You are on page 1of 32

Connecticut Health Foundation

ANNUAL REPORT 2003

THE CONNECTICUT HEALTH FOUNDATION IS A CATALYST, BUILDING

CONSENSUS AND COALITIONS TO IMPROVE HEALTH SERVICES, SO PEOPLE

CAN PURSUE AND ENJOY OPTIMUM HEALTH IN BODY, MIND AND SPIRIT. ULTIMATELY, STRIVING

TO IMPROVE HEALTH AND ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE MEANS GOING BEYOND A MEDICAL

MODEL. IT MEANS SUPPORTING PEOPLE TO BE THE BEST THEY CAN BE IN ALL ASPECTS

OF THEIR LIVES.

G E N E R AT I N G S U B S TA N T I A L A N D L A S T I N G CHANGE: A HOLISTIC APPROACH

Money can solve a lot of problems. But improving health care services, access and outcomes for all the people of Connecticut also calls for leadership, insights, coalition-building, and shared best practices.

Since 1999, the Connecticut Health Foundation (CHF) has been exploring and supporting the most effective and creative ways to improve the health status of the people of Connecticut. In 2003, CHF, the largest independent health foundation in the state, dispersed a record number of dollars in direct funding to a range of organizations from small neighborhood groups to large academic institutions. But CHF also takes a holistic approach to achieving substantial and lasting change an approach that includes providing information and technical assistance to grantees, analyzing public policy to shed light on unmet needs and related policy gaps, and supporting health education and training in the communities. Success in achieving these objectives, however, can only be determined by the people, organizations and communities that CHF serves. Only they know if the Foundations programs and initiatives add value and have a positive impact on peoples health. According to the executive director of one grantee organization that focuses on improving mental health care for children: Working with CHF is different. CHF doesnt just wait for our quarterly reports. Theyve been in partnership with us from the beginning, saying all along that were learning in this field together. Working in close partnership with community groups, government agencies, other foundations and grantees helps CHF realize its mission and primary goals improving childrens access to oral health care and mental health services, and eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities.

CHF doesnt just wait for our quarterly reports. Theyve been in partnership with us from the beginning, saying all along that were learning in this field together.

GAINING STRENGTH T H R O U G H C O L L A B O R AT I O N

In the world of community health, budgets are often small and resources are stretched thin. Thats why CHF joins forces with other foundations, health care organizations and advocates pooling resources, disseminating information and sharing ideas and insights to achieve similar goals.

In 2003, for example, CHF formed a funders collaborative with the Childrens Fund of Connecticut, the William Casper Graustein Memorial Fund and the Community Foundation of Greater New Haven. Together, the cooperative is helping New Britain, New London and Middletown develop their own comprehensive, community-based health service system that promotes wellness in young children at early-care and education sites. CHF and the Aetna Foundation have also found a great deal of common ground. As leading grantmaking organizations, the two Connecticut-based foundations share programming priorities, particularly in the battle to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities, and to provide oral health services to children and families in need. Board members and a national conference of grantmakers in health initially brought CHF and Aetna together. Now the two organizations are evaluating ways to collaborate within the city of Hartford, to forge a model of cooperation that will help solve the serious problems associated with racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Our connection with CHF is around our shared commitment, says Sharon Dalton of the Aetna Foundation. When we started to look at how we as a foundation would address these critical issues, we wanted to find out whos doing what and how we could work with interested parties. We hope to establish a community-wide effort, with CHF playing a significant role as a partner.

...We hope to establish a community-wide effort, with CHF playing a significant role as a partner.

FILLING THE GAPS

Meaningful collaborations can also be forged with government agencies that may need particular support in their efforts to provide effective services. CHF has worked closely with Connecticuts Department of Children and Families (DCF), in the area of childrens mental health, providing funding and technical assistance to 10 of the states 27 community-based childrens mental health collaboratives.

