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THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO
2010-2011 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

Welcome to UTEP .................................................................................. Enrollment Services .............................................................................. Financial Information............................................................................. Academic Regulations .......................................................................... Student Services .................................................................................... Colleges and Degree Programs ............................................................ Academic and Research Facilities ................................................... Core Curriculum ................................................................................ Study Abroad and Exchange Programs .......................................... Undergraduate Studies ..................................................................... College of Business Administration ................................................ College of Education ......................................................................... College of Engineering ..................................................................... College of Health Sciences............................................................... College of Liberal Arts ...................................................................... College of Science ............................................................................ School of Nursing ............................................................................. University College ............................................................................. Faculty and Staff .................................................................................... Index .......................................................................................................

Campus Map ..........................................................................................
August 2010
Published by the University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968-0599 STATEMENT OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY To the extent provided by applicable law, no person shall be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under, any program or activity sponsored or conducted by The University of Texas System, or any of its institutions on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, veteran status, genetic information, sexual orientation, or disability. DISCLAIMER This catalog is a general information publication only. It is not intended to nor does it contain all regulations that relate to students. The provisions of this catalog do not constitute a contract, expressed or implied, between any applicant, student, or faculty member and The University of Texas at El Paso or The University of Texas System. The University of Texas at El Paso reserves the right to withdraw courses at any time, and to change fees or tuition, calendar, curriculum, degree requirements, graduation procedures, and any other information or requirements affecting students. Changes will become effective whenever the proper authorities so determine and will apply to both prospective students and to those already enrolled.

Welcome to UTEP
What’s Inside
General Information ............................................................................. 5 Our History .................................................................................... 5 Our Campus .................................................................................. 5 Our Mission.................................................................................... 6 Our Vision ...................................................................................... 6 Our Students.................................................................................. 8 Accreditation .................................................................................. 6 Board of Regents ................................................................................. 8 Officers .......................................................................................... 8 Members........................................................................................ 8 Office of the Chancellor ................................................................. 8

GENERAL INFORMATION/4

Administrative Officers ....................................................................... 8 Academic Calendar.............................................................................. 9

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

GENERAL INFORMATION/5

General Information
Welcome to the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)! This undergraduate catalog contains information about UTEP‖s success in combining academic and research excellence with innovative programs and services, outstanding faculty, and a university-wide commitment to fostering student success. A nationally recognized university with faculty and staff who are dedicated to your academic success, UTEP offers a broad range of academic programs that encourage you to become involved in the discovery and creation of knowledge. UTEP is a friendly place where relationships are easily formed among fellow students, staff members, and faculty More than 73 percent of our student population is Mexican-American. About 50 percent are firstgeneration college students. UTEP is the first-choice institution for most students in our region: Ninetyfour percent of freshman students tell us that UTEP was their first or second choice for college. UTEP is also the choice of the region‖s top students who enroll in public institutions in Texas: F ifty-seven percent of El Paso County‖s top-ten percent high school graduates who are enrolled in public institutions in Texas attend UTEP. UTEP‖s achievements extend far beyond the University‖s traditional strengths in science and engineering. UTEP has received national acclaim for innovative programs in business, fine arts, education, the humanities, health sciences, and nursing. The Carnegie Foundation ranks UTEP in the Doctoral/Research University-Intensive category, placing UTEP among the top seven percent of all colleges and universities in the United States. The following pages of this catalog introduce you to our policies, our degrees, majors and minors, and our curricula. As you review them, we hope you know that our commitment to you is to offer you the highest-quality education in a supportive community. OUR HISTORY Located on the U.S.-Mexico border in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez binational metropolitan area of more than two million people, UTEP is the largest Mexican-American-majority research university in the United States. In this unique multicultural setting, the University offers a rich variety of academic programs and outstanding support services, providing academic excellence for students. The second-oldest academic component of The University of Texas System, UTEP was established in 1914 as the Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy to prepare professionals for the mining industry of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico. Since its inception, the campus has featured architecture derived from the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan. UTEP‖s unique buildings are the only examples of this ancient architecture in the Western Hemisphere. The style, characterized by thick, sloping outer walls accented with a band of elaborate brickwork, was suggested by Kathleen Worrell, the wife of the college‖s first dean, after she saw photographs of Bhutanese monasteries in an issue of National Geographic Magazine. Noted El Paso architect Henry Trost designed the first buildings, and subsequent architects have continued the theme through more than 90 years of campus expansion. The college‖s curriculum expanded in 1927 with the addition of liberal arts courses. The first Master of Arts degree was established in 1940. The institution was renamed Texas Western College in 1949 and the University of Texas at El Paso in 1967. Enrollment has grown to more than 20,000 students, and the scope of programs has expanded to 81 Bachelor‖s, 78 Master‖s, 14 Doctoral degrees and three combined degrees (Bachelor‖s/Master‖s or Master‖s/Master‖s), all designed to meet the needs of an increasingly industrialized and more diverse West Texas. OUR CAMPUS

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

GENERAL INFORMATION/6

The 367-acre UTEP campus comprises 87 buildings with more than four million square feet of space for facilities that support academic excellence. The 125,000-square-foot Undergraduate Learning Center features multimedia computer and distance learning technology. The UTEP Library contains more than one million resources, the new Collaborative Learning Center with 224 open-access computers, a lobby café, and an extensive art collection. The 362,000-square-foot Engineering Sciences Complex houses many research opportunities for students in facilities such as the W.M. Keck Center for 3D Innovation with $4-million of equipment, including 17 rapid-prototyping machines and facilities for tissue engineering. Nearby, the Biosciences Research Building provides state-of-the-art equipment to address biomedical and environmental problems. Computer laboratories are located throughout the campus. The Fox Fine Arts galleries, recital halls, and studios present art, theatre, music, and dance programs. Athletic facilities including the Don Haskins Center, the 52,247-seat Sun Bowl Stadium, and the Larry K. Durham Sports Center provide student-athletes a range of world-class resources including a strength and conditioning center, a sports medicine center, a student-athlete lounge and computer center, locker rooms, coaches‖ offices, meeting rooms, and the “Hall of Champions.” With its strategic location on the U.S.-Mexico border, UTEP is a nationally recognized leader in creating excellent academic opportunities for the people of the El Paso region and a stimulating context for students from elsewhere to pursue their education. Quality academic programs and a robust research agenda mark UTEP as an innovative force in American higher education for the 21st century.

OUR MISSION The University of Texas at El Paso is dedicated to the advancement of the El Paso region through education, creative and artistic production, and the generation, interpretation, application and dissemination of knowledge. UTEP embraces its role as an intellectual, cultural, and socio-economic asset to the region, offering programs to meet human-resource needs and contribute to the quality of life in the region. As a public university, UTEP is committed to providing access and educational opportunity to the people of the El Paso region and the State of Texas. UTEP‖s mission of ensuring access is coupled with a commitment to excellence, reflected in rigorous programs which prepare students to make significant contributions to their professions, their communities and the world. As a research/doctoral institution, UTEP fosters a climate of scholarly inquiry, with a special focus on applying innovative interdisciplinary approaches to explore and address major issues that confront the multicultural U.S.-Mexico border region.

OUR VISION The University of Texas at El Paso will be internationally recognized as a preeminent model for urban st public research universities in the 21 century. It will serve as a gateway to an improved quality of life for people of the Paso del Norte region, which includes far-west Texas, northern Mexico, and southern New Mexico. UTEP will offer a broad range of undergraduate, professional and doctoral programs that support the workforce needs of the region and the state, and will provide lifelong educational opportunities for area residents.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

GENERAL INFORMATION/7

UTEP will be recognized nationally as the preeminent institution in fostering student participation and success, especially young people, working adults, returning students, and lifelong learners from socioeconomic groups that have been traditionally under-represented in U.S. higher education. UTEP graduates will be known for the high quality of their academic preparation and eagerly recruited by employers and the most selective graduate and professional schools in the country. UTEP will be nationally and internationally recognized for its exemplary accomplishments in generating and applying knowledge about emergent global issues, with a special focus on those having a direct regional impact. UTEP will continue to be the leading research university in the nation with a majority Mexican-American student body, and through its excellent academic programs, will help meet the demands of American enterprise for a diverse and highly educated workforce. UTEP will be known for its commitment to diversity in its recruitment of faculty, staff, and administrators who serve as role models and mentors for its largely first-generation, Mexican-American student population. UTEP will build on the strength of its core disciplines, the promise of new and emerging areas of academic excellence, and the resources of its U.S.-Mexico border context to develop innovative and multidisciplinary strategies to address major issues that confront the Paso del Norte region. UTEP’s centers of excellence will be at the forefront of addressing emergent national challenges in such areas as Hispanic health disparities, the education of U.S. Hispanics, homeland security, and national defense. UTEP will be acknowledged as the principal human and economic development engine for the Paso del Norte region and as a catalyst for technology transfer, commercialization, regional innovation, and entrepreneurship. UTEP’s role in the El Paso Collaborative for Academic Excellence will be recognized as the preeminent national model for successfully raising aspirations and academic achievement of K-16 students through its development of a partnership among K-12 school districts, the community college, civic and philanthropic organizations, business leaders, and researchers. UTEP will be recognized for incorporating into both graduate and undergraduate curricula research that engages students, cultivates intellectual curiosity, and promotes innovation and creative thinking. UTEP will be internationally recognized for its artistic and creative productions that are shaped by the confluence of cultures, values, and aesthetics of the U.S.-Mexico border region. UTEP will be known for its commitment to play a role in creating educational opportunities for residents of northern Mexico and fostering the cross-border economic development essential to the long-term resolution of border issues.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

GENERAL INFORMATION/8

UTEP will be known for its success in integrating public service and civic engagement into its teaching, learning, research, and creative activities, and its graduates will be prepared to engage in civic affairs and make meaningful contributions to society. UTEP will be recognized as an engaged partner in sponsoring and enhancing cultural, artistic, athletic and entertainment activities and events in the Paso del Norte region. UTEP’s intercollegiate athletics program will build on the legacy of its transformat ive NCAA men‖s basketball championship to be recognized for its achievement of high performance standards in both men‖s and women‖s athletic competitions and in the classroom. UTEP will be known for its effectiveness in containing costs and generating additional resources to ensure a high quality educational experience for its students and for its efficient and prudent stewardship of the resources entrusted to it by students, the State of Texas, granting agencies and donors. OUR STUDENTS Students who attend UTEP come from a varied mix of social, cultural, and economic backgrounds that closely mirror the population of the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez region. Approximately 73 per cent of UTEP‖s students are Hispanic, two-thirds work while in college, and more than half are first-generation college students. UTEP students typically represent more than 47 states and 74 countries, with about nine percent coming from Mexico. ACCREDITATION The University of Texas at El Paso is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: telephone number: 404 679 4500) to award bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees. Information on accreditation by separate accrediting bodies for specific programs is presented in the specific college and school sections of this catalog.

Board of Regents
OFFICERS COLEEN MCHUGH, Chairwoman PAUL FOSTER, Vice Chairman JANIECE LONGORIA, Vice Chairwoman FRANCIE A. FREDERICK, General Counsel to the Board of Regents MEMBERS Terms expire February 1, 2011* R. STEVEN “STEVE” HICKS, Austin JANIECE M. LONGORIA, Houston COLLEEN McHUGH, Corpus Christi Terms expire February 1, 2013 JAMES D. DANNENBAUM, Houston

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

BOARD OF REGENTS/8

PAUL FOSTER, El Paso PRINTICE L. GARY, Dallas Terms expire February 1, 2015 JAMES R. HUFFINES, Austin WM. EUGENE “GENE” POWELL, San Antonio ROBERT L. STILLWELL, Houston Student Regent with term to expire May 31, 2010 KARIM A. MEIJER * The actual expiration date of the term depends on the date the successor is appointed, qualified, and takes the oath of office. OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR FRANCISCO G. CIGARROA, Chancellor DAVID B. PRIOR, Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs KENNETH I. SHINE, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs SCOTT C. KELLEY, Executive Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs TONYA MOTEN BROWN, Vice Chancellor for Administration BARRY D. BURGDORF, Vice Chancellor and General Counsel GERI H. MALANDRA, Vice Chancellor for Strategic Management BARRY McBEE, Vice Chancellor for Governmental Relations KEITH McDOWELL, Vice Chancellor for Research and Technology Transfer RANDA S. SAFADY, Vice Chancellor for External Relations WILLIAM H. SHUTE, Vice Chancellor for Federal Relations

Administrative Officers

DIANA S. NATALICIO, President B.S., St. Louis University; M.A., Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin RICHARD S. JARVIS, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs B.A., Ph.D., Cambridge University, England RICARDO ADAUTO III, Executive Vice President for Advancement and Oversight B.S., The University of Texas at El Paso; J.D., The University of California at Berkeley School of Law CYNTHIA VIZCAÍNO VILLA, CPA, Vice President for Business Affairs B.B.A., M.A., The University of Texas at El Paso ROBERTO OSEGUEDA, Vice President for Research B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Texas A & M University JOSE RIOJAS, Vice President for Strategic Initiatives B.S., The United States Military Academy, West Point STEPHEN RITER, P.E., Vice President for Information Resources and Planning

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

BOARD OF REGENTS/9

B.A., B.S.E.E., Rice University; M.S., Ph.D., The University of Houston RICHARD PADILLA, Vice President for Student Affairs B.A., Bellarmine College; M.Div., Catholic Theological Union; Ed.D, The University of Houston ROBERT STULL, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics B.S., M.S., Kansas State University ESTRELLA ESCOBAR, Assistant to the President B.A., M.A., The University of Texas at El Paso ___________________________________

KATHLEEN A CURTIS, Dean, College of Health Sciences B.S., Northeastern University; M.S., San Jose State University; Ph.D., The University of California, Los Angeles HOWARD C. DAUDISTEL, Dean, College of Liberal Arts B.A., M.A., Ph.D., The University of California, Santa Barbara ANNY MORROBEL-SOSA, Dean, College of Science B.Sc., University of Puerto Rico; M.S., State University of New York at Stony Brook; Ph.D., University of Southern California ROBERT NACHTMANN, Dean, College of Business Administration B.S., City College of New York; M.B.A., Long Island University; D.B.A., Indiana University ELIAS PROVENCIO-VASQUEZ, Dean, School of Nursing RICHARD T. SCHOEPHOERSTER, Dean, College of Engineering B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The University of Iowa DENNIS SODEN, Dean, University College B.A., University of California at Riverside; M.A., University of Southern California; Ph.D., Washington State University JOSEFINA V. TINAJERO, Dean, College of Education B.S., M.Ed., The University of Texas at El Paso; Ed.D., Texas A & M University PATRICIA WITHERSPOON, Dean of the Graduate School B.S., University of Texas at Austin; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Academic Calendar
Listed below are the tentative 2010-2011 academic calendars. For detailed information or changes, students should visit the academic calendar Web site, http://www.utep.edu/register. For mini-term dates, visit the Class Schedule Web page, http://www.utep.edu/register, (under Registration Information), or call the Registration and Records Office at 915.747.5544.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ACADEMIC CALENDAR/10

Fall 2010 Undergraduate admission application priority due date ($15.00 late fee begins) Undergraduate admission date for international applicants (all documents due) Web Registration Undergraduate admission document due date Late Registration and schedule adjustment prior to classes Classes begin Late Registration and Schedule Adjustment, continued Last day of class Last day of Final Examinations May 1 May 1 April July 1 Aug. 19-20 Aug. 23 Aug. 23-26 Dec. 2 Dec. 10

Undergraduate admission application priority due date ($15.00 late fee begins) Undergraduate admission due date for international applicants Telephone and Web Registration for Wintermester and Spring Undergraduate admissions document due date Late Registration and schedule adjustment prior to classes for Spring Classes begin for Spring Late Registration and Schedule Adjustment, continued Last day of class Last day of Final Examinations

Spring 2011 Oct. 1 Oct. 1 October Nov. 30 Jan. 13-14 Jan. 18 Jan. 18-21 May 5 May 13

Summer 2010 Undergraduate admission application priority due date ($15.00 late fee begins) Undergraduate admission date for international applicants (all documents due) Telephone and Web Registration for Maymester and Summer I and II Undergraduate admission document due date March 1 March 1 April April 30

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ACADEMIC CALENDAR/11

Late Registration and schedule adjustment prior to classes for Summer I and 8-week Classes begin for Summer I and 8-week Late Registration and Schedule Adjustment, continued Last day of class for Summer I Last day of Final Examinations for Summer I Late Registration and schedule adjustment prior to classes for Summer II Classes begin for Summer II Late Registration and Schedule Adjustment, continued Last day of class for Summer II and 8-week Last day of Final Examinations for Summer II and 8-week

June 3

June 6 June 6 June 30 July 1 July 1 July 5 July 5 July 29 August 1-2

Enrollment Services
What’s Inside
Enrollment Services .......................................................................... 12 Admissions and Recruitment ....................................................... 12 Financial Aid ............................................................................... 29 Student Assessment and Testing ............................................... 37 New Student Orientation .............................................................. 39 Military Services ........................................................................... 40 Registration and Records ............................................................ 40

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/12

Enrollment Services
Enrollment Services consists of six departments: Admissions and Recruitment, Financial Aid, Student Assessment and Testing, New Student Orientation, Military Services, and Registration and Records.

Craig Westman, Associate Provost for Enrollment Management 102 Academic Services Building 915.747.5890 cewestman@utep.edu Luisa Havens, Executive Director for Enrollment Services 102 Academic Services Building 915.747.5890 lmhavens@utep.edu

Admissions and Recruitment
102 Academic Services Building Phone: 915.747.5890 Fax: 915.747.8893 futureminers@utep.edu www.utep.edu/admit UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION The Office of Admissions and Recruitment assists students with enrollment into the University. It provides information about admission requirements and procedures, financial resources, academic program offerings, and general information about the University. In addition, this office determines all students‖ eligibility for admission and evaluates transfer credit according to standards set by Texas law, the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System, and UTEP faculty. All prospective students are encouraged to apply online through Apply Texas. This electronic application is used by all Texas public universities and can be found at www.applytexas.org. Admission applications are also available at the following locations: 1. UTEP Office of Admissions and Recruitment 2. www.utep.edu/admit 3. Counseling offices of most El Paso-area high schools 4. El Paso Community College campuses 5. UTEP East Side Book Store (1452 North Zaragoza Road, El Paso, Texas 79936) Application Dates and Fees Applications for admission and all supporting documents are due by the following priority dates: Fall Spring Summer May 1 October 1 March 1 All checks must be made payable to The University of Texas at El Paso.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

All documents submitted to the University become part of the official files of the University and cannot be released or returned to the student or to another institution. $15. Students who refuse to submit to a background check or who do not pass the background check may be dismissed from the program. Students completing high school or college studies in foreign countries should refer to the section on International Student Admission for admission and testing requirements. an American Consulate.S. The following first-year and transfer admission sections apply to citizens.FINANCIAL AID/13 All applications and documents from international students must be received by the priority date and must be accompanied by a non-refundable $65. Documents Required: Freshmen applicants must submit the following: Application for admission found at www. and to international students who are completing high school or college studies in the United States. Official* SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test). military credit or credit from specialized schools) should apply for admission as freshmen. Secondary Admission Requirements: Admission to the University does not assure admission into any programs that have secondary admission requirements. and official test scores must be sent directly from the appropriate testing agency. as designated by Texas Education Code.00 late application fee if applying after the priority deadline . rank. To be considered official. and graduation (actual or expected) date. Children of public servants killed or fatally injured in the line of duty. dollars. Students must submit all admission documents. Admission Policies and Procedures The requirements for undergraduate admission to the University are described below and are based on the student‖s previous academic preparation. AP. academic transcripts must be mailed directly from the issuing high school to the Office of Admission and Recruitment. Certain programs require students to submit to and satisfactorily complete a background check review as a condition of admission and/or participation in education experiences. permanent residents of the United States. ACT (American College Test). First-year Admission Documents Required Applicants who have never attended another college or university or have never earned college credit through non-traditional methods (e. Official high school transcript indicating adequate high school preparation (the Recommended High School Program or Advanced High School Program is required). All transcripts in languages other than English or Spanish must be accompanied by an English translation prepared by the educational institution. or ACCUPLACER score report.803(e).00 check or money order in U.org.applytexas. Official transcripts must be sent directly from the schools attended. are eligible for automatic admission if they meet Universityestablished requirements. CLEP) while in high school also are considered freshmen. outlined below. Students who have earned college-level credits by participating in a dual enrollment program or have earned credit by examination (IB.803 of the Texas Education Code as amended by HB 3826. This policy is in accordance with section 51. or a certified English translator.g. Students should consult with the appropriate department to determine any other requirements that must be met. made payable to The University of Texas at El Paso. Section 51. directly to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment.

ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/14 International Baccalaureate transcript. DSST (DANTES Subject Standardized Tests).. Lang. or Principles of Technology I. must also meet the 24-credit requirement (26 credits starting with graduating class of 2011). & Geometry. AP Calculus AB. AP Physics. AP Statistics. CLEP (College Level Examination Program). Arts. AP Biology. IB Mathematical Studies. IB Physics. concurrent enrollment in college courses. (26 credits starting with graduating class of 2011). or UTEP departmental examination scores. History Studies Since Reconstruction (One Credit) U. if applicable * SAT. Earth and Space Science. Note: IPC cannot be taken as the final or 4th year of science. These include: Astronomy. II. military AARTS or SMART transcript. if applicable GED certificate if the applicant did not graduate from high school Official* score report(s) verifying AP (Advanced Placement).S. Not more than one course may be chosen from each of the areas to satisfy this requirement: (a) IPC (Integrated Physics and Chemistry). Pre-calculus. AP Chemistry. or IB Chemistry. World History Studies (One Credit) World Geography Studies (One Credit) U. Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems. II. III. and IV English I and II for Speakers of Other Languages (SOL) may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency Required: Algebra I. ACT or ACCUPLACER scores recorded as part of the high school transcript are also considered official. but must be taken before the senior year of high school. in addition to any other requirements set by their high schools. Science 3 credits (4 credits starting with graduating class of 2011) Two courses from two of the following areas. Engineering. IB Mathematics Higher Level. Mathematical Standard Level. Aquatic Science. (b) Chemistry. AP Calculus BC. or IB Biology. (c) Physics. AP Computer Science. Medical Microbiology and Pathophysiology. All other test scores must be sent to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment directly from the testing agency. & Reading 4 Credits Mathematics 3 credits (4 credits starting with graduating class of 2011) Courses English I. Graduates from non-Texas or private high schools. High School Preparation All new first-year students applying to UTEP within five years of graduation from a recognized Texas high school must have completed the Recommended High School Program. AP Environmental Systems. IB Mathematics Standard Level. The fourth year of science may be selected from the laboratory-based courses listed in Chapter 112. Principles of Technology II. Concurrent enrollment in college courses. Subject English. Government (One-Half Credit) Economics with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits Social Studies 3 1/2 credits Economics 1/2 credit UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .S. IB Adv. IB Environmental Systems. Scientific Research and Design. The Recommended Program consists of 24 credits. SAT II Subject Exams. Independent Study in Mathematics. One course must be Biology. The 4th credit may be selected from the following: Mathematical Models with Applications*. Environmental Systems.

students must take the ACCUPLACER to determine first-semester course placement in reading.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/15 Physical Education 1 credit Fine Arts 1 credit Lang. or Driver Education (one-half credit) All courses counting toward meeting the credit requirements listed here must have been completed prior to the graduation date posted on the student ’s official transcript. and mathematics and must register for these courses with the approval of their advisors.) Communication Applications may be counted towards the six elective credits. writing. ROTC. Approved Private Programs. state-approved innovative courses. JROTC (one to four credits). but were unable to complete the remainder of the curriculum solely because courses necessary to complete it were unavailable as a result of course scheduling. Applicants who are not in the top 10% of their graduating classes can qualify for admission based on their high school rankings and standardized test scores. first-year students who wish to attend The University of Texas at El Paso. Other Than English 2 credits Speech 1/2 Credit Electives 6 Credits Total 24 credits (26 credits starting with graduating class of 2011) The following may be substituted for the 5 physical education courses available: Drill Team. Currently. there is no limit on number of credits or substitutions allowed.*** Courses may be found in 19 TAC Chapter 17 Must consist of Level I and Level II in the same language Communication Applications Required (This course may also count as an elective. or certain career & technical education courses. first-year students if they meet any of the criteria listed below: HS Rank in Class Top 25% Minimum SAT Combined Score (Verbal + Math) No minimum. Path 1: Top 10% Graduates Individuals are admissible to UTEP as first-time. but scores must be submitted UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . but scores must be submitted OR OR Minimum ACT Composite Score No minimum. or through UTEP‖s Reviewed Admission Programs. Marching Band. lack of enrollment capacity. ACCUPLACER scores. Cheerleading. Path 2: High School Rank and Test Scores Texas high school graduates and all graduates of out-of-state high schools are admissible as first-time. or another cause not within the students’ control. ADMISSION PATHWAYS There are four pathways to admission for first-time. Athletics. first-year students if they graduated from a Texas high school in the top 10% of their graduating classes and submit all required credentials. Students may satisfy the requirement above if their official high school transcript or diploma states that they completed the portion of the recommended curriculum that was available. After admission. Dance I-IV. Select courses from the list approved by SBOE for grades 9-12 (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills).

public schools outside of Region 19. Completion of the Recommended High School Program or Advanced High School Program is required. The Accelerated Preparation Program and the START Program offer mathematics and/or English (reading and writing) instruction during the first term of enrollment to prepare students for successful completion of collegelevel mathematics and English courses. El Paso Community College. Students admitted under UTEP‖s Reviewed Admission Programs must attend New Student Orientation. complete at least UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . students must take the ACCUPLACER to determine first-semester course placement in reading. GED. Although taking and submitting the ACT or SAT are not an admission requirements for Top 10% students and students choosing the College Readiness path. home schools. unaccredited HS. first-year students. or 1010 OR 21 home-school program After admission. To find an ACCUPLACER test site outside of El Paso. must be submitted to complete their admission files. Applicants who do not meet these criteria might qualify for admission based on their ACCUPLACER scores or through UTEP‖s Reviewed Admission Pro grams. including required test scores. All required credentials. Path 4: Reviewed Admission Programs First time.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/16 Second 25% Third 25 % Fourth 25% 920 970 1010 OR OR OR 19 20 21 No HS rank. The ACCUPLACER test can be taken at UTEP. Path 3: College Readiness Graduates of public high schools in Texas Educational Service Center Region 19 take the ACCUPLACER placement examination in their junior or senior year as a component of the El Paso Region College Readiness Initiative (CRI). students are strongly encouraged to take the ACT and/or SAT to ensure eligibility for scholarships and other types of merit-based financial assistance. be advised every term by an academic advisor. If they qualify to take UTEP college-level courses in English and mathematics. or those who have GEDs can also take the ACCUPLACER and be admitted to UTEP using the College Readiness standard after determining that the Recommended or Advanced High School program requirement is met. writing.5223. first-year students who have completed the Recommended High School Program or Advanced High School Program but do not meet the admission requirements as stated in Paths 1 through 3 are eligible for admission through the University‖s Reviewed Admission Programs.607. or ACCUPLACER test sites around the country. Applicants who do not meet these criteria might qualify for admission through UTEP‖s Reviewed Admission Programs. they are admitted as first-time. Students are encouraged to begin math and English requirements during the first semester of enrollment and continue until complete. check with college and university testing offices in the student‖s area or call the College Board toll-free at 866. and mathematics and must register for these courses with the approval of their advisors. The ACCUPLACER scores required to take college-level courses are as follows: Reading = 78-120 Writing: Essay = 5 + Sentence Skills = 80-120 or Essay = 6-8 College Mathematics = 20-80 Graduates of private high schools.

Under extenuating circumstances. first-year students who are residents of Texas and who do not meet the requirements for admission as stated in Pathways 1. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . social sciences. Once these requirements have been met. first-year students. Summer enrollment is recommended for START students. English and math courses required based on the students ACCUPLACER scores must be included in the minimum nine (9) hours. If the student does not meet these requirements during the first semester but has at least a 1. the student is fully admitted to UTEP and can change majors. START Program (Success Through Academic Readiness Today) First-time.0 grade point average (GPA). mathematics. START students must: Enroll in the College of Liberal Arts as START majors Attend New Student Orientation Be advised by the Academic Advising Center Earn a grade of C or better in at least nine (9) hours of prescribed courses from at least two of the following areas: English. Admission is based on ACCUPLACER test scores. and earn a minimum 2.0 GPA was maintained. Students who score in the ACCUPLACER ranges outlined below will automatically be admitted into the Accelerated Preparation Program: Reading = 31-77 Writing: Essay = 3-5**+ Sentence Skills = 20-79 Arithmetic = 71-120 **Students scoring 3 or 4 on the essay exam will enroll in English 0311. Apply for readmission through the Office of Admissions and Recruitment after attending another college or university at which a minimum of 12 semester hours of college-level work with grades of C or better in each course were earned and a minimum cumulative 2. During the first semester at UTEP. natural science.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/17 nine (9) hours of courses based on ACCUPLACER scores.5 cumulative GPA.0 must be maintained and academic advising is required. foreign language. and humanities. Accelerated Preparation Program Admission to the Accelerated Preparation Program is open to Texas residents and nonresidents who are first-time. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2. or 2. Maintain a minimum 2. students scoring 5 and falling within the sentence skills score above will be required to enroll in a supplemental English lab in addition to English 1311. an ineligible START student can petition for reinstatement through the Academic Advising Center. START students who do not satisfy these requirements have two options if they wish to re-enroll at UTEP: 1. or 3 are eligible for provisional admission through the University‖s START Program. students in the program must enroll in the English and/or math courses required based on their ACCUPLACER scores. Apply for readmission and reinstatement by the START Manager after two calendar years have elapsed since the end of the last period of attendance.0 GPA. an additional START semester will be allowed. Students in the Accelerated Preparation Program will be advised by advisors in their respective academic colleges or the Academic Advising Center. 2.

for example. High school instruction in Spanish. The ACCUPLACER can be taken locally at UTEP. In addition. Such material can document. or call the College Board toll-free at 866. Graduates of U. A minimum score of 1000 is required.S. A minimum score of 500 on the paper-based exam. and awards. Graduates of high schools outside the United States must demonstrate proficiency in English that will enable the successful pursuit of universitylevel work. bilingual proficiency. Students UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . or at ACCUPLACER test sites around the country. Once ESOL 1610 has been completed with a grade of C or better.5223. types of courses taken. Students who completed the Spanish version of the GED with an average standard score of 45 or higher. Letters of recommendation from high school teachers. Students whose high school institution was not in English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). To find an ACCUPLACER test site outside of El Paso. the ACCUPLACER placement test is required to determine academic placement in English and math courses.607.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/18 Individual Review Applicants who have completed the Recommended High School Program or Advanced High School Program but do not meet the requirements for first-year admission described may apply to be reviewed on an individual basis. the applicant‖s work experience. 73 on the computerbased exam. Students who completed their high school education in Spanish and do not pass the TOEFL with the minimum scores required should take the Prueba de Aptitud Academica (PAA). status as a first-generation college student. Testing Requirements for Students Whose High School Language of Instruction Was Not English High school instruction in a language other than English . High Schools Five or More Years Ago First-year applicants who graduated from high school five or more years ago are not required to take the SAT or ACT. including child or elder care or other major responsibilities. Students with Non-traditional High School Preparation Students who received a high school equivalency certificate are eligible for admission with an SAT score of 1500 out of 2400. honors. To find an ACCUPLACER test site outside of El Paso. responsibilities while attending school. Applicants can submit additional material or an essay for consideration in evaluating their potential for success at UTEP. counselors. check with college and university testing offices in the student‖s area or call the College Board toll-free at 866. must also submit scores of 1000 or higher on the PAA (Prueba de Aptitud Academica). The ACCUPLACER can be taken locally at UTEP. strengths and talents that might not be apparent from the academic record. Performance on standardized tests is also considered. check with college and university testing offices in the student‖s area. Students admitted on the basis of the PAA must enroll as a Programa Interamericano Estudiantil (PIE) major in the College of Liberal Arts and enroll in bilingual and ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) courses. socioeconomic background. at El Paso Community College. The UTEP school code for the TOEFL is 6829. and grades earned in specific courses. or at ACCUPLACER test sites around the country. students can change majors. or higher. or equivalent ACT college readiness score.607. and 61 on the Internet exam is required. This review gives consideration to the applicant‖s high school and college records. and activity leaders are also appropriate. and experiences in surmounting obstacles in pursuit of higher education. commitment to a particular field of study. achievements. supervisors. residency status. the strength of academic preparation.5223. However. The ACCUPLACER placement test is required to determine academic placement in English and math courses. involvement in community and extra-curricular activities. at El Paso Community College. a TOEFL or PAA might be required if students received high school instruction in a language other than English.

