You are on page 1of 13

Working paper No 3 (2007)                Digital Time stamping                     

Emerging and Novel  Photovoltaic  Technologies

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

 

Contents 

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

1

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

 

Introduction 
Energy  consumption  in  Europe  is  expected  to  grow  by  20%  between  now  and  2020,  leading  to  a  14%  increase  in  carbon  dioxide  (CO2)  emissions.  Renewable  energy  (hydroelectricity,  solar,  wind,  bio‐energy  and  geothermal  power)  has  an  important  role  to  play  in  reducing  emissions  of  greenhouse  gases  (such  as  CO2)  and  also  can  make  important  contributions  to  improving  the  security  of  energy  supplies  in  the  EU  by  reducing the Community's growing dependence on imported energy sources. Renewable energy sources are  expected  to  be  economically  competitive  with  conventional  energy  sources  in  the  medium  to  long  term.  Increasing the share of renewable energy in the energy balance also enhances sustainability.   EU  legislations  and  commitments  taken1,2,3,4  sets  a  clear  goal  to  attain,  by  2010,  a  minimum  penetration  of  12% (from 6%) of renewable energy sources in  the  EU also addressing the Kyoto Protocol5 requirements for  reduction  of  8%  of  greenhouse  gas  emissions.  Lithuania  also  committed  to  achieve  the  12%  share  of  renewable  energy  in  the  total  energy  balance  until  the  year  20106  and  to  achieve  that  7%  of  consumed  electricity would be generated from renewable sources7.   Many  initiatives  and  industry  led  efforts  have  already  started  across  the  EU  to  assess  the  best  mix  of  research  and  market  development  supports  for  acceleration  of  photovoltaic8  (PV)  development.  That  predicts  that  with  a  reasonable  set  of  incentives  the  photovoltaic  market  in  the  EU  could  grow  more  than  30% per year over the next 20 years, from 344 MW of installed capacity to 9600 MW.  Although,  a  number  of  scientific/technical,  institutional  and  market  barriers  still  stand  in  the  way  of  reaching the preferred goals in PV industry and the level of energy market penetration.   Despite  of  large  PV  market  expansion  and  many  research  achievements  made  over  the  last  couple  of  decades,  their  costs  are  presently  still  the  main  obstacle  for  a  world‐wide  increased  utilisation  of  electric  power provided by this clean and renewable technology. The price of PV systems is still too high, compared  with competing electricity generation and distribution methods.   In  order  to  become  competitive  with  the  conventional  energy  sources,  new  improved  solar  cell  concepts  and  cost‐effective  forms  of  applications  and  installations  of  PV  modules  have  to  be  developed  to  facilitate  further growth of the sector. The industry is looking to drive module prices down from €5.75/Wp9, to €3/Wp  in 2010 and €1.5‐1/Wp in 2030. 

1 2

 Energy for the future: renewables sources of energy (White Paper), Commission of the European Communities, 1997.   Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources. 23.01.2008  COM(2008) final   3  Energy for the future: renewable sources of energy ‐ White Paper for a Community Strategy and Action Plan, European Commission, 1997  4  A European strategic energy technology plan (SET‐PLAN): 'Towards a low carbon future'. Communication from the commission to the council, the  European Parliament, The European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the regions. {SEC(2007) 1508}, {SEC(2007) 1509},  {SEC(2007) 1510}, {SEC(2007) 1511}. 22.11.2007 COM(2007) 723 final  5  Kyoto Protocol to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. 1997, 3rd Conference of the Parties to the UNFCCC.  6 Lietuvos Respublikos Seimo 2002 m. spalio 10 d. nutarimas Nr. IX‐1130 ,,Dėl nacionalinės energetikos strategijos patvirtinimo“.  7  Lietuvos Respublikos Seimo 2006 m. gegužės 11 d. nutarimas Nr. 443 ,,Dėl Nacionalinės energijos vartojimo efektyvumo didinimo 2006‐2010 metų  programos patvirtinimo“.  8  Photovoltaic comprises the technology to convert sunlight directly into electricity. The term “photo” means light and “voltaic,” electricity. A  photovoltaic cell, also known as “solar cell,” is a semiconductor device that generates electricity when light falls on it. 9  Wp, or ‘Watt‐peak’, is the common term for what a PV system is capable of producing under ideal circumstances. 

