THANK YOU

2009 SPONSORS!
2 I Palisade Roots Music Festival 2009
TICKET PRICES/
PERFORMANCE
SCHEDULE ..........4
TOWN OF PALISADE
& RIVERBEND
PARK MAP ..........5
WHAT IS
ROOTS MUSIC? ....6
RIVERBEND PARK
HISTORY ............8
WORKSHOP
SCHEDULE .......11
FESTIVAL
MANNERS ........13
GUITAR GIVEAWAY
INFO ON PAGE 10
PERFORMER PROFILES
BEGINNING ON PAGE 11
CONTENTS
C&F
Food Stores
FREE PRESS STAFF
Valerie Smith - Publisher
Josh Nichols - Managing Editor
Katie Nichols - Advertising
Coordinator
Priscilla Mangnall - Marketing
& Promotions
Aaron Cessna - Creative Director
Spencer Green- Graphic Artist
Brian James - Advertising Lead
www.palisademusic.org I 3
The Town of Palisade was founded in 1904
following more than twenty years of growing
interest in the agricultural potential of the eastern
end of the Grand Valley. A perfect combination
of sunshine, cool breeze, rich alluvial soils and
water from the Colorado River has made Palisade,
Colorado the Peach capital of the state as well
as a wine producing region unparalleled throughout
the Rocky Mountain west!
The Town itself still enjoys a laid back atmosphere
complete with friendly and welcoming residents.
Although still under 3,500 souls, Palisade is home
to some of the best restaurants in the valley, and a
growing and popular arts and entertainment district.
Don’t forget to stop by downtown Palisade for a look
around at the shops and restaurants and the town’s
brand new Civic Plaza on the corner of 3rd and
Main. From there you can wander northwest across
the railroad tracks for a closer look at the Palisade
Brewery and Peach Street Distillers. If you’ve got
time, take a drive around town to visit one of the
many top notch wineries that call Palisade home.
Just beyond Palisade is quick access to some
of the one and half million acres of public land
in Mesa County where visitors can find excellent
hiking, climbing, skiing, biking and boating.
Palisade also enjoys its proximity to the downstream
neighbors of Grand Junction and Fruita, both vibrant
towns and well worth a visit. With a little luck
and some perseverance, these three towns of the
Grand Valley will one day soon be connected by
a riverfront bike trail with Palisade’s Riverbend Park
as its eastern anchor!
And speaking of Riverbend Park: this stunning
venue is over 110 acres of beautiful riverfront
scenery, complete with pavilions, a playground, a
boat launch, fishing ponds, a winding bike path
and the valley’s premiere disc golf course. The park
has already received a well deserved reputation
as an ideal setting for popular events such as
Peach Fest (August 13th-16th) and Wine Fest
(Sept 17th- 20th), and should be a perfect fit
for Bluegrass and Roots!
Editorial by Nathan Boddy
WELCOME TO PALISADE
PERFORMANCE
SCHEDULE
SUNDAY - June 14th
11am: Dakota Blonde
12noon: Catfish Keith
1pm: Kane, Welch, Kaplin
2pm: Moira Smiley & VOCO
3pm: The Dixie Bee-Liners
4pm: The Kruger Brothers
FRIDAY - June 12th
5pm: Way Down Yonder
6pm: Mollie O’Brien & Rich Moore
7pm: Dakota Blonde
8pm: Danny Barnes
9pm: The April Verch Band
SATURDAY - June 13th
11am: Catharsis
12noon: Danny Barnes
1pm: The April Verch Band
2pm: Cadillac Sky
3pm: The Dixie Bee-Liners
4pm: Catfish Keith
5pm: Mollie O’Brien & Rich Moore
6pm: Dakota Blonde
7pm: The Kruger Brothers
8pm: Kane, Welch, Kaplin
9pm: Cadillac Sky
Friday $30 $35
Saturday $50 $60
Sunday $35 $40
3 Day w/o Camping* $90 $105
3 Day w/ Camping** $125 $145
Gate - Opens Noon,
Thurs., June 11th
Kids 14 under Free
Advanced - Before
Wed., June 10th
Campground open from noon Thursday to noon Monday.