The TPHSC can be found by visiting www. In order to be considered official. Graduates of unaccredited high schools. cancellation of registration. Official SAT or ACT scores and an official high school transcript (required of students who graduated from high school within the past five years and have not earned 12 semester hours of transfer credit). and academic advising. Students who graduated from high schools that are not accredited by one of the accrediting organizations recognized by the State of Texas or who attended a home school program may be eligible for admission if a portion of the Recommended High School Program or Advanced High School Program was completed with comparable content and rigor. Transfer Admission Requirements Applicants who have completed a minimum of 12 college-level hours are eligible for admission to UTEP if they have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of college-level work with grades of C or better and have maintained a minimum overall 2. Suspension periods UTEP honors suspension periods imposed by other colleges and universities. Official transcripts from all colleges or universities the transferring student attended must be directly from those institutions to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. In addition to the documents required for first-year admission. academic transcript must be mailed directly from the issuing institution to UTEP‖s Office of Admissions and Recruitment. financial aid. Transfer counselors are available in the Admissions and Recruitment Office to assist with the admissions application and course transferability information. Complete.0 GPA. denial of transfer credit. or appropriate disciplinary action. Students who are unable to provide a TPHSC form may also qualify for admission by meeting the ACT college readiness score or earning at least a 1500 out of 2400 on the SAT. maintained a minimum cumulative 2. Official TOEFL or PAA scores (might be required of students whose high school education was in a language other than English). the following materials must be submitted as applicable: Application for admission. students should also provide a Texas Private High School Certification (TPHSC) form demonstrating course equivalency to the Recommended or Advanced High School Program. scholarships.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/19 who meet the Spanish GED and PAA requirements will be admitted into the Programa Interamericano Estudiantil (PIE). and meet the requirements for first-year admission. Students ineligible to return to a previous institution or whose official records will not be released are not eligible for admission to UTEP UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . TRANSFER ADMISSION The University welcomes applications from qualified individuals who have begun their college work at other accredited institutions of higher education.edu/admit. Documents Required: To be considered for admission as a transfer student. testing. All transcripts in languages other than English or Spanish must be accompanied by a certified English translation. Failure to provide complete information will be considered grounds for denial of admission. official transcripts from EACH college or university attended. Applicants who have completed fewer than 12 college-level hours are eligible for admission to UTEP if they have earned grades of C or better in all courses taken.utep. Additional assistance is provided regarding orientation. Application Documents Transfer credit used toward a degree at UTEP must come from institutions declared on the admissions application.0 (C) grade point average.

including as elective credits. D. 3. or Pass are evaluated. 2. elective (TR) credit is given. the Office of Admissions and Recruitment will provide a generic evaluation of courses that are transferable to the University. 12. Transfer credit is generally awarded for academic courses completed at regionally accredited or nationally recognized institutions. C. TRANSFER POLICIES Evaluation of Transfer Credit Once a student is admitted to UTEP as a transfer student. 4. However. a maximum of 66 semester hours of credit from two-year lower-division institutions is applicable toward a degree at UTEP. Courses classified below freshman level by sending previous institution are not transferable. Students should request a degree plan from their academic department or dean‖s office by the time 60 semester hours have been earned. There is no limit on the total number of hours that can be transferred from other institutions. 11. Whenever possible. equivalent course numbers are given. 9.3042. and only credit hours transfer to UTEP. Section 51. B. Grades earned at other institutions are not averaged into the UTEP grade point average. 7. if there are no numerical equivalents. Transfer credits are awarded according to the following policies: 1. A transfer grade point average is not computed. at UTEP.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/20 Transfer students who do not meet the requirements for transfer admission described above can seek admission through the Reviewed Admissions process. eligible former members of the armed forces admitted to UTEP as an undergraduate or readmitted as an undergraduate (after having withdrawn to perform military service) will be given course credit for all physical education courses the institution requires for an undergraduate degree and for additional semester credit hours. 6. Credits transfer into the University in several ways. Courses from two-year lower-division institutions transfer as lower division credit. Only courses with grades of A. Individual core courses completed at another Texas institution will be designated as core courses at UTEP 14. or from institutions that are candidates for regional accreditation if the credit was earned during the candidacy period. 13. In general. and quarter hours are converted to semester hours by multiplying the quarter hours by two-thirds. Acceptance of transfer credit by UTEP does not constitute approval of the credit for use toward a particular degree program. at another Texas institution is considered as completion of the core. not to exceed UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Equivalent transfer credit for upper-division business courses is granted only for work completed at AACSB-accredited institutions. only academic courses that are comparable in content to those offered at UTEP are transferable. Completion of the core curriculum. UTEP does not award university credit for professional certificates or life experience. Credit. or blocks within the core. 10. 8. Awarding Credit for Military Service In accordance with Texas Education Code. or appropriate blocks within the core. The applicability of transfer courses toward a degree is determined by the academic dean or the advisor in one‖s major or his or her designate. Undergraduate courses from four-year institutions transfer at the same level (lower-to-lower and upper-to-upper division). Graduate-level coursework is not transferable as undergraduate credit. 5. and transfer credit carries the same value as work completed at UTEP. Equivalent transfer credit for engineering courses is granted only for work completed at ABETaccredited institutions.

residency status. UTEP students who have difficulty having UTEP credit accepted at other Texas public institutions should contact the Director of Admissions and Recruitment at UTEP for initiation of the transfer dispute resolution process.e.edu/admit under ―Online Forms‖ or can be requested by calling the Office of Admissions and Recruitment at 915-747-5890. achievements. To have the credit awarded. to satisfy any elective course requirements for the student ’s degree program for courses outside the student’s major or minor. effective the date of approval. Applicants can submit additional material or an essay for consideration in evaluating their potential for success at UTEP..3042. Section 51. If the dispute is not resolved to the student‖s satisfaction or to the satisfaction of the sending institution within 45 days of the initial notification. Incoming students who meet the requirements will. The University of Texas at El Paso does not have any degree programs that require physical education courses and so will not award any physical education credit under Texas Education Code. honors.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/21 12. the applicant‖s work experience. The Coordinating Board will resolve the dispute and notify all involved parties of its findings. and awards. a veteran must have graduated from an accredited public or private high school or a high school operated by the US Department of Defense. for example. involvement in community and extracurricular activities. the appropriate amount of elective credit will be added to the student’s official academic record. socioeconomic background. this process (including the awarding of credit) is irrevocable. Credit earned under this policy does not prohibit UTEP from awarding additional military educational experience credit based on American Council of Education (ACE) Guide recommendations. be eligible to receive up to 12 semester hours of credit for elective coursework that will be applied toward their degree. Individual Review Applicants who do not meet the requirements for transfer admission described above or whose individual circumstances are highly unusual with respect to their academic credentials can apply to be reviewed on an individual basis. bilingual proficiency. UTEP will attempt to resolve the issue with the student and the sending institution according to applicable rules and guidelines of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. the strength of academic preparation. Such material can document. Resolution of Transfer Disputes If the University refuses to accept lower-division credit earned at another Texas public institution of higher education. responsibilities while attending school. DD214 or disability discharge documentation. Once processed (and approved). Questions concerning the evaluation of transfer credit should be referred to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. This review gives consideration to the applicant‖s high school and college record. Performance on standardized tests is also considered. carefully consideration should be given to the total effect of the additional course credit to degree progress and other institutional rules. students must complete a Military Service Credit Request form and must provide proof of eligibility (i. types of courses taken. however. strengths and talents that might not be apparent from the academic record: and experiences in UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . the University will notify the Coordinating Board of the denial of the transfer credit and the reason for the denial. To be eligible. students and the institution where the credit was earned will be given written notice that the transfer credit was denied. and grades earned in specific courses.utep. including child or elder care or other major responsibilities. The form can be found at www. If the denial of transfer credit is contested. and be honorably discharged from the US armed forces after completing at least two years of service or discharged because of disability. Please note. status as a first-generation college student. Therefore. commitment to a particular field of study.

Documents Required. Satisfactory SAT. and the originals should be presented to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment for validation when students arrive on campus.0 or its equivalent is required.00 application fee paid in U.S.0 scale. and activity leaders are also appropriate. etc. A minimum overall grade point average of 2. college or university MUST notify their current International Student Advisor of their plans to transfer.0 on a 10.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/22 surmounting obstacles in pursuit of higher education.S. Transfer students must have completed credits at institutions recognized by the appropriated authority in the country where the institution is located. Applicants must be eligible to return to all previous institutions attended. that would qualify them for admission to recognized universities in their home country. International applicants must submit the following documents to be considered for admission to UTEP: Application for admission. supervisors. Applicants must present a cumulative grade average equivalent to a 3. or school-certified transcripts of high school and university work sent directly from each institution attended.edu. accompanied by a $65. International Transfer Admission Applicants will be considered for admission to UTEP as transfer students if they have completed academic work at colleges or universities recognized by the appropriate authority in the country where the institution operates. or U. First-year applicants must complete high school preparation. Citizenship and Immigration Services regulations to receive an I-20 Certificate of Eligibility for Non-Immigrant Student Status: Signed and completed Certification of Financial Resources form Appropriate documentation verifying source and availability of funds. scholarship award letters. Students UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . or a 7.S.747.S. college. International students must also submit the following documents in order to meet financial certification requirements as set by U. The University must receive complete. students must list all postsecondary institutions attended. or its equivalent. PAA. All transcripts in languages other than English or Spanish must be accompanied by certified English translations. All admission credentials will be evaluated on the basis of the admission requirements described below. or TOEFL scores as described below Complete. ACT. Failure to do so can result in the denial or withdrawal of any admission offer previously tendered. official high school transcript Complete.0 on a 4. dollars. official. copies certified by the school. official transcripts from EACH college or university attended (for transfer applicants). If the original documents are in the student‖s possession. Students who have attended other colleges or universities in the United States or abroad should also refer to the Transfer Policies section of this catalog for additional information about the transferability of credit. educational benefits certification from an employer. Acceptable documents include but are not limited to bank statements. Letters of recommendation from high school teachers.5664 or at oip@utep. counselors. Students transferring to UTEP from another U. For additional information regarding acceptable documentation please contact the Office of International Programs at 915.0 scale in addition to the applicable test scores as described below. International First-Year Admission Secondary school or high school graduates whose academic credentials would make them eligible for admission to recognized universities in their home country will be considered for admission to UTEP if all other admission requirements are met. Consulate can be submitted initially. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION The University welcomes applications from qualified international students whose academic backgrounds indicate a high probability of success in desired academic programs. During the application process. university.

PIE students must enroll in ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) courses.S. Students whose high school instruction was not in English are required to take the TOEFL. U. High school instruction in Spanish. SPECIAL ADMISSIONS PROGRAMS Programa Interamericano Estudiantil (PIE) Programa Interamericano Estudiantil is a bilingual instruction program designed for students from Spanish-speaking countries who wish to attend UTEP and who need to improve their English. Students who have successfully completed the University‖s English Language Institute meet the English proficiency requirement for regular admission. Pre-freshman level or developmental coursework will not be reviewed when determining TOEFL waivers. The PIE coordinates first-level content courses taught in Spanish (for example. 73 on the computer-based exam. contact the Office of International Programs at 915.5664. International Student Test Score Requirements All international students who have not earned a baccalaureate degree from a college or university in the United States must submit entrance examination scores. the student can change to a major of choice.747. students can change into a their major of UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . All test scores must be official and submitted directly from the testing agency to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. a minimum score of 500 is required on the paperbased exam. The Prueba de Aptitud Academica (PAA) should be taken if the student‖s primary language is Spanish and she or he does not pass the TOEFL. he or she will enroll in the bilingual Programa Interamericano Estudiantil (PIE) program.747. The UTEP school codes are 6829 for the SAT. We welcome your application if you scored 1000 or higher on the PAA. Once ESOL 1610 has been completed with a grade of C or better. If the student is admitted on the basis of the PAA. History) that students can take while enrolling in ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) courses to increase your English language proficiency. contact the Office of Financial Aid at 915. and 6829 for the TOEFL. International Student Financial Aid Financial assistance for our international students is limited. a total score of 1000 is required on the PAA. Citizens of Mexico who meet the requirements of the Programa de Asistencia Estudiantil (PASE) might qualify to pay Texas resident tuition. The amount assessed will match the University of Texas System Student Insurance Plan premium. international students must furnish a Certification of Financial Responsibility (CFR) documenting the source and amount of funding available to cover the cost of attendance while enrolled at UTEP.5204.utep. After admission and before an I-20 Certificate of Eligibility for Non-Immigrant Student Status (CFR) can be issued. 4223 for the ACT.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/23 transferring 12 or more transferable credits from another US institution are exempt from the ACT or SAT testing requirements listed below. The Student Assessment and Testing Web site at www. High school instruction in a language other than English. Once ESOL 1610 has been completed with a grade of C or better. For additional information. and 61 on the Internet exam. To receive a waiver of the TOEFL requirement transfer students must have completed at least one reading/writing-intensive course at the freshman level or above at another US institution with a grade of C or better. you should contact the Office of Admissions and Recruitment to determine which test is appropriate. Insurance is required of international students holding non-immigrant visas and living in the United States. If your academic background is unusual or is not described above. To learn more about financial assistance.edu/testing contains information about test dates and registration.

Students interested in early admission must also submit a letter of recommendation from their high school counselor or principal.747. contact the Office of Admissions and Recruitment at 915. For more information. A new application must be submitted for every subsequent summer enrollment along with updated official transcripts. Summer Guest Program Students currently pursuing degrees at other institutions and wishing to continue studies at UTEP during the summer can be admitted as Summer Guest (transient) Students.747. Students who choose to change from FLEX to degree-seeking status are required to meet all the requirements for regular admission. For further assistance.5858.747. FLEX students can take selected basic courses to meet their personal educational objectives or to complete courses in a particular field for professional reasons. contact Student Success Programs at 915. allowing qualified students to enroll in regular University courses while attending high school. For more information on this program. she or he must apply for admission as a transfer student. If a student wishes to be admitted to UTEP as a regular student. FLEX Program applicants must meet the following criteria: Be at least 23 years of age Be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States Have had no previous college or university experience Complete the undergraduate application for admission.5890. A maximum of 30 semester hours can be accumulated while in the FLEX Program. academic advising is required every semester in the Academic Advising Center. Flexible Admission Program (FLEX) The Flexible Admission Program is designed for our first-time. For transfer admission information.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/24 choice and use the courses taken toward their graduation requirements. Early Admission Program UTEP‖s Early Admission Program allows students to enroll concurrently in high school and University courses if they are in their last semester of high school and meet the requirements for first-year admission. Hours earned will count as University credit and some courses can also be approved to apply toward high school graduation requirements. and the Director of Admissions must approve any FLEX enrollment beyond 30 hours. Official transcripts are needed to verify prerequisite requirements for the summer courses the student intends to take at UTEP. To be considered for admission as a Summer Guest.0. a student must submit the following: Summer Guest application Official transcripts showing a minimum of 12 semester hours of college level work with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5890 Junior Scholars Program The Junior Scholars Program is a cooperative effort between The University of Texas at El Paso and El Paso-area public and private schools. The late application fee does not apply to you as a FLEX applicant. non-traditional students who have never attended a college or university and who do not intend to pursue a degree at the time of admission. please contact the Office of Admission & Recruitment at 915. and regulations as degree-seeking students. Admission into a UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . students are subject to the same tuition. fees. Once admitted under this option. Continued high school enrollment is a condition of the Early Admission Program.

Used to meet prerequisite requirements. and notation will be made on the transcript indicating the portion of the record that is to be included in computing requirements for graduation. German Abitur Program German NATO forces stationed at Fort Bliss often have children whose high school education has been interrupted by their family‖s move to the United States. For returning students. Junior Scholars who have graduated from high school and wish to continue at UTEP as regular students. and submit satisfactory TOEFL. Used to remove any existing high school deficiencies. Students who were previously admitted to UTEP but never enrolled in courses. SAT. Students seeking a second bachelor‖s degree. Students requesting readmission within one year after being released from active military service will be readmitted to the University if they are eligible to register for classes. Students who complete this curriculum at UTEP can be considered for admission to German universities when they return to their home country. the University shall: Provide any financial assistance previously provided before the students‖ withdrawal. To participate in the Abitur program. UTEP has developed a 60 -hour academic curriculum that the German Ministry of Education considers to be equivalent to completion of the diploma required for admission to higher education in Germany ( Abitur). or ACT scores as determined by the Admissions Office. Academic Fresh Start Program An applicant for undergraduate admission who is a Texas resident can choose to enter UTEP under the Academic Fresh Start statute. submit documents showing completion of a United States high school diploma or its equivalent. provide a statement of financial support. Students who have attended other colleges or universities since last attending UTEP must submit complete. 1984. Upon readmission. Summer Guest students who want to transfer to UTEP. Courses excluded for Academic Fresh Start purposes are not: Considered as transfer credit. Once the request has been processed. students must apply for admission. Readmission of Student Who Withdraws to Perform Active Military Service This section applies to students who withdraw from the University to perform active military service as a member of the United States armed forces or the Texas National Guard. Counted in the cumulative GPA calculation.931 by submitting the Academic Fresh Start Acknowledgement Form to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. READMISSION Students who meet the criteria listed below must apply for readmission to the University: Former students who last attended UTEP prior to January 1. official transcripts in order to evaluate any course work completed and make it part of the complete undergraduate academic record. these courses and grades will remain part of their official UTEP academic record. Abitur students will be advised by the Academic Advising Center for the duration of their enrollment at UTEP. Counted toward a degree.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/25 non-degree program such as FLEX excludes you from participation in federally funded financial aid programs. UTEP will not consider in tis admission decision any credit or grades taken 10 or more years prior to enrollment. if students UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Texas Education Code §51.

Credit earned by examination satisfies degree requirements in the same way as credit earned by classroom instruction. but not in the grade point average calculation. DSST (DANTES Subject Standardized Tests). 4. There is no limit to the amount of credit that can be earned by examination. 9. Credit by examination is recorded on the official UTEP academic record after your first enrollment at the University. including any course credit awarded The University might adopt rules requiring reasonable proof from students regarding the fact and duration of their military service. 6. Departmental test results and recommendations. Examination Advanced Placement Examinations (AP) Art: Studio Art-Drawing Minimum Score Hours Earned UTEP Credit 3 6 ARTF 1301. and Allow students the same academic status that they had before the withdrawal. other than any requirement directly affected by their service. Credit earned by examination does not fulfill the UTEP degree requirement for completion of 30 semester hours in residence. 8. It is included in hours earned. and credit by examination can be used to meet prerequisites for higher-level courses. 2. Credit earned by examination is recorded as a grade of CR. cut-off scores. 7. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests. credit will be allowed based on the basis of the other institution's transcript. Credit by examination is available to our currently and formerly enrolled UTEP students unless credit has been earned for a higher level course in that subject area or a grade other than W has been received in the course. Otherwise. Official score reports must be sent directly from the testing agency to the Admissions Office. official score reports must be submitted directly from the testing agency to the Admissions Office. 5. and testing policies have been approved by the academic colleges and departments teaching the respective courses. Credit by Examination Policies 1. There might be other areas in which departmental examinations can be given for credit. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION We recognize academic achievement acquired outside the classroom and are pleased to offer UTEP credit for the courses listed below based on successful performance on the International Baccalaureate (IB). and cut-off scores become effective the semester after the changes are approved. 1302 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 3. and departmental examinations. tests. SAT II Subject Tests.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/26 meet current eligibility requirements for the assistance. must be sent directly to the Records Office. with the approval of the department chair and the academic dean. These tests. Changes in credit by examination policies. College Entrance Examination Board's Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations. If a student has received credit by examination at another institution and have completed more advanced work in that subject area with a grade of C or better. please contact the appropriate academic departments for the availability of such examinations. such as continuous enrollment or another similar timing requirement.

2301. 2302. 2302 1401. 1302. 2302. 2302 1301. 2301. 1302. 1402. 2301. 1306 1411 1411. 1312 1311. 1302. 2302. 3301 1301. 2302 3 hrs elective 2310 1300 1310 1401. 2302 1301. 2301. 2301. 2302 1301. 3355. 1302. 2301. 1302. 2301. 1302. 3357 1301. 1302 1305. 1302. 2301. 1302. 3357 1301. 2301. 3301. 1302. 2302 550 3 BIOL 1305 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 1302. 2301. 1306 1401 1401 2304 2303 1311. 1312 1305. 2301. 2301. 3300 2380 2301. 3357 1301. 3357 1301. 2301. 1302. 3357 1301. 1404 2420 2421 1301 1301. 2301. 3355. 2302. 1402. 1302. 2302 1301. 2302. 2301. 1302. 3357. 1302 1301.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/27 Art: Studio Art-2D Design Art: Studio Art-3D Design Biology Calculus AB Calculus BC Chemistry Computer Science A Computer Science AB Economics: Microeconomics Economics: Macroeconomics English Language and Composition English Literature and Composition Environmental Sciences European History French Language French Language French Language French Literature French Literature French Literature German Language Government and Politics: Comparative Government and Politics: United States History of Art Human Geography Latin Literature Latin: Vergil Music Theory Physics B Physics C – Mechanics Physics C – Electricity and Magnetism Psychology Spanish Language Spanish Language Spanish Language Spanish Literature Spanish Literature Spanish Literature Statistics World History SAT II Subject Tests Biology E/M 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 5 3 4 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 5 3 4 5 3 3 6 6 6 4 7 6 4 4 3 3 6 6 3 6 12 15 18 12 15 18 12 3 3 3 3 14 14 3 8 4 4 3 12 15 18 12 15 18 3 6 ARTF ARTF BIOL MATH MATH CHEM CS CS ECON ECON ENGL ENGL ESCI HIST FREN FREN FREN FREN FREN FREN GERM POLS POLS ARTH GEOG LATN LATN MUST PHYS PHYS PHYS PSYC SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN SPAN STAT HIST 1301. 2302. 2302. 2302 1311 1403. 3355 1301. 1312 1301-1101 6 hrs elective 1301. 2302.

S.S. 1302 1301.) German Language (1 and 2) 50 6 GERM 1301. 1302 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 50 3 POLS 2310 50 3 ENGL 3 hrs elective 50 3 ENGL 3 hrs elective 50 6 BIOL 1305. History World History CLEP Examinations 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 550 3 6 6 6 6 3 5 3 6 6 3 3 CHEM FREN FREN GERM GERM ENGL MATH PHYS SPAN SPAN HIST HIST 1305 1301. 1306 50 4 MATH 1411 50 3 CHEM 1305 50 3 MATH 3 hrs elective 50 3 MATH 3 hrs elective 57 3 MATH 1320 50 3 ENGL 3 hrs elective 50 3 ENGL 3 hrs elective 50 3 ACCT 2301 50 6 FREN 1301. History I 50 3 HIST 1301 U. 1302 3 hrs elective 1508 3 hrs elective 1301. 1302 1301. 1302 52 and 3-6 ENGL 1311 approved essay (Students who score 72 or higher may submit a research paper to the Director of Freshman Composition for possible ENGL 1312 credit. 1302 Human Growth and Development 50 3 PSYC 2310 Humanities 50 3 HUMN 3 hrs elective Info Systems and Computer Applications 50 3 CIS 2320 Intro to Educational Psychology 50 3 EDPC 3 hrs elective Introductory Business Law 50 3 BLAW 3 hrs elective Introductory Psychology 50 3 PSYC 1301 Introductory Sociology 50 3 SOCI 1301 Natural Sciences 50 3 GSCI 3 hrs elective Pre-calculus 50 5 MATH 1508 Principles of Macroeconomics 50 3 ECON 2303 Principles of Management 50 3 MGMT 3303 Principles of Marketing 50 3 MKT 3300 Principles of Microeconomics 50 3 ECON 2304 Social Sciences and History 50 3 SOSC 3 hrs elective Spanish Language (1 and 2) 50 6 SPAN 1301. 1302 1301. 1302 1301.S. History II 50 3 HIST 1302 American Government American Literature Analyzing and Interpreting Literature Biology Calculus Chemistry College Algebra College Algebra-Trigonometry (through 6/06) College Mathematics English Composition (without essay) English Literature Financial Accounting French Language (1 and 2) Freshman Col Composition UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 1302 Trigonometry (through 6/06) 50 3 MATH 3 hrs elective U.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/28 Chemistry French French Listening German German Listening Literature Mathematics Level 2 Physics Spanish Spanish Listening U.

1302. 1302. 1106 Computer Science 4 3 CS 1310 Design Technology (SL/HL) 4 3 GSCI 13CR ** Economics (SL) 4 3 ECON 2303 Economics (HL) 4 3 ECON 2303. Classical (HL) 4 3 LING 2304 History Africa 4 3 HIST 23CR Americas (SL) 4 3 HIST 1302 Americas (HL) 4 6 HIST 1301. 1304. 2301. 1108 Business and Management 4 3 BUSN 3 hrs elective Chemistry (SL) 4 8 CHEM 1407. 1302. 33CR 4 4 15 15 FREN GERM UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 1101 Film 4 3 THEA 1390 Geography 4 3 GEOG 1310 Greek. 2301. 1104 Biology (HL*) 4 8 BIOL 1305.1306. 23CR 1301. 1302. 2302 1301. Biology (SL*) 4 8 BIOL 1303. 2302 13CR. 1302 Americas (HL) 5 9 HIST 1301. 1103. 2301. 2302 1301.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/29 Western Civilization I Western Civilization II 50 50 3 3 HIST HIST 2301 2302 International Baccalaureate The University grants 24 semester hours credit for completion of the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. 1306. 1302. 2302. 33CR 1301. 1107. 2304 English Language A1 or A2 (SL/HL) 4 6 ENGL 1311. 23CR Extended Essay 4 3 ENGL 1312 Environmental Systems 4 4 ESCI 1301. 2301. 2302. 3301 4 4 MATH 1411 Mathematics (HL) Further Mathematics (SL) 4 3 MATH 1312 Mathematical Methods (SL) 4 5 MATH 1508 Mathematical Studies (SL) 4 3 MATH 1320 Modern Languages Language A1 or A2 (SL) French German Spanish Other Languages Language A1 or A2 (HL) French German 4 4 4 4 12 12 12 6 FREN GERM SPAN LING 1301. 2302 East and Southeast Asia and Oceania 4 3 HIST 23CR Europe 4 3 HIST 23CR South Asia and Middle East 4 3 HIST 23CR Islamic History 4 3 HIST 23CR Information Technology/Global Society 4 3 UNIV 2350 Latin (SL) 4 3 LATN 2303 Latin (HL) 4 6 LATN 2304. 1408 Chemistry (HL) 4 8 CHEM 1305. 1302. 2301. Credit is also granted for successful completion of the IB courses listed below. 1105. Classical (SL) 4 3 LING 2303 Greek.

2302 1301. 33CR 1301. 23CR. 1302. 1302. Introduction to Business Introduction to Computing 48 48 52 48 47 45 49 49 46 46 46 47 45 47 48 49 48 48 46 45 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 ART ASTR BLAW MATH HIST HIST CRIJ SOWK ESCI PHIL EDUC MATH PSYC ANTH HSCI HIST GEOG MGMT BUSN CIS 1300 3 hrs elective 3301 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 1310 3311 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 1302 1301. 1302 LING 13CR 1301. 2302 13CR. 2302. 2301. 2302 1301. 23CR 1301 1301 1301 1301 1304 1324 1301 1301 1403 1404 1302 1313 1300 DSST (DANTES Subject Standardized Tests) Art of the Western World Astronomy Business Law II Business Mathematics Civil War and Reconstruction Contemporary Western Europe 1946-1990 Criminal Justice Drug and Alcohol Abuse Environment and Humanity Ethics in America Foundations of Education Fund of College Algebra Fundamentals of Counseling General Anthropology Here‖s to Your Health History of the Viet Nam War Human/Cultural Geography Human Resource Mgmt. 2301. 33CR 13CR.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/30 Spanish Other Languages Language B (SL) French German Spanish Other Languages Language B (HL) French German Spanish Other Languages Language AB French German Spanish Other Languages Fine Arts Dance Music (SL/HL) Philosophy (SL/HL) Psychology (SL/HL) Physics (SL) Physics (HL) Social and Cultural Anthropology Theatre Arts (SL/HL) Visual Arts *SL = Standard Level. 2301. 1302. 1302. HL = Higher Level 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ** CR = Elective Credit 15 9 6 6 6 3 12 12 12 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 SPAN LING FREN GERM SPAN LING FREN GERM SPAN LING FREN GERM SPAN LING DANC MUSL PHIL PSYC PHYS PHYS ANTH THEA ART 1301. 1302 1301. 2301.

Go Centers UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Lower-division or advanced elective credit will be given for other ACE recommendations where appropriate. credit is given for all prerequisite courses. official copies of the certificates of completion must be submitted.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/31 Introduction to Modern Middle East Introduction to World Religions Life Span Development Psychology Management Information Systems Money and Banking Organizational Behavior Personal Finance Principles of Finance Principles of Financial Accounting Principles of Physical Geology Principles of Physical Science I Principles of Statistics Principles of Supervision Rise and Fall of Soviet Union Technical Writing UTEP Departmental Examinations Art General Chemistry General Chemistry College French College German Nutrition College Spanish 47 49 46 46 48 48 46 47 48 50 47 48 46 45 47 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 HUMN RS PSYC CIS ECON MGMT FIN FIN ACCT GEOL PSCI STAT MGMT HIST ENGL 3 hrs elective 1301 2310 3 hrs elective 3320 3304 3 hrs elective 3310 2301 1301 3 hrs elective 2380 3 hrs elective 3 hrs elective 3357 Portfolio review C C 35 19 70 varies 6 3 3 varies varies 3 varies ARTF CHEM CHEM FREN GERM HSCI SPAN 1301. Credit for Non-Traditional Educational Experiences Credit for non-traditional educational experiences is awarded based on American Council on Education (ACE) recommendations published in the National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs and the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services when such recommendations are similar to courses offered at UTEP. Official records verifying course completion from the appropriate agency or from the ACE Registry of Credit Recommendations must be submitted to the Admissions Office. If an Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript System (AARTS) or Navy Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript (SMART) transcript is not available to verify military experience. The academic dean or department will determine the applicability of elective credit to a student‖s degree plan. Direct course equivalents are given for lower division ACE recommendations where applicable. 1302 1305 1306 Varies* Varies* 2302 Varies* *If the course into which the student places is completed with a C or better.

All forms and required documents are due and must be completely processed by the Office of Student Financial Aid by this date for one to be considered for the maximum aid available. such as Veterans Educational Benefits. No person is excluded from participating on the basis of race. and they serve as one of the points of coordination between the College for Texans efforts and local schools. who meet academic eligibility criteria. veteran status. financial aid.5204 Fax: 915. Financial aid awards are based on financial need and academic merit.747. which includes UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . age. disability. national origin. and whose applications are received by the priority date of March 15 each year for the upcoming academic year. color. and college work-study programs follow existing federal. sex. loans. and other materials to help foster the affordability and attainability of higher education. religion. e-mail. a student must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine financial need for the aid period. Information that UTEP obtains from a student‖s need analysis is used to determine financial need and the types of awards for which one is qualified. Financial Aid 204 Academic Services Building Phone: 915. Financial assistance includes all non-Title IV scholarships. or sexual orientation. family contribution. For a detailed breakdown of direct and indirect educational costs. compromise the student/family contribution. The Centers have information regarding admission to colleges and universities. FINANCIAL AID POLICY The amount and type of financial assistance provided through educational loans. To apply. and financial assistance determines the student‖s financial need. We welcome inquiries by mail.edu www. or other assistance. telephone and personal visits. The purpose of the Go Centers is to raise awareness among students and their families about the benefits of higher education and how to be academically and financially prepared. students should contact the Financial Aid Office. and local regulations and policies governing financial aid programs. grants.747.edu/financialaid DIRECTOR: Raul H.utep. Priority is given to UTEP undergraduate students with documented need. scholarships. grants. The difference among the student budget. The processing of financial aid documents can take at least four weeks. combined with those of the student‖s parents if the student depends on them. state. Appropriate forms are available at El Paso-area high schools in the counselors' offices and at our office.ADMISSIONS AND RECRUITMENT/32 Go Centers are a Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board initiative to increase postsecondary admission and enrollment among prospective college. The student‖s financial resources. APPLICATION PROCESS March 15 is the application submission priority date for each school year. Lerma The Office of Student Financial Aid assists qualified students in meeting the costs of college education.5631 financial@utep. Go Centers are located in local high schools and staffed by UTEP students with the assistance of high school counselors. who are enrolled on a full-time basis (12 hours or more). The cost of attending the University is the student budget. Awards fall into two categories: (1) gift aid. Late applications will be considered on the basis of available funds.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) CRITERIA The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is mandated by the Department of Education (DOE) to establish minimum Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards for students receiving financial aid. in a successful and timely manner. Certain financial aid programs (ACG. To remain eligible to benefit from Financial Aid. TEXAS Grant. The financial aid award will be packaged from a variety of sources and will be based on the financial need. Students pursuing certification programs must meet the GPA requirements of the certification to remain eligible. * NOTE: Attempted hours include transferable hours that count only toward a student’s degree plan at UTEP as well as all hours attempted at UTEP (see “measureable progress” section II. A student may check their current SAP status by going to mystatus.FINANCIAL AID/33 grants and (2) self-help funds. UTEP’s SAP policy encourages a student to progress. Degree plans can be found in the “Degree Evaluation” link. Qualitative Standard--Grade Point Average (GPA) Grade point average (GPA) is the qualitative cumulative measurement used to track the quality of the student’s academic performance at UTEP. The amount of aid awarded. cannot exceed the student budget. SMART. If a student wishes to apply for financial assistance for the spring semester. and to all types of aid awarded (federal and state grants. and availability of funds. Qualitative and Quantitative Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards I. the total award might be less than the documented need because of fund limitations. TEACH Grant. program eligibility. Once the documented need is established. program eligibility requirements. The table below illustrates the financial aid programs and the applicable GPA requirement by academic level.00 GPA if pursuing a graduate degree. the Office of Student Financial Aid will make every effort to meet that need. A student will receive notification via a letter if they are not meeting any of the following SAP requirements: low GPA and/or failing to complete 75% of attempted hours * and/or exceeding the “maximum timeframe” (see below for further explanation of these items ). a student must maintain at least a 2. by following their degree plan. and a 3. in order to be eligible to apply for federal or state financial aid. UTEP’s Office of Student Financial Aid will update a student’s SAP status at the end of every semester. or other factors. and the UTEP Promise) may require a higher GPA standard for those students pursuing an undergraduate degree. in order to comply with this requirement.edu in the Check Status tool/portal at after all course grades are posted. he or she will be considered based on the availability of funds after UTEP receives the financial aid documents. which include the College Work-Study Program and long-term educational loans. in student’s Goldmine account. Students should refer to the Tuition and Fees Emergency Loan section of this catalog for non-need emergency loan fund programs. Students are responsible for determining into what courses they should enroll. SAP is comprised of both a qualitative standard and a quantitative standard ( see below for explanations). b. If a student is subject to Selective Service registration. In some instances. combined with the student‖s resources (student/family contribution). loans and work-study). for more information on “attempted hours”). whether financial aid was received or not. under the “Student Records” link. toward completion of their program of study (degree) for which the student is receiving financial aid. Academic Level Financial Aid Program GPA Requirement UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .utep. she or he must file a statement indicating whether one has registered for or is exempt from service registration.00 GPA if pursuing an undergraduate degree. At UTEP. These standards apply to the student’s entire academic history.

