IT

-4Information Technology 1.17 Students use computers, telecommunications, and other tools of technology to research, to gather information and ideas, and to represent information and ideas accurately and appropriately. Research 1.19 Students use organizational systems to obtain information from various sources (including libraries and the Internet). Communication of Data 1.20 Students use graphs, charts, and other visual presentations to communicate data accurately and appropriately. Selection (applies to grades 5 – 12 only)

1.21 Students select appropriate technologies and applications to solve problems and to communicate with an audience.

General Course Information
Course Policies/Expectations:
Students are expected to have basic computer skills. If anyone wishing to take this class does not have basic skills, a pre-class meeting with the instructor may be arranged to familiarize the student with the necessary preliminary skills. This will allow everyone to focus on technology as applied to the writing process. The first assignment ―1. How I Use Writing in My Classroom,‖ is to be turned in at the beginning of the first class. This is because 1) Students will be working through each of the steps of the writing process in class, and this exercise will serve them best if they can do it with specific writing assignments from their own classrooms in mind. 2) Knowing what students wish to achieve will help the instructor to adapt the class to meet particular needs. Students should complete readings related to outside assignments prior to each class session.

Attendance Expectations:
Attendance at every class session is required. If a student has a valid excuse that keeps her or him from class, the class may be made up by an extended journal entry documenting the student’s progress through the material covered and responses to it. If necessary, an extra meeting with the instructor may be scheduled.

Religious Observance:
The official policy for excused absences for religious holidays: Students have the right to practice the religion of their choice. Each semester students should submit in writing to their instructors by the end of the first full day of classes their documented religious holiday schedule for the semester. Faculty must permit students who miss work for the purpose of religious observance to make up this work.

Contributions in Class:
Students are expected to participate in all activities and discussions and use their own classroom experience to expand upon, support, or (civilly) question others’ observations and insights, providing opportunities for crossdisciplinary fertilization.

Academic Honesty & Professionalism:
All students are required to be familiar with and adhere to the ―Academic Honesty Policy Procedures‖ delineated in the most recent edition of ―The Cat’s Tale‖. (http://www.uvm.edu/~dosa/handbook/). Additionally, when speaking of your teaching situation, be sure to protect the identity of any student you mention. Follow your school policies for sharing student work in any forum.

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Accommodations:
Accommodations will be provided to eligible students with disabilities. Please obtain an accommodation letter from the ACCESS office and see one of the instructors early in the course to discuss what accommodations will be necessary. If you are unfamiliar with ACCESS, visit their website at http://www.uvm.edu/access to learn more about the services they provide. ACESS: A-170 Living Learning Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405. PH: 802-656-7753, TTY: call 711 (relay), Fax: 802-656-0739, Email: access@uvm.edu, Instant Messenger: UVMaccess. General office hours: 8:30am – 4:30pm Monday through Friday. Call to make an appointment. If any students in the course are not native speakers of English, the language/expression elements of the rubrics may be adjusted as deemed appropriate.

Required and/or recommended readings:
N.B. All readings for this course, in the spirit of the course, will be made available through technological means: electronic reserve; hyperlinked documents; Blackboard, etc. Not every source will be used in its entirety. As part of the content of the course involves considering how to evaluate sources, each source presented to students will be discussed and evaluated as a source and some are chosen with the purpose of furthering this discussion. IN CLASS READINGS July 13 Definitions of the Writing Process • Freedman, S. W., Dyson, A. H., Flower, L., Chafe W. (1987) Research in Writing: Past, Present, and Future. • Mason, J. (2002) Composition Theory. • Simard, J. (1997) The Writing Process in a Multimedia Environment. • Yancey, K. B. (2004) Using Multiple Technologies to Teach Writing. Step-by-Step Through the Technology-Assisted Writing Process 1. Purpose, Audience, Context, Topic ME selections from published books. Waldo, M. (1996) Inquiry as a Non-Invasive Approach to Cross-Curricular Writing Consultancy. 2. Researching, Search Engines, & Online Safety • Infopeople. (2008) Best Search Tools Chart. a. Finding Sources • Ranks.NL. (2008) Compare Search Engines. • UC Berkeley Library. (2008) Recommended Search Engines. Bradley, P. (2005) Major Search Engines; a comparison. Notess, G. R. (2008) Search Engine Showdown: The Users’ Guide to Web Searching. • Cornell University Library. (2008) Research Minutes: How to Identify Scholarly Articles (video). • Magi, T. (2006) How to Do a Better Online Search. • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (2006) Online Library Catalog Overview. • Google (2008) SafeSearch Archive. • Google (2008) Web Search Help Center: Safe Search Filtering. b. Evaluating Sources • Harris, Robert. Evaluating Internet Research Sources. • Price-Evans, P. (2008) Researching Online for College Students: Five Easy Steps (video). c. Crediting Online Sources Bailey Howe. (2005) How to Cite Your Electronic Sources in APA Format. Bailey Howe. (2006) How to Cite Your Sources in MLA Style. July 14

