You are on page 1of 16

INTERVIEWING TIPS 

Review the Interview Preparation below and spend some time on the website studying the Law  Firm/Company’s Historical Perspective, Practice Areas/Services Expertise, News Coverage and Future  Growth prior to your interview. 
FIRST IMPRESSION 

This will distinguish you from the competition. You never get a second chance to make a first  impression. The first few minutes will have the greatest impact on the interview. Enthusiasm is one of  the leading reasons why people are hired! A. Strong Vocal Inflections to show enthusiasm.  B. Strong Body Language to show interest ­ firm handshake, maintain strong eye contact, sit up  straight,  square off your shoulders to the person you are talking to, and most important ­­ SMILE! C. Professional Appearance: dress and groom for success (Even if the office is casual). A leading  reason for  not getting the job is often appearance. Shine shoes. No open toe shoes for females etc. 
  LISTEN,    BUT REMEMBER TO TAKE AN ACTIVE ROLE IN THE INTERVIEW   

Be proactive, rather than reactive (simply waiting for the next interview question).  A.  B.  Market yourself to the interviewer by providing specific attributes that they are looking for.

Uncover more details of the law firm/company, job and opportunity through inquiry, and more   importantly, what skills are important to the interviewer.  Examples of applicant questions that could be asked towards the beginning of the interview:  • “I am familiar with the position and job duties as explained by Rhumbline, but can you expand  on the  areas of responsibilities?”  • “What skills do you feel are important to be successful in this position?”  C. Be prepared to answer the question with a Brief 30 second response:  • What do you know about the law firm/company?  • Tell me about yourself? 

KNOW YOUR STRENGTHS/WEAKNESSES 

Go to the interview with knowledge of your skills from which you can pull at any point during the  interview and speak confidently about yourself.  A.  Be prepared to discuss 2 technical strengths. Examples: analytical skills, knowledge of the flow 

of  transaction within the G/L cycle, computer skills, etc. and 2 non­technical strengths. Example:  team  work, attention to detail, communication skills, organizational skills, etc. BE PREPARED to  support  each strength with at least I work related example (or school related examples for a new  grad). Practice  the presentation of your strengths and related examples similar to how you would  prepare for a speech. Develop 2 weaknesses or “areas of improvement”. Show how you have  attempted to overcome and  improved over time. 

KNOW YOUR RESUME

Review your resume and be able to answer all questions relating to what, why and when.  Don’t have it in front of you ­ You should be the expert on you.  A.  What did you do at each position you have held in the past? 

B.  Why did you choose your school? Your major? Why did you take this job? Why did you leave  this  job? Why are you currently looking to leave your current employer’? Be positive about prior  experiences  (don’t talk about negatives). Reasons for change should be positive and for professional  reasons. Stay  away from compensation, commute, didn’t like your boss, etc. as reasons for change.  C.  When did you work for each law firm/company and when did you attend school  (BA/JD/CPA/LLM)?  Memorize the months and years of employment and education. 
STANDARD INTERVIEW QUESTIONS TO BE EXPECTED 

Prepare for the standard interview questions such as “Why are you looking?” “What are you looking to  do more long­term, say, 3 to 5 years?”  Respond to these questions with clear, positive, concise, well thought out answers with  business/professional motivating factors. Your responses to short term goals/movement should align  with the position you are applying for and the company you are interviewing with. Long­term movement  needs to be consistent with opportunities for movement within the law firm/company that you are  interviewing with. 
MONEY 

A.  Leave discussion of money to the second interview. The First Interview should be in ‘SELL”  mode. On  the application and in discussion, be open to salary based on responsibilities and that  “you are more interested in the opportunity and would consider a reasonable offer.”  A salary too high 

will immediately  eliminate you from consideration and too low will cut into your potential. Try to  turn it back to them —  ex: what is the range for the ideal candidate?  B.  If asked about your current compensation, be honest and include all applicable overtime,  bonus, rewards,  and other key fringe benefits.
YOUR QUESTIONS 

Remember you are there to interview them as well and it is your responsibility to gather information  needed to properly evaluate the opportunity. Prepare questions related to: Position, Department,  Company, Opportunity, Company Direction and Interviewer’s Background. 
INTERVIEW CLOSE 

You should proactively “close” any interview you are offered. Consider these areas in closing:  A.  Remember to SMILE! 