For UTEP this determination is made only during the summer session. a. associates. Completed Degree or Change of Major Credit hours obtained in a completed degree (i. plus 6 total hours in the summer.5 by the length of the degree program in credit hours to arrive at the maximum attempted credit hours allowed before financial aid eligibility runs out. plus 12 total hours in the spring. bachelors. Measurable Progress--Progression Toward A Degree or Certificate The DOE calls progress toward a degree or certificate “measurable progress.5 to renew 2. (The DOE provides a glossary of terms at www.ed. To calculate “maximum timeframe” simple multiply 1. In addition.” “Measurable progress” is determined by the cumulative completion of at least 75% of all attempted hours toward a student’s degree plan in an academic year.FINANCIAL AID/34 Undergraduate ACG SMART TEACH Grant TEXAS Grant UTEP Promise All other aid All Aid All Aid Graduate Alternative Certification 3.25 2.” as defined by the DOE.0 Initial 2.00 2.5 II. If a freshmen student has attempted 12 total credit hours in the fall.00 3.” as defined by the DOE. under the “Student Records” link). For example: If the length of a student’s undergraduate academic program (degree plan) is 120 total credit hours. cannot attempt more than 150% of the published length of the degree program as measured by credit hours.e. etc. then the “maximum timeframe” would equal150% of 120 credit hours for a total of 180 credit hours.gov ). a certificate. in their Goldmine account. b. the student would be making satisfactory academic progress.00 3. he/she has attempted 30 total credit hours for the academic year.75 = 21 earned/passed hours.studentaid. For example. students who change their major will not have the attempted credit hours count against them.) will not affect a student’s “maximum timeframe” by beginning a new degree. (Students may view their “Degree Evaluation” online. masters. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Assuming the student has earned/passed 21 of the 30 total credit hours attempted.00 3 2. receiving financial aid. tracks the amount of credit hours attempted toward completion of an eligible degree program and whether the appropriate proportion of those hours are completed without surpassing the maximum number of hours allowed for such degree. Maximum Timeframe Undergraduate and graduate students. or To calculate this it would be 30 (total attempted hours during an academic year) x . the minimum required to meet “measurable progress. Quantitative Standard: Maximum Timeframe and Progression Toward A Degree or Certificate The “quantitative standard.

FINANCIAL AID/35 Certain financial aid programs (ACG.edu/financialaid.” Grades Affecting Measurable Progress: The following grades are not considered hours completed/earned and will affect the 75% “measurable progress” requirement: F N = = Failure No grade UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .” but they will be considered in measuring the “maximum timeframe. SMART. the TEXAS Grant requires the completion of 24 completed/earned hours. All programs. however. find the total number of hours attempted at UTEP in column A. spring. For example. summer). A B Need to complete 75% of attempted hours 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 A B Need to complete 75% of attempted hours 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 60 63 66 69 72 75 A B Need to complete 75% of attempted hours 78 81 84 87 90 93 96 99 102 105 108 111 A B Need to complete 75% of attempted hours 114 117 120 123 126 129 132 135 138 141 144 147 150 # of Total Attempted Hours 6 to 8 9 to 11 12 to 15 16 to 19 20 to 23 24 to 27 28 to 31 32 to 35 36 to 39 40 to 43 44 to 47 48 to 51 # of Total Attempted Hours 52 to 55 56 to 59 60 to 63 64 to 67 68 to 71 72 to 75 76 to 79 80 to 83 84 to 87 88 to 91 92 to 95 96 to 99 100-103 # of Total Attempted Hours 104 to 107 108 to 111 112 to 115 116 to 119 120 to 123 124 to 127 128 to 131 132 to 135 136 to 139 140 to 143 144 to 147 148 to 151 # of Total Attempted Hours 152 to 155 156 to 159 160 to 163 164 to 167 168 to 171 172 to 175 176 to 179 180 to 183 184 to 187 188 to 191 192 to 195 196 to 199 200 to 203 NOTE: Repeated Course(s): Students who repeat a course(s) to improve their GPA are cautioned that previously attempted hours will remain on their record and therefore could affect their “measurable progress. TEACH Grant. See the financial aid web site for details on each program at www. TEXAS Grant. and the UTEP Promise) may require a specific number of completed/earned hours to remain eligible within an academic year (fall. fall under the “measurable progress” DOE rule of 75% completion of attempted hours. The chart below is a guide to determine if the “measurable progress” standard is being met. To find out the number of attempted credit hours that a student must earned to remain in good standing for satisfactory academic progress.” Modular Math: Modular math classes (MATH 1411 and MATH 1508) will not be counted in evaluating “measurable progress.utep. The number found in column B is the minimum number of credit hours the student needs to have completed/earned to be making satisfactory progress.

SAP Evaluation Time Frame SAP is evaluated at the close of each term when grades are posted by the Registrar ’s Office. if a student is not meeting SAP they will receive notification. Students who do not complete the conditions stipulated in their appeal approval notification. II. Good Semester UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . in order to be reinstated.” Students who have not completed the conditions stipulated in their appeal approval notification are subject to termination. It is available to students. Students are placed on probation for an academic year. At this point. at the end of the academic year. they will not be eligible and receive a letter of termination. Otherwise. III. 2. if a student has reached their “maximum timeframe” they will receive a “termination” of financial aid letter. The student is expected to follow the instructions on the probation letter. otherwise. Probation Probation is grace period during which a student receives financial aid.FINANCIAL AID/36 P/F I P W U = = = = = Pass/Fail Incomplete In Progress Withdrawal Unsatisfactory Satisfactory Progress (SAP). Probation. will not receive financial aid and receive a letter of termination. Meeting all SAP requirements (qualitative and quantitative standards) during the academic year on probation to continue receiving financial aid. Good Semester. will not receive financial aid and receive a letter of termination. via a letter. who for the first time in their academic career at UTEP fail to meet either their qualitative and/or the quantitative standard(s) noted above. IV. At the end of any term. Termination Termination of financial aid may occur for the following reasons: Students who do not meet the requirements of their probation. Probation requirements consist of: 1. Termination. Proof of attendance in one of the Office of Student Financial Aid ’s Information Sessions on financial literacy the first semester after being placed on probation. Students who have reached their “maximum timeframe” will not receive financial aid and receive a letter of termination. Students who are not meeting any of the SAP requirements (low GPA and/or failing to complete 75% of attempted hours and/or exceeding the “maximum timeframe”) will not receive financial aid and receive a letter to that effect. and Reestablishing Financial Aid Eligibility I. that they are not meeting any of the SAP requirements: low GPA and/or failing to complete 75% of attempted hours and/or exceeding the “maximum timeframe. a student will need to complete a “good semester” or reestablish financial aid eligibility. Evaluation Time Frame.

Register for at least 6 credit hours for which the student must pay ( see number 7 under the appeals process chart). Students can view prior term balances in their Goldmine account by clicking on “Student Records” then “Account Summary by Term. Letter from Attorney Orders Bills. **All extenuating circumstances must be documented. 2. Have a 2. Academic performance improvement 8. Medical 7. Extenuating Circumstance 1. having to work because the parent suddenly lost their job. Reestablishing Financial Aid Eligibility A student may regain federal student aid eligibility after: 1. Dr’s Notes. 2. and 3. The student improves their academic performance to meet the school’s SAP standards noted above.00 GPA for their “good semester. Military deployment 6. Complete 75% of all attempted hours. or 2. and 3. room 204) to obtain an appeal form. A “good semester” is achieved when a student improves their academic performance. memo from Dr. A student must: 1.) Court Order. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .” Questions on prior balances should be directed to Student Business Services (Academic Services Building 118). Supporting documentation relevant to the semester(s) in question. the student needs to come to the Office of Student Financial Aid (Academic Services Building. the Office of Student Financial Aid will require the following documentation: 1. Below are some examples of extenuating circumstances.FINANCIAL AID/37 A “good semester” is required prior to the term for which a student wishes to receive financial aid. Legal matters such as divorce/separation 5. If a student has grounds for an appeal. An appeal form obtained from Office of Student Financial Aid (Academic Services Building 204). Death in the immediate family 2. A typed personal statement with an explanation of the circumstances which brought about the ineligibility and what has been done to remedy the situation.edu. If there are grounds for an appeal. The student successfully appeals their Financial Aid termination. Appeal Process An appeal process is available to any student who is ineligible for financial aid but has extenuating circumstances that prevented him or her from making satisfactory progress. (Also. Accidents 3. Payment options are available at loans. (There may be other extenuating circumstances not listed). Employment changes Documentation Type Death Certificate or News Paper Clip Insurance Claim/Police report Unexpected loss of job or attaining a job due to sudden events beyond their control. hospital statement Grades for one “Good Semester”* Varied—check with the Office of Student Financial Aid** 4. Extenuating circumstances not listed in 1-7 *Students whose appeal is granted must ensure there are no prior balances.utep.” V.

FINANCIAL AID/38 Appeals are reviewed throughout the year for clearly defined extenuating circumstances (see chart above numbers 1-7). GRANTS AND LOANS The following summaries of financial aid programs are provided for information only and are subject to legislative acts. Transfer Students: Undergraduate students. Academic Fresh Start students will be eligible for financial aid during their probation period. one will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) within six weeks of applying. If one has applied for the Federal Pell Grant. will not receive financial aid. however. in the event the appeal result is unknown by the tuition deadline. If the appeal is denied the student will need to complete a “good semester” (see number IV above). For extenuating circumstances (see chart above number 8) the student’s appeal will go through a Financial Aid Internal Review (FAIR) process. III. and UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . must have their transcript evaluated by this institution’s Undergraduate Admissions and Recruitment Office.utep. who begin their academic career at another postsecondary institution and subsequently transfer to UTEP. The Federal Pell Grant Program is designed to assist eligible students in pursuing their first undergraduate degree by providing a foundation of aid to help pay the cost of attending school. Undergraduate students must apply each year for the Federal Pell Grant. Academic Fresh Start: Students who return to UTEP under the Academic Fresh Start ( see Academic Fresh Start section in the catalog for details ) and apply for financial aid will be placed on probation (see probation requirements above) immediately after being granted an Academic Fresh Start. The Federal SEOG is available for enrolled students who maintain good academic standing. Non-degree: Non-Degree seeking students are not eligible for financial aid. Certifications. The result of the student’s appeal request will be known within a week. To be considered for financial aid. II. Grants Pell Grant. a student must be enrolled in a degree granting program at UTEP. must be making satisfactory academic progress.edu/financialaid. Special Considerations: Academic Fresh Start. Certifications: A few certificate programs are eligible for financial aid. IV. Students. Any student anticipating the necessity of requesting an appeal should be prepared to make payment arrangements for his or her own tuition and related fees. financial aid eligibility is identical to that of UTEP students with comparable credit hours. Student’s whose appeal is denied. Students should note that DOE requires an institution to count courses applicable to a student’s major (whenever taken) in evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress.edu). Satisfactory academic progress must be maintained in order for the student to remain eligible for the program. who are making satisfactory academic progress. For these students.utep. (Payment options are available at loans. and Transfer Students I. Complete details of the programs are available through the Office of Student Financial Aid. Non-degree. who have been taking classes after being granted an Academic Fresh Start and then apply for financial aid. To see the updated list of eligible certificate programs go to www. Only transferred courses that apply to a student’s degree plan at UTEP will be counted toward their “maximum timeframe” of attempted hours. The Financial Aid Internal Review (FAIR) will review the provided documentation and make a final decision. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG).

enrolled full-time in an eligible major. Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG). and hold a minimum cumulative 3. All of these loans defer payment while one is enrolled in a course of study at least half-time. The recipient must be a U. For more information. eligible for a federal grant. she or he must attend Pre-Loan Counseling or Review Sessions prior to receiving the loan funds. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . This is a federal grant available to you during the first and second years in college.com/utep/student/. This is a federal grant available to you during the third and fourth years of college. second-degree. Access. Texas Public Education Grant (TPEG).utep. Repayment is made on a monthly basis. The Federal College Work-Study Program provides jobs for students who have documented financial need and wish to earn part of their educational expenses while going to school. Both graduate and undergraduate students demonstrating financial need are eligible for participation in this program. Toward EXcellence. Loans The Office of Student Financial Aid offers assistance through various long-term loan programs. Students should refer to the Financial Aid Web site for repayment information. students may use UTEP login information to access the following portal and search for available positions: https://www. as well as unclassified graduates. and certification students. Student employees are paid at the prevailing minimum wage rate as prescribed by federal law.FINANCIAL AID/39 who demonstrate exceptional financial need.000 a year in grants for undergraduate and graduate students who intend to teach full-time in high-need subject areas for at least four years at schools that serve low-income families. This grant provides financial assistance to undergraduate and graduate students with financial need who are enrolled at least half-time. The recipient must be a U. SMART Grant (National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent). Jobs cannot exceed 19 hours per week at both on-campus and off-campus worksites. enrolled full-time. and Success Grant Program (TEXAS Grant).S.0 scale in the program. This is a state-matched grant awarded based on financial need. International. not to exceed ten (10) years. One can be a graduate or an undergraduate student and must be enrolled at least part-time. please visit http://academics. eligible for a federal grant.myinterfase. Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Program (LEAPP).aspx?tabid=47768. This state program provides financial assistance to our students with demonstrated financial need who graduated from a Texas public or accredited high school in 1998 or later. Priority will be given to students who are enrolled full-time and observe the application submission deadlines. For work study opportunities.edu/Default. If the student is a first-time recipient of a long-term loan. are not eligible for the Work-Study Program. One must also have completed the Recommended High School Curriculum or Advanced High School Program or higher to be considered for this program. Recipients who do not complete the teaching requirements must repay the grant as a Direct Unsubsidized Loan under the Direct Loan Program. in the third or fourth year in four-year degree programs. Specific descriptions of the various loan programs are listed below. TEACH (Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education) Grant.S.0 GPA on a 4. Loans cannot be released and remaining loan amounts will be canceled if one drops below half-time status. jobs range from clerical to research. full-time enrollment is required. citizen. citizen. Awarding of the TEXAS Grant is dependent upon the availability of funds. It is necessary to file a separate application for this grant. and have completed a rigorous secondary school program of study. Student Employment (Federal College Work-Study Program). The long-term educational loans available through the Financial Aid Office have many repayment benefits. This program provides up to $4.

If this type of action is taken. These loans are available for those who need assistance in meeting the costs of tuition and fees.edu. Hazlewood Act Exemption The Hazlewood Act exempts eligible Texas veterans and their children from the payment of tuition and fees. The loan must be repaid during the semester in which it is obtained. Emergency Book Loans. during a six-month grace period. Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. To be eligible to receive the Hazlewood Act Exemption as a veteran. Interest is charged throughout the life of the loan. Tuition and Fees Loans. Emergency book loan funds are available for students who are temporarily in need of funds for books. Regularly enrolled students are eligible if they do not have an outstanding emergency loan or previous semester balance. one must have classified as a Texas resident for tuition purposes for the semester for which the exemption was requested.utep.FINANCIAL AID/40 Loan repayment begins at the end of a grace period or after one ceases to enroll half-time.edu. less property deposit and student services fees.S. Department of Education made on the basis of the student‖s financial need and other specific eligibility requirements. UTEP will participate in the Direct Student Loan Program. Unlike the Stafford Loan. The Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan is a loan from the U. Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan. one must have been honorably UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Federal Perkins Loan. If one fails to make a payment after the grace period. Federal Subsidized Stafford Student Loan. the student is required to repay the entire loan plus costs of collection. This loan requires evidence of financial need and is offered through participating lending institutions. The lending agency can then take necessary action to obtain payment. A $10. including the use of a collection agency or court action. the loan is in default. other than property deposit and student services fees. subject to the following provisions. one must demonstrate Texas residency at the time of entering military service. The Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan is a federally financed loan made to students meeting specific eligibility requirements. The borrower may choose to pay the interest charged on the loan or allow the interest to be capitalized (added to the loan principal) when the loan enters repayment.utep. The federal government will pay the interest as long as one is enrolled at least half-time. There are provisions for partial cancellation and deferral for designated public service. and international students. Eligible veterans or children who are entitled to receive both federal and state veterans‖ educational benefits for the same semester can do so only if the value of the federal benefit is less than the value of your tuition and fees. Please refer to the current Class Schedule for availability dates. The Perkins Loan is dependent upon the availability of funds. The Federal government does not charge interest on these loans while the borrowers are enrolled at least half-time. This loan is available for both undergraduate and graduate students. This exemption does not apply to fees for services or items that are not required for general enrollment or for specific courses that one might take. the student is responsible for the interest on the loan while in school. The interest is 5% and does not accrue while you are enrolled at least half-time. The funds are deposited into the Miner Gold Card to be used at the Campus Bookstore. There is a $250. Starting the fall of 2010. non-resident. One can apply for this loan at https://loans. The loan must be repaid during the semester in which it is obtained.00 service charge is added to each loan. Starting the fall 2010. Under this plan. and documentation of need as described elsewhere in this section is not required for these loans. this loan does not require evidence of financial need. UTEP will participate in the Direct Student Loan Program. In addition. Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loan. Applications for these loans are available at: https://loans. This loan requires evidence of financial need. or during authorized periods of deferment. the recipient is responsible for selecting a bank or lending institution that participates in the Federal Family Education Loan Program.00 limit for book loans. An annual interest rate of 5% is charged. They are available to resident.

one must not be in default on an educational loan made or guaranteed by the State of Texas and one must not be in default on a federal loan if that default is the reason that one cannot use federal veterans‖ benefits.FINANCIAL AID/41 discharged from the service. or served at least 181 days during the Cold War. and several state and national professional and certification test programs. the National Emergency by Reason of Certain Terrorist Attacks. Phone: 915. one must have attempted fewer than 150 hours of college work. World War II (except those who were discharged because they were over the age of 38 or because of a personal request).8013 testing@utep. Gerber The Student Assessment and Testing Office serves as the test administration center for college admissions. one is eligible for the Hazlewood Act Exemption if you are classified as a resident of Texas for the semester for which the exemption is requested and one must demonstrate that he or she is a dependent of a member of the U. As a child of a veteran applying for the exemption. As a child of a veteran. one must have served in the Armed Forces or in certain auxiliary services during World War I. Complete information is available in the Financial Aid Office. the value of the benefits is less than the value of tuition and fees. for the relevant term. whose death was caused by service-connected injuries. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . It is highly recommended that the student complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine federal grant eligibility to obtain student loan history.edu academics. and have no federal veterans‖ educational benefits based on the death or disability of a veteran parent. or if so. The office also provides proctoring services for correspondence tests along with information about testing services for various state-wide and national testing programs. Persian Gulf War. less property deposit and student services fees. the Korean War.edu/testing DIRECTOR: Edward F. Grenada and Lebanon. A copy of the Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD-214) and proof of current status regarding eligibility for federal veterans‖ educational benefits must be submitted. or who became totally disabled for purposes of employability as a result of a service-related injury. To obtain this exemption as a veteran. The UTEP credit-by-examination testing policy is described in the Admissions section of this catalog. available in the Financial Aid Office. which include the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSST). along with proof regarding eligibility for federal benefits on the basis of the parent‖s service-related death or disability. Student Assessment and Testing 127 Academic Advising Center Bldg.utep. Armed Forces who was a resident of Texas upon entry into the service and who died while in the service. is missing in action. and any future national emergency declared by law.S. and must have followed the application procedures required by these provisions. have no federal veterans‖ educational benefits. Prospective and current UTEP students can also save time and money by taking advantage of creditby-examination programs offered. the student must submit the application.5009 Fax: 915. In addition. and to expedite the awarding process. Panama. Viet Nam. and documentation that the parent was a resident of Texas when he or she entered the service. a student must complete the Hazlewood Act Exemption Application.747. assessment and placement tests.747.

and score reports will provide the most current course placement information. TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). Scores from ACT. ADMISSIONS TESTS The Student Assessment and Testing Office administers the ACT (American College Test). ENGLISH and READING) All entering students who do not have college-level credit in math. Minimum passing TSI assessment standards are: 1) ACCUPLACER: Reading Comprehension-78. and Written Essay–6 3) COMPASS: Reading Skills–81. For additional information on teacher preparation and certification requirements contact the College of Education. refer to the Academic Advising Center section of this catalog. Algebra–29. Transfer students who have college-level credit in math. PAA (Prueba de Aptitud Académica) and the MAT (Miller Analogies Test). TEXAS SUCCESS INITIATIVE (TSI) Entering students. TEXAS HIGHER EDUCATION ASSESSMENT (THEA) The Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) or Quick THEA is used to meet teacher preparation requirements. The Admissions Office determines which tests must be taken or whether exemptions apply. Quick THEA test dates. English or reading-intensive courses can be exempt from placement testing. Writing Skills (Objective)–59.STUDENT ASSESSMENT AND TESTING /42 Special testing accommodations are available for students with disabilities. For additional information about the Texas Success Initiative. and Written Essay-6 2) ASSET: Reading Skills–41. The ACCUPLACER is also used to meet the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) basic skills assessment requirement. TOEFL. an essay with a score of 5 will meet this standard if the student meets the objective writing test minimum score. or reading-intensive courses must take the ACCUPLACER test for course placement in those areas. Contact the Student Assessment and Testing Office or the Academic Advising Center for current information. you must satisfy the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) assessment requirement before enrolling in classes at UTEP. Please refer to the Admission section of this catalog for information about admission test score requirements. and students must retake the math placement test. Contact the Student Assessment and Testing Office for information on THEA. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Writing–220 The minimum passing standard for the written essay portion of all tests is a score of 6. Arrangements can be made through the Disabled Student Services Office. English. Mathematics–230. and PAA institutional examinations can be used only for admission to UTEP. which is given by UTEP‖s Student Assessment and Testing Office and in most El Paso area high schools. and Written Essay–6 4) THEA: Reading–230. This can be done by taking the ACCUPLACER. Sentence Skills-80. Elementary Algebra-63. Contact the Student Assessment and Testing Office for information on admission test dates and registration procedures. Writing Skills (Objective)–40. ACCUPLACER math test scores expire two years after the test date if no college math credit is earned. or one of the accepted assessment exams. Placement scores are subject to change. Elementary Algebra–38. Students can meet both testing requirements by taking the ACCUPLACER. and registration procedures. but still must satisfy the TSI. ACCUPLACER PLACEMENT TESTS (MATH. However.

STUDENT ASSESSMENT AND TESTING /43 ESOL PLACEMENT TESTS The COMPASS/ESL test is required if a student‖s secondary education was not conducted in English and if the student took the TOEFL (and scored less than 600) or the PAA for admission. They also allow students to start higher in a course sequence if they have previously acquired expertise in an area.747. The following is a list of the departmental placement tests administered by the Student Assessment and Testing Office. Contact the Student Assessment and Testing Office for information on COMPASS/ESL test dates and registration procedures. For current information. New Student Orientation 107 Academic Services Building Phone: 915. These tests might be required by departments for enrollment in specific courses. Test fees are non-refundable and nontransferable. Fees must be used during the current fiscal year. Students who enroll in the ESOL Program are expected to complete the appropriate sequence of courses. are required. Placement Test Computer Information Systems French Part A Score Range 0-56 57-80 0-34 35-44 45-50 0-41 42-53 54-60 0-69 70-100 0-18 19-27 28-35 36-44 45-50 0-73 74-83 84-100 0-69 70-100 Course Placement CIS 2320 Exempt from CIS 2320 FREN 1301 FREN 1302 Qualify for French Part B test French 2301 French 2302 See Languages & Linguistics Dept HSCI 2302 Exempt from HSCI 2302 SPAN 1301 SPAN 1302 SPAN 2301 SPAN 2302 Any 33xx course SPAN 2303 SPAN 2304 Any 33xx course COMM 1301 Qualify for oral test French Part B Nutrition Prerequisite: BIOL 1305 Spanish (For non-native speakers) Spanish (For native speakers) Speech Note: Minimum scores required for course placement are subject to change. Academic advisors help determine whether departmental tests are available in specific areas and which placement tests.5841 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . or with approval of the ESOL Coordinator.747. ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTAL PLACEMENT TESTS Departmental placement examinations are based on policies set by individual departments. contact the Student Assessment and Testing Office.6752 Fax: 915. Contact the Student Assessment and Testing Office for information on placement test dates and registration procedures. if any. Students can retake the COMPASS/ESL if they have not enrolled in an ESOL course during the 12 months following initial testing.

UTEP Technology.edu/orientation DIRECTOR: Jaime Mendez Success in college is determined not only by the quality of a student‖s academic work. College-Specific Advising and Campus Involvement.edu/orientation Orientation Registration Link: http://academics. Sessions are offered throughout the year at no cost. Financial Aid. The program‖s main goal is to ensure that enrollment as a UTEP student is a positive and effective experience.STUDENT ASSESSMENT AND TESTING /44 Orientation Website: http://academics. as well as by how easily students make the transition to their new environment on campus. The programs include valuable information on the Miner Gold Card.utep.utep. Programs offered include Freshmen Orientation. Transfer Orientation and Parent Information Sessions. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . UTEP‖s New Student Orientation program is designed to help students start making those transitions. Parking and Transportation.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . dependents. For detailed information concerning registration and student academic records. including enrollment verifications. and the Records Office. MilitaryOneSource – Military Spouse Career Advancement Accounts (MyCAA).5342 Fax: 915.a spx?tabid=10958 DIRECTOR: Holly Denney The Military Services Office provides one-stop services for military students.edu/Default.utep. Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) The University of Texas at El Paso participates in the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges‖ Concurrent Admissions Program. which maintains your student records and all registration transactions. If a student plans to join the military and wants to attend UTEP when service is complete.edu.utep. veterans. UTEP registration and withdrawals. degree plan.edu.747. transcript requests. graduation applications. he or she can apply for admission before enlistment and designate UTEP as the home institution.747. registration. veterans@utep. Registration and Records 123 Academic Services Building Phone: 915. and diplomas. Credit earned while in the military can be transferred to UTEP and students can work closely with advisors to develop degree plans prior to arrival on campus.edu www.8764 registrar@utep. which coordinates faculty and classroom assignments.edu http://academics. Services include assistance with admissions documents. including residency. and civilian employees at military bases. financial aid and Hazelwood documents.747. Contact the Military Services Office for additional information. tuition and fees payment processing and Department of Veterans Affairs documents. and grade posting. consult the Academic Regulations section of this catalog under General Academic Information. including creating and maintaining records that support certification of one‖s status with the Department of Veterans Affairs.8764 GoArmyEd@utep.5544 Fax: 915.747. including: Scheduling. militaryservices@utep. residency.STUDENT ASSESSMENT AND TESTING /45 Military Services 127 Academic Services Building Phone: 915.edu/register REGISTRAR: Miguel Sifuentes The Registration and Records Office houses several functions. GoArmy admissions.

........................MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM/BMS/41 Financial Information What’s Inside Tuition and Fees ............................................ 61 Residency for Tuition Purposes .......................................................................................................... 62 Undergraduate Scholarships ......................... 64 ..................... 42 On-Campus Housing Expenses ................................

cheerleaders.50/SCH $30. intercollegiate athletics and others as recommended by the Student Service Fee Committee. operation.75/SCH Energy Fee Student Union Fee Undergraduate Students All Students All Students All Students 2. student government.TUITION AND FEES/42 Tuition and Fees THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO Summary of PROPOSED Tuition and Fee Charges* 2010-2011 Name of Charge Tuition: Classification Residency Amount Notes Undergraduates Resident $168.00 Library Fee Undergraduate Students All Students $10. health services. A fee to defray the cost of provision of library services as well as the acquisition costs of library materials.78/SCH Tuition revenue is used to fund general University instructional and operating expenses.78/ semester credit hour (SCH) $478.00/SCH to a maximum of $180. Fee may be used for finance.00/ semester UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Non-Resident Tuition for Repeated Undergraduate Hours Resident Tuition assessed to undergraduates who attempt courses on the third time and thereafter A fee to fund studentrelated services such as intramural activities. construction. career services. Required Fees: Student Services Fee All Students All Students $15. A fee to defray utility expenses. on-line services and computer equipment.78/SCH $268. student publications. and maintenance of a student union building and its programs. disabled student organizations.

academic support and administrative functions. Recreation Fee All Students All Students $20. library fines.00/ semester Technology Fee All Students All Students $17. application processing fees. Charges in addition to regular tuition for certain course-related materials and/or for individual instruction.25/SCH to a maximum of $258.00/ semester Registration Fee All Students All Students $5. and operations of new and existing recreation facilities and programs. A fee to finance construction. add/drop fees. Course Fees: Variety (See below) All Students (depending on courses taken) All Students $10-$50 Supplemental Fees: Variety Students needing (See below) specific services All Students Variable UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . To defray the costs of providing certain services to students.20/ semester Incidental Fees: Variety (See below) All Students (depending on services used) All Students Variable To defray the cost of providing specific services such as late registration.75 Health Center Fee All Students All Students $13. To defray the costs associated with the provision of web enabled and other automated registration related services. maintenance. and other services as approved by the governing board.TUITION AND FEES/43 International Education Fee All Students All Students $4. To defray the cost of providing medical services and support to students.00/ semester A fee to provide financial assistance to University students participating in international student exchange or study abroad programs. To defray the cost of information technology and network services that are related to supporting the University's instructional. bad check charges.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . ** Non-resident/international students will be assessed the actual cost of education per semester hour as determined by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.TUITION AND FEES/44 * Tuition and fees are subject to change due to legislative and/or institution action and become effective when enacted.

The student fees assessed as listed above are authorized by state statute.718. Liberal Engineering Arts. fees and other charges are approved by the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System and comply with applicable state statutes.00 5. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 3 and/or optional student services fees Total Charges: Tuition plus subtotalrequired fees plus averages for college and course related fees and/or optional student services fees AVERAGE COST PER SEMESTER CREDIT HOUR 1 1 Business 12 SCH $2.00 4.20 60.643.00 30. and supplemental fees.00 4.36 180.00 30.00 $2. Changes in tuition and fee charges might occur after the information is first published.36 180.5116. incidental.36 180.56 $2. the specific fee amounts and the determination to increase fees are made by UTEP administration and The University of Texas System Board of Regents. Actual fees are published on the following pages and in the Class Schedules. Policies governing payment or refund of tuition. however.00 207.20 25. can be based on semester credit hours or can be per semester.63 235.56 226.750.00 30.00 30.00 129.36 $2.747.00 30.00 20.00 129. Tuition and Fees Increase Tuition and fees provided in this catalog represent the figures at the time of publication.00 20.00 4.78/semester credit hours (SCH).20 107.00 20.20 0. updated information can be obtained from the Student Business Services Office at 915.025.00 207.025.00 13.00 180.00 $2. Descriptions of these fees may be found on this page.703.00 Name of Charge Resident Tuition 2 Add: Required Fees Student Services Fee Library Fee Student Union Fee Registration Fee Energy Fee International Education Fee Recreational Fee Technology Fee Health Center Fee Major Fee Subtotal-Required Fees Add: Average for college and courserelated.56 $2. Tuition and fees are subject to change by regental or legislative action and become effective on the date enacted.743.TUITION AND FEES/45 THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO (PROPOSED) Tuition and Fee Charges for a Semester 2009-2010 Academic Year Education.00 13.00 30.025.00 207.56 75.00 $2.00 5.56 Nursing 12 SCH $2.00 5.00 4. The Texas Legislature does not set a specific amount for any particular student fee.56 $2. incidental.00 207.46 2 3 Resident undergraduate tuition as established by the Texas Legislature and the Board of Regents is $168. Averages are given for course-related.00 75.00 30. Required fees.00 5.56 75. non-residents undergraduate tuition is $478.55 231.00 13.825.00 30.78/SCH.778. and voluntary fees since changes vary according to courses and services chosen.00 129.668.00 13. or Science 12 SCH 12 SCH $2.00 $2.00 $2.025.56 75.00 129. those charged to all students.55 228.00 20.

891.28 2.407.32 1.76 715.367.28 6.916. Such funds will be invested and the income will be used for scholarship purposes.84 7.76 1. A property deposit which remains without call for refund for a period of four (4) years from the date of last attendance at the University will be forfeited and will become the property of the Student General Property Deposit Endowment Fund.16 4.645.864.00 5.46 9.786.52 10.84 3.969.363.12 7.000.76 1.897.12 3.$150.00 5.042.351.28 6.58 *This table of Tuition and Required Fees does not include incidental fees.408.266.72 5.56 2.44 4.215.43 3.357.88 3.52 4.00 per student (one-time deposit) fee assessed at the time of the student's initial registration at the University. This fee is refundable to the student at the end of his or her University enrollment less any loss.TUITION AND FEES/46 (PROPOSED) TUITION AND REQUIRED FEES for 2009-2010 Hrs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 Resident UG 286.55 4.605.718.72 2.60 3. or breakage caused by the student.12 7.58 Non-Resident UG 596.84 7. Please refer to other sections in this catalog.868.00 New Entering Undergraduate International Student . damage.46 9.790.884.291. New Undergraduate Student (one-time fee): New Entering Undergraduate Resident Student .00 one-time issuance fee Student ID Replacement Fee .56 6.32 2.643.43 8.120.388.72 5.48 1.241.340. **Tuition and fees are subject to change due to legislative and/or institution action and become effective when enacted.16 1.40 8.670.44 4.00 New Entering Undergraduate Transfer Student .48 1.$180.44 2.55 10.49 9.392.572.875.04 2.382.376.04 929. or individual major fees.145.49 3.56 6.693.742.60 1.767.843.00 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .16 4.$10.423.88 3.40 8.49 9.52 10.217.842.900.872.383.40 3.429.839.$6.242.787.04 2. the following must be added as appropriate: SUPPLEMENTAL FEES New Student Student ID Fee (Miner Gold Card) .32 2.151.315.60 3.$20.333.169.815.00 Student General Property Deposit . In addition to the tuition and fees quoted above.143.859.43 8.$200. course-related fees.88 1.58 International UG 621.55 10.194.00 2.48 500.46 3.