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

2

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

  There  are  two  main  driving  forces  proposed  by  industry10  for  decreasing  the  manufacturing  costs:  by  production volume and by innovations (Figure 1). 

  Figure 1: Manufacturing costs driven by production volume and innovations    The  volume  is  needed  to  stimulate  market  partners  to  lower  cost  and  to  take  advantage  of  economy‐of‐ scale.  Consistent  with  the  time  needed  for  any  major  change  in  the  energy  infrastructure,  another  20  to  30  years  of  sustained  and  aggressive  growth  will  be  required  for  photovoltaics  to  substitute  a  significant  share  of  the  conventional  energy  sources.  This  growth  will  be  only  possible  if  the  price  is  reduced  considerably  (Figure 2).  

10

 3  PV Industry Forum – New Strategies for the Booming PV Market, 2006

rd

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

3

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

 

  Figure 2: Projected cost development until 2040 – PV competitiveness    Though  the  module  price  decreased  throughout  the  last  decade,  the  price  reduction  was  slower  than  expected.  Certainly  in  the  last  years  the  demand  was  very  high  and  the  construction  of  many  new  facilities,  which  will  lead  to  a  better  economy  of  scale  in  future,  is  not  reflected  in  a  lower  price  yet.  In  addition  the  introduction  of  new  technologies  is  necessary  to  really  fulfil  the  promise  of  low‐cost  solar  energy  as  well  as  sound  fundamental  research  and  improvements  of  the  process  and  manufacturing  technologies.  New  developments  with  respect  to  material  use,  device  design  and  new  concepts  to  increase  the  overall  efficiency  are  needed.  The  module  price  is  the  key  element  in  the  total  price  of  an  installed  solar  system  as  it cost represents around 50‐60% of the total installed cost of a PV system.  Therefore, the competitiveness of PV systems could be achieved by:  Either increasing the efficiency of the solar cells (i.e. increasing the Wp/m2 of cells);  Or by decreasing the manufacturing cost (i.e. reducing the €/Wp).  Obviously,  the  increase  of  solar  cell  efficiency  is  an  important  factor  for  the  decrease  of  cell  costs  (per  generated  Wp),  because  it  reduces  the  costs  for  feedstock,  crystallization  and  wafering  by  reducing  the  material  consumption.  Although,  the  increment  of  the  efficiency  of  the  solar  cells  requires  new  technological approaches and input from research. 

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

4

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

 

Generations of PV Cells 
First generation photovoltaics 
First  generation  photovoltaic  modules  are  based  on  crystal  silicon  solar  cells  and  demonstrate  efficiencies  from  13  to  16  %  (in  production),  with  theoretical  maximum  30%.  Wafer  based  crystalline  (monocrystalline  or  polycrystalline)  silicon  is  the  dominant  technology11  (Figure  3)  because  of  wide  availability  and  proven  reliability.  This  technology  is  well  understood  as  it  is  founded  on  the  knowledge  and  technology  originally  developed for the electronics industry. Yet manufacturing  is  energy  intensive,  needs  numerous  processing  steps  (=  high  manufacturing  costs)  and  high  materials  costs  (for  m‐Si).  

80 Market share (%) 60 40 20 0 mono c-Si multi c-Si
thin film

other

 

Figure 3: Production by technologies in 2003 

Second generation photovoltaics 
In  an  effort  to  reduce  manufacturing  costs,  photovoltaic  cells  based  on  thin  film  technology  –  called  second  generation  solar  cells  –  were  developed.  Thin‐film  modules  are  made  by  coating  and  patterning  entire  sheets  of  substrate  with  micron‐thin  layers  of  conducting  and  semiconductor  materials  followed  by  encapsulation.  This  leads  to  a  process  that  can  be  highly  efficient  in  materials  utilisation,  while  the  stable  efficiencies of these  modules are in the  range of 5 to  15%. The  major technical obstacles hampering  market  penetration  by  this  technology  on  large‐scale  are  as  follows:  (i)  growing  of  large  area  thin  films  of  homogeneous parameters at low costs and (ii) poor stability.  For  solar  cells  of  both  generations  efforts  are  made  mainly  in  improving  performance  –  most  notably  in  efficiency  –  in  order  to  reduce  module  manufacturing  costs  per  Wp,  which  will  lead  to  lower  system  costs.  The  first  generation  product  is  nearing  its  optimum  price/efficiency  in  cost  per  delivered  Whr.  However,  the  predicted  module  efficiency  increment  (up  to  the  30‐50%  range)  after  2030  it  is  expected  to  be  a  result  of  successful  implementation  of  the  so‐called  third  or  next  generation  concepts,  allowing  very  efficient  use  of  available area. 