B.  Express your interest for the position and why you’re interested! If you are interested in the  position, tell  them so. This is also a good time to summarize why you believe this is the right  employment opportunity  for you. Match your skills to what the interviewer is looking for.  C.  Express “thanks,” “appreciation for their time,” and let them know that you look forward to  speaking  with them again in the near future.  D.  A timely thank­you letter or email is also a great touch. Make sure your letter of correspondence  and/or  email does not contain any spelling, syntax or grammatical errors! E. Be sure to ask for their business card before you  leave!

CLOSING RECOMMENDATIONS  A. Be on time. Arrive 10 to 15 minutes early to the interview. This is an absolute – take into account  traffic  congestion and locating parking. B. Do some brief homework/research on the law firm/company (History, Practice Areas, Services,  News  Coverage, Accolades, etc.)  C. Focus on questions being asked. Avoid Yes/No answers, but do not “tangent” your responses.  Keep your  responses brief, but concise. 

D. Relax ­ Think of it as a conversation, not an interrogation. The interviewer is a person just like  you and  me. Remain positive and show self­confidence during throughout the interview process.  E. Do not have your resume in front of you during the interview. You should be the expert on your  resume.  Don’t volunteer your resume, but always be sure to have a clean copy,  F. you  G. Please call me following the interview with your honest feedback. What did you like, what didn’t  like?  Have a great interview and have fun with it. 

HOW TO OVERCOME EIGHT INTERVIEW STUMBLING BLOCKS Does the thought of going on a job interview cause your palms to sweat and your body to break out in  hives?  Stop itching; you’re not alone. The vast majority of job seekers admit to emotions ranging from mild  uneasiness to downright panic leading up to their interviews. The good news is there have been no  reported cases of job seekers who died of nervousness during a job interview. So relax and follow  these simple tips for keeping your anxiety at bay before and during your interview.  First, take the proper amount of time to prepare for your interview. Being well­prepared will boost your  confidence and lower your anxiety. Experts recommend that you spend at least three hours preparing  for each interview. You should draft answers to the most common interview questions and practice  speaking them out loud. You also should read up on the company with which you will be interviewing  and prepare some questions of your own. This lets the interviewer know that you are truly interested in  the company and the position. As a final step in your preparation, make sure you have good directions  to the interview site. Some job seekers make a dry run to the interview site to ensure the directions are  correct and to estimate the amount of time they will need to get to the interview on time.  Going into a job interview is often like entering the great unknown. Although every interviewer is  different and questions vary from industry to industry, there are some questions that are common  across the board.  Reading through the following questions and developing your own answers is a good place to start in  your preparation. Once you have done that, remember practice makes perfect! Nothing impresses a  potential employer like being ready for whatever is thrown your way. 

1)

Why should we hire you?  Here’s the chance to really sell yourself. You need to briefly and succinctly lay out your  strengths,  qualifications and what you can bring to the table. However, Be careful not to answer this  question too  generically. Nearly everyone says they are hardworking and motivated. Set yourself  apart by telling the  interviewer about qualities that are unique to you.  2) Why do you want to work here?  This is one tool interviewers use to see if you have done your homework. You should never  attend an  interview unless you know about the company, its direction and the industry in which it  plays. If you have  done your research this question gives you an opportunity to show initiative and  demonstrate how your  experience and qualifications match the company’s needs.  3) What are your greatest weaknesses?  The secret to answering this question is being honest about demonstrating how you have turned  it into a  strength. For example, you ad a problem with organization in the past, demonstrate the  steps you took to  more effectively keep yourself on track. This will show that you have the ability to  recognize aspects of  yourself that need improvement, and the initiative to make yourself better.  4) as  to  Why did you  leave your last job?  Even if your last job ended badly be careful about being negative in answering this question. Be  diplomatic as possible. If you do point out negative aspects of your last job, find some positives  mention as well. Complaining endlessly about your last company/law firm will not say much  for you attitude.