00 $ 8. Occupational Therapy Major Fee . 3221. 4176 CHEM 3151. 1303 ARTF 3315 ARTG 1306.00 $ 5. 3152 CHEM 1407 CHEM 2161 CHEM 4376 CHEM 4131 CHEM 1408.00 $ 30.$180.$25. 2306. 3314.00 $ 15.00 $ 150. 4314.00 $ 10. 2314. 2326. 4212 $ 50.00 $ 10. 4306. 3414. 4398 BIOL 4325 BOT 3437 BOT 2410 CERM 4304.00 $ 12. 4326 BIOL 1103.00 $ 7. 3119. College of Engineering Major Fee .00 $ 5.00 $ 750.00 $ 10.00 $ 4.$75. 1107.00 $ 5.00 $ 15. 3222.00 $ 25. Physical Therapy Major Fee .TUITION AND FEES/47 Certain Declared Majors Clinical Laboratory Science Major Fee .00 $ 20. 1108 BIOL 1104 BIOL 4198.00 $ 20.$50.00 $ 8.00 $ 30. 4316.00 per semester with a declared major in Clinical Laboratory Science.00 $ 5. 3324.00 $ 20. 3317. 4319 ARTS 3320 ASTR 1107. 3304. 4347 ARTF 1302.00 per semester with a declared major in Occupational Therapy. 4309.00 per semester with a declared major within the College of Engineering. 3110. 4223. 4195 BIOL 2111. 4314.00 per student per semester COURSE FEES ANTH 3347 ANTH 3647 ART 1300 ARTE 3317.00 $ 16. 3124.00 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .00 $ 15.00 $ 25. 1306.00 $ 4.00 $ 6. 1304 ARTF 1301. 4376 CHEM 4165 CHEM 1106.00 $ 18.00 $ 12.00 $ 15. 3306.00 $ 8.00 per semester with a declared major in Nursing. 4304. Nursing Major Fee -$107. 2113 BIOL 4298 BIOL 3427 BIOL 2117.00 $ 15. 3330.$60. 3329. 4324 CHEM 1105 CHEM 4176. 4324 CERM 2304. 3125.00 per semester with a declared major in Physical Therapy International Student (ONLY): International Student Services Fee . 4325 ARTH 1305.

1250. 3139. 4380 2411 3425 4665 4332. 1324. 3254. 2268.00 $ 8. 1151. 3209. 1143.00 $ 10. 3236. 3313. 4346.00 $ 12. 3241 1137. 3150. 2277. 1269. 3331. 1281. 4311 1185.00 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 4315 4334 3449 3445 2440. 3491 1321.00 $ 450. 2101.00 $ 30. 3250.00 25. 3295. 3313. 3345. 4335 2343. 4313. 3391.00 $ 18. 2313.00 $ 10. 3137. 4330 3308 2318 1101. 3423. 4323 2303. 4201 2303 3331. 2255. 3443. 2267. 3348. 4453 4300 4413 1113. 1391. 4371 2308. 2272. 3261. 4319.00 $ 25. 3315. 1241. 4320. 4320 3201.TUITION AND FEES/48 CHIC COMM COMM COMM COMM COMM DANC DRAW DRAW DRAW DRAW ESCI FREN GEOG GEOL GEOL GEOL GEOL GEOL GEOP GERM HSCI HSCI HSCI KIN KIN KIN KIN KIN KIN KIN MICR MICR MICR MGMT MME MS MTLS MTLS MUSA MUSA MUSA MUSA MUSL 3302. 3303 2371.00 $ 5. 3211.00 25. 1295. 1162. 1236. 4310. 2271. 2375.00 $ 5. 1195.00 $ 50.00 20. 1104. 2256. 1491. 3203. 4311 2309. 2276.00 $ 20. 3311.00 $ 20.00 12. 3346.00 20. 2376. 3244. 4201. 3205. 1150. 4303. 3347.00 $ 15.00 5. 2254. 1261. 3207. 1272. 3162.00 $ 6. 1311. 3195.00 $ 10. 2253.00 $ 20. 4359 3317 1371.00 10. 1244. 1312 3311. 2103 2301.00 $ 17. 4323 1139. 3303. 1270. 4330 1303.00 $ 5.00 $ 7.00 $ 10. 3202. 2279. 4321 4222.00 50. 3151. 4313 4320 4309. 4311 3333 2342.00 $ 18.00 $ 15. 1271.00 $ 35. 3311. 3143. 2278. 2371. 3323. 3318 4310. 4345.00 $ 20. 1327. 3318.00 $ 10.00 20. 2302 4301. 3228 $ 15. 3355. 4334 2301.00 $ 20.00 24. 1116 4303. 2302 1106 1103. 2275.00 30. 1381.00 $ 8. 4313.00 30. 3204. 3420. 4312. 3371. 3210.00 $ 20. 2102. 1291 1290.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 9. 4312.00 10. 3206. 4313.

00 5.00 8. A fee of $10. 4644 1101.00 12.00 will be assessed to defray costs.00 30. 1186. 1315. 3342 1390.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 14. 1184. 4642. 2219. 2302 4305. 4157. 3394. 2332. 1125. 2331. 2321. 2325.00 is assessed to students pursuing teacher certification. 1313. 4332. 1151. 3331. 1178.00 is charged within one year of order. A fee of $30. 1191. 3464 3468 4181 $ 10.A fee of $5.00 10. 3261.00 per course will be assessed.00 30. 4476. 3304 3101 4352. 3391. 1182. CERTIFICATION DEFICIENCY PLAN PREPARATION FEE . 4335 2305. 2322.00 8. 1129 1164. 1404. This defrays administrative costs of processing certification deficiency plans.A fee of $10.00 will be assessed to a student requesting a replacement after one year. 3315. a fee of $30.00 15. 1404. 1180. 3332.00 5. 3319 2316. For a person who is not enrolled at the University. 2111. 1157.00 8. 4478 2406.00 30. 3316.00 23. 3395 3341 4155. if the student has lost the diploma or if the student's name has changed.00 is assessed per transaction each time a change is made to the initial registration. 3341. 4342 2301. 3342.00 12. 1170. 3305. 1314. 3263. 2112.00 16. 4390 3302. 4332. 4301. 1403. 3303. 1173. 3302. 2314.00 25.00 5.00 $ 8. 4353 2301.00 5. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . AUDIT FEE . 3325.00 10. 2313. 3390. DIPLOMA REPLACEMENT FEE .00 5. 1403. 1122. 3215.00 20. 4341 2301. CLINICAL TRACKING AND EVALUATION FEE – A fee of $50. 4331. 3301. 3262. 3335 2303.00 15. 4325. 1112. 2304 4340 1313. 1104.area diploma can be replaced at the student's request. 2302 4302. 2302. 3216. 3243 4371 4331. 1194 1121. 4302. 4341 2301. 1152.00 per audited course will be assessed to a student who is currently enrolled at the University.00 20. 2303. 3243 1121.00 32. 3218.00 INCIDENTAL FEES ADD/DROP FEE .TUITION AND FEES/49 MUST MUST OT PE PE PE PHYS PHYS PHYS PNTG PNTG PORT PRNT PRNT PSCI PSYC PSYC RUSS SCUL SCUL SPAN SPLP THEA THEA THEA THEA ZOOL ZOOL ZOOL ZOOL 1111.00 $ 180. 3317 4640. 1188 1128.00 $ 20. 1311. 3393.A fee of $20. 4342 2302.00 20.00 15. 1116.

To cover costs associated with handling special items.00 per delinquent payment will be assessed to defray costs of handling delinquent installment tuition payment. GRADUATION FEE .A fee of $17. These fees defray the costs of the extra services required to complete the late registration process. IN ABSENTIA GRADUATION FEE . GRADUATION APPLICATION LATE FEE .A fee of $15. damaged.00 is required of candidates for graduation.00 per semester will be assessed to students who wish to use musical instruments that are available through the Music Department. EQUIPMENT SUPPORT FOR ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING .00 per semester will be assessed to support the costs of open laboratory operations for Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science.A fee of $30. INSTALLMENT TUITION DELINQUENCY FEE . INSTALLMENT TUITION HANDLING FEE . damaged. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT APPLICATION FEE .–For music students. and $50.Any student who. HEALTH INSURANCE FEE .To cover costs associated with handling special items.A fee of $15.00 for in-person late registration.00 will be assessed to applicants who submit applications for admission to the University after the scheduled deadlines. An individual who has applied. registers after the appointed days for registering will be required to pay a special charge of $30. INSTRUMENT USERS FEE .00 check or money order.00 per academic term will be assessed to cover costs related to providing the installment payment option. will not be considered. funds. including submission of the thesis or dissertation.00 per semester will be assessed to graduate students who have completed the degree requirements. and who wish to register for the sole purpose of receiving the degree. the library charges the following fees: UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .A fee of $25. and been accepted but who does not enroll will be considered for later admission only upon reapplication including another payment of this fee again.00 is assessed to all international students who apply for admission to UTEP.00 will be assessed to all candidates for graduation who apply for graduation after the regular processing period has been completed.A fee of $15. after the semester deadline. payable in U. LATE ADMISSION APPLICATION FEE .00 per semester credit hour will be assessed to defray costs associated with providing distance learning facilities and support for students enrolling in distance learning classes or other off-campus course(s). the library charges the following fees: LIBRARY FEES .S.A fee of $25. but prior to registration for the following semester.00 per long semester and $12. The amount assessed will match the University Texas System Student Insurance Plan premium.A fee of $15. This fee is paid each time an application for degree is filed after the processing period deadline and under no circumstances is it subject to refund. and/or overdue books. EMERGENCY LOAN PROCESSING FEE . paid the fee. Applications not accompanied by a $65.00 will be assessed to defray administrative costs incurred in processing and collecting emergency loan payments. a fee of $15. and/or overdue books. Veterans attending the University under an exemption defined elsewhere in this section are not exempt from payment of this fee. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICE FEE – A fee of $25.A mandatory insurance fee required of international students holding nonimmigrant visas and living in the United States.A fee of $65.00 on or after the first class day. Veterans attending the University under an exemption as defined elsewhere in this section are not exempt from payment of this fee. This fee must be paid each time an application for degree is filed and under no circumstances is it subject to refund.50 per summer session is assessed to international students to defray the costs of operating the Office of International Programs and supporting the programs that are unique to international students. with proper permission. LATE REGISTRATION FEE .TUITION AND FEES/50 DISTANCE EDUCATION FEE . LIBRARY FEES .A fee of $25.

00 plus actual costs Photographic Reproduction Preservation Fee Student Fee $4.00 maximum) $1. SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ENRICHMENT EXPERIENCE .00 per hour ($25. A housing deposit remains without call for refund for a period of two (2) years from the date of last attendance at the University. Failure of a student to abide by the Terms and Conditions of Occupancy and/or the University Regulations or Residence Hall Regulations resulting in the University ‖s terminating a Residence Hall Agreement.00 per item. The deposit will be applied to the outstanding balance owed to the University and/or applied towards repairs or damages to the unit leased (except for reasonable wear and tear) c.00 processing fee and any fines accrued All costs charged by suppliers plus $0.00 $1.00 per day-$1.50 per request (or $2. or an examination to be given at a time other than that for which it is regularly scheduled.15 per microfilm or microfiche $5.A fee of $5.00 per request plus any charges from the lending library Cost of book plus $10.00 will be assessed to all incoming freshman and transfer students attending the Enrichment Experience in the College of Science and College of Engineering to defray costs associated with this program.00 will be assessed to defray costs of insurance for students working in clinical settings in courses in health science.A fee of $200. STUDENT HOUSING DEPOSIT .00 per examination is required of persons who wish to take an advanced standing examination. speech-language pathology.00 will be assessed to defray the loss of State formula revenue associated with reinstatement of enrollment after the state funding census date.00 fee will be assessed to students in Social Work for a handbook required by the Council of Social Work Education SPECIAL EXAMINATION FEE . an examination to remove a condition. REINSTATEMENT FEE . nursing. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .50 per copy $0.00 to $80. SOCIAL WORK HANDBOOK FEE . Permission of the academic dean must be secured before payment is made.A $200. and social work. RETURNED CHECK FEE . b.00 maximum) Varies depending on type of equipment/service $0.00 per day ($25.A fee of $30.TUITION AND FEES/51 Overdue Charges: Regular Checkouts Reserve Items Inter-Library Loans Lost Books Inter-Library Loans Computer Searches Damaged Book Fee Recall Fee Media-Charges Photocopier $0. Any reason of non-payment of rent.00 per semester credit hour (undergraduate) PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE FEE .00 per request for rush fee) 115% of connect time plus any off-line print charges $10.A fee of $10.A fee of $50.A $2. A Student Housing Deposit will be forfeited under any of the following conditions: a.05 to $0.00 deposit will be assessed to all students applying for residence hall housing.25 per day ($25.00 per check will be assessed to students who issue payment to the University with a check that is returned to the University because of insufficient funds. plus actual costs Architectural Drawings and Blueprint Reprographic Fee Special Collection $5.00 maximum) $1.

The charges shown in this schedule must be paid by all students registering for credit. The higher tuition rate will be the non-resident rate for any credit hours above 169.84 If students are enrolled only in Distance Learning courses. Health Center Fee.A fee of $10. or placement and credit testing will be assessed a fee ranging from $5.00 will be assessed for an official copy.00 will be assessed to students approved for student teaching during the fall and spring semesters.75 4.00 per test based on the test subscription costs.00 per card will be assessed students for reissuing a Miner Gold Card because of loss or destruction.00 681.00 will be assessed for an official copy with immediate processing.00 per semester Assessment based on 3 semester credit hours Tuition Distance Learning Fee Energy Fee Library Fee Technology Fee International Fund Fee Registration Fee Total $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 506. 2. TRANSCRIPT FEE . UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . A fee of $7. and Union Fee.00 per SCH Energy Fee $ 2.34 75.00 will be assessed to a student for an unofficial copy of his or her transcript. STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARD REPLACEMENT FEE .25 51. Recreation Fee.Students requesting administration of graduate or undergraduate admission testing. Tuition for Undergraduate Hours in Excess of 170 or More Credit Hours A resident student who has attempted 170 or more semester credit hours will be charged a higher tuition rate than is charged to other resident students. professional certification testing. TEACHER CERTIFICATION CREDENTIALS FEE .00 will be assessed to students enrolled in the Teacher Education Program who are having their academic credentials evaluated for compliance with certification requirements set by the Texas Education Agency. Malfunctioning cards or inoperative cards will be replaced at no charge. *Distance Learning Tuition and Fees subject to change by action of the Texas Legislation and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Changes will be effective as determined by the governing body. the following fees are waived under this program: Activity Fee.A fee of $2.50 per SCH Library Fee $ 10. This is a one-time fee assessed with initial issuance of the card.A fee of $20.00 per semester Registration Fee $ 5.25 per SCH International Fund Fee $ 4.00 5.00 per student will be assessed for the new Miner Gold ID card.00 to $50. The amount includes the following: Tuition $ 168. TEST FEE .75 per SCH Technology Fee $ 17.00 7. A fee of $5.TUITION AND FEES/52 STUDENT IDENTIFICATION CARD ISSUANCE FEE – A fee of $6. The higher tuition rate will not be charged to a student enrolled in: 1. STUDENT TEACHING FEE . Two or more baccalaureate degree programs at the same time.50 32.A fee of $50. A double-major degree program that requires 130 or more semester credits for completion.78 per semester credit hour (SCH) Distance Learning Fee $ 25.

or stolen will be assessed a $20. A new photo will be taken every time a card is re-issued. students should contact the Registrar‖s Office at 915 . driver‖s license. lost.TUITION AND FEES/53 3. The University reserves the right to modify or change any or all parts of the Miner Gold card at any time. For more information: Miner Gold Card Office Academic Services Building.7334 www. 2. Various debit-declining balance plans can be utilized by Miner Gold card holders. 3. A health-professional baccalaureate degree program. The Miner Gold card remains active as long as the student is enrolled in courses at UTEP. Semester credit hours earned by the student by examination or under any other procedure by which credit is earned without registering for a course for which tuition is charged.747. Enrollment in these plans is automatic: participation is optional. The Miner Gold card must be surrendered to University officials upon request. Any card rendered unusable. Semester credit hours earned by the student at a private institution or an out-of-state institution. MINER GOLD CARD The Miner Gold card is the official identification (ID) card of the University of Texas at El Paso.00 fee for the ID card.931.g. 4. All students must carry their Miner Gold cards at all times while on University property in order to obtain services. Semester credit hours earned by the student while the student was classified as a nonresident or foreign student for tuition purposes. Semester credit hours earned by the student 10 or more years before the date the student begins the new degree program under the Academic Fresh Start Program of the Texas Educational Code. § 51. The Miner Gold card is issued to all students who are enrolled in at least one credit hour. the following credit hours will not be counted: 1. non-refundable $6. All first-time students will be assessed a one-time.747.utep. A current photo ID (e. For more information.5550. In determining whether the student has previously attempted 170 or more semester credit hours. 6.edu/minergold PARKING FEES The following parking fees apply to students desiring to park on campus: Classes of Permits and Annual Fees Sun Bowl Parking Garage Allows the holder to park in any garage parking space designated for their particular class of permit. 5. Credit for a remedial education course or another course that does not count toward a degree program at the institution. Semester credit hours earned by the student before receiving a baccalaureate degree that has previously been awarded to the student. damaged. No article of clothing or accessory including a hat or sunglasses can be worn on the student‖s head when the ID card photograph is taken. or passport) must be presented before a Miner Gold card is issued.00 fee. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . state ID. Room 116 915. The Miner Gold card is the property of the University and is non-transferable.

00 all students (including graduate students) $ 77.10 all students (including graduate students) if purchased during the spring semester if purchased during the summer session all Miner Village residents if purchased during the spring semester if purchased during the summer session Replacement Decal With remnants of decal. Twenty percent (20%) payment of tuition. Class S $175.15 $ 37.30 $ 75. mandatory and incidental fees at the time of registration.86 if purchased during the summer session Perimeter Parking Lots Allows the holder to park in any perimeter area designated for their particular class of permit. Class R $ 75.00 METHODS OF PAYMENT Cash.01 if purchased during the spring semester $ 52.15 if purchased during the spring semester $ 37. MasterCard.42 Silver Parking Lots Allows the holder to park in any Silver parking area designated for their particular class of permit.00 $154.00 Without remnants of decal.00 $ 77.TUITION AND FEES/54 Class PG-1 (Covered) $250.44 $ 60.86 if purchased during the summer session Remote Parking Lots Allows the holder to park in any remote area designated for their particular class of permit. American Express.52 all students (including graduate students) if purchased during the spring semester if purchased during the summer session all students (including graduate students) if purchased during the spring semester if purchased during the summer session Class PG-1 (Deck) $200.00 $123. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and Discover will be accepted for payment of tuition and fees. $5.00 all students (including graduate students) $ 46.76 if purchased during the summer session Class P (Motorcycle) $ 75.00 all attendants (including graduate students) $108. 1. 2. mandatory fees and incidental fees at the time of registration. The University offers the two following payment methods during long semesters (fall and spring) only.86 $ 15.00 $ 30.86 if purchased during the summer session Other Class Permits Class H (Inner Campus Disabled) Class M $125. VISA. $20.29 if purchased during the spring semester $ 22.29 if purchased during the spring semester $ 22. check. Class P (Automobile) $125.76 $ 50. Full payment of tuition. th with the remaining balance due in Four (4) equal installments by the 15 of each month.00 all students (including graduate students) (Automobile/Motorcycle) $ 46.

and official transcript. Technology Fee. A bar against registration at the institution.00 will be assessed at the end of the sixth and eleventh week of classes if the payment due for that period is not paid in full. including items associated with deferred payment. The University shall assess the Installment Tuition Handling Fee of $17. including any late fees assessed. this charge is payable at the time of registration. 3. Student Union Fee.TUITION AND FEES/55 Items for which payment CAN be deferred under Method 2 include the following: Tuition Mandatory Fees (Library Fee. Withholding of grades. except for students who officially withdraw up to the end of the refund period as indicated in the Class Schedule. Supplemental Fee for Fine Arts. or a Summer term of 10 weeks or longer.) The following additional policies will apply to deferral of payments: 1. however. Further. Installment Tuition Handling Fees. will be refunded applicable tuition and fees as follows: Prior to the first class day 100% minus $15. Health Center Fee. International Studies Fee. A payment plan selected at the time of registration will be binding and will be applied to any subsequent add/drop activities. must be paid in full before a student can begin registration for a subsequent semester. c. degree. An Installment Tuition Delinquency Fee of $15. and are subject to change by. Withdrawals Students withdrawing during a Fall or Spring semester. REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES Refund policies are established by. etc. Add/Drop. Major Fees) Discretionary Fee (Health Insurance) Optional Fee (Parking Decal Fee) Items for which payment CANNOT be deferred include the following: Student General Property Deposit Discretionary Fee (Liability Insurance) Amounts due for financial holds or from previous periods Optional Incidental Fees (such as Late Registration. general fees. Student Services Fee. No reduction in amounts due will be made after this date. 5. the Legislature of the State of Texas and are applicable to withdrawals and dropped courses. All penalties and actions authorized by law. 2. 4. Refunds of tuition.00 to students choosing Method 2. which is the twelfth (12 ) class day in a long semester. and student services fees will be made under the following conditions. The Office of Student Business Services will send e-mail notifications as appropriate to students paying tuition and fees under Method 2. A student who fails to provide full payment of tuition and fees. pre-payment of outstanding balances will be accepted. the student is obligated to pay the assessed amounts whether or not class attendance is subsequently interrupted or terminated. The student's tuition and fees assessment will be based upon the courses for which a student is th enrolled on the official census date.00 During the first five class days 80% UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . All student account balances due from previous semesters. b. to the University when the payments are due is subject to one or more of the following: a. Recreational Fee) Incidental Fees (Course-related Fees (such as Equipment Fees).

surrender all applicable privileges. or third class day 80% During the fourth. or scholarship will be made to the source rather than directly to the student who has withdrawn or dropped courses. including identification cards and athletic and cultural-entertainment tickets.S. fees. The refund is required if the student does not register for. or sixth class day 50% Seventh day of class and thereafter No Refund Students withdrawing from a term or session of five weeks or less will be refunded applicable tuition and fees as follows: Prior to the first class day 100% minus $15.TUITION AND FEES/56 During the second five class days During the third five class days During the fourth five class days After the fourth five class days 70% 50% 25% No Refund Students withdrawing from a term or session of more than five weeks but less than ten weeks will be refunded applicable tuition and fees as follows: Prior to the first class day 100% minus $15. and other charges that were assessed for the enrollment period. a loan. if the funds were made available through the University.747. room and board.C. and other charges to certain students attending the institution for the first time who have received a grant. Unless the student withdraws completely from school prior to the first official class day. donor.5105 with any questions. the student is responsible for a percentage of total tuition and mandatory and incidental fees assessed.5116 or 915. Section 1087-2. fifth. second. provided the student remains enrolled for that semester or term. Refund of tuition for dropped courses will be made only if the original payment exceeds the established minimum amount. withdraws from. reduced by the amount of any unpaid charges and a reasonable administrative fee not to exceed the lesser of five (5%) of the tuition. fees. Students who withdraw or drop courses must. or one hundred dollars ($100. or otherwise fails to complete the period of enrollment for which the financial UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Refunds for students who owe balances on deferred payment of tuition and fees will be credited to the student's account. or whose parents have received a loan on their behalf under 20 U. Refunding for Students in Title IV Programs As an institution participating in programs under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended (“the Act”).00 During the first. Dropped Courses Refunds of applicable tuition and fees will be made for courses from which a student drops within the first twelve (12) class days of a long session semester or an appropriately shorter period for a summer session term. Students should contact the Student Business Services Office at 915. or work assistance under Title IV of the Act. Refunds of tuition and fees paid on the student's behalf by a sponsor. room and board. Refunds provided for the above will be granted if applied for by the end of the semester in which the withdrawal or drop was appropriately completed.747. in order to qualify for a refund. not on the amount paid.00). The University of Texas at El Paso is required to refund unearned tuition.00 During the first class day 80% During the second class day 50% During the third class day and thereafter No Refund Note: Percentage of refund is based on the total tuition and mandatory and incidental fees assessed.

a portion or all of the refund will be returned to these programs. or game wardens Disability/death occurred in the line of duty Tuition Required Fees not to exceed 120 undergraduate credit hours or any semester begun after age 26 Children of Prisoners of War or Persons Missing in Action A person under the age of 21 or a dependent person under 25 years of age who receives majority of support from parent Parent is a resident of Texas on active duty military and Tuition Required Fees UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .201. and other charges will be determined for students who withdraw prior to this time. TUITION AND FEES EXEMPTION SUMMARY This information is provided in summary form.003) of disabled full-paid or volunteer firefighters. § 29. Tuition NOT TO EXCEED 150 CREDIT HOURS Adopted Children formerly in Foster or other Residential Care Texas Education Code § 54.2111 For individuals who were adopted. custodians of the Department of Criminal Justice. § 54. Description **Accredited School Scholarship (permissive) Texas Education Code § 54.S. No refund is required if the student withdraws after a point in time that is sixty percent (60%) of the period of enrollment for which the charges were assessed. full-paid municipal. county. fees. or a person whose sense of hearing is nonfunctional Must be a Texas resident Tuition Required Fees General Property Deposit Children of Disabled/Deceased Texas Firefighters and Law Enforcement Officers Texas Education Code. Texas Education Code or a pro rata refund calculated pursuant to Section 484B of the Act. A refund of tuition. state peace officers. If the student charges were paid by Title IV funds.201 Active Military Dependent Children (including stepchild) Texas Education Code § 54.TUITION AND FEES/57 assistance was intended.204 For children under 21 years of age (or 22 if the student was eligible to participate in special education under Texas Education Code. Chapter 162.S.203(b-2) Eligibility Highest ranking graduate of an accredited Texas high school Exempted Charges* Tuition during first two semesters (long session) following graduation Child or stepchild of member of U. room and board. The refund is the larger of the amount provided for in Section 54.006.205 A blind disabled person. Armed Forces who is resident of Texas or eligible for resident tuition Military member deployed on active duty for purpose of engaging in a combative military operation outside the U. For more information contact Student Business Services and/or refer to Texas Education Code § 54. that provided monthly payments and medical assistance benefits and was not limited to providing only for the reimbursement of nonrecurring expenses Tuition and Fees Blind and Deaf Students Texas Education Code § 54. and Were subject of an adoption assistance agreement under Texas Family Code Subchapter D. et seq.

Sections 56.203 Tuition Fees (excluding general deposit fees. whose death is documented to be directly caused by illness or injury related to service in the U. are MIA.S. or who become totally disabled for purposes of employability according to the U.2041 All or part of tuition and fees Texas resident who has resided in Texas for 12 months immediately preceding registration Permanently disabled as a result of injury sustained in performance of duties as Texas peace officer Unable to continue duties as peace officer Tuition Fees excluding class and laboratory fees NOT TO EXCEED 12 SEMESTERS IN UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM Fees for activities.025. Department of Veterans Affairs' disability rating as a result of a service-related injury For children or the spouse of members of the Texas National Guard who after January 1. were killed while on active duty or became totally disabled for purposes of employability according to the U.S. services or facilities that the student cannot reasonably be expected to use **Distance/Off-Campus Learning (permissive) Texas Education Code § 54. 1946. if the person graduated If completed the recommended or advanced high school program: $2.216 **Disabled Peace Officers (permissive) Texas Education Code § 54.000 for tuition and mandatory fees if graduated UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . student services fees. board. or clothing) NOT TO EXCEED 150 CREDIT HOURS **Concurrent Enrollment-High School/University Credit (permissive) Texas Education Code § 54.218 Early High School Graduates Texas Education Code.TUITION AND FEES/58 Texas Education Code § 54. armed forces who were killed in action.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' disability rating as a result of a service-related injury Texas resident who resided in the state at least 12 months immediately preceding date of registration Individuals enrolled in a course that provides simultaneously course credit towards (1) high school academic requirements. and any charges for lodging.209 classified by Department of Defense as a Prisoner of War or Missing in Action at time of the student’s registration Children of Professional Nursing Program Faculty Texas Education Code § 54. § 28.S. who die or died while in service. and (2) a degree offered by the institution Tuition (prorated if parent is not full-time) Children and Spouse of Texas Veterans Texas Education Code § 54. armed forces.201-209 Student enrolled only in distance learning courses or other off-campus courses Graduated from high school: in not more than 41 consecutive months and successfully completed the recommended or advanced high school program under Texas Education Code.221 For children whose parent is a faculty member or teaching assistant in a nursing program in Texas Age is 25 years or younger Texas resident Has not previously received a baccalaureate degree Has not previously received an exemption under this section for 10 semesters or summer sessions Exemption applies only at institution that employs the parent/faculty member For children or the spouse of members of the U.

Attended for the majority of time a Texas public high school Be a U. an active member of an organized volunteer fire department in Texas. and are enrolled in course offered as a part of fire science curriculum For individuals under the conservatorship of the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services on the day preceding the individual’s 18th birthday.214 When payment of fee causes undue economic hardship -number of exceptions limited to 5 percent of total enrollment School employee who worked as an educational aide for at least one year during the 5 years preceding the semester of the exemption Establish financial need Pursuing teacher certification Maintain acceptable GPA Resident of Texas Firefighters who: are employed by a political subdivision of Texas as a firefighter.208 [Back to Top] Tuition Laboratory Fees Students Under Conservatorship of Department of Family and Protective Services Texas Education Code § 54. if the person graduated before 9/1/2005. if the person graduated on or after 9/1/2005. or are currently and have been for at least one year. with at least 30 college credit hours. or in no more than 36 consecutive months after successfully completing the requirements for a high school diploma. or on the day the student received a high school diploma or equivalent. § 28. who holds appropriate levels of certification as specified in the statute. from high school on or after 9/1/2005 in 36 consecutive months or less (an additional $1. on or after the day of the student’s 14th birthday if the student was eligible for adoption on or after that day. citizen or otherwise lawfully authorized to be present in the U.S. and if graduated from high school in not more than 36 consecutive months General Fee Economic Hardship Texas Education Code.211 Tuition Required Fees UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Tuition Fees excluding class and laboratory fees Firefighters enrolled in Fire Science Courses Texas Education Code § 54. and successfully completed the recommended or advanced high school program under Texas Education Code. as defined by the fire fighters' pension commissioner.503(e) Educational Aides Texas Education Code § 54.000 for tuition only if graduated before 9/1/2005.025. in not more than 46 consecutive months. § 54.000 if graduated with at least 30 college credit hours) $1.S.000 for tuition and mandatory fees if graduated from high school in 42-45 consecutive months on or after 9/1/2005 with at least 30 college credit hours If completed the requirements for a high school diploma: $1.TUITION AND FEES/59 on or after 9/1/2005.000 if graduated with at least 15 college credit hours) $500 for tuition and mandatory fees if graduated from high school in 37-41 consecutive months on or after 9/1/2005 (an additional $1.

207 Interinstitutional Academic Programs (Permissive) Texas Education Code § 54.212 For individuals admitted to the institution and its Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program Selected by ROTC Selection Committee must become a member of the Texas Army National Guard or the Texas Air National Guard and maintain status as a member in good standing Possess and maintains academic and personal conduct standards established by institution Maintain full-time enrollment status Enter into a contract to serve no less than four years after graduation as a commissioned officer with Texas Air or Army National Guard Tuition Fees Lodging and Board (1st two years of enrollment) NOT TO EXCEED FOUR YEARS UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . but who is enrolled primarily at another institution Tuition Required Fees Individual certified by the adjunct general of the state military forces as having been awarded assistance for tuition and fees under Texas Government Code § 431. 1999 Is enrolled for at least 12 semester credit hours Prisoners of War Texas Education Code § 54. and has not previously received an exemption under this section for 10 semesters or summer sessions Is a resident of Texas and was a resident of Texas at the time of original entry into the U.2155 Individuals enrolled in courses that are fully funded by federal or other sources Tuition and Fees for particular course A limited number (as prescribed by the Coordinating Board) of native-born citizens and residents from nations of the Western Hemisphere other than the United States Tuition Individuals taking a course at an institution under an interinstitutional academic program agreement.090 Tuition not to exceed 12 semester credit hours charged at the Texas resident rate Mandatory Fees for any semester in which the tuition exemption is received $500 off tuition per semester Nursing Preceptors and their Children Texas Education Code § 54.S.224 Members of State Military Forces Texas Education Code § 54.219 Tuition and Required Fees Student Housing and Food Contract Costs Textbook Costs NOT TO EXCEED 120 HOURS ROTC Students Texas Education Code § 54. has not previously received a baccalaureate degree. armed forces Was first classified as a POW on or after January 1.217 **Good Neighbor Scholarship (permissive) Texas Education Code § 54.TUITION AND FEES/60 or during an academic term in which the student was enrolled in a dual credit course Enrolls in an institution of higher education (including a dual credit course) no later than his or her 25th birthday **Fully Funded Courses (permissive) Texas Education Code § 54.222 Texas resident Registered nurse Serving under contract as a clinical preceptor OR A child 25 years or younger whose parent meets the criteria above.

police reservists. board. Lebanon. the Cold War.S. parole officers. Persian Gulf. jailers.210 Individuals 65 years of age or older on space available basis Tuition NOT TO EXCEED 6 CREDIT HOURS PER SEMESTER Individuals 65 years of age or older on space available basis may audit Surviving Spouse and Minor Children of Certain Police. lab fees or other course specific fees or optional fees.203 Tuition Fees (excluding general deposit fees.212 For students who during the student’s last year of public high school in this state. Security or Emergency Personnel Killed in the Line of Public Duty Texas Gov’t Code § 615. was a dependent child receiving financial assistance under Chapter 31. and any charges for lodging.003 Death occurred in the line of duty as a result of a risk inherent in the duty Must be enrolled full-time Tuition Tuition and Fees Student Housing and Food Contract Costs Textbook Costs NOT TO EXCEED BACHELOR’S DEGREE OR 200 HOURS TANF Students Texas Education Code § 54. TUITION REBATES FOR CERTAIN BACCALAUREATE RECIPIENTS UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .0225 For the surviving spouse or children of certain public peace officers. probation officers. Vietnam. They do not include room. Texas Human Resources Code. books. Panama.085 Younger than 22 years of age on the date of enrollment Enrolls at the institution as an undergraduate student not later than the second anniversary of the date of graduation from a public high school in this state Has met the entrance examination requirements of the institution before the date of enrollment Must be a Texas resident Resided in Texas for 12 months prior to registration Entered the service at a location in Texas Declared Texas as the person's home of record or would have been a resident of Texas under Subchapter B at the time of entry Served in U. fire fighters.TUITION AND FEES/61 Pass the physical examination and police records background check **Senior citizen (permissive) Texas Education Code § 54. **Must have Regental approval. board. for not less than six months Successfully completed the attendance requirements under Texas Education Code § 25. Texas Gov’t Code § 615. armed forces in World War II. Korean Conflict. student services fees. the national emergency related to 9/11/2001 Honorably discharged Not eligible for federal education benefits Tuition Fees NOT TO EXCEED FIRST ACADEMIC YEAR Texas Ex-Servicemen Texas Education Code § 54. transportation. Grenada era. and emergency medical personnel. or clothing) Other required charges NOT TO EXCEED 150 CREDIT HOURS (assignment of unused hours to children under 25 years of age is authorized) *Required Fees are those required as a condition of enrollment.