3. Organizing (project and paper)

-6• Mann, Merlin. (2006) Vox Populi: Best practices for file naming. • Wells, K. D. (2007) Organizing Writing Projects: Keeping track of your projects in each stage of development. • The Association of Independents in Radio. (1995) Organizing the Writing Process. • Hall, T. and Strangman, N. (2002) Graphic Organizers. National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum. • Institute for the Advancement of Research in Education (IARE). (2003) The Graphic Organizers: A Review of Scientifically Based Research. • Beasley J. D. (2004) The Impact of Technology on Plagiarism Prevention and Detection: Research Process Automation, a New Approach for Prevention. • Harris, Robert. (2004) Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers. • Kunka, J.L. (2007) Writing Process Presentation. • Lesko, J. R., Editor (2008) Plagiary.org Papers and Perspectives. • Martini, M. (edited by Brizee, A.) (1994) Reverse Outlining: An Exercise for Taking Notes and Revising Your Work. • Jolliffe, D. A. adapted. Some Basic Terminology for the Writing Process. • Lehr, F. (1995) Revision in the Writing Process. • Bader, A. (1996) Do’s and Don’ts for Writing Commentary. • Dawson, M. Peer Editing Guide. • University of Richmond Writing Center. (nd) Editing Checklist. • Arcanum-Butler Local Schools. (nd) The Writing Process: The Most Important Thing to Know. • National Council of Teachers of English. (2008) Writing Contests for Students and Places that Publish Student Writing. • Publishingstudents.com (2004) Online Student Publishing & Writing Resources. • The WIDE Research Center Collective. (2004) Why Teach Digital Writing? • CCCC Position Statement on Teaching, Learning, and Assessing Writing in Digital Environments. (2004) • Honeycutt, L. (1996) Review of Writing Technology: Studies on the Materiality of Literacy. • Lohr, Steve. (2008) At School, Technology Starts to Turn a Corner. Rossitto, C. (2004). The Writing Process and Writing Technology: A Pre-study for the Scribani Project • Wanderman, R. (2008) How Computers Change the Writing Process for People with Learning Disabilities.

4. Composing/Drafting and Plagiarism Prevention

5. Reviewing/Critiquing a. Reviewing one’s own work b. Other’s review of one’s work 6. Revising July 15 7. Editing oneself and others

8. Publishing

What Changes when Writing w. Technology? Digital Rhetoric The Digital Environment Technology and Disabilities

July 16 1. Microsoft Word Software Applications In Depth in the Writing Process • Bailey Howe. (2001) Microsoft Office 2000 Basics. • Bailey Howe. (2001) Basic Guide to Microsoft Word 2000. • Bailey Howe. (2001) Basic Guide to Microsoft Excel.