5)

Describe a problem situation and how you solved it. Sometimes it is hard to come up with a response to this request, particularly if you are coming  straight  from college and do not have professional experience. Interviewers want to see that you  can think  critically and develop solutions, regardless of what kind of issue you faced. Even if your  problem was not  having enough time to study, describe the steps you took to prioritize your  schedule. Prioritizing will  demonstrate that you are responsible and can think through situations on  your own.  6) What accomplishment are you most proud of?  The secret to this question is being specific and selecting an accomplishment that relates to the  position.  Even if your greatest accomplishment is being on a championship high school basketball  team, opt for a  more professionally relevant accomplishment. Think of the qualities the company  is looking for and  develop an example that demonstrates how you can meet the company’s needs. 

7)

What are your salary expectations?  This is one of the hardest questions, particularly for those with little experience. The first thing to  do  before going to your interview is to research the salary range in your field to get an idea of what  you  should be making. Steer clear of discussing salary specifics before receiving a job offer. Let the  interviewer know that you will be open to discussing fair compensation when the time comes. If  pressed  for a more specific answer, always give a range, rather than a specific number.  8) Tell me about yourself. While this query seems like a piece of cake, it is difficult to answer because it is so broad. The  important  thing to know is that the interviewer typically does not want to know about your  hometown or what you  do on the weekends. He or she is trying to figure you out professional!  Pick a couple of points about yourself, your professional experience and your career goals and  stick to those points. Wrap up your answer y bringing up your desire to be a part of the  company. If you  have a solid response prepared for this question, it can lead your conversation  in a direction that allows you to elaborate on your qualifications.  TWENTY TOUGH QUESTIONS & TOUGH ANSWERS

1. TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF? Just talk for 2 minutes. Be logical. Start anywhere, e.g. high school, college, or first position. Looking for  communication skills, linear thinking, also try to score a point or two (describe a major personal  attribute). 2. WHY ARE YOU LEAVING YOUR CURRENT POSITION?  This is a very critical question. Don’t “bad mouth” previous employer. Don’t sound “too opportunistic.”  Best when major problems, or buy­out or shut­down. Also good to state that after long personal  consideration, the chance to make a contribution is very low due to company changes. Still attempt to  score points! 3. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENT?  This can get you the job. Prepare extensively. Score points. Tell a 2 minute story, with details and  discuss personal involvement, Make the accomplishment worth achieving. Discuss hard work, long  hours, pressure and important company issues at stake.  4. WHY DO YOU BELIEVE YOU ARE QUALIFIED FOR THISS POSITION?  Pick two or three main factors about the job and about you that are most relevant. Discuss for 2  minutes, with specific details. Select a technical skill, a specific management skill (organizing, staffing,  planning), and a personal success attribute for each to mention. 

5. HAVE YOU EVER ACCOMPLISHED SOMETHING YOU DIDN’T THINK YOU COULD?  Interviewer is trying to determine your goal orientation, work ethic, personal commitment, and integrity.  Provide a good example where you overcame numerous difficulties to succeed, Prove you’re not a  quitter, and “that you’ll get going when the going gets tough.”  6. WHAT DO YOU LIKEIDISLIKE MOST ABOUT YOUR CURRENT POSITION?  Interviewer is trying to determine compatibility with the open position. If you have interest in position be  careful. Stating you dislike overtime or getting into details, or you dislike “management” can cost you the  position. There is nothing wrong with liking challenges, pressure situations, opportunity to grow, or  disliking bureaucracy and frustrating situations.  7. HOW DO YOU HANDLE PRESSURE? DO YOU LIKE OR DISLIKE THESE SITUATIONS?  High achievers tend to perform well in high pressure situations. Conversely, the question also could  imply that position is pressure packed and out of control. There is nothing wrong with this as long as  you know what you’re getting into. If you do perform well under stress, provide a good example with  details, giving an overview of the stressful situation. Let the interviewer “feel” the stress by your  description of it.  8. THE SIGN OF A GOOD EMPLOYEE IS THE ABILITY TO TAKE THE INITIATIVE. CAN YOU  DESCRIBE SITUATIONS LIKE THIS ABOUT YOURSELF?  A proactive, results­oriented person doesn’t have to be told what to do. This is one of the major success  attributes. To convince the interviewer you possess this trait, you must give a series of short examples  describing your self­motivation. Try to discuss at least one example in­depth. The extra effort, strong  work ethic and creative side of you must be demonstrated.  9. WHAT’S THE WORST OR MOST EMBARRASSING ASPECT OF YOUR BUSINESS CAREER?  HOW WOULD YOU HAVE DONE THINGS DIFFERENTLY NOW WITH 20120 HINDSIGHT?  This is a general question to learn how introspective you are, to see if you can learn from your mistakes.  If you can, it indicates an open, more flexible personality. Don’t be afraid to talk about your failures,  particularly if you’ve learned from them. This is a critical aspect of high potential individuals. 