0065.tx. including the Texas Guaranteed Student Loan Corporation. f.htm and www. and repeated courses.capitol. eligibility. b. graduate within four calendar years with a four-year degree or within five calendar years with a five-year degree (if the degree is in architecture. course credit earned exclusively by examination (except that. to avail themselves of academic counseling. for the purposes of this program. Enrolled at UTEP for the first time in the fall semester of 1997or later. and responsibilities. and the state. c. Tuition Rebates Tuition rebates shall be reduced by the amount of any outstanding student loan. parents. Minimizing the number of courses taken by a student results in financial savings to students. Room 123 915. Have attempted no more than three hours in excess of the minimum number of semester credit hours required to complete the degree in the catalog under which they graduated. Section §54. Teaching Certificates For purposes of the $1. only the number of semester credit hours earned exclusively by examination in excess of nine semester credit hours is treated as hours attempted). regarding students concurrently earning a baccalaureate degree and a Texas teaching certificate. e. Have been a Texas resident at all times while pursuing the baccalaureate degree. The Texas Education Code.TUITION AND FEES/62 The Texas Legislature has authorized a $1. Required teacher-education courses shall not be counted to the extent that they are over and above the free electives allowed in the baccalaureate degree program. for-credit developmental courses.tx.000 tuition rebate for students who complete baccalaureate degrees with no more than three credits in excess of those required for their degrees. Have requested a rebate for semester credit hours achieved toward their first baccalaureate degree. or any other program determined by the Board to require more than four years to complete).000 tuition rebate. courses dropped after the official census date. engineering. Hours attempted include transfer credits. students should contact the Registration and Records Office. The purpose of the program is to provide a financial incentive for students to prepare for university studies while completing their high school work.5544.state. including an emergency loan.thecb. Courses dropped for reasons that are determined by UTEP to be totally beyond the control of the student shall not be counted. and complete their baccalaureate studies with as few courses outside the degree plan as possible. Academic Services Building. optional internship and cooperative education courses. For more details about the Tuition Rebate Program.747. make early career decisions.us. owed to or guaranteed by the state. Have applied for rebates prior to receiving their baccalaureate degrees. TUITION LIMIT IN CASES OF CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT When a student registers at more than one public institution of higher education at the same time.us/rules/13/13F. d.state. If enrolled for the first time in fall 2005 or later. authorizes UTEP to provide a tuition rebate to students who: a. Further information on the Tuition Rebate Program can be found at ww. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

060 of this code. 2. and in any event shall pay an amount at least equal to the minimum tuition specified in this code. then the student shall first register at the institution having the lower minimum tuition and shall pay to the second institution only the amount equal to the difference between his total tuition charge at the second institution and his or her total tuition charge at the first institution. to the second institution. The student shall pay the full tuition charge to the first institution at which he or she is registered. that student shall be considered a Texas resident at each of the institutions at which he is concurrently registered for the purposes of determining the proper tuition charges. but in no case shall the student pay to the second institution less than the hourly rates as provided in this code. If the minimum tuition specified in this code for the first institution at which the student is registered is equal to or greater than the minimum tuition specified in this code for the second institution at which the student is registered concurrently. if the second institution has a higher minimum tuition charge specified in this code). as provided in this code. If the minimum tuition specified in this code for the first institution at which the student is registered is less than the specified minimum tuition charge at the second institution (that is.TUITION AND FEES/63 tuition charges shall be determined in the following manner: 1. but shall pay only the hourly rates. 4. If a student is considered a Texas resident and therefore qualified to pay Texas resident tuition rates by one institution at which she or he is registered. 3. Nothing in this subsection shall be so construed as to allow a nonresident to pay resident tuition except at institutions covered by Section 54. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . the student shall not be required to pay the specified minimum tuition charge to the second institution in addition to the tuition charge paid to the first institution.

All check writers whose check is returned will be assessed a $30. The University will not assume the role of collection agency for any organization. or individual to which students owe money. can be subject to disciplinary action. or money order which is not subsequently honored by payor‖s bank. TX 79902 915. The student's grades and official transcripts can be withheld. Delinquent accounts will be referred to a collection agency and credit bureau. RETURNED CHECKS A student who pays the University a check. draft. most academic buildings.edu UTEP offers some of the finest and most affordable on-campus housing facilities available anywhere. Students can choose from four different styles of apartments: efficiencies for one or two students or two-bedroom and four-bedroom units. nor will the University adjudicate disputes between students and creditors over the existence or amounts of debts.UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS/64 GENERAL DEBTS OF STUDENTS OR ORGANIZATIONS The University is not responsible for any debts contracted by individual students or by student organizations.747. DEBTS OWED TO THE UNIVERSITY In the event of non-payment of debts owed to the University. A degree to which the student might otherwise be entitled can be withheld.5352 housing@utep. or money order for services or goods which is not subsequently honored by the payer‖s bank and the fault is not that of the bank. one or more of the following actions may be taken by the University: The student can be barred from registration.00 fee for each check not honored by payor‖s bank. On-Campus Housing Expenses Department of Residence Life Miner Village 2401 North Oregon Street El Paso. Miner Village provides a state-of-the-art residential environment designed to help students succeed academically while living comfortably. This assessment is subject to change without notice. Other penalties and actions authorized by law can be exercised. Miner Village offers unprecedented on-campus convenience. Each bedroom is private.00 returned check fee within ten (10) class days after receiving written notice and the student‖s check will be referred to the County Attorney for collection. and all apartments . and the Sun Bowl Stadium. Opened in fall of 2001. A student who pays tuition and fees with a check. Located a five-minute walk from the UTEP Library. and who does not pay the University the amount due within ten (10) class days after the receipt of written notice that the bank has refused payment. firm. draft. can be withdrawn from the University for non-payment of tuition and fees if the student fails to pay the University the check amount due plus a $30. the fault not being that of the bank.

as his or her domicile while in this country and who has not met the State of Texas requirement for establishing residency for tuition purposes. or has not been permitted by Congress to adopt the U. Residency for Tuition Purposes The Office of Admissions and Recruitment is responsible for determining residency status of students for tuition purposes. A non-resident student is a citizen. The Office is guided by the Texas Education Code. A foreign student is an alien who is not a permanent resident of the U.S. a student or prospective student is classified as either a resident of Texas. An individual can also be classified as a Texas resident if the individual (1) graduated from a public or private high school or received the equivalent of a high school diploma in Texas. a national. a coffee table. citizen. and University regulations. Interested students must reserve spaces by submitting a Miner Village application and a $200 deposit. they generally require that an independent individual (18 years of age or older) establish a domicile in Texas and reside in Texas for a period of 12 months prior to the census date of the academic term in which she or he is enrolled. gas. an end table. and trash removal). Under the State of Texas statutes and regulations.UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS/65 feature high-speed Internet. An individual is classified as a Texas resident until he or she establishes a residence outside of the state of Texas.25.S. and private telephone lines. or an alien who has been permitted by Congress to adopt the U. as directed. to initially establish residency status students will be required to submit a completed set of Core Residency Questions or supporting documentation. While these State of Texas requirements for establishing residency are complex and should be referred to in each particular circumstance. water. a dresser. permanent-resident alien. . The apartments are fully furnished: Each living room contains a couch. and a dining table and chairs. and (3) continuously resided in Texas for one year prior to the census date of the academic term of enrollment at UTEP.S.S. A $30. a national or permanent resident of the U. sewer. A resident student is an individual who is either a U. cable-television connections. refrigerated air-conditioning. a desk and a desk chair. a chair.. One low monthly payment includes all utilities (electricity. (2) resided in Texas for at least three years after graduation from high school or receiving the equivalent of a high school diploma.S. the parents or court-appointed legal guardian must have established a domicile and meet the residency requirements. Variable lease options are available which enable students to live at Miner Village during the academic year only or on a year-round basis if desired. as his or her domicile. please call or visit. For information on current rates or to take a tour of Miners Village. to establish resident status. the Rules and Regulations for Determining Residence Status of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. or an alien who has been permitted by Congress to adopt the United States as his or her domicile while in the United States and who has otherwise met the State of Texas requirements for establishing residency for tuition purposes. For minors and dependents. high-speed Internet.00 annual once a year telephone maintenance fee is required upon move-in. or a foreign student. each bedroom contains a bed. basic cable television and a parking permit. a non-resident. In accordance with Texas Administrative Code §21. The minor or dependent must be eligible to be claimed by the parent or court-appointed legal guardian on the parents‖ or legal guardian‖s federal income tax.

. G-2. G-1. To qualify. An individual who is classified as a non-resident or foreign student can qualify. OP-1. and is not a member of the National Guard or Reserves who will be in Texas only to attend training with Texas units. Higher-education teachers and professors and their dependents. their spouses. Students whose families transferred to Texas as part of the State‖s plan for economic development. G5. the student must submit a statement once a year from an authorized officer in the services. Recipients of competitive University scholarships of $1. NATO 1-7. R-1. Military Certain military personnel. residency must be established. K-2. Registered nurses enrolled in postgraduate nursing degree programs. For these cardholders to be eligible for resident tuition. NATO forces stationed in Texas and their dependents. O-2. E-2. are eligible to pay resident tuition rates as provided through the Texas Education Code. H-1B. L1a. V.UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS/66 The following visa holders are eligible to establish a domicile in the United States and have the same privilege of qualifying for Texas residency as U. The document must indicate the member‖s permanent residence address in Texas must designate Texas as the member‖s place of legal residence for federal income-tax purposes. I. Teaching and research assistants and their dependents.058 (d) also provides resident tuition rates for a spouse or dependent child of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States who is not assigned to duty in Texas but who has previously resided in Texas for a six-month period if the member has provided at least one year preceding the first day of the term or semester a document starting the applicable military service that is in effect on the first day of the semester.S. A-2. Texas Probate Code. O-3. G-3. under certain exceptions. or I-688/A/B visas that have not expired. certifying that he or she (or a parent or court-appointed legal guardian) will be assigned to duty in Texas at the time of the student‖s enrollment. I-551.000 or more. and their dependent children. R-2. A-3. Armed Forces.058 (b)-(c). citizens: A-1. K-1. Other Exceptions Other categories of non-residents who may be entitled to pay resident tuition are: Participants in the Academic Common Market. O-1.S. K-3. L1b. Mexican citizens with demonstrated financial need. or at least one year preceding the first day of the semester executed a will that has not been revoked or superseded indicating that the member is a resident of Texas and deposited the will with the clerk of the county of the member‖s residence under Section 71.S. H-4. In addition. for resident tuition rates and other charges while continuing to be classified as a non-resident or a foreign student. dependents of O-1. and their dependent children. These provisions provide for nonresident members of the U. L-2. Section 54. or Commissioned Officers of the Public Health Service who are assigned to duty in Texas to pay the resident tuition rate for themselves. Foreign Service Officers assigned to posts in Mexico. In addition. Residents of the eight New Mexico counties that border Texas. K-4. members of Texas units of the Army or Air National Guard. E-1. dependents of H-1B. Military stationed in Texas and their dependents. U. Section 54. Texas Education Code. G-4. their spouses. the member must provide documentation proving that he or she has been registered to vote in Texas for the entire year preceding the first day of the semester and satisfies at least one of the following requirements: (1) has owned real property in Texas for the entire year preceding the first day of the semester and (2) has had an automobile registered in Texas for the entire year preceding the first day of the semester.

Students should consult the Class Schedule for specific information concerning the submission of non-resident exemption forms.UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS/67 STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES Reclassification as a Non-Resident Students who have been classified as residents of Texas will be reclassified as non-resident students whenever they report. in accordance with the rules and regulations of The University of Texas at El Paso. please contact the Office of Admissions and Recruitment at 915. If students who have been classified as residents of Texas are found to have been erroneously classified as a result of an omission or falsification will be reclassified as non-residents and will be required to pay the difference between resident and non-resident fees for the semesters for which they were erroneously classified. All students are expected to pay the tuition assessed on or before the payment date for each semester as established by the University. Justice The University of Texas at El Paso through the Scholars Excellence Program offers various scholarships to attract and retain the best and brightest students. After the questions and documentation are reviewed.edu/scholarships DIRECTOR: Elizabeth S. Reclassification as a Resident Persons classified as non-residents upon first enrollment can request reclassification. to the Office of Admissions and Recruitment prior to the first day of class of the semester for which the change is sought. students are notified in writing of the residence decision.utep. For questions on residency or to update residency status. Room 202 El Paso. Non-Compliance With Institutional Rules and Regulations If students have obtained residency classification by virtue of deliberate concealment of facts or misrepresentation of facts. circumstances indicating a change in legal residence to another state. or there are found to exist. These competitive scholarships are awarded based on academic merit and are intended to recognize outstanding academic .747. they can be required to repay the difference in tuition rates and can be subject to appropriate disciplinary action. students are encouraged to submit all forms at least two weeks before registration. Undergraduate Scholarships Academic Services Building.5890. they will be reclassified as residents of Texas and will be entitled to a refund of the difference between the resident and non-resident fees for the semesters in which they were erroneously classified. To prevent any delay in enrollment. If students have been erroneously classified as non-residents and subsequently prove to the satisfaction of the University‖s residency official that they should have been classified as resident students. All residence questionnaires and forms verifying non-resident tuition exemption status must be submitted prior to the first day of class of the term for which the change is sought. Texas 79968 (915) 747-5478 Fax: (915) 747-5089 schp@utep.edu www. students must complete the Core Residency Questions and submit them along with the appropriate documentation regarding residency. To have residence status reconsidered.

As a first-year or transfer student. which is used to award all institutional scholarships. Scholarship Programs The following programs include the University‖s most prestigious awards. Scholarships are made possible by generous alumni. you should make sure that your transcripts are noted as such since this could qualify you for additional funding such as the Texas Grant.0 cumulative GPA. you must submit a statement of educational goals and objectives (minimum of 250 words) along with your application. class rank. friends. and currently enrolled undergraduate students. you must have a minimum 3. to a lesser degree.UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS/68 accomplishments and future potential of UTEP students. renewable for three years Awarded to students with exceptional leadership skills Students must also meet two of the these requirements: . renewable for three years Awarded to valedictorians and salutatorians of high schools in El Paso. If you are currently enrolled. Socorro and Ysleta Independent School Districts of Texas PRESIDENTIAL EXCELLENCE Total award $16. corporations and community groups. extracurricular achievements. A non-awarded or late scholarship application is kept on file as long as you maintain full-time enrollment and a minimum 3.000. Completed applications must be received by the Office of Scholarships by the deadline dates below: November 1 Priority Deadline (high school seniors only) March 1 Second Round (high school seniors only) June 1 Current UTEP and transfer students Late applications are accepted and kept on file. you are considered for awards based on your high school cumulative grade point average (GPA). PRESIDENT‖S LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIP AWARD Total award $24. They are considered on the basis of available funds in all categories awarded.000. If you are a first-year student and have followed the recommended high school curriculum. have transferred from another university.0 cumulative GPA and must be enrolled full-time to be considered for a scholarship. Most are reserved for our first-year students with outstanding academic credentials. college transfers. Scholarship Requirements If you are a high school student.000 Annual award of $6. As an undergraduate student. SAT or ACT scores and. foundations. Priority Deadlines All of our students complete one application. Please visit the Office of Scholarships website for instructions on how to apply and to download scholarship applications. Academic scholarships are offered to our qualified first-year students. you must also submit an academic transcript with your scholarship application.000 Annual award of $4.

000 Annual award of $3. while ranked within the top 10 percent of their high school graduating classes Enroll in an institution of higher education in Texas the fall semester immediately following high school graduation Must be a Texas resident Maintain full-time enrollment Award is $2000 the student is a junior or senior and declared a major in a shortage field defined in Texas Administrative Code §22. These scholarships are awarded based on availability of funds. financial need.000 or $4. service awards. . Scholarships may also be awarded based on departmental recommendation if required by the donor. in which case the student is eligible for a $2. however. Athletes Awarded Academic Scholarships If you are awarded a scholarship based on merit and participate in intercollegiate athletics. renewable for three years Students must meet two of the these requirements:  High school GPA of at least 96  Rank in top 3% of graduating class  Score at least 1220 on SAT (combined math and reading) OR at least 27 on ACT ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIP Total award $6.000 bonus. Students may also be eligible for aid from state and federal need-based programs. having completed the Recommended or Distinguished Achievement High School Program. or residency. renewable for three years Students must meet all of these requirements:  High school GPA of at least 93  Rank in top 10% of graduating class  Score at least 1120 on SAT (combined math and reading) OR at least 24 on ACT EPCC TRANSFER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Minimum $1.201.000. which may limit dollar amounts and methods of disbursement. you must comply with NCAA governing rules.000 Annual award of $1.UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS/69    High school GPA of at least 96 Rank in top 3% of graduating class Score at least 1220 on SAT (combined math and reading) OR at least 27 on ACT PRESIDENTIAL Total award $12.000 award Students transferring to UTEP from EPCC during the last year Minimum 2.75 cumulative GPA from EPCC Minimum of 45 transferable credit hours from EPCC Maintain full-time enrollment at UTEP TOP 10 PERCENT SCHOLARSHIP Total Award: $2. Students are allowed to receive one UTEP academic scholarship. and/or research awards. may also be eligible for outside scholarships.000 Outstanding high school students who graduate from an accredited high school in Texas. General Scholarships There are various additional UTEP scholarships available with specific requirements such as classification. major.500. Please contact the Athletics Compliance Office at (915) 747-8607 for additional information.

athletic teams. you may qualify for resident tuition rates for each semester in which the scholarship is awarded to you. you may submit an appeal to the Undergraduate Scholarship Committee. The required forms are available at the Office of Scholarships and must be submitted by the specified deadline. you should contact the Graduate School Office at (915) 747-5491.edu/scholarships which is updated periodically.000 or more per year. Graduate Scholarship Information Graduate scholarships are merit-based awards available from the UTEP Graduate School. To qualify for the waiver. you are also encouraged to access databases that are available through the Internet in order to identify scholarships and fellowship opportunities. contact the sponsoring department. For more information. and external sources. pending summer grades. Check this listing regularly and APPLY APPLY APPLY! Academic Regulations . As a graduate student. are met. including GPA and credit hours. academic departments. you must have competed with Texas residents for the scholarship and the award must be administered by the Office of Scholarships. Non-Resident Waivers If you are a non-resident of Texas and are awarded a competitive scholarship of $1. and other such organizations.UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS/70 Service Awards Service awards are scholarships based on participation in university organizations including music groups. International Students Our international students are encouraged to submit an application to the Office of Scholarships for scholarship consideration. Appeal Process If you do not meet the scholarship requirements for renewal. Renewal Information Renewal letters are mailed in June after spring grades are posted. Please note the following: It is your responsibility to know whether or not scholarship requirements have been met It is your responsibility to know whether summer school enrollment is required to complete hour requirements Scholarship funds will not be applied toward tuition and fees until the conditions of a conditional renewal. A listing of these scholarships is available on the Office of Scholarships website at www. Additional Scholarship Opportunities Additional scholarship resources are offered through civic groups and other organizations. To apply for these awards.utep. You may only appeal once for any reason of nonrenewal.

...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 93 Immunization Requirement ...................................................................What’s Inside General Academic Information.................................................. 94 Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act ............................. 89 Prohibited Conduct ................................................................................. 96 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2009-2010 ..................................................... 91 Compulsory Inspection of Vehicle ............................................................................................................................... 91 Student Travel Policy ...................................................................................... 96 Equal Educational Opportunity ........................................................... 90 Hazing Policy ............................. 83 Textbook Policy ... 93 Bacterial Meningitis .............................. 70 Student Educational Records .............................. Student Life Policies and Procedures ........................................ and Hepatitis B Infection Policy ......................................................... 90 Disruptive Acts Policy .................................................................................................................. 79 Grades and Grade Point Averages ........................................... 87 Institutional Academic Honors ...................................................................... 86 General Requirements for Undergraduate Degrees ............. 95 Student Grievance Procedures .... 70 Registration ................................................................................................................................. 89 Gang-Free Zone Policy ......................................................................................... 89 Student Conduct .................. 93 AIDS................. 79 Course Information ................................................ 70 Classification of Students ................... 90 Solicitation ............... HIV................................................................................. 74 Curriculum and Classroom Policies ................................................................. 70 Student Responsibilities .................... 89 Illegal Substances Policy..................................................................

... and departmental academic advisors.... The general and specific degree requirements in their major fields. 2.... The current academic regulations and calendar of the University... registers after the scheduled days for regular registration will be required to pay $20.. After registration...00 for Web registration process. a student continues to attend classes even after their class schedule was cancelled due to no payment of tuition and fees. including those recent changes that appear in the on-line Class Schedule. All approvals must be forwarded to the Registration and Records Office... The student will be responsible to pay the proper tuition and fees.. Degree requirements and those specific to a given major are located in the appropriate college and departmental sections... 30-59 hours Junior. 3. Interpretations or explanations contrary to the regulations stated below are not binding upon the University..... After the semester is closed the student must obtain approval from the instructor(s) and department chair(s) to enroll in the course(s) no later than 90 days after the end of the term for which the approval is being requested... Additional information can be obtained from the academic deans.utep. Students can attend only those classes for which they are officially enrolled.. enrollment can be verified by the Registration and Records Office.......... A student is not enrolled in a course and will not receive a grade unless the proper tuition and fees are paid by the deadlines published in the on-line Class Schedule or unless arrangements for deferral of payment have been made with the Student Business Services Office.... General academic regulations are contained in this section of the catalog...... An ineligible student who enrolls will be dropped from all courses. If after census day. 0-29 hours Sophomore ... procedures.............. Late Registration Any student who. $30. Their academic status. Although every effort is made to advise students academically..... 60-89 hours Senior .. or a student attends a course(s) that they are not officially registered in. 90 or more hours REGISTRATION Registration is a process every student must successfully complete each semester.00 for in-person late registration.... Students are bound by the academic regulations in effect at the time of each registration. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES Students are responsible for being aware of 1..edu/register.. Policies that apply to registration... and any late fees associated to the late enrollment.. the student must obtain approval from the instructor(s) to enroll in the course(s).. and UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . final responsibility for registration rests with the student.. Registration policies.. with proper permission...... and schedules can be found in this section and in the on-line Class Schedule at www.. department chairpersons........ regardless of one‖s date of admission... CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS Classification is based on the total number of UTEP and transfer semester hours earned: Classification Hours Freshman .... including eligibility to re-enroll.. 4..GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/70 General Academic Information Current regulations are applicable to every student enrolled..

and a Miner Gold Card are not available to audit-only students. Administrative Drops UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .utep.00 per course for students concurrently enrolled at UTEP. Students should not register for courses they plan to audit. woodwinds. private lessons. $10. Dropping Courses and Complete Withdrawals Students can drop individual courses or completely withdraw from the University as described below. individual instruction. It is the student‖s responsibility to verify that the course being audited is not within the excluded categories. This form must be signed by the instructor teaching the course and by the department chair and then taken to Student Business Services in the Academic Services Building for payment. Athletes must receive permission from the Miner Athletic Advising Center before dropping a course.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/71 $50. 4. Audit-only students must purchase a library community user card and a parking decal in order to park on UTEP property. student health services. 3. 6. Refer to the on-line Academic Calendar at www. and class or laboratory work missed will be counted as a zero (0) unless the instructor grants permission to make up the work. The following courses cannot be audited: clinical.00 on or after the first day of class. withdrawals. A new student will have the late registration fee waived as long as registration is made prior to the first day of class for the term. Failure to do so might result in a grade of F on the student‖s academic record. 5. Credit by examination for audited courses will not be permitted unless tuition and all appropriate fees are paid before the exam is taken. $30. c. Existing student IDs will not be activated for any semester in which a student is in an audit-only status. access to the Swimming and Fitness Center. 2. b. The extent of a student‖s class participation is at the discretion of the instructor. No grades will be assigned and no credit will be awarded for audited courses. Other student benefits such as tickets to events. Each class missed because of late registration will be counted as an absence. Students should complete an Audit Registration form for each course to be audited after classes begin and prior to Census Day of the long semester.). Auditing Courses Courses can be audited under the following provisions: 1.00 per course for students not concurrently enrolled at UTEP. drops. studio activity (such as art. Late registrants are subject to the same regulations and course requirements as students who enroll on time. 7. International students with F or J visas must receive permission from the Office of International Programs before dropping a course. any physical activity class (such as PE or Dance).edu/calendar or to the on-line Class Schedule to identify the dates during which adds. and pass/fail registration changes may occur. Registering for the course will result in assessment of regular tuition and fees. laboratory (organized laboratory classes). and courses specified in the degree plan. Student-Initiated Drops It is the student‖s responsibility to officially drop a course that she or he no longer wishes to take. in addition to the audit fees noted above. etc. Any student who has been withdrawn and has his or her schedule reinstated after census day will be assessed a $200 reinstatement fee. Audit Registration fees will not be refunded for a class in an excluded category. Audit fees: a. dance classes. piano. Course registration does not guarantee a seat as an auditor. No charge for students over 65 years of age.

niece. nephew. all first-year students enrolled for the first time at any Texas public college or university are limited to six (6) course drops during their academic career. grandchild. or needy person if provision of that care affects the student‖s ability to satisfactorily complete the course. uncle. Active duty service as a member of the Texas National Guard or armed forces of the United States of either the student or a person who is considered to be a member of the student‖s family or who is otherwise considered to have a sufficiently close relationship to the student that the person‖s active military service is considered to be a showing of good cause . A grade of “W” will be assigned before the course drop deadline and a grade of “F” after the course drop deadline. The death of a person who is considered to be a member of the student‖s family or who is otherwise considered to have a sufficiently close relationship to the student that the person‖s death is considered to be a showing of good cause*. First-time. beginning fall 2007. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . At the discretion of the instructor. a student can be dropped from a course because of excessive absences or lack of effort. father. students will be dropped from registered courses for failure to meet prerequisites or corequisites after final grades have been posted for the current semester and before the beginning of late registration for next semester. Six-Course Drop Limit Under section 51. mother. or 7. 5. but it is the student‖s responsibility to demonstrate good cause. Exemptions for good cause may include and are not limited to: 1. *The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has specified “family member” to include spouse. Approved requests will be forwarded to the Registration and Records Office for processing. Students are encouraged to discuss options with their professors and advisors and to make use of campus resources before deciding to drop a course. step-parent. step-child. or step-sibling. child. housemates. The student‖s responsibility for the care of a sick. This includes student-and faculty-initiated drops and courses dropped at other Texas public institutions. first-year students must meet with their academic advisor (or department chair of their major if they do not have an advisor) before dropping a course. with the concurrence of the instructor and department chair. Other reason as described by the student. There are exemptions that may allow a student to drop a course without having it counted toward the six-drop limit.907 of the Texas Education Code. “Sufficiently close relationship” includes a relative within the third degree of consanguinity plus close friends including. Students are responsible for checking their class schedules in Goldmine and for checking their official UTEP preferred e-mail accounts to determine if they have been dropped from a class. subsequent course drops will be recorded with grades of WF. grandmother. This policy does not apply to courses dropped prior to census day or to complete withdrawal from all courses for the semester. A severe illness or other debilitating condition that affects the student‖s ability to satisfactorily complete the course. but not limited to. grandfather. Other good cause as determined by the University in consultation with the advisor. 4. The advisor will determine whether the drop will count toward the six-drop limit prior to the course drop deadline. 6. A grade of “F” received due to disciplinary action imposed by the University overrides a grade of “W” received through a student-initiated or faculty drop. or dean. After the course drop deadline. Students will be notified of their drop through their UTEP e-mail account. aunt. 2. 3. A student may petition the department chair of the course in question for a prerequisite or corequisite waiver.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/72 During registration periods for upcoming semesters. first cousin. A change in the student‖s work schedule that is beyond the student‖s control and that affects the student‖s ability to satisfactorily complete the course. roommates. injured. brother. Students may also be administratively withdrawn from a course during the semester for other reasons. the faculty member will determine if the drop will count toward the six-drop limit. Once the six-drop limit has been reached. sister.

clinical psychologist. Students who cannot drop in person can submit a fax with signature to 915. stating the date(s) within the semester that the student was under medical care and that the student must withdraw because of the medical condition. Complete withdrawal from all courses for a semester does not count toward the six-drop limit for firsttime. and Speech Language Pathology should check with their major department to determine their eligibility for re-enrollment in the program. Students receiving financial aid or student loans must clear through the Financial Aid Office. Athletes must receive permission from the Miner Athletic Advising Center before dropping all classes. Occupational Therapy. The Course Drop Form contains the exemption request and should be submitted to the advisor no later than the last day of class for the semester in question. This number reflects only UTEP drops. Students who drop all courses for the semester and re-enroll the following semester are allowed to re-enroll based on their last academic standing as described in the Standards of Academic Performance section of this catalog. Nursing.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/73 classmates. The letter must be UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .5544. or call 915. This letter must be submitted within the semester (or no later than 90 days after the end of the term for which the withdrawal is being requested). A UTEP drop that counts toward the six-course drop limit is noted on the academic transcript by a grade of WC. Transfer work that counts toward the limit is noted by a grade of TWC. a representative can do this for the student. or licensed clinical practitioner. 123 Academic Services Building. For further information. International students with F or J visas must receive permission from the Office of International Programs before dropping all classes. Financial information concerning drops and withdrawals can be found in the Refund of Tuition and Fees section of this catalog. and before late registration begins for the next semester. contact the Registration and Records Office. Complete Withdrawal Due to Medical Conditions of a Family Member A student who must withdraw completely because of a medical condition of an immediate family member must submit a letter to the Student Business Services Office from the family member‖s attending physician. If the student is unable to act on his or her own behalf. Students who were enrolled in professional programs such as Social Work. Clinical Laboratory Science.747. Complete Withdrawal From All Courses for the Semester Students who withdraw from all courses for the semester must do so in person through the Registration and Records Office. Appeals to the denial of exemption requests may be made to the student‖s academic dean.8764 or an e-mail using their UTEP e-mail account to registrar@utep. first-year students who enter fall 2007 or thereafter. clinical psychologist. or licensed clinical practitioner on official letterhead with an original signature. Physical Therapy. The importance of a relationship is both highly individual and highly subjective. The statement TEC 51.edu. Complete Withdrawal Due to Medical Reasons A student who must withdraw completely due to medical reasons must submit a letter to the Student Business Services Office from the attending physician. A student who withdraws from all classes for the semester immediately loses access to services and privileges available to enrolled students.907 Undergraduate Course Drop Counter –(#) appears at the end of the UTEP transcript. refer to the Standards of Academic Performance section in this catalog. students whose academic standing makes them ineligible to re-enroll will be withdrawn from all their classes for the next semester. For further details. Complete Withdrawal Due to Academic Performance After final grades have been posted for the current semester.747. or others identified by the student and approved by the institution.

Complete Withdrawal Due to Death of a Family Member A student who must withdraw because of the death of an immediate family member must submit an official death certificate to the Student Business Services Office during the semester (or no later than 90 days after the end of the term for which the withdrawal is being requested). and death of a student. son. or legal guardian must submit an official death certificate to the Student Business Services Office within the semester (or no later than 90 days after the end of the term) so that the student can be withdrawn from all classes and grades assigned. This letter must be submitted within the semester (or no later than 90 days after the end of the term for which the withdrawal is being requested). a representative may do this for the student. Sec. or grandparent. related to medical reasons. instructors will determine a grade of “W” or “F” for each course. other relationships can be considered on a case–by-case basis. Receive a refund of the tuition and fees paid for the withdrawn semester (see NOTE below). death of a family member. sibling. with the required documents. sister. daughter. If the student is unable to act on his or her own behalf. state the date(s) within the semester that the student‖s immediate family member was under medical care. parent. neither the course nor a grade will appear on the student‖s academic record. wife. “Immediate family member” is defined as a husband. If a student withdraws from a course or all courses after the census date. a grade of W will be assigned. or grandparent.006: 1. Receive an appropriate final grade or credit if the instructor determines that a substantial amount of coursework has been satisfactorily completed and sufficient mastery of the course material has been demonstrated. the student‖s parent. 2. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . but before the studentinitiated course drop deadline listed in the on-line Class Schedule. Military personnel can select one of the withdrawal options below according to the Texas Education Code. with the notation “Withdrawn – Military” appearing on the academic transcript (see section on Incomplete or In-progress Work in this catalog). 3. receive grades of Incomplete (I) from instructors. 2. Complete Withdrawal Due to Death of Student Upon the death of a student. a full refund of tuition and fees will not be approved. active military service. will only be accepted if received within 90 days of the end of the term for which the withdrawal is being requested. If a student drops a course or all courses before the official census date of a semester. A grade of W will be considered only under exceptional circumstances and must be approved by the instructor and department chair for the course. or 3. and confirm that the student must withdraw to attend to the immediate family member‖s medical condition. Grade Assignment for Drops and Withdrawals and Complete Withdrawals Grades will be assigned as follows when a student drops a course or completely withdraws from the University: 1. If the student drops after the student-initiated course drop deadline. Requests for complete withdrawals. A student may need to petition the instructor for a grade of “W” in writing with the necessary supporting documentation. Once documentation has been received. After 90 days. With this option. 54. child. legal guardian.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/74 submitted on official letterhead with an original signature. If eligible. legal guardian. parent. wife. “Immediate family member” can be defined as a husband. brother. the student will not be eligible for a full refund of tuition and fees. medical conditions of a family member. Grades will be assigned as described below. the student will be withdrawn and grades assigned. spouse. Complete Withdrawal Due to Active Military Service Students who have to withdraw because they have been called to active military service must provide a copy of their military orders covering the affected semester to the Student Business Services Offices.