While DCF is responsible for providing direct services, says the programs director Tim Marshall, the basic task of the collaboratives is to identify gaps and then to plug those gaps so that kids can receive mental health care in their own communities. There is no way I can overstate the quality and importance of the technical assistance CHF has provided in those 10 collaboratives. In fact, CHFs expertise has been so valuable that Marshall shares the information it provided with the other 17 collaboratives, so that all 27 can benefit from CHFs good modeling. The Foundation makes it clear, Marshall notes, that whatever material or information they provide is to be put to the broadest use to serve as many people as possible. The CHF-DCF relationship demonstrates a simple fact: while funding is essential, various kinds of support and technical assistance are also invaluable. And so, CHF communicates regularly and often with its grantees to find out what they need to be successful and how the Foundation can help meet that need. The CHF staff worked hard with us before we even submitted the grant, explains Martha Stone, executive director of the Center for Childrens Advocacy, which provides legal representation to children who fall through the cracks of the child welfare, mental health and juvenile justice systems. When we approached CHF, they asked us, What do you really need to do your work? and helped us figure out how to ask for it. They wanted to help, they gave us a lot of information, and we appreciate the openness and willingness to walk in our shoes.

...they wanted to help, they gave us a lot of information, and we appreciate the openness and willingness to walk in our shoes.

ADDING VALUE THROUGH KNOWLEDGE


The health care system in the state of Connecticut and the nation is complex and troubling solutions to problems are not always clear. For most state agencies, community groups and advocates, its a challenge to gather and share accurate information and knowledge in order to establish meaningful plans, make sound decisions, and improve existing service capabilities. CHF helps by finding and supporting people who can provide the knowledge, expertise and technical assistance needed to solve the most pressing health care problems.

The challenge of providing oral care for underserved populations is a case in point. Eight oral health collaboratives supported by CHF are trying to develop and implement a coordinated dental care delivery system in Connecticuts largest urban areas. The goal is to double by 2007 the use of dental health services by children enrolled in HUSKY, Connecticuts Medicaid program. This is a daunting task, with plenty of budgetary, bureaucratic and cultural obstacles. If we want to have an impact on childrens oral health, we have to look at the core issues that govern the availability of dental care, says Burton Edelstein, D.D.S., M.P.H., the founding director of the Childrens Dental Health Project and a Columbia University scholar. Thats why Edelstein, working closely with CHF, developed a framework and a handbook that enables federally qualified community health centers (FQHCs) to contract with private dentists who can provide care at the centers and see eligible patients in their own offices. As a result, FQHCs can expand their capacity to treat this underserved population of children. The brilliance of this approach is that it brings together people from different areas of health care and helps break down barriers familiarizing dentists with health centers and their patients, and introducing the centers to local practitioners, explains Evelyn Barnum, executive director of the Connecticut Primary Care Association. Thanks to CHFs funding and technical assistance, for example, the Staywell Community Health Center in Waterbury a participant in the Waterbury Oral Health Collaborative was able to contract with private dentists for needed services. As a result, the center is able to offer evening hours to accommodate working families and provide more education about oral health issues and service access, which helps overcome barriers in the community. By addressing these systemic problems in partnership with the collaboratives, CHF is making a significant impact on the most common chronic health problem in children tooth decay the leading cause of lost school time.

If we want to have an impact on childrens oral health, we have to look at the core issues that govern the availability of dental care.

LEARNING IN THE COMMUNITY

Before health care in Connecticut can be improved, however, 360 degree learning must often take place from listening to people in the community to learning about their needs, to training health care organizations about establishing efficient systems of care, to educating communities about basic health information and how to access the health care that is their right.

10

This scope of learning is evident at programs like We Walk in New Haven (WeWiN), a CHF-funded initiative that promotes physical activities and good nutrition to reduce health risks associated with chronic illnesses among city residents, particularly low-income African-Americans and Hispanics. Scattered across the greater New Haven area, eight WeWiN sites offer educational programs ranging from nutritional counseling to basic health assessments and fitness activities, including line dancing and weight training all free and locally based. We talk to people where they are, says WeWiN program director Sharon Bradford. Neighborhood groups, churches, housing complexes. We want to help them learn how to resist chronic illnesses and maintain health and show that you can have fun while youre at it. Education and outreach is also a key aspect of Project LEARN of the Southeast Mental Health Systems of Care (SeMHSC), a group of agencies that coordinate services for children with serious mental health problems in 19 southeastern Connecticut towns. While its direct care management services are funded through the state, CHF funds its community collaborative. According to Cara Westcott, LEARNs project director, we are committed to getting out the word that children DO have mental health issues, that early intervention and prevention are vital, and that services are available. With CHF funding over three years, SeMHSC has also been able to think strategically about building an infrastructure to serve children with mental health needs within their communities, and to establish a system of care in our local agencies care that is community based, culturally competent and family focused, Westcott explains. CHF gave us the opportunity to learn how to build systems of care.