2. Microsoft Excel

-7• Bailey Howe. (2001) Basic Guide to Microsoft Powerpoint 2000. 4. Adobe Acrobat • Foss, K. (2006) Adding audio comments to a PDF with Acrobat. • Johnson, D. (2007) PDF Bookmarks: Surveying the options. Online Tools for Collaboration In Depth Safety Google. (2008) Terms of Service. 1. ThinkFree Office, Writeboard.com, • Writeboard.com homepage Acrobat.com • ThinkFree.com homepage and Features • Baker, D.L. (2008) Talk Amongst Yourselves. July 17 2. Skype • Kiesler, R.C. (2008) Real Time Online Collaboration. • Graupner, M.A. Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Communication. 3. Email and Instant Messaging • Belisle, R. (December, 1996) E-mail Activities in the ESL Writing Class. Online References In Depth • The American Heritage Dictionary of the English 1. Comparing Dictionaries, Encyclopedias, et al. Language http://www.bartleby.com/61/ • Merriam-Webster Online http://www.merriamwebster.com/help/faq/etymology.htm • The Free Dictionary http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ • One Look Dictionary Search http://onelook.com/ • Thesaurus.com http://thesaurus.reference.com/ • Answers.com http://www.answers.com/ • Infoplease http://www.infoplease.com/ 3. Microsoft Powerpoint

-8Reading for Outside of Class Assignments 3. Reading and Writing—Due July 16 • Anderson, T. H and Armbruster, B. B. (1984) Content Area Textbooks in Learning to Read in American Schools: Basal Readers and Content Texts (ed. Richard C. Anderson, Jean Osborn, Robert J. Tierney). 4. Technology Standards and My Classroom— • Vermont Framework of Standards and Learning Due July 17 Opportunities—Communications Standards • International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•T) and Performance Indicators for Teachers 5. My New Writing Curriculum—Due August 7 • Kleiman, G.M. (2004). Myths and realities about technology in k-12 schools: Five years later. • Lenhart, A., Arafeh, S., Smith, A, and Macgill, A. R. (2008) Writing, Technology and Teens; Part 3 and Part 5 • Miners, Zach. (2008) How Do You Define 21st Century Skills? • Partnership for 21st Century Skills. (2004) ICT Literacy Map – English • Yates, R. (1999) Curriculum for the 21st Century.

Week-by-Week Reading Rubric:
Reading is either incorporated into the writing assignments or the class activities and discussions: it does not have a separate rubric.

Electronic Submissions/Internet Use:
Students will use the Internet to: • Perform a number of the classroom activities. • Access course readings, both in and out of class. • Complete the course assignments. • Submit papers to the instructor and access the instructor’s comments.

Student Evaluation/Assessment
Grading: Each percentage contribution (see below) is equivalent to that number of points. (100% = 100 points) TOTAL POINTS: 100 94-100 points A 90-93 points A87-89 points B+ 84-86 points B 80-83 points B76-79 points C 70-75 points D below 70 points F

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Description of Class Assignments:
1. How I Use Writing in My Classroom—Due July 13 This paper will serve to set a baseline for you to reflect on your practice, so you will need to: i. lay out your writing assignments (you can do this for just one class that you wish to focus on or for as many as you like, but note that whatever you address here you will need to address in your final paper); ii. discuss your approach to writing, including your current use of technology; iii. explain how, in your view, writing fits into your discipline; and iv. discuss what you’d like to achieve in this class. The first section will. be as long as it takes; the following three may be 1–2 paragraphs, if that is sufficient. 2. Safe and Sane Researching—Due July 14 To create a lesson to demonstrate to your students the ethical, qualitative, privacy, and other issues involved in Internet research, you are going to do Internet research with the express purpose of discovering dead ends, wrong turns, poor writing, misinformation, plagiarism or other copyright violations, opinion presented as fact, privacy violations, etc., as well as valid, authoritative, and useful websites. You will use topics that are pertinent to your classroom and in which you are expert, so that you can distinguish the good from the bad and the ugly. The research will be done during class (so in case you don’t go very far wrong yourself, there will be others who can help you to fall off the beaten path), and you will write an outline for your presentation to your students as your assignment, including the pertinent web addresses as hyperlinks. 3-5 pages. 3. Reading and Writing—Due July 16 This is a 2-part paper of 3–5 pages Part 1 – Discuss the role of reading in the writing process. Part 2 – After reading ―Content Area Textbooks‖ by Thomas H. Anderson and Bonnie B. Armbruster, which will be on electronic reserve, consider how the insights presented about reading could be turned around to inform your writing instruction. Begin by explaining why this 1984 article is or is not outdated and then discuss how you will address Anderson’s and Armbruster’s points in your writing instruction. 4. Technology Standards and My Classroom—Due July 17 Referencing the Vermont Framework Communications Standards from here: http://www.education.vermont.gov/new/html/pubs/framework.html and the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•T) and Performance Indicators for Teachers here: http://www.iste.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=NETS Use them to write a 2-page reflection on how you currently use technology and a vision of how you would like to incorporate technology in the future with an eye to its use in writing. 5. My New Writing Curriculum—Due August 7 This is a revision of your first paper with supplemental sections. It is due August 7 and must follow these guidelines. Note that in this case there is a defined audience and purpose: I am your audience and your purpose is to integrate your experiences and understandings from this class into your instructional setting. Please write in first person and address me as the person you know from 40 hours together in the past 5 days.