001. and are not accessible or revealed to any individual except a temporary substitute Records of the University campus police Student medical and counseling records created maintained. by correspondence. Definitions A student is an individual who is attending or has attended The University of Texas at El Paso. To request amendment of the student‖s education records to ensure that they are not inaccurate or misleading. certificates and awards (including scholarships) received. dates of attendance. photographs. active military service. 20 U.S. date and place of birth.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/75 4. The University of Texas System and The University of Texas at El Paso have implemented a student records policy that adheres to these laws. and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . (Although a student cannot inspect his or her medical records. Annual Notification The University will notify its students annually of their rights according to FERPA and of the procedures for exercising their rights.S. death of a family member. medical conditions of a family member.C. local and permanent addresses. and death of a student will be assigned a gra de of “W”. It does not include individuals who have been admitted but have not attended. Education records do not include: Records of instructional. student classification. except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. enrollment status. administrative. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Directory information means information in a student's education record that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. To be notified of the student‖s privacy rights under FERPA . § 552.e. Alumni records. and during periods when the student is working under a work-study program.. STUDENT EDUCATIONAL RECORDS Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). that are not disclosed to anyone other than the individuals providing the treatment. e-mail address. Complete withdrawals related to medical reasons. field of study. are federal and state laws that provide students the following rights with respect to their student educational records: To inspect and review the student‖s education records . telephone number. Education records include records directly related to a student that are maintained by the University. participation in officially recognized activities and sports. To consent to disclosure of the student‖s education records to third parties. §1232g and the Texas Public Information Act. are used only as a personal memory aid. Texas Government Code. weight and height of members of athletic teams. these records can be reviewed by a physician of the student's choice) Employment records unrelated to the student's status as a student. file notes of conversations). et seq. and used only in connection with provision of medical treatment or counseling to the student. To file a complaint with the U. UTEP designates the following minimum information as directory information: student's name. and educational personnel that are in the sole possession of the maker (i. Attendance includes attendance in person. degrees. online.

This provision includes institutions participating in UT TeleCampus Programs. University Officials. The University can release a student‖s education records to organizations conducting studies for. or administering predictive tests. Audit or Evaluation of Federal or State Education Programs. and state and local educational authorities can have access to student records in connection with the audit and evaluation of federal or state supported education programs. The University can release a student's education records to persons or organizations in connection with that student's application for. the Attorney General of the United States. but only to the extent necessary for such purposes as determining eligibility. except as authorized by FERPA. or in two components of the University. or on behalf of. Requests to withhold directory information will be honored by the University until such time that the request is revoked by the student or at the time of death. if a student is concurrently enrolled in one component of the University of Texas and in another institution. and improving instruction. supervisory. or from two components of the University (or UT System). University officials with legitimate educational interests in the student's education records are allowed access to student education records. conditions. if such studies are conducted in a manner which will not permit the personal identification of students and/or their parents by individuals other than representatives of UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . amount. and enforcement of terms or conditions of such financial aid. or a person assisting another University official in performing his or her tasks who needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Inter-institutional disclosures can be made between institutions that administer or participate in joint programs or activities. or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health staff). or in connection with the enforcement of federal law which relates to such programs. The University can release education records to state and local officials that are authorized by statute to access student education records to efficiently serve the student. in accordance with legitimate educational interest criteria. FERPA's authorizations for release without consent include the following: Directory Information. administering student aid programs. For example. State and Local Officials Pursuant to Statute Concerning Juvenile Justice. academic. Other Institutions. Financial Aid. educational agencies or institutions for the purpose of developing. to withhold such information from disclosure. Authorized representatives of the Comptroller General of the United States. the Secretary of Education. or by the University component to the other institution. a member of Board of Trustees. the first day of the minimester. information from the student records of that individual can be disclosed by one University component to the other. or the first four class days of a summer session. Disclosure of Education Records Disclosure Without Prior Consent of the Student The University will not disclose personally identifiable information from a student's education records without prior written consent of the student. The University can release a student's education records to officials of other educational institutions in which that student seeks or intends to enroll or is enrolled.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/76 University official with a legitimate educational interest is a person employed by the University in an administrative. Organizations Conducting Studies. Directory information (as defined above) can appear in public documents and can otherwise be disclosed without student consent unless a student submits a written request to the registrar during the first 12 days of class of a long semester. a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney. or receipt of financial aid. or receives services from one component of the University and from another institution. auditor. validating. without obtaining the written consent of the student in accordance with legitimate educational interest criteria. or collection agent or clinical facility).

regardless of whether that information is contained in the student's education records. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The University can disclose student information to persons in an emergency in order to protect the health and safety of the student or others in the University community. Education records can be disclosed to the U. Such disclosure shall include only the name of the student. However. such as a victim or witness. can have access to that student's education records without prior consent of the student. or local law. both parents can have access to the student's records. the final results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the University against the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. the violation committed. Disciplinary Hearing Results Disclosure to Victims: The University can disclose to an alleged victim of any crime of violence (as that term is defined in Chapter 1. United States Code). Parents can demonstrate the tax dependency of a student only by submitting to the University a copy of their most recently filed federal income tax return. 1998. If a dependent student's parents are divorced.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/77 the organization. The University can disclose to a parent or legal guardian of a student information regarding any violation of any federal. Accrediting Organizations.F.39). Parents of Dependents. to review all materials that are in the student's education records. and local agencies and independent organizations. a student can demonstrate tax dependency. regardless of whether the alleged perpetrator was found responsible for violating the University's rules or policies with respect to such crime or offense. Health and Safety. The University will make reasonable efforts to notify the student of an order or subpoena before complying with it. Disclosure to the Student The student has the right. by submitting to the University a signed statement of his or her tax dependency. 99. or a non-forcible sex offense. Attorney General or his or her designee in response to an ex parte order concerning an authorized investigation or prosecution of domestic or international terrorism. and any sanction imposed by the University on that student. upon request to the appropriate University official. the University shall not notify a student of a subpoena if it is from a federal grand jury or is for law enforcement purposes. or of any rule or policy of the University. Alcohol and Drug Violations. Such disclosure can include the name of any other student. Information concerning a student shall be released in response to a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. if the student is found responsible on or after October 7. Disclosure to Third Parties: The University can disclose the final results of any disciplinary proceeding against a student who is an alleged perpetrator of any crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense (as those terms are defined in 34 C. and it provides that the University shall not disclose to any person the existence or contents of the subpoena or any information furnished in response to the subpoena. only with the written consent of that other student. state. Judicial Order or Subpoena.R. without prior notice to the student. as long as at least one parent claims the student as a dependent. and the University determines that the student is responsible for a disciplinary violation with respect to such use or possession. if the student is under the age of 21 at the time of disclosure to the parent. Section 16 of Title 18. governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance. and the information will be destroyed when no longer needed for the purposes for which the study was conducted. and thus allow parental access to the student's records without prior consent of the student. Parents of a student who is a dependent for federal tax purposes. except: Financial information submitted by the student's parents. for violating the University's rules or policies with respect to such crime or offense. The term organizations includes and is not limited to federal. state. Alternatively. as defined by Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. S. The University can release a student‖s education records to accrediting organizations in order to carry out their accrediting functions.

GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/78 Confidential letters and recommendations associated with admissions. Research papers and theses authored by the student will be made available to interested members of the public. Requests for access to specific student records should be made in writing to the University official responsible for the particular record. except that official transcripts will cost $5. and the purpose of the disclosure. which are maintained at the campus locations listed below. the University will release personally identifiable student information in education records or allow access to those records. Division. These copies will be made at the student's expense at rates authorized in the Texas Public Information Act. provided those letters were collected under established policies of confidentiality and were used only for the purposes for which they were collected. Records covered by FERPA will be made available within forty-five days (45) of the request. Student Services Records University Counseling Services: Director Student Activities Center: Director Student Services: Dean of Students 3. Official copies of academic transcripts will not be released for students who have a delinquent financial obligation or financial hold at the University. Financial Records Business Office: Vice President for Business Affairs Financial Aid Office: Director Scholarships Office: Director Students can request copies of their education records and this policy. the party to whom the records are to be disclosed. Department.00. Disclosure With Prior Consent of the Student With the student's prior consent. The Vice President for Business Affairs is the official custodian of UTEP records. 1975. To University officials with legitimate educational interests. and must specify the records to be disclosed. Academic Records Admissions Office: Director Graduate School: Dean Registration and Records: Registrar College. to which the student has waived rights of inspection and review (the University is not required to permit students to inspect and review confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files prior to January 1. Pursuant to a law enforcement subpoena and the issuing court or other issuing agency has ordered that the existence or the contents of the subpoena or the information furnished in response to the subpoena not be disclosed or the order is concerning an authorized investigation UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Pursuant to the written consent of the student. 1. employment or job placement. and that office maintains a list of those individuals responsible for education records. and Faculty Offices 2. Record of Disclosures The University will maintain with the student's education records a record for each disclosure request and each disclosure. except disclosures: To the student himself or herself. or honors.) Education records containing information about more than one student. signed and dated. Such consent must be written. in which case the University will permit access only to that part of the record that pertains to the inquiring student.

US Department of Education. and will be delivered to all parties concerned. within a reasonable period of time after receiving such request. students are entitled at their request to receive and review the information UTEP collects about them.004 of the Texas Government Code. will inform the student of the date. the University will inform the student of its decision and of the student's right to request a formal hearing. for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to disclose the number of semester credit hours that the student has taken at UTEP to other institutions of higher education for the purpose of confirming these hours for transfer and related issues. and released whenever the records in question are disclosed. or the first day of the minimester. a request to withhold Directory Information to THECB must be filed each semester or session in the Registration and Records Office. Collection of Personal Information With few exceptions. they are entitled to have The University of Texas at El UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Complaints Complaints regarding alleged violations of the rights accorded by the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be filed with the Family Policy and Regulations Office. expressed in grades and/or evaluations. the student can place with the education records a statement commenting on the information in the records or a statement setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decisions of the hearing officer. Requests to Amend Records A student who believes that his or her education records are inaccurate or misleading. the education records will be corrected or amended in accordance with the decision of the hearing officer. Requests to withhold directory information will be honored by the University for only the current enrollment period. Disclosure for Directory Information to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (the State of Texas Educational Governing Entity) FERPA allows.] If the record is not amended pursuant to the student's request. Under Section 559. under Sections 552. If agreement is reached with respect to the student's request. 20203. A student may present evidence relevant to the issues raised and can be assisted or represented at the hearing by one or more persons of the student's choice. Students can have all directory information withheld by notifying the Registration and Records Office in writing each semester during the first 12 days of class of a long semester. at the student's expense. or the first four class days of a summer session. will be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing. with the student‖s consent.023 of the Texas Government Code. The request must be made in writing to the UTEP Vice President for Business Affairs who. If the decision is unsatisfactory to the student. Washington. Of directory information. the appropriate records will be amended. The statement will be placed in the education records. The decision of the hearing officer will be final. and time of the hearing.C. maintained as part of the student's records. or both. If the decision is in favor of the student. will consist of a written statement summarizing the evidence and stating the reasons for the decision. therefore.GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/79 or prosecution of domestic or international terrorism. is not within the purview of this right to seek amendment of education records. or that the records violate his or her privacy rights. place. [Note: The substantive judgment of a faculty member about a student's work. D. can informally discuss amendment of the record with the University office concerned with the particular record.021 and 552. Students who believe that the adjudications of their challenges were unfair or were not in keeping with the provisions of the Act can request in writing assistance from the President of the institution. including attorneys. The hearing officer who will adjudicate such challenges will be appointed by the President.

Enrollment Status Fall and Spring Hours per Semester/Term Full-time = 12 or more Part-time = Fewer than 12 Maymester and Wintermester Full-time = 3 or more Part-time = Fewer than 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The second number indicates the semester credit hour value of the course. and 5 or 6 = graduate. Maximum Course Load A student is permitted to register each term for the maximum number of semester credit hours listed below. imposed on registration in advanced courses. A UTEP course determined to be equivalent to a course listed in the Guide has the common course number listed below the UTEP course title in the individual course description of this catalog and a Texas state symbol is to the left of the course prefix and number.180. Students must have a grade point average above 2. The Information that The University of Texas at El Paso collects will be retained and maintained as required by Texas records retention laws (Section 441. 4 = senior. 1 = freshman. 2 = sophomore. of the Texas Government Code) and rules. or 6 for Maymester. in accordance with the procedures set forth in the University of Texas System Business Procedures. Different types of information are kept for different periods of time. The student should refer to the departmental and college requirements for specific conditions. which was developed to facilitate the transfer of general academic courses among Texas colleges and universities. 3 = junior. Lower-Division Courses are designated by a 1 or 2 as the first digit of the course number. Common courses are freshman. Curriculum and Classroom Policies COURSE INFORMATION Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) System The University of Texas at El Paso participates in the Texas Common Course Numbering (TCCN) System. if any.and sophomore-level courses taught throughout Texas which correspond with the general description of courses or category of courses included in the Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual. or 6 for Wintermester. Upper-Division and Advanced Courses are designated by a 3 or 4 as the first digit of the course number. Term Maximum Hours Fall = 21 Spring (Wintermester) = 24 (combined terms). The last two numbers identify the course within its particular department. Summer (Maymester) = 15 (combined terms).GENERAL ACADEMIC INFORMATION/80 Paso correct information about them that has been collected and is incorrect. Students interested in transferring can refer to the common course number in each college or university catalog to determine course transferability among institutions. or 9 for Summer. or 21 for Spring.0 to request permission. Memorandum 32. Graduate Courses are designated by a 5 or 6 as the first digit of the course number. Course Numbering System Each course offered by The University of Texas at El Paso is identified by a four-digit course number. The first number indicates the level: 0 = developmental.. et seq. Written permission from the academic dean must be obtained to take more than the maximum load.

or 3 in Summer II and 3 in 8-week. Fall and Spring: Hours per Semester/Term Full-time = 12 or more 3/4 time = 9 .” A student can enroll in a course in which a grade of “C” or higher has been previously earned.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/81 6 or more. Summer Sessions Full-time = Enrollment Verification For enrollment verification to financial aid. scholarships. workshop. a student cannot enroll in a course in which he or she has an unresolved grade of I (Incomplete). who are on academic probation or academic suspension/dismissal. or who are in the START Program will have course load conditions imposed by their advisor or dean. or other course that is identified as “can be repeated for credit. with department approval. or 3 in Summer I and 3 in 8-week. However. A student can enroll more than three times in a variable-topic. or 3 in Summer I and 3 in 8-week. etc. studio. D. Individual colleges might have more restrictive policies. who have been readmitted or reinstated from such conditions. Courses Taken on a Pass/Fail Basis UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . loan agencies. or P. further enrollment requires PERMISSION OF THE STUDENT'S ACADEMIC DEAN. This includes enrollments that result in a grade of W.. It does not apply to courses taken prior to a student‖s re-enrolling under “Option 2” as described under the Reinstatement After Extended Absence or Academic Fresh Start portions of this catalog. performance. or 3 in Summer I and 3 in Summer II 3/4 time = 4-5 1/2 time = 3 Less than 1/2 time = fewer than 3 Students participating in the Career and Professional Development Services Cooperative Education Program and are only enrolled in a co-op course will be classified as full-time for the semester/term. or 3 in Summer II and 3 in 8-week. Limits on Undergraduate Course Enrollment In most instances. a student can enroll in an undergraduate class a maximum of three (3) times. the following categories will be followed. F.11 1/2 time = 6-8 Less than 1/2 time = fewer than 6 Maymester and Wintermester: Full time = 3 or more 1/2 time = 2 Less than 1/2 time = 1 Summer Sessions: Full-time = 6 or more. or 3 in Summer I and 3 in Summer II Part-time = Fewer than 6 Students who are not eligible to enroll without conditions. insurance companies. Veteran students are recommended to consult with the campus Veterans Affairs Office. Students are encouraged to enroll in the appropriate number of credit hours as required/specified by the agencies. Students should see the section of this catalog entitled Standards of Academic Performance.

Reservation of Work by Undergraduates for Graduate Credit Ordinarily. 2. Submit the approved form to the Records Office by the submission deadline listed in the on-line Class Schedule at www. C. This option is limited to one term. B. 4. 5. but it is possible for seniors to register in graduate courses in their last semester under the following conditions: 1. or D. Repetition of Courses Students can repeat courses at UTEP under either of the following conditions: 1. the student must meet the minimum standard and do all assigned work required for the grade of A. and the Dean of the Graduate School. To enroll on a Pass/Fail basis in courses that are not normally graded Pass/Fail.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/82 Some courses are graded only on a Pass/Fail basis (grade of S or U). Such courses cannot be reserved for graduate credit. The previously earned grade is automatically excluded from the GPA calculation. A form for reserving courses is available in the Graduate School.and senior-level courses. No course graded Pass/Fail can be used to fulfill any degree requirement in the College of Engineering. These courses can be used to fulfill degree requirements if so specified on the student's degree plan. Courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis cannot be counted toward the minimum residency requirements. 5. Business majors cannot take any course offered by the College of Business Administration on a Pass/Fail basis. 2. as free electives only. Both grades earned remain on the academic record and the UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .edu/register. 7. the undergraduate dean. Election of the Pass/Fail option is irrevocable after the submission deadline. There is no assurance that Pass/Fail courses will be accepted as transfer credit by another institution. 3. To obtain credit for the course. It will be reserved for credit toward a graduate degree. A student who already has a baccalaureate degree is not eligible to reserve courses for graduate credit. In addition.0 in junior. Obtain a Pass/Fail form and approved signature from the academic dean of his or her college.0 or higher can take courses on a Pass/Fail basis with the following conditions: 1. a student must: 1. an undergraduate student whose cumulative grade point average is 2. Enrollment in graduate courses must be approved prior to registration by the graduate advisor of the department. Approval to reserve work for graduate credit neither constitutes nor implies admission to any graduate program. Repetition of UTEP freshman level courses (1XXX) for the first time: Only grades of “D” or “F” earned the first attempt are eligible for repetition. 2. These 12 hours (or less) must all be completed in the same semester or summer session in which the graduate courses are taken. 3. undergraduates are not eligible to take graduate courses. Check with the appropriate academic department for a listing of these courses. An undergraduate cannot count credit for graduate courses toward the baccalaureate degree. Pass/Fail courses are not included in the grade point average calculation. 4. Not more than two such courses can be taken in a long semester or one in a summer session. Total registration for all work must not exceed 15 semester hours (or 9 hours in a summer session).utep. 6. The undergraduate must need no more than 12 semester hours (or six semester hours in summer session) of work to complete all requirements for the first baccalaureate degree and must have a grade point average of at least 3. A maximum of four courses attempted on a Pass/Fail basis can be used to fulfill degree requirements.

A student may enroll in a course in which a grade of “C” or higher has been previously earned for a variable-topic.9111 of the Texas Education Code and 19 Texas Administrative Code 4. workshop. in the judgment of the instructor. It is the responsibility of the student to inform each instructor of extended absences.” Exceptional circumstances can be reviewed by the student‖s academic dean in consultation with the appropriate faculty member. even if it is the first-time repetition of freshman-level courses (1XXX). either the student or the instructor can request a ruling from the Provost or the Provost‖s designee. If a student and an instructor disagree about the nature of the absence being for the observance of a religious holy day as defined therein. 3XXX.4 related to absences by students for observance of religious holy days states that the institution shall excuse a student from attending classes or other required activities. The last grade earned is the official grade for a course. Transfer courses are not calculated in a student's UTEP GPA. Excused Absences for University-Recognized Activities Students who will be absent while representing the University in officially recognized University activities (sports. etc. When. Class Attendance The student is expected to attend all classes and laboratory sessions. band. professional conferences.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/83 record will be annotated with the symbol (E-Excluded) next to the first grade. Absence for Religious Holy Days Religious holy day means a day observed by a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property taxation under Section 11.) must notify the Dean of Students not less than ten (10) days prior to the absence. 4XXX): All grades earned remain on the academic record and are included in the GPA calculation. 2. Section 51. a student has been absent to such a degree as to impair his or her status relative to credit for the course. Grade replacement and GPA recalculation may not occur after graduation. A student whose absence is excused under this subsection cannot be penalized for that absence and shall be allowed to take an examination or complete an assignment from which the student is excused within a reasonable time after the absence. including examinations. The student must provide written notice to the instructor of each course that he or she will be absent for a religious holy day not less than 10 days prior to the absence. performance. Note: Students are cautioned that courses taken at UTEP and repeated at another college or university are not eligible for GPA recalculation.20. Repetition of UTEP freshman level courses (1XXX) after the first time and repetition of nonfreshman level courses (2XXX. the instructor can drop the student from the class with a grade of W before the course drop deadline and with a grade of F after the course drop deadline. for the observance of a religious holy day. A grade received as a result of disciplinary action is not eligible for grade replacement for GPA recalculation. It is the student‖s responsibility to give the letter to the professors prior to the official recognized activity. Tax Code. Grade replacement and GPA recalculation cannot occur after graduation. studio. or if there is similar disagreement about whether the student has been given a reasonable time to complete any missed assignments or examinations. The Dean of Students will provide the student with a letter of excuse for the professors. The record will be annotated with the symbol (D) next to the grade. or other course that is identified as “may be repeated for credit . The student and the instructor shall abide by the decision of the Provost or designee. Exceptional circumstances may be reviewed by the student’s academic dean in consultation with the appropriate faculty member. Students following these procedures will be permitted to make up both assignments and examinations in consultation with faculty. including travel for that purpose. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

Implementation of this recommendation is to be left to the discretion of the individual instructor. 2. forty-five (45) minutes in length and take place during the final examination period. The excused absence is permitted only if the student will not miss more than 25% of the total number of class meetings or the contact-hour equivalent (not including the final examination period) for the specific course or courses in which the student is enrolled at the beginning of the period of active military service. Dead Day This specific day will be scheduled one day after the last day of classes during the fall and spring semesters. and is not limited to cheating..9111. It is also University policy that students shall not have more than two final examinations in a single day. Academic Integrity The University of Texas at El Paso prides itself on its standards of academic excellence. collusion. Final examinations are scheduled to be two hours. Students called to active military service must provide a copy of their military orders to the instructor of each course. Further information is available under Complete Withdrawal Due to Active Military Service. plagiarism. All student work (e. Academic dishonesty includes. that the members of this academic community understand the regulations pertaining to academic integrity and that all faculty insist on adherence to these standards. no new material. In the unlikely event that the examination schedule results in a student having three final examinations on a single day. and attention should be given to review of semester material. research papers. Any form of academic dishonesty is an affront to the pursuit of knowledge and jeopardizes the quality of the degree awarded to all graduates of UTEP. Final Examinations Exemption from final examinations cannot be given. Any student who commits an act of academic dishonesty is subject to discipline. the faculty member upon the request of the student shall reschedule the second of that student‖s three examinations. or exams should be given two calendar days prior to Dead Day. Absence From Examinations A student absent from a test during the semester is graded zero (0) unless another policy is set by the instructor. term paper. In all matters of intellectual pursuit. UTEP faculty and students must strive to achieve excellence based on the quality of work produced by the individual.) should be due prior to this day. except classes which meet once a week on that day. No classes will be held on this day.g.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/84 Military Leave Section 51. the submission for credit of any UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . It is imperative. If a comprehensive final is given. It is the policy of the University not to administer a second final examination in a course. The following policy will be observed: 1. In the classroom and in all other academic activities. etc. and 19 Texas Administrative Code 4. quizzes. Make-up exams should be left to the discretion of each individual instructor. Texas Education Code. students are expected to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity.9 provides that students be excused from scheduled classes or other required activities if the student is called to and participates in active military service for a reasonably brief period and that the student shall be allowed to complete an assignment or exam within a reasonable time after the absence. lab reports. therefore. 3. 4.

among others. as printed in the Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP).edu/dos. (2) divide the total number of grade points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted in which the above grades were earned. and any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts. GRADES AND GRADE POINT AVERAGES Grade A B C D F WF Meaning Excellent Good Average Below Average but Passing Failure Assigned to a dropped course that exceeds the Six-Course Drop Limit Grade Point Value per Semester Hour 4 3 2 1 0 0 Courses in which the above grades were earned are included in the grade point average (GPA). which is calculated as follows: (1) determine grade points by multiplying the number of semester hours each course is worth by the grade point value of the grade received. Proven violations of the detailed regulations. in a Pass/Fail course In Progress Withdrawal Transfer credit or credit by examination Satisfactory Satisfactory Satisfactory Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Satisfactory Unsatisfactory A temporary administrative grading notation often meaning not reported by the faculty or some other administrative problem Assigned to a dropped course that will count toward the Six-Course Drop Limit UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/85 work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person.utep. to suspension or dismissal. in a Pass/Fail course Unsatisfactory. to a failing grade in the course. and available in the Office of Student Life and on the homepage of the Office of Student Life at www. to a failing grade on the work in question. (Total Grade Points/Total Attempted Hours = GPA) The following grades are not included in grade point average calculations: Grade I S U P W CR A* B* C* D* F* S* U* N WC Meaning Incomplete Satisfactory. taking an examination for another person. can result in sanctions ranging from disciplinary probation.

and certain undergraduate courses. a formal grade appeal process is available for cases in which a student wishes to appeal a grade assigned by the instructor. the filing deadline is three months following the semester in which the degree was awarded. (3) disciplinary action imposed by the Dean of Students or Hearing Officer for violation of University rules. 6320-6321). the I will be changed to an F. Exceptions to the grade change policy will be at the discretion of the faculty member. for a student who has graduated . A student cannot enroll in a course in which he or she has an unresolved grade of I. This includes all thesis courses (5398-5399. A student whose college or major GPA falls below a 2. See the Student Life Policies and Procedures section-Student Grievance Procedures in this catalog for additional information. or calculated in the academic standing. counts toward the Six Course Drop Limit. No other grade change shall occur without the consent of the instructor. computed in the cumulative grade point average. all students with fewer than 30 cumulative semester hours will receive midterm grades. The grade of P (in progress) is limited to specific courses in which re-enrollment is required. Any student can request that the faculty member review and re-evaluate a grade previously given. The student can then seek assistance from the department chair or the academic dean in obtaining a grade review. The Registrar shall notify the student and the instructor of any change of grade. and final approval from the academic dean. Grades can be changed as a result of (1) initiation by the instructor and approval by the appropriate department chair. College/Major Academic Standing Selected colleges or majors can also require students to maintain a 2. Incomplete or In-Progress Work Assignment of the grade I is made only in exceptional circumstances and requires the instructor to file with the academic dean an outline of the work to be completed and the time span (not to exceed one calendar year) allowable for completion with the academic dean.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/86 TWC Assigned to a dropped undergraduate transfer course taken at another Texas public college or university. The midterm grade report is designed to give beginning students an early indication of their academic progress. Midterm grades are not recorded on the student‖s academic record. In no case can repetition of the course be assigned as work to be completed.0 GPA for courses taken within the college or within the major. After a grade review. or (4) action taken by the Student Welfare and Grievance Committee in grade-appeal procedures. for a student who has graduated. the deadline is three months following the semester in which the degree was awarded. Grades determined as a result of actions taken in items (3) or (4) above are final and not subject to change. Grade Changes All student-initiated grade reviews and grade appeals shall be made no later than one year after the official grade has been released to the student. department chair. If the work has not been completed at the end of the specified time. (2) initiation by the department chair for cases in which the instructor is no longer affiliated with the University and cannot be contacted and there exists clear and convincing reason for a grade change.0 after completing a specified minimum number of hours of the designated course work in the college/major will be placed on UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . graduate internships. Midterm Grades for Freshmen At mid-semester. The formal appeal shall be officially filed with the Student Welfare and Grievance Committee no later than one year after the official grade has been released to the student.

designations appropriate to the student‖s past academic performance and eligibility to re -enroll at the University are included. both term GPA (for the semester or session just ended) and cumulative GPA (for all work attempted at UTEP) are included.0 or higher is eligible to re-enroll. Students who have been suspended for a period of one semester and have been allowed to re-enroll in that college/major must attain a GPA of 2. and a GPA of at least 2.0 for all course work required in the major field of study. Any penalties concerning eligibility to re-enroll arising from the University's academic standing policy shall take precedence over any provisions within this policy. higher minimum standards of performance are required in some programs. This minimum shall be nine (9) hours unless specified differently in the degree requirements for the college/major.0 will be placed on academic probation. failure to do so will result in suspension from the college/major for a minimum of one year. It is recommended that students who are suspended from the college/major receive career counseling through the University Counseling Center. Academic Probation A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2. the student will be placed on suspension from the college/major for a minimum of one semester. The dean is empowered to grant relief in unusual cases if the circumstances warrant such action.0 after completing nine additional hours of course work in the college/major (or the designated college/major probationary period: students should refer to the individual degree requirements to determine the applicable probationary period). Other students should seek this permission from UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . A student on academic probation must have permission to re-enroll.0 (C average) for all work attempted at UTEP. A student who wishes to re-enroll in the same major after a suspension must submit to the student‖s academic dean a Petition for Reinstatement to the College/Major. If the petition is approved. This is in addition to the policies concerning academic standing within the University. plus any special conditions which might be imposed by the academic dean. the student will be permitted to re-enroll under academic probation. These designations are as follows: Eligible to Re-enroll A student whose cumulative GPA is 2. Standards of Academic Performance Undergraduate students are expected to maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/87 probation within the college/major. A student who is on suspension from a college/major can continue to enroll in the University if the student changes majors and meets the GPA requirements of the new college/major. These are University-wide minimum requirements for the conferral of any bachelor‖s degree. A change to a new major in the same college will require permission from the dean.0 GPA in the college/major (or the designated college/major probationary period: students should refer to the individual degree requirements to determine the applicable probationary period) will be dismissed from the college/major. When final grades of each term are posted to the student‖s academic record. Students in an entering student program should seek this permission from their entering student advisor. A change of major will be required if the student wishes to continue to enroll in the University.0 in the college/major after the completion of nine additional hours of course work in the college/major (or the designated college/major probationary period: students should refer to the individual degree requirements to determine the applicable probationary period). If the student's college/major GPA remains below a 2. Any appeal from the regulations governing academic performance shall be directed to the dean of the college in which the student is a major. In addition. A student who is allowed to re-enroll after this suspension and does not achieve a 2.

a student has the option of: 1. Academic Suspension for Two Years A student who has been placed on academic suspension for one year and whose semester and cumulative GPA is below 2. Continuing with the academic record and GPA as they stand. and whose term GPA is less than 2. nor counted in the cumulative GPA calculations. the student will be permitted to re-enroll under academic probation. Academic Suspension for One Year A student on academic probation who has already been placed on academic suspension for one semester.0 will be placed on academic suspension for one semester. A student thus suspended cannot re-enroll at the University until one long semester or a full summer session has elapsed.0 will be placed on academic suspension for two years. If Option 2 is chosen.0 and the cumulative GPA is below 2. Reinstatement of Students After Extended Absence At the time of reinstatement to the University after an absence of at least two academic years. with no courses attempted earlier at UTEP counted toward the degree. Re-enrollment Following Academic Suspension A student wishing to re-enroll after his/her academic suspension period is over must submit a Petition for Reinstatement with the academic dean of the previous major or.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/88 their academic dean. In either case. Beginning anew. If the student was not eligible to re-enroll at the end of the last period of enrollment at the University. Pursuit of the degree under either option does not exempt the student from the provisions of the "seven-year rule" (Students should refer to this catalog‖s Requirements section). and completing all remaining requirements for graduation. notation will be made in the student's record indicating that portion of the record which is to be involved in computing requirements for graduation. This option can be elected only once. Any appeal from the regulations governing academic performance shall be directed to the dean of the college in which the student is a major. The dean is empowered to grant relief in unusual cases if the circumstances warrant such action. will be placed on academic suspension for one year. the GPA will be computed according to rules in force at the time of re-entry. The petition will specify which of the two aforementioned options has been chosen. A student thus suspended cannot re-enroll at the University until one full calendar year has elapsed. If reinstated. Any student who attempts to circumvent the academic performance regulations is subject to disciplinary action. A student will remain on academic probation as long as the term GPA is at least 2. with the dean of the intended new major. or 2. Academic Suspension for One Semester A student on academic probation whose term GPA is below 2. plus any special conditions of the Petition for Reinstatement. A student thus suspended MAY NOT re-enroll at the University until two full calendar years have elapsed. If Option 1 is chosen. if the student is selecting a new major.0. all courses taken and grades earned will remain on the official academic record.0. TEXTBOOKS UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . There is no assurance that courses attempted prior to this option will be accepted as transfer credit by another institution. submission of a Petition for Reinstatement with the academic dean of either the previous or intended major is required at the time of reinstatement.

