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September 2013 Scenic Travel Wildlife Sports Vol. 29 No. 8
C
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40
44
50 KEEPING IT REAL WITH HDR
How to use HDR software to maintain appropriate
contrast, overcome the limitations of the sensor
and bring out detail—without overdoing it!
Text And Photography By Glenn Randall
56 TAKE CONTROL OF BACKLIGHT
Like facing into a refreshing breeze,
backlight can flow through a scene to create
depth, dimension and visual impact
Text And Photography By Justin Black
66 EXTREME CLOSE-UP
Learn how to use proper technique
for sharp, tight photos at extreme
focal lengths
By Kathryn Vincent Lepp
Photography By George D. Lepp
56
PORTFOLI O
40 BEST OF ASSIGNMENTS
The best of the Assignments submissions from
outdoorphotographer.com
44 THE NEW TRADITIONALIST
In less than a decade, Jim Shoemaker went from being
afraid of his SLR to a life filled with landscape photography
and creating images that convey what the scene feels like
By William Sawalich
Photography By Jim Shoemaker
TRAVEL
60 THE FACES OF KUMBH MELA
Amidst a cacophony of humanity, Fredric Roberts’
photos of the 2013 Kumbh Mela isolate
the individuals, and through that, his
images tell the broader story
By Catherine Marshall
Photography By Fredric Roberts
More On
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6 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
Visit Your Favorite Places: Photographers from all over the world
are sharing favorite nature photography locations. You can, too!
Learn About New Products: Exciting new products featured in
OP’s In Focus section appear earlier on the website. In addition,
you’ll see the latest news releases from many different photo
companies right away.
[ E Q U I P M E N T ]
70 TOP DSLRS FOR WILDLIFE
To capture the decisive moment in animal activity and
behavior, choose a camera with the AF performance,
speed and image quality that are up to the task
By Mike Stensvold
86 GADGET BAG: EXTEND YOUR REACH
Tele-extenders give you an inexpensive way to
boost your focal length
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cover shot
Photographer: Russ Bishop
Location: John Muir Wilderness, Calif.
Equipment: Nikon D7000, Nikon 16mm
ƒ/2.8D AF
Situation: A backpacker on the Bishop
Pass Trail in the John Muir Wilderness
of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in
California is treated to a spectacular view
of the high lakes in the region. Moments
like this are the greatest rewards for most
nature photographers. This grand vista
conveys a sense of place and a feeling
of being in the moment.
Russ Bishop is a professional fine-art
landscape photographer. He was featured
in the July 2013 issue of OP, and his
dynamic photography has been winning
awards for years. Bishop is the embodi-
ment of the dreamof many OPreaders—
he’s a professional who makes a living
with his photography, but he isn’t limited
exclusively to landscapes. “Although my
roots are firmly in the natural landscape,”
he explains, “my photography crosses
over into many other interests. I’m fas-
cinated by historic and cultural subjects,
and I’m involved in many outdoor activ-
ities such as climbing, skiing and back-
packing, all of which not only make for
great photographs, but are really an exten-
sion of who I am as an individual. This
is the passion part that I knowis overused,
but I can’t thinkof a better wordtodescribe
it. Like the life saying with a twist, ‘Shoot
what you love, the money will follow.’
Obviously, that’s an oversimplification.
There’s a lot of hard work in marketing
and business management, but the basic
point is true. If you’re passionate about
a subject and apply that to your photog-
raphy, it will permeate your work and
result in more compelling images.”

10 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
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outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 11
G
eorge Lepp sent me a collec-
tion of images with some pretty
incredible photos he had taken
with a variety of especially long
focal lengths. He had gone up
to and past the extremes by starting with long
lenses and adding multiple tele-extenders.
The results were stunning, and the photos
inspired me to ask him to do the “Extreme
Close-Up” article in this issue. Lepp shares
his gear solutions, but more importantly, he
discusses the techniques used to maintain
sharpness with these setups. And, of course,
you can use these techniques for any tele-
photo photography—birds, wildlife, travel
and even long-lens scenics.
The controversy over HDR continues to
churn on the Internet. In this issue, frequent
OP contributor Glenn Randall shows you
how to get the best use out of HDR tech-
nology while keeping it realistic. Image sen-
sors, like film, are limited in their dynamic
range. The judicious use of HDR software
lets you break free from those technological
limitations to create photographs that come
closer to howyou see a scene with your eyes.
Randall also makes the excellent point that
he’s really trying to create photos that show
what he saw in a scene rather than what
his camera recorded. By shooting bracketed
exposures, he creates a series of notes that
shows the detail his eyes perceived from
highlights to shadows, and from those notes
he can construct the proper image. Take a
look at “Keeping It Real With HDR” to see
Randall’s tips for getting the most out of
your HDR tools without crossing into the
realm of overdone.
Justin Black explores a different part
of the dynamic range spectrum in “Take
Control Of Backlight.” Black writes about
shooting backlit scenes as being like facing
into a refreshing breeze. I thought this anal-
ogy was perfect. Exploring backlight adds a
dynamic element to your photography and
a lot of nature photographers ignore it. The
next time you’re composing a shot in early-
morning or late-afternoon light and you find
yourself working hard to keep your shadow
out of the frame, turn around and have a
look. You might find that there’s a perfect
backlit image just waiting to be taken.
Most days, my first work task is to
go to the Assignments gallery at outdoor
photographer.com to see what has come in
overnight. There are a lot of outstanding pho-
tographs that get sent in, and my favorites are
the ones that show me something I haven’t
seen before. I like the shots that surprise me
and make me think about a scene differently.
In this issue, “The Best Of Assignments”
shows several of the recent weekly winners
and the Assignment that they won. The pho-
tographers also tell the story of how they got
their winning image. The photos are judged
on their own merits, but the stories behind
these shots are inspiring and interesting, and
there’s always something to learn from
them. See all of the Assignments winners at
outdoorphotographer.com/blog.
The OP Blog has undergone a transfor-
mation over the last few months. In addition
to excellent articles from bloggers like Ian
Plant, Kevin Schafer, Michael Frye and Jon
Cornforth, you’ll find news and announce-
ments, the Photo Of The Day, Assignments
winners and a new Behind The Shot section
that reveals the stories of particularly inter-
esting images as told by the photographers.
With the increasing interest in video and time-
lapse, we’ve also relaunched OPTV to show-
case some outstanding motion projects. In
short, the OPBlog is where you can find your
daily dose of Outdoor Photographer. Check
it out and let me know what you think. Send
an email to editor@outdoorphotographer.com
or find me on Twitter @OPRobinson.
—Christopher Robinson, Editor
G
l
e
n
n
R
a
n
d
a
l
l
in this issue
The controversy over
HDR continues to churn
on the Internet. In this
issue, frequent OP
contributor Glenn
Randall shows you how
to get the best use out
of HDR technology while
keeping it realistic.
Image sensors, like film,
are limited in their
dynamic range. The
judicious use of HDR
software lets you break
free from those
technological limitations
to create photographs
that come closer to how
you see a scene with
your eyes.

12 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com

S
i
m
o
n
C
h
r
i
s
t
e
n
Forest, Marin Headlands, California
On a foggy morning in May 2012, Simon Christen was on the Morning Sun Trail in the Marin Headlands, just
north of San Francisco, Calif., looking for a time-lapse opportunity for his film, Adrift. Describing the scene,
he says, “I was trying to get to the top of the hill in order to capture the fog flowing into the bay from a new
vantage point. Unfortunately, the top was completely covered in fog and I couldn’t see a thing. On my way
back, the fog started to lighten up, and all of a sudden the sun started to peek through the trees in front of
me. I noticed the beautiful blades of grass alongside the trail. As soon as the sun cast rays through the fog,
I knew I had to stop and try to capture the scene. It was one of those moments that I just stumbled upon by
pure luck.” This image is a panorama stitched together from a total of 66 bracketed vertical exposures.
Canon EOS 7D, Canon EF 10-22mm ƒ/3.5-4.5, Really Right Stuff tripod
Show
case
Show
case
outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 13

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14 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com

When you come to Maine you’ re going to have an experience unlike any other. Just emulate Mainer Barry Tripp, who on any
given day is either snowboarding at Sugarloaf or riding the waves at Old Orchard Beach. Or you may find him taking in the
breathtaking scenery on the pristine fairways of the Ledges Golf Club or fly fishing on an inland lake. In other words, this isn’ t
just any place. This is a place where you can do more before sundown than you ever imagined.
Be inspired. Be adventurous. Be yourself. Discover your Maine Thing. To learn more, go to VisitMaine.com.
BARRY, Life Enthusiast
Get more insider info at VisitMaine.com

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16 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com

www.tamron-usa.com
Experience the full power of Macro.
SP 90mm F/2.8
Di VC USD Portrait/Macro
Matchless performance plus extreme 1:1 close-up capability.
State-of-the-art optical and image stabilizing technologies combine to
create a new masterwork lens in the 90mm. With images of astounding
sharpness, augmented by natural blur effects, Tamron’s classic high
resolution 1:1 macro lens lets the photographer capture the moment’s
atmosphere at will. Features include rounded 9-blade diaphragm to
deliver spectacular bokeh; new eBAND (Extended Bandwidth &
(UN\SHY+LWLUKLUJ`*VH[PUN[OH[YLK\JLZ\UKLZPYLKÅHYLHUKNOVZ[PUN
to a new level to deliver sharp, crisp images; Tamron VC (Vibration
Compensation) image stabilization; and USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive)
autofocus system.

Model F004
Di (Digitally Integrated) lens designed for digital APS-C and full-size Canon, Nikon, Sony* cameras
*The Sony mount does not include VC, as Sony digital SLR bodies include image stabilization functionality.
© Mike Moats

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No purchase necessary to enter or win. For a chance to win one of the “WIN THIS!” products, click on the button at outdoorphotographer.com
for complete details. Open to legal residents of the 50 U.S. & D.C., 18 or older. Void where prohibited. Sweepstakes end 9/30/13. 18 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
PRI ME GLASS Ǡ
Photographers looking for a fast prime lens will take note of
the Sigma 35mm ƒ/1.4 DG HSM Art Lens. Designed for a
full-frame sensor and compatible with an APS-C sensor, the
lens features a Hyper Sonic Motor for quick and quiet focusing,
as well as a floating internal focusing system, allowing high
performance, even at close shooting distances. SLD and FLD
glass elements correct axial and chromatic aberrations. The
lens is compatible with the Sigma USB dock for firmware
updates and adjusting focus parameters. Estimated Street
Price: $899. Contact: Sigma, www.sigmaphoto.com.
COMPACT SONY Ǡ
A compact camera with ultra-low-light capability, the
Sony RX100 II with a 28-100mm Exmor R Sonnar
T* ƒ/1.8 fixed lens fits in your pocket on days when
you want to travel light. The 1-inch CMOS reverse
structure sensor increases the sensitivity by 40% from
the RX100. The 3.0-inch White Magic LCD screen
tilts 84º up and 45º down to aid in overhead and
waist-level shooting. A 24p video option has been
added to the 1080p60 standard included in the
original RX100. A shoe-mount expands versatility,
allowing the addition of a viewfinder, flash or clip-on
LCD monitor. A shutter-release remote control may be
added with a Multi Terminal. The RX100 II includes a
built-in WiFi connection and Near Field Communication technology for smooth one-touch asset transfer between devices,
as well as Smart Remote Control functionality for previewing images and controlling shutter release via your smartphone or
tablet. The RX100 II is compatible with Sony’s TRILUMINOS color technology when connected to a BRAVIA TV featuring a
TRILUMINOS display. Estimated Street Price: $750. Contact: Sony, www.sony.com.
ǡ ADOBE LI GHTROOM 5
While Adobe Creative Cloud has been getting a lot of attention, it shouldn’t be
overlooked that one of its standalone elements has been upgraded. Adobe Lightroom
5 covers your workflow from photo organization to edit to sharing. New features
include an Upright tool to straighten skewed lines, a Radial Gradient for off-center
vignettes, an Advanced Healing Brush to remove irregularly shaped objects and Smart
Previews, which create stand-in files for on-the-go edits. The software includes
location-based organization for grouping your photos by GPS location or creating photo
journeys, advanced black-and-white and eight colors when converting to grayscale,
and improved book creation with customizable templates. Lightroom 5 works tightly
with both Photoshop CC and Premiere Pro CC in Creative Cloud. It can be licensed
alone or as part of the Creative Cloud membership. Estimated Street Price: $149 (full
license); $79 (upgrade). Contact: Adobe, www.adobe.com.

THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN BY NYIP STUDENT STEEN TALMARK.
Scan this image
with your phone
to watch a short
video about NYIP
Courses
LEARN PHOTOGRAPHY AT HOME
HIGH QUALITY PHOTO COURSES. REAL-LIFE SUPPORT. FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES.
REQUEST YOUR FREE COURSE CATALOG
ONLI NE: WWW. NYI P. EDU/OUTDOOR | PHONE: 1. 800. 445. 7279
New York Institute of Photography

Ǡ More gear online: www.outdoorphotographer.com/infocus 20 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com Ǡ More gear online: www.outdoorphotographer.com/infocus
PENTAX DSLR į
The new Pentax K-500 offers full features, making it a light DSLR
to accompany you on the trail. With a 16-megapixel APS-C
CMOS sensor, the K-500 has a low-light ISO sensitivity of 51,200.
The 11-sensor autofocus system and Pentax’s in-body Shake
Reduction system aid in precise sharp images. It shoots a quick
5 to 6 fps, ideal for wildlife photographers, as well as full 1080
HD video. While the K-500 may use an optional rechargeable
lithium-ion battery, it’s also powered by four AA batteries, giving
you flexibility and power options when recharging is impossible.
Estimated Street Price: $599 (kit with 18-55mm ƒ/3.5-5.6 lens).
Contact: Pentax, www.pentaximaging.com.
MAXI MI ZI NG MONI TOR Ĭ
For increased visibility video shoots in the field, the 1280x800-pixel resolution
Flashpoint 7-inch LED Field Monitor increases the size of your typical
3-inch on-camera LCD screen by five times. The 16:9 aspect ratio is ideal
for shooting HD video and allows you to move between a black border and
full-screen modes. View the screen from a wide range of positions with the
178º horizontal and vertical viewing angle. The housing is constructed from
metal to ensure durability and includes a clip-on
sun hood, which also provides screen
protection. Full HDMI input and output, a
headphone jack, a mono speaker, a 3-way
power switch and a mini-ballhead
shoe-mount bracket for adjusting
position are included.
Estimated Street Price:
$400. Contact:
Flashpoint
(Adorama),
www.adorama.com.
PERFECT PANORAMA Ǡ
Capture 360º panoramas with the
Novoflex VR-SYSTEM SLANT coupled
with your fisheye lens. Easily set the
system nodal point, attach the system to
a monopod, raise it above your head
and take up to four shots to the north,
south, east and west. Using your
editing software of choice, composite
the images together for a full panorama.
The system includes calibrated quick-
release plates for accurate positioning of
your nodal point and a pistol grip. The
upper Q mount has a +/-15º tilt ability
for composition choice. The upper
mount is angled at 60º so when the
camera is mounted to the diagonal,
the image sensor will be vertical.
Estimated Street Price: $429. Contact:
Novoflex (HP Marketing Corp.),
www.hpmarketingcorp.com.
SUPERWI DE ZOOM į
The Tokina AT-X 12-28mm ƒ/4 lens has
several features attractive to outdoor
photographers. The superwide-angle zoom
allows you to experiment with a new look for
landscapes while still keeping a standard-
angle lens and constant ƒ/4 aperture. It has
been specifically designed for an APS-C
sensor and corrects for aberrations and
distortions out to the edges for sharp
images. A new autofocus control sensor has
been placed close to the drive unit to speed
up the communication between the
controller and the autofocus motor. In
addition, a silent drive module maintains
quiet autofocus functioning, reducing the
noise and distraction your equipment may
cause while capturing the moment. Mounts
are available for Canon and Nikon bodies.
Estimated Street Price: $599. Contact:
Tokina, www.kenkotokinausa.com.

STYLE MEETS SUBSTANCE
Learn more about the Olympus PEN E-P5 at
www.olympusamerica.com
The new E-P5, flagship of the Olympus PEN
lineup, creates superior image quality with
breakthrough digital technology and the
best of film-era form and function
Pro Image Quality
Image quality trumps all for pro-
fessional photographers and the
E-P5 captures rich tonality and
colors, as well as high resolution
for large prints and freedom to
crop. The E-P5 is compatible with
the full range of Micro Four Thirds
lenses, including the new black
versions of the incredibly fast
M.ZUIKO
®
DIGITAL 17mmƒ/1.8,
45mmƒ/1.8 and 75mmƒ/1.8
lenses. From lens to sensor,
the E-P5 gives you image
quality that’s up to
professional scrutiny.
Speed Redefined
The E-P5 is a speed machine. The
camera’s mechanical shutter gives you
a max shutter speed of 1/8000th of a
second at up to 9 frames per second
to freeze any action without blur. Its
Super Spot AF system locks in on sub-
jects with amazing accuracy, and the
new short release time lag AF mode
reduces the time between shots to
0.044 seconds! The camera’s F.A.S.T.
(Frequency Acceleration Sensor Tech-
nology) AF system has 35 focus areas,
and you can select four AF sizes or
3x3 AF sensor groups to align the AF
system with your desired composition
and instantly focus on the shot. When
you’re shooting at high speeds, set the
Tracking AF (C-AF+Tr) to stay locked
on target as you follow your subject.
Advanced 21st Century Features
The E-P5 has built-in WiFi to keep you connected. Setup takes advantage of a
QR code to keep the process fast and simple. You can connect to your smart
device using the free Olympus Image Share 2.0 smartphone app to control the
camera via your phone and embed data like GPS coordinates into your photos
and add a handwritten signature. Photo Story Mode gives you
the ability to make collages of images captured from
multiple vantage points. The Time Lapse mode and
interval shooting automatically create a time-
lapse movie from a set of photos, and there
are a host of Olympus Art Filters.
At a glance, the Olympus PEN E-P5 exudes the
craftsmanship of a bygone era. Its
distinctive styling shares the DNA of the
classic Olympus PEN rangefinder
cameras that were beloved by so many
photographers shooting with black-and-
white film and color slides for the pages
of LIFE, National Geographic, Le Temps,
Der Spiegel and other iconic magazines
and newspapers. The new E-P5 builds
on that legacy, combining its classic look
and easily accessible dials with the
latest cutting-edge digital technology. The
E-P5 features a 16-megapixel TruePic VI
Live MOS sensor, 5-Axis Image Stabi-
lization, WiFi capabilities, a mechanical
shutter that can achieve 1/8000th of a
second shutter speed—a first for mirror-
less cameras—1/320 flash sync speed
and the same renowned AF system as in
the Olympus OM-D E-M5.
ADVERTI SEMENT FEATURE

XX Outdoor Photographer Ǡ More gear online: www.outdoorphotographer.com/infocus 22 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com Ǡ More gear online: www.outdoorphotographer.com/infocus
APPS FOR NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
ǡ Layer multiple images in the creative Photoshop Touch app for iOS and Android.
Use the Scribble Selection tool to choose elements to keep or remove from your image,
refine the selection with the Refine-Edge and Edge-Aware painting tools, adjust tone and
color with levels and curves, and easily add text. Send your image to the Cloud to
access your image from a home computer or share with friends. Estimated Street Price:
$4.99/phone; $9.99/tablet. Contact: Adobe, www.adobe.com.
Ǡ Camera Noir is an easy-to-use app for capturing and sharing monochrome images. Choose
between the low-, mid- or high-contrast filters and simply tap on the screen to adjust the focus and
exposure. A level line aids in balance. Square crop lines show your composition, so you can plan in
advance for Instagram crops. Then share directly to Facebook, Twitter and other social media.
Estimated Street Price: $1.99. Contact: Pacific Helm, www.pacifichelm.com.
ǡ WeatherBug by Earth Networks helps keep you updated on weather
and storm activity. One particularly handy function of the app is the Spark
feature, which detects lightning activity. Using the Total Lightning Network,
cloud computing and smartphone technology, Spark can tell you the
location and distance the nearest lightning is from your current GPS
location or any saved locations. While this is a great application to have on
hand for weather photography enthusiasts, it also provides information
about lightning safety, with recommendations about when to seek shelter.
Free. Contact: Earth Networks, www.earthnetworks.com.
Ǡ SmugMug recently acquired the successful Android app SmugFolio along with the app creator, Brian Wood, and has
rebranded and updated the app as SmugMug for Android. The app now allows users to upload photos and videos to unlimited
galleries and access your assets even while offline. You can upload your photos
with geolocation and detailed photo info as you shoot and share your photo URLs
with other Android apps. Or, switch to Read Only mode to avoid accidental edits.
For new SmugMug users, sign up through the app and receive 25% off for your
first year. Free. Contact: Google Play, play.google.com.
ǡ Keep a visual journal of your trip with the Trip Journal app. With full Google Earth and GPS
integration, you can geotag and pin each of your photo, video and blog entries on a map. View
this map later, or organize your entries by type of media. Share your journal with your friends
on Facebook, Flickr and Picasa, or upload your videos directly to YouTube. Trip Journal is also
compatible with blogging software for direct embedding with WordPress, Blogger, TypePad,
Squarespace and Tumblr. Available for iPhone and Android. Estimated Street Price: $2.99.
Contact: iQapps, www.trip-journal.com.
HANDLE WI TH CARE Ǡ
Keep a comfortable handle on your camera with the Hand Strap by Cotton
Carrier. The Hand Strap is adjustable with heavy-duty Velcro
®
, so you can
tighten and loosen your hand against the body of your camera, as needed.
The strap attaches to the camera with a hard anodized aluminum Arca-Swiss-
style plate that offers a ¼”-20 thread hole, which allows you to still attach the
camera directly to a tripod or to a tripod quick-release plate. This way, you
can move from the tripod to handheld shooting with ease. Estimated Street
Price: $19. Contact: Cotton Carrier, www.cottoncarrier.com.
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24 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
ǡ OUTPOST PROJ ECT
The new Outpost Project line
of camera bags by Crumpler
provides a versatile selection of
six bags that take you from an
urban commute to an outdoor
adventure. Each bag utilizes
the rucksack design with
water-resistant 600D Field
Twill on the outer shell, as well
as ultra-durable, anti-abrasive
materials throughout the bags.
The line is comprised of the
Cobram Messenger Bag, Kashgar
Shoulder Bag, Sebang Sling
Bag, Karachi Backpack, Aso
Commuter Backpack and
Tondo Casual Backpack,
ensuring that you’ll find the
size and style of bag to fit your
gear and shooting style. All bags come with the Crumpler
lifetime guarantee. Estimated Street Price: $95-$265. Contact:
Crumpler, www.crumpler.com.
PHOTOGENI C I ON Ĭ
Stay prepared with the ION lithium-ion pure sine wave
inverter by Photogenic. The 7.5x4.4x3.3-inch ION
converts DC battery power to AC power in a 3.5-pound
pack that can power your various electronics in the field
(laptop, tablet, smartphone, DSLR battery charger, etc.).
The control panel includes two 3-pronged AC outlets,
an LED battery power level monitor, charger receptacle,
power switch and 0.5 amp USB port for cell phone and
computer charging. The full kit includes the inverter,
one lithium-ion battery, charger, light stand mount and
carry strap. Estimated Street Price: $399. Contact:
Photogenic, www.photogenic.com.
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outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 25
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reduce the amount of light that’s recorded by the sensor. To
compensate, the exposure must be lengthened to allow suffi-
cient information to be captured. Unfortunately, on a bright
day, the lowest ISO (50-100) and the smallest ƒ-stop (ƒ/22)
won’t suffice to allowa dramatic long-exposure effect because,
even after
1
∕10 second, the image may be overexposed. A polar-
izing filter might darken things down enough to gain us another
two ƒ-stops, or an exposure of about
1
∕4 second, which is fine
for suggesting movement in streams and waterfalls, but won’t
give the misty or fog-like effect along the ocean.
What we’re looking for is a 10- to 30-second exposure, and
to achieve this, you’ll need an extreme neutral-density filter.
I often use the Singh-RayVari-NDfilter (www.singh-ray.com),
which can be adjusted to pro-
vide from two to eight stops
of neutral density. Singh-Ray
also offers a five-stop neu-
tral-density filter (the Mor-
Slo) and a new 10-stop
tech tips
26 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
Taking It Slow
Water Done Softly • Time-Lapse Drama
Getting More MMs • Traveling With The Big Glass
[ By George D. Lepp Wi th Kathryn Vi ncent Lepp ]
MORE On The Web
OP columns are available as an archive online
at www.outdoorphotographer.com/columns.
Find tips, answers and advice from OP’s trusted
stable of world-famous nature photographers!
̈
Water Done Softly
Q
We’ll be photographing along the West coast, and I’d
like to get that misty look where the waves are mov-
ing in and out. I have a polarizing filter, but I don’t
think that’s going to give me a long enough shutter speed.
Any ideas on how to slow everything down during the day?
G. Temple
Via email
A
There are so many options when it comes to por-
traying the subject of moving water. And it’s one of
my favorite subjects! The creative choices range from
stop-action, tack-sharp drops of spray, to flowing water, to
extreme renditions that turn a crystal-clear, raging stream into
ghost-like streaks between banks of verdant green foliage or
crashing waves into a gentle fog. These effects are, for the
most part, dependent on the length of the exposure: the shorter,
the sharper; the longer, the softer.
The starting point for longer exposures is the lowest ISO
and the smallest ƒ-stop (ƒ/22). These two factors combine to
George Lepp gave this coastal landscape a misty, dreamy look by using a neutral-density filter to slow the exposure in bright conditions.
Montaña de Oro State Park, California. Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II, 30 seconds at ƒ/16, ISO 50

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outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 29
panorama I recently captured using a
fisheye lens at Smith Rocks State Park
at www.vimeo.com/67527488.
You can create the illusion of pan-
ning and zooming in standard time-lapse
captures by using the Ken Burns effect
in video assembly software. It’s avail-
able in even basic programs such as
Apple iMovie and Adobe Premiere
Elements. In reality, the effect is achieved
by cropping into (zoom) or moving a
crop across (pan) a sequence of images,
so to maintain the quality in a pan or
zoom, you need to capture the time-
lapse at a resolution higher than it will
be rendered in the final movie. High-
definition video is 1920x1080; if you
capture the individual images that com-
prise the time-lapse as small JPEGs on
a typical DSLR, you’d have resolution
of 2784x1856, allowing you to crop into
the images without observable loss of
quality. I’m using Apple Final Cut Pro,
which offers more options and more
control over the final output.
Getting More MMs
Q
I keep hearing about increasing
my lens magnification by using
tele-extenders. Then I hear that
the image quality goes away and they’re
not worth investing in. What’s your take
on the 1.4X and 2X converters?
B. Allen
Seattle, Washington
A
I use tele-extenders regularly on
both telephoto lenses and macro
lenses. Sometimes, I even stack
the 2X and 1.4X converters together to
extend my reach. The end result can be
excellent, but there are several condi-
tions to consider.
It’s at the extremes that the quality of
your equipment is tested. With extenders,
you’ll lose light, so start with a camera
body that’s capable of high-quality cap-
ture at up to ISO 1600 to allow faster
shutter speeds and smaller lens openings.
Placing a tele-extender between your lens
and camera body will, in and of itself,
reduce the quality of your capture slightly.
Alleviate this by starting with the best
available prime lens and extender. By
stopping down the lens, you’ll be using
the lens at its optimum capability. The
faster shutter speeds enabled by the higher
ISO will mitigate camera movement or
vibration. Using Live View or Mirror
Lock-Up modes will help control cam-
era vibration at capture.
(Cont’d on page 88)
neutral-density filter (the 10-Stop Mor-
Slo), both of which can be used alone
or in combination with the Vari-ND. At
this point, your viewfinder will be so
dark that you won’t be able to see through
it, so you need to compose your image
before you place the filters for capture.
Check the results on the camera’s LCD,
a huge advantage of the digital age!
Time-Lapse Drama
Q
Lately, I’ve noticed that time-
lapse movies have all kinds of
moves and pans instead of just
staying stationary on a subject. How
is this being done, and how difficult
would it be to add some new moves to
my own time-lapses?
J. Crenshaw
Via email
A
I’m incorporating more motion
into my time-lapse movies in
two ways. One involves equip-
ment, and one is a software solution.
In the equipment department, the most
popular are motorized time-lapse rails in
the 4- to 6-foot lengths (see “MovingYour
Moving Pictures” in the July 2013 issue
of OP or at outdoorphotographer.com).
There are many available from motion-
picture equipment sources. The camera
attaches to a head on the rail and is moved
along the span by a belt. A computerized
system fires the camera, moves it to a
new position, then fires again. Depend-
ing upon your settings, it can take many
hours to transverse the length of the rail.
The rail can be positioned either verti-
cally or horizontally and the camera can
move up, down, left or right. This adds
an element of movement into your time-
lapse and slightly changes the perspec-
tive during the capture.
Arecent addition to time-lapse equip-
ment options is the motorized revolv-
ing panoramic head. The camera rotates
around a central point, moving in very
slight increments over a period of time.
The unit I’m using is called a Radian
(www.alpinelaboratories.com). I control
it with my iPhone, but it works with
Androids also. With the smartphone app,
the photographer selects the angle and
direction of rotation, the total duration
and the elapsed time between move-
ments. The unit can be used to cap-
ture horizontal panoramas or, with an
L bracket, vertical panoramas. You can
see an example of a 180º time-lapse
tech tips
Spectacular images.
To capture challenging images you
need amazing technology. That’s
why the E-M5 has 9fps sequential
shooting, F.A.S.T AutoFocus and
Touch Shutter to freeze time and
capture the shots that are the
hardest to capture.

30 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
while summers are mild, with
temperature averages at around
70 degrees.
Photo Experience
Atelephoto zoomlens is essen-
tial whenphotographingthemus-
tangs. The telephoto lens gives
me the ability to stay at the
required distance of 100 feet
from the horses to respect their
space and privacy. My favorite
is the Nikon 80-400mmwith the
vibration reduction feature. I
carry a Tamrac backpack to
hold extra equipment, water
and snacks, as I may be in the
field for up to 10 hours at a
time. There are no accommo-
dations onthe range, soa warm
sleeping bag and rainproof tent
are essential for staying warm
anddry. Thunderstorms are com-
mon, andtemperatures may drop
as low as the 40s at night. If the
horses are active—fighting, run-
ning, playing, etc.—I’ll use a fast
shutter speed to capture the
action. If they’re inactive, I’ll
experiment with different aper-
[
F A V O R I T E P L A C E S
]
Explore exciting nature imagery in the Your Favorite Places
gallery at www.outdoorphotographer.com. Submit
your photos for a chance to be published!
What’s Your
Favorite Place?
group of federal agencies led
by the Bureau of Land Man-
agement administer the wild
horse range, consisting of more
than 38,000 acres of land. Most
of the horses live on the east-
ern side of Pryor Mountain and
are very accessible, while some
stay on the desert lowlands of
the range near Lovell, Wyo.,
along Highway 37. A low-range,
four-wheel-drive vehicle and
excellent tires are necessary to
gain access to these horses.
Weather
With an average elevation of
8,700 feet, the Pryor Mountain
Wild Horse Range is home to
a variety of terrestrial environ-
ments, including alpine mead-
ows, expansive high desert
plains, mountain ridges and
slopes. Rainfall can vary from
an average of only five inches
in the foothills to as much
as 20 inches at higher eleva-
tions. Snowfall occurs from
September through May, at an
average rate of three feet a year,
tures to blur the backgroundand
foreground. And, at other times,
I’ll strive to capture a scene of
the mustangs in the beauty and
vastness of the area using a
smaller aperture for larger depth
of field. In low-light situations or
when using slower shutter
speeds, I always use a tripod.
Best Times
I typically shoot intheearly morn-
ing and late afternoon for the
light; however, sometimesabeau-
tiful silhouette can be captured
after the sun has set, especially
if the horses can be caught on
a ridge. It took me four years to
finally capture the scene you see
here. The middle of the day can
be good for close-ups to cap-
ture intimate shots of the loving
interaction between families,
too. Roads on the range are
impassable in wet weather and
in the winter months, so June
through September are gener-
ally the best months for visit-
ing. July is typically a favorite
time to visit. Wildflowers are in
bloomin July, and the many dif-
ferent colors make a magnificent
backdrop when photographing
the mustangs.
Contact: Bureau of Land Man-
agement, Montana/Dakotas, (406)
896-5000, www.blm.gov/mt. OP
Ballheads provide much
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plates. Contact: HP Marketing
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Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range,
MONTANA
Text And Photography By Di xi e Wi l son
Location
Captured as the sun was set-
ting over a ridge on the Pryor
Mountain Wild Horse Range,
these fighting stallions are part
of a herd of 150 free-roaming
mustangs and feral horses
known locally as “wild horses.”
Located adjacent to the Bighorn
Canyon National Recreation Area
80 miles south of Billings, Mont.,
the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse
Range was established in 1968
as the first protected refuge for
mustangs and only the second
area for feral horses in the United
States. The recreation area strad-
dles the northern Wyoming and
southern Montana border while
the Pryor Mountains continue
through the CrowIndian Reser-
vation to the east and Custer
National Forest to the west. A
Pryor Mountain
Wild Horse Range
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The reason I mention this personal history is that I want to
encourage younger readers with ambitions of becoming nature
photographers. The world needs more photographers with
strong environmental and natural history backgrounds. Although
I never held an environment-related job, my education has
greatly enriched my understanding of nature. I wish I could
say otherwise; I’m not much of an activist, preferring a some-
what reclusive life here in the Sierra Nevada foothills near
Yosemite. Still, I feel that my education informs the impact
of my images and that my art has had an impact of people’s
appreciation of, and desire to protect, the natural world.
I also want to tell a story about a friend and fellow photog-
rapher. Fifteen years ago, I received a letter from John Weller,
who wanted to work for and learn from me. He had recently
graduated with a degree in Environmental Economics from
Stanford and taken a job in the field, but felt unsatisfied. Although
I couldn’t pay him much, and he was excessively overqualified
for the job, we met and I hired him. We worked together suc-
cessfully for two years and became fast friends in the process.
John returned to his hometown of Boulder, Colorado, and
soon launched an extensive exploration of Great Sand Dunes
National Park, culminating in a masterful book of writing and
I
’m a photographer and an environmentalist. The passion
for each developed within me when I was in college at
the University of Colorado in the 1970s. I was browsing
the CU catalog and found courses such as Dynamics of
Mountain Ecosystems, Environmental Physics, Politics
of Natural Resources and Plant Ecology! When finding that
I could take these courses while receiving an Environmental
Conservation degree, I quickly switched out of my pursuit of
a Political Science degree.
Soon after graduation, I moved to Yosemite for a job with
the National Park Service. Since that time way back in 1977,
I’ve been exploring the park. As myYosemite portfolio devel-
oped, I dreamed of publishing a book of my photographs, a
dream that came true in 1994 with Yosemite: The Promise of
Wildness, coauthored with environmental writer Tim Palmer.
Besides featuring my images, Tim delivers an impassioned
plea for preserving Yosemite as a natural treasure and pro-
tecting the park from development and overuse. The book
was greatly satisfying since it combines to show my artistic
efforts to capture the essence of Yosemite, with thought-
provoking text regarding the conservation issues the parks
faced then, and still face today.
Environmental
Conservation
The world needs more nature photographers with
environmental and natural history backgrounds
[ By Wi l l i am Nei l l ]
on landscape
ABOVE: Morning Mist over Yosemite Valley, shot with a Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III, EF 70-200mm ƒ/2.8L USM,
1
∕10 sec. at ƒ/16, ISO 100
32 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com

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34 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
photography, Great Sand Dunes National
Park: Between Light and Shadow.
Impassioned by his experiences on the
dunes andarmedwitha newunderstanding
about the necessity of conservation, John
was primed to embark on what would
turn out to be a decade-long project in
defense of one of the last great places on
earth. His journey to the Ross Sea in
Antarctica started in 2004 when he read
an obscure scientific paper, which pre-
sented evidence of a truly shocking state
of affairs. It asserts that the Ross Sea was
likelythe last remaininglarge intact marine
ecosystem on Earth. It also presents evi-
dence that a new fishery in the Ross Sea
is threatening to destabilize this last intact
place. John called the scientist who had
written the paper, and together they started
The Last Ocean Project, intended to pro-
mote conservation of the Ross Sea.
John employed all his skills, working
full time on the project as fundraiser, org-
anizer, designer, writer, photographer
and, eventually, filmmaker. Working as a
SeaWeb Fellow, he helped catalyze an
international movement toprotect the Ross
Sea. He worked closely with scientists,
policy makers and conservation organi-
zations, recruited NewZealand filmmaker
Peter Young to make a film, conceived,
organized and funded a key scientific con-
ference, and raised over $1 million to sup-
port the effort. In 2006, he made his first
trip to Antarctica. After four trips to the
Ross Sea, including three months of div-
ing under the ice as a guest of the United
States Antarctic Program, John compiled
a library of Ross Sea photographs that
has been published in dozens of maga-
zines used by conservation organizations
to publicize the Ross Sea all over the
world and showcased at the National
Museum of Wildlife Art and the 2009,
2011 and upcoming 2013AntarcticTreaty
Consultative Meetings. He was awarded
a prestigious Pew Fellowship in Marine
Conservation in 2009.
The culmination of his efforts is a new
book, The Last Ocean: Antarctica’s Ross
Sea Project: Saving the Most Pristine
Ecosystem on Earth (Rizzoli, 2013),
which will be available in October. See
www.johnbweller.com, www.rizzoli
usa.com or Amazon.com for details.
John’s philosophy of photography is
a direct derivative of his philosophy of
conservation. He says, “The Ross Sea
story is not just about a fish, or the incred-
on landscape
MORE On The Web
OP columns are available as an archive online
at www.outdoorphotographer.com/columns.
Find tips, answers and advice from OP’s trusted
stable of world-famous nature photographers!
̈
ible organisms that live at the edge of
the world. This is our own story—the
story of our struggle to become sus-
tainable. And despite the overwhelming
challenges we must face, I believe that
we can unite our efforts, and write the
next chapter of this story together. Really,
it’s our only choice, because the truth is,
that in the face of exponentially increas-
ing pressure on our world resources, we
all comprise a single community, and
only in its balance can we find peace.”
In July and October of this year, the
Commission for the Conservation of
Antarctic Marine Living Resources—
with delegates from25 nations—will dis-
cuss a proposal for a Ross Sea Marine
Protected Area.
There are many other examples of
environmental photographers doing
highly artistic imagery and great work
to protect our Earth—Robert Glenn
Ketchum, James Balog, Frans Lanting,
Jack Dykinga, JimBrandenburg andArt
Wolfe, to name a few. Ansel Adams was
a mentor in that regard for many pho-
tographers concerned with preserving
wild lands and creatures. Organizations
such as the North American Nature
Photography Association, International
League of Conservation Photographers
and Blue Earth Alliance are providing
funding and forums for project-minded
photographers wishing to make a dif-
ference in the world.
My focus has been, and still is, on
creating images that reflect the magic,
mystery and spirituality I see in nature,
whether in my backyard garden or the
epic cliffs ofYosemite Valley. At the core
of developing a sense of environmental
responsibility is for artists to communi-
cate their deepest feelings about nature,
and in doing so, encourage others to act
with respect and love for the natural
beauty that surrounds us. There are many
ways to make a powerful impact with
your images. Which path will you take?
Will you make a difference? OP
To learn about William Neill’s one-on-
oneYosemite workshops, ebooks andiTunes
app, see his latest images and learn about
his online courses with BetterPhoto.com,
visit www.williamneill.com.
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36 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
basic jones
Overflowing
On being part of the natural cycles we
watch as photographers
[ By Dewi tt Jones ]
that made it even more beautiful. My heart quickened every
time the tub filled. No, every time it overflowed. That was
what was so powerful—watching something overflow. Some-
thing that had been filling up from the inside.
How powerful that is, wherever we see it, filling up from
the inside and overflowing.
A couple of weeks after my experience at the Bathtub, I
went to the Ka Hula Piko Festival. There were some very good
dancers, but none who tran-
scended the notes and the ges-
tures. None, in short, who
became the hula when they
danced. I actually drove back
to my house to grab lunch and
S
tars were still hanging in the dark sky as I pulled my
gear from the back of the car and headed off toward
the edge of the sea. Dawn at Mo‘omomi Beach on
Molokai is one of the great wonders of the world, and
I didn’t want to be late. As I worked my way across
the slabs of sandstone toward one of my favorite viewing spots,
I realized that something was amiss. The water just wasn’t where
it was supposed to be. Even in the near darkness, it was clear
that this morning the sun would dawn on a super-low tide. “I’m
taking a chance on the Bathtub,” I murmured to myself.
The Bathtub is a large blowhole at the far end of a rock
ledge jutting far out to sea. At normal or high tide, one is tak-
ing his life in his hands to venture to its edge.
On this particular morning, however, both the wind and
the waves were calm. So, keeping an eye on what waves there
were, I worked my way slowly out to the blowhole and set
up my tripod. Then I just stopped and stared.
The water coming into the Bathtub was a mixture of
turquoise and froth. It joyously filled up the rock cavern and
flowed out over the ledge and over my feet. Then, gently, it
retreated, only to repeat the process with each incoming wave.
I thought about all the natural cycles I had witnessed while
photographing—the seasons, the rising and setting of the sun,
the tides. How many thousands of times had I watched them?
Like watching the smooth muscle of the planet—the things
our little orb can’t help but do. Like watching the earth breathe.
Well, the in-breath here at the Bathtub was breathtaking.
Certainly, it was visually stunning, but there was an energy
MORE On The Web
OP columns are available as an archive online
at www.outdoorphotographer.com/columns.
Find tips, answers and advice from OP’s trusted
stable of world-famous nature photographers!
̈
LEFT: Dewitt Jones auto-bracketed
the shot of the Bathtub in Molokai,
but didn’t like the blend on the water
in HDR. He found he could get all the
detail he wanted just by tweaking
the properly exposed frame in Adobe
Camera Raw.
BELOW: The original image was shot
with a Canon EOS 5D Mark III with a
70-300mm lens. Jones masked the
hula dancer out of the background of
the festival and blended it with an
iPhone shot of a rain-soaked forest
that he had tweaked in Topaz
Simplify. Then he took the resulting
image into Nik Silver Efex Pro 2 to
give it the sepia cast and the frame.

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 37
probably wouldn’t have returned if some-
thing hadn’t been pulling me, maybe like
the Bathtub had pulled me out on that
shelf in the predawn light.
When I did return to the festival, I
remember asking myself, “Should I sit
on the left side or the right?” Without
hesitation, my body moved left. My
mind and my cameras followed. I love
when my intuition kicks in.
I ducked in front of the sound mixer’s
table and put my telephoto to my eye.
There, in the viewfinder, was a dancer I
didn’t know. Not one of the local girls,
she had come from a neighboring island
with her halau. The music began and she
raised her arms in the first gesture of the
dance. Unspeakably beautiful. One upon
another, the gestures flowed fromher. She
wasn’t dancing the hula, she was the hula.
And her face! The emotions of the
dance overflowed fromher eyes, poured
from her cheeks and mouth. It was as
if she was so full, she couldn’t contain
it another moment. She was full from
the inside, and she overflowed.
I shot one dance after another until
finally she left the stage. My CF card was
full. I sat there touchedbythe same energy
I hadfelt standingbefore the Bathtub. The
sheer joy of watching some thing, some
body, fill up fromthe inside and overflow.
Later that afternoon, storm clouds
moved in, and I walked back to my
house in the rain. I thought of photos I
had taken of this incredible young woman
and knewwhen I eventually made prints
that I didn’t want her standing before
the bandstand and the crowd. Her beauty
seemed more connected to nature than
the man-made structures at the festival.
I stopped and photographed the rain-
soaked forest with my iPhone.
Later, in front of my computer, I sur-
rounded her with that soft, misty forest.
It seemed the perfect background for
her gesture and the emotions that over-
flowed from her being.
Looking at the image, I realized that,
when we let ourselves, we, too, are part
of those natural cycles we all watch as
photographers. When we allowourselves
to truly feel their wonder, we, too, fill
up from the inside and overflow. OP
Dewitt Jones now posts daily celebra-
tion images on his Facebook page. He
invites you to post yours as well at
www.facebook.com/celebratewhatsright.
Or sign up for his weekly Photos of Cel-
ebration at www.celebratewhatsright.com.
B E C A U S E T H E Y W O R K.
l u m i q u e s t . c o m
Unconditionally Guaranteed
Made in USA
Location/Portrait Photo Kit
Because great portraits
don’t always happen in a studio.

Color Pools

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 39
I
n the last 30 years, Antarctica has opened
up, enabling travelers to witness some of
the most spectacular scenery on the planet.
But when you carry a camera on such a
once-in-a-lifetime journey, it’s good to be
aware of the difference between moments worth
remembering with an easy shot and opportunities
to get creative that may require more effort.
On a recent cruise to the Antarctic Peninsula,
I passed through the Lemaire Channel, a
dramatic strait with glacier-covered mountains
on both sides. The water was in afternoon
shadow, with sunlit scenery mirrored on its
gently rippling surface. When water undulates
in waves, the reflections bend with it,
creating phenomena known as “skypools” and
“landpools”—elongated ovals that form
ever-changing patterns that show distorted
images of sky and land.
Watching water in motion is mesmerizing,
but translating that experience to a striking
image requires some forethought. I decided to
capture the interplay between water and light
as sharply as I could. I took my gear to the
topmost deck, knowing that the steeper angle
from a higher vantage point would reveal
more detail. Using a tripod on a moving ship
can be futile, but our vessel was cruising
slowly and there were no ocean swells. So I
could use a 200-400mm ƒ/4 lens to get more
reach and I mounted it on a tripod to achieve
better stability. Applying an ISO of 1600
kept my shutter speed above a thousandth of
a second, which overcame the effect of
water movement and ship vibration. It also
enabled me to close my aperture to ƒ/22
for a maximum depth of field.
What I sacrificed in pixel rendition from
increasing my ISO was more than
compensated for by the exquisite patterning
I was able to freeze: ellipses of baby-blue sky
and dark brown naked rock, surrounded by
swirling beige hues of snow and ice tinged
creamy by the evening sun—an abstraction of
an Antarctic summer scene distilled into pools
of pure color. OP
world view
[ By Frans Lanti ng ]
Get creative with seascapes and coastal wildlife during “California Light,” Frans Lanting’s
October 2013 workshop in Santa Cruz. Learn more at www.lanting.com/workshops.html.

A S S I G N M E N T S
̈̈ The Best Of The Assi gnment s Submi ssi ons From out door phot ogr apher. com
40 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
1
EVERY WEEK, THE OP EDITORS
CHOOSE A WINNING IMAGE
FROM THE SUBMISSIONS TO
THAT WEEK’S ASSIGNMENT ON
OUTDOORPHOTOGRAPHER.COM.
That photo is highlighted on the
OP homepage and in the OP Blog.
In this issue of the magazine,
instead of showing several top
images from a single Assignment,
I’m publishing recent winners from
various spring Assignments here.
—Christopher Robinson, Editor
Winner, View From The Top Assignment
2) PHOTOGRAPHER: Harry Lichtman
LOCATION: White Mountains, New Hampshire
EQUIPMENT: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Canon EF 24-105mm ƒ/4L IS USM, Manfrotto carbon-fiber tripod
I’ve hiked along the Moat Mountain Trail in New Hampshire’s White Mountains many times and made a
mental note of the great views. Since the ridge runs south to north, sunrise and sunset possibilities make
for good photo opportunities from the same location. Generally, the area isn’t great for camping, as there’s
no running water and the ledges are exposed. I hiked down the exposed ledges near Middle Moat, away
from the trail in June 2013, and found a relatively flat area where I could set up my ultralight tent and be in
a good position should the light cooperate. I prefer the spring and fall for these grand views as the varying
shades of green foliage provide some differentiation between leaves and the evergreens. Midsummer
greens tend to be overwhelming in this kind of photo. I packed extra water and brought only dry food so
as not to need a stove above treeline and minimize impact.
I previsualized the scene so I could be in the right place at the right time if weather conditions worked
out. The weather always comes into play. I had intended to shoot pure landscape images, but found the
inclusion of the tent and me (using the self-timer) a more powerful image.
I bracketed exposures and manually blended two exposures to maintain detail in the highlights
and shadows. The distant cloud bank acted as a natural diffuser, making the lighting a little softer and
more uniform.

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 41
Winner, Shooting In The Dark Assignment
1) PHOTOGRAPHER: Dustin Penman
LOCATION: Near Folsom, California
EQUIPMENT: Nikon D7000, 10-24mm
ƒ/3.5-4.5G ED AF-S DX Nikkor
On July 22, 2012, I was awakened by my
buddy calling, “We got lightning,” and I was
off like a flash (pun intended)! At 3 a.m., I
was still outside, amazed by the constant
lightning, the fast-moving storm clouds and
the fact that the stars were visible through it
all. This just blew my mind. I knew I also
wanted to incorporate a strong foreground
in the image, so I went looking for an oak
tree that would fit the bill. At a local park, I
found this scene.
I knew I wanted to capture just how
crazy of a night it was. I figured that six
2-minute exposures would allow enough
time to capture the lightning and show a
small amount of star travel, as well as the
quick-moving clouds. The grass near the
tree was being lit by a street lamp
hidden behind the tree, and I did a little
light-painting of the tree with my flashlight
on the last exposure. I then stacked the
images in Photoshop CS6. I’ve been waiting
for another electrical storm ever since.
Winner, Wildlife In Motion Assignment
3) PHOTOGRAPHER: Scott Dere
LOCATION: Jamaica Bay, New York
EQUIPMENT: Canon EOS-1D Mark IV, Canon
EF 600mm ƒ/4 IS L, cable release, Gitzo tripod,
Wimberley head
During the winter of 2011-2012, there were two
adult snowy owls and two owlets that were
found across Long Island. The park officials I
spoke with say that this male has been wintering
here for 20 years. The adult female could be
found on the dunes at Jamaica Bay, Queens,
while the younger owls were found at the
beaches of Breezy Point and Hampton Bays.
This was an awesome sighting just miles from
New York City.
I previsualized this photograph, but I was
definitely in the right place at the right time.
I found the owl late in the afternoon near
sundown. As the large bird started to become
more alert near sunset, I prepared for him to
start hunting. Sure enough, as soon as the sun
was gone, the snowy owl launched off the sand.
He was wide-eyed and ready for action, and
came right at the camera with no fear of me or
the large equipment I was carrying. I set my
camera to Al Servo, ƒ/4.5 at
1
∕1000 sec. and ISO
1250 to get the low-light exposure.
2
1
3

42 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
Winner, Cloudy Days Assignment
4) PHOTOGRAPHER:
Colleen Miniuk-Sperry
LOCATION: Del Norte Coast Redwoods
State Park, California
EQUIPMENT: Canon EOS 5D, Canon EF
24-105mm ƒ/4L IS USM, cable release,
Manfrotto tripod with grip-action ballhead
In mid-May 2009, my husband Craig
and I ventured from our Arizona home to
see Redwood National Park for the first
time, with the hope of seeing this
magnificent forest showing off fresh pink
rhododendrons beneath the massive
canopy. Upon arrival, we wandered
around the park under clear, bright,
sunny skies, which enabled endless and
exciting explorations, but harsh, contrasty
lighting conditions for photographing the
beauty in front of our eyes. I had hoped
for overcast skies or fog to bring out the
vibrant pink color of the flowers, but
Mother Nature had other plans for our
four-day stay. On the fifth day, our travel
plans took us north to Gold Beach,
Oregon, but I secretly hoped I would
have one last chance to see diffused light
in this spectacular park on our return trip
home to Arizona.
As luck would have it, on May 23, as
we drove back through the state park
[which is part of Redwood National Park]
en route to Arizona, thick fog curled
around the giant redwoods and dainty
“rhodies.” From our previous visit, I knew
exactly which flowering plant and
redwoods I wanted to capture.
Overjoyed, I quickly jumped out of our
car with my tripod, camera, 24mm lens
and lens cloth in hand. To emphasize the
dramatic height of the trees, I pointed my
camera toward the sky, getting almost
underneath the rhodies 15 feet overhead.
I specifically wanted to show the
juxtaposition between the towering trees
and the large, but delicate flowers, so I
intentionally broke the “Rule of Thirds”
and gave them equal amount of real
estate within the frame and leveraged the
converging lines down the center of the
image to pull the viewer into the picture.
4

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on your favorite mobile device or computer.
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XX Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
In less than a decade,
Jim Shoemaker went
from being afraid
of his SLR to a life
filled with landscape
photography and
creating images that
convey what the
scene feels like
The
NEW
Traditionalist
BY WILLIAM SAWALICH | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JIM SHOEMAKER

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 45
W
When Jim Shoemaker relocated from
Southern Michigan to Southern California
13 years ago, the move changed his life.
Agraphic designer by trade, Shoemaker
was inspired by the national parks and
beautiful scenery he encountered on that
journey to pick up a camera for the first
time. It was an inauspicious start to what
would quickly blossom into a career as
a professional photographer.
“My wife had a basic Ricoh SLR,” he
says, “as she’d taken some photography
classes at the University of Michigan. But
I was scared of it, so I used a point-and-
shoot APS film camera and an incredi-
bly primitive digital camera that produced
absolutely useless files. I shot dozens of
rolls of filmover the course of two weeks,
and I couldn’t wait until they got back
from the lab to see the results.”
What happened next isn’t much of
a surprise.
“Saying that it all came out a colossal
failure is an understatement,” he says. “I
couldn’t understandhowI couldhave shot
so many great scenes, yet none of the
prints evenremotelyresembledanyof the
amazing landscapes I had experienced. In
fact, when I looked at many of the prints,
I didn’t knowwhat it was that hadprompted
me to take the picture in the first place. I
didn’t even know what I was looking at.”
His conclusion at the time was that
perhaps photographs simply couldn’t
capture the grandeur of what he was see-
ing. So, Shoemaker invested in a video
camera and read every book on compo-
sition and cinematography he could find.
Reading, it turns out, is also a great way
to learn the fundamentals of photogra-
phy—which he did after realizing he was
simply framing still images with a video
camera. In 2004 he bought a Canon EOS
10D and read the manual cover to cover.
“The camera manual was followed by
several books byAnsel Adams,” he says,
“from which I was instilled with the
notion of getting it right in the camera,
learning the mechanics of the camera to
the point where they can be operated by
instinct and capturing all the necessary
information on the digital negative so I
could create the print that I visualized
during the exposure. As the years passed
and I gradually improved, I collected and
studied books by other photographers I
admired. But books aside, I knew that
the most important aspect of learning
photography was to just do it.”
As it is with many landscape pho-
tographers, Shoemaker first concerned
himself with simply recording what he
saw. As he kept shooting, though, his
prowess improved and his mission
evolved. Soon he would work to docu-
ment scenes and to convey what he felt
while he experienced nature.
“People get hung up on wondering,
‘Did it really look like that?’” he says.
“My answer is, ‘Maybe not, but that’s
what it felt like.’ A good example is
when I was in the North Cascades in
Washington last year. [See the photo in
the Showcase section of this issue.] I
was in the Heather Meadows area one
morning before sunrise.
“I had set up my gear and was

XX Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
waiting in silence for the right light when
I suddenly heard music from a Native
American flute coming from somewhere
in the nearby woods. It was amazing. The
music was soothing and beautiful, and as
the morning alpenglow began to hit the
mountains, I wondered if this was a tra-
dition that has been going on for hun-
dreds of years.
“I looked through my viewfinder and
considered how I could frame a shot
that would transmit the sense of tran-
quility and serenity that I was feeling.
I don’t know that such a thing is possi-
ble—to define the combined input of all
five senses into the single sense of sight
via a two-dimensional image—but I
begin framing every location I visit by
how it makes me feel to be there.”
With every click of the shutter,
Shoemaker feels the weight of every
master photographer who came before
him. He knewthemwell, after all, through
their books. He may be working with
different tools in a whole new era, but
he’s quite comfortable walking in their
footsteps, carrying on their tradition.
“Considering the bulk of my educa-
tion came from reading the books and
studying the works of photographers like
Adams, Weston, Hyde and others,” he
says, “I’d say that I’m probably more of
a traditionalist when it comes to the style
of my framing. But again, I’mmore inter-
ested in how it feels to be there. It’s an
interpretive process, but by ‘interpreting’
I don’t mean ‘fabricating.’ Everything
that appears in the image was present
when I made the exposure. I’mnot inter-
ested in stripping in skies that are more
dramatic or adding and removing objects
in post. I’m also not interested in creat-
ing a hyper-reality by overcooking HDR
images, oversaturating colors or over-
exaggerating the mid-tone contrast in
Photoshop. There are a lot of styles that
have become popular due to improving
technology in cameras and digital dark-
rooms. Everyone needs to find their own
voice, and there’s nothing wrong with
pushing boundaries and experimentation,
but my subjective preference lies in a
slightly more traditional look.”
When it comes to aesthetics,
Shoemaker’s 20-year career in graph-
ic design left him with a sensibility
that still informs the way he builds

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 47
OPENING SPREAD: Canyonlands National Park, Utah. THIS PAGE, LEFT: Natural Bridges, Samuel H.
Boardman State Scenic Corridor, Oregon. THIS PAGE, ABOVE: Castro Crest, Santa Monica Mountains
National Recreation Area, California. Jim Shoemaker prefers to work with focal lengths at the
extremes. As he explains, “I tend to work on either end of the focal length spectrum, but not in
the middle. The bulk of my work resides in the 16mm to 35mm range, then jumps to 100mm to
400mm. I have no prejudice against a 50mm lens; it’s just that it doesn’t fit the way I see things
very well. I’m also a filter junkie, even in this age where they can be applied to some extent in
post. I carry a collection of Singh-Ray graduated and reverse graduated ND filters, and a warming
polarizer. The desire to get the exposure within the camera goes back to my early exposure to
Ansel Adams’ writings, but if the situation calls for it and the technique is suitable, I’ll use HDR
to capture the image.”
[
Jim Shoemaker’s
]
Equipment
CanonEOS5DMark II and Mark III DSLRs
Mamiya 645AFD with Leaf Aptus 17
digital back or film back
On Canon DSLRs: Canon 16-35mm
Ä/2.8L, Canon 24-105mm Ä/4L IS, Canon
100-400mm Ä/4.5-5.6L IS (for landscape and
wildlife work), Canon 600mm Ä/4L IS with a
1.4x teleconverter (for wildlife work)
On Mamiya 645AFD: 35mm Ä/3.5,
55-110mm, 105-210mm lens on occasion
Gitzo GT5561SGT tripod, Manfrotto
468MGRC0 ballhead and Wimberley head
for the 600mm when photographing wildlife
Singh-Ray warming polarizer, and
graduated and reverse graduated ND filters
Cable release

48 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
of symmetrical and asymmetrical bal-
ance, shape, form and repetition have
to be understood. The Rule of Thirds
doesn’t begin to cut it and, frankly, some-
times a subject placed dead-center in a
frame is powerful if you knowwhat you’re
doing. I can’t say I see landscapes dif-
ferently; I just see them my way.
“My preferred lens is the [Canon]16-
35mm ƒ/2.8L,” he adds, “and often I
place my foreground object at the min-
imumfocusing distance of the lens. This
really forces the sense of depth of the
image from front to back and makes the
foreground feel imposing. I think it also
gives the viewer more of a sensation
that they’re drawn into the image, and
it becomes more of an interactive expe-
rience rather than a passive one.”
While Shoemaker’s aesthetics have
surely evolved in his nine-year photog-
raphy career, the real revolution has been
in the way he approaches the technical
matters of exposure and processing.
“In the beginning,” he says, “I wor-
ried too much about what a ‘proper’ expo-
sure was, when there really is no such
thing. A ‘proper’ exposure makes the
image look the way you visualized it,
and a ‘technically proper’ exposure meters
at 18% gray. It usually made my images
W
hile his portfolio is filled with rich
and moody color images, Jim
Shoemaker is equally comfortable
working with black-and-white, but it requires
a different way of seeing.
“More often than not,” Shoemaker says,
“I know at the time of exposure whether I’m
going to process an image in color or if
I’m going to process it as black-and-white.
It’s rare that I discover in post that an image
works better without color, and signals
that I didn’t give the subject sufficient
thought while I was making the image. It’s
basically carelessness.
“Generally, a color image should be
about color,” he says. “Amazing
sunrises and sunsets, fields of flowers,
stands of trees in autumn… The story of
the image is the color, or at least the color is
an integral part of the subject. But black-
and-white images are about luminosity,
about how the light renders the subject and
the interplay of shadow and highlight. It’s
shape and form and visual movement. It’s
less literal and more graphic, and having
worked as a graphic designer for 20 years,
I suppose that appeals to me. It forces me to
really examine the subject and ‘get’ what’s
going on with it, what it’s saying. Color can
almost be a crutch by comparison because
people can offhandedly dismiss an image as
simply a pretty picture. But, with black-and-
white, you have to actually have substance
to make it work.
“In my opinion,” he says, “long-scale
subjects work best for black-and-white.
Light direction and texture are also strong
indicators that an image may be stronger in
black-and-white. For my landscape work,
the sky is also an important consideration. In
color, cirrus and cirrocumulus clouds often
appear weak, but in black-and-white when
the sky is darkened, they can become
powerful or even surreal. Even a clear sky
garners more presence when the tonality
falls to almost black, as opposed to even a
deep blue in a color image.
“Black-and-white also has a
timelessness that color can’t begin to
approach,” Shoemaker says. “It strips away
the distraction of color and focuses the
attention on form, tone, texture and pattern.
To me, black-and-white feels more iconic,
although that, again, could be an association
I make due to the influence Ansel Adams has
on me.”
Seeing In Black-And-White
(Cont’d on page 88)
ABOVE: Echo Park, Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado. Shoemaker enjoys returning to favorite locations, and he’s not concerned with being cliche or
repetitive. As he says, “There’s no guarantee that I’ll see the same landscape twice, even if I want to.”
compositions. His tend to be formal
arrangements, full of rich tonalities that
emphasize the beauty of the land.
“I construct images the same way I
design a layout,” he says. “I simply put
things where I feel they need to be. Under-
standing color is important. Understand-
ing shape is important. Understanding
howthe eye moves over a page, or image,
is important. The use of negative space,


50 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
How
2
>>
Keeping It Real
WithHDR
satisfied with the limited dynamic range
of my 4x5 film, for example, and car-
ried a quiver of eight graduated neutral-
density filters to try to capture shadow
and highlight detail the way I saw it.
When affordable film scanning became
available, I began using Photoshop to fur-
ther adjust shadowand highlight density.
Digital capture was another step forward,
but even the high-end Canon EOS 5D
Mark III I’m using today still has less
dynamic range than my eyes, which is
why I use a variety of digital techniques,
including HDR, to capture what I saw.
But how do you really know what
you saw hours, days or weeks later?
According to Mark Fairchild, Professor
of Color &Imaging Sciences at Rochester
Institute of Technology (RIT), people
are notoriously bad at remembering col-
ors. We can distinguish thousands of dif-
ferent colors if they’re placed side by
side, but can accurately remember less
than 100. We can easily remember if the
flowers were blue or red, for example,
but quickly forget what shade of pink
we sawin sunset clouds. To further muddy
the waters, people tend to remember col-
ors as more saturated than they actually
were, according to Fairchild. In addi-
tion, we tend to substitute certain “mem-
ory colors” for common objects. For
example, we remember yellow-green
grass as more green than it actually was.
Similarly, we tend to remember sky as
pure blue when it actually wasn’t. Your
best guide to what you saw, therefore,
is your original bracketed set of images.
Let’s assume you’ve loaded a brack-
eted set of images into your favorite
TEXT AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY GLENN RANDALL
o
One of the most frequent questions I’m
asked by students in my landscape pho-
tography workshops is, “Howdo I make
my HDR photographs look more real-
istic?” To answer that question, we first
need a clear understanding of the prob-
lem. Our eyes can see a range of light
intensities, from brightest highlight to
darkest shadow, of something like 10,000
to one. A print can only display a range
of light intensities of about 50 to one.
In that sense, it’s impossible for a print
to ever look completely “real.” But it’s
possible to get close—close enough that
a print evokes many of the same emo-
tions in the viewer that the real scene
evoked in the photographer.
My guide when preparing prints has
always been what I saw rather than what
my film or sensor captured. I was never

How to use
HDR software
to maintain
appropriate
contrast,
overcome the
limitations of
the sensor
and bring out
detail—without
overdoing it!
high-contrast scenes generally look more
realistic if the brightest tones are close
to pure white, but not clipped. Images
containing the sun are an exception. The
disk of the sun itself will always be
blank white. Note that our eyes are sub-
ject to veiling flare, an overall diffuse,
washed-out appearance, just as much as
our lenses. Veiling flare occurs when
the sun is shining directly on the lens
surface, even if the sun is outside the
frame. Allowing some degree of flare
to reduce the contrast in the region around
the sun can actually make an image look
more natural. Your HDR sequence may
have a frame that’s so dark, it shows
very little flare at all, but that’s not nec-
essarily the best frame to match.
3)
Let shadows be shadows. Com-
pressing the tonal scale until the
shadows and highlights have the same
density screams “HDR!” Retaining small
areas of pure black makes your images
more believable as long as the subject
matter allows it. Most high-contrast
scenes do. Large areas of near-black
shadows, however, can be unnatural,
since our eyes can usually see good
detail in broad shadow regions.
4)
Maintain good local contrast in
highlights and shadows. Our
visual system doesn’t analyze contrast
globally, that is, we don’t look at a scene
overall and call the darkest tone black
and the lightest tone white. Instead, we
analyze contrast locally, within regions,
most notably highlights and shadows.
According to both Mark Fairchild
HDR software. As you begin to adjust
the 32-bit file, compare the region you’re
working on to the frame fromyour brack-
eted set that’s properly exposed for that
region. If you’re adjusting the portion
of the image that contains flowers, for
example, “properly exposed” may mean
the frame in which the green foliage
surrounding the flowers was rendered
as a midtone. If you’re adjusting a sun-
set sky, however, don’t pick the frame
in which the glowing clouds are mid-
tone and everything else is black. As
pretty as those clouds may be, they’re
underexposed. Glowing clouds are a
highlight; they should be brighter than
midtone. Midtone clouds will look unnat-
urally dark if placed in a landscape where
the flowers beneath are also midtone.
Here are some key principles for mak-
ing your HDR photos look realistic.
1)
Keep saturation under control.
Wildly oversaturated colors may
catch your viewer’s eye, but excessive
color saturation looks unnatural and is
a flimsy reed on which to hang the entire
impact of your image.
2)
Let highlights be highlights. As
Margaret Livingstone, a neurobi-
ologist and vision researcher at Harvard
Medical School, points out, “We don’t
actually perceive the amount of light at
any point in a scene, but instead we per-
ceive the relative amount of light at each
point, compared to that point’s imme-
diate surround.” In other words, she adds,
“Something looks light only if it’s lighter
than its background.” Photographs of
The key to creating an HDR
image that brings the
photograph closer to the
reality that our eyes
perceived is to maintain
appropriate contrast and
saturation. In the images
on these pages, Glenn
Randall created 32-bit
files with Photoshop
CS6 or Photomatix 4.2.
He tonemapped in
Lightroom 4. OPPOSITE
PAGE: Mount Sneffels in
late September from
County Road 7, San Juan
Mountains, Colorado.
LEFT: Aspen grove on
top of Stealey Mountain
at sunset, near Owl
Creek Pass, San Juan
Mountains, Colorado.
September 2013 51

all contrast tends to make bright areas
look brighter. For example, if you have
the sun in the frame, letting a few shad-
ows go dark will make the sun appear
brighter, which will, in turn, enhance the
appearance of naturalness.
5)
Look at HDR images at all
scales, from thumbnail size to
print size. Excessive use of Clarity in
Adobe Lightroom or Camera Raw or
Structure in Nik HDR Efex Pro 2 can
look fine at screen size, but be a prob-
lem once you zoom in to print size at
16x24 inches. The Detail Contrast slider
in the Details Enhancer tone-mapping
method in HDRsoft Photomatix is a gen-
tler control that’s less likely to damage
your image. Digital graduated ND filters
can be useful tools, but if the transition
zone is too narrow, they can make thumb-
nails look strange even when the print-
size image looks fine.
6)
HDR software packages have
different personalities, which can
create different problems. In my experi-
ence, flat local contrast in the shadows
canbe a problemwiththe Details Enhancer
tone-mapping method in Photomatix.
On the other hand, when HDR Efex Pro
2 errs, it tends to produce excessive local
contrast. If you’re struggling to achieve
a natural-looking result with one HDR
package, consider a different one. HDR
Expose 2 and HDR Express 2 from
Unified Color are worth exploring.
at RIT and Margaret Livingstone at
Harvard, there’s no easy way to define
in a scientific sense what level of local
contrast looks most realistic. Fairchild
adds, “Amazingly, we are pretty good
at just looking at them—images—and
making a judgment—and with fairly good
agreement among observers.” When in
doubt, go back to your bracketed set of
images to see what level of local contrast
you captured in the frame that’s properly
exposedfor the regionof interest. Remem-
ber that surrounding the target region with
high-contrast subject matter will make
the target region look less contrasty. Sur-
rounding the same target region with low-
contrast subject matter will make the target
region seemmore contrasty. Strong over-
ABOVE: Clearing storm over the Sneffels
Range at sunset, San Juan Mountains,
Colorado. BELOW: North Maroon Peak
from the summit of 14,156-foot South
Maroon Peak at sunrise, Maroon
Bells-Snowmass Wilderness, Colorado.
NEXT PAGE: Beaver Lake and aspen,
near Silver Jack Reservoir, San Juan
Mountains, Colorado.

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7)
Beware halos where dark objects
meet bright backgrounds. This
is another dead giveaway of an over-
baked HDR. HDRpackages have become
much better over the past few years at
controlling halos, but they can still be
an issue, particularly if you compress
the tonal scale too far.
8)
When blending shadow and
highlight regions into a believ-
able whole, gradients can be your
friend. Our visual system is very sensi-
tive to abrupt change, but quite insensi-
tive to gradual change. For example, we’re
sensitive to the abrupt change of color
and density at the boundary between high-
light and shadowregions, but rather insen-
sitive to gradual changes in density within
each region. By employing a digital grad-
uated ND tool, such as the one found in
HDR Efex Pro 2, you can place both the
shadows and highlights relatively close
to midtone, then blend them in a way
our visual system finds believable.
Imagine a simplified example, in
which the top half of the frame is filled
by sunlit mountains and the bottom half
of the frame shows shadowed flowers.
You place a digital graduated ND filter
over the image, with the transition zone
of the filter centered over the dividing
line between shadow and light, which
lies in the middle of the frame. Now
let’s trace the changes in density caused
by the filter as you examine the image
from top to bottom. In the highest quar-
ter of the frame, the filter has made the
image uniformly darker. In the next quar-
ter of the frame, which is still sunlit, the
image gradually gets lighter as the vir-
tual filter begins its transition from dark
to clear. The beginning of the third quar-
ter marks the beginning of the shadow
region. The filter’s transition from dark
to clear continues in this quarter, so the
shadow is darkened most at the very top
of the quarter and not darkened at all at
the bottom as the transition zone ends.
The bottom quarter of the image is
unchanged. Both the bottom and top
quarters can be rendered close to mid-
tone, but the transition from highlight
to shadow still looks natural because
there’s still a strong color and density
change at the shadow boundary.
In the days before digital, a “film aes-
thetic” ruled. A photograph was deemed
“realistic” if it looked the way film orig-
inally recorded the subject. For a high-
contrast scene, that meant bright highlights
and inky black shadows. The invention
MORE On The Web
You can find more articles on HDR techniques,
both extreme and moderate, by visiting
the How-To section of the OP website at
www.outdoorphotographer.com.
̈
of digital photography gave photogra-
phers greater control over highlight and
shadow density, and the film aesthetic
began to erode. Today’s HDR software
gives you total control over the density
of every part of your frame, from the
deepest shadows to the brightest high-
lights. This unprecedentedpower has com-
pletely overturned the old film aesthetic,
but a new aesthetic hasn’t yet become
widely accepted. I’ve worked diligently
to prepare a realistic-looking HDR ren-
dition of a high-contrast scene, one that
closely resembled what I saw, then had
experienced photographers tell me they
thought the result looked quite unnatural.
During this period of flux, your best guide
to “realistic” will be your bracketed set
of images, your knowledge of how our
visual system processes high-contrast
scenes and your own good judgment. OP
You can see more of Glenn Randall’s
work, sign up for his monthly newslet-
ter, read his blog and learn about upcom-
ing workshops at www.glennrandall.com.

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56 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
Take
Control
OF B ACKL I GHT
Like facing into a
refreshing breeze,
backlight can
flow through a
scene to create
depth, dimension
and visual impact
TEXT AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY JUSTIN BLACK
The stars faded as darkness gave way
to soft twilight. The eastern horizon cast
its gentle glow across the landscape.
Long wavelengths of light penetrated
the sky overhead, defining a blue shadow
cast by the Earth against the atmosphere,
and then pushing it ever lower in the
sky. Clouds and the east-facing moun-
tains gathered hues of pink and orange
that dropped gradually toward the base
of the escarpment. Then, with a flash
of gold, the disc of the sun broke the
horizon and direct sunlight poured in.
Contrast between highlights and shad-
ows built rapidly as the sun revealed
itself. Like millions before, this sunrise,
in visual terms, was an evolution from
simple to complex.
On this particular morning, in the
crisp autumn air among golden grasses
at Mono Lake, it occurred to me that
many of my favorite photographs have
an almost palpable sense of movement
created by backlight. Like facing into
a breeze, the light flows through the
image—glowing through an autumn leaf,
rim-lighting cactus spines or reflecting
toward the viewer from the surface of
water. All of these effects depend on
light coming froma position somewhere
behind the main subject.
The photograph of glowing rabbit-
brush flowers that I composed that morn-
ing is a classic use of backlighting in the
landscape. The sun is low over the hori-
zon so the color temperature of the direct
light is still warm, and the translucent
nature of the grasses and rabbitbrush
flowers makes them glow. I chose the
camera position to layer the sunlit veg-
etation against shadows illuminated by
cool blue skylight. This provides con-
trast of both tone and color to set off the
highlight areas, enhancing the impres-
sion of depth and dimension. The trick
was to avoid lens flare and loss of con-
trast from the sun in-frame and shining
directly into my lens. Shading the lens
with my hand as I normally would
wasn’t an option as it would have been
in the frame, but luck was with me—a
low cloud would become a natural lens
shade as the sun rose behind it. Waiting
for the sun to rise behind the cloud meant
How
2
>>

that it was also high enough to spill over
Negit Island to illuminate the water vapor
rising from the lake in the distance.
Dissecting Backlight
Over time, I’ve grown to think of
backlight not only in terms of direct
light as from the sun or a strobe, but as
any light source arriving from an angle
behind the subject that plays an impor-
tant role in determining the character of
the photograph. Thinking of it this way
has helped me dissect the various sources
of light at play to make better-informed
creative decisions in the search for sit-
uations and camera positions that make
use of subtle backlight to create sepa-
ration of color, form and tone. The light
might be transmitted toward the cam-
era through translucent objects or reflected
off in the manner of a rock skipped off
the surface of a pond—the light’s path
is deflected, refracted or diffused toward
the camera rather than reflected back
off the subject like front light.
One of my favorite forms of back-
light occurs when light is reflected off
a surface behind the subject, but just out
of frame, then transmitted through leaves
or other translucent materials. The bal-
ance between this transmitted backlight
and overhead skylight is close enough
for the effect to be subtle, and it main-
tains a shaded background against which
the leaves achieve an elegant glow. It’s
an effect that can be easy to miss in
nature unless you’re really looking for
it, but it especially sings in a photograph.
Reflected backlight, which is then
further reflected toward the camera from
the surface of water, is a combination
that I look for. In this case, the silhou-
ette of objects directly between the light

source and the camera’s perspective
becomes graphic silhouettes, while objects
oriented to catch the light pick up its
warm hue and blend with blue skylight
above across the contours of the subject.
We’re all accustomed to seeing sil-
houettes against intense backlight, and
their striking graphics can make or break
a photograph. The key is to make sure
silhouettes “read” well, with a clean out-
line that simplifies and emphasizes the
shape. Unless you’re creating an abstract
design, it’s important to compose sil-
houettes so they’re instantly identifiable
to the viewer. For example, a prominent
silhouette of a saguaro cactus that fails
to read well as a cactus—due to merg-
ing with overlapping black shapes—can
tend to diminish the communicative
power of the image. Silhouettes appear
to flatten out, so when one black shape
compresses against another, the result
can be confusing.
Rim light is another aspect of back-
light that can bring life to an image. In
this case, a subject illuminated by a direct
light source behind the subject and just
out of frame will define its edge and
help separate it from the background. In
special cases, when the air is very clear
and when the subject is just the right
distance from the camera position, hid-
ing the sun directly behind the subject
will result in a halo of diffracted rim
light. Done correctly, the entire outline
of the subject can sometimes be illumi-
nated. Or, you can opt to let the disc of
the sun peek around an edge, stop down
the lens to ƒ/16 or ƒ/22, and create a
starburst that’s prominently defined against
the shadow side of the subject.
Timing Is Everything
It all comes down to anticipation—
being aware of opportunities and pre-
pared to capture the effects you want
from dynamic and fleeting light at just
the right moment. Understanding the
pace and sequence of changing light on
the landscape makes it possible to antic-
ipate with surprising accuracy the set of
lighting opportunities we might be pre-
sented with in any given situation—front
light, sidelight, backlight, bounce light,
blue/cyan skylight, the natural softbox
of overcast skies, the gentle warmth pro-
vided by a cloud glowing pink after sun-
set and so on. It’s amazing how a little
thoughtful planning can focus your cre-
ative vision and eliminate numerous vari-
ables that otherwise would divert you
from making the images you seek.
The photograph of Eagle Falls at Lake
Tahoe is a good example. I knewI wanted
to make an image of the sun’s first rays
kissing the waterfall, but rather than sim-
plyshowingupbefore dawn, I scoutedthe
location in lousy light the prior afternoon.
I started out by finding the bearing to the
point on the horizon where the sun would
rise the next day and thought through the
way the light would stream over the lake
to play across the cascading water in the
foreground. The decisive moment, in this
case, was tocatchthesunjust highenough
to barely illuminate the little kick of water
OPENING SPREAD, TOP: Sunrise at Mono Lake,
California. As the sun rose above the horizon, this
scene was transformed from quiet and flat to one of
glowing colors and rich contrast. OPENING SPREAD,
BOTTOM LEFT: Within canyons, you can find a subtle
form of backlight in reflective surfaces like water.
OPENING SPREAD, BOTTOM RIGHT: Crepuscular
rays penetrate fog through oaks, Sonoma
County, California.
RIGHT: Here, the sun is just out of the frame, but it’s
creating a rim-light effect on the scene. Notice how
the scrub brush in the foreground has depth and
dimension and the cactus shapes are clearly
defined. OPPOSITE PAGE, BOTTOM: Eagle Falls, Lake
Tahoe, California. By scouting this location and
knowing where the sun would come up, Black was
able to position himself perfectly to create the
previsualized backlit image.
58 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
Here are a few tricks to avoid or minimize
lens flare when shooting into the light:
1
Remove all filters.
2
Make sure the lens
surfaces are clean,
front and back.
3
Use a lens hood.
4
Shade the lens with your hand, hat,
black card or body. If your camera is
on a tripod, try standing where you
can actually see the shadow fall
across the front of the lens.
5
If you aren’t able to shade the entire
front element without getting your
hand in-frame, at least try to fully
shade the entire aperture diaphragm
hole itself—you’ll eliminate most flare.
6
If the sun is within your composition,
you can try to hide it partially behind
a tree, cloud or other object to reduce
the intensity of direct sunlight falling
on your lens.
To Minimize Flare
With Backlight
Tips

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 59
the lens and filters I would use. Lens flare
was a concern once again, so I decided to
try to make my exposure when the sun
was partially hidden behind a tree branch,
cutting the intensity of direct light on the
lens enough to eliminate flare. This image
was made using 4x5 Fujichrome Velvia
film, which made it necessary to use two
filters—a 3-stop gradu-
ated neutral-density and
a mild warming filter—
to execute the image, so
avoidingflarewas of par-
ticular importance.
Use Technology
To Reveal The
Full Range
Of Image Data
Astonishingly, RAW
files fromcurrent DSLRs
can capture—in a sin-
gle exposure—the full
tonal range of strongly
backlit scenes like this
one, without use of fil-
ters. We can still make
good use of graduated
ND filters or exposure
blending techniques to
optimize our exposures,
of course, but the idea
of a 14-stop dynamic
range in a single cap-
ture was only a dream for color pho-
tographers a few years ago.
Part of the fun of photography comes
from uniting technique and technology
to manifest creative vision, and the ever-
increasing ability to view challenging
lighting as opportunity is just one rea-
son why photography today excites me
more than ever. Tuning into the various
qualities and movements of light—of
“facing into the wind”—feeds my soul
and gets me out there to see how the
sunrise will evolve today. OP
You can see more of Justin Black’s pho-
tography and sign up for his workshops
at www.visionarywild.com.
MORE On The Web
Backlight is a powerful tool for adding drama,
depth, dimension, contrast and color to your
photographs. Look under the How-To tab on the
OP website at www.outdoorphotographer.com
to find more how-to articles on backlight.
̈
in the extreme foreground—thus com-
pleting the illumination of that band of the
waterfall—but not sohighthat intensesun-
light would wreck the delicate balance of
detail, color contrast and tonality. This
awareness enabled me to visualize the fin-
ishedcomposition, identifyaprecisecam-
era position and tripod height, and select

I
60 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
It was just after 3 a.m., and Fredric Roberts
was descending a hill above the Ganges River
in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The fine
white soil that advanced from the riverbank all
the way up into the surrounding countryside
shimmered in ghostly puffs about his ankles
as he walked. Golden light fromnearby camp-
grounds bounced off the inky black water.
Roberts stopped and looked upon the river and
the deluge that appeared to be flowing out from
it—thousands uponthousands of people, swathed
in saffron robes and peasants’ attire and saris
and turbans, carrying in their hands jugs of
Ganges water and marching slowly toward him,
like salmon swimming upstream.
Kumbh
Mela
Amidst a cacophony of humanity, Fredric
Roberts’ photos of the 2013 Kumbh Mela
isolate the individuals, and through that,
his images tell the broader story
BY CATHERINE MARSHALL
PHOTOGRAPHY BY FREDRIC ROBERTS
“I kept saying, ‘Well, what’s going on?’
And they said, ‘This is the auspicious day,
the planets are all aligned, so we got here at
midnight and now we’re going home.’ And
I said, ‘Where are you going, where is home?’
And they said—Roberts pauses here and opens
his arms wide—“‘Home is everywhere.’”
It was a moment that definedmost poignantly
for Roberts the unwavering devotion of a peo-
ple drawn to this junction by a common thread:
their Hindu faith. TheAmerican photographer,
who has been traveling to India since 1974,
had returned to document the world’s largest
human gathering, the Kumbh Mela. The event
is held every three years, alternating between
Travel

The Faces Of


62 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
Allahabad, Ujjain, Nasik and Haridwar.
Each of these cities, according to Hindu
lore, was splashed with a droplet of the
nectar of immortality that fell from the
kumbh (pitcher) during a fight between
the gods and the demons. Today, the
melas held in commemoration of this
spiritual tussle attract millions of faith-
ful; they come from all over India and
beyond to receive blessings from holy
men, partake of religious discourse and
cleanse their sins in the river beside which
each city sits.
Allahabad’s festival, held every 12th
year, is the largest and most auspicious
of the four events, for it’s here that three
holy rivers converge: the Ganges, the
Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati,
which is said to emerge from the earth’s
crust at the Sangam, the very point at
which the other two waterways touch.
And the 2013 mela was made more spe-
cial still by the simultaneous occurrence
of a rare planetary alignment that last
occurred 144 years ago. It was on the
day of this astrological event that Roberts
met the pilgrims moving in slow pro-
cession back up the riverbank. By the
conclusion of the 55-day-long festival
on March 10, his encounters with pil-
grims would expand beyond his imag-
inings; around 100 million Hindus would
have surged to the banks of the river
and taken a holy dip.
“There’s some form of sainthood that
derives from having gone in that water,”
Roberts explains. “You see what people
will go through to get there, and fight
through the crowds, and get down into
the water, and then come back and be
exhilaratedbythis. It was a marvel tome.”
That wonderment is apparent in the
images Roberts captured during his six-
week-long project. They evoke the joy
that miraculously exists amidst capacious,
tightly packed crowds, and suggest inti-
macy rather than the fleeting connections
that so often link the photographer to his
subject. This rejection of the cliché in
favor of authenticity—apparent in all of
Roberts’ work—isn’t something he con-
sciously strove to achieve, he says. Rather,
it emerged organically from the rela-
tionships he formed with those he encoun-
tered on his journey: pilgrims, sadhus
(holy men), naga sadhus (naked holy
men), gurus and swamis.
“If you have a real relationship with
someone and you take a picture that
reflects that, then you’ve broken through
the clichés. It’s not just one of these
instantaneous things where you smile at
somebody and they smile back and you
think you have a relationship—you have
to really spend time with them and they
have to hang around with you enough
to sense an honest emotion,” he explains.
“Once that feeling [of weariness] dissi-
pates on its own—and it has to dissi-
pate on its own—then you have that
relationship and they’ll open up.”
It’s a technique Roberts has intuited
during 13 years spent roaming the globe
as a photographer, living with local
communities in countries like Bhutan,
Cambodia, Myanmar and India, cap-
turing their lives in pictures and, in some
cases, documenting the dying days of
ancient cultures. This creative pursuit
is a world away from his former life as
The triennial festival of Kumbh Mela puts a
deeply spiritual aspect of Indian culture
on display. The concentration of the
devoted, combined with the ever-present,
sometimes overwhelming colors of India,
attracts eager photographers from around
the globe. Most photographers are seduced
by the cacophony of colors and their images
fail to delve beyond that outer layer of
the Kumbh Mela. When he journeyed to
Allahabad for the 2013 Kumbh Mela,
Fredric Roberts waded through the
distractions, and he captured the essence
of the festival in the faces of the people
who make it so special.

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MORE On The Web
To learn more about the Kumbh Mela and
other destinations, both exotic and closer to
home, visit the OP website at www.outdoor
photographer.com, and explore the articles
under the Locations tab.
̈
an investment banker, during which
he spent three decades haggling with
people intent on one thing only: the
gathering of monetary riches. Today, it’s
the poor he most often communes
with, and they have shown him a world
more enriching by far than the one he
left behind.
But it was hard to tell rich from poor
in the ashrams that towered above the tent
cities carpetingthe shores of the Ganges—
expensive cars wedged up around their
facades, gurus wafting by on a scent of
money, pilgrims clustering together in
orangeknots, ash-cakednagasadhus suck-
ing on chillums (pipes), wearing the gold
watches and strings of pearls gifted to
thembypilgrims anddeliveringblessings
upon the faithful for a few rupees each.
Out on the streets, council workers sprin-
kled antiseptic lime about and pilgrims
flowed across bridges and took boats out
to the Sangam. On and on these people
went, restless in their spiritual quest.
Roberts stepped into this melee car-
rying with himthe most important piece
of equipment a photographer could pos-
sess: his eyes. He made his way to one
of the big ashrams where, day after day,
one group of sadhus after another would
file in, sit down in rows, eat their meal
and file out again. The ritual drewRoberts
in emotionally—the lines of orange sad-
hus, the fervor of the people listening
to lectures delivered by Swami Ji. Even-
tually, the swami approached him and
said, “Weren’t you here yesterday?” and
so the barriers crumbled. Finally, Roberts
took out his camera and began to shoot.
“Swami Ji and I would sit and talk
and form a relationship, and the sadhus
pushing their way in to lunch would see
me two or three or four days in a row
and they would start talking to me. And
so I wasn’t just a tourist with a cam-
era,” he says.
The ashrams became Roberts’ emo-
tional bedrock. Soon, he was ready to
venture into the Juna Akara, headquar-
ters for naga sadhus undergoing induc-
tion; the men were about to forsake all
material comforts to live as ascetics, for-
aging for food, meditating in sub-zero
temperatures, relyingonstrangers for kind-
ness. It was almost impossible to engage
with these people. Fortuitously, Roberts’
entrée into the Juna Akara was enhanced
byadvicefromphotographer DavidDucoin,
whom he met at the mela. Ducoin sug-
gested he make prints at Allahabad’s only
photography shop and hand them out to
his subjects as an act of goodwill.
“I got to know a couple of the nagas,
and when I brought back the printed pho-
tos to them, they said, ‘Okay, this guy’s
different.’ They gave me real access. If
you’re a bump-and-run guy who’s there
for three days, you don’t have time to
do this. You have to be a long-termer.”
The fruit of Roberts’ gentle tenacity
in the Juna Akara is a “once-in-a-life-
time” shot he took of the newly inducted
nagas gathered around a fire. No one
would recognize it as an iconic picture,
he concedes, but it’s a sacred vision that
few outsiders ever get to witness.
On the morning of the most auspi-
cious bathing date, Roberts fought the
flow of people and made his way down-
hill. Approaching the riverbank, he found
himself amidst a crowd of people so
large and unyielding, he thought he was
going to die. Twenty million pilgrims
had come here to wash away their sins.
“They just lifted us up, as if we were
in a stampede,” he recalls. “We had no
control over our feet. The crowds just
took us where they wanted to go.”
Roberts’ best images weren’t shot on
that day—it’s hard to find one’s bearings
in the midst of such chaos. Photographs
are always secondary to the experience,
he says, and cameras should never be
allowed to rob you of the joy of the
moment. Consequently, he returned home
with a legacy far more enduring than
mere images: a pure and absolute rever-
ence for the pilgrims he met on his way.
Concludes Roberts, “That they would
take everything they owned and put it on
their heads and walk and take trucks and
buses and trains and get there, regardless
how far, regardless of what percentage it
took of the money that they had, and live
on the side of the road and sleep on those
streets just to get that holy bath and then
to go home—I mean, to be around that
many people with that kind of powerful
fervor is quite an exquisite experience.” OP
Fredric Roberts’work is exhibited widely.
He has published three books and will
conduct a series of photography work-
shops among disadvantaged communi-
ties for the Save the Children foundation
in 2014. Go to www.fredricroberts.com.
ABOVE: Roberts connected with naga sadhus, Hindu ascetics, by handing out prints of his photos to
show the work he was doing. This genuine and gentle approach enabled him to engage with and
photograph this group of newly inducted nagas.
64 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com

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How
2
>>
EXTREME
1) Fast Glass And AF. Each fall, tens of thousands of migrating birds
gather at the beautiful Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in
southcentral New Mexico. With so many subjects, it’s the best possi-
ble place for wildlife photographers to add to their portfolios of birds in
flight. Armed with a new Canon EOS-1D X and EF 400mm ƒ/2.8L II
lens, Lepp was equipped with the fastest possible combination of cam-
era and lens to freeze this snow goose in midair. An ultrasharp EF 2X
III tele-extender multiplied the focal length to 800mm on the full-frame
1D X, which offers a 12 fps capture rate and the fastest autofocus so
far. A gimbal head and Really Right Stuff tripod allowed quick and steady
tracking and capture of the flying birds.
1
∕3000 sec. at ƒ/9.5, ISO 800
L
Looking for ways to get closer
to your feathered, flying subjects?
We’ll show you how a steady
hand, a respectful distance,
sophisticated techniques and lots
of awesome technology combine
for great wild bird photography.
1
2
3

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 67
CLOSE-UP
Learn how to use proper technique for
sharp, tight photos at extreme focal lengths
BY KATHRYN VINCENT LEPP | PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEORGE D. LEPP
3) Close-Ups From A Distance. In a busy rookery, such as this one in St. Augustine,
Florida, the courting and nesting birds are abundant and can be photographed at tantaliz-
ingly close range. Still, Lepp wanted to get even closer to the birds to capture their extraor-
dinary plumage as design elements. A combination of an EF 500mm lens, an EF 2X
tele-extender (1000mm) and a 25mm extension tube on a full-frame Canon EOS 5D Mark
III offered both the close-up magnification Lepp wanted along with the needed working dis-
tance to keep from disturbing the subjects. This particularly striking little blue heron was
nesting in the shade; to compensate for the slow shutter speed of
1
∕45 sec. at ƒ/11 needed
for proper exposure at a reasonable ISO (1250), the camera/lens combination was mounted
on a Gitzo Explorer tripod and Really Right Stuff ballhead. The square format is a result of
compositing two vertical captures in a sort of mini-panorama that can be printed quite large.
2) The Camera Counts. It’s not always about
longlenses; sometimes the capabilities of the cam-
era make the shot. In Botswana’s Okavango Delta,
this little bee-eater returnedrepeatedly tothe same
branch. As the bird landed, Lepp fired a short
burst of images at 10 frames per second. The
handheld Canon EOS-1D Mark IV was set to ƒ/8,
1
∕4000 sec., and ISO 1600 to maximize the possibil-
ity of capturingthe peak action at maximumsharp-
ness. The camera’s 1.3X crop factor coupled with
the EF 500mm lens yielded 650mm of telephoto.

6) Reaching Waaaaaaay Out. Tucked into
its nest in a tall pine, a bald eagle chick at
three weeks is so small it can’t be seen from
the nearest vantage point, a cliff just above
and about 200 feet away. Here, Lepp cou-
pled a Canon EF 800mm lens and two EF 2X
III tele-extenders to a Canon EOS 5D Mark
III to attain a whopping 3200mm to reach
inside the nest. When working at this focal
length, the equivalent of a 160X telescope,
the depth of field is negligible and precise
focus can’t be obtained through the viewfinder
or even with magnification of the 5D Mark
III’s generously sized LCD screen. To posi-
tion the focus, Lepp used a wireless acces-
sory, the CamRanger, which transmitted the
image and camera controls to his Apple iPad,
offering a much larger viewing screen and
hands-off firing. OP
4) FlashMatters. Arufous hum-
mingbird perches on a skunk
cabbage leaf amongst purple
larkspur in Colorado’s San Juan
Mountains. By combining pro-
jected flash and ambient light,
Lepp rendered the wings of the
bird both sharp and blurred,
while enhancing the color and
sharp detail of the body and
head. The effect captures the
bird’s feisty personality and
brings out thecolors inthescene,
giving a natural, outdoor look
to the image. Canon EOS-1D
Mark III with EF 500mm lens
and EF 1.4X tele-extender
(910mm with 1.3X crop factor)
at
1
∕200 sec. and ƒ/11, ISO 800,
Really Right Stuff tripod and
ballhead, Better Beamer pro-
jected flash
5) A Stable Approach. The petite and
elusive malachite kingfisher is a prized
subject for wildlife photographers in Africa.
This busy little bird hangs out in reeds
and feeds on miniscule fish and frogs,
moving over ponds and streams in quick
bursts. The most successful photographic
approach is from the water, with lots of
pixels (for cropping potential), long glass
(for reach) and ISO (for shutter speed).
An extra benefit of the extreme focal
length is the very small depth of field
which, when properly placed, renders
the subject very sharpandthe busy back-
ground beautifully out of focus. Lepp
photographed this tiny gemfroma Gitzo
Explorer tripod mounted in a powerboat.
Canon EOS-1D Mark IV with EF 500mm
lens and EF 2X tele-extender (1300mm
equivalent),
1
∕750 sec. at ƒ/8, ISO 1600
68 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
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sensors, respectively. Because they’re full-
frame models at those resolutions, the
EOS-1D X and the D4 really require
lenses of at least 500mm for birds and
other wildlife. Those lenses will add
another $10,000 or so to the cost of entry.
Such systems are also very bulky, hard
to carry into the field and are best used
on a tripod with a gimbal head. So, while
these are the best systems, and preferred
by most wildlife pros, they’re certainly
not for everyone.
A competent wildlife photographer
can get good shots with any DSLR, but
will get more “keepers” with a camera
and lens that are better suited to the spe-
cific challenges that wildlife presents.
Of course, a better camera won’t make
up for a lack of skill, but it will give
you the best opportunity to get sharp,
well-exposed images. Wildlife photog-
raphy covers a lot of territory, photo-
graphically speaking. The ultimate
wildlife tests for a DSLR are birds in
flight. They’re tough subjects, and even
the experts miss more shots than they
get. It takes lots of practice to become
a good bird photographer (I’mstill work-
ing on it after more than 20 years!).
Because birds in flight represent such a
challenge, we’re holding them up as a
real-world benchmark in this article.
To capture the decisive
moment in animal
activity and behavior,
choose a camera with
the AF performance,
speed and image quality
that are up to the task
BY MIKE STENSVOLD
L
Landscape photographers are concerned
primarily with low-ISO image qual-
ity—the ability to record fine details,
wide dynamic range and accurate (or
as-envisioned) colors, while shooting
stationary subjects from a tripod. While
wildlife photographers certainly appre-
ciate good image quality, key criteria
also include AF speed, high ISO per-
formance and system ruggedness. AF
performance is especially important to
bird photographers because birds in flight
present the ultimate wildlife action chal-
lenge to both camera and photographer.
Thebest cameras for wildlifeareDSLRs
for their combination of AFperformance,
availability of long lenses, image quality
at higher ISO settings and ease of use on
moving subjects. The top-performing
wildlife DSLRs currently are the top-of-
the-line pro models by Canon and Nikon,
the Canon EOS-1D X and Nikon D4.
They have state-of-the-art AFsystems and
provide the fastest shooting rates. The
EOS-1DXand the D4 have ample buffers
so you can keep shooting those fast
sequences, and they have the best high-
ISO performance, which is important for
wildlife prime time aroundduskanddawn.
These models also have the most rugged
bodies and shutters available today. That’s
why pros (and higher-budget amateurs)
pay the $6,799 (EOS-1D X) and $5,999
(D4) prices for them. Both are full-frame
cameras with 18.1- and 16.2-megapixel
Top
DSLRs
For
Wildlife

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 71
A
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o
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a
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c
eIf you’re shooting wildlife action, especially birds in flight, then AF speed and accuracy,
and the ability to track a subject for several frames, are prime considerations. There
aren’t any numerical scores for AF performance in the field, but as a general rule, the higher-end
DSLRs have better AF performance than entry-level ones, and newer models with the most
up-to-date AF technology refinements are better than their predecessors in a given category.
For wildlife photographers whose budgets don’t allow for pro DSLR bodies, the Canon
EOS 7D and Nikon D300S have been popular for the past few years. AF performance is
excellent, and almost every bird photographer I know who doesn’t have an all-out pro DSLR
uses one of these rugged “semi-pro” models. Their main drawback is that, while excellent,
their image sensors are four years old and have since been surpassed in overall image
quality by 16- and 24-megapixel sensors in newer APS-C cameras. The newer DSLRs have
DxOMark.com sensor scores of 80-84 vs. 66-70 for the EOS 7D and the D300S. Nikon’s D7100
and D7000 use these newer sensors, and provide very good AF performance on birds in flight.
The Pentax K-5 series (the original, and the newer K-5II and K-5IIs) features sensors similar to
OPENING SPREAD:
A ring-billed gull doing
some fishing. INSET:
Multi-point AF systems
(the 51-point Nikon
system simulated here)
can yield excellent
results if the background
isn’t busy. If you do have
a cluttered background
and a fast-moving
subject, single-point
AF will result in more
sharp photos.

(Cont’d on next page)

It’s very hard to get close to wild
subjects. So “reach”—the ability of
camera and lens to “bring the subject to
you”—is very important, especially for
small wildlife subjects such as birds.
You can get more reach by using a camera
with a smaller image sensor. An APS-C sensor
measures about 23.6x15.6mmvs. 36x24mm
for a “full-frame” sensor. The APS-C sensor
thus “sees” a smaller portion of the image
produced by any given lens, providing a
tighter cropping on the subject (see the
illustration below). A given focal length on an
APS-C camera frames like a lens 1.5X longer
on a full-frame camera. If a full-frame camera
and an APS-C camera have the same number
of megapixels, the APS-C camera will have
more reach—it will produce a larger image of
the subject on a per-pixel basis. If the full-
frame camera has at least 2.4X more pixels
than the APS-C camera, the full-frame camera
will have more reach (i.e., you could crop into
the full-frame image until it matches the APS-
C image and still have more “pixels per duck”).
Four Thirds System DSLRs (the Olympus
E-5 is the only current one) have even smaller
sensors: 17.3x13.0mm, for a 2.0X crop factor.
A 300mm lens on the E-5 frames like a 600mm on a full-frame camera (or a 450mm on an APS-C camera).
The best way to increase reach is to get more focal length, of course. As mentioned in the “AF
Performance” section, many wildlife photographers employ the less costly alternative of attaching a 1.4X or
2X teleconverter ($200-$500) to a telephoto lens rather than buying a big, fast, heavy and expensive lens.
Add a 1.4X converter to a 300mm lens, and you have a 420mm lens. Add a 2X converter to the 300mm
lens, and you have a 600mm lens. The main drawbacks to converters are that they reduce image quality a
bit, they slow AF performance somewhat, and they eat light: one stop for a 1.4X converter, two stops for a
2X converter. Add a 1.4X converter to a 300mm ƒ/4 lens, and you get a 420mm ƒ/5.6; add a 2X converter,
and you get a 600mm ƒ/8. This loss of lens speed means you have to use a slower shutter speed or a
higher ISO setting in a given light level. Also, only higher-end DSLRs can autofocus at ƒ/8; with others, you
lose AF capability with lens/converter combos slower than ƒ/5.6 or so. Many pro wildlife photographers use
matched teleconverters with their supertelephotos to extend reach and get incredible results. An added
teleconverter bonus is that the lens’ minimum focusing distance doesn’t change when you use one. Add a
2X converter to a 300mm ƒ/4 lens that focuses down to 5 feet, and you have a 600mm ƒ/8 lens that
focuses down to 5 feet. A typical 600mm ƒ/4 lens won’t focus closer than 15 to 18 feet.
the D7000’s, good AF performance on birds in flight and weather sealing.
Different DSLR models have varying numbers and arrangements of AF
points. In theory, more points are better, but not all cameras have powerful
enough processors to deal with all AF points quickly enough for really difficult
subjects like birds in flight. Also, busy backgrounds, such as foliage, can
confuse multi-point AF and cause it to focus on something other than the
desired subject. The number of AF points is only part of the story. The entire
AF system needs to be considered. More up-to-date AF systems with fewer
AF points and more powerful internal processors can outperform older
systems with more AF points. I use multi-point AF only when a bird is
flying against a plain background like a clear sky, and just the center
AF point otherwise. For portraits of stationary wildlife, you can activate the
AF point over the eye nearest the camera. Experiment with your camera’s
different AF-point options to see which work best for you and your gear.
The lens plays a big part in AF performance, too, of course. The pro
supertelephotos—300mm ƒ/2.8, 400mm ƒ/2.8, 500mm ƒ/4, 600mm ƒ/4
and 800mm ƒ/5.6—have better focusing motors and AF algorithms, as
well as better optics than lower-end lenses. They’re more rugged, with
better sealing against weather and dust. They also cost a lot more, and are
much bulkier than lesser lenses, but they’re really that much better.
Many photographers are unaware that their AF systems operate with the
lens wide open at its maximum aperture. As the shutter button is pressed,
the lens iris closes down to the chosen ƒ-stop an instant before the shutter
opens and the exposure is made. Most AF systems can only operate at
ƒ/5.6 and greater apertures. Because many wildlife photographers use
teleconverters to extend their focal lengths, a DSLR with an AF
system that works down to ƒ/8 is preferable.
A
F
P
e
r
f
o
r
m
a
n
c
e
R
e
a
c
h
The black area represents a full-frame (36x24mm)
image area. The blue rectangle shows the area
“seen” by an APS-C sensor with a 1.5X crop factor,
the red rectangle, the area seen by Canon’s 1.6X
APS-C sensors. The green rectangle represents the
portion of the “full-frame” area seen by a Four
Thirds sensor, and the smaller rectangles, the
portions seen by the smaller sensors used in
compact digital cameras. Note that the image
produced by the lens doesn’t change with the
format; only the portion of the image that’s
recorded changes. A smaller sensor doesn’t
increase magnification of the image at the image
plane; it just crops the image more tightly.
72 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
Full-Frame 35 mm Sensor
APS-C Sized Sensors
1.5X Crop Factor 1.6X Crop Factor
4/3”
36 mm
2
4
m
m
2/3” 1/2”
1/3”

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Birds-in-flight photographers like to shoot at high frame rates to capture
exactly the right wing position. Today’s highest-rated DSLRs for frames per sec-
ond (fps) are Canon’s EOS-1D X (12 fps at full resolution with AF for each frame) and
Nikon’s D4 (10 fps at full resolution with AF for each frame). One reason why these
cameras have “only” 18 and 16 megapixels is to obtain these frame rates—affordable
technology doesn’t currently exist to process 36-megapixel images at 10 per second.
There are also limits on how quickly a DSLR can raise and lower the mirror.
Mid-range and entry-level full-frame DSLRs are slower: 4-6 fps. In APS-C, Sony’s
SLT-A77, with a fixed mirror, can do 12 fps with continuous AF—but it has an
electronic viewfinder that isn’t ideal for birds in flight, but fine for a lot of other wildlife
photography (see the “EVF DSLRs For Wildlife” sidebar). Canon’s 18-megapixel EOS
7D can do 8 fps, Nikon’s 12.3-megapixel D300S and the 16.2-megapixel Pentax K-5
series, 7 fps. Nikon’s 24.1-megapixel D7100 can do 7 fps in 15.3-megapixel 1.3X DX
crop mode, in which a 300mm lens frames like a 600mm on a full-frame camera.
Besides fps, you also should consider buffer capacity. When you shoot a series
of images, the camera stores them in its buffer as it writes them to the memory
card. When the buffer fills, either the camera stops shooting until buffer space
becomes available or the shooting rate decreases drastically. The higher-end
cameras have bigger buffers, allowing you to shoot more frames before filling them.
The lower-end cameras have much smaller buffers—in some cases, a few RAW
files will fill the buffer. With these, you’ll either have to settle for brief bursts or shoot
JPEGs. The Nikon D4’s buffer can hold 92 12-bit lossless compressed RAW files
or 170 Large Fine JPEGs, while the D800’s can hold 21 of the former or 56 of the
latter, and the D7100’s buffer, just 7 12-bit losslessly compressed RAW files or 73
Large Fine JPEGs—another reason why Nikon pro action shooters go with the D4.
Bear in mind that the lower-end DSLRs aren’t likely to be able to maintain focus on
a flying bird for more than a few frames, so longer bursts aren’t really needed.
F
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TOP WILDLIFE DSLRS
Normal Max. AF Points Min. AF Min. Shutter Max. Buffer Top
Sensor ISO Range ISO (X-Type) Aperture AF EV Cycles fps* RAW/JPG** Video MSRP
Full-Frame
Canon EOS-1D X 18.1 MP 100-51200 204,800 61 (to 41) 8 -2 400K 12 38/180 1080/30p $6,799
Canon EOS 5D Mark III 20.2 MP 100-25600 102,400 61 (to 41) 8 -2 150K 6 18/65 1080/30p $3,499
Nikon D4 16.2 MP 100-12800 204,800 51 (15) 8 -2 400K 10 92/170 1080/30p $5,999
Nikon D800/D800E 36.3 MP 100-6400 25600 51 (15) 8 -2 200K 4 (6) 21/56 1080/30p $2,999
Sony SLT-A99 24.3 MP 100-25600 25600 19 (11)*** 5.6 -1 200K 6 15/15 1080/60p $2,799
APS-C
Canon EOS 7D 18.0 MP 100-6400 6400 19 (19) 5.6 +1 150K 8 25/130 1080/30p $1,499
Nikon D300S 12.3 MP 200-3200 6400 51 (15) 5.6 -1 150K 7 18/44 720/24p $1,699
Nikon D7100 24.1 MP 100-6400 25600 51 (15) 8 -2 150K 6 (7) 7/73 1080/60i $1,199
Pentax K-5II/K-5IIs 16.3 MP 100-12800 51200 11 (9) N/S -3 100K 7 20/30 1080/25p $1,099
Sigma SD1 Merrill 15.3x3 MP 100-6400 6400 11 (11) N/S -1 100K 5 7/7 No Video $2,299
Sony SLT-A77 24.3 MP 100-16000 16000 19 (11) 5.6 -1 150K 12 13/13 1080/60p $899
Four Thirds
Olympus E-5 12.3 MP 200-6400 6400 11 (11) N/S -2 150K 5 20/card 720/30p $1,699
Criteria include AF performance on action subjects, image quality, high-ISO performance, shooting speed, ruggedness and operational comfort. Some cameras are better in
some of these areas than others, but all are excellent wildlife cameras.
* Maximum fps at full resolution with AF for each frame; figure in parentheses is maximum fps in 15.3 MP cropped mode
** Maximum number of RAW/highest-quality JPEG images per burst; “card” means can shoot JPEGs until memory card is full
*** SLT-A99 has a 102-point phase-detection AF sensor overlaying the image sensor, as well as a main 19-point AF sensor
N/S = not stated by manufacturer
EVF DSLRs For Wildlife
S
ony’s SLT cameras offer some
unique advantages for wildlife
photographers because they can
provide continuous phase-detection
AF in Live View mode, including
videos. A nonmoving semitranslucent
mirror and an eye-level electronic
viewfinder replace the typical DSLR’s
moving mirror, focusing screen and optical
viewfinder. The semitranslucent mirror
transmits most of the light to the image
sensor and a portion to the phase-
detection AF unit, so you get full-time
continuous AF, with convenient eye-level
viewing, even for movies. Thus, SLT
cameras can do videos of birds in
flight. (When conventional DSLRs are in
Live View or Movie mode, the eye-level
finder blacks out so you have to use the
external LCD, and the phase-detection
AF doesn’t work, so the camera has
to switch to contrast-based AF, which is
too slow for action as implemented
in DSLRs.)
If you want to capture wildlife action
videos as well as still shots, you should
check out the SLT cameras and see how
you like the EVF.

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Digital cameras deliver their best image quality at lower ISO
settings because lower ISO settings call for more exposure (i.e., a
longer shutter speed and/or wider aperture), which means more
photons hit the sensor. Photon noise (which accounts for much of the
noise in normal photos) increases as the square root of the photon count.
In simple terms, if 4 photons hit the sensor, you get 2 photons of noise, a
2:1 signal-to-noise ratio. If 100 photons hit the sensor, you get 10 photons
of noise, for a 10:1 S/N ratio. If 10,000 photons hit the sensor, you get
100 photons of noise, for a 100:1 photonic S/N ratio. This largely is why
higher ISOs are “noisier” than lower ISOs with DSLRs. When you set a
higher ISO, the meter calls for a faster shutter speed and/or
a smaller aperture, which means less light reaches the
sensor and thus the S/N ratio goes down.
More light is better, and bigger sensors can collect
more because there’s more area there to do it. More
light means less noise. There are other sources of
image noise, but this is the main reason why
full-frame sensors can deliver better image quality than
smaller ones, especially at higher ISO settings.
Pixel size also comes into consideration. Higher pixel
counts provide the ability to crop into images more and can deliver finer
details in fur and feathers, assuming the image is sharply focused and not
blurred by camera shake or subject motion—or details lost to noise. But
the more pixels you have on a given-size sensor, the smaller they will be.
And smaller pixels are less effective at collecting light than larger ones. So,
the best high-ISO performance for a given generation of technology is
found in full-frame sensors with big pixels (i.e., lower megapixel counts).
The all-time (so far) high-ISO champ on DxOMark.com’s sensor ratings is
the discontinued 12.3-megapixel, full-frame Nikon D3S, with a score of
3253. (The score is the highest ISO setting that meets specified
signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic-range and color bit-depth criteria.) But the
36.3-megapixel, full-frame D800 (with much smaller pixels) isn’t far behind,
with a score of 2853 (the 16.2-megapixel, full-frame D4 scored 2965).
And when all of DxOMark.com’s image-quality criteria are considered, the
D800E and D800 are the two highest-scoring cameras overall. So pixel
size matters less than sensor size; the highest-scoring APS-C sensor is
the 24-megapixel unit in the Nikon D5200, at ISO 1284—23rd place
overall. (You can find good data on dynamic range, color and noise for
many DSLRs and other cameras at DxOMark.com.)
Bottom line: If you want the best image quality, especially in lower light
levels such as at dusk and dawn, you’ll get it from a full-frame DSLR vs. an
APS-C DSLR (assuming equal generations of technology). If you want maxi-
mum reach, you’ll get that from a high-megapixel smaller sensor. Pro wildlife
photographers make great photos with both full-frame and APS-C DSLRs.
You just have to consider your personal priority—low-light image quality or
reach (as well as budget, of course)—and choose your camera accordingly.
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If you’re going to shoot in harsh conditions, you want a camera
that can deal with them. The pro models are the most rugged, but
many mid-level models are generally rugged enough for most wildlife/bird
photography (the Pentax K-5 series and K-30 are even weather-sealed,
as are some of their lenses, including the DA* 300mm ƒ/4). Entry-level
models are less rugged and not good choices for harsh conditions.
Higher-end cameras also have better shutters. Those of the Canon
EOS-1D X and Nikon D4 have been tested to 400,000 cycles. Mid-range
DSLRs have shutters tested to 100,000-200,000 cycles or so. Entry-level
cameras have less sturdy shutters; many manufacturers don’t provide
shutter-life estimates for these cameras. OP
David Akoubian
Ed Heaton
Learning Series 2013
Register Today at
www.tamron-usa.com/events
ATTEND A TAMRON
STATE PARK WORKSHOP
NEAR YOU
with a Tamron Pro
either David Akoubian
or Ed Heaton
Unicoi State Park (Helen, GA):
May 18 with David Akoubian
Hocking Hills State Park
(Logan, OH):
June 1 with Ed Heaton
Ricketts Glen State Park
(Benton, PA):
July 27 with Ed Heaton
Henry Cowell Redwoods
State Park (Felton, CA):
August 17 with Ed Heaton
Letchworth State Park
(Castile, NY):
October 5 with Ed Heaton
Eldorado Canyon State Park
(Eldorado Springs, CO):
October 12 with David Akoubian
Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
(Borrego Springs, CA):
November 9 with David Akoubian
Spring Mountain Ranch
State Park (Blue Diamond, NV):
November 16 with David Akoubian
The cost is $189
Includes 1 day event, welcome bag,
loaner lenses, bonus rebates, lunch,
refreshments and more.

outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 77
MORE On The Web
For more information and comparisons between
cameras for your photography, visit the OP
website at www.outdoorphotographer.com
and check out our extensive archive of
equipment articles.
̈
Wildlife Portraits
N
ot all wildlife photos are
action shots. For wildlife
portraits, AF performance
isn’t the prime consideration; image
quality is. You want lots of megapixels
to record fine details in fur and feathers,
and you want accurate colors. Again,
you can do wildlife portraits with any
DSLR, just as you can do wildlife action
with any DSLR. But the best cameras
for portrait detail would be the newest
models with the highest pixel counts, or
Sigma’s SD1 Merrill, with its unique
Foveon sensor that records all three
primary colors (red, green and blue) at
every pixel site (conventional DSLR
sensors just record one of the three
primaries at each pixel site, and obtain
the missing colors from neighboring
pixels via interpolation using complex
proprietary algorithms). This means the
SD1 doesn’t need a blurring low-pass
filter over the sensor to eliminate the
artifacts caused by conventional sensor
interpolation, resulting in sharper
images. Note that the Nikon D7100
and Pentax K-5IIs don’t have low-pass
filters, and the low-pass filter’s effect has
been cancelled in the Nikon D800E,
which could result in finer fur and
feather detail. Some pros who specialize
in wildlife portraits and don’t do
action shots use very expensive
medium-format digital cameras for
the ultimate in detail.
Protecting the Future of Nature
WWF is leading an unprecedented effort to create and
sustain over 80 reserves and parks in the Amazon that will
protect animals and plants while strengthening livelihoods
for local communities.
Be Part of Our Work worldwildlife.org
scenics
www.outdoorphotographer.com
Outdoor Photographer
sports action
travel
wildlife

XX Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
78 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
travel & workshops
sharing their extensive expertise and
unique vision, as well as for their abil-
ity to deliver an overall experience that’s
deeply rewarding and full of fun. High-
lights include Patagonia’s Torres del
Paine National Park, California’s North
Coast redwoods, the surreal gypsum
dunes of White Sands, the Catalina
Mountains near Tucson and Iceland’s
stunning south coast. Photograph the
incredible rainforest biodiversity of
Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula; join a lux-
ury African safari for a small group at
Chobe and Maasai Mara; explore New
Zealand’s sublime South Island. Rich
photographic opportunities, personal-
ized mentorship, great amenities and
upbeat group dynamics are hallmarks
of a Visionary Wild workshop.
For more information, contact:
Visionary Wild, (202) 558-9596, info
@visionarywild.com, www.visionary
wild.com.
Night Landscapes
November & December 2013
February 2014
Comet ISON is coming this fall, and
you can learn how to photograph night
landscapes in spectacular Arches NP or
beautiful Monument Valley withTomTill
and Moab Photo Tours on their night
landscape photography workshops. Learn
how to photograph the landscape after
the sun goes down with stars as points
of light, star trails or with the MilkyWay.
Learn how to light-paint your scene to
give it that something extra. While Moab
Photo Tours can’t promise that you’ll get
pictures of the comet, if predictions are
Bosque Del Apache/White Sands
November 30 to December 6, 2013
What could be a better combo than
some of the best birds in flight photog-
raphy in the country, and some incred-
ible sunrise and sunset landscape
photography? Your adventure starts off
in Bosque del Apache, where you’ll learn
to take great birds-in-flight shots or take
your skills up a notch or two, as well
as discover tips on bringing out the best
colors at sunrise or sunset, as the birds
fly into one of numerous lakes and ponds
for some amazing flight silhouette shots.
After five days at Bosque, you’ll ven-
ture south for two days to White Sands
National Monument, where sunrise and
sunset shoots will bring out the best col-
ors of the rippled white gypsum sand
and colorful sky, as well as the poten-
tial for some star and Milky Way shots.
Learn different techniques for painting
the foreground yucca with light to add
even more pop to the great shots avail-
able from there.
For more information, contact:
First Light Tours, Andy Long, (303)
601-2828, andy@firstlighttours.com,
www.firstlighttours.com.
Visionary Wild
2013 & 2014
Visionary Wild continues to exceed
expectations with its world-class work-
shops and photo travel experiences. Fea-
turing such acclaimed photographers as
Jack Dykinga, John Shaw, Jeff Foott,
Roy Toft, Marc Muench, Jerry Dodrill
and Justin Black, VisionaryWild instruc-
tors are selected for their dedication to
accurate, you’ll have a good chance of
gettingnight landscapes withComet ISON
in view. Also visit the exotic Himalayan
mountain kingdoms of Bhutan and
Nepal in February 2014.
For more information, contact:
Jon Fuller, (435) 259-4700, moab
phototours@gmail.com, www.moab
phototours.com.
Arizona Highways
Photo Workshops
Year-Round
Join Arizona Highways Photo Work-
shops (AHPW) onthe photographyadven-
ture of a lifetime. For over three decades,
they’ve championed photographic edu-
cation through an extensive lineup of full-
service workshops throughout Arizona
and theWest. Led by award-winning pho-
tographers, their instructors are passion-
ate about sharing their skills and imparting
their knowledge with photo enthusiasts
at all levels. As a beginner or a seasoned
pro, AHPW has something for you.
Designed to take the guesswork out of
planning your photo adventure, AHPW
provides the total workshop package:
epic destinations, quality education, travel
and accommodations, and all permits,
guides and tours. If you’re looking for
the ultimate photo experience, travel
with them to iconic Arizona locations
such as Antelope Canyon, Monument
Valley, the Grand Canyon and Havasu-
pai Falls, or other western favorites like
Glacier National Park, Redwoods and
Seastacks, Vancouver Island and Yel-
lowstone National Park.
For more information, contact:
AHPW, (602) 712-2004, info@ahpw.org,
www.ahpw.org.
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www.charlesneedlephoto.com
425-968-2884
Creative Macro & Garden
Photography Workshops
Wolves-Wolves-Wolves
A Photo Center In The East
Best photo ops available anywhere and you don’t have to leave
“home.” Arctic, Tundra and Timber Wolves in Natural Settings
Lakota Wolf Preserve ¥ 89 Mt. Pleasant Rd.,
Columbia, NJ 07832 ¥ TOLL-FREE: 877-SEE-WOLF
www.lakotawolf.com
e-mail:photography@lakotawolf.com
855-337-6532
Natures Image
Photo Field Workshops
Bill and Linda Lane
(804) 883-7740
UTopics: exposure/natural light,
fill flash, creative visualization,
composition refinement,
technique, equipment...
UExpert instruction
UOutstanding
locations & subjects
UCamaraderie & food
Capture the Seasons. . .
Look us up on the web for further details:
lanephotoworkshops.com
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scenics
www.outdoorphotographer.com
Outdoor Photographer
sports action
travel
wildlife

Jim Cline Photo Tours
Year-Round
Join a small-group photo tour and
discover the best photography locations
in Peru, India, Guatemala, Myanmar,
Bhutan, Mexico, Central Europe and
Southeast Asia. What makes Jim Cline
photo tours different is that Jim Cline
and Karl Grobl have established per-
sonal relationships with people in the
places where tours are led. This allows
for special access by group members –
something that would be nearly impos-
sible when traveling with other larger
tours. Explore and photograph magical
Machu Picchu in Peru, the Day of The
Dead celebrations in Oaxaca, one of the
world’s great train rides in Mexico’s Cop-
per Canyon, or the Mayan World in
Guatemala or Chiapas. Join humanitar-
ian photojournalist Karl Grobl on a jour-
ney to experience and photograph
Cambodia’sAngkor Wat or the unspoiled
beauty and tranquility of Myanmar.
Explore and photograph Vietnam or the
amazing spectacle of the Pushkar Camel
Fair in Rajasthan. Every JimCline photo
tour is well-planned, so small groups are
in the prime photo locations at the opti-
mum times to take advantage of the best
photo opportunities. Read some of the
heartfelt testimonials on their website!
For more information, contact: Jim
Cline Photo Tours, (877) 350-1314,
info@jimcline.com, www.jimcline.com.
Iceland: The Land Of Ice & Fire
Year-Round
Sigurjón Pétursson’s occupation is
photography and showing other pho-
travel & workshops
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West Virginia Autumn
With Irene Hinke-Sacilotto
October 4 to 6, 2013
Photo Workshop featuring Canaan
Valley, Blackwater Falls State Park
and other nearby West Virginia attrac-
tions with Irene Hinke-Sacilotto. In the
WV mountains, fall arrives in early
October. As temperatures drop, the
mountainsides turn fromgreen to a kalei-
doscope of color. Frost paints exposed
surfaces with lacy patterns. In low
areas, fog develops, and as the sun rises,
it lifts to reveal ghostly shapes of trees
and distant mountains. Beaver, musk-
rats, bear and other animals are actively
preparing for the winter, and deer are
at their most handsome. Includes cabin
accommodations at Blackwater Falls
State Park. From there, it’s only a short
distance to overlooks of the Blackwa-
ter River Canyon and Blackwater Falls.
Canaan Valley, Seneca Rocks and other
scenic locations are just a short drive
away. Includes Friday PM orientation,
and Saturday and Sunday field trips with
mid-day critiques of images. Class size
limited to 10.
For more information, contact:
Irene Hinke-Sacilotto, (410) 679-2873,
ospreyphot@aol.com, www.facebook.
com/ospreyphotoworkshops.
tographers Iceland, the land he and his
wife are so proud of. They’ve been trav-
eling and photographing this land dur-
ing all seasons for more than 50 years.
Their happiness is in showing other pho-
tographers where and how. This is their
passion. The diversity of geology in
such a small area is unique: volcanoes,
lava fields, glaciers, black deserts, rivers,
waterfalls, aurora borealis, birds and
history. Iceland is one of the 1,000 places
to visit before you die. Your expecta-
tions are to come away with stunning
landscape photographs fromunique Ice-
landic locations. Let them organize pri-
vate long and short custom-made tours
and workshops during winter, summer,
fall and spring for individuals and small
groups. Maximum group size is four.
For more information, contact:
(354) 894 0652, sigurjonp@gmail.com,
www.sigurjonpetursson.com.
80 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
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Ultimate Guide To
Workshop Listings Online
Visit outdoorphotographer.com and click
on the Locations tab to view the ultimate
guide to Travel & Workshops, plus photos.
This directory will help you pick your next
workshop from a listing that includes some of
the best programs in the world!

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For more workshop listings, go to www.outdoorphotographer.com and click on Travel & Workshops.
Andy Biggs Photo Safaris
ȊThe Gura Gear Bataȵae 32L is
my go-to camera bag for my
Multi-Point
Access System
Stowable Harness
for Travel
Tripod Flexibility
www.guragear.comlOP
ae 32L
- Andy Biggs,
Andy Biggs Photo Safaris
ȊThe Gura Gear Bataȵa
my go-to camera bag
African safaris.ȋ
A
Sto
Tri
www.gu
he Gura Gear Bataȵa
Reach
PHOTO, TRAVEL and
OUTDOOR enthusiasts who want to
know about your products and services.
call 310-820-1500 ext: 135
for classified advertising rates

travel &workshops
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82 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
BI G I DEA,
SMALL SPACE
Find out how to effectively reach a
large audience in a small space.
Contact Debra Levine at
(310) 820-1500, ext. 111 or at
dilevine@wernerpublishing.com
Specializing in comprehensive, professionally-led,
natural history & photo tours of the Galápagos Islands.
Monthly departures on 14-16 passenger yachts.
(800) 969-9014 • www.galapagostravel.com
783 Rio Del Mar Boulevard, Suite #49, Aptos, CA 95003
The Nature Workshops
7 Ryan Circle, Lebanon, IL 62254-1948
618-589-1729
www.natureworkshops.com
Join us at some of North AmericaÕs and the
worldÕs most inspirational locations. Usually
not more than 8 participants per instructor. In
our 17th year!
Our Schedule:
Sep 20-24 - Grand Tetons NP, WY
Oct 02-06 - Cape Cod, MA
Oct 09-12 - New Hampshire
Oct 13-17 - Vermont
Oct 19-23 - Acadia & Maine
Nov 09-13 - FL Everglades Experience
Dec 04-08 - Photoshop Printing
Jan 25-Feb 01 -Yellowstone/Tetons in Winter
Feb 05-09 - S FL Birds & Gators
Feb 23-Mar 07 - Costa Rica
Apr weekends - TX Wildflowers
Apr14-27 - China’s Hidden Landscapes
May 11-16 - N Arizona
May 21-28 - San Francisco & CA Coast
Jun - Palouse Area, WA state
Jul 25-Aug 09 - Kenya
Aug 08-12 - Rwanda Gorillas
Sep 01-09 - Denali & Kenai Fjords NP, AK
Sponsored by:
Lowepro, Manfrotto/Gitzo Tripods, Panavue
ImageAssembler, Helicon Software, HDR
Software, Wimberly, Essential HDR,
Breathing Color
Due for release in November 2013,
Awe is not just another coffee-table
book about wildlife; it is the result
of one man’s personal quest to
find the Africa of his dreams and
is the culmination of more than
a decade’s worth of exploring
and photographing.
Countdown to launch date:
2 months
www.gregdutoit.com
Coffee-table book coming soon
Details on how to order to follow soon

check our website or call for up-to-the-minute prices & information! email your order or inquiry to us at: sales@beachcamera.com
Toll-free Customer Service 800-634-1811 Dial 2
or email us at CS@beachcamera.com
Retail Showroom:732-968-6400
203 Route 22 East Green Brook, NJ 08812
Now Shipping Internationally
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Club
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Where the Customer Always Comes First
A l l p r o d u c t s a r e b r a n d n e w, f a c t o r y f r e s h a n d i n c l u d e U S A w a r r a n t y !
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All merchandise is brand new and factory fresh. Prices Are For Mail Order Only. 10% deposit required for COD orders. No restocking fee will be charged if merchandise is returned in pristine condition (returns are only subject to a 10% restocking fee if package is opened). Exchange or refund less shipping
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Camcorders
The Flagship of the VIXIA Series
VIXIA HF G30 offers a Genuine Canon 20x HD Video Lens and 8-Blade Circular
Aperture for superb video quality and natural, beautiful background blur. The new
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up to 28 Mbps ñ and even simultaneously with Dual Recording thanks to two SDXC
memory card slots. A 3.5-inch OLED Touch Panel Display and Built-in Wi-Fi technol-
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Record Special Moments in Stunning HD Power
Compact and easy-to-use, the VIXIA HF R400 is equipped with a Genuine
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Headline Quality and Easy Sharing
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The On-the-go Videographerís Dream
This feature-rich, professional model records Full HD 1080p to either its
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ability to record simultaneously to both cards for instant backup. It includes
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equivalent range 30.4mm-304mm) and smooth, pleasing backgrounds.
Vixia HF G30
XA10 Pro HD
Vixia HF R40
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Cameras and Lenses
Camcorders
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The new EOS Rebel SL1 is small in size but enormous in
performance. With a newly-designed Canon 18MP CMOS
sensor and speedy Canon DIGIC 5 Image Processor, it
delivers images of extraordinary quality - ideal for those
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The 16.1MP ExmorÆ APS-C sensor Alpha NEX-3N
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The AF 18-270 covers an angle of view equivalent to that
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Ignite your imagination
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Every Detail of Life, Beautifully
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The Longest Steadiest Lens on Earth
AF18-270mm F/3.5-6.3
Di II VC (Vibration Compensation)
LD Aspherical (IF) Macro
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outdoorphotographer.com September 2013 85
www.outdoorphotographer.com
scenics
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Outdoor Photographer
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T
ele-extenders, also known as
teleconverters or multipliers,
are small optical accessories
that mount between your
lens and camera to extend
your focal length. Tele-extenders come
in several different multipliers, with the
most common being 1.4x and 2x. The
1.4x will increase your focal length by
40%, making your 200mm lens act as a
280mm, while the 2x will increase focal
length by 100%, turning the 200mm lens
into a full 400mm.
This can have exciting implications
for wildlife photographers. For one,
having extended focal length that fits in
a small camera bag gives you the tools
to capture make-it-or-break-it moments
while letting you be flexible and mobile.
Not only do side-by-side comparisons
of tele-extenders versus postprocessing
crops show extenders to have a quality
advantage in sharpness and precision,
but tele-extenders are more budget-
friendly than supertelephoto lenses,
making experimenting and perfecting
new types of birding or quick-action
wildlife photography more accessible for
exploratory photographers.
But while a tele-
extender may sound
like the perfect quick
fix for any focal-length
woes, it’s important to
know how to pair your
extender with your lens
to get the highest-quality
images possible.
When light enters a
tele-extender from the lens, the optics in
the extender spread the light over a
larger surface area. This magnifies the
image, casting the central section over
the camera sensor. At the same time,
this dissipates some of the light from
the edges of the image, decreasing the
gadget bag
TOP: Tight wildlife portraits are ideal subjects for a long lens and a teleconverter; ABOVE: Nikon AF-S TC-17E II 1.7X
86 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
overall amount of light
reaching the sensor.
Because of this,
tele-extenders will
decrease the maximum
aperture ability of the
lens. A 1.4x extender
will always make the lens
one stop slower. A 2x extender,
in turn, will always make the lens two
stops slower. For 1.4x extenders, it’s
best to pair them with at least ƒ/4
lenses, while 2x extenders are best
paired with ƒ/2.8 lenses. This way,
you’re starting with workable combina-
tions given variable lighting conditions.
This slower speed will affect the
autofocus ability of the camera. For a
camera to autofocus, it opens to its
widest aperture, compares the angles of
two paths to set the focus, then closes
back to the set exposure. Prosumer-
type cameras can generally autofocus
up to ƒ/6.3, while pro DSLRs autofocus
up to ƒ/8. Depending on the lens and
lighting conditions you’re working with,
when you lose stops with the extender,
you may lose the ability to autofocus.
Tele-extenders add an extra step
between the lens and the camera, and
in so doing also add an additional bend
Extend
(Cont’d on page 96)
Your
Reach
Tele-extenders
give you an
inexpensive
way to boost
your focal
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NEW TRADITIONALIST
look overexposed and clinical. Now I
prefer them slightly darker and more
moody. Mystery in an image is good, so
long as you intend it to be there!”
Shoemaker deliberately plays up the
mystery in his photographs by working
at the edges of light. He finds them at
dawn and dusk, in the transition from
shadow to highlight, and when light is
coming directly at him.
“Backlight adds mystery,” Shoemaker
says, “hiding elements of the landscape
in shadow or silhouette. It serves a simi-
lar function to fog, which I consider to be
nature’s lingerie, but whereas fog is gen-
tle and short scale, backlighting is harsh
and dynamic. Both offer only glimpses
of what lies beyond the initial tease, but
backlight is much more energetic.
“Have you ever seen a Western movie
end with the cowboy riding off into a
front-lit scene with the sun at his back?”
he adds. “All the drama is shooting into
the sun. I shoot a lot of my landscapes
into the sun, not only at sunrise and sun-
set, but after the sun has some elevation
to it. It works especially well in black-
and-white because of the graphic look.
All of the shadows come right to the
camera, and I like to shoot low to the
ground to make them prominent lead-
ing lines or design elements.”
When working in such challenging
lighting situations, good technique—
both in camera and in the computer—
becomes paramount. Here, again,
Shoemaker defers to the past masters,
while harnessing modern means to
achieve his traditionalist aesthetic.
“I think a lot of people misinterpret
what it means to get it right in-camera,”
he says. “I know how I need to expose
the image in order to make sure I’m
going to get the details in the tones I
want. I shoot in RAW, and I think a lot
of people assume all you need to do in
RAW is ‘expose to the right,’ but that’s
not always the best way to do it. Using
a cookie-cutter formula just means that
much more work on the computer.
“My settings are pretty tame and
understated compared to a lot of work
I see today,” Shoemaker continues. “The
bulk of my manipulation is similar to
what Ansel did: dodging and burning. I
put down a layer of 50% gray set to
Soft Light blend mode and paint with
black or white to adjust tones. This dodge
and burn layer has been around for a
long time. It’s a more organic way of
lightening and darkening portions of the
image, and the intensity of each can be
controlled by the opacity of the brush.
I do use Levels adjustment layers as
well for this type of thing, but usually
that’s for adjusting a larger area of the
image because it’s a uniformadjustment
and I use a layer mask to limit it to
whatever area I want modified. Since
CS6 came out, the ‘new’ way of doing
this is to just use a blank layer set to
Overlay and then paint black or white
directly on this, but for some reason,
I don’t think it looks the same, so I
stick with the old method of the 50%
gray layer.
“I think the modern digital darkroom
isn’t all that different from a traditional
one,” Shoemaker adds. “It just offers
more tools, options and power that enable
a lot of photographers to hang them-
selves with the technology. It’s easy to
get carried away.”
Ultimately, Shoemaker says, although
he has come far in a short time, he feels
like he has only just begun.
“I’mjust going on nine years of work-
ing with a camera,” he says, “so I’m still
a kid in this field. Believe me when I say
that when I talk about photography, that
I do so with the mind-set of a student,
not a master. It’s really not that difficult
to go from making bad photographs to
making good ones, but it’s extremely dif-
ficult togofrommakinggoodphotographs
to making great ones. I don’t know if I’ll
ever get there. It’s an eternal process that
requires a lot of dedication.” OP
You can see more of Jim Shoemaker’s
stunning landscape photography at
www.jimshoemakerphotography.com.
MORE On The Web
Go to www.outdoorphotographer.com to see
more landscape photography from old masters as
well as the next generation of visionary artists.
Under the Locations tab, you’ll find an archive of
inspiring articles.
̈
(Cont’d from page 48)
88 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
The most vexing problemwith higher
magnification is precise focus. The greater
the magnification, the less depth of field
and the more critical the need to place
the focus precisely. Shooting in Live
View and magnifying the image on the
LCD (up to 10 times) before capture
will help with focus placement. It’s even
better to use a loupe like the HoodLoupe
(www.hoodmanusa.com) to view the
screen under bright conditions. Arecent
innovation that enables me to place crit-
ical focus at very high magnifications
(up to 4280mmtelephoto and 24Xmacro)
is the CamRanger (www.camranger.com),
which sends a wireless signal to my
Apple iPad, turning it into a large-screen
viewfinder. With this system, vibrations
are eliminated because all the controls
are managed on the iPad.
Traveling With The Big Glass
Up until now, I’ve always had to
pack my long lens (500mm ƒ/4) into a
separate carry-on bag, and with my
computer bag and camera backpack,
that puts me over the carry-on limit.
We’ve resolved this by sending the
big lens along as Kathy’s second carry-
on, but you can imagine how well she
likes that remedy, since she has cam-
era and computer equipment of her own
to deal with.
Recently, I was introduced to a photo
backpack that allows me to carry my
Canon EF 500mm ƒ/4L along with my
normal complement of cameras, lenses
and accessories. It even fits in the over-
head compartment of small regional
flights. The Gura Gear Bataflae 26L
(www.guragear.com) works because of
its compact depth and two-sided design.
One side holds the 500mm with a cam-
era body attached, and the other holds
the rest of my essential photo equip-
ment. You can access each side sepa-
rately, if you wish, or open both at the
same time. The harness (straps) tucks
away, making it easier to stow. The bag
is lightweight, but still protects the gear.
I like it. Kathy likes it, too. OP
Follow George Lepp’s exploits, see his
latest photographs and be part of
the discussion on his Facebook page:
www.facebook.com/georgelepp. Lepp
is part of the OP Blog at www.outdoor
photographer.com/blog/author/glepp.
tech tips
(Cont’d from page 29)

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Class 10
233x Elite 200x 400x 600x 40MBs 94MBs Micro
8GB 18.95 22.95 — 9.95 — 13.95 — — — 20.95 — 9.95 17.50 9.95
16GB 28.95 44.95 18.50 15.95 17.00 19.00 34.95 — 26.50 37.95 26.50 15.95 26.50 16.95
32GB 45.95 75.95 32.99 29.95 29.95 38.49 62.95 37.95 45.95 63.95 45.95 26.99 45.95 29.95

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Sunday 10-5 t Mon.-Thurs. 9-7
Friday 9-1 EST/9-2 DST
Saturday Closed
092013
Over 300,000 products,
at your leisure
www.BandH.com
We Buy, Sell and Trade
Us Used ed EEqu qu q ip ippme ment nt
800-947-9953
212-444-6653
Fax:
212-239-7770
When in New York,
Visit our SuperStore
420 Ninth Ave.
Corner of 34th Street
New York, N.Y. 10001
September 5-6 ......... Closed
September 13 ........... Closed
September 19-27 ..... Closed
50mm f/2 Macro ED Zuiko
Digital Lens
t%FTJHOFEFYDMVTJWFMZGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
º |dea| |c| ra:|c p|c|c¸|ap|]
a|d a|ºc aº a pc|||a|| |e|º
º |a¸|||:a||c| 1.2
º EO ¸|aºº e|ere||
º |||. |c:uº. 9.4b"
º b2rr |||e|
d|are|e|
º we|¸||. 10.O c/
HVL-F58AM
S|ce-|cu|| O|¸||a| ||aº|
º Zccr Head (24-10brr,
º Bcu|:e & SW|.e| Head
º ûu|de \c. 190'
º TT| Oed|:a||c|
º Va||-PcWe|
º H|¸|-Speed S]|:
º Au|c wB Ad(uº|re||
º w||e|eºº
Ra||c Cc|||c|
º we|¸||. 1b.O c/
16-80mm f/3.5-4.5
Carl Zeiss T* DT Digital Lens
t%FTJHOFEFYDMVTJWFMZGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
º |dea| |c| º|apº|c|º,
pc|||a||º, |||e||c|º,
c| cu|dcc| º:e|e|]
º 8brr e(u|..
24-120rr
º |||. |c:uº. 18.8"
º O2rr |||e|
d|are|e|
º we|¸||. 1b.b c/
18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 ED AL (IF)
DC WR Digital Lens
t%FTJHOFEFYDMVTJWFMZGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
º SP Cca|||¸ Repe|º Ouº|,
wa|e|, & û|eaºe
º wea||e| |eº|º|a||
º 0u|:|-S||||
|c:uº S]º|er
º |||. |c:uº. 1.8'
º O2rr |||e| d|are|e|
º we|¸||. 14.8 c/

Alpha SLT-A58 DSLR
º T|a|º|u:e|| ||||c| Te:||c|c¸]
º 2./" T|||||¸ |CO |c|||c|
º Sc|] A-rcu|| |e|º
|cu|| (1.b/ |a:|c|,
º |S P|c Ouc, |S PR0 Hû-Ouc,
SO, SOHC, SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º |u|| HO 1080|/p V|dec
a| O0 c| 24|pº
º S|ead]S|c| |\S|OE
|ra¸e S|ao|||/a||c|
Kit with 18-55mm SAM II Lens ........... #SOSLTA58K 20
Mega
Pixels
Flash System
||-800R ||aº| ...................................................... 169.95
||-O00R ||aº| ...................................................... 299.95
||-b0R ||aº| ........................................................ 499.95
R|-11 R||¸ ||aº| .................................................. 249.95
SR|-11 R||¸ ||aº| Se| .......................................... 559.95
T|-22 TW|| ||aº| .................................................. 449.95
ST|-22 TW|| ||aº| Se|........................................... 739.95
Zuiko 4/3 System Digital Lenses
8/8.b ||º|-e]e EO ................................................. 799.99
8b/8.b |a:|c EO (b2c, ......................................... 229.95
b0/2.0 |a:|c EO (//c, ......................................... 499.95
1b0/2.0 EO (82c, ............................................... 2,499.95
800/2.8 EO ....................................................... 6,999.95
/-14/4.0 EO (/2c, ............................................. 1,799.95
11-22/2.8-8.b EO (/2c, ........................................ 799.95
12-O0/2.8-4 EO SwO (/2c, ................................... 999.95
14-42/8.b-b.O EO (b8c, ........................................ 249.95
18-180/8.b-O.8 EO (O2c, ...................................... 499.95
8b-100/2.0 EO (//c, ......................................... 2,499.99
40-1b0/4-b.O EO (b8c, ......................................... 279.95
b0-200/2.8-8.2 EO SwO (O/c, ........................... 1,199.95
90-2b0/2.8 EO (10bc, ....................................... 5,999.95
EC-14 1.4/ Te|e:c|.e||e| ...................................... 439.95
EC-20 2/ Te|e:c|.e||e| ......................................... 479.95
||-1 0| |e|º Adap|e| ........................................... 83.95
AF Flash System
A|-8O0|ûZ .....................................................................
A|-b40|ûZ .....................................................................
SMCP-DA Digital AF Lenses
14/2.8 EO || (//c, ...........................................................
1b/4.0 EO A| (49c, ..........................................................
8b/2.8 |a:. ||r||ed (49c, ...................................................
bb/1.4 ||r||ed (b8c, ........................................................
21/8.2 A| ||r||ed 'Pa|:a|e' (49c, ...................................
40/2.8 ||r||ed 'Pa|:a|e' (49c, ........................................
/0/2.4 ||r||ed 'Pa|:a|e' (49c, ........................................
200/2.8 EO || ..................................................................
800/4.0 EO || SO| (//c, ....................................................
10-1//8.b-4.b EO || (//c, ..................................................
12-24/4 EO A| || (//c, ......................................................
1O-b0/2.8 EO A| || SO| (//c, .........................................
1/-/0/4.0 A| || SO| (O/c, ..............................................
18-bb/8.b-b.O A| || (b2c, .................................................
b0-18b/2.8 EO || SO| (O/c, ............................................
b0-200/4-b.O EO wR (b2c, ..............................................
bb-800/4-b.8 EO (b8c, ....................................................
O0-2b0/4.0 EO || SO| (O/c, ............................................
AF Lenses for 35mm & Digital SLRs
81/1.8 ||r||ed (b8c, ........................................................
b0/1.4 (49c, ....................................................................
48/1.9 ||r||ed 'Pa|:a|e' (49c, ........................................
b0/2.8 |a:|c (b2c, W||| Caºe ..........................................
///1.8 ||r||ed (49c, ........................................................
100/2.8 O |A Aw |a:|c (49c, ..........................................
Compatible with Maxxum DSLRs
Flash System
HV|-|20A| .......................................................... 149.99
HV|-|20S............................................................. 149.99
HV|-|48A| .......................................................... 349.99
HV|-|b8A| .......................................................... 499.99
Digital Lenses
1O/2.8 ||º|-e]e .................................................... 999.99
20/2.8 (/2c, ......................................................... 749.99
24/2 Ca|| Ze|ºº (/2c, ......................................... 1,399.99
8b/1.4 û (bbc,................................................... 1,499.99
b0/1.4 (bbc, ......................................................... 449.99
b0/2.8 |a:|c (bbc,............................................... 599.99
8b/1.4 Ca|| Ze|ºº (/2c, ...................................... 1,699.99
100/2.8 |a:|c (bbc,............................................. 799.99
18b/1.8 Ca|| Ze|ºº (//c, .................................... 1,799.99
18b/2.8 ST| (/2c, ............................................. 1,399.99
800/2.8 û AP0 .................................................. 6,999.99
11-18/4.b-b.O OT (//c, ........................................ 799.99
1O-8b/2.8 ZA SS| Ca|| Ze|ºº (//c, .................... 1,999.99
1O-80/8.b-4.b OT Ca|| Ze|ºº (O2c, ........................ 999.99
1O-10b/8.b-b.O OT (O2c, ...................................... 699.99
18-200/8.b-O.8 OT Aºp|e||:a| (O2c, ...................... 549.99
18-2b0/8.b-O.8 OT (O2c, ...................................... 649.99
24-/0/2.8 Ca|| Ze|ºº (//c, ................................. 1,999.99
/0-200/2.8 û AP0 (//c, .................................... 1,999.99
/0-800/4.b-b.O û (O2c, ........................................ 999.99
/b-800/4.b-b.O (bbc, ........................................... 249.99
1.4/ Te|e:c|.e||e| ................................................. 549.99
2/ Te|e:c|.e||e| .................................................... 549.99
Alpha NEX-5R ||||c||eºº S]º|er Care|a
º |aº| H]o||d Au|c|c:uº
º 8.0" T|||-ao|e Tcu:|º:|ee| |CO
º Uºeº Sc|] E-rcu|| |e|ºeº
º |||u|||.e |||e||a:e W||| Cc|||c| O|a|
º |u|| 1080 HO O0p/O0|/24p V|dec
º SO/SOHC/SO/C & |S P|c Ouc/
Hû-Ouc Ca|d S|c| º w|-|| S|a|||¸
º P|a]|erc||eº Care|a a|d |co||e Appº
º |cW ||¸|| Pe||c|ra|:e up |c |S0 2bO00
º A.a||ao|e || B|a:| c| S||.e|
with 16-50mm Lens .......................... #SONEX5RL*
with 18-55mm Lens ..........................#SONEX5RK* 16
Mega
Pixels
Alpha NEX-6 ||||c||eºº S]º|er Care|a
º |aº| H]o||d A| W|||
P|aºe-Oe|e:||c| A|
º 8.0" |CO
º Uºeº Sc|] E-rcu|| |e|ºeº
º /ûA 0|EO T|u-|||de| EV|
º Cap|u|eº 1080 HO V|dec
º SO/SOHC/SO/C & |S P|c Ouc/
P|c Hû-Ouc Ca|d S|c|
º w|-|| Capao|e
º |aº| 10|pº Bu|º| S|cc|||¸
º P|a]|erc||eº Care|a Appº
with 16-50mm Lens .............................#SONEX6L* 16
Mega
Pixels
Alpha SLT-A99 DSLR
º Sc|] Oua| A| S]º|er & T|a|º|u:e|| ||||c|
º |u||-||are E/rc| C|0S Se|ºc|
º /ûA 0|EO E|e:||c||: V|
º 8.0" T|uB|a:| T|||||¸ |CO
º Uºeº Sc|] A|p|a |e|ºeº
º |S P|c Ouc/Hû-Ouc &
SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º |||e||a| S|ead]S|c| |ra¸e
S|ao|||/a||c| º |u|| HO
1920/1080 O0p V|dec Re:c|d||¸
Body Only.........................................#SOSLTA99V* 24
Mega
Pixels
Lumix DMC-GH3 ||||c||eºº S]º|er Care|a
º |a¸|eº|ur A||c],
wea||e|-Sea|ed Bcd]
º |u|| HO 1080p V|dec a| O0|pº
º 8.0" ||ee-A|¸|e |CO
º ||:|c |cu| T|||dº S]º|er
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º ||.e V|eW |||de|
º 20|pº Cc||||ucuº S|cc|||¸
º |u||-A|ea Au|c |c:uº S]º|er, P||pc||| A|
º Bu|||-|| w|-|| |c |||| |c Sra|| Oe.|:eº
Body Only........................................... #PADMCGH3B 16
Mega
Pixels
E-P5 PEN ||||c||eºº S]º|er Care|a
º 8.0" T||| Tcu:|º:|ee| |CO
º T|ueP|: V| |ra¸e P|c:eººc|
º ||:|c |cu| T|||dº
(2/ C|cp |a:|c|,
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º |u|| HO 1080p V|dec ||
|0V & AV| |c|ra|º
º Bu|||-|| w|-|| Cc||e:||.||]
º b A/|º |ra¸e S|ao|||/a||c| W||| |S Au|c
º A.a||ao|e || B|a:|, S||.e| c| w|||e
#OLEP5* 16
Mega
Pixels

When in New York,
Visit our SuperStore
420 Ninth Ave.
Corner of 34th Street
New York, N.Y. 10001
Over 70,000 square feet
of the latest gear
The most knowledgeable
Sales Professionals
Hands-on demos
Convenient free parking
available
The Professional’s Sourceª
Su ubsccrib be to o ou ur
fre ee C Cataalog g
BandH.com/catalog
212-444-6633
www.BandH.com
EOS-1Dx DSLR
º Oua| O|û|C b+ |ra¸e P|c:eººc|º
º |a¸|eº|ur A||c] Bcd]
º E]e-|e.e| Pe||ap||ºr V|eW|||de|
º 8.2" |CO |c|||c|
º Uºeº Ca|c| E| |e|ºeº
º Oua| C| :a|d º|c|º
º 1920 / 1080 HO V|dec Cap|u|e
º ||.e V|eW S|||| a|d V|dec Re:c|d||¸
º G1-Pc||| H|¸| Oe|º||] Au|c |c:uº
Body Only............................ #CAE1DX* ........................................ 18
Mega
Pixels
EOS Flash System (USA)
2/0E/ || .......................................................................
820E/ ..........................................................................
480E/ || .......................................................................
G00E/-RT.....................................................................
|R-14E/ R||¸||¸|| ........................................................
|T-24E/ TW|| ||aº| ......................................................
EF-S Lenses for Digital Only (USA)
(\c| :crpa||o|e W||| |u|| ||are :are|aº,
G0/2.8 US| |a:|c (b2c, ...............................................
10-22/8.b-4.b US| (//c, .............................................
1b-8b/8.b-b.G |S US| (/2c, .........................................
1/-bb/2.8 |S US| (G/c, ................................................
1/-8b/4-b.G |S US| (G/c, ............................................
18-bb/8.b-b.G |S (b8c, .................................................
18-18b/8.b-b.G |S (G/c, ...............................................
18-200/8.b-b.G |S (/2c, ...............................................
bb-2b0/4.0-b.G |S US| (b8c, .......................................
TS-E MF Lenses (USA)
1//4.0 | .......................................................................
24/8.b | || ....................................................................
4b/2.8 .........................................................................
90/2.8 .........................................................................
EF Lenses (USA)
20/2.8 US| (/2c, .........................................................
24/2.8 |S US| (b8c, .....................................................
28/1.8 US| (b8c, .........................................................
28/2.8 |S US| (b8c, .....................................................
8b/2 (b2c, ....................................................................
8b/2 |S US| (G/c, ........................................................
40/2.8 ST| Pa|:a|e (b2c,............................................
b0/1.8 || (b2c, ..............................................................
b0/2.b |a:|c (b2c,.......................................................
b0/1.4 US| (b8c, .........................................................
|P-E Gb/2.8 1/-b/ |a:|c (b8c, ....................................
8b/1.8 US| (b8c, .........................................................
100/2 US| (b8c, ..........................................................
100/2.8 US| |a:|c (b8c, .............................................
28-18b/8.b-b.G |S US| (/2c, .......................................
/0-800/4-b.G |S US| (b8c, ..........................................
/0-800/4.b-b.G O0 |S US| (b8c, ..................................
/b-800/4.0-b.G ||| (b8c, ................................................
/b-800/4.0-b.G ||| US| (b8c, ........................................
EF “L” Lenses (USA)
14/2.8 US| || ...............................................................
24/1.4 || (//c, ..............................................................
8b/1.4 US| (/2c, .........................................................
b0/1.2 US| (/2c, .........................................................
8b/1.2 US| || (/2c, ......................................................
EF “L” Lenses (USA)
100/2.8 |S US| |a:|c (G/c, .........................................
18b/2.0 US| (/2c, .......................................................
180/8.b US| |a:|c (/2c, .............................................
200/2.8 US| || (/2c, ....................................................
200/2.0 |S US| (b2c, ...................................................
800/4.0 |S US| (//c, ...................................................
800/2.8 |S US| || (b2c |ea|, ..........................................
400/b.G US| (//c, .......................................................
400/2.8 |S || (b2c |ea|, ..................................................
b00/4 |S US| || (b2c |ea|, .............................................
G00/4.0 |S || (b2c |ea|, ..................................................
8-1b/4.0 ||º|-e]e US| .................................................
1G-8b/2.8 US| || (82c, .................................................
1/-40/4.0 US| (//c, ...................................................
24-/0/4.0 |S US| (//c, ................................................
24-/0/2.8 || US| (82c, .................................................
24-10b/4 |S US| (//c, .................................................
28-800/8.b-b.G |S US| (//c, .......................................
/0-200/4.0 US| (G/c, .................................................
/0-200/4.0 |S US| (//c, ..............................................
/0-200/2.8 US| (//c, .................................................
/0-200/2.8 |S || US| (//c, ...........................................
/0-800/4.0-b.G |S US| (G/c, .......................................
100-400/4.b-b.G |S US| (//c, .....................................
1.4/ ||| Te|e:c|.e||e| .....................................................
2/ ||| Te|e:c|.e||e| ........................................................
SLR Lenses and Flashes
EOS-6D DSLR
º |u||-||are C|0S Se|ºc| º 8.0" |CO
º O|û|C b+ |ra¸e P|c:eººc|
º Uºeº Ca|c| E| |e|ºeº
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º Bu|||-|| w|-|| a|d ûPS Cc||e:||.||]
º |u|| HO 1080p W||| |a|ua| Cc|||c|º
º E/|e|ded |S0 Ra|¸e c| b0-102400
º Up |c 4.b |u|| Reºc|u||c| |PS
º Bu|||-|| HOR a|d |u|||p|e E/pcºu|e |cdeº
Body Only............................ #CAE6D ...........................................
Kit with 24-105mm f/4 L ...... #CAE6D24105 ................................. 20
Mega
Pixels
18
Mega
Pixels
EOS-60D DSLR
º 1920 / 1080 HO V|dec Cap|u|e
º O|û|C 4 |ra¸e P|c:eººc|
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º wc||º W||| a|| Ca|c| E| & E|-S
|e|ºeº º Va||-A|¸|e C|ea|
V|eW 8.0" |||p-0u| |CO
º HO|| 0u|pu| |c HOTV
º b.8 |pº Cc||||ucuº S|cc|||¸
º |S0 G400 - E/pa|dao|e |c 12800
Body Only............................ #CAE60D ................... $200 Rebate
Kit with 18-135mm IS .......... #CAE60D18135 ......... $200 Rebate
Kit with 18-200mm IS ......... #CAE60D18200 ......... $200 Rebate
EOS-5D Mark III DSLR
º 8.2" C|ea| V|eW H|¸| Reºc|u||c| |CO
º O|û|C b+ |ra¸e P|c:eººc|
º G1-Pc||| H|¸| Oe|º||] A|
º Uºeº Ca|c| E| |e|ºeº
º Oua| C|, SO Ca|d S|c|º
º |u|| HO 1080/80p a|d
/20/G0p |c|ra|º
º E/|e|ded |S0 Ra|¸e (b0-102400,
º Bu|||-|| HOR & |u|||p|e E/pcºu|e |cdeº
Body Only............................................ #CAE5D3* ..............................
Kit with 24-105mm L IS ....................... #CAE5D324105 ......................
5D Mark II Kit w/24-105mm L IS .. #CAE5D224105 ...................... 22
Mega
Pixels
EOS-7D DSLR
º Re:c|d HO V|dec º 8" |CO
º Uºeº Ca|c| E| |e|ºeº
º C| Ca|d S|c|
º Ouº| a|d wea||e| Reº|º|a||
º Se|e:|ao|e V|dec E/pcºu|e
a|d ||are Ra|eº
º |S0 100-G400 (e/pa|dao|e |c
12800, º 8 |pº Bu|º| |cde
º 19-Pc|||, A|| C|cºº-T]pe A| S]º|er
Body Only............................ #CAE7D ...........................................
Kit with 18-135mm IS .......... #CAE7D18135 ..................................
Kit with 28-135mm IS .......... #CAE7D28135.................................. 18
Mega
Pixels
Digital Rebel T5i DSLR
º 8.0" Va||-A|¸|e Tcu:|º:|ee| |CO
º Uºeº Ca|c| E| |e|ºeº (1.G/ |a:|c|,
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º ST| |e|º Suppc|| |c|
0u|e| A| || |c.|eº
º |u|| HO 1080 V|dec
W||| Cc||||ucuº A|
º |S0 100-12800, E/pa|dao|e |c 2bG00
Body Only............................ #CAEDRT5I.......................................
Kit with 18-55mm IS STM .... #CAEDRT5IK .................$50 Rebate
T3 Kit with 18-55mm IS ... #CAEDRT3K .....................................
T3i Kit with 18-55mm IS .. #CAEDRT3IK .................................... 18
Mega
Pixels
Expires 8-3-13
600 EX-RT
S|ce-|cu|| ||aº|
º Ouº| a|d Wa|e| |eº|º|a|:e
º ûu|de \c. 19/'
º w||e|eºº Rad|c
|u|||p|e ||aº|
S]º|er
º Bcu|:e a|d
SW|.e| Head
º Zccr Head (20-200rr,
º 18 Cuº|cr |u|:||c|º
º we|¸||. 1b c/
10-22mm f/3.5-4.5
EF-S USM O|¸||a| |e|º
t%FTJHOFEFYDMVTJWFMZGPS%JHJUBM4-3T
º 8brr e(u|.a|e||. 1G-8brr
º |||. |c:uº. 9.b"
º 8 aºp|e||:a|
|e|º e|ere||º
º 8.b-2/ |/S|cp
Ra|¸e
º //rr |||e|
d|are|e|
º we|¸||. 18.G c/
70-200mm f/2.8
EF “L” IS II USM
Te|ep|c|c-Zccr |e|º
º |rp|c.ed 0p||:a|
|ra¸e S|ao|||/a||c|
p|c.|deº up |c
4 º|cpº :c||e:||c|
º |||. |c:uº. 8.9'
º Ouº| & rc|º|u|e |eº|º|a||
º //rr |||e| d|are|e|
º we|¸||. b2.bG c/
24-70mm f/2.8
EF “L” II USM Zccr |e|º
º H|¸||] Reº|º|a|| |c Ouº| a|d wa|e|
º 9-B|ade O|ap||a¸r
º UO E|ere||
º ||uc|||e Cca|||¸
Redu:eº |||¸e|p||||º
º 2.8-22 |/S|cp Ra|¸e
º |c:uº 1.2b' |c ||||||]
º 82rr |||e| d|are|e|
º we|¸|| 1.// |o
$
5
0
R
E
B
A
T
E
!
Expires 8-3-13
$
2
0
0
R
E
B
A
T
E
!

The Professional’s Source™
Store & Mail Order Hours:
Sunday 10-5 t Mon.-Thurs. 9-7
Friday 9-1 EST/9-2 DST
Saturday Closed
092013
Over 300,000 products,
at your leisure
www.BandH.com
We Buy, Sell and Trade
Us Used ed EEqu qu q ip ippme ment nt
800-947-9953
212-444-6653
Fax:
212-239-7770
When in New York,
Visit our SuperStore
420 Ninth Ave.
Corner of 34th Street
New York, N.Y. 10001
September 5-6 ......... Closed
September 13 ........... Closed
September 19-27 ..... Closed
D4 DSLR
º RAw, T|||, JPEû, RAw+JPEû |||eº
º |/-|c|ra| (|u||-||are, C|0S Se|ºc|
º 1080p HO B|cad:aº| 0ua|||] V|dec
º E/PEEO8 |ra¸e P|c:eººc|
º 8.2" |CO S:|ee| W||| ||.e V|eW
º Ccrpa||o|e W||| |cº| \|||c| 0p||:º
º |a|||/, Ce||e|-we|¸||ed,
Spc| |e|e|||¸ º 100-12800 |S0
º C| T]pe 1 & /0O Ccrpa||o|e
º \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Body Only...................... #NID4 .................. 5,996.95 16
Mega
Pixels
SLR Lenses and Flashes Instant Savings! Expire 7-27-13
AF Flashes
SB-400 .................................................... .....................
SB-/00 .........................................326.95 ........... $30
[A]
SB-910 .........................................546.95 ........... $50
[B]
R1 w||e|eºº TW|| ||aº| .............................. .....................
R1C1 w||e|eºº TW|| ||aº| S]º|er .............. .....................
DX ED-IF Lenses for Digital Only
10.b/2.8 ||º|-E]e ..................................... .....................
8b/1.8 û A|-S (b2c, ......................196.95 .....................
40/2.8 û A|-S ||:|c (b2c, .............276.95 .....................
8b/8.b û EO VR ||:|c (b2c, ...........526.95 ......... $100
[C]
10-24/8.b-4.b û A|-S (//c, ...................... .....................
12-24/4 û A|-S (//c, ............................... .....................
1O-8b/8.b-b.O û A|-S VR (O/c, ................. .....................
1/-bb/2.8 û A|-S (//c, ............................ .....................
18-bb/8.b-b.O û A|-S || (b2c, ................... .....................
18-bb/8.b-b.O û A|-S VR (b2c, ......196.95 .....................
18-10b/8.b-b.O û A|-S VR (O/c, ....396.95 ......... $100
[D]
18-200/8.b-b.O û A|-S VR || (/2c, .846.95 ......... $250
[E]
18-800/8.b-b.O û A|-S EO VR (//c, ..996.95 .....................
bb-200/4-b.O û A|-S (b2c, ....................... .....................
bb-200/4-b.O û A|-S VR (b2c, .......246.95 ......... $100
[F]
bb-800/4.b-b.O û A|-S VR (b8c, ....396.95 ......... $150
[G]
D-Type AF Lenses
14/2.8 O EO ............................................. .....................
1O/2.8 O (89c, W||| Hccd .......................... .....................
20/2.8 O (O2c,.......................................... .....................
24/2.8 O (b2c,.......................................... .....................
24/1.4 û A|-S EO (//c, ............................ .....................
24/8.b O EO PC-E (//c, ............................ .....................
28/1.8 û A|-S (O/c, ......................696.95 .....................
28/2.8 O (b2c,.......................................... .....................
8b/2.0 O (b2c,.......................................... .....................
8b/1.4 û A|-S EO (O/c, ............................ .....................
4b/2.8 O EO PC-E ||:|c (//c, ................... .....................
b0/1.8 O (b2c,.......................................... .....................
b0/1.8 û A|-S (b8c, ......................216.95 .....................
b0/1.4 O (b2c,.......................................... .....................
b0/1.4 û A|-S (b8c, ................................. .....................
O0/2.8 O ||:|c (O2c, (1.1, ........................ .....................
O0/2.8 û A|-S EO ||:|c (O2c, ................... .....................
8b/1.8 O (O2c, W||| Hccd .......................... .....................
8b/1.8 û A|-S (O/c, ......................496.95 .....................
8b/1.4 O || (//c, ...................................... .....................
8b/1.4 û A|-S (//c, ................................. .....................
8b/2.8 PC-E ||:|c (//c, ........................... .....................
10b/2.8 û A|-S EO-|| VR ||:|c (O2c, ........ .....................
10b/2.0 OC O W||| Hccd (/2c, .................. .....................
180/2.8 O EO-|| (/2c,............................... .....................
D-Type AF Lenses
200/4 O EO-|| ||:|c W||| Caºe (O2c, ......... .....................
200/2 û A|-S EO-|| VR || (b2c, .................. .....................
800/4.0 O A|-S EO-|| (//c, ...................... .....................
800/2.8 û A|-S VR (b2c-R, ....................... .....................
400/2.8 û A|-S VR EO (b2c,...................... .....................
b00/4.0 û A|-S VR EO (b2c,...................... .....................
14-24/2.8 û A|-S EO-|| ..............1,996.95 .....................
1O-8b/4.0 û A|-S EO VR (//c, ....1,256.95 .....................
1/-8b/2.8 O A|-S EO-|| (//c, ................... .....................
18-8b/8.b-4.b A|-S û EO (//c, ......746.95 .....................
24-/0/2.8 û A|-S EO-|| (//c, .....1,886.95 .....................
24-8b/2.8-4.0 O || (/2c, .......................... .....................
24-8b/8.b-4.b û A|-S EO VR (/2c, .596.95 ......
*
$100
[H]
24-120/4.0 û A|-S EO VR (//c, ..1,296.95 .....................
28-800/8.b-b.O û A|-S EO VR (//c, ...1,046.95 .......... $150
[I]
/0-200/4.0 û A|-S EO VR (O/c, .......1,396.95 .....................
/0-200/2.8 û A|-S EO-|| VR || (//c, .2,396.95 .....................
/0-800/4.0-b.O û (O2c, ............................ .....................
/0-800/4.b-b.O û-A|S VR (O/c, .....586.95 ......... $200
[J]
80-200/2.8 O W||| Cc||a| (//c, .................. .....................
80-400/4.b-b.O O VR (//c, ....................... .....................
200-400/4 û A|-S EO VR || (b2c, ............... .....................
TC-14E || (1.4/, Te|e:c|.e||e| .................... .....................
TC-1/E || (1.//, Te|e:c|.e||e| .................... .....................
TC-20E ||| (2/, Te|e:c|.e||e| ...................... .....................
Price Savings Price Savings Price Savings
1 J3 ||||c||eºº O|¸||a| Care|a
º E/PEEO 8A |ra¸e P|c:eººc| º 8.0" |CO
º |||e|:|a|¸eao|e 1 \|||0R |e|º S]º|er
º |c||c| S|apº|c| a|d ||.e |ra¸e Cc|||c|
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º |u|| HO 1920 / 1080/O0| V|dec
º S|ru||a|ecuº HO |c.|e a|d S|||| Cap|u|e
º 1b|pº Cc||||ucuº S|cc|||¸ W||| Au|c|c:uº
º \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Available in Black, Beige, Red or White Price Rebate Final Cost
||| W||| 10-80rr VR #NI1J31030* ............................. b9O.9b ..... $50 ........ 546.95
||| W||| 10-80 & 80-110rr VR #NI1J32LK* ................84O.9b .... $150 ....... 696.95
||| W||| 10-100rr VR #NI1J310100* ....................... 1,04O.9b .... $200 .......846.95
14
Mega
Pixels
P
r
o
m
o
t
i
o
n
!
Valid Through
7-27-13
D600 DSLR
º |/-|c|ra| (|u||-||are, C|0S Se|ºc|
º Uºeº \||c| A| |e|ºeº
º 8.2" |CO º E/PEEO 8 P|c:eººc|
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º 1080p HO V|dec Cap|u|e
º b.b |pº Cc||||ucuº S|cc|||¸
º 89 w|de-A|ea A| |c:uº Pc|||º
º 100-O400 |S0, E/pa|dao|e |c b0-2bO00
º \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Price Rebate Final Cost
Bcd] 0||] #NID600 ..................................................2,09O.9b .... $100 ....1,996.95
||| W||| 24-8brr VR |e|º #NID6002485 ................2,O9O.9b .... $300 ....2,396.95
24
Mega
Pixels
P
r
o
m
o
t
i
o
n
!
Valid through 7-27-13
D7100 DSLR
º |a¸|eº|ur A||c] Bcd]
º |c|º|u|e Reº|º|a||
º E/PEEO 8 |ra¸e P|c:eººc|
º 1080p |u|| HO V|dec Cap|u|e
º A::ep|º \||c| A| |e|ºeº
(1.b/ |a:|c|, º 8.2" |CO
º Oua| SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|º
º Bu|||-|| ||aº| W||| Ccrra|de| |u|:||c|
º \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Price Rebate Final Cost
Bcd] 0||] #NID7100 .............................................. 1,199.9b .......— ................... —
||| W||| 18-10brr VR #NID710018105 .................1,b99.9b .... $100 ....... 1,499.95
D7000 ||| W||| 18-10brr VR #NID700018105 ..1,299.9b .... $200 ....... 1,099.95
P
r
o
m
o
t
i
o
n
!
Valid Through 7-27-13
24
Mega
Pixels
D5200 DSLR
º E/PEEO ||| |ra¸e P|c:eººc|
º |u|| HO V|dec W||| |u||-T|re Se|.c A|
º 8.0" Va||-A|¸|e |CO º ||.e V|eW
º Uºeº \||c| A| |e|ºeº (1.b/ |a:|c|,
º SO/SOHC/SO/C Ca|d S|c|
º 89-Pc||| A| S]º|er W||| 9 C|cºº-T]pe
º b|pº Cc||||ucuº S|cc|||¸ Ra|e
º \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
D5200 is available in Black, Bronze or Red Price Rebate Final Cost
D5200 ||| W||| 18-bbrr VR #NID52001855* .......... 89O.9b .... $100 ....... 796.95
D3200 ||| B|a:| W/18-bbrr VR #NID32001855* ....O9O.9b .... $150 ....... 546.95
D3100 ||| W||| 18-bbrr VR #NID31001855 ............b4O.9b .... $100 .......446.95
24
Mega
Pixels
Valid Through 7-27-13
P
r
o
m
o
t
i
o
n
!
D800 DSLR
º 8b.9/24rr C|0S |/ |c|ra| Se|ºc|
º 8.2" |CO |c|||c|
º \||c| | |cu|| |e|º |cu||
º C| & SO Oua| Ca|d S|c|º
º 0p||:a| |cW-Paºº ||||e|
º E]e-|e.e| Pe||ap||ºr V|eW|||de|
º 1920 / 1080/80/2b/24p HO
V|dec Cap|u|e º |a|||//Ce||e|-
we|¸||ed/Spc| |e|e|||¸
º \||c| ||:. ||r||ed Wa||a||] ||:|uded
Price Rebate Final Cost
Bcd] 0||] #NID800 ......... 2,99O.9b ..... $200 .... $2,796.95 36
Mega
Pixels
P
r
o
m
o
t
i
o
n
!
Valid Through 7-27-13

Instant
Savings
on
Combo
Kits
(Expire 7-27-13)
Flash/Lens Price Savings Final
Buy Flash [A c| B| with O8100, O8200, Ob100,
Ob200, O/000, O/100, O90, O800º,
OO00, O800, O800E, O8/ c| O4 DSLR
[A] SB-/00 $82O.9b $30 $296.95
[B] SB-910 $b4O.9b $50 $496.95
Buy Lens [C,E,|, c| û| with O8100, O8200,
Ob100, Ob200, O/000, O/100, O90, O800º,
OO00, O800, O800E, O8/ c| O4 DSLR
[C] DX 8b/8.b û EO VR ||:|c $b2O.9b $100 $426.95
[E] DX 18-200/8.b-b.O û A|-S VR || $84O.9b $250 $596.95
[F] DX bb-200/4-b.O û A|-S VR $24O.9b $100 $146.95
[G] DX bb-800/4.b-b.O û A|-S VR $89O.9b $150 $246.95
Buy Lens [O| with O/100 DSLR [D] DX 18-10b/8.b-b.O û A|-S VR $89O.9b $100 $296.95
Buy Lens [H, | c| J| with O8100, O8200, Ob100,
Ob200, O/000, O/100, O90, O800º,
OO00, O800, O800E, O8/ c| O4 DSLR
[H] 24-8b/8.b-4.b û A|-S EO VR * $b9O.9b $100 $496.95
[I] 28-800/8.b-b.O û A|-S EO VR $1,04O.9b $150 $896.95
[J] /0-800/4.b-b.O û-A|S VR $b8O.9b $200 $386.95
* Special! Receive an additional $100 in savings when purchased with a D600 body.

When in New York,
Visit our SuperStore
420 Ninth Ave.
Corner of 34th Street
New York, N.Y. 10001
Over 70,000 square feet
of the latest gear
The most knowledgeable
Sales Professionals
Hands-on demos
Convenient free parking
available
The Professional’s Source™
Su ubsccrib be to o ou ur
fre ee C Cataalog g
BandH.com/catalog
212-444-6633
www.BandH.com
AF LENSES
Di |c| oc|| d|¸||a| a|d ||r S|R :are|aº º Di-II |c| O|¸||a| S|Rº 0||] º Di III for mirror-less cameras Only
C = Canon N = Nikon P = Pentax SM = Sony/Minolta SE = Sony E Mount ** Price After Rebate Expires 9-30-13
SKU # Available for Rebate Price
Di-II 60mm f/2.0 LD IF Macro (55ø) #TA602DI* C, N, SM — 524.00
Di 90mm f/2.8 Macro (55ø) #TA9028M* C, N, P, SM — 499.00
Di 90mm f/2.8 SP Macro USD (58ø) #TA9028VC* C, N, SM $100 649.00**
Di 180mm f/3.5 LD IF Macro (72ø) #TA18035* C, N, SM — 739.00
Di-II 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 (77ø) #TA102435* C, N, P, SM $50 449.00**
Di-II 17-50mm f/2.8 XR LD IF Aspherical (67ø) #TA175028* C, N, P, SM — 499.00
Di-II 17-50mm f/2.8 XR VC LD IF Asph. (67ø) #TA175028*Q C, N $50 599.00**
Di-II 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 (62 ø) #TA1820035* C, N, P, SM $20 179.00**
Di-III 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 VC (62 ø) Black or Silver #TA1820035S* SE — 739.00
Di-II 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 VC PZD (62 ø) #TA18270* C, N, SM $30 419.00**
Di 24-70mm f/2.8 VC USD (82ø) #TA247028* C, N, SM $100 1,199.00**
Di 28-75mm f/2.8 XR (67ø) #TA287528* C, N, P, SM — 499.00
Di 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 XR LD (62ø) #TA2830035XD* C, P, SM — 419.00
Di 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 XR VC (62ø) #TA2830035* C, N — 629.00
Di 70-200mm f/2.8 SP VC USD (77ø) #TA7020028* C, N, SM $100 1,399.00**
Di 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 VC USD (62ø) #TA70300* C, N, SM $100 349.00**
Di 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 LD (62ø) #TA753004* C, N, SM — 164.00
Di 200-500mm f/5-6.3 LD IF (86Cø) #TA2005005* C, N, SM — 949.00
1.4x SP AF Pro Teleconverter #TA14XP* C, N — 224.00
2x SP AF Pro Teleconverter #TA2XP* C, N — 254.00
AF LENSES & FLASHES
DC - |c| O|¸||a| S|Rº 0||] º DG – Optimized for Digital SLRs
H – HSM Model with Canon, Nikon, Sigma
R – Rear Slip-in Gelatin Filter Slot
Canon Nikon Pentax Sigma Sony Rebate Price
DC 4.5mm f/2.8 EX Circular Fisheye HSM
R
#SI4528EXDCC #SI4528EXDCN #SI4528EXDCP #SI4528EXDCSI #SI4528EXDSO $100 799.00**
DG 8mm f/3.5 EX Circular Fisheye
R
#SI835CA #SI835NA — #SI835SI #SI835SO $100 799.00**
DC 10mm f/2.8 EX Fisheye HSM
R
#SI1028EXDCC #SI1028EXDCN #SI1028EXDCP #SI1028EXDCSI #SI1028EXDCSO — 649.00
DG 15mm f/2.8 EX Diagonal Fisheye
R
#SI1528DGCAF #SI1528DGNAF #SI1528DGPAF #SI1528DGSA #SI1528DGMAF — 609.00
DG 20mm f/1.8 EX DF RF Aspherical (82ø) #SI2018CAF #SI2018NAF #SI2018PAF #SI2018SA #SI2018MAF — 629.00
DG 24mm f/1.8 EX DF Aspherical Macro (77ø) #SI2418MCAF #SI2418MNAF #SI2418MPAF #SI2418MSA #SI2418MMAF — 549.00
DG 28mm f/1.8 EX DF Aspherical Macro (77ø) #SI2818MCAF #SI2818MNAF #SI2818MPAF #SI2818MSA #SI2818MMAF — 449.00
DC 30mm f/1.4 HSM (62ø) #SI3014DCHSMC #SI3014DCHSMN — #SI3014DCHSMS — — 499.00
DG 35mm f/1.4 HSM (67ø) #SI3514C #SI3514N #SI3514P #SI3514SI #SI3514S — 899.00
DG 50mm f/1.4 EX (77ø)
H
#SI5014C #SI5014N #SI5014PE #SI5014SI #SI5014SOM $100 399.00**
DG 50mm f/2.8 EX Macro (55ø) #SI5028MDGCAF #SI5028MDGNAF #SI5028MDGPAF #SI5028MDGSA #SI5028MDGMAF — 369.00
DG 70mm f/2.8 EX Macro (62ø) #SI7028MDGCA #SI7028MDGNA #SI7028MDGPA #SI7028MDGSA #SI7028MDGSAQ $50 449.00**
DG 85mm f/1.4 EX HSM (77ø) #SI8514C #SI8514N #SI8514P #SI8514SI #SI8514S $75 894.00**
DG 105mm f/2.8 EX Macro OS HSM (62ø) #SI10528MDGCE #SI10528MDGNQ — #SI10528MDGS #SI10528MDGSM $200 769.00**
DG 150mm f/2.8 EX APO Macro OS HSM (72ø) #SI15028AMOC #SI15028AMON — #SI15028AMOSI #SI15028AMOS — 1,099.00
DG 180mm f/2.8 EX APO Macro OS HSM (86ø) #SI18028AMEOC #SI18028AMEON — #SI18028AMEOQ #SI18028AMEOS $150 1,549.00**
DG 300mm f/2.8 APO EX HSM (46ø Rear) #SI30028DGCAF #SI30028DGNAF #SI30028DGPAF #SI30028DGSA #SI30028DGMAF — 3,399.00
DG 500mm f/4.5 APO EX HSM (46ø Rear) #SI50045DGCAF #SI50045DGNAF #SI50045DGPAF #SI50045DGSA — — 4,999.00
DC 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 HSM #SI8164556CA #SI8164556NI #SI8164556PE #SI8164556SI #SI8164556SO $50 649.00**
DC 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX HSM (77ø) #SI102045DCAF #SI102045DNAF #SI102045DPAF #SI102045DSA #SI102045DMAF $50 429.00**
DC 10-20mm f/3.5 EX HSM (82ø) #SI102035C #SI102035SN #SI102035P #SI102035SG #SI102035S — 649.00
DG 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 EX Aspherical HSM II #SI122445C #SI122445N #SI122445P #SI122445SI #SI122445S $100 849.00**
DC 17-50mm f/2.8 EX OS HSM (77ø) #SI175028CA #SI175028NI #SI175028PE #SI175028SI #SI175028SO $75 594.00**
DC 17-70mm f/2.8-4.0 OS Macro HSM TSC (72ø) #SI1770284DCC #SI1770284DCN #SI1770284DCP #SI1770284SI #SI1770284DCS — 499.00
DC 18-35mm f/1.8 HSM (72ø) #SI183518DCC #SI183518DCN #SI183518DCP #SI183518DCS #SI183518DCSO — 799.00
DC 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 OS II HSM (72ø) #SI1820035CQ #SI1820035NQ #SI1820035P #SI1820035SAQ #SI1820035SQ $150 349.00**
DC 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 OS Macro HSM (62ø) #SI1825035MC #SI1825035MN #SI1825035MP #SI1825035MS #SI1825035MSO $150 399.00**
DG 24-70mm f/2.8 EX IF HSM (82ø) #SI247028C #SI247028NF #SI247028PS #SI247028S #SI247028SM $75 824.00**
DC 50-150mm f/2.8 EX APO OS HSM (77ø) #SI5015028CA #SI5015028NA — #SI5015028SAF — $150 949.00**
DG 50-500mm f/4.5-6.3 APO OS HSM (95ø) #SI505004563C #SI505004563N #SI505004563P #SI505004563 #SI505004563S $150 1,509.00**
DG 70-200mm f/2.8 EX APO OS HSM (77ø) #SI7020028CQ #SI7020028NI #SI7020028P SI7020028SIQ #SI7020028SOQ $150 1,249.00**
DG 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Macro (58ø) #SI703004SCAF #SI70300456N #SI703004PAF #SI703004SA #SI703004MAF $25 144.00**
DG 70-300mm f/4-5.6 APO Macro (58ø) #SI703004DGCA #SI70300456AN #SI703004DGPA #SI703004DGSA #SI703004DGMA — 199.00
DG 70-300mm f/4-5.6 OS (62ø) #SI7030045C #SI7030045N #SI7030045P #SI7030045S — $50 309.00**
DG 120-300mm f/2.8 EX APO OS HSM (105ø) #SI12030028C #SI12030028N — — — — 2,499.00
DG 120-300mm f/2.8 OS HSM (105ø) #SI120300C #SI120300N — #SI120300SIQ — — 3,599.00
DG 120-400mm f/4.5-5.6 APO OS HSM (77ø Rear) #SI120400C #SI120400N #SI120400P #SI120400S #SI120400SQ $100 899.00**
DG 150-500mm f/5-6.3 APO OS HSM (86ø) #SI150500C #SI150500N #SI150500P #SI150500S #SI150500M $100 969.00**
DG 1.4x EX APO Tele-Converter #SI1.4XDGCAF #SI1.4XDGNAF — #SI1.4XDGSA #SI1.4XDGMAF $25 224.00**
DG 2x EX APO Tele-Converter #SI2XDGCAF #SI2XDGNAF — #SI2XDGSA #SI2XDGMAF $50 249.00**
DG EF-610 ST #SIEF610STC #SIEF610STN #SIEF610STP #SIEF610STSI #SIEF610STS $30 135.00**
DG EF-610 Super Flash #SIEF610C #SIEF610N #SIEF610P #SIEF610SI #SIEF610S $30 225.00**
DG EM-140 TTL Ringlight #SIEM140DGC #SIEM140DGN #SIEM140DGP #SIEM140DGS #SIEM140DGM $30 349.00**
28 CS-2 Digital Slave Shoe Mount Flash ................ 139.99
36 AF-5 Digital ..................................................... 129.99
44 AF-1 Digital Shoe Mount Flash .......................... 199.99
52 AF-1 TTL Touchscreen ...................................... 300.00
58 AF-2 TTL Digital Shoe Mount Flash ................... 399.99
45 CL-4 TTL Digital Handle Mount Flash ................ 519.99
45 CL-4 TTL Digital Handle Mount Flash Kit ............ 699.99
76 MZ-5 TTL Digital Handle Mount Flash ............. 1,039.99
Q-flash TRIO ......................................................... 875.00
Q-flash T5D-R ...................................................... 706.00
Q-flash T5D-R with Turbo SC Battery & Charger ... 1,172.00
Q-flash T5D-R with Turbo 3 Battery Kit ................ 1,330.00
Batteries
Battery 1 ............... 224.00
Turbo SC ............... 466.00
Turbo Blade ........... 466.00
Turbo 3 ................. 624.00
E-Flash Flat Panel Kit #SUFP38 ............................... 58.95
PF20XD Digital Slave Shoe Mount Flash ................... 44.95
RD-2000 Shoe Mount Flash .................................... 64.95
DF3000 Digital for Canon, Nikon, Sony ..................... 69.95
PZ-4000 AF TTL Shoe Mount .................................. 69.95
PZ-40x II AF TTL Shoe Mount f/Nikon (Silver) ............ 69.95
PZ-42x AF TTL Shoe Mount for Canon, Nikon ......... 139.00
622 Super Pro TTL Handle Mount Flash ................. 179.95
285HV Professional Auto ......................................... 85.00
Pearstone SB-4 AC Adapter for 285HV #PESB4 ........ 14.95
FLASHES
18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC II
OS HSM Digital Lens
t%FTJHOFEFYDMVTJWFMZ
GPS%JHJUBM4-3T
º |c:uº 1.b'
to Infinity
º |a¸. |a||c.
1.8.8
º /2rr |||e|
diameter
º we|¸||. 1/.8 c/
70-200mm f/2.8 EX APO
OS HSM DG Lens
t%FTJSBCMFGPS
%JHJUBM4-3T
º ||||rur
|c:uº. 4.b9'
º 84-12.8°
angle of view
º //rr |||e|
diameter
º T||pcd :c||a|
º we|¸||. b0.4 c/
17-50mm f/2.8 XR VC
LD-IF Di II Digital Lens
t%FTJHOFEFYDMVTJWFMZ
GPS%JHJUBM4-3T
º |c:uº 11.4"
to Infinity
º |a¸. |a||c.
1.4.8
º /2rr |||e|
diameter
º we|¸||. 1.2b |o
11-16mm f/2.8 Pro DX AT-X II
Wide-Angle Digital Lens
t%FTJHOFEFYDMVTJWFMZ
GPS%JHJUBM4-3T
º wR (wa|e|
Repellent)
coating
º ||||rur
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$$$$$$
20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 200 00000000
Expires 9-25-13
** Price After Rebate
$150
REBATE!
$150
REBATE!
Six-Year Warranty
Manual Focus Lenses
In Stock – Call for Prices
AF LENSES
DX – for Digital SLRs Only FX – Designed for full frame DSLRs ** Price After Rebate Expires 8-31-13
Canon EOS Nikon AF Rebate Price
FX 100mm f/2.8 Pro D Macro (52ø) #TO10028PCAF #TO10028PNAF $30 459.00**
DX 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 ATX Fisheye #TO101735CAF #TO101735NAF $40 629.00**
DX 11-16mm f/2.8 Pro II (77ø) #TO111628PCII #TO111628PNII $40 659.00**
DX 12-24mm f/4.0 Pro II (77ø) #TO12244DXC #TO12244DXN — 449.00
FX 16-28mm f/2.8 Pro #TO1628FXC #TO1628FXN $50 699.00**
FX 17-35mm f/4 Pro (82ø) #TO1735F4FXC #TO1735F4FXN $40 559.00**
$50
REBATE!
$40
REBATE!

The Professional’s Source™
Store & Mail Order Hours:
Sunday 10-5 t Mon.-Thurs. 9-7
Friday 9-1 EST/9-2 DST
Saturday Closed
092013
Over 300,000 products,
at your leisure
www.BandH.com
We Buy, Sell and Trade
Us Used ed EEqu qu q ip ippme ment nt
800-947-9953
212-444-6653
Fax:
212-239-7770
When in New York,
Visit our SuperStore
420 Ninth Ave.
Corner of 34th Street
New York, N.Y. 10001
September 5-6 ......... Closed
September 13 ........... Closed
September 19-27 ..... Closed

55mm 58mm 62mm 67mm 72mm 77mm
UV Haze SC 18.50 24.95 28.99 31.95 34.00 39.99
UV Haze MRC 010M 35.50 31.50 36.30 42.90 49.89 71.75
Circular Polarizer SC 83.95 85.95 83.50 80.00 73.95 99.00
Circular Polarizer MRC 78.00 87.53 82.50 109.99 89.99 119.99
Circular Polarizer Slim 56.95 49.99 68.00 69.99 59.99 80.00
Skylight KR1.5 (1A) 24.50 25.95 31.95 38.95 42.00 53.95
Digital Pro UV MC 41.95 41.95 44.00 — — —
Graduated (N.D. & Colors) 99.95 106.95 99.50 109.50 142.50 152.95
Neutral Density 106 56.00 60.95 97.95 105.95 121.95 137.95
Close-Up Lenses 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 25.95 25.95 31.95 38.95 45.95 53.95

52mm 58mm 67mm 72mm 77mm
UV, Skylight (1B) HMC 16.50 21.50 27.50 29.95 36.20
UV, Skylight (1B) Super HMC 27.89 26.49 33.00 52.95 44.99
Linear Polarizer 16.99 25.00 38.85 36.85 44.90
Circular Polarizer 23.95 29.95 34.95 42.95 38.90
Circular Polarizer HMC 39.95 49.00 55.90 69.00 104.90
“Moose” Warm Circular Polarizer 35.75 39.55 53.90 55.65 91.50
K2 Yel, X0 Yel/Grn, Grn X1, Or G, Red 25A HMC 23.95 28.35 41.95 46.35 60.90
Close Up Set (+1, +2, +4) 39.99 47.35 53.00 63.00 68.00
Close-Up Set HMC (+1, +2, +4) 52.68 64.88 73.00 100.68 145.35
Intensifier – Blue, Green Field, Enhancement (Red) 34.68 39.95 55.08 60.00 71.50
Neutral Density 2x, 4x, 8x HMC 23.88 19.95 36.95 30.99 34.80
Star 6, Star 8 16.89 22.50 43.35 49.90 46.68

Made exclusively with glass from Schott (Zeiss)
the world’s finest optical glass supplier.
55mm 58mm 67mm 72mm 77mm
Skylight (1B), UV 39.99 41.99 62.99 77.99 89.99
Skylight (1B), UV SH-PMC 72.99 78.99 103.99 131.99 157.99
Circular Polarizer, Slim Circular Polarizer 115.99 121.99 151.99 180.99 195.99
Circular Polarizer SH-PMC, Slim Circ. Pol. SH-PMC 161.99 171.99 214.99 242.99 275.99
#5, #8, #11, #13, #15, #22, 81A, 81B, 81C 49.99 51.99 78.99 96.99 108.99
Digital Filter 176.99 180.99 222.99 261.99 301.99
FILTERS
B&H SPECIAL! Buy 3 or more Hoya Filters & Get 10% Off.
B&H SPECIAL! Buy 3 or more
B+W Filters & Get 5% Off.

in stock
PHOTOGRAPHY ACCESSORIES
· Accepts 2 lltblum-lon batterles
to ehectlvely oouble tbe
camera's battery ll|e
(8atterles not lncluoeo)
· Tbe lncluoeo AA battery
boloer allows you to use
6 AA batterles |or aooeo
convenlence (e×cept 8G-N3)
· Alternate sbutter release
button, maln ano sub
commano olals, ano an
AL-L/AF-L button are
provloeo to |acllltate
sbootlng ln a vertlcal
orlentatlon
8ATTLPY
GP|PS
LiteTrek 4.0 (LT) Series
Whether it's fashion, wedding or portrait
photography, the best way to achieve
professional-looking results in the field
is by adding flash to the ambient light.
The Impact Mini LiteTrek Battery Pack
provides DC juice to your Impact
LiteTrek 4.0 portable flash or select
Nikon & Canon flashes with optional
power cords as well as Quantum
flashes without adaptation.
LiteTrek 4.0 DC Monolight
Flash Head #IMLTFH ..$499.95
LiteTrek 4.0 DC Monolight Kits
with Mini LiteTrek Battery Pack
1-Light Kit #IMMLTBK ................... $799.95 Instant Rebate -$150 $649.95
2-Light Kit #IMMLTBK2 .............. $1,049.90 Instant Rebate -$150 $899.90
Mini LiteTrek (LT) Battery #IMMLTB ...................................................................... $199.95
Mini LiteTrek (LT) Battery Pack #IMMLTPBP ....................................................... $399.95
Mini LiteTrek (LT) Pack & Charger Kit with CKE Nikon Cable #IMMLTPBPK1 ... $439.95
Mini LiteTrek (LT) Pack & Charger Kit with CZ Canon Cable #IMMLTPBPK2 ..... $439.95
LiteTrek Accessories
Charger for Mini LiteTrek #IMCBP ...$49.95
IM-CZ Canon Flash Cable #IMCZ.....$42.95
IM-CKE Nikon Flash Cable #IMCKE .$42.95
LiteTrek 4.0 Flash Tube #IMFTFH .....$79.95
Reflector Adapter (Bowens Adapter) #IMBAFH ........................................................... $24.95
lighting equipment and accessories
Instant Savings on LiteTrek 4.0
Monolight Kits (Expires 7-31-13)
|or Canon 5D Mark ||| ................ 8G-C9 ;vL8GC9 ........ $99.95
|or Canon 5D Mark || ................. 8G-C2 ;vL8GC2 ........ $69.95
|or Canon 7D ................................ 8G-C4 ;vL8GC4 ........ $64.95
|or Canon 60D ............................. 8G-C6 ;vL8GC6 ........ $72.50
|or Canon T4l, T3l, T2l ............... 8G-C5 ;vL8GC5 ........ $72.00
|or Canon T3 ................................ 8G-C7 ;vL8GC7 ........ $69.95
|or Nlkon D7000 .......................... 8G-N4 ;vL8GN4 ....... $69.95
|or Nlkon D5100 .......................... 8G-N6 ;vL8GN6 ....... $59.95
|or Nlkon D3100, D3200 ........... 8G-N9 ;vL8GN9 ....... $64.95
|or Nlkon D, D40×, D60 ** ....... 8G-N3 ;vL8GN3 ....... $49.95
** Note. Tbe 8G-N3 wlll not work wltb non-|P Nlkon mooels.

Digital Essentials Kits
In Stock
DIGITAL HT FILTERS
52mm 58mm 62mm 72mm 77mm
812 Warming 48.95 74.95 99.95 109.95 129.95
Grad ND 0.6 74.95 63.95 82.90 119.95 139.95
Circular Polarizer 74.10 89.95 119.90 129.95 199.99
Ultra Clear 34.95 38.95 45.95 54.95 54.95
Haze 86 38.95 47.95 56.90 64.95 99.95
ND 1.2 41.50 56.95 74.90 109.95 129.95
ND 0.6 48.95 50.95 69.95 99.95 119.95
Soft FX3 56.95 63.95 82.90 119.95 139.95
Star 4 pt 2 64.95 56.95 74.90 109.95 129.95
Ten -Year Warranty
Made in USA
Multicoated Filter
Technology
FILM – B&W AND COLOR
COLOR PRINT
Superia
CA 200 135-24 ..........1.79
CA 200 135-36 ..........2.50
CH 400 135-24 ..........1.99
CZ 800 135-24 ..........2.75
Pro
400H 135-36 .............7.59
400H 120 Roll ............4.99
Gold Max
GC 400 135-24 ..........2.09
GC 400 135-36 ..........2.49
Ektar
100 135-36 ...............4.99
100 120 Roll ..............4.50
Portra
160 135-36 ...............5.99
160 120 Roll ..............5.19
160 220 Roll ............12.99
160 220 PP (5) .........64.95
400 135-36 ...............7.19
400 120 Roll ..............5.39
400 220 Roll ............14.65
400 220 PP (5) .........73.25
800 135-36 ...............9.50
800 120 Roll ..............7.59
COLOR SLIDE
Provia
RDP 100F 135-36 .....7.99
RDP 100F 120 Roll ....5.90
RXP III 400X 135-36 .. 13.65
RXP III 400X 120 Roll ..8.58
Tungsten 64T
RTP II 135-36 ............9.99
Velvia RVP
Pro 50 135-36 ...........9.95
Pro 50 120 Roll ..........6.59
100 135-36 ...............7.99
100 120 Roll ..............6.59
Ektachrome E Series
100 VS 120 Roll .........7.99
PROCESSING MAILERS
Slide 36 Exp. (35mm) .8.49
B&W 35mm .............16.75
B&W 120 Roll ..........16.75
Print C41 35mm ......13.49
Print C41 120 Roll ...15.49
Print C41 220 Roll ...30.95
BLACK & WHITE PRINT
Pan F+ 50 135-36 .....6.29
Pan F+ 50 120 Roll ....4.49
FP4+ 125 135-36 ......5.99
FP4+ 125 120 Roll .....4.25
HP5+ 400 135-36 .....4.75
HP5+ 400 120 Roll ....4.09
Delta Pro
100 135-36 ...............5.69
100 120 Roll ..............4.19
400 135-36 ...............6.19
400 120 Roll ..............4.74
3200 135-36 .............7.49
3200 120 Roll ............5.59
XP-2 Super
400 135-36 ...............5.95
400 120 Roll ..............4.49
Infrared
SFX 3200 135-36 ......7.49
SFX 3200 120 Roll .....7.50
Acros 100 135-36 .....5.69
Acros 100 120 Roll ....3.89
Neopan 400 135-36 ..5.49
Tri-X 400 135-36 ......4.29
Tri-X 400 120 Roll .....4.95
TMX 100 135-36 .......4.95
TMX 100 120 Roll ......4.90
TMY 400 135-36 .......6.95
TMY 400 120 Roll ......4.59
TMZ 3200 135-36 .....7.99
BW 400CN 135-36 ....5.95

gadget bag
to the light. This may negatively impact
the image sharpness and contrast, but
the degree of impact often is dependent
on the type of lens you’re using with the
extender. Images taken with wide-angle
lenses are more adversely impacted
than telephoto lenses—zoom lenses
more than primes. The 2x extenders
often have more noticeable effects than
1.4x extenders.
When you’re
using an extender,
it’s important to
remember that as
you’re multiplying
focal length, you’re
also multiplying the
effect of camera shake.
Some extenders have stabilizers built in,
but using a tripod or monopod support
will help you obtain sharp images.
Nikon offers the standard 1.4x and
2x extenders, as well as a 1.7x length
that increases the focal length of the
lens by 70%. All of Nikon’s extenders
use a Nikon Integrated Coating, which
enhances the light transmission and
reduces flare while improving color
consistency. The 2x extender uses an
aspherical lens element that works to
eliminate the aberrations that occur at
wide apertures. All three extenders
attach to F-bayonet mounts, but it’s
important to check with the Nikon
compatibility chart for lens listings. One
additional Nikon extender is the AF-S
Teleconverter TC800-1.25E ED. This
converter is specifically designed to be
used with the AF-S Nikkor 800mm
ƒ/5.6E FL ED VR lens, extending the
focal length to 1000mm, or 1500mm on
a DX-format DSLR. This extender is
sold with the lens, and isn’t sold
separately. Estimated Street Price:
$549 (AF-S Teleconverter TC-17E II);
$519 (AF-S Teleconverter
TC-14E II); $499 (AF-S
Teleconverter TC-20E II).
www.nikonusa.com
Three extenders are in
the Canon arsenal—the
Extender EF 1.4x III, the
Extender EF 2x III and the
Life-Size Converter EF.
The Extender EF 1.4x III
and 2x III both have a
microcomputer built into the extender to
aid in communication flow between the
lens, extender and body. The placement
of the lens in addition to the lens
optical quality of prime
lenses and to avoid edge
aberrations and vignetting.
They’re best used with prime
telephoto lenses at 100mm or
above (200-500mm is the sweet spot)
and may be used with zooms. The Pro
line includes the typical 1.4x and 2.0x
extenders, but also the more rare 3.0x.
The 3.0x multiplies focal length by three,
turning a 300mm length into 900mm.
Consequently, this reduces the light by
three stops and means the lens must be
manually focused. The Pro 300 line is
compatible with Nikon AF and Canon
EOS (but not Canon Digital Rebel
XT/EOS 350D camera bodies).
Estimated Street Price: $189 (MC7 AF
2.0 DGX); $149 (MC4 AF 1.4 DGX);
$259 (Pro 300 AF DGX 1.4X); $269
(Pro 300 AF DGX 2.0X); $278 (Pro 300
AF DG 3.0X). www.kenkotokinausa.com
Pro-Optic makes standard converters
that are compatible with Canon and
Nikon cameras—a 1.4X and 2X for
Canon and a 2X for Nikon.
Pro-Optic characterizes their
teleconverters as being
specifically designed to be
used with prime lenses of
100mm and longer, and they
allow your camera’s electronics
to communicate with the lenses
(contact Adorama to confirm that your
camera and lens combination will work
properly). The 2X model for Canon
cameras won’t work with EF-S lenses.
Estimated Street Price: $79 (Pro-Optic
Multi-Coated 1.4x Tele-Converter); $99
(Pro-Optic Multi-Coated 2.0X Tele-
Converter). www.adorama.com
Olympus offers the EC-20
2.0X Teleconverter and EC-14
1.4X Teleconverter. Both are
compatible with all ZUIKO
digital lenses. Estimated
Street Price: $479 (EC-20 2.0X
Teleconverter); $439 (EC-14 1.4X
Teleconverter). www.getolympus.com
Tamron also makes inexpensive
extender options. Their 1.4x and 2x
teleconverters are compatible with most
autofocus and auto-exposure cameras.
www.tamron-usa.com OP
(Cont’d from page 86) coating has been designed
to reduce ghosting and flare.
An additional Flourine
coating has been added to
reduce smearing and fingerprints
that may find their way onto the glass.
The body maintains Canon standards
for rugged water-resistant construction.
These converters pair exclusively with
L-series 135mm and over fixed-focal-
length lenses, as well as the EF
70-200mm ƒ/2.8L, EF
70-200mm ƒ/2.8L IS,
EF 70-200mm ƒ/4L and
EF 100-400mm ƒ/4.5-5.6L
zooms. The Life-Size
Converter EF pairs
exclusively with the 50mm
ƒ/2.5 Compact Macro lens
and is specifically used for high
magnification in the 0.26x-1.0x range, or
approximately 1∕4 life-size up to true
life-size. Estimated Street Price: $499
(Extender EF 1.4X III); $499 (Extender
EF 2X III). www.usa.canon.com
While many of the
manufacturers insist that
you stay brand loyal
with each accessory for
optimum results, Sigma
carries 1.4x and 2x
converters with mounts
for several companies,
including Sigma, Canon, Nikon,
Sony/Minolta and Pentax. The converters
have a multilayer coating to reduce flare
and ghosting, and come with a carrying
case. Check the website for a full list
of compatible lenses. Estimated Street
Price: $224 (1.4X Teleconverter EX APO
DG); $249 (2.0X Teleconverter EX
APO DG). www.sigmaphoto.com
Kenko has a myriad of
extenders to choose from. The
MC4 AF 1.4 DGX and MC7 AF
2.0 DGX come standard with
Gate Array IC (Integrated
Circuitry), which integrates
the autofocus system with the
camera. The extender’s
electronic system also
communicates the full EXIF
data from lens to extender to
camera body. High-quality
Hoya glass has a multi-coating
to protect from aberrations.
These extenders are available for
Canon EF lenses (not for EF-S), Nikon
AF and Sony Alpha. Kenko has also
added a Pro 300 line of extenders
designed specifically to match the
MORE On The Web
The Gadget Bag column is available as an archive
in the Gear section of the OP website at www.
outdoorphotographer.com. You’ll find information
and reviews on new and exciting gear, including
cameras, lenses, printers and more!
̈
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: Sigma 2.0X EX APO DG; Pro-Optic 2X for Nikon; Olympus EC-20 2.0X; Kenko Teleplus Pro 300 AF DGX 2.0X; Canon Extender EF 1.4x III
96 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com

The Professional’s Source™
Store & Mail Order Hours:
Sunday 10-5 t Mon.-Thurs. 9-7
Friday 9-1 EST/9-2 DST
Saturday Closed
092013
Over 300,000 products,
at your leisure
www.BandH.com
We Buy, Sell and Trade
Us Used ed EEqu qu q ip ippme ment nt
800-947-9953
212-444-6653
Fax:
212-239-7770
When in New York,
Visit our SuperStore
420 Ninth Ave.
Corner of 34th Street
New York, N.Y. 10001
September 5-6 ......... Closed
September 13 ........... Closed
September 19-27 ..... Closed
LensCoat makes unique, protective covers for camera lenses, bodies, and accessories.
Made from 100% closed-cell neoprene, LensCoat products protect your gear from bumps
and scratches, they keep rain and mist away from sensitive equipment, and they also
insulate your hands from cold equipment.
"We've Got You Covered"
Other Innovations from LensCoat
®
º G/mba/ Pouch º CB G/mba/ Pouch º ManfroIIo 393 G/mba/ Pouch
º RRS PG Pouch º BeamerKeeper º F//IerPouch 2 º F//IerPouch 8
º Trave/CoaI º LensPouches º F/ashKeeper º /Pad S/eeve º LegCoaI Wraps
BodyBag PS (Point & Shoot) 9 colors
BodyBag PS Large Zoom 11 colors
BodyBag Small 9 colors
BodyBag Bridge 11 colors
BodyBag 4/3 11 colors
BodyBag 9 colors
BodyBag with lens 5 colors
BodyBag Telephoto 5 colors
BodyBag Compact 5 colors
Compact with Grip 5 colors
Compact with lens 5 colors
Compact Telephoto 5 colors
BodyBag Pro 5 colors
Pro with Lens 5 colors
Pro Telephoto 5 colors
Lens Covers
º A.a||ao|e W||| a :uº|cr |||
|c| rcº| pcpu|a| |e|ºeº
º C|ea|, ||e/|o|e W||dcW c.e|
||e A|/|S/VR :c|||c|º a|d
||e d|º|a|:e-º:a|e W||dcW.
º Cuº|cr |c|eº ||a| |e.ea|
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ocd] W|||cu| |erc.||¸
||e :c.e|.
º A|ºc a.a||ao|e || W|||e
|c| Ca|c| |e|ºeº
Hoodie Lens Caps
º |||º º|u¸|] a|cu|d ]cu|
|e|º |ccd c| º|ade
º |ea|u|eº a |e|||c|:ed
|erc.ao|e ||c||
p|c|e:||c| d|º:
º A.a||ao|e ||
9 :c|c|º
X-Small ..2.75" to 3.25"
Small ......3.25" to 3.75"
Medium ..3.75" to 4.25"
Large ......4.25" to 4.75"
X-Large ..4.75" to 5.25"
2X-Large ..5.5" to 6.25"
3X-Large .....6.25" to 7"
4X-Large .....7" to 7.75"
LegCoat Wraps (set of 3)
º w|ap a|cu|d ||e uppe| |e¸ c| ]cu| |||pcd
º T|¸|||] ¸||pº |c ]cu| |||pcd
ºc ||e] W||| |c| º||de
BodyBag Series
º |dea| |c| º|c|a¸e c| ||a.e|
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last frame
98 Outdoor Photographer outdoorphotographer.com
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Synchronized Swimming
“Turtles are one of my favorite animals,” says photographer Joaquin Gutierrez Fernandez, who’s
lucky enough to live quite close to one of the many marine habitats on the coast of Tenerife, the
largest of the Canary Islands in Spain. The photographer had spent several diving sessions on this
particular day looking for his favored half-shell subjects, as well as other marine life. But he says
that the water was much murkier than usual, making photography underwater difficult, and adding
to his frustration, he had found no signs of life whatsoever. Suddenly, near the end of his fourth
and final dive, a pair of graceful green sea turtles emerged from the depths, showing incredible
symmetry and poise as they danced for the photographer in this pool of backlit sunlight. Patience
can be rewarded, as slow-moving turtles have often taught us.
Canon EOS 5D Mark II, Canon EF 15mm Ä/2.8 fisheye lens, SUBAL CD5MII underwater housing, Seacam Seaflash strobes

The moment a passion
becomes the love of your life.
This is the moment we work for.
Touit 2.8/12 and Touit 1.8/32
Introducing the new ZEISS Touit lenses—for photographers who are passionate about their image
making. Designed for the Sony NEX and Fujifilm X Series cameras, these luxurious autofocus lenses
deliver the legendary precision and performance of ZEISS optics, for stunning images that go straight
to the heart.
www.zeiss.com/touitfascination
// FASCINATION
MADE BY ZEISS

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