Emerging generation photovoltaics 
Emerging  generation  photovoltaics  –  a  variety  of  other  PV  technologies  and  conversion  concepts  are  the  subject  of  research  in  Europe  and  worldwide.  They  are  all  aimed  at  a  module  price  of  ≤0.5 €/Wp,  resp.  system  price  of ≤1 €/Wp  in  2030,  at  super  high  efficiencies  (efficiencies  above  25%  under  1  sun  have  to  be  demonstrated on lab level before 2015) at super high efficiencies or at new application possibilities.   This requires  fundamental  research, because reaching the targets  requires a thorough understanding of  the  underlying  chemistry,  physics,  and  materials  properties.  Hence,  the  new  technologies  are  at  various  stages  of  development:  from  proof‐of‐principle  to  pilot  production.  A  key  factor  in  the  decrease  of  the  costs  of  modules  is  related  with  the  manufacturing  processes  used.  In  this  context  there  is  considerable  interest  in 

A Vision for PV Technology for 2030 and Beyond. Preliminary Report. Photovoltaic Technology Research Advisory Council (PVTRAC). 2004

11

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

5

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

  replacing  single  crystalline  or  polycrystalline  semiconductor  layers  by  nano‐structured  layers,  on  the  same  time  searching  for  methods  and  experience  in  different  research  sectors  to  find  cheap  technological  solutions.  Emerging‐generation  cells  will  be  based  on  a  variety  of  new  conversion  concepts  and  principles,  and currently can be considered to be at the fundamental research stage (Table 1). 
Table 1: The characteristics of emerging generation solar cells  Parameters  Type of Solar Cell  Description and main technical limitations  Efficiency in  production (%)  Lifetime  (Years)  Band gap  (eV) 

Higher efficiencies could be achieved by using stacks of  semiconductors with different band gaps (for instance  GaAs, InP, GaInP2/GaAs, GaAs (Si substrate),  GaInP2/GaAs, InGaP/InGaAs/Ge). These are referred to  as "multi‐junction" cells (also called "cascade" or  "tandem" cells). This technology makes better use of the  incoming light whereby the conversion efficiency is  improved. It is the most promising (high efficiencies  could be achieved) and the most expensive technology. 

Multi‐ junction 

21‐36 

‐ 

0.7‐3.4  

 
Figure 4: A multijunction device is a stack of individual  single‐junction cells in descending order of bandgap (Eg).  The top cell captures the high‐energy photons and passes  the rest of the photons on to be absorbed by lower‐ bandgap cells 

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

6

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

 
The main material for solar cell used is low‐cost  nanocrystalline titanium dioxide with a large effective  area and organic dyes immersed in an electrolyte. The  advantage of dye‐cells is that they can be produced from  potentially inexpensive materials and by simple  production technology. The major challenge is to develop  cells and modules for power applications, as that poses  for this type of cells severe temperature conditions.  Though the stability increased significantly, it still does  not meet the standards of other solar modules.  11 (0.25 cm2)  and 8 on real  devices  Variable  Low  (depends  on material  used) 

Dye‐ sensitised  photochemic al solar cells  (DSC) 12. 

 

Figure 5: Dye‐sensitized organic‐inorganic solar cell   These devices are based on the property of some organic  materials to be conductive: “conjugated polymers”.  Among the conductive polymers investigated, the most  promising ones are the structures containing fullerene  (C60) as the acceptor material. Evident advantages of  this technology are the expected low‐cost manufacturing  and the possibility to make solar cells by tailoring the  required properties by modifications of the organic  molecules. Challenges are to increase small area cell  efficiencies and stability under outdoor conditions. 