10. HOW HAVE YOU GROWN OR CHANGED OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS?  This requires thought. Maturation, increased technical skills, or increased self­confidence are important  aspects of human development. To discuss these effectively is indicative of a well balanced, intelligent  individual. Overcoming personal obstacles or recognizing manageable weaknesses can brand you as  an approachable and desirable employee.  11. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT STRENGTHS? 

Be prepared. Know your 4 to 5 key strengths. Be able to discuss each with a specific example. Select  those attributes that are most compatible with the job opening. Most people say “management” or “good  interpersonal skills” in answer to this question. Describe how your skills have proven critical to your  success.  12. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT WEAKNESSES?  Don’t reveal deep character flaws. Rather, discuss tolerable faults that you are working towards  improving. Show by specific example how this has changed overtime. Better still, show how a weakness  can he turned into strength. For example, how a concentration on the details results in higher quality  work even though it requires much overtime.  13. DEADLINES, FRUSTRATIONS, DIFFICULT PEOPLE, AND SILLY RULES CAN MAKE A JOB  D1FFICULT. HOW DO YOU HANDLE THESE TYPES OF SITUATIONS?  Most companies, unfortunately, face these types of problems daily. If you can’t deal with petty  frustrations you’ll be seen as a problem. You certainly can state your displeasure at the petty side of  these issues, but how you overcome them is more important. Diplomacy, perseverance, and common­ sense often prevail even in difficult circumstances. This is part of corporate America, and you must be  able to deal with it on a regular basis.  14. ONE OF OUR BIGGEST PROBLEM(S) MR/MRS CANDIDATE IS ___________. WHAT HAS  BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH THESE PROBLEM(S)? HOW WOULD YOU DEAL WITH  IT/THEM?  Think on your feet. Ask questions to get details. Break it into sub­parts. Highly likely you have some  experience with the subsections. Answer these, and summarize the total. State how you would go  about solving the problem, if you can’t answer directly. Be specific. Show your organizational and  analytical skills. 15. HOW DO YOU COMPARE YOUR TECHNICAL SKILLS TO YOUR MANAGEMENT SKILLS?  Many people tend to minimize their technical skills either because they don’t have any, or they don’t like  getting into the details. Most successful candidates possess good technical skills and get into enough  detail to make sure they understand the information being presented by their group. Try for a good  balance here if you want to be seriously considered for the position.  16. HOW HAS YOUR TECHNICAL ABILITY BEEN IMPORTANT IN ACCOMPLISHING RESULS?  Clearly, the interviewer believes he needs a strong level of technical competence. Most strong  managers have good technical backgrounds, even if they have gotten away from the detail. Describe  specific examples of your technical wherewithal, but don’t be afraid to say you are not current Also, you  could give examples of how you resolved a technical issue by “accelerated research.”  17. HOW WOULD YOU HANDLE A SITUATION WITH TIGHT DEADLINES, LOW EMPLOYEE  MORALE, AND INADEQUATE RESOURCES? 

If you pull this off effectively it indicates you have strong management skills. You need to be creative.  An example would be great. Relate your toughest management task, even if it doesn’t meet all the  criteria. Organizational skills, interpersonal skills, and handling pressure are key elements of effective  management. Good managers should be able to address each issue, even if they were not concurrent.  Deftly handling the question is pretty indicative of your skills, too.  18. ARE YOU SATISIFIED WITH YOUR CAREER TO DATE? WHAT WOULD YOU CHANGE IF YOU  COULD?  Be honest. Interviewers want to know if he can keep you happy. It’s important to know if you’re willing to  make some sacrifices to get your career on the right track. A degree of motivation is an important  selection criteria.  19. WHAT ARE YOUR CAREER GOALS? WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF FIVE YEARS FROM  NOW? TEN YEARS?  Most importantly, be realistic. Blue sky stuff brands you as immature. One or two management jumps in  3­5 years is a reasonable goal. If your track record indicates you’re in line for senior management in 10  years it’s okay to mention. However, if you’ve had a rocky road it would be better to be introspective.  20. WHY SHOULD WE HIRE YOU FOR THIS POSITION? WHAT KIND OF CONTRIBUTION WOULD  YOU MAKE?  This is a terrific chance to summarize all salient points made previously during the interview. By now  you know the key problems. Re­state and show how you would address those problems. Relate to  specific attributes and specific accomplishments. Qualify responses with the need to gather information.  Don’t be too confident. Demonstrate a thoughtful, organized, strong effort kind of attitude. 