(Tents, RV’s etc OK, no hookups available
Enjoy Alida’s Taste of Western Colorado
500 Main St., Downtown Grand Junction
3402 C 1/2 Rd., Palisade (East of Orchard Mesa)
(970) 241-2091 • (970) 434-8769
Open Monday through Saturday 9:00am to 5:30pm
Sundays 10:00am to 4:00pm
• Peach Fudge
• Fresh Fudge
• Peach Salsa
• Jams
• Jellies
• Syrups
• Dried Fruit
• Fruit & Chocolate
• Local Honey
• John Deere
• Tee Shirts
• Sweat Shirts
• Puzzles
• Post Cards
• Wildlife Books
• Magnets
• Key Chains
• Greeting Cards
Grand Valley’s Premiere
Souvenir Shop!
SEE OUR NEW SUMMER INVENTORY
OF SOUVENIRS & COLLECTABLES
Leslie Randolph
Broker Associate
Cell (970) 778-2084
lrandolph@bresnan.net
Tammy Craig
GRI, CRS
Broker/Owner
tlcraig@bresnan.net
(970)464-5200
(970) 464-4699 Fax

144 S. Kluge Avenue
PO Box 1330
Palisade, CO 81526
www.fruitandwine.net

Welcome to Palisade
“The only thing better than a visit
to Palisade is living here.”
www.palisademusic.org I 5
TOWN OF PALISADE
AND RIVERBEND PARK
SHUTTLE
SERVICE
We will have a Town Shuttle that
runs every 30 minutes between
the Concert Park, The Town Park
(for showers), Downtown Palisade
and the Wine Country Inn:
FRIDAY
• 9am to 1:15am
SATURDAY
• 7am to 1:15am
SUNDAY
• 7am to 6pm
Find more general info on
www.palisademusic.org
EXPLORE PALISADE
If you need some last minute items or have an itch to
scratch, explore the Town of Palisade! The free shuttle will
depart from just outside the main entrance gate to the festival
grounds every half hour and will make stops throughout town
before returning to the festival. This is your chance to get
to the grocery store, restaurants, galleries, the Town Plaza,
hardware store, wineries, a brew pub, a distillery, downtown
shops, etc.!
These are busy days in Palisade! Check out the ‘Palisade
Plaza Party’ on the evening of the 11th from 7 to 8 pm.
Jump on stage yourself at the ‘Open Mike on The Plaza’ from
10:00 am to 7:00 pm on Friday the 12th, and 10:00 am to
4:00 pm on Saturday the 13th. Not only that, but ‘Merchant
Specials and Sidewalk Sales’ will be going on this weekend,
as will special events at the Blue Pig Gallery and the Palisade
Brewery! Finally, Sunday morning will usher in the year’s fi rst
‘Palisade Farmer’s Market’ from 10 am to 2 pm at the Town
Plaza on the corner of 3rd and Main.
There’s a lot to see and do in this small town so take
a break and check it out!
6 I Palisade Roots Music Festival 2009
American folk music, also known as roots music,
is a broad category of music including Bluegrass,
country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands,
Appalachian folk, blues, Cajun and Native American
music. The music is considered American either
because it is native to the United States or because
it developed there, out of foreign origins, to such
a degree that it struck musicologists as something
distinctly new. It is considered “roots music” because
it served as the basis of music later developed in
the United States, including rock and roll, rhythm
and blues, and jazz.
Many Roots musicians do not consider themselves
to be folk musicians; the main difference between
the American folk music revival and American “Roots
music” is that Roots music seems to cover a slightly
broader range, including blues and country.
Roots musical forms reached their most expressive
and varied forms in the first two to three decades
of the 20th century. The Great Depression and the
Dust Bowl were extremely important in disseminating
these musical styles to the rest of the country, as
Delta blues masters, itinerant honky tonk singers
and Latino and Cajun musicians spread to cities like
Chicago, Los Angeles and New York. The growth
of the recording industry in the same approximate
period was also important; increased possible profits
from music placed pressure on artists, songwriters
and label executives to replicate previous hit songs.
This meant that fads like Hawaiian slack-key guitar
never died out completely as rhythms or instruments
or vocal stylings were incorporated into disparate
genres. By the 1950s, all the forms of roots music
had led to pop-oriented forms. Folk musicians like
the Kingston Trio, pop-Tejano and Cuban-American
fusions like boogaloo, chachacha and mambo, blues-
derived rock and roll and rockabilly, pop-gospel,
doo wop and R&B (later secularized further as soul
music) and the Nashville sound in country music
all modernized and expanded the musical palette
of the country.