13

Variable  > 5  Low  (depends  on material  used) 

Conductive  organic  polymer cells 

12 13

 PV‐NET, European Roadmap for PV R&D, 2004.   http://www.oe‐chemicals.com/dictionaryM‐Z.html

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

7

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

 

 
Figure 6: An organic solar cell made up of several  layers  These cells use quantum confinement to modify the  electronic structure in order to decouple current and  voltage and thus increasing efficiency. The effect is  demonstrated using III/V solar cells having layers with a  thickness in the nanoscale range. The challenge is to find  low‐cost systems that can use the same principle. 

Variable  Quantum  solar cells  > 5%  ‐  (depends  on material  used) 

Figure 7: Electron transport through a structure of  nanoparticles (left) and more ordered nanotubes  (center) is shown. At right, different wavelengths of  light can be absorbed by different‐sized quantum dots  layered in a “rainbow” solar cell. Image credit:  Kongkanand, et al. ©2008 ACS 

  No nanomaterials are presently commercially used in the application field of photovoltaics.14 The materials  are still in a fundamental research, proof‐of‐principle and test phases. The main challenges for the  application of nanomaterials in the energy sector are the improvement of efficiency and reduction of costs  as well as reliability, safety and lifetime. Obviously, the increase of solar cell efficiency is an important factor  for the decrease of cell costs (per generated Wp), because it reduces the costs for feedstock and  manufacturing by reducing the material consumption. The increment of the efficiency of the solar cells 

14

 SWOT Analysis Concerning the Use of Nanomaterials in the Energy Sector. Prepared under FP6 SSA project NanoroadSME: “Development of  Advanced Technology Roadmaps in Nanomaterial Sciences and Industrial Adaptation to Small and Medium sized Enterprises” (Contract no NMP4‐CT‐ 2004‐505857) 

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

8

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

  requires new technological approaches and the input from research (based on principles of device physics,  efficiencies as high as 50–60% are predicted15,16).  New technologies can be categorised as:17 
• • -

Options primarily aimed at very low cost (while optimising efficiency):  Advanced inorganic thin‐film technologies (e.g. polysilicon thin‐film, spheral CIS‐approaches);   Organic solar cells (e.g. Graetzel cell, bulk donor‐acceptor heterojunction solar cells);  Thermophotovoltaic solar thermal concentration systems or cogeneration systems.  Options primarily aimed at very high efficiency (while optimising cost):  Tailoring  the  solar  spectrum  with  the  active  semiconductor  layer  relying  on  up‐  and  down‐  conversion  layers  and  plasmonic  effects.  Surface  plasmons  generated  upon  interaction  between  light  and  metallic  nanoparticles  have  been  proposed  as  a  mean  to  increase  the  photoconversion  efficiency  in  solar  cells  by  shifting  energy  in  the  incoming  spectrum  towards  the  wavelength  region  where  the  collection  efficiency  is  maximal  or  by  increasing  the  absorbance  by  enhancing  the  local  field intensity. The application of such effects in photovoltaics is definitely still in a very early stage.  Novel  active  layers  with  reduced  dimensionality  (quantum  wells – quantum  wires – quantum  dots).  By introducing quantum wells or quantum dots consisting of a low‐bandgap semiconductor within a  host  semiconductor  with  wider  bandgap,  the  current  might  be  increased  while  retaining  (part  of)  the  higher  output  voltage  of  the  host  semiconductor.  This  approach  aims  at  using  the  quantum  confinement effect to obtain a material with a higher bandgap.   The  collection  of  excited  carriers  before  they  thermalize  to  the  bottom  of  the  concerned  energy  band  (e.g.  hot  carrier  cells).  The  reduced  dimensionality  of  the  QD‐material  tends  to  reduce  the  allowable  phonon  modes  by  which  this  thermalization  process  takes  place  and  increases  the  probability of harvesting the full energy of the excited carrier.  