CHF gave us the opportunity to learn how to build systems of care.

11

O V E R C O M I N G C U LT U R A L B A R R I E R S

Overcoming cultural and language barriers to health care access is yet another significant educational challenge.

12

Thats why CAUSA, the Connecticut Association for United Spanish Action, took action to confront the high rate of diabetes in the states Latino communities. With a three-year CHF grant, CAUSA created DIAL Diabetes Information and Action for Latinos which provides mini-grants to some of its member organizations that run local diabetes prevention and care initiatives. CAUSA is also developing an information clearinghouse, and it created the first-ever statewide Spanish-language conference on diabetes. With a massive outreach campaign for the conference, CAUSA provided everything from transportation to childcare to attract more than 600 people from Hispanic communities around the state. Medical check-ups and health screenings were available, as well as a range of workshops from healthy cooking with traditional foods to low-impact aerobics. We saw the hunger for this kind of information, says Carmen Sierra, CAUSAs executive director. Fortunately with the DIAL initiative, we will be able to continue the work with nearly 30 bilingual volunteer diabetes educators, plus a statewide media campaign. We learned from this conference that people really do want to change and will respond if you make the information accessible to them.

We saw the hunger for this kind of information.

13

I N F L U E N C I N G T H E P U B L I C P O L I C Y D E B AT E

Working with communities on the ground is vitally important. But perhaps the most significant battle with the greatest potential impact on peoples day-to-day lives is in the halls of Connecticuts state and local governments and institutions, where public health policies are written.

14

One of the unfortunate realities of modern political life is that legislators are asked to make decisions on a huge range of complex issues and often do so with very little information, says Joan Alker, senior researcher at Georgetown Universitys Health Policy Institute. One such issue to which CHF was compelled to respond was a proposal to drastically change the way the state of Connecticut administers Medicaid. While Medicaid is a federal health insurance program for low-income, elderly, and disabled people who cant afford medical care, it is managed by the states, which have latitude in creating regulations. The proposed changes in Connecticut which included the imposition of premiums for recipients who couldnt afford them would have sharply reduced access to health care by the states neediest people, especially children. To make sure policymakers understood what was at stake, CHF decided to commission research and analysis on the issue and do so quickly. A preliminary bill on the policy change was passed late at night, at the end of a very hectic legislative session, with no public hearings and no forum for discussing the impact, explains Judith Solomon, senior policy fellow with Connecticut Voices for Children, a statewide research and advocacy organization concerned with the health and well-being of children. To support the contention that people would suffer if the legislation were passed, we knew we had to put together numbers that would show what the abstract policy language really meant. Georgetowns Health Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., and Connecticut Voices for Children were commissioned by CHF and the Anthem Foundation of Connecticut, Inc., to publish five successive policy briefs on the proposed changes. The numbers, it turns out, were startling. If passed, the legislation would have resulted in a 43 percent increase in the number of uninsured children and the loss of Medicaid coverage for thousands of elderly and disabled people. In total, 96,000 residents were being threatened with a loss of coverage.

...we knew we had to put together numbers that would show what the abstract policy language really meant.

15

Its unusual for a grant provider to be so nimble, to move so quickly in response to an immediate situation.

The reports also showed the negative long-term effect on the states economy as a whole, and its health care system in particular, as more underinsured and uninsured individuals would be forced to make use of expensive emergency room care, often waiting until they were very ill. Concise and filled with concrete data, the policy briefs were sent not only to legislators, but also to childrens advocacy organizations, pediatricians and other interested parties, as well as to news outlets across the state, to generate vocal support and media coverage. The results were significant and gratifying. The legislators repealed almost all of the proposed changes, and many made it clear how useful the new information was. CHF did a fantastic job of getting the information out, notes Alker. Its unusual for a grant provider to be so nimble, to move so quickly in response to an immediate situation. In fact, she adds, CHF is becoming a model for other foundations around the country on how to influence public policy through research and analysis.