The roots approach to music emphasizes the
diversity of American musical traditions, the
genealogy of creative lineages and communities, and
the innovative contributions of musicians working
in these traditions today. In recent years roots music
has been the focus of popular media programs
such as Garrison Keillor’s public radio program
A Prairie Home Companion and the feature film
by the same name.
www.pbs.org/americanrootsmusic
WHAT IS
ROOTS MUSIC ANYWAY...?
QUESTIONS? KUDOS?
COMMENTS? CONCERNS?
Look for us at the event...
NATHAN BODDY
Operations
- Beverage Station
- Campground
- Shuttle
- Porta-Potties
- Parking
GEORGE GERTZ
Production
- Performers
- Stage
- Workshops
- Publicity
AMY PALMER
Finance
- Box Office
- Ticketing
- Budget
KRISTINE EDGE
- Vendors
ARVID KOPPANG
- Sponsors
JODY ANDREWS
Marketing
- Web & E-News
- Graphics
- Marketing
- Volunteers
- Merchandise
Celebrating two years in business with
Te Blue Pig Birthday Concert-
featuring
The North 17th Street Band
Saturday, June 13, 2009, 4:00pm
For details: 970.464.4819or www.the-
bluepiggallery.com
Gallery Hours: Tues. - Sun., 10 - 6
YOUR DESINTATION GALLERY
FINE ART FOR ALL STYLES
Colorado National Monument,
Grand Valley wineries, biking and
golf just minutes away!
Luxurious pillow-top beds
37’ inch Àat screen TV’s
Complimentary airport shuttle
14,000 square foot meeting space
Outdoor seasonal heated pool and
year round hot tub
Precor ¿tness center
Complimentary Double Tree cookie
970.241.8888
Be our guest in Grand
Junction and enjoy...
743 Horizon Drive
Grand Junction, Colorado 81506
*Wednesday Nights
Live in the Bistro lounge!
Open Mic Night with Local Musicians
*Thursday Nights
Enjoy live Jazz in the Bistro lounge
“World Wide
Highly Rated
Hotel”
www.grandjunction.doubletree.com
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8 I Palisade Roots Music Festival 2009
From guitar pickers to peach
pickers, people have always
found a home at Riverbend.
By Priscilla Mangnall and David Soker
The Grand Valley is rich in history.
The Colorado River (originally
named the Grand River) has always
attracted inhabitants. Riverbend
Park in no exception. Here is
a bit of its history.
Prior to being forced to leave in 1881,
the Grand Mesa Ute Indians called the
Grand Valley home. They would winter
in the lowlands and when the land told
them it was time, they would spend their
summers in the high country of Grand
Mesa. Although no traces have been found, due to
flooding and receding of the Colorado River, the Utes
most likely camped beneath the Cottonwoods of what
is now Riverbend Park. True speculation, but according
to experts throughout the state, why wouldn’t they?
Often called the “Roots of the American
Environmental Movement”, FDR enacted the
Emergency Work Progress Bill to bring the American
people out of the deep economic and mental depression
that was plaguing our country in the 1930s. From this
“New Deal”, 5,000 Civilian Conservation Corps camps
were established throughout the US and existed from
1933 to 1942.
The Palisade CCC Camp BR-59-C was one of in the
Grand Valley. BR stood for Bureau of Reclamation,
55 designated which camp and C was for Colorado.
The Palisade Camp was established in 1935 to help
rehabilitate and develop the irrigation canals that were
vital to the Grand Valley’s agriculture. It was located
on the east end of Riverbend Park.
Former member Morris Grodsky writes a lively
memoir of what he calls “A program intended to salvage
two valuable national resources of this country; its
youth and its land.”
He goes on to write:
“Enrollees received a monthly salary
of $30, and $25 had to be sent to the
family. This money helped support the
economies of communities across our
country. Even the modest $5, which
enrollees received each month helped
support the economies of small towns
located near the work camps.
Our barracks were half wood and
half canvas. We had a mess hall and a
recreation hall with a pool table and ping
pong table. There was a little store or
canteen that sold candy bars, chewing
tobacco, Bull Durham or Golden Grain
tobacco, cigarette paper, etc. Once a
month was payday and we lined up
at a table to receive our five dollars.
On payday, we could buy a coupon
RIVERBEND PARK HISTORY
book with 5 cent tickets in it. These could be used
in our little canteen during the month to buy a candy
bar or whatever we needed. Our routine was simple.