- 10 Use the writing process, as appropriate, to create this paper, but however you use the writing process, you must have a peer review by the person you chose in the final class session. This is a complicated assignment. The aim is to create a situation in which it is advantageous to use technology, techniques, and resources that we’ve discussed in class, as well as to give you an opportunity to reflect on how technology can enhance and support your particular instructional needs. Formatting • Use technology and so-called ―pre-digital‖ elements as suits you in your writing process, but your final paper must be created using a software application or an online application. Since this is an opportunity to gain extra practice with and insight into how the technologies and techniques introduced in the course work, it’s probably in your interest to be daring. • Set up a versioning system and make a copy of your first paper, renaming it to be the first version in the series for this final assignment. Include all revisions in a folder and send the folder to the instructor via uvm email as a file attachment on or before the due date. Any pre-digital elements can be scanned. • One of these versions should be either an outline, a graphic organizer, or some other organizing approach that you use. • One of the versions should be notes from your peer reviewer. If your peer review was done synchronously in videochat or using the telephone or any other technology that does not yield a written record, the reviewer should also provide the writer with a copy of the reviewer’s notes. Include the notes or the commented document in your folder. • At some point in your document where it makes sense to do so, insert at least one visual element: image, photo, graph, chart, etc. Format the text to work well with your addition. • Online opportunities that you intend to introduce or make available to your students should be included as hyperlinks. This includes references to search engines, online collaboration tools, online resources, and online references. Be sure to properly credit any references you use. • Attach the chart that follows this sentence showing your choices of technology. Check techniques, applications, tools, and references you used, and write in uses of technology and/or techniques that are not listed. Techniques • bookmarking for saving website locations for future reference and for TOC and index use in publishing • checking readability • checking spelling and grammar • citing online sources • creating keyboard shortcuts • creating a personalized proofreading checklist • creating graphs and charts • commenting in both synchronous and asynchronous environments • downloading documents (from reputable websites) • evaluating and using websites • highlighting changes • linking for publishing • making file attachments • morphing an outline into a writing framework • online collaboration • outlining for organizing • programming your mouse buttons • searching techniques to find quality sources • simple drawing for illustrations

- 11 • simple image editing • simple layout for organizing, mixing media, and creating attractive and ―considerate‖ texts • simple text styling for organizing and creating attractive and ―considerate‖ texts • using a search engine to locate sources • using an online card catalogue • using online reference works, such as dictionaries, thesauri, encyclopedias, etc. • versioning • other (list)

Software Applications Microsoft Word Microsoft Excel Microsoft PowerPoint Adobe Acrobat Other: list

Online Tools Search Engines (Google, Yahoo, etc.) Skype Instant Message/Videochat program http://www.skype.com/ ThinkFree Office http://www.thinkfree.com/ Writeboard http://writeboard.com Other: list

Online References The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language http://www.bartleby.com/61/ Merriam-Webster Online http://www.merriam-webster.com/help/faq/etymology.htm The Free Dictionary http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ One Look Dictionary Search http://onelook.com/ Thesaurus.com http://thesaurus.reference.com/ Answers.com http://www.answers.com/ Infoplease http://www.infoplease.com/ Others: newspapers, college and university websites, government websites such as NASA and the Library of Congress, etc. – list

Sections Your final paper will have four sections: 1. Explain any global changes you intend to make in the use of technology or techniques in the writing done in your classroom. This may include introducing students to new technology, techniques, tools, and resources; changing the classroom environment; etc. Make another copy of the chart above, altering it as needed, and fill it in to show which technology, techniques, resources, and references you have used in your instruction in the past and which technology, techniques, resources, and references you plan to use in your instruction in the future. 2. For each assignment that you were considering when you began this class, tell how you will adapt it with technology, techniques, resources, or references, given what you’ve learned. Include both your write-up from your first paper and your new version of each assignment.