POLICY BRIEFS ARE AVAILABLE AT WWW.CTHEALTH.ORG


THE IMPACT OF PREMIUMS ON CHILDREN AND PARENTS IN HUSKY A IMPOSING PREMIUMS ON LOW-INCOME ELDERLY AND DISABLED PERSONS IN MEDICAID THE IMPACT OF CO-PAYMENTS AND REDUCED BENEFITS ON CHILDREN ENROLLED IN HUSKY A COST OF PROPOSED MEDICAID AND HUSKY A CHANGES TO THE CONNECTICUT ECONOMY THE IMPACT OF PREMIUMS ON PREGNANT WOMEN IN MEDICAID (insert) CAP ON FEDERAL MEDICAID FUNDS WOULD FORCE STATE TO PAY INCREASED HEALTH CARE COSTS

16

CORRECTING INJUSTICES

CHF also expects to change public policies and correct injustices in its fight against racial and ethnic health disparities. Since its inception, the Foundation has been committed to reversing the significantly poorer health and higher mortality rates among minority groups disparities that exist even when income and insurance coverage are equal.

17

In October 2003, CHF held its second conference on the issue A World Waiting to be Born: Taking Action to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities which drew more than 250 policymakers, health professionals, community leaders and academics, who exchanged ideas and heard the latest findings presented by experts from around the country.

Were trying to correct and change a serious wrong that was created in the past and has been sustained over many decades.

Forrester (Woody) Lee, M.D., professor of Medicine, assistant dean of Multicultural Affairs at Yale University Medical School and a conference workshop leader, reflected the tone of the event. Referring to the groundbreaking 2001 Institute of Medicine report, Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, he said, with this report, which pulled together two decades of research, there is no longer a debate about whether these inequities exist. The issue now is what to do about them. One strategy is to include cultural competencies in the education of health care professionals and encourage members of underrepresented groups to pursue health care careers. To learn more about this, CHF awarded a three-year grant to conduct a comprehensive cultural competence audit and assessment at the University of Connecticut Health Center with the goal of increasing the number of underrepresented students and faculty that are recruited and retained. The Foundation also put together a panel of leaders in health care, business, education, politics and community advocacy, to collect information and develop policy recommendations for the public, private and nonprofit sectors.

18

In 2004, the panel will gather data and host three public hearings to learn directly from experts and citizens alike. Topics being explored include health workforce diversity, language and cultural barriers to health care, social determinants, data collection and monitoring, and environmental health, among others. Were trying to correct and change a serious wrong that was created in the past and has been sustained over many decades, says the panels chair, Sanford Cloud, Jr., president of the National Conference for Community and Justice.

As we learn about the impact of racial and ethnic disparities on all Connecticut residents from experts and the public over the next several months, I hope the panel will greatly impact the lives of individuals, families, communities and institutions, and the state of Connecticut as a whole.
The panels policy recommendations will appear in a published report in 2005.

19

STRIVING TO BE BETTER
People often talk in the abstract about CHFs philosophy of continuous improvement. But in reality, its based on a simple question: How can we do this better?
Part of the answer is ongoing education for the Foundations staff, board and grantees from reading the latest research to attending retreats and seminars. The other part is a commitment to evaluation monitoring the well-being of the organization and its partners, figuring out what works and what doesnt, and allowing for change. Open for all to see, the Connecticut Health Foundation strives to be a model of philanthropy that can make a difference as a resource, catalyst and partner so that all of Connecticuts people can pursue and enjoy optimum health, in body, mind and spirit.

20

2003 GRANT AWARDS


In 2003, CHFs Board of Directors began approving multi-year, strategic grants, providing 54 community groups, institutions and organizations both local and statewide with nearly $9.1 million in funding, each ranging from $2,000 to $600,000. The grantees listed below represent CHFs ongoing commitment to learning, assessing, and developing systematic changes that will improve the health of all Connecticut residents.

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION

American Medical Association (Statewide)

60,000

To convene a panel of experts who will discuss patient-centered communication as a way to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities. While this project is national, the AMA will develop and field test performance measures and tool kits in Connecticut. To provide a planning grant to participate in a special two-day technical assistance workshop in January 2003.