Five days a week we would rise up early, make up our
cots, shave and clean up, have a hearty breakfast and
head for the work trucks. The trucks trundled us up a
mountain where other crews had blasted into shale
deposits. We arrived with our tools, sledge hammers
and chisels. We became expert at hitting those rocks
with great precision, splitting them into flat rock slabs.
Then we’d raise these over the head, march down the
mountain and load them on the trucks. The trucks took
our slabs to another camp group that was constructing
irrigation canals, and those guys used our slabs
to line the canals which nourished the peach orchards
in the valley.”
Many of these men and women remain in our
community today. His memoirs can be viewed
at www.geocities.com/oralbio/grodskymbio. A CCC
Legacy Reunion will be Oct. 8 - 11, 2009 in Denver.
During the first year of the war, 1942, another
camp was also built on the west end of what is now
Riverbend Park. Since the early 1900s, as the number
of peach trees increased in the Grand Valley so did
the need for harvest labor. People have been coming
to Palisade every year from around the world to help
harvest peaches. There was never enough housing for
the thousands of workers, and many of them camped
along the river or canals for two weeks during harvest.
Sanitary conditions were poor at best.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Services
Administration tried to help solve this problem by
building the Palisade Migratory Labor Camp to house
workers for the peach harvests. Instead of barracks like
the CCC Camp, 200 individual “cabins” were build
with common latrines and showers. It could hold about
1,000 people. After WWII, the camp was turned over
to the Peach Board of Control in 1948. They continued
operating the camp until it was closed in 1961.
At that time, the buildings were sold off and many
were bought by local growers for labor housing or
storage. About a third of the original concrete slab
www.palisademusic.org I 9
continued on page 12
INTRODUCING
HARLEY
Harley” is a fish sculpture with scales
composed of Harley Davidson mufflers.
This brilliant sculpture by Palisade’s own
Lyle Nichols is a focal point of the Town
Center Plaza located at the corner of Third
& Main Streets in Downtown Palisade.
The project came to fruition through the
enthusiasm and vision of Jane Wood proprietor
of the Blue Pig Gallery in Palisade.
REGISTER
TO WIN A GUITAR
& MORE!
Come by the Starr’s
Guitars Booth and fi ll out
an “Offi cial Entry Blank”.
$1.00 for each entry
gets you in the on-stage
drawings for CD’s, T-Shirts,
Merchandise, and one
of two giveaway
Guitars!
You must be elegible
and present to win,
or your name will be
returned for another try.
Guitar drawings will
be held at 3 pm on
Saturday and Sunday
&
&
September 18,19 & 20, 2009
Flagstaff, Arizona
BandŏContestŏđŏContraŏDancing
WorkshopsŏđŏKidsĚŏActivitiesŏĒŏmoreē
Crooked Still
Claire Lynch Band
Gibson Brothers
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Steep Canyon Rangers
Freight Hoppers
Burnett Family Bluegrass
Murphy’s Law
Muskellunge Bluegrass
Red Desert Ramblers
Headline Bluegrass Band
Voluntary String Band
Mars Hillbillies
The Bears and the Bees
Festival Sponsored by: Arizona Commission on the Arts, City of Flagstaf BBB
Revenues, Coconino County Board of Supervisors, Flagstaf Cultural Partners
& National Endowment for the Arts
*Children sixteen and under admitted free with accompanying adult ticketholder.
Festival Sound by
,%'%*%*0$!,%*!/ċ+.#ŏđŏĨĊĂĉĩŏĆĂĆġāćĊĆ
Today’s Best Gear
at the Hottest Prices!
242-9282
7 Main St.
Grand Junction
WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
Join some of your favorite artists for an intimate hour of hints, practice tips and insight. Instrument, Vocals and
Clogging Workshops are part of Festival Saturday & Sunday morning tradition. Artisan glass blowing and alpaca
wool felting are also scheduled. Bring your own chair - instruments optional.
SATURDAY - JUNE 13 9:45-10:45AM
• GUITAR
(In Front of Starr’s Guitar Booth) – Clay Ross, Rich Moore
• RESONATOR/SLIDE/BLUES GUITAR
(Backstage Hospitality Area) Catfish Keith
• FIDDLE/DANCE
(Front of Hemstrom’s Fiddles Booth) – April Verch
• BASS
(Kid’s Play Area))– Cody Walters, Tony Raddell
• BANJO
(Front of Beverage Tent) – Danny Barnes
• CLOGGING
(In Front of Stage) – Andrea Earley
• GLASS BLOWING
Meet in front of Palisade Glass Booth Vendor
• ALPACA WOOL FELTING
Meet in front of Suncrest Orchard Alpacas Vendor
SUNDAY - JUNE 14 9:45-10:45AM
• VOCALS
(Behind Sound Booth) Mollie O’Brien, Brandi Hart, Mary Huckins
• GUITAR
(In Front of Starr’s Guitar Booth) – Uwe Kruger
• FIDDLE
(Front of Hemstrom’s Fiddles Booth) – Fats Kaplin, Rachael Renee Johnson
• BASS
(Kid’s Play Area))– Joel Landsberg, Jeremy Darrow
• BANJO
(Merchandise Tent) – Jens Kruger, Sam Morrow
• MANDOLIN
(In Front of Stage) – Buddy Woodward, Jonathan Maness
• SONGWRITING
(Behind Sound Booth) – Kevin Welch, Kieran Kane
• GLASS BLOWING
Meet in front of Palisade Glass Booth Vendor
• ALPACA WOOL FELTING
Meet in front of Suncrest Orchard Alpacas Vendor
PERFORMER INFORMATION
CONTINUED ON PAGE 12
CADILLAC SKY (TEXAS)
This hot, young band does
bluegrass their way. Creative
arrangements and tempos
with plenty of grit and drive
caused the Chicago Sun-
Times to write, “This quintet
offers a mountain of musical
riches, close harmony singing,
propulsive melodies with
innovative tempo changes,
hot banjo picking from Matt
Menefee and intriguing
original material from the
pen of the group’s lead singer
and mandolin player, Bryan
Simpson.” They are precise
and reckless, controlled but
spontaneous, happy yet
lonesome, in other words,
the perfect ingredients for a
young, unique group - the
best thing to come out of
Texas since barbecue!
THE KRUGER BROTHERS
(NORTH CAROLINA VIA
SWITZERLAND)
Get ready for stellar, world-
class musicianship. This trio
delivers tunes from Appalachia
to Broadway with elegance and
grace. They recently performed
with the Bangor Symphony
Orchestra as winners of a
National Endowment for the
Arts Artistic Excellence Award.
Jens Kruger is considered one
of the finest banjo players in
the world. Uwe Kruger flatpicks
a mean guitar while Joel
Landsberg lays down intricate
bass lines – when all three
combine, the result is amazing.
These folks are unforgettable!
KANE, WELCH, KAPLIN
(TENNESSEE)
This collaborative effort
provides original acoustic
music steeped in tradition but
with tones of the 21st Century
- freestyle Americana with a
groove. Kieran Kane and Kevin
Welch are prolific songwriters,
excellent vocalists and fine
instrumentalists – add
PERFORMER
INFORMATION
www.palisademusic.org I 11
12 I Palisade Roots Music Festival 2009
foundations for the cabins still exist in the Park
and there is an effort underway to restore two of
those buildings and move them back onto the site.
The camping area for the Palisade Bluegrass Festival
is located toward the Migratory Labor Camp site
where thousands of people have camped over the
last 100 years.
Harvest time in Palisade has been described by
old timers as “unbelievable,” “insane” or “beyond
description”. In 1949, there were nearly 1 million
peach trees in the Grand Valley and all of them
ripened at the same time. An estimated 6,000 people
came for two weeks to Palisade to harvest peaches.
The population of Palisade at that time was 1,202
people. Even with the labor camp, there were still
5,000 people that camped in the East Valley
Once World War II started, the Civilian Conservation
Corps Camps were closed down because most of
the men joined the military or contributed to the
war effort in other ways. The Palisade CCC Camp
was only reopened for a short period of time during
1944, to house 250 German Prisoners of War that
were brought in to pick peaches. They originally were
part of Rommel’s Afrika Corps, had been captured
in Africa and shipped to the POW camp in Trinidad.
Since there was very little available labor during
the war the Peach growers were desperate to find
harvest labor. The Germans were brought in under
guard to help out. Many of them had never had a
peach and a number of them got sick because they
ate green peaches.
Still yet another enterprise sprang up at Riverbend
Park. Previously held in Forte’s apple orchards,
the 8th Annual Apple Jam took place in the same
spot the Bluegrass Festival is being held. Producer
Karen McCarty remembers how her staff, crew and
volunteers labored to remove Russian Olives and
Tamarisk to turn the long abandoned migrant farm
into a festival venue.
Over the years, several ideas took root.
The Grand River Golf Course was planned — as was
a campground. The Hilltop Renaissance Faire was
held there one year and a Disc Golf Course is laid
out between the two festival grounds. Riverbend
Park is used now for Wildlife Heritage Day, Palisade
Peach Festival, Colorado Mountain Winefest, the
Renaissance Faire and many a family picnic.
And now … the Palisade Bluegrass
& Roots Music Festival!
RIVERBEND PARK CONTINUED
KANE, WELCH, KAPLIN Continued...
the talent of multi-
instrumentalist of Fats Kaplin
and the tasteful percussion
of Lucas Kane and the result
is a sound that is original
and unique. These guys are
regularly nominated for Group
of the Year by the Americana
Music Association and have
had all the three of their
CD’s go to the top of the
Americana charts. They defy
categorization.
CATFISH KEITH (IOWA)
The Catfish delivers
spectacular acoustic blues
done with foot-stompin’
energy. He is a two-time W.C.
Handy Award nominee who
does amazing things with a
resophonic guitar. Great finger-
picking, hot slide work and
blues-soaked vocals make for
a one-man blues cruise straight
to the heart of a style that is so
uniquely American. The tones
and textures he gets out of his
instruments is incredible and
the rhythms he conjures up will
get your toes tapping
DAKOTA BLONDE
(COLORADO)
Be prepared for soulful music
that goes from delicate to
powerful. This long time
Colorado favorite weaves
wonderful arrangements of
their own material and some
cover tunes – covers that
often surpass the originals.
The trio performs many of
their own compositions and
features the wonderful voice
of Mary Huckins whose
vocals will leave you smiling.
If you’ve never heard them
before, you’ll be an instant fan
of these talented folks.
THE DIXIE BEE-LINERS
(VIRGINIA)
This band is creating quite a
buzz with their high-octane
harmonies and beautiful
original songs. They are
coming to Palisade from
Merlefest and on their way to
Bean Blossom afterwards. Just
honored by The Roots Music
Association as “Best Bluegrass
Band of 2008”, these folks
play their own brand of music.
Their critically album, “Ripe”,
is a chart-topper and the
song, “Down the Crooked
Road” stayed on the singles
charts for months. Lead singer

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
PERFORMER
INFORMATION
• Please avoid loud conversation
during the performances.
• Low chairs or tarps in front.
• Taller chairs on the sides or behind
the sound booth.
• Rain or shade shelters in the sides or rear.
• Unoccupied seats may be “borrowed”
until the owner returns .
• Dancing encouraged! – To the right side
of the stage please.
• Please do not enter the front stage
boundary area.
• Frisbees, balls, hula-hoops, hacky-sacks
in the open play area.
• Smoking only in designated
“Red Ash Can” areas.
• Avoid unnecessary moving about during
the performances.
• No glass or alcohol may be brought
into the park.
• Keep our lovely grounds clean – garbage
& recycling available.
• Refill water bottles – water available by
the beverage station.
• Take any found items to Lost & Found
at the Box Office.
Let us know how we did – what
worked, what didn’t work…
info@palisademusic.org
Thank you!!!
PLEASE RESPECT OTHERS
SO THAT EVERYONE MAY ENJOY
THEIR FESTIVAL EXPERIENCE
201 W. 3rd Street
Downtown Palisade
464-7706
Columbine Liquors
Featuring
a complete selection
of local
wines, beers, and spirits
FESTIVAL
MANNERS
The Commons of Hilltop
Halliburton Acid Frac Facility
FCI
Constructors, Inc.
Grand Junction, CO P: 970.434.9093
Durango, CO P: 970.259.8644
Longmont, CO P: 970.535.4725
Phoenix, AZ P: 623.772.7400
Cheyenne, WY P: 307.778.3085
Aztec, NM P: 970.259.8644
Visit us at www.fciol.com
St. Mary’s Century Project
FCI/McCarthy—A Joint Venture
Hospice Inpatient Care Center
Construction Manager/General Contractor
Proud to Support the
Palisade Bluegrass & Roots Music Fest
THE DIXIE BEE LINERS Continued...