-

-

For  most  of  emerging  approaches  the  present  emphasis  is  on  basic  material  development,  advanced  morphological  and  opto‐electrical  characterization  and  modelling  as  to  predict  the  behaviour  and  performance under illumination.   Nanomaterials  with  potential  for  exploitation  in  active  layers  with  reduced  dimensionality  are  nanocomposites,  consisting  either  of:  (i)  a  non‐nanocrystalline  matrix  of  one  material  filled  with  either  nanoparticles or nanofibers of another material; or (ii) nano‐nanocomposites with the size of all constituent  materials  grains  in  the  nanometer  range  (e.g.  quantum  dots,  core  shell  nanoparticles,  carbon  nanotube‐ polymer  nano‐nanocomposites,  metal‐ceramic  nano‐nanocomposites,  oth.).  Synthesis  and  assembly  strategies  of  nanomaterials  accommodate  precursors  from  liquid,  solid,  or  gas  phase.18  They  employ  both  chemical  and  physical  deposition  approaches  and  similarly  rely  on  either  chemical  reactivity  or  physical 

15

 M.C. Beard, K. P. Knutsen, P. Yu, J. M. Luther, Q. Song, W. K. Metzger, R. J. Ellingson, A. J. Nozik. Multiple Exciton Generation in Colloidal Silicon  Nanocrystals. NANOLETTERS. Received June 22, 2007.  16  NCPV and Solar Program Review Meeting Proceedings, 2003, USA  17  A Strategic Research Agenda for Photovoltaic Solar Energy Technology Research and development in support of realizing the Vision for  Photovoltaic Technology. Prepared by Working Group 3 “Science, Technology and Applications” of the EU PV Technology Platform. March 2007  18  Jia Grace Lu, Paichun Chang, Zhiyong Fan. Quasi‐one‐dimensional metal oxide materials—Synthesis, properties and applications. Available online  23 May 2006

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

9

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

  compaction  to  integrate  nanostructure  building  blocks  within  the  final  material  structure.  The  methods  employed  to  produce  nanostructured  materials  are  numerous  (main  production  processes  in  use  are  Chemical  Synthesis  (sol‐gel,  thermal  decomposition  are  used,  oth.),  Coating  techniques  (Physical  Vapour  Deposition  or  Chemical  Vapour  Deposition),  and  Patterning  (Electron  Beam  Lithography;  X‐ray  Lithography,  Scanning  Probe  Microscopy),  with  each  method  having  advantages  and  disadvantages  depending  on  the  desired  properties  or  application. The  product  quality  and  application  characteristics  of  nanostructured  materials  depend  strongly  on  the  size  distribution,  morphology  and  state  of  aggregation,  i.e.  the  size  and  number  of  primary  particles  defining  the  degree  of  aggregation.  Fundamental  research  by  process  simulation  is  needed  to  provide  the  understanding  of  the  particle  and  nanostructure  formation  mechanisms.  Combined  with  detailed  analysis  of  particle  size  and  morphology  and  their  impact  on  the  function  at  hand,  it  is  possible  to  customise  nanostructured  products,  providing  distinct  performance  advantages for specific applications.   

Strategic R&D topics for emerging PV technologies 
The main issues for emerging PV technologies are:17 
• • •

Poor stability not meeting the standards of other solar modules;  The present 3‐5% (except multijunctions) is only a stepping stone for much higher efficiencies;   Poor  understanding  of  the  separation  of  generated  charged  carriers,  transport  processes  and  the  relation  between  structure  and  function.  This  requires  better  processes  and  materials  based  on  fundamental chemical and physical knowledge and new designs;  The tolerance to impurities is not known yet (the cost rises exponentially with purity requirements),  therefore, one cannot asure if such solar cell be made in a standard environment. 

In summary it can be stated that within the period 2007‐2013, for the emerging PV technologies19 (Table 2),  issues  like  efficiency  improvement,  stability  and  encapsulation  and  the  development  of  first‐generation  module  manufacturing  technology  will  be  dominant.  For  the  novel  technologies20  (Table  3)  the  emphasis  in  the  coming  years  will  be  rather  on  nanotechnology‐related  items  (nano‐particles,  growth  and  synthesis  methods) and the first demonstration of concepts based on the use of such materials within functional solar  cells. It has to be emphasized that for part of the emerging as well as for all the novel PV technologies these  developments  require  theoretical  and  experimental  tools  allowing  the  understanding,  the  manufacture  and  the  characterization  of  the  morphological  and  opto‐electrical  properties  on  nano‐scale.  For  the  subsequent  time periods 2014‐2020 and beyond 2020 the most promising concepts are to be selected and implemented 

19

 The category “Emerging” is used for those technologies which have passed the “proof‐of‐concept”‐phase or can be considered as longer term  options for the two established solar cell technologies – crystalline Si and thin‐film solar cells – for which clearly defined disruptive developments are  still to be made.  20  The term “Novel” is used for developments and ideas which can lead to potentially disruptive technologies, but where there is not yet clarity on  practically achievable conversion efficiencies or cost structure.