- 12 Please organize your comments on assignments using the segments of the writing process as follows (but feel free to change the terminology as necessary to match the use in your instructional environment). If you are excluding any sections, please explain your decision to do so. • setting a purpose, audience, context, and topic • researching • organizing • composing/drafting • reviewing/critiquing • revising • editing • publishing Here is an example: Old One assignment I like to use in 4th grade science is a BME story, a collaborative work written by three students. The group chooses an animal that they would like to study. They draw straws for who will write the Beginning (from the time the animal is born), Middle (up until the animal has young of its own, and End (up until the animal dies). Then they do research on the animal using three books, one of which can be a wildlife guide. The student with the Beginning writes first; the student with the Middle adds on and the student with the End finishes. They create the story in one word processor file, and work on it during class time. The story has to incorporate facts about the animal, such as appearance, prey, predators, habits, environment, etc. They publish by reading the story to the rest of the class (and sometimes parents). New Researching • I’m going to add two online sites to their list of sources: National Geographic http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/ and the World Wildlife Federation http://www.worldwildlife.org/species/index.html I will add these links to the class webpage, rather than have them do any searching, for safety considerations. Composing • Teaching students to send a file with an attachment or merge files will allow them to work outside of school time, either at the school library, the public library, or at home, if they have access to a computer. I’ll have parents sign off on this if the students are working from home. New Publishing IdeaComposing Changes • I’m going to add a digital publishing element to this assignment. We can put the stories on the school’s website and make them available to other classes. With this use in mind, I will teach students to create hyperlinks, which will allow them to add explanatory factual information and/or define words without interrupting the flow of the story. • Another element I may add with the digital publishing is the incorporation of a photo, which I will supply. We might need to do some scaling and other formatting to fit it with the text. If this seems too difficult, we can use an image on the cover page, which will be easier to set up. • Digital publishing also suggests that we might give some more attention to making and styling heads that divide the text and make it more considerate reading for other students.

3. Introduce and explain any new assignments that you have been inspired to create and how you will incorporate technology. Again, use the steps of the writing process as listed to walk me through the assignment(s).

- 13 4. Write a reflection on your own use of the writing process and technology in this assignment. What new things did you try? What governed your choice to use pre-digital approaches in any cases in which you did? What worked well for you? What would you change in approaching a future writing assignment? Considerate Text Use whatever techniques you believe will contribute to making the text considerate for me as a reader.

Scoring Rubrics:
CLASS PARTICIPATION— Class participation will make up 25% of your grade, and will be judged using the following criteria:

Category Initiative and Value

0
Rarely raises any issues or provides information to extend the class’s understanding.

4
Sometimes raises issues and provides information to extend the class’s understanding. Sometimes presents issues, questions, information, responses, or any other material in clear and straightforward prose. Sometimes communicates in ways that are respectful and pertinent, whether in raising issues or responding to them. Sometimes provides helpful observations/ information/ suggestions for others, sharing resources if/as appropriate.

6.25
Consistently raises issues and provides information to extend the class’s understanding. Consistently presents issues, questions, information, responses, or any other material in clear and straightforward prose. Consistently communicates in ways that are respectful and pertinent, whether in raising issues or responding to them. Consistently provides helpful observations/ information/ suggestions for others, sharing resources if/as appropriate.

Points

Expression

Rarely presents issues, questions, information, responses, or any other material in clear and straightforward prose.

Appropriateness

Rarely communicates in ways that are respectful and pertinent, whether in raising issues or responding to them. Rarely provides helpful observations/ information/ suggestions for others, sharing resources if/as appropriate.