Brandi Hart sings like an angel
and is a prolific songwriter
– combine that with the sweet
voice of Rachel Renee Johnson
and the talents of veterans Sam
Morrow, Jonathan Maness,
Buddy Woodward and Jeremy
Darrow and you have one
great package!
MOIRA SMILEY & VOCO
(CALIFORNIA)
These ladies deliver everything
from ’ rebel-harmony with cello
and banjo to ethereal renditions
of old Americana. And how
are their vocals? They were
voted America’s #1 a cappella
band (that’s when they don’t
feel like playing instruments
and just sing). Throw in some
body percussion and the result
is a blend of voice and sound
that is a treat for the ears.
We are excited to have them
here as part of their western
states tour.
MOLLIE O’BRIEN
& RICH MOORE
(COLORADO)
Once a regular on “Prairie
Home Companion”, Mollie
is one of Roots music’s finest
song interpreters and singers
– she has a voice that is smoky,
smooth and powerful. Mollie
rocks ‘em or croons ‘em while
Rich provides tasty guitar licks
and rhythms. This duo is one
of Colorado’s finest musical
acts and we are thrilled to
have them perform.
DANNY BARNES
(WASHINGTON)
Ol’ Danny Barnes exemplifies
fearless creativity in a
union between folk music
& technology that he calls
‘Folktronics”. His original
songs are poignant yet flavored
with a strong dose of humor.
A master banjo and guitar
player, Danny has performed
with Tim O’Brien, Yonder
Mountain String Band and
Dave Matthews (and don’t
forget The Bad Livers). Be
sure to catch his performances
to experience something new
and refreshing.
THE APRIL VERCH BAND
(CANADA)
April is a Canadian Grand
Master Fiddle Champion
PERFORMER
INFORMATION
RENTALS • SALES • SERVICE
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
FACTORY-TRAINED
TECHNICIANS SERVING
THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION
PORTABLE LIGHT PLANTS
Load Testing
thru 400kw
Daily, Weekly, Monthly
970-242-9980
819 Pitkin Ave • Grand Junction
www.rmspllc.com
standbypower@rmspllc.com
STAND-BY EMERGENCY
GENERATORS
Daily, Weekly, Monthly
Portable
Self-Contained
Diesel Driven
20kw thru 320kw
Full Festival Pass: $115
Single Venue Pass: $30
Early Bird Special:
10% Discount on all non-lodging packages
and non-local ticket sales until July 1, 2009
)The Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band
) Eliza Gilkyson with Special Guest Nina Gerber
) People’s Choice Award winner Ferron
) The Burns Sisters ) Jimmy LaFave
) Brooks Williams ) Harry Manx
) Corinne West ) Blame Sally ) The Lab Dogs
) Charley Simmons... and more TBA!
FEATURING:
G
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G
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Contact info: 435-259-3198
info@moabfolkfestival.com
and Canadian Open Fiddle
Champion as well as a
champion Ottawa Valley step-
dancer – she sings too. You will
be treated to some mainstay
Americana, fiddle tunes of
the Ottawa Valley and some
sparkling originals done in a
contemporary bluegrass style.
Singing, dancing, fiddling all
at the same time - a dynamic
and entertaining stage show!
CATHARSIS (COLORADO)
This established regional string
band serves up some great
old-time fiddling and clogging.
Veterans of many concerts and
contra-dances they also throw
in a bit of Celtic music to mix it
up. Check out this fun group
and don’t be surprised if you
end up hopping up and doing
a little clogging yourself!
WAY DOWN YONDER
(COLORADO)
These guys are a local bluegrass
band gone good. They had to
because the local police chief
is in the band. They are band
contest winners and veterans
of regional festivals who pick
traditional bluegrass and a bit
more. We couldn’t think of a
better bunch of guys to open
up the show!
787 N Elberta Ave., Palisade, Colorado 81526
(Grand River Drive)
(Just off I 70, EXIT 42, PALISADE)
Hear it Through the Grapevine
C O N C E R T S E R I E S
Sat, June 20th…King ‘n Trio
Sat, July 11th…Quemundo
Sun, July 12th…Boys of Summer
Sat, August 15th…Hazel Miller
800 CO-GROWN (264-7696)
www.grandriverwines.com
General admission tickets on sale
at Stop ‘n Save locations.
For reserved, VIP seating &
camping go to countryjam.com
or call 1.800.7800.jam

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