HOW TO OVERCOME EIGHT INTERVIEW STUMBLING BLOCKS Does the thought of going on a job interview cause your palms to sweat and your body to break out in  hives?  Stop itching; you’re not alone. The vast majority of job seekers admit to emotions ranging from mild  uneasiness to downright panic leading up to their interviews. The good news is there have been no  reported cases of job seekers who died of nervousness during a job interview. So relax and follow  these simple tips for keeping your anxiety at bay before and during your interview.  First, take the proper amount of time to prepare for your interview. Being well­prepared will boost your  confidence and lower your anxiety. Experts recommend that you spend at least three hours preparing  for each interview. You should draft answers to the most common interview questions and practice  speaking them out loud. You also should read up on the company with which you will be interviewing  and prepare some questions of your own. This lets the interviewer know that you are truly interested in  the company and the position. As a final step in your preparation, make sure you have good directions  to the interview site. Some job seekers make a dry run to the interview site to ensure the directions are  correct and to estimate the amount of time they will need to get to the interview on time.  Going into a job interview is often like entering the great unknown. Although every interviewer is  different and questions vary from industry to industry, there are some questions that are common  across the board.  Reading through the following questions and developing your own answers is a good place to start in  your preparation. Once you have done that, remember practice makes perfect! Nothing impresses a  potential employer like being ready for whatever is thrown your way.  1) Why should we hire you?  Here’s the chance to really sell yourself. You need to briefly and succinctly lay out your  strengths,  qualifications and what you can bring to the table. However, Be careful not to answer this  question too  generically. Nearly everyone says they are hardworking and motivated. Set yourself  apart by telling the  interviewer about qualities that are unique to you. 

2)

Why do you want to work here?  This is one tool interviewers use to see if you have done your homework. You should never  attend an  interview unless you know about the company, its direction and the industry in which it  plays. If you have  done your research this question gives you an opportunity to show initiative and  demonstrate how your  experience and qualifications match the company’s needs.  3) What are your greatest weaknesses?  The secret to answering this question is being honest about demonstrating how you have turned  it into a  strength. For example, you ad a problem with organization in the past, demonstrate the  steps you took to  more effectively keep yourself on track. This will show that you have the ability to  recognize aspects of  yourself that need improvement, and the initiative to make yourself better.  4) as  to  Why did you  leave your last job?  Even if your last job ended badly be careful about being negative in answering this question. Be  diplomatic as possible. If you do point out negative aspects of your last job, find some positives  mention as well. Complaining endlessly about your last company/law firm will not say much  for you attitude.

5)

Describe a problem situation and how you solved it. Sometimes it is hard to come up with a response to this request, particularly if you are coming  straight  from college and do not have professional experience. Interviewers want to see that you  can think  critically and develop solutions, regardless of what kind of issue you faced. Even if your  problem was not  having enough time to study, describe the steps you took to prioritize your  schedule. Prioritizing will  demonstrate that you are responsible and can think through situations on  your own.  6) What accomplishment are you most proud of?  The secret to this question is being specific and selecting an accomplishment that relates to the  position.  Even if your greatest accomplishment is being on a championship high school basketball  team, opt for a  more professionally relevant accomplishment. Think of the qualities the company  is looking for and  develop an example that demonstrates how you can meet the company’s needs.  7) What are your salary expectations?  This is one of the hardest questions, particularly for those with little experience. The first thing to  do  before going to your interview is to research the salary range in your field to get an idea of what  you  should be making. Steer clear of discussing salary specifics before receiving a job offer. Let the  interviewer know that you will be open to discussing fair compensation when the time comes. If  pressed  for a more specific answer, always give a range, rather than a specific number.  8) Tell me about yourself.