African-Caribbean American Parents of Children with Disabilities [AFCAMP] (Statewide) African-Caribbean American Parents of Children with Disabilities [AFCAMP] (Statewide) Bridges A Community Support System, Inc. (Milford and West Haven, Milford, Bethany, Orange, Woodbridge, Amity and the lower Naugatuck Valley) Bridgeport Child Advocacy Coalition (Bridgeport)

10,000

50,000

To provide technical assistance and support so that the Foundations local collaborative grantees can effectively engage parents in the mental health system and foster involvement in their local system of care. To strengthen the capacity of the local systems of care by developing a strategic plan. Once this plan is complete, Bridges may apply for future implementation funds.

25,000

31,150

To work with the Board of Education Nutrition Center to adopt more rigorous nutrition standards for school meal programs and with the Physical Education Departments to adopt physical and health education curricula designed to address childhood obesity. Building Capacity grant to develop the ChildFIRST programs long-term sustainability by hiring a consultant and providing additional resources to improve clinical protocols.

Bridgeport Hospital Foundation Child FIRST [Child & Family Interagency Resource, Support, and Training Program] (Bridgeport) Bridgeport Hospital Foundation Child FIRST [Child & Family Interagency Resource, Support, and Training Program] (Bridgeport) Bridgeport ORBIT Oral Health Collaborative (Bridgeport area)

25,000

200,000

A one-year continuation grant to develop an early childhood prevention/ intervention system of care through identification and assessment, home-based inventions, and community education and referrals.

520,000 over four years

To continue working toward the five-year goal of doubling access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in the Greater Bridgeport area (the Childrens Fund of Connecticut contributed an additional $20,000).
21

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION

Capitol Region Conference of Churches, Inc. (Hartford area)

99,645

To establish a health ministry network to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities in the Greater Hartford region and strengthen the capacity of local faith communities to improve the health of individuals and families. Building Capacity grant to increase pastor and clergy support of the health ministry program though a Clergy Self Care and Renewal Program and to provide educational materials to 10 churches on the north side of Hartford. To continue supporting the TeamChild program, which helps children in the juvenile justice system receive appropriate mental health and special education services. To enable the Center to continue protecting and promoting legal rights of poor children. Under this two-year grant, the Center must develop a sustainability plan by the end of the first year of funding. To develop and implement a strategy for increasing parent involvement and satisfaction with the system of care, and to enhance the cultural competency of organizations that provide services to families who have children with severe behavioral problems. To support the Albany/Vine Street Task Force Block Party Initiative in August of 2003. To support the continuation of the Fitness Fun and Cardiovascular Health project at CPAs Juvenile Detention Center in Hartford. To develop and implement a strategy for increasing parent involvement and satisfaction with the system of care, and to enhance the cultural competency of organizations that provide services to families who have children with severe behavioral problems. To create an education campaign for pediatricians about proposed changes to the state Medicaid program. To continue increasing public awareness of the risks of diabetes among Latinos in Connecticut.

Capitol Region Council of Churches, Inc. (Hartford area)

20,000

Center for Childrens Advocacy, Inc. (Hartford area)

12,500

Center for Childrens Advocacy, Inc. (Hartford area)

142,800 over two years

Child Guidance Center of Southern Connecticut (Stamford, New Canaan, Darien, Stamford and Greenwich)

355,000 over three years

Christian Activities Council (Hartford)

2,000

Community Partners in Action (Hartford)

10,000

Community Health Resources (Windsor, Enfield, Windsor, Manchester and Vernon)

375,000

Connecticut Academy of Pediatrics (Statewide) Connecticut Association for United Spanish Action, Inc. [CAUSA] (Statewide) Connecticut Center for Effective Practice (Statewide)

70,700

200,000 over two years

500,000 over two years

To continue its work of identifying and promoting evidence-based practices in the diagnosis and treatment of children with serious and complex emotional/behavioral disorders. The Foundation helped create and establish CCEP to enhance the capacity of the states Connecticut Community KidCare initiative. To support Americas Second Harvest network of nearly 200 food banks and food rescue organizations in six of the states eight counties.

Connecticut Food Bank (Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London and Windham counties) Connecticut Food Share, Inc. (Hartford and Tolland counties)

30,000

15,000

To distribute food to more than 270 local programs that feed hungry people in Hartford and Tolland counties.