A student transferring from a Texas two-year institution can select a catalog that was in effect prior to the first semester of enrollment at UTEP. sec. a student must fulfill the specific course and degree requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of his or her admission.CURRICULUM AND CLASSROOM POLICIES/89 A student of this institution is not under any obligation to purchase a textbook from a university-affiliated bookstore. Students entering the University for the first time during a summer session are subject to the requirements of the catalog for the next fall term. including an online retailer. General Requirements for Undergraduate Degrees General academic regulations can be changed at any time. CHANGE OF MAJOR A student who wishes to change majors must obtain permission of the dean of the college of the new major. Twenty-four (24) of the last 30 semester hours 3. or of a later catalog. regardless of when originally enrolled. CONCENTRATIONS AND MINORS Students interested in pursuing a concentration or minor in an area of study should refer to the college curriculum in the catalog or consult with their major advisor for further details. Twelve (12) semester hours of advanced courses in the major subject must have been completed not more than three years prior to the date of graduation CATALOG GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS To graduate. RESIDENCE Work counting toward the degree must be completed in residence at the University as follows: 1. A total of at least 25% of the semester hours (a minimum of 30 semester hours) 2. as long as the student was following UTEP‖s degree plan while enrolled at the community college. per Texas Education Code. All students. 51. A student must complete all requirements within seven (7) years or be subject to the degree requirements of a subsequent catalog. The same textbook may be available from an independent retailer. provided that the required courses are still being offered. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .9705. or of any subsequent catalog in effect during his or her enrollment with the approval of the academic dean. regardless of the student's first semester of enrollment. Students are required to select a major and file a degree plan with the academic dean of that major by the time they complete 60 semester hours. The seven-year period begins with the year the catalog was issued. DEGREE PLAN Students are advised to obtain and follow their major‖s degree plan when they first enroll at the University. are required to abide by current academic regulations.

A minimum grade point average of 2. The application process begins with the academic dean and should be initiated during the next-to-last semester or session and completed no later than the deadline published in the on-line Class Schedule at www. The UTEP cumulative grade point average consists of all grades earned at this institution regardless of their applicability toward a degree. even though the courses must be completed. Summer candidates names will not appear in the May program. Students must apply for graduation and pay the appropriate fee in order to be considered candidates for graduation. Formal commencement ceremonies are held in May for all candidates who complete degree requirements during the spring semester and in December for fall candidates. except with specific approval of the academic dean. Summer candidates who do not participate in May commencement can participate in December commencement. ONE-HOUR COURSES No more than six (6) one-hour courses can be counted toward completion of the minimum total hours required for a degree (unless degree requirements specify otherwise). Summer candidates participating in May commencement must complete the application process by the published deadline for May graduation. a comprehensive examination can be required in the major subject under the following conditions: 1. or three hours written and one hour oral. Transfer credits can be counted toward meeting degree requirements. GRADUATION Degrees are conferred at the end of each long semester (December and May) and at the end of the second summer session (August). 3. The paid graduation application form will be collected by the Student Business Services Office for processing by the Registration and Records Office. Four hours written. the student can take another examination on a date determined by the department. 2. SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .edu/register. GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION A minimum grade point average of 2.utep. Summer graduates‖ names will appear only in the December program. This is intended as a University-wide minimum and does not prevent a college from requiring a higher GPA in specific majors or programs. No credit for these freshman-level courses will be granted toward fulfilling the minimum credit-hour requirements for the degree.GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES/90 COMPLETION OF FRESHMAN-LEVEL COURSES All freshman-level courses that are required by specific course number must be completed before the student has completed 90 hours toward the degree. The department fixes the time and place. In case of failure. and supervises the examination. Summer candidates can participate in the May commencement ceremony if no more than six (6) hours are needed to complete the degree during the summer session. MAJOR EXAMINATIONS At the discretion of the department concerned.0 must be achieved in all course work at The University of Texas at El Paso and in all transfer work counted toward the degree. but transfer grades and grade points do not enter into UTEP grade point average calculations.0 is required in the major. provided appropriate approvals have been obtained.

but who do not qualify for Highest Honors.. but who do not qualify for High or Highest Honors.90. in addition to those counted toward the baccalaureate degree requiring the higher number of semester hours of credit. Upon graduation. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Physics. and Psychology. History. This honor is noted on the student's academic record. Students may include departmental honors credits with University honors credits. and outside referees may be consulted if deemed appropriate. Academic Honors The University of Texas at El Paso offers three opportunities for students to achieve special recognition for academic performance at graduation. 2. For further information. Cum Laude (Honors) will be awarded to students who attain a minimum UTEP grade point average of 3. A student who earned the first bachelor‖s degree at another institution must complete at least 30 hours at UTEP. To be eligible for the following recognitions and/or programs. and if the student had the appropriate grade point average in the required areas.80. senior project. Geological Sciences. depending on the department. including completion of the legislative requirements of six (6) hours of American History and six (6) hours of Political Science covering the Constitutions of the United States and Texas. upon consultation with the University Honors Program Director. These additional hours must include at least six (6) advanced hours in the major subject of the second degree. The following offer Departmental Honors: Biological Sciences. Chemistry. in order to earn Honors at both levels. or other special requirement.GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES/91 Applicants for a second baccalaureate degree must complete at least 24 semester hours at The University of Texas at El Paso. In computing the minimum grade point average for academic honors at graduation. The director. Dean’s List At the end of each fall and spring semester. A student working toward a second bachelor's degree will register as an undergraduate senior. only grades earned at UTEP applied to the degree will be included. judge the student's work. INSTITUTIONAL ACADEMIC HONORS Departmental Honors Program A student who wishes to earn departmental Honors must complete a senior thesis. Magna Cum Laude (High Honors) will be awarded to students who attain a minimum UTEP grade point average of 3. individuals should contact the appropriate dean's office. A departmental faculty member directs the project or thesis.5. Summa Cum Laude (Highest Honors) will be awarded to students who attain a minimum UTEP grade point average of 3. the Registration and Records Office prepares a Dean's List for each undergraduate college of all full-time undergraduate students who have completed at least 12 collegiate hours and have earned a minimum semester grade point average of 3. Requirements for honors for a second degree include the above requirements with the additional stipulation that the student completes thirty (30) hours beyond the original baccalaureate requirements. candidates must be among the most able and intellectually curious of students and must meet minimum GPA requirements.50. Graduation with any of these honors adds a special distinction to academic records and diplomas and may enhance the prospects for graduating seniors to enter graduate and professional schools or the job market. POSTHUMOUS DEGREE A posthumous degree can be awarded only if the student was enrolled in courses that would have allowed the student to complete all work for the degree. along with a departmental honors committee. honors in the following categories will be awarded for each baccalaureate degree conferred upon students who have completed at least sixty (60) of the total required credit hours for their degrees at The University of Texas at El Paso: 1. Political Science. 3.

...........................Dark Green For information about the University Honors Program............................................................................................... Golden Yellow School of Nursing.................. Wine University Honors ProgramHonors Certificate.ACADEMIC HONORS/92 Honors cords worn at commencement recognize the following academic achievements: University Academic HonorsHighest Honors................................ Blue College of Engineering.. Gold High Honors.......... Apricot University College....... Royal Blue College of Health Sciences............................................ Olive Drab College of Education............................................................ Orange College of Liberal Arts.......... College Color College of Business Administration...................................................... White Honors................................................................................................................ Salmon College of Science........................... Lt.... Lilac Senior Thesis/Project…................................................... UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ... please see the Undergraduate Studies section of this catalog.....................

suspension and expulsion. Penalties. students need to refer to the rules in the Regents‖ Rules and Regulations (http://www. These penalties can be imposed singularly or in any combination upon individuals.edu/Default. restitution.utep. The University of Texas at El Paso administers student discipline according to established procedures of due process.aspx?tabid=63689. or organizations. disciplinary probation. Procedures are defined and described in the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents. Penalties for copyrighted violations may be found at: http://www. educational records. withholding of grades. Unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material. The administration of student discipline (academic dishonesty and general misconduct is the responsibility of the Assistant Dean of Students who is located in the Office of Student Life. or local law is subject to discipline whether such conduct takes place on or off campus or whether civil or criminal penalties are also imposed for such conduct.gov/title17/92chap5. certain privileges can be withdrawn consistent with the severity of the offense and the rehabilitation of the student. gambling. Additionally. groups. The Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System are at http://www. which can be imposed in conjunction with the approved disciplinary procedures. Rule 50101. may subject students to civil and criminal liabilities. dishonesty. and student publications. and to observe correct standards of conduct. use of obscene and threatening language. This set of rules is available at http://hoop. Students should check with appropriate departments whose policy or regulation is of concern. endangering the health or safety of others. defacing of property. altering of records.html. failure to respond promptly to official notices and other infractions will subject the student to disciplinary action.utsystem. withholding of official transcript or degree. include the following: written warning.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/93 Student Life Policies and Procedures Detailed policies and procedures affecting student life are printed in the Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP) student section and are also available at http://hoop. students may be subjected to disciplinary action as described in this section. revocation of degree and withdrawal of diploma. denial of degree.copyright. student organizations.edu/bor/rules) and the HOP. The handbook supplements the rules and regulations of the Board of Regents and covers student conduct and discipline. a student neither loses the rights nor escapes the responsibilities of citizenship. In addition. failing grade. GANG-FREE ZONE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . use of University facilities. including unauthorized peer-to-peer file sharing. OTHER PROHIBITED CONDUCT Computer usage violations. state.edu/bor/rules. STUDENT CONDUCT While enrolled at the University. UTEP ’s policy on Peer-to-Peer Sharing can be found at http://admin. to show respect for properly constituted authority. All students are expected and required to obey the law. Any student who engages in conduct that is prohibited by the Board of Regents' Rules and Regulations or University rules or by federal. or other penalty as deemed appropriate under the circumstances. use of alcoholic beverages.edu. If necessary.utep. possession or use of firearms.edu.utep. and in the Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP). The Office of Student Life can assist on this matter.utsystem.

or requires the student to perform a duty or task which involves a violation of the Penal Code. push-ups. 2. Certain criminal offenses. In addition to possible criminal prosecution. possession. disciplinary. or degrading. or any other form of physical exercise. or reckless act. shame. Any activity involving consumption of food.000 feet of the premises are "gang-free" zones. alcoholic beverage. electronic shocking. or sale of any illegal drugs or narcotics. harmful.. such as sit-ups. or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students at an educational institution. public service. directed against a student. • the eating or ingesting of unwanted substance. Any type of physical activity. • total or partial nudity at any time. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . as well as a violation of state law. drug. including any amount of marijuana on the campus of the University. Additionally. beating. including those involving gang-related crimes. such as sleep deprivation. The law defines hazing as any intentional. that subjects the student to extreme mental stress. 3. exposure to the elements. liquid.936 and 37. or other substance which subjects the student to an unreasonable risk or harm or which adversely affects the mental or physical health of the student. 4. holding office in. Hazing includes but is not limited to: 1. by one person alone or acting with others. or other activity that subjects the student to an unreasonable risk or harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student. causes. liquor. Individuals or organizations engaging in hazing could be subject to fines and charged with criminal offenses.151 et seq.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/94 Premises owned. in violation of rules include but are not limited to: • calisthenics. calisthenics. being initiated into. the law does not affect or in any way restrict the right of the University to enforce its own rules against hazing. or that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of the student or discourages the student from entering or remaining registered in an educational institution. Any activity that intimidates or threatens the student with ostracism. or similar activity. Activities which under certain conditions constitute acts that are dangerous. affiliating with. HAZING POLICY Hazing in state educational institutions is prohibited by both state law (Sections 51. The minimum disciplinary penalty that will be imposed is suspension from the University for a specified period of time and/or suspension of rights and privileges. Texas Education Code) and by the Regents‖ Rules and Regulations (Rule 50101). such as whipping. research. Any type of physical brutality. ILLEGAL SUBSTANCES POLICY The use. striking. DISRUPTIVE ACTS POLICY The obstruction or disruption of any teaching. branding. See Texas Penal Code. or that may reasonably be expected to cause a student to leave the organization or the institution rather than submit to acts described in this subsection. Section 71. occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution. administrative. 5. is a violation of Regents' Rules and Regulations and of University policies governing student conduct. that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging. will be enhanced to the next highest category of offense if committed in a gang-free zone by an individual 17 years or older. placing of a harmful substance on the body. Any activity that induces. or humiliation.028. rented or leased by The University of Texas at El Paso and areas within 1. knowing. or other authorized activity on campus or under the authority of the University or on property owned or controlled by the University is prohibited and will subject the student or group of students to disciplinary action. student offenders will be subject to disciplinary action by the University. confinement in a small space.

According to the law. rides. or attempting to aid another engaging in hazing. structure. STUDENT TRAVEL POLICY Purpose The University of Texas at El Paso promotes safe travel by students who participate in certain university-organized and sponsored activities or events. • yelling and screaming. syrup. too small). This policy is applicable to student travel undertaken by one or more currently enrolled students to reach an activity or event that meets all of the following criteria: • • • • • • • • • UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . kidnaps. An organization can commit a hazing offense if the organization condones or encourages hazing or if an officer or any combination of members. or facility of the UTEP campus. flour. Policy and Procedure 1. transportation and abandonment (road trips. shoving. This handbook is available for review in the Office of Student Life and on the homepage of the Office of Student Life at http://studentaffairs. lineups intended to demean or intimidate. and any individual and/or registered student organization participating in such activities will be held responsible for those actions. Certain university activities are permitted as defined in the Handbook of Operating Procedures. high temperature. tackling.edu/dos. or any other harmful substance on a person. by intentionally. confining individuals in an area that is uncomfortable or dangerous (hot box effect. pushing. the law grants immunity from civil or criminal liability to any person who reports a specific hazing event in good faith and without malice to the Office of Student Life or other appropriate university officials. or alumni of the organization commits or assists in the commission of hazing. drops). In an effort to encourage reporting of hazing incidents. The University regards any form of hazing as a major violation. pledges. • assigning pranks such as stealing. or other individual interrogation. paddle swats. walks. knowingly. • intentionally messing up the house or room for clean up. SOLICITATION In general. a person can commit a hazing offense both by engaging in a hazing activity and by soliciting. rat court.utep. or recklessly allowing hazing to occur. or by failing to report in writing to the Dean of Students or other appropriate university officials first-hand knowledge that a hazing incident is planned or has occurred. encouraging. aiding. throwing oil. • any type of personal servitude that is demeaning or of personal benefit to the individual members. • demeaning names. or any other physical contact. harassing other organizations. solicitation is prohibited in any building. The fact that a person consented to or acquiesced in a hazing activity is not a defense to prosecution for hazing under this law. including the trading of swats. kangaroo court. forced consumption of alcoholic beverages either by threats or peer pressure.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/95 the wearing or carrying of any obscene or physically burdensome article. and • requiring boxing matches or fights for entertainment. directing. and it immunizes a person from participation in any judicial proceeding resulting from that report. • wearing of embarrassing or uncomfortable clothing. painting objects.

(i) Travel to the activity or event is funded and undertaken using a vehicle owned or leased by the University. The activity or event is located more than 25 miles from the University. without scheduled rest stops or overnight stops. possess.a. b. Seat Belts: Occupants of motor vehicles shall use seat belts or other approved safety restraint devices required by law or regulation at all times when the vehicle is in operation. operators shall have a current Motor Vehicle Record on file with the designated office of the University. Travel Using a Vehicle Owned or Leased by the University. recreational sports club trips. a. whichever is lower. Passenger Capacity: The total number of passengers in any vehicle at any time it is in operation shall not exceed the manufacturer‖s recommended capacity or the number specified in applicable federal or state law or regulations. This definition applies if the activity or event has been planned and funded by the University and approved in writing by the designated administrator. Where applicable. or transport any alcoholic beverages or illegal substances. departmental-sponsored trips. All Motor Vehicle Travel. Travel Using Rented Vehicles. provisions concerning vehicle passenger capacity. the activities of sponsored student organizations. Service and Maintenance: In addition to those provisions in Item 3. and meetings of academic organizations at which a student is officially representing the University. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . License and Training: Each operator of a motor vehicle shall have a valid operator‖s license and be trained as required by law to drive the vehicle that will be used.. Proof of Insurance. c. and b. and comply with all other applicable requirements of federal or state law or regulations. each vehicle owned or leased by the University must be subject to scheduled periodic service and maintenance by qualified persons and comply with all applicable requirements of The University of Texas System Business Procedure Memorandum 16-05-02. including and not limited to. 2. whichever is lower.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/96 a. and c. regulations. be equipped with all safety devices or equipment required by federal or State law or regulation. and posted signs regarding speed and traffic control and shall not operate the vehicle for a continuous period that is longer than the maximum provided by federal or state law or regulations or guidelines promulgated by the university. The types of activities and events covered by this policy include course related field trips. or (ii) Attendance at the activity or event is required by a registered student organization and approved in accordance with this policy. Inspection. Alcohol and Illegal Substances Prohibited: Occupants of motor vehicles shall not consume. Operators of Vehicles: All operators of vehicles owned or leased by the University shall be employees of the University and shall have a valid operator‖s license for the operation of the particular vehicle. 3. In addition. Registered student organizations that require their members to travel 25 miles or more from the University to attend an activity or event covered by this policy must obtain from the designated University administrator prior written approval for the proposed travel. The following provisions will apply to all travel covered by this policy. Legal Operation of Vehicle and Driving Schedule: Operators of motor vehicles shall comply with all laws. all travel participants are required to comply with The University of Texas System Business Procedure Memorandum 16-05-02. and Safety Devices: Each motor vehicle must have a current proof of liability insurance card and State of Texas inspection certification. An activity or event organized and sponsored by the University.

Although certain immunizations are required only of students enrolled in specific health-related courses and programs. and operation of all rented vehicles shall comply. local. As part of the approval process. Certain exemptions are allowed from the immunization requirements. Students may obtain information regarding the consequences of outdated immunizations for certain diseases.a. all reasonable steps will be taken to assure that the travel is undertaken in conformance with this policy and all applicable federal. In accordance with state law. The sponsoring department can promulgate additional rules concerning expectations of students while on the trip. state. COMPULSORY INSPECTION OF VEHICLE The following notice is provided in accordance with Section 51. All persons driving personal vehicles for travel covered by this policy must agree to comply with the requirements of 3. with the State contracts for rental cars and all applicable requirements of The University of Texas System Business Procedure Memorandum 16-05-02. use.) is used for student travel covered by this policy. d. To obtain information call 915..5624. and local providers of immunization services from the Student Health Center located on campus. etc. Mumps: proof of one dose of mumps vaccine administered on or after the first birthday or proof of immunity. the rental. students should contact the Student Health Center or the academic department responsible for the courses or programs requiring immunizations. When a common carrier (bus. Tetanus/Diphtheria: proof of one "booster" dose of tetanus/diphtheria (within 10 years).STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/97 In addition to those provisions specified in Item 3. Hepatitis B virus (HBV): proof of serologic immunity to HBV or certification of immunization with a complete series of Hepatitis B vaccine.a. the age groups most vulnerable to these vaccine-preventable diseases. For further information. airline. the following immunizations are required for all students enrolled in health-related courses which will involve direct patient contact in medical or dental care facilities or who come in contact with human biological fluids or tissue. and university regulations. Students enrolled at UTEP are charged a reasonable fee for all immunizations. Measles: proof of two doses of measles vaccine administered on or after the first birthday and at least 30 days apart or proof of immunity. and produce some evidence of a valid operator‖s license for the vehicle to be used. Travel by Common Carrier. where applicable. Students are responsible for abiding by the rules and regulations contained in the UTEP Handbook of Operating Procedures while they are traveling. all students are strongly encouraged to obtain them for their own protection. Immunizations are also available at the Student Health Center. all participants must sign an appropriate Release and Indemnification Agreement. Note: Some colleges or academic departments can require additional immunizations. 5. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Students will be required to present a letter or other suitable written certification. current proof of liability insurance and Texas State Inspection Certificate. 4. IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENT The health and safety of students is paramount to the University. Rubella: proof of one dose administered on or after the first birthday or proof of immunity.747.207 of the Texas Education Code: It is mandatory for all students enrolled in public institutions of higher education in the State of Texas to be in compliance with Vehicle Emissions Testing Laws before privileges can be granted to park or drive on institutional property a motor vehicle that is not registered in this state.

This disease strikes about 3. potentially deadly disease that can progress rapidly. The HB vaccine is also available for a nominal charge for students enrolled in medical-related programs. The Student Health Center is responsible for maintaining a record of those students who comply with these requirements and can recommend the placement of an administrative hold on records of students who have not met these requirements. BACTERIAL MENINGITIS Bacterial meningitis is a serious. Students are urged to take utmost caution. employees. An educational pamphlet on HIV infection developed by the U. This policy is applicable to all students of UTEP as they pursue their academic (and clinical) endeavors. Department of Health and Human Services and the Public Health Service is available to all students in the Student Health Center. AND HEPATITIS B INFECTION POLICY The University of Texas at El Paso recognizes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). and students is confidential. No individual with HIV or HBV infection will be discriminated against in employment. A complete copy of the AIDS. There is a treatment. The bacterium that causes meningitis can also infect the blood. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) as serious public health threats and is committed to encouraging an informed and educated response to issues and questions concerning AIDS. and patients who might be infected with HIV or HBV as well as to prevent the spread of infection. including 100-125 on college campuses. What are the symptoms? High fever Rash or purple patches on skin Sensitivity to light Confusion and sleepiness Lethargy Severe headache Vomiting Stiff neck Nausea Seizures There might be a rash of tiny. as long as they are physically and mentally able to participate and perform assigned work and pose no health risks to others. HIV and Hepatitis B Infection Policy can be found in the institutional Handbook of Operating Procedures (HOP) available in the Office of Student Life. leading to five to 15 deaths among college students every year. and the Student Health Center. The Student Health Center provides the required immunizations for all academic programs. red-purple spots caused by bleeding under the skin. This is an inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. admission to academic programs. HIV. but those who survive might develop severe health problems or disabilities.000 Americans each year.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/98 A form on which the required immunizations can be documented is available from the Admissions Office or the Student Health Center. the Library. UTEP has adopted a policy and procedural steps to protect both the rights and well being of those students. staff.S. These can occur anywhere on the body. HIV. health benefits. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Students with HIV or HBV infection can attend all classes without restriction. and HBV. faculty. All information regarding the medical status of UTEP. AIDS. To demonstrate its commitment. a copy of the high school immunization record can be submitted. however no X-ray screening is available. or access to facilities. Since most secondary schools are required by law to maintain similar records.

747. Vaccinations are available and should be considered for: Those living in close quarters College students 25 years old or younger Vaccinations are effective against -four of the -five most common bacterial types that cause 70% of the disease in the U.834. However. Immunization Outreach at 915. Early diagnosis and treatment can greatly improve the likelihood of recovery. Vaccination is available at the UTEP Student Health Center. or by sharing drinking containers. on a walk-in basis. health care providers have more information.591. can save lives and chances of recovery are increased. the higher the risk. The cost of the vaccine varies.dcd. water bottles. etc. toes. The most common side effects are redness and minor pain at the injection site for up to two days. cigarettes. so when these symptoms appear. food.acha. How does one increase the risk of getting bacterial meningitis? Exposure to saliva by sharing cigarettes. Contact your Student Health Center at 915. How is Bacterial Meningitis diagnosed ? Diagnosis is made by a medical provider and is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms and laboratory results from spinal fluid and blood tests. legs) requiring amputation Gangrene Coma Convulsions Can the disease be treated? Antibiotic treatment. Visit: http://www. permanent disability or death can still occur.S.5624. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . with protections lasting a minimum of eight years. Vaccination is very safe. eating utensils. Vaccinations take seven to10 days to become effective.2050 Contact the Pro Action-Tillman Health Center at 915.) or come in contact with respiratory or throat secretions. if received early.7853. What are the possible consequences of the disease? Death (in 8 to 24 hours from perfectly well to dead) Permanent brain damage Kidney failure Learning disability Hearing loss or blindness Limb damage (fingers.3414 How can I find out more information? Contact your own health care provider. Contact the City County Health Department. kissing. arms. Contact your local or regional Texas Department of Health Office at 915. seek immediate medical attention. Living in close conditions (such as sharing a room or suite in a dorm or group home). How is the disease transmitted? The disease is transmitted when people exchange saliva (such as by kissing. etc. toothbrushes.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo and http://www.533.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/99 The more symptoms. but do not protect against all types of meningitis. utensils.org.

STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES Grade Appeals A student can challenge his or her grade as determined by a member of the faculty of the University during or within one year after the end of any credit course or qualifying or comprehensive examination.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/100 Requirement to obtain information on Bacterial Meningitis All incoming undergraduate and graduate students are required to obtain information about bacterial meningitis and sign an acknowledgement form with the Records Office.edu/LinkClick.edu/police. A challenge to a grade can be pursued only on the basis of malice.9192. including sexual assault prevention programs. and submits a copy of the report to the Secretary of Education upon request. the University of Texas at El Paso collects specified information on campus crime statistics. UTEP publishes in the annual security report its policy regarding sex-related offenses. administrative disciplinary procedures and sanctions for offenders. Detailed information pertaining to the requirements of Texas Education Code 51. provides copies of the report to applicants for enrollment or employment upon request. campus security policies. The annual campus crime statistics report references crimes which occur on the campus property owned or controlled by UTEP or within a contiguous geographic area of the institution. The University of Texas at El Paso complies with Texas Education Code. STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Police and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 2008. missing student statistics. In addition. Every October.aspx?link=Clery%2Fclery+%282%29. and institutional completion or graduation rates. In addition. counseling and student services for victims. Statistics for off-campus buildings or property owned by student organizations that are registered by the institution are also reported when such statistics are available from local police departments. UTEP publishes and distributes an annual report of campus security policies and crime statistics to all current students and employees. http://admin. UTEP annually calculates and discloses institutional completion or graduation rates for undergraduate students to all prospective and current students. Pursuant to the federal law.utep. bias. guidance counselor. and fire statistics. 51. and crimes are reported to campus police or local police agencies. and coach.pdf&tabid=571&mid=12387. arbitrary. education programs to promote awareness of sex offenses. sec. can be found at: http://securityoncampus. alleged victims of violent crime are entitled to know the results of campus student disciplinary proceedings concerning the alleged perpetrators. including policies and procedures for emergency response and missing student notification.org/.utep. and http://admin. for which the student has been enrolled or three months following the term the graduate degree was awarded. UTEP provides certain information on graduation rates specified by the Act to the prospective student and to the student's parents. “the Jamie Schanbaum Act. Further information concerning Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security. located in the Academic Services Building.” which requires first time students and transfer students at a Texas institution of higher education (undergraduate and graduate) residing in on-campus housing to show evidence of immunization for bacterial meningitis. UTEP makes timely reports to the campus community on crimes considered to be a threat to students and employees. or capricious UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .) Prior to the offer of athletically-related student aid to a potential student athlete.9191 can be obtained by calling the Student Health Center at (915) 747-5624. (The federal requirement for calculation of a completion or graduation rate applies only to institutions of higher education that admit undergraduate students who are enrolling for the first time at an institution of higher education and have not enrolled previously at any other institution of higher education.

Complaints regarding discrimination should be reported to the University's Equal Opportunity Office. rd 3 Floor. Kelly Hall. Inquiries regarding applicable policies should be addressed to the University‖s Equal Opportunity Office. religion.STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES/101 grade determination. In no event shall a challenge be pursued on the basis of the standards employed in setting grades. no person shall be excluded from participation in. denied benefits of. disability. it must be submitted in writing to the Provost or the Provost‖s designee within 10 working days of the questioned decision or interpretation. such as the application or interpretation of student policies. The student should first attempt to resolve the question through consultation with the faculty member who assigned the grade. national origin. including complaint resolution procedures. on equal opportunity.edu. so long as those standards are employed impartially. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Having failed to resolve the matter after consultation with both the faculty member and her or his supervisors. If the matter is not resolved.747.edu/dos and click on Student Conduct. or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity sponsored or conducted by the University of Texas at El Paso on the basis of race. Students should contact the Office of Student Life for specific information or download a copy of the grievance form and instructions on the Office of Student Life Web page at http://studentaffairs. or impermissible discrimination. The University‖s full policies. sex. Non-Academic Grievances Non-academic grievances of policies and procedures of University departments related to matters other than discrimination. The student should then attempt to resolve the question through consultation with the administrator(s) to whom the faculty member reports.5662 or eoaa@utep. color. EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY To the extent provided by applicable law. age. the student can consult with and/or file a challenge with the Chairperson of the Student Welfare and Grievance Committee. at 915.utep. veteran status. or sexual orientation. must be initiated by making an effort to resolve the matter with the individual involved in the interpretation or decision. sexual harassment and misconduct and accommodations for individuals with disabilities are available in the Handbook of Operating Procedures and on the Web page of UTEP‖s Equal Opportunity Office.

103 Student Support Services Program (SSSP) ......................................................... 104 University Bookstore ........... 98 Adelante Child Development Center ......... 99 Intercollegiate Athletics ...................................................................................... 102 Student Development Center .................................................................. ..................................................................................................................................................... 102 Special Events ............... 100 Miner Village ............................................................................................................. 100 International Programs................................................................................................................. 103 Student Publications ............... 101 Office of Student Life……………………………………………….... 102 Student Government Association ..................................Student Services What’s Inside Student Services ......................................................................................................... 98 Campus Cultural Programs ................................. 103 Union ...... 98 El Paso Centennial Museum/Chihuahuan Desert Gardens .... 101 Recreational Sports ...................................................................................................................... 104 Women‖s Resource Center ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 105 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ................. 98 Disabled Student Services ............................ 104 University Counseling Center........................ 104 University Career Center ............. 98 Food Services ......................................................................................... 103 Student Health Center .................................................................................................... 101 Professional and Public Programs .................................... 100 KTEP Public Radio .

edu Each year departments across campus sponsor hundreds of cultural events including concerts.747. Opera. staff. Pandemonium Steel Drums. and faculty of the University. plays. sign-language interpreters. Children aged three months to 12 years are accepted. as well as those who become temporarily disabled because of an injury or recent surgery. and the Student Union Gallery in the Union East Building. Jazz Bands. Age-appropriate early childhood developmental programs are offered in the curriculum. Symphonic Band. The Adelante Child Development Center is licensed by the Texas Department of Protective and Regulatory Services. depending on space availability (Hourly. Lectures and a variety of other public programs are part of the yearly schedules of all UTEP colleges. and chamber groups are held in the Fox Fine Arts Center‖s Recital Hall or the Magoffin Auditorium. and the Magoffin Auditorium. alternative test formats. Theatre and dance productions are performed in the Wise Family Theatre. art exhibits. Faculty. Choral and Chorus. The Adelante Child Development Center is located at 314 W. Music activities such as the University‖s Symphony Orchestra.5148. Campus Cultural Programs www. All information UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and lectures. use of adaptive technology. testing accommodations and advocacy. ballet and dance performances. Disabled Student Services Office (DSSO) 915. daily and weekly care are available and the Center offers a Summer Camp for school-age children). Students requiring accommodations must schedule an intake interview with a staff member of DSSO and provide medical and/or diagnostic documentation verifying a disability. University Dinner Theatre productions are presented in the Student Union West Building. films. student. Voice/TTY www. Schuster and is managed and operated by Adelante Childcare. and interests are addressed. music theatre productions. or mental impairments. Inc.utep. Jazz Singers. academic departments and centers as well as the University Centennial Museum and Chihuahuan Desert Gardens.STUDENT SERVICES/98 Student Services The University of Texas at El Paso offers a wide array of services for students to ensure that student needs. A film series is also presented annually in the Student Union East Building. DSSO provides the following services as accommodations: note taking.utep. the Glass Gallery in the Fox Fine Arts Center. and to women with at-risk pregnancies. The Student Development Center provides a wide-variety of student programming ranging from lectures to artistic performances. priority registration.edu/childcare Child care is available for children of all students.utep. Adelante Child Development Center Phone Number: (915) 532-1114 Website: http://studentaffairs. and touring art shows are exhibited in the Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for Contemporary Art. the Studio Theatre in the Fox Fine Arts Center. concerns. The documentation must clearly state symptoms and limitations that adversely affect academic performance.edu/dsso The Disabled Student Services Office (DSSO) provides a program of support to students with physical. reader services. Financial assistance is available for qualifying parents through Child Care Services.

a disability that is adversely affecting academic performance.admin. staff and faculty members are encouraged to visit one of the many food venues located throughout campus. Basic museum and special-project classes are offered to UTEP students. are located on the west side of the museum. wings grab-and-go) Chopsticks (Asian cuisine) UTEP Union East Building 1st Floor *B* *E* Freshens/Starbucks (Starbucks coffees. and display cooking featuring international cuisine) nd UTEP Union East Building 2 Floor Pizza Hut Express (pizza and wings) *E* Mine Shaft (pizza. document. and baskets. Temporary exhibits. dedicated in 1999. Garden Gourmet (hand tossed salads. Food Services 915. it serves students an d the El PasoCiudadJuárez communities. If a student has. or suspects having. exhibit. and volunteer activities are educational offerings. grab-and-go) The El Paso Natural Gas Conference Center *E* Quiznos (deli) *B* Delicious Mexican Express (comida Mexicana) Miner Grill (grill) *B* Pete’s Arena (pizza and pasta) Library *E* Jazzman’s Café (upscale coffee and pastry shop) Academic Services Building UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .5628 www. Students should be aware that faculty members are not obligated to provide accommodations without proper notification from DSSO. Noteworthy collections pertaining to Geology. The Chihuahuan Desert Gardens.5565 www. gallery talks. The mission of this natural and cultural history museum is to preserve.edu/museum The El Paso Centennial Museum was built in 1936 with funds allocated by the Commission for the Texas Centennial Celebration. El Paso Centennial Museum / Chihuahuan Desert Gardens 915. youth classes.utep.747. smoothies. crystals.STUDENT SERVICES/99 provided to DSSO is treated as confidential. The museum is free and open to the public. frozen yogurt.utep. shell jewelry. adult workshops. Paleontology. Students. As the University‖s museum. and Mammalogy include rocks. Ornithology. Archaeology.edu/sodexho UTEP Food Services strives to provide the highest-quality food at the most convenient campus locations. minerals. and educate about the Southwest and Mexico. lectures. pottery. soups. she or he should contact the Disabled Student Services Office immediately to discuss available options. stone tools. Anthropology. *B*=Breakfast available *E*=Open during evening hours nd UTEP Union East Building 2 Floor (Food Court) *B* Chick-Fil-A (deli) Firehouse Grill (grill and tortas) *B* El Cazo (comida Mexicana).747. They contain plants of the region in settings that can be adapted for area businesses and homes.

and women‖s volleyball is played in the Memorial Gymnasium.747. Miner Meals can be purchased in $50 increments at Student Business Services.5347 www. women‖s softball. which seats 15.edu/oip The Office of International Programs serves as the primary source of information and assistance for the international community at UTEP. grab-and-go) Miner Meals are dollars placed on the Miner Gold card that are held in reserve exclusively for food purchases. men‖s and women‖s basketball. women‖s soccer. which is located on campus and nestled into the southern tip of the Rocky Mountains. An interesting. Its services include: Advising for international students and scholars on immigration. women‖s tennis. located on the first floor of the Academic Services Building. and women‖s rifle. financial cross-cultural and personal issues.247-seat Sun Bowl Stadium. men‖s and women‖s indoor track and field. smoothies. which seats 3. UTEP Catering Services offers a full range of services for banquets. International Programs 915.com UTEP is an NCAA Division IA school and is a member of Conference USA.utepathletics. men‖s and women‖s golf.747. cross country. varied menu is designed to meet the diverse needs of any group and function. PASE (Programa de Asistencia Estudiantil) program administration: a Texas initiative for a waiver of out-of-state tuition for Mexican nationals who can prove financial need.767-seat Don Haskins Center. With Miner Meals.STUDENT SERVICES/100 *B* Jazzman’s Café (upscale coffee. Administration of the Good Neighbor Scholarship and the Frank and Polly Ann Morrow Awards for UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and women‖s volleyball. Sponsored sports are football. and staff can receive an automatic 10% discount on all food purchases. students. Soccer games are held at the University Soccer Field with the Rocky Mountains as a backdrop. men‖s and women‖s cross country. any diner‖s cravings are sure to be satisfied. football. indoor and outdoor track and field. conferences.000 people. Administration of United States Passports. women‖s rifle. The track program runs at Kidd Field. and private functions. sandwiches. Football is played in the 52. Intercollegiate Athletics 915. International and multicultural activities on campus highlighting the multicultural nature of El Paso and UTEP through cultural events and presentations involving UTEP‖s diverse population . Teams nationally ranked in recent years include men‖s basketball. men‖s and women‖s outdoor track and field. From traditional hot dogs to local favorites. meetings. salads. men‖s and women‖s bas ketball games are played in the 11. receptions.utep. faculty.000 people. UTEP Concessions provides a variety of tasty options at sporting and special events. men‖s golf. and pastries) rd College of Business Administration 3 Floor *B* *E* Miner Stop (grab-and-go) nd College of Education 2 Floor *B* *E* Café a la Cart (grab-and-go) College of Health Sciences *B* Healthy Corner (grab-and-go) Swimming and Fitness Center *E* Gold Rush (energy stop.5664 http://studentaffairs.