While this query seems like a piece of cake, it is difficult to answer because it is so broad. The  important  thing to know is that the interviewer typically does not want to know about your  hometown or what you  do on the weekends. He or she is trying to figure you out professional!  Pick a couple of points about yourself, your professional experience and your career goals and  stick to those points. Wrap up your answer y bringing up your desire to be a part of the  company. If you  have a solid response prepared for this question, it can lead your conversation  in a direction that allows you to elaborate on your qualifications. 

TWENTY TOUGH QUESTIONS & TOUGH ANSWERS 1. TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF? Just talk for 2 minutes. Be logical. Start anywhere, e.g. high school, college, or first position. Looking for 

communication skills, linear thinking, also try to score a point or two (describe a major personal  attribute).  2. WHY ARE YOU LEAVING YOUR CURRENT POSITION?  This is a very critical question. Don’t “bad mouth” previous employer. Don’t sound “too opportunistic.”  Best when major problems, or buy­out or shut­down. Also good to state that after long personal  consideration, the chance to make a contribution is very low due to company changes. Still attempt to  score points! 3. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENT?  This can get you the job. Prepare extensively. Score points. Tell a 2 minute story, with details and  discuss personal involvement, Make the accomplishment worth achieving. Discuss hard work, long  hours, pressure and important company issues at stake.  4. WHY DO YOU BELIEVE YOU ARE QUALIFIED FOR THISS POSITION?  Pick two or three main factors about the job and about you that are most relevant. Discuss for 2  minutes, with specific details. Select a technical skill, a specific management skill (organizing, staffing,  planning), and a personal success attribute for each to mention.  5. HAVE YOU EVER ACCOMPLISHED SOMETHING YOU DIDN’T THINK YOU COULD?  Interviewer is trying to determine your goal orientation, work ethic, personal commitment, and integrity.  Provide a good example where you overcame numerous difficulties to succeed, Prove you’re not a  quitter, and “that you’ll get going when the going gets tough.”  6. WHAT DO YOU LIKEIDISLIKE MOST ABOUT YOUR CURRENT POSITION?  Interviewer is trying to determine compatibility with the open position. If you have interest in position be  careful. Stating you dislike overtime or getting into details, or you dislike “management” can cost you the  position. There is nothing wrong with liking challenges, pressure situations, opportunity to grow, or  disliking bureaucracy and frustrating situations.  7. HOW DO YOU HANDLE PRESSURE? DO YOU LIKE OR DISLIKE THESE SITUATIONS?  High achievers tend to perform well in high pressure situations. Conversely, the question also could  imply that position is pressure packed and out of control. There is nothing wrong with this as long as  you know what you’re getting into. If you do perform well under stress, provide a good example with  details, giving an overview of the stressful situation. Let the interviewer “feel” the stress by your  description of it.  8. THE SIGN OF A GOOD EMPLOYEE IS THE ABILITY TO TAKE THE INITIATIVE. CAN YOU  DESCRIBE SITUATIONS LIKE THIS ABOUT YOURSELF?  A proactive, results­oriented person doesn’t have to be told what to do. This is one of the major success 

attributes. To convince the interviewer you possess this trait, you must give a series of short examples  describing your self­motivation. Try to discuss at least one example in­depth. The extra effort, strong  work ethic and creative side of you must be demonstrated.  9. WHAT’S THE WORST OR MOST EMBARRASSING ASPECT OF YOUR BUSINESS CAREER?  HOW WOULD YOU HAVE DONE THINGS DIFFERENTLY NOW WITH 20120 HINDSIGHT?  This is a general question to learn how introspective you are, to see if you can learn from your mistakes.  If you can, it indicates an open, more flexible personality. Don’t be afraid to talk about your failures,  particularly if you’ve learned from them. This is a critical aspect of high potential individuals. 