22

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION

Connecticut Health Policy Project (Statewide)

63,250

To track 5 to 10 families who lost HUSKY benefits over a one-year period due to changes in eligibility requirements, and to present findings to the community and policymakers. To support litigation and advocacy for HUSKY adults who will not receive oral health services due to state budget cuts. To continue oral health policy education and advocacy throughout Connecticut. To provide technical assistance to increase the number of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) who sign contracts with private dentists in order to expand dental health services among community health center patients. Under this two-year grant, six contracts will be signed between community health centers and private dentists. To support the planning process surrounding a study that highlights the health status of African-Americans in Connecticut.

Connecticut Legal Services (Statewide) Connecticut Oral Health Initiative (Statewide) Connecticut Primary Care Association (Statewide)

10,000

180,000 over two years 300,000 over two years

Connecticut State Conference of the NAACP (National Organization for the Advancement of Colored People) Branches (Statewide) Connecticut Voices for Children (Statewide)

25,000

178,986 over three years 12,650

To conduct an educational campaign that will increase public understanding of the impact of state budget choices on children and other vulnerable populations. To provide organizational support to these national foundation associations. To continue working toward the five-year goal of doubling access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in the Greater Danbury area. Building Capacity grant to expand the capacity for treating HUSKY children by purchasing an additional portable dental unit and supplies, and using dental hygiene students to help treat HUSKY children. To provide scholarships for 20 Connecticut residents to attend the Third New England Regional Conference in Boston on March 2-4, 2003.

Council on Foundations and Grantmakers in Health (Nationwide) Danbury Oral Health Collaborative (Danbury area)

600,000 over four years

Danbury Oral Health Collaborative (Danbury area)

25,000

Eliminating Health Disparities by 2010: Tools, Skills and Networks for Action (Statewide) End Hunger Connecticut, Inc. (Statewide) Environment and Human Health, Inc. (Statewide)

7,000

9,020

To support a Fellow from the Congressional Hunger Center to work on child nutrition needs in Connecticut. To assess how nutrition and physical activity programs affect obesity in school-aged children throughout the state and publish its report, Understanding the Barriers to Good Nutrition and Reducing Obesity in Connecticut Public Schools. To provide technical assistance and support so that the Foundations local collaborative grantees can effectively engage parents in the mental health system and foster involvement in their local system of care.

20,000

Families United for Childrens Mental Health (Statewide)

50,000

23

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION

FAVOR, Inc. (Statewide)

71,500

To continue supporting its member organizations and other groups of parents throughout the state whose children have severe mental and behavioral disorders. Building Capacity grant to modify and implement a national leadership training curriculum for parents of children with special behavioral health needs. To provide scholarships to the May 8, 2003, conference, Unlocking Learning Potential: Relentlessly Pursuing Closing the Achievement and Health Disparities Gap for Connecticuts Children. To develop and implement a model cultural competency policy to meet the needs of its diverse patient population. The hospital plans to establish a community advisory group; conduct and analyze a needs assessment; and develop a long-term strategy to improve medical services for all of its patients. To work toward the five-year goal of doubling access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in the Greater Hartford area during the second year of a five-year initiative (the Childrens Fund of Connecticut contributed an additional $20,000). To continue increasing the quality and quantity of a diverse health care workforce by expanding the number of African-Americans and Latinos eligible for admission into the NVCCs nursing program to at least 28 students per year by 2005. To work toward the five-year goal of doubling access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in the Greater New Britain area during the second year of a five-year initiative (the Childrens Fund of Connecticut contributed an additional $20,000). Building Capacity grant to increase physical activity levels in selected New Haven neighborhoods by purchasing equipment that encourages people to exercise indoors. To continue reducing risk factors associated with chronic illnesses that are disproportionately represented among partner populations. To continue working toward the five-year goal of doubling access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in the Greater New Haven area (the Childrens Fund of Connecticut contributed an additional $20,000). Building Capacity grant to increase collaboration and tracking through an inter-organizational data collection system. To support six food pantries in Windham County.