Community

FOUR SHORT PAPERS— These 4 papers combine for a total of 40% of your grade and each of them will be judged using the following criteria:

Element On Time

Complete (addresses all points in assignment) Written Expression

0 points Never turned in or turned in late without a valid excuse. Fails to meet the assignment in serious ways.

- 14 1 points Turned in on time.

2 points —

3 points —

Written expression is sub-standard.

Only some points are addressed, or the consideration given to all the points is very sketchy. Written expression has a number of errors. The content demonstrates that the student has not given sufficient time or thought to the concepts under consideration.

Most points are addressed or all points are addressed but not sufficiently. Most of the written expression is acceptable. The content demonstrates that the student has given some thought to the concepts under consideration, but has failed to thoroughly consider them and what they might mean in his or her instruction.

Every point is addressed thoroughly.

Content

Work is incomplete or otherwise inadequate in important ways.

Written expression is impeccable and unites seamlessly with the content. The content demonstrates that the student has a firm grasp of the concepts under consideration and their implications for improving his/her classroom instruction.

FINAL PAPER— Your final paper accounts for 35% of your grade and will be judged using the following criteria: Element On Time 0 points Never turned in or turned in late without a valid excuse. Fails to meet the assignment in serious ways. Written expression is sub-standard. 3 points Turned in on time. 5 points — 8 points —

Formatting Instructions Written Expression

Only some points are addressed. Written expression has a number of errors. The content demonstrates that the student has not given sufficient time or thought to the concepts, techniques, and approaches under consideration or the application of them in his or her classroom.

Most points are addressed. Most of the written expression is acceptable. The content demonstrates that the student has given some thought to the concepts, techniques, and approaches under consideration, but has failed to thoroughly consider them and what they might mean in his or her instruction. Most of the paper

Every point is addressed. Written expression is impeccable and unites seamlessly with the content. The content demonstrates that the student has a firm grasp of the concepts, techniques, and approaches under consideration and their implications for improving his/her classroom instruction.

Content

Content is substantially lacking or otherwise inadequate in important ways.

Considerate

The writer has failed to

The writer has made

The paper

consider the reader.

- 15 some attempts to take the reader into account.

is geared for the reader.

demonstrates a good understanding of ways in which the reader can be assisted by the writer.

Percentage Contribution of Each Assignment:
Class Discussion and Participation – 25% How I Use Writing in My Classroom – 10% Safe and Sane Researching – 10% Reading and Writing – 10% Technology Standards and My Classroom 10% My New Writing Curriculum 35%

Instructional Sequence: - List the course topics for each scheduled class meeting date including
readings and assignment due dates. Date July 13 Topics Introductions Definitions of the Writing Process (in-class group project) Step-by-Step Through the Technology-Assisted Writing Process 1. Purpose, Audience, Context, Topic 2. Researching, Search Engines, and Online Safety a. Finding Sources (in-class group project) b. Evaluating Sources c. Crediting Online Sources Step-by-Step Through the Technology-Assisted Writing Process cont. 3. Organizing Project and Paper (in-class group project) 4. Composing/Drafting and Plagiarism Prevention 5. Reviewing/Critiquing a. Reviewing one’s own work b. Other’s review of one’s work 6. Revising Step-by-Step Through the Technology-Assisted Writing Process cont. 7. Editing oneself and others 8. Publishing What Changes when Writing w. Technology? Digital Rhetoric (in class group project and presentations) The Digital Environment Technology and Disabilities Software Applications In Depth in the Writing Process 1. Microsoft Word 2. Microsoft Excel 3. Microsoft Powerpoint 4. Adobe Acrobat Online Tools In Depth (in-class group projects) 1. ThinkFree Office, Writeboard.com, and Acrobat.com (in-class group project) Online Tools In Depth (in-class group projects) cont. 2. Skype 3. Email and Instant Messaging Online References In Depth 1. Comparing Dictionaries 2. Comparing Encyclopedias, etc. Wrapping Things Up Put course in perspective.

July 14

July 15

July 16

July 17

- 16 Students choose peer for review of final paper. Course evaluation.

Technology Checklist: