THE STRUCTURE OF THE CONFEDERACY OF 1781 TO PRESENT TIME.

THIS PRESENTATION IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE REIGN OF THE HEAVENS SOCIETY

NORTHWEST ORDINANCE
• FIRST PARAGRAPH: QUOTE: Be it ordained by the United States in Congress assembled, That the said territory, for the purposes of temporary government, be one district, subject, however, to be divided into two districts, as future circumstances may, in the opinion of Congress, make it expedient.

Here are the districts today.
• Outside of Chicago in Cook County, the townships of Cicero, Lake View, Jefferson, and Hyde Park had also received special municipal charters from the state legislature by 1870. In addition, Barrington, Palatine, Winnetka, and Glencoe had received special municipal charters. Des Plaines and Evanston incorporated under the state's general town incorporation act. Note: the special charters were not a part of the original township that still exists today, any kind of special municipal charter usually came from Monarchs.

Districts? Those are townships right?? This is just an example township.
Cicero Township is one of thirty townships in Cook County, Illinois. Township functions are generally attended to by a governing board (the name varies from state to state) and a clerk or trustee. Township officers frequently include justice of the peace, road commissioner, assessor, constable, and surveyor. A civil township is a widely used unit of local government in the United States, subordinate to a county. NOTICE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CIVIL TOWNSHIP AND THERE IS A TOWNSHIP UNDER THE LAW OF NATIONS BECAUSE THE ORIGINAL CONFEDERACY WAS UNDER THE LAW OF NATIONS. TODAY, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS ARE DIRECTLY UNDER THE UNITED NATIONS BECAUSE THE UNITED STATES WAS TRANSFERRED TO THE UNITED NATIONS IN 1945.

Cicero- No residents
• NAME: Cicero COUNTY: Sumner ROADS: 2WD GRID: 4 CLIMATE: Cold in winter, hot in summer BEST TIME TO VISIT: Anytime COMMENTS: No residents. take US 81 4 miles north from Wellington, Ks. turn east on gravel road about 2 1/2 miles. REMAINS: Town hall remains standing to this day, elevator ruins, 1 house The town was founded in the late 1800's. At one time it had 2 wooden grain elevators, a town hall, 3 or 4 houses and a store with a post office in the store. The town hall was used for all social activities such as meetings, dances voting and church services. There was a 1 room school house 1/2 mile west of town. The santa Fe railroad runs through town. The mainstay of Cicero was the shipping of wheat and cattle to market in major cities such as Wichita, Emporia, and Kansas City. The elevators were torn down by the Santa fe for fear of them collapsing on the tracks. the town was deserted shortly after the end of World War 2 when trucks became more readily available to haul crops and livestock directly to market. Submitted by: Larry LeTourneau

TOWN OF CICERO
• • The Town of Cicero is the only incorporated town in Cook County, and one of the oldest and largest municipalities in the State of Illinois. It bears the name of the great Roman statesman of the First Century B.C., Marcus Tullius Cicero. Among the townships created by the County Board in 1849 was a 36 square mile tract bounded by what are today Western, North and Harlem Avenues, and Pershing Road. On June 23, 1857, 14 electors met to organize a local government for the district, which they named "The Town of Cicero." Railroads, immigration and the Civil War contributed to economic growth in the new township, which by 1867 numbered 3,000 residents. In that year, the state legislature incorporated the Town of Cicero as a municipality with a special charter, which was revised in 1869. Township and municipal functions have subsequently been discharged by a single board of elected officials. Cicero’s rapid development in these early days collided with the expanding political power of its neighbor, the City of Chicago. By 1889, Chicago had annexed more than half of the original town. An 1899 referendum ceded the Austin neighborhood to the city and in the following year land containing a race track was transferred to Stickney Township.

TOWN OF CICERO
• On July 21, 1899, Ernest Hemingway, winner of both the Pulitzer and Nobel Prizes, was born within the Town of Cicero, in what is today the Village of Oak Park. In 1901, the three remaining components of the Town-today’s Oak Park, Berwyn and Cicero-voted to separate. The surviving Town of Cicero retained less than six of the 36 square miles carved out in 1849. Immigrants and their families swelled the town’s population, however, and housing construction boomed within its diminished territory. Served by a network of railroads, Cicero attracted many industries in the twentieth century and became the largest manufacturing center in the state after Chicago. The Cicero Flying Field established in 1911 was one of the first airfields in the Midwest. W. Edwards Deming began his pioneering work on management techniques in the 1920s at the Western Electric Hawthorne Works, an industrial colossus which employed more than 40,000 people during World War II and was the dominant business in town for eight decades. From the early townsmen who fought in the Union Army during the Civil War, Ciceronians have proudly served in the armed forces. Their bravery is exemplified by Boatswain’s Mate Joseph P. Steffan, who died aboard the U.S.S. Arizona in the attack on Pearl Harbor, and Capt. Edward C. Krzyzowski, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroism in Korea. Cicero is composed of eight neighborhoods, with their own distinct characteristics and names: Boulevard Manor, Clyde, Drexel, Grant Works, Hawthorne, Morton Park, Parkholme and Warren Park. Three U.S. Presidents-Eisenhower, Reagan and Bush-visited Cicero on their roads to the White House. The Town of Cicero has a colorful history, which forms a part of the larger stories of the county, state and nation.

• • •

DID YOU MISS IT?
• Among the townships created by the County Board in 1849 was a 36 square mile tract bounded by what are today Western, North and Harlem Avenues, and Pershing Road. On June 23, 1857, 14 electors met to organize a local government for the district, which they named "The Town of Cicero." Railroads, immigration and the Civil War contributed to economic growth in the new township, which by 1867 numbered 3,000 residents. In that year, the state legislature incorporated the Town of Cicero as a municipality with a special charter, which was revised in 1869. Township and municipal functions have subsequently been discharged by a single board of elected officials.

NORTHWEST ORDINANCE
• Previous to the organization of the general assembly, the governor shall appoint such magistrates and other civil officers in each county or township, as he shall find necessary for the preservation of the peace and good order in the same: After the general assembly shall be organized, the powers and duties of the magistrates and other civil officers shall be regulated and defined by the said assembly; but all magistrates and other civil officers not herein otherwise directed, shall during the continuance of this temporary government, be appointed by the governor.

NORTHWEST ORDINANCE
• For the prevention of crimes and injuries, the laws to be adopted or made shall have force in all parts of the district, and for the execution of process, criminal and civil, the governor shall make proper divisions thereof; and he shall proceed from time to time as circumstances may require, to lay out the parts of the district in which the Indian titles shall have been extinguished, into counties and townships, subject, however, to such alterations as may thereafter be made by the legislature.

CICERO
• Cicero is the suburb nearest to the center of Chicago. In physical appearance, it look enough like the city that you might think it was just another one of those Community Areas, instead of a separate political entity. • Cicero Township was established in the 1860s, with an original size of 36 square miles. Over the next few decades, the City of Chicago nibbled away at its outer sections, while Oak Park and Berwyn went their own ways. In 1901 the current borders of the Town of Cicero were set in place.

CICERO
• TOWN MAP-SEPARATE POLITICAL ENTITY

NORTHWEST ORDINANCE
• So soon as there shall be five thousand free male inhabitants of full age in the district, upon giving proof thereof to the governor, they shall receive authority, with time and place, to elect a representative from their counties or townships to represent them in the general assembly: Provided, That, for every five hundred free male inhabitants, there shall be one representative, and so on progressively with the number of free male inhabitants shall the right of representation increase, until the number of representatives shall amount to twenty five; after which, the number and proportion of representatives shall be regulated by the legislature: Provided, That no person be eligible or qualified to act as a representative unless he shall have been a citizen of one of the United States three years, and be a resident in the district, or unless he shall have resided in the district three years; and, in either case, shall likewise hold in his own right, in fee simple, two hundred acres of land within the same; Provided, also, That a freehold in fifty acres of land in the district, having been a citizen of one of the states, and being resident in the district, or the like freehold and two years residence in the district, shall be necessary to qualify a man as an elector of a representative. NOTE: THEY DID NOT SAY A CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES, THEY SAID A CITIZEN OF ONE OF THE UNITED STATES.

TWO YEARS IN THE DISTRICT AND THEN A CITIZEN OF THE TOWNSHIP, NOT THE STATE NOR THE UNITED STATES
• TODAY, THE SCHOOL DISTRICTS ARE THE DISTRICTS OF THE NORTHWEST ORDINANCE. THE TOWNSHIPS ARE THE TOWNSHIPS OF THE NORTHWEST ORDINANCE. MOST PEOPLE ARE KEPT IN THE SCHOOL DISTRICTS THEIR WHOLE LIFE AND NEVER REACHING THE AGE OF MAJORITY ON THE DISTRICT RECORDS. THIS MEANS ALL PEOPLE ARE CONSIDERED UNDER THE AGE OF 18, THIS GIVES THE SCHOOL DISTRICT THE ABILITY TO KEEP CREATING BONDS AND OVER TAXING THE PEOPLE FUNDED BY THE PRIVATELY OWNED CENTRAL BANK KNOWN AS THE FEDERAL RESERVE BANK. PRIVATE BANKS OPEN PRIVATE COURTS NOT PUBLIC COURTS. PRIVATE BANKS CANNOT FUND THE BILL OF RIGHTS NOR ENFORCE THE BILL OF RIGHTS. SO YOU NEED A PUBLIC BANK TO FUND A PUBLIC COURT WITHIN THE TOWNSHIP, A SEPARATE POLITICAL ENTITY. AN OATH OR AFFIRMATION AT AGE 21 BONDS THE MAN OR WOMAN TO THE TOWNSHIP, A SEPARATE POLITICAL ENTITY.

THE TOWNSHIPS AND DISTRICTS STILL BELONG TO THE ORIGINAL CONFEDERACY OF 1781
• • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF UTAH’S TRUST LAND STORY • Margaret Bird • 2012

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

History of school trust lands in a nutshell: The concept of granting lands for the support of education is intricately embedded throughout the history of America. In 1781, prior to passage of the U.S. Constitution, the Continental Congress reserved one square mile out of every thirty-six square mile township “for the maintenance of public schools. Beginning in 1850, two square miles were granted to schools, then in 1894 with Utah, Arizona and New Mexico four square miles per township were granted. The lands were granted in trust. In each state constitution, states accepted the responsibilities of trustee, requiring the states to act with undivided loyalty in the best interest of the schools and other institutions that were granted lands. Proceeds from the lands were to be placed in permanent funds, the interest of which only was to support the schools. These lands were not a gift since each state was required to give up the right to tax federal lands in exchange for the lands. Today most legislative and education leaders are left speechless when informed that schools are the beneficiaries of trusts containing 45 million acres (almost the size of Minnesota) and $49 billion3 held in permanent funds for the support of public schools.

THE TOWNSHIPS AND DISTRICTS STILL BELONG TO THE ORIGINAL CONFEDERACY OF 1781
• Fundamental Questions Raised by the Education Community in Utah: • Beginning in the early 1980’s, the State Office of Education researched the management of the school • trust lands and the investment of the permanent funds. They found misused and neglected lands and • raided and poorly invested funds. School children were subsidizing state parks, wildlife, forestry, and • mining and petroleum companies. By the 1990’s education leaders in Utah began to ask: • 1. How can we maximize the impact of this trust for students for the next 100 years? • 2. How can we structure the land management to optimize revenue to our schools? • 3. How can we generate greater returns from our permanent school fund? • 4. How can we build public support for the productive use of school trust lands?

THE TOWNSHIPS AND DISTRICTS STILL BELONG TO THE ORIGINAL CONFEDERACY OF 1781
• A Utah legislative Task Force studied the issues for two years. Under the leadership of Representative Mel Brown, the legislature removed the agency from the Department of Natural Resources and modeled the management after that of corporations. The legislature with the support of the education community expanded the State Treasurer’s ability to develop a long-term investment strategy, including investing in equities as a prudent investor would. They directed all interest and dividends to each public school to be spent on academic programs developed and implemented by the school community council of teachers, parents, and the principal. Local school boards were the gatekeepers with the authority to approve the plans. Now 8,000 people implement incredible academic programs annually in 1,000 public and charter schools, including technology, remediation, accelerated programs, science and computer labs, and other academic plans. Councils are knowledgeable and concerned about the contributions of school trust lands to the education of the children. Councils annually view a DVD about how trust lands make money for schools which has built support for those activities that generate the funds.

THE TOWNSHIPS AND DISTRICTS STILL BELONG TO THE ORIGINAL CONFEDERACY OF 1781
• BEFORE the reform: $83 million in school fund AFTER the reform (June 2011): $1.2 billion in permanent funds • $19 million gross FY1994 from lands $122 million gross in FY2011 Few had heard of school trust lands 75% know school trust lands help schools $ into education pot—no one knew what it did $ to each school—visible & measurable • 1 Act of Continental Congress, May 20, 1785 • 2 Laws of United States of America, 1789-1815, Vol. I, Chapter 32, pages 563-569 • 3 As of June 30, 2011.

PLAN
• 1: INFORM THE PEOPLE THROUGH SEMINARS OF THEIR POSITION AS A STATELESS PERSON. • 2: INFORM THEM OF THE EXISTING TOWNSHIPS OUTSIDE OF THE CORPORATE UNITED STATES AND MUNICIPALITIES. • 3: TEACH THE PEOPLE TO ASSEMBLE, RECLAIM THEIR TOWNSHIP AS AN INDEPENDENT POLITICAL ENTITY, AND POPULATE IT WITH OATHS AND AFFIRMATIONS FROM THE GENERAL POST OFFICE.

PLAN
• 4: REOPEN THE GENERAL POST OFFICE, REOPEN THE PUBLIC BANK WITH FULL TITLE CURRENCY, REOPEN THE PUBLIC COURT IN ACCORDANCE TO THE NORTHWEST ORDINANCE. • 5: USE THE COURT TO ACCEPT CLAIMS OF PROPERTY FOR ACTUAL PROPERTY OWNERSHIP FOR THE PEOPLE, HAVE THE PEOPLE KEEP THEIR FAMILY RECORDS IN BIBLES OR THE SCRIPTURES, OR THE GREAT REGISTRY.

PLAN
• 6: COMMENCE OPEN ELECTIONS WITH QUALIFIED ELECTORS • 7: REOPEN THE SCHOOLS WITHIN THE DISTRICT OF THE TOWNSHIP WITH ACTUAL KNOWLEDGE. • 8: THE TOWNSHIP HAS THE AUTHORITY TO ISSUE DRIVING QUALIFICATION CARDS, TOWNSHIP TAGS FOR PROOF OF OWNERSHIP OF AUTOMOBILES, PASSPORTS, SCHOOL BONDS IF NEEDED, DEEDS, AND LAND PATENTS IN COOPERATION WITH BLM.

UMBRELLA
• ALL TOWNSHIPS WILL OPERATE UNDER THE UMBRELLA SPHERE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, THE ORIGINAL CONFEDERACY OF 1781, AND THE REIGN OF THE HEAVENS WORLD GOVERNMENT, THE LAW OF NATIONS, AND THE PRINCIPLES OF THE SCRIPTURES THAT IS BASED IN NATION BUILDING TO PROTECT THEM FROM THE ABUSES OF AGENDA 21, AND THE 9 BARON FAMILIES TRYING TO KILL THEM.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME AND ATTENTION IN THIS MATTER
• www.reignoftheheavens.org