10. HOW HAVE YOU GROWN OR CHANGED OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS? 

This requires thought. Maturation, increased technical skills, or increased self­confidence are important  aspects of human development. To discuss these effectively is indicative of a well balanced, intelligent  individual. Overcoming personal obstacles or recognizing manageable weaknesses can brand you as  an approachable and desirable employee.  11. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT STRENGTHS?  Be prepared. Know your 4 to 5 key strengths. Be able to discuss each with a specific example. Select  those attributes that are most compatible with the job opening. Most people say “management” or “good  interpersonal skills” in answer to this question. Describe how your skills have proven critical to your  success.  12. WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER TO BE YOUR MOST SIGNIFICANT WEAKNESSES?  Don’t reveal deep character flaws. Rather, discuss tolerable faults that you are working towards  improving. Show by specific example how this has changed overtime. Better still, show how a weakness  can he turned into strength. For example, how a concentration on the details results in higher quality  work even though it requires much overtime.  13. DEADLINES, FRUSTRATIONS, DIFFICULT PEOPLE, AND SILLY RULES CAN MAKE A JOB  D1FFICULT. HOW DO YOU HANDLE THESE TYPES OF SITUATIONS?  Most companies, unfortunately, face these types of problems daily. If you can’t deal with petty  frustrations you’ll be seen as a problem. You certainly can state your displeasure at the petty side of  these issues, but how you overcome them is more important. Diplomacy, perseverance, and common­ sense often prevail even in difficult circumstances. This is part of corporate America, and you must be  able to deal with it on a regular basis.  14. ONE OF OUR BIGGEST PROBLEM(S) MR/MRS CANDIDATE IS ___________. WHAT HAS  BEEN YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH THESE PROBLEM(S)? HOW WOULD YOU DEAL WITH  IT/THEM? 

Think on your feet. Ask questions to get details. Break it into sub­parts. Highly likely you have some  experience with the subsections. Answer these, and summarize the total. State how you would go  about solving the problem, if you can’t answer directly. Be specific. Show your organizational and  analytical skills. 15. HOW DO YOU COMPARE YOUR TECHNICAL SKILLS TO YOUR MANAGEMENT SKILLS?  Many people tend to minimize their technical skills either because they don’t have any, or they don’t like  getting into the details. Most successful candidates possess good technical skills and get into enough  detail to make sure they understand the information being presented by their group. Try for a good  balance here if you want to be seriously considered for the position.  16. HOW HAS YOUR TECHNICAL ABILITY BEEN IMPORTANT IN ACCOMPLISHING RESULS?  Clearly, the interviewer believes he needs a strong level of technical competence. Most strong  managers have good technical backgrounds, even if they have gotten away from the detail. Describe  specific examples of your technical wherewithal, but don’t be afraid to say you are not current Also, you  could give examples of how you resolved a technical issue by “accelerated research.”  17. HOW WOULD YOU HANDLE A SITUATION WITH TIGHT DEADLINES, LOW EMPLOYEE  MORALE, AND INADEQUATE RESOURCES?  If you pull this off effectively it indicates you have strong management skills. You need to be creative.  An example would be great. Relate your toughest management task, even if it doesn’t meet all the  criteria. Organizational skills, interpersonal skills, and handling pressure are key elements of effective  management. Good managers should be able to address each issue, even if they were not concurrent.  Deftly handling the question is pretty indicative of your skills, too. 

18. ARE YOU SATISIFIED WITH YOUR CAREER TO DATE? WHAT WOULD YOU CHANGE IF YOU  COULD?  Be honest. Interviewers want to know if he can keep you happy. It’s important to know if you’re willing to  make some sacrifices to get your career on the right track. A degree of motivation is an important  selection criteria.  19. WHAT ARE YOUR CAREER GOALS? WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF FIVE YEARS FROM  NOW? TEN YEARS?  Most importantly, be realistic. Blue sky stuff brands you as immature. One or two management jumps in  3­5 years is a reasonable goal. If your track record indicates you’re in line for senior management in 10  years it’s okay to mention. However, if you’ve had a rocky road it would be better to be introspective.  20. WHY SHOULD WE HIRE YOU FOR THIS POSITION? WHAT KIND OF CONTRIBUTION WOULD 

YOU MAKE?  This is a terrific chance to summarize all salient points made previously during the interview. By now  you know the key problems. Re­state and show how you would address those problems. Relate to  specific attributes and specific accomplishments. Qualify responses with the need to gather information.  Don’t be too confident. Demonstrate a thoughtful, organized, strong effort kind of attitude.