FAVOR, Inc. (Statewide)

25,000

Foundation for Educational Advancement (Statewide)

5,000

Griffin Health Services Corp. (Lower Naugatuck Valley area)

55,435

Hartford-East Hartford Oral Health Collaborative (Hartford-East Hartford areas)

160,000

Naugatuck Valley Community College Nursing Program (Statewide)

150,000 over two years

New Britain Oral Health Collaborative (New Britain)

160,000

New Haven Family Alliance We Walk In New Haven (New Haven)

10,000

New Haven Family Alliance We Walk In New Haven (New Haven) New Haven Oral Health Collaborative (New Haven area)

350,000 over two years 520,000 over four years

New Haven Oral Health Collaborative (New Haven area) Northeast Food Collaborative (Windham county) O.N.E./ C.H.A.N.E. (Hartford)

25,000

5,000

7,000

To support the Zero Child Abuse Summit in Hartford on Feb. 28, 2003, to make child abuse prevention a community priority.

24

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION

One Connecticut, Inc. (Statewide)

10,000

To support a strategic planning process mapping One Connecticuts work and capacity building over the next three years and to develop an organizing and mobilization strategy. To reduce racial and ethnic disparities among children suffering from asthma, lead poisoning and other injuries.

Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Dept. of Pediatrics (Hartford) Southeast Connecticut Oral Health Collaborative (New London County)

150,000 over two years

200,000

To double access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in New London County over five years; develop a formalized care coordination program; increase care delivery by employing more staff; and open a new dental chair. Building Capacity grant to increase efficiency of care coordinators and dental hygienists by enabling them to spend more time with clients and to expand community awareness of school-based oral health programs. To develop and implement a strategy for increasing parent involvement and satisfaction with the system of care, and to enhance the cultural competency of organizations that provide services to families who have children with severe behavioral problems. Building Capacity grant to increase knowledge and skills of local collaborative members by sending them to the National Conference on Systems of Care and expanding KidCare curriculum training by utilizing KidCare trainees as facilitators. To continue working toward the five-year goal of doubling access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in the Greater Stamford area. Building Capacity grant to increase the collaboratives data collection and analysis capacity in order to more efficiently track HUSKY patients at oral health facilities. To support the FMHs grassroots infrastructure through the purchase of database development and donor tracking software. To underwrite the part-time salary of the site coordinator for the We Can Clubhouse in Manchester. To determine the best methods of increasing the recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of historically underrepresented minority students in health care degree programs. To increase the number of underrepresented minority students in Connecticut pursuing an education in the health sciences. To conduct a comprehensive cultural competence audit and assessment of the Health Center through focus groups, interviews, and an analysis of current policies, practices and procedures, with the purpose of increasing the number of students and faculty from underrepresented groups who are recruited and retained over this three-year grant.

Southeast Connecticut Oral Health Collaborative (New London County)

12,500

Southeast Mental Health System of Care LEARN (Old Lyme and New London County)

365,000 over three years

Southeast Mental Health System of Care LEARN (Old Lyme and New London County)

15,000

Stamford Oral Health Collaborative (Stamford area)

600,000 over four years

Stamford Oral Health Collaborative (Stamford area)

25,000

The Foundation for Mental Health (Statewide) The Foundation for Mental Health (Statewide) University of Connecticut (Statewide)

3,314

10,000

150,000 over 18 months

University of Connecticut Health Center (Statewide) University of Connecticut Health Center (Statewide)

110,000 over three years 319,125 over three years

25

GRANTEE

AMOUNT

PROGRAM

DESCRIPTION

Urban League of Greater Hartford (Hartford) Waterbury Oral Health Collaborative (Waterbury area)

10,000

To maintain and enhance a newly designed intake and tracking system.

160,000

To work toward the five-year goal of doubling access to and utilization of oral health services among HUSKY children in the Greater Waterbury area during the second year of a five-year initiative (the Childrens Fund of Connecticut contributed an additional $20,000). Building Capacity grant to expand capacity to collect and analyze data across all collaborative organizations. To develop a strategic plan for the Family Focus Partnership Advisory Board (FFPAB) that will increase parent satisfaction with services provided under KidCare, the states community-based, family-centered and culturally competent mental health care delivery system. To continue increasing breast/cervical cancer awareness, knowledge, screening and early detection behaviors among African-American women in medically underserved areas of Connecticut. To help support the semi-annual newsletter, Speaking of Health, and print an additional 40,000 copies of the October 2003 issue.