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

10

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

  with  an  increased  emphasis  on  aspects  like  cost,  up‐scaling,  manufacturing  and  sustainability  when  moving  to very large >10 GWp/year production scenarios.    
Table 2: R&D issues for emerging technologies  Basic category  Advanced inorganic  thin‐film technologies  Technology  Spheral CIS  solar cell  Aspects  Material  Device  Performance  Cost  Material  2007‐2013  Deposition  technology  Parallel  interconnection  14%  N/A  Improving poly‐Si  electronic quality,  deposition up‐ scaling  14% / monolithic  module process  N/A  Improved and  stable sensitizers,  solid electrolytes,  encapsulation to  ensure lifetime >  15 years  15%  N/A  Improved and  stable polymers,  stabilization of  nanomorphology  for 5 years  Printing  technology  Organic  multijunctions  15%  N/A  Cell/module  technology for  various active  materials  Demonstration of  reliability  N/A  2014‐2020  Industrial  implementation  > 12% on  industrial level  =0.5‐0.8 €/Wp  Industrial  implementation  > 12‐14% on  industrial level  =0.5‐0.8 €/Wp  2020‐2030 and  beyond  Implementation  of advanced  concepts of solar  spectrum  tailoring in ultra  thin solar cells to  reach < 0.5 €/Wp 

Thin‐film  polycrystalline  Si solar cells 

Performance  Cost  Material 

Organic solar cells 

Dye solar cells 

Industrial  implementation  > 10% on  industrial level =  0.5‐0.8 €/Wp 

Implementation  of advanced  concepts of solar  spectrum  tailoring to reach  < 0.5 €/Wp 

Bulk  heterojunction 

Performance  Cost  Material 

Device 

Low‐cost  encapsulation  materials to  guarantee  stability > 15  years  Organic  multijunctions 

Performance  Cost  Material 

Thermophotovoltaics 

> 10% on  industrial level  =0.5‐0.8 €/Wp  Nanostructured  emitters 

Novel active  layers using  nanotechnology  Electrical  efficiency >8%  < 0.1 €/Wp 

Performance  Cost     

Electrical  efficiency >8%  < 0.2 €/Wp 

©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies 

11

Working Paper No 3 (2007) 

                                  Emerging and Novel Photovoltaic Technologies                          

 
Table 3: R&D issues for novel technologies  Basic category  Novel active layers  Technology  Aspects  2007‐2013  Deposition  technology  Nanoparticle  synthesis  Metallic  intermediate  band bulk  materials  Morphological  and  optoelectronic  characterization  First functional  cells under 1‐sun  or concentration  N/A  N/A  Basic material  development  2014‐2020  Idem  2020‐2030 and  beyond  Up‐scaling of  most promising  approaches  requiring low‐ cost approaches  for deposition  technology,  synthesis, cell  and module  technology  compatible with  module costs <  0.5 €/Wp   

Quantum wells  Material  Quantum wires  Quantum dots  Nanoparticle  inclusion in  host  semiconductor 

Device 

Lab‐type cell  Selection 

Boosting structures at  the periphery of the  devise  

Up‐down  converters   

Performance  Cost  Material 

Device 

Performance 

Exploitation of  plasmonic  effects 

Cost  Material 

Device 

Performance 

Cost 

> 30%  N/A  Stability of  boosting layer  materials  First  Lab‐type cell  demonstration on  Selection  existing solar cell  types under 1 sun  or concentration  N/A  > 10%  improvement  relative to  baseline  N/A  N/A  Metallic  Stability of  nanoparticle  boosting layer  synthesis with  materials  control over size,  geometry and  functionalization  First  Lab‐type cell  demonstration on  Selection of  existing solar cell  most promising  types under 1 sun  approaches  or concentration  N/A  > 10%  improvement  relative to  baseline  N/A  N/A 

Up‐scaling of  most promising  approaches  requiring low‐ cost approaches  for synthesis of  required  materials.  Deposition or  application  technology of  peripheral layers  with module  costs < 0.5 €/Wp 

 
©2007 The Applied Research Institute for Prospective Technologies  12