Waterbury Oral Health Collaborative (Waterbury area) Waterbury Youth Service System, Inc. (Waterbury)

12,500

375,000 over three years

Witness Project of Connecticut, Inc. (Bridgeport)

100,000 over two years

Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (Waterbury, New Haven, Hartford and Bridgeport areas) Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center (Waterbury, New Haven, Hartford and Bridgeport areas) Yale University School of Medicine, Dept. of Pediatrics (New Haven)

10,000

399,000 over two years

To continue supporting the PREDICT program, which develops policies, programs and practices that reduce diabetes-related health disparities among African-Americans living in New Haven and Hartford. Building Capacity grant to integrate lessons learned into the Adopt-aDoc program by making improvements to the curriculum of those pediatric residents who participate in the program to improve outcomes and effectiveness. To continue funding the Adopt-a-Doc Program, which provides pediatric residents with the knowledge, skills, and expertise to address ethnic and cultural disparities in the health and development of children.

15,000

Yale University School of Medicine, Dept. of Pediatrics (New Haven)

220,774 over two years

TOTAL

$9,050,804

CHF offers several types of grants, primarily in the areas of oral health, childrens mental health, and racial and ethnic health disparities. For detailed information on the grant application guidelines and grantmaking process, please visit our website www.cthealth.org.

26

STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES
Revenues and Gains Interest & dividend income from investments Net realized investment gains Net unrealized investment gains Total revenues and gains Expenses and Losses Grants & program related expenses General & administrative expenses Investment expenses Net realized investment gains (losses) Net unrealized investment gains (losses) Total expenses and losses Change in unrestricted & total net assets Net assets, beginning of year Net assets at end of year 10,102,181* 493,895 525,991 3,684,121 471,770 466,224 4,381,188 6,865,431 15,868,734 (11,965,004) 128,529,061 $116,564,057 2003 3,343,287 249,379 16,627,157 20,219,823 2002 3,903,730

3,903,730

11,122,067 9,097,756 116,564,057 $125,661,813

STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION


Assets Cash & cash equivalents Dividends & interest receivable Security deposits Prepaid expenses Marketable securities Escrow deposits Investment in ConnectiCare Holding Co., Inc. Fixed assets, net of accumulated depreciation Total assets Liabilities and Net Assets
*Reflects first-time recognition of multi-year grants. Our auditors have rendered an unqualified opinion on our financial statements. Copies of our audited financial statements may be obtained by contacting Foundation staff or by visiting our website at www.cthealth.org.

2003 4,656,895 39,108 1,676 45,866 127,740,656

2002 1,831,398 24,154 1,676 9,643 107,726,087 1,500,000 7,500,000 58,491 $118,651,449

41,381 $132,525,582

Liabilities Accounts payable & accrued liabilities Grants payable Total liabilities Net assets - unrestricted Total liabilities and net assets

453,124 6,410,645 6,863,769 125,661,813 $132,525,582

180,729 1,906,663 2,087,392 116,564,057 $118,651,449

27

THE CONNECTICUT H E A LT H F O U N D AT I O N

STAFF

OFFICERS

Patricia Baker President & CEO Bill Crimi Director of Program Monette Goodrich Director of Communications & Public Affairs Roslyn Hamilton Program Officer Nancy Nolan Grants/Office Manager Carol Pollack Director of Finance & Operations Jennifer Pomales Program Associate Eliz Valentin

Leo Canty, Chair Susan Addiss, Vice Chair Corine T. Norgaard, Treasurer Michael Williams, Secretary

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Jean Adnopoz Raymond Andrews, Jr. W. Renata Dixon Arthur Evans, Ph.D. Laura Green Katherine Ill, M.D. Peter Libassi Maximino Medina, Jr. Henry Parker Jean Rexford Arthur Sperling, D.M.D. Lynelle Thomas, M.D.

Administrative Assistant

28

Writing: Don Heymann Design: E.K. Weymouth Design Photography: 2004 galezucker/www.gzucker.com Conference photos: Edwina Stevenson Researcher: Rhea Hirshman Printing: Hitchcock Printing

The Connecticut Health Foundation (CHF) will be moving to a new location with the Community Foundation of Greater New Britain, Inc. We look forward to moving to our new address 74 Vine Street, Suite 200, New Britain, CT 06052 by September 2004.

270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 357 Farmington, Connecticut 06032 phone 860.409.7773 fax 860.409.7763 www.cthealth.org