All apartments are fully furnished.org KTEP 88.5152 www. Student Conduct (General misconduct and academic integrity) 2. with local telephone service. along with credit course offerings. Office of Student Life Phone Number: (915) 747-5648 Website: www. Southern New Mexico.5142 www.ktep. Dean Certifications (Background checks.STUDENT SERVICES/101 Outstanding International Students. The Office is located in the Union East Building. and students can work at the station either as interns or volunteers. and high-speed Internet connections. Miner Village 915. basic cable. the dedicated Housing and Residence Life staff of Miner Village has served the students of UTEP in one of the most modern residence facilities in the state of Texas. The station trains UTEP students in broadcasting. Whether you are a student-athlete with a busy season ahead. and cultural programming 24 hours a day for the University as well as El Paso. Student Travel Professional and Public Programs (PACE) 915. an international student visiting the United States for the first time. KTEP is a member of National Public Radio and Public Radio International. KTEP began broadcasting in 1950 and was the first FM station in El Paso and one of the first in the Southwest. Recreational Sports and Student Publications. an out-of-state student. We are directly responsible for the leadership and administration of seeral departments including but not limited to Miner Village. or an El Paso native looking for a new experience away from home.edu/pace The role of the Professional and Continuing Education (PACE) office is to offer a variety of continuing education and professional development opportunities. Miner Village offers its residents a unique on-campus environment as well as the skills needed to be a responsible student.utep. a sand volleyball court. and citizen. KTEP Public Radio 915. KTEP is equipped with the latest in digital broadcast technology.utep.5352 www. information. the Student Development Center.utep.747. PACE consists of ten major program areas: UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . A quarterly programming guide is available by calling the station. UTEP Mine Tracker (Co-curriculum and co-curricular transcript) 4. The Office of Student Life is directly responsible for the following services and/or initiatives: 1.5 FM broadcasts news. and Ciudad Juárez.747. only one welcomes students home! Since 2001. There are laundry facilities. certification for graduate school and Board of Law Examiners) 3. refrigerated air. and off-campus restaurants and stores within walking distance.edu/housing Although many offices and departments on campus are devoted to student success. roommate. Room 203.747.edu/dos The Office of Student Life strives to create an environment where every student flourishes and is actively engaged in the University community.

6. Advanced Placement Summer Institute trains area teachers and administrators to prepare students for the AP exam. Equipment is provided with a valid UTEP ID. staff and faculty at a minimal fee. The Center for Lifelong Learning (CLL) is an educational program planned and operated by and for individuals fifty (50) years of age or older.747. The English Language Institute (ELI) conducts intensive English training on a full-time basis to prepare students for the TOEFL to enter UTEP. free weights and two swimming pools.747. Challenge Course is a half-day or full-day team-development program. weight machines. and update knowledge.8100. Fitness Programs are non-credit exercise classes offered to UTEP students. The CLL provides learning opportunities for those eager and willing to learn and take an active role in renewing or expanding their education and enriching their lives. Room 108. For further information visit the Recreational Sports Web site or call Memorial Gym at 915. 10. and Professional Programs offer opportunities for individuals of varying levels of experience from both the public and private sectors to develop new skills. Career Development Programs offer courses that provide individual professional growth. Community Programs offer short courses quarterly for personal and professional enrichment for adults and youth. Technology Education Programs provide critical training for a broad range of computer software and user levels to the general public and business community. 8. Intramural Sports Program offers approximately 40 activities for men and women with a valid UTEP ID. Credit Courses are designed to meet the needs of students at various stages of their careers and education-attainment levels. Special Events 915. Outdoor Adventure Program offers equipment rental and outdoor trips to UTEP students.STUDENT SERVICES/102 1. staff and faculty. Sports Clubs are available for registered UTEP students who want to participate in extramural competition. Manufacturing.5103 or the Swimming and Fitness Center at 915. Faculty and Staff Training and Development provides training offerings to University employees through the One-Stop Training Shop offered in collaboration with the University‖s Human Resource Services office. All credit courses are accredited and are transferable to degree programs at UTEP. For more information call or visit the PACE office at Miners‖ Hall. 3. meet license or certification renewal requirements.utep. Summer Athletic Camps: PACE oversees the athletic camps offered by the various UTEP NCAA Athletic programs. Swimming and Fitness Center consists of an exercise facility with cardio machines. 5. Open Recreation provides the use of sport facilities for leisure play. Business.747. 2.edu/rsd The Recreational Sports department provides an opportunity for each member of the University community to voluntarily participate in a wide variety of sports and leisure activities. 7.5481 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .5103 www.747. 4. Recreational Sports 915. 9.

747. Shakira. Cher.5624 www. A variety of events are presented each year. Student Development Center 915. FREE services include office visits. Ricky Martin. The office operates as a full production house in the booking of UTEP ‖s special event facilities: Sun Bowl Stadium. Social. Special Interest. Advocacy. Tigres and many others. Student Health Center 915. and Magoffin Auditorium. to noon). WWE. Aerosmith. Student Government Association 915.utep. pap smears. International. health awareness. developing them both academically and personally.5584 http://studentaffairs. student organizations and Greek Life. The SGA maintains an open channel of communication between the student body and the university administration by voicing to the University administration the concerns of the student body and informing students about changes in policy that will affect campus life and student activities.utep. The Eagles.utep. publications and workshops. Past events include Juanes. campus activities. Fleetwood Mac. Don Haskins Center. The Office of Special Events is also responsible for the programming of the Wednesday Music Café FREE Concert Series. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Religious/Spiritual. Service. Greek. Recognizing the campus‖ unique diversity. and School/Community Spirit. host of the Cinema Novo Film Society of El Paso. Governing. SGA works to assure that every student or group of students is treated with respect and dignity to maintain an atmosphere of acceptance and understanding among all members of the campus community. diversity initiatives. Professional.edu/sdc The Student Development Center (SDC) is a one-stop clearinghouse of information and resources for UTEP students who are or want to become involved.747. and international soccer Pumas vs. These organizations are categorized as Academic/Professional. NSYNC.m. SGA‖s goal is to make every student‖s college experience a complete one.STUDENT SERVICES/103 www. The SDC provides a variety of programs to enhance student organizations through personal consultations.edu/events “There is no business like show business!” For more than a decade the Office of Special Events has been dedicated to bringing quality entertainment to the UTEP and El Paso communities. Laboratory tests.747. Graduate. the only art-film society in the city. The Rolling Stones.edu/dsso The Student Health Center (SHC) is located directly across from the Library and offers confidential health care services to all University students presenting a valid UTEP ID.edu/sga The Student Government Association (SGA) is the official voice of the student body. Recreational. The Student Development Center works with more than 200 student organizations on campus. vaccinations and many other services are provided at reduced rates. nutritional counseling and HIV/AIDS testing (which is conducted every Wednesday from 11:00 a. Linkin Park.5670 http://studentaffairs. SGA takes pride in the diversity of the student body and is dedicated to providing assistance to and support for all student organizations and campus activities whenever possible. Honorary.utep. HBO’s Oscar de la Hoya Fight. The SDC provides students with opportunities to get involved in leadership activities. the Union Exhibition Gallery and the Art and Foreign Film series. Please visit the SDC Web Site for more information on how to start an organization and to view helpful links for student organizations. in campus life.

graphic designers. staff and students. where students receive training to become reporters. Students meeting the above criteria can apply to the program in Room 203.747. Information on student health insurance can be obtained by calling 888. The Student Publications department provides a professional environment using the latest computerbased publishing technology. The Union Services office is located in the Union Building. Minor illness. designers. As the epicenter of the campus. the Union Building serves as a gathering place and provides an atmosphere that fosters the exchange of ideas representing the diverse backgrounds of members of the UTEP community.747. Room 307. editors. professional experience in a variety of facets of publishing through The Prospector. To ensure freedom of expression. X-rays. Its primary goal is to provide services and facilities for the University community in support of the academic and student development mission of the University.5711 www. economically disadvantaged students with academic need from their freshman year through graduation. a semi-weekly student newspaper. University Bookstore 915.STUDENT SERVICES/104 Referrals outside the Student Health Center for stitches. a Student Publications Committee. oversees the student-produced publications.utepbookstore.utep. composed of UTEP faculty. or advertising sales representatives. Union 915. Student Publications 915. a bilingual. Student insurance is available and recommended for every student who does not have insurance coverage.6105.5349 / 8602 http://studentaffairs. injury or health concerns are treated by the SHC‖s professional staff. Union East. First-year participants are enrolled in learning communities for two semesters to help them adjust to the demands of college.747.747. and other medical services and treatments are at the student‖s own expense. and well-qualified journalists.344. and advertising professionals through experiential training that will lead them to successfully pursue and thrive in their chosen careers. Student Support Services Program (SSSP) 915.utep. All emergencies are referred to local hospitals. photographers. bicultural publication produced once each fall and spring semester.5594 www. and Minero Magazine. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .5161 www.com The University Bookstore is responsible for stocking required academic textbooks and supplies for all students. Student Publications‖ mission is to produce talented. photographers.edu/union The Union Building is the community center for the University of Texas at El Paso. ethical.0 and be enrolled for at least nine (9) undergraduate hours or six (6) graduate-level hours. The Bookstore also provides the University community a large variety of reference books.utep. Students must maintain a GPA of at least 2.edu/studentpublications Working with student publications offers motivated students the opportunity to gain hands-on. specialists.edu/sssp This federally funded TRIO program provides intensive academic and personal support for firstgeneration.

and a safe environment to foster health and wholeness in all people. provides programs and services designed to foster the career development of UTEP students and alumni from all academic disciplines. and professional employment) Cooperative Education/Internship Program (career-related experience for college students) On-campus interviews Career fairs Students are encouraged to visit the University Career Center early in their time at UTEP to develop a personalized career-development action plan. calculators. and telephone designated for student use. and on-line resources) Career development activities and workshops (resume writing. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The WRC provides students a library of books. professional and spiritual) goals and promotes social justice through education programs. The Center also provides personal counseling to address issues that can affect a student‖s ability to perform optimally in his or her academic and professional endeavors. confidential services in Spanish and English to currently enrolled UTEP students. There is also a microwave. and self-help resources on everything from stress and time management to self-esteem and relationship issues. academic. In addition. etc. Hours of operations are 8:00 a.utep. and health-related brochures as well as access to a computer lab. book buy-backs.edu/wrc The Women‖s Resource Center (WRC) empowers women to achieve their holistic (personal.edu/counsel The University Counseling Center provides free. the Department provides the following services: Career advising Resource Center (career development literature.STUDENT SERVICES/105 school and office supplies. University Counseling Center 915.) during the fall and spring semesters on Mondays and Tuesdays. and computer hardware orders. the University Counseling Center provides educational workshops.edu/careers The University Career Center. cooperative education and internship opportunities. refrigerator. support groups.utep. commencement apparel and invitations. Services include career counseling to help students clarify their academic or career goals and overcome obstacles to learning and decision making. special book and software orders. outreach programs. including staff. job search correspondence. Career counseling services are offered by the University Counseling Center. magazines.5302 www..5291 http://studentaffairs. to 5:00 p.747. videotapes.utep. University Career Center (915. UTEP apparel and gift items. Toward this end. These services are available to women and men who identify as allies.) Resume reviews Job listings and referrals (part-time student employment.747.747.m.5640 www. The WRC‖s knowledgeable staff offers community resource information and networking opportunities. magazines.m. Women’s Resource Center 915. and families. as part of the Division of Student Affairs. interviewing. Monday through Friday with extended hours (open until 7:00 p.m. The University Bookstore is managed and operated by Follett Higher Education Group. employer information. specialty plaques. faculty. computer software and accessories.

STUDENT SERVICES/106 The WRC is a welcoming space for lesbian. gender identity. gay. It is committed to promoting an environment free from hatred and discrimination based on sexual orientation. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . transgender. or gender expression. The WRC empowers everyone to be authentic and share their experiences. Students will find understanding and acceptance here. queer and intersexed (LGBTQI) community members.

............................................................................................................................................ 499 University College ...................................... 119 College of Business Administration ........................................................................... 115 Undergraduate Studies ............ 108 Core Curriculum .......................................................................................... 129 College of Education .............................................................. 183 College of Health Sciences ................................................................................................ 277 College of Science ......................................... 445 School of Nursing ........................... 155 College of Engineering .........STUDENT SERVICES/111 Colleges and Degree Programs What’s Inside Academic and Research Facilities ............................................... 231 College of Liberal Arts .......................................... 513 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

faculty. and local laws and regulations.000 journals and newspapers more than 445 databases providing bibliographic information. organization. subject. unless authorized by the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System. and the computers have full Internet access. and audio-visual materials are easily found in Nugget. state. Special Collections. and Oral History. and key-word. and applicable federal. Military History. and access to electronic resources via the Internet. the rules and regulations of The University of Texas at El Paso. title. either in the Library‖s three computer classrooms. subject consultation with librarians. as well as the traditional hard-copy resources. Housed in a six-story Bhutanese-style building with a coffee shop and both formal and casual seating for more than 1. The professional staff of the Reference Department provides classroom instruction on Information Literacy. The Access Services Department provides automated checkout services. Western Fiction. or facilities owned or controlled by The University of Texas at El Paso for any purpose other than in the course of the regular programs or activities related to the role and mission of the University. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Housing more than one million books and government publications and nearly million microforms. Most materials can be taken out on loan by University students. association. and reports. This support includes delivery of books and other materials by surface mail. and staff. meaning it collects more than 65% of all materials published by the Federal Government. located on the sixth floor of the Library. or from a user‖s personal computer. located on the second floor of the Library. and provides inter-library loan and document-delivery services. faculty. as well as selected abstracts. or corporation can use property. from any computer on campus. the Library's computerized catalog. The Collaborative Learning Center.ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH FACILITIES/108 Academic and Research Facilities The property. The Library is classified as a Federal Depository. group. journals. Librarians are available to provide assistance with specialized collections in all subject matters. Chief among these holdings are collections in Art. Any authorized use must be conducted in compliance with the provisions of the Regents‖ Rules and Regulations. the Library is open daily to serve students. Books. Support for students and faculty who are involved in distance education is also provided by the Library. M&M (Media and Microforms) houses retrospective newspapers. The Library's manuscript and archival materials are also located in the Special Collections Department. house rare books and other unique artifacts and collections. The catalog is easily searched by author. has 250 PC and Macintosh desktop computers and 35 laptops available for student use.500 users. speeches. and is accessible from computers located in the library. buildings. The collection also includes access to more than 24. Border Studies. and the community. the University Library strives to support the curriculum and research needs of the campus. and such their usage by students and employees are subject to reasonable regulation. and computers. buildings. Various software packages are available. The Reference staff also provides assistance in locating and using the electronic resources of the Library. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and facilities owned or controlled by The University of Texas at El Paso are not open to the general public for assemblies. or other activities. Chicano Studies. makes reserve materials available. microforms. Printing. No person. full-text research articles. Group study rooms and individual graduate-study carrels are located conveniently throughout the library. or in campus classrooms as requested by faculty. DVDs and video tapes.

procedures. The services of the ISS office are focused on technical production. students. a digital library.edu. face-to-face instruction. In carrying out its mission.utsystem. instructional design and pedagogical guidance.telecampus.edu). ISS offers distance-learning opportunities in hybrid and completely on-line formats for the UTEP campus. links to various admissions and registrar offices throughout the UT System. the ISS office provides UTEP faculty with state-of-the art professional development and training opportunities.ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH FACILITIES/109 Self-service photocopying equipment is available on all floors of the Library. Distance Learning and Hybrid Courses ISS provides graduate and undergraduate students. delivery. students can select courses offered through the distance-education delivery options of the UT TeleCampus. The FIT Lab offers a well equipped self-service computer lab in which faculty can develop digital materials for instruction and research. Students are required to abide by the host university policies. a 24/7 technical support helpdesk. and evaluation of distance education and online instructional programs. At their website you will find: online study programs and courses. who are unable to take advantage of a traditional class schedule appropriate opportunities to participate in the learning process through the use of alternative media and methods for the delivery of instruction in a distance learning environment.edu). interested students are encouraged to consult the ISS website at UTEP for the most recent information: http://iss. CD ROM. and training-development programs for faculty engaged in the design and adaptation of instructional materials for fully online and hybrid courses at a distance. MDL and ISS staff work with UTEP faculty to develop instructional programs that integrate a variety of technology-based and electronic digital media materials. it also provides walk-in services and assistance to faculty in learning instructional technologies.telecampus. Administrative offices for ISS are located in the Undergraduate Learning Center. and a full-service Copy Center is located on the first floor.utsystem. Once admitted to one of the 15 University of Texas campuses. course management. and staff engaged in asynchronous and distance-delivered instruction. and student qualifications. Through its new Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Lab. and full program descriptions for the available online courses and degrees the UT TeleCampus facilitates. Students interested in undertaking distance courses through UTEP and the UT TeleCampus must be fully admitted to UTEP or to one of the other UT System academic university campus components by completing the Inter-Institutional Distance Education Admission and Registration (IDEAR) forms available online at the UT TeleCampus Web Site (www. interactive videoconferencing. including access to a broad selection of specialized production software. free online student tutorial services. the ISS office collaborates with public and private institutions to meet the expanding needs for higher education and workforce retooling in the region.6675. INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT SERVICES Instructional Support Services (ISS) serves as an academic resource and campus support unit for UTEP faculty. Suite 308 and can be contacted by phone at 915. It also promotes and implements campus policies and practices to appropriately guide the growth and development of all UTEP distance-education programs. World Wide Web (WWW). and requirements regarding the course selection process. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Additional new on-line courses and program degree study options are routinely being added at UTEP and as a result. The Mediated and Distance Learning Group (MDL) at ISS also works in cooperation with UTEP faculty across the six academic colleges in the design. Internet. and other telecommunications technologies for teaching and learning. as well as classes and meetings convened through interactive video conferences.747. Through ISS the UTEP campus is also an active partner of the UT System TeleCampus (http://www.utep.

ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH FACILITIES/110 BORDER BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CENTER (BBRC) The Border Biomedical Research Center (BBRC). the built environment. and a modern Bioinformatics Laboratory. multi-use technical solutions for the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security. document.edu/bbrc. faculty can document their teaching effectiveness. developed and supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health. Cell Culture. The BBRC will soon move to new facilities following completion of the new Biosciences Research Building. curriculum. The Center shall also act as a one-stop shop for DoD. Current and efforts cross into multiple Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) agencies. and Neurological and Metabolic Disorders. The Center is currently supporting research efforts for U. assessment and documentation of effective teaching. and a library of teaching and learning materials. confidential consulting on issues of course and curriculum design. air quality. The BBRC also has an active Statistical Consulting Laboratory. CETaL aids faculty in conducting scholarly research on teaching. the CDSR shall provide experiential programs for undergraduate. DHS and University collaborations.S Army White Sands Missile Range. was established in 1992 as a basic biomedical research center in Infectious Diseases. graduate and faculty members at the University of Texas at El Paso. In applying this research toward real solutions. and development of community- UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . In addition. Through these services. including hazardous waste. U. water availability and quality. sustainability.S Army Space and Missile Defense Command and U. and policy issues. CENTER FOR DEFENSE SYSTEMS RESEARCH The mission of the Center for Defense Systems Research (CDSR) at the University of Texas at El Paso is to apply a broad range of cutting-edge research and technology to applied. ecology. report. methods of containment and remediation of soil-borne and water-borne contaminants. The BBRC‖s Core Facilities in Analytical Cytology. and other issues related to teaching and learning. CENTER FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING (CETaL) The Center for Effective Teaching and Learning (CETaL) is a resource for University faculty. and evaluated. environmental risks. environmental health. Toxicology. CETaL provides faculty workshops. and that it can be taught. Biomolecule Characterization and DNA Sequencing and Analysis all have up to date instrumentation. It is a scholarly center working to find. The mission of the BBRC is to enhance the capability for biomedical research at the University of Texas at El Paso relevant to the border region and to promote the progress of minority scientists in biomedical research. CETaL is a resource for those who understand that teaching is a complex and interactive process among many parties in a variety of environments. development of alternative energy technologies such as wind energy. the opportunity for faculty mentoring. and help advance the best teaching practices at UTEP and elsewhere. CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (CERM) The Center for Environmental Resource Management (CERM) coordinates faculty and student research addressing the environmental problems affecting the border region of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. improved. measurement and characterization of air pollution.utep. CETaL seeks to cultivate an environment in which teaching is highly valued and in which teachers strive continuously to improve their effectiveness.S Customs & Border Protection. Students receiving support through CERM obtain hands-on experience with research projects addressing a variety of issues such as management of water resources. For more information visit the BBRC Web site at http://www.

The Center also provides opportunities for faculty and graduate students to do significant research. CERM also coordinates education. The Center is available to guide inventors on how to bring their scientific advances or inventions to the market place. and UTEP‖s doctoral program in environmental science and engineering. Indio Ranch Research Station. and Border economics. In 2007. in Mexico. the Center for Research on Educational Reform (CRER) conducts broad-based and multidisciplinary research on issues of educational reform in the public schools and in higher education. The main mission of CREIE is to stimulate innovation and unify campus initiatives in technology transfer. Border governance. CENTER FOR INTER-AMERICAN AND BORDER STUDIES (CIBS) The Center for Inter-American and Border Studies (CIBS) coordinates UTEP‖s degree programs in Latin American and Border Studies. and Math Education Reform. These include the undergraduate major and minor. A significant element of the Center‖s initial work is research that addresses critically important questions about the impact of these and similar reform efforts. and in Latin America. and the Southwest Center for Environmental Research and Policy Consortium (SCERP). CENTER FOR RESEARCH ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATIVE ENTERPRISES (CREIE) The Center for Research Entrepreneurship and Innovative Enterprises (CREIE) is an outcome of a Kauffman Foundation Campus Initiative and grant to infuse entrepreneurship into UTEP ’s education. Major initiatives of the Center include the NSF-funded Mathematics and Science Partnership.ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH FACILITIES/111 based training programs to help disadvantaged communities restore and maintain environmental health. entrepreneurship and commercialization at UTEP. CIDS leverages El Paso’s Kay Bailey Hutchison Desalination Plant. it is extensively involved in research dealing with the use of advanced field and laboratory techniques in transportation infrastructure. CENTER FOR INLAND DESALINATION SYSTEMS The Center for Inland Desalination Systems (CIDS) partners with El Paso Water Utilities develop and implement technologies to create alternative water sources in Texas and across the globe. CTIS is an internationally known center of excellence in nondestructive testing of transportation facilities. administration. Teaching Gender Equity in Mathematics and Science. developing smallscale portable desalination equipment to be used in remote locations. The University-wide center builds on more than a decade of K-16 educational reform efforts at the University of Texas at El Paso. geo- UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and an interdisciplinary MA. CIBS also conducts research and assists other units with research on the Border. and in Latin America. CIBS sponsors events and publications addressing Border and Latin American issues. Border health. CERM received a Texas Environmental Excellence Award from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. CERM provides the research infrastructure needed to support major University environmental programs including the Energy Center. and developing processes that can reduce energy and water use during desalination. addresses the need for basic and applied research related to transportation infrastructure. Recent projects have focused on issues such as Border demography. Some examples include mining the brine concentrate produced during the osmosis process. to research on desalination-related areas that have potential commercial applications. and works to forge linkages between UTEP and other institutions and agencies in the Border region. and outreach activities. the Rio Bosque Wetlands Park. in Mexico. which is among the largest of its kind in the world. The Center was established to create a central identity for entrepreneurship. outreach and policy development programs. CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS (CTIS) The Center for Transportation Infrastructure Systems (CTIS). research. in partnership with the University. technology transfer and commercialization at UTEP. CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON EDUCATIONAL REFORM (CRER) Established in 2002.

3 IM offers a range of programs and services in the following areas: (1) Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC) provides technical solutions to industrial problems ranging from design-for-manufacturing 3 to supply-chain qualification to pollution prevention. (2) IM assists manufacturers in filling both long and short-term workforce development gaps through a number of programs including K-12 and university student outreach programs. evaluation. and community engagement and dissemination. the HHDRC is a collaborative venture among UTEP‖s College of Health Sciences. trust recommendations. 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and uncertainty levels (areas that are recognized as essential for the success of CI).S. (b) create a program of excellence to investigate and eliminate Hispanic health disparities in the Texas-Mexico border region. CENTER OF EXCELLENCE FOR SHARING RESOURCES TO ADVANCE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION THROUGH CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE The Center of Excellence for Sharing Resources to Advance Research and Education through Cyberinfrastructure (Cyber-ShARE) was created in 2007 to bring together experts in computer science. and construction of transportation infrastructure. The team addresses the challenge of providing information to scientists and other users of cyberinfrastructure (CI) that allows them to make informed decisions about the resources that they retrieve and to have confidence in using results from CI-based applications. In years three through five of this grant.-Mexico border and the impact of increased traffic flow on the safety of people and the environment. and student internship programs in regional industry settings. (c) establish the University of Texas System as a leader in the study and solution of Hispanic health disparities. The Cyber-ShARE team conducts innovative research to facilitate the development of CI-based applications and increase their use by scientists by enhancing CI results with provenance information. A recently awarded NIH P20 grant funds two full studies. new pilot studies based on this research will be funded. industrial arts program development. The mission of the HHDRC is guided by a conceptual framework that makes explicit and serves as a catalyst for research on the variables of interest that influence Hispanic health disparities. CTIS is engaged in about 20 projects dealing with the planning. CTIS has also expanded its research activities to include transportation planning and infrastructure management: current projects deal with risk assessment of transporting hazardous materials along the U. INSTITUTE FOR MANUFACTURING AND MATERIALS MANAGEMENT (IM ) 3 The Institute for Manufacturing and Materials Management (IM ) serves as both a focal point for UTEP‖s diverse manufacturing efforts and as a conduit for University resources to area manufacturers. education. and (d) promote knowledge transfer to both practice and policy. (3) the Institute assists area economic development agencies by identifying 3 industry-sector gaps and facilitating strategic planning. including (1) a population-based assessment of health disparities among Hispanics in El Paso and (2) research focused on cultural and institutional factors affecting adherence to HIV/AIDS treatment in border clinics. Activities of the Center include research. The aims of the Center are to (a) build capacity for researchers in health disparities. Funded by the National Institutes of Health‖s National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities. and by contributing CI resources to appropriate CI portals. and (4) IM provides support for the manufacturing-education program funded by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. computational mathematics. research training and education. and environmental engineering. HISPANIC HEALTH DISPARITIES RESEARCH CENTER (HHDRC) The Hispanic Health Disparities Research Center (HHDRC) provides leadership to research-based innovations that will reduce Hispanic health disparities. earth science. design.ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH FACILITIES/112 technical earthquake engineering. UTEP‖s School of Nursing and the University of Texas at Houston School of Public Health. by creating scientist-centered tools and artifacts. At any given time. and environmental science.

data collection. Austin State University and Texas Natural Resource Information System. fosters interdisciplinary research across the Colleges of Science. RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR MANUFACTURING AND ENGINEERING The Research Institute for Manufacturing and Engineering Systems (RIMES) is a research. MRTI also fosters the development of intellectual property by UTEP faculty. and trade and transportation. provides leadership and coordination in objective analysis and interpretation of public and private policy research addresses issues of importance to the people of the Paso del Norte and Camino Real and ensures that economic development proceeds in a rational and sustainable fashion. The program is designed to create a path for careers in DHS components or in a homeland security-related industry. and students and helps develop industrial partnerships and new businesses based on UTEP intellectual property. Mayan Pigments. Through education program. and Biology.D. and supports the Ph. academic. Chemistry. and service center dedicated to generate new knowledge in Systems Engineering through it research UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and design multidisciplinary degree programs with an emphasis in homeland/border security. and Refinery Science Corporation. REGIONAL GEOSPATIAL SERVICE CENTER The Regional Geospatial Service Center (RGIS) provides accurate geospatial data to local emergency responders including the Texas National Guard and other member of the El Paso region ’s emergency response community. collaborates with homeland security related industry. which is commercializing complex organic/inorganic materials developed by UTEP researchers. MATERIALS RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE (MRTI) The Materials Research and Technology Institute (MRTI) administers the University‖s multi disciplinary Ph. timely information that forms the framework needed for public policy investigation in areas such as economic development. economic development and public health. Stephen F. Key MRTI activities include the Department of Energy-funded UTEP/Stanford Gateway Program. Business. Engineering. The works closely with its partners. NATIONAL CENTER FOR BORDER SECURITY AND IMMIGRATION The Center for Border Security and Immigration will develop integrated education and research initiatives. in order to promote interest in science and technology. among other projects. the center assists the Department of Homeland Security in meeting its border security and immigration related science and technology needs. technologists. to maintain a data repository and backups in the event of catastrophic system failure.ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH FACILITIES/113 INSTITUTE FOR POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (IPED) The mission of the Institute for Policy and Economic Development (IPED) at The University of Texas at El Paso. and provides full support to those agencies and individuals charged with defense of the homeland and development of national immigration and border security policy. Inc.D. programs in Environmental Science and Engineering. which is working to convert heavy petroleum feed stocks to useful transportation fuels. and Liberal Arts. which gives UTEP faculty and students access to the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. technology and business development. engineers and mathematicians to meet emerging challenges of homeland security in a global context. which are complementary in scope. The Institute‖s interdisciplinary approach to research design. Through research. program in Materials Science and Engineering (MASE).. and analysis provid es the Institute‖s clientele objective. The Center is also involved in the development of geospatial applications to support UTEP research and service activities in a variety of areas including border security. staff. the Center will develop and educate future scientists.

publications. cardiovascular hemodynamics (experimental fluid mechanics). RIMES facilitates interactions among colleges and industry to foster total systems-level thinking and systems effectiveness. and tissue engineering (including scaffold fabrication. The lab uses rapid prototyping technologies to fabricate functional end-use products and patient-specific anatomical shapes for use in pre-surgical planning.M. manufacturing. The facilities house more than $4-million in research infrastructure. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . tissue engineering and more. W. including 17 rapid prototyping machines with combined infrastructure for advanced manufacturing. cardiovascular flow research. polymer synthesis. While accomplishing these goals. workforce development. the newly renovated 6. Seminars. surgery.100-square-foot facility is the only one of its kind in the world. disseminate new knowledge and best Systems Engineering practices through its academic programs. and promote and encourage multi-disciplinary research and collaboration in Engineering Systems. Originally funded through a $1-million grant from the W. and biomedical laboratory focused on multi-disciplinary research.M. Keck Center for 3D Innovation (Keck Center) is an advanced engineering.ACADEMIC AND RESEARCH FACILITIES/114 programs. and Workforce development. and cell culture capabilities). addressing applications oriented research areas on large-scale systems and systems of systems. and industry extension.M. RIMES advances multi-disciplinary educational programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels and industry extensions through Training in MPT. medical-device development. KECK CENTER FOR 3D INNOVATION The W. Keck Foundation.

occasion. ENGL 1311 Expository English Composition [ENGL 1301] and ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing [ENGL 1302] or b. Students are advised to consult particular degree requirements for their major before selecting courses to meet core curriculum requirements. II. Any additional hours may apply toward degree requirements. For students whose secondary education was in English: a. I. and audience. The courses that can be used to satisfy the block requirements are listed with their Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) in brackets [ ]. or blocks. without completing the baccalaureate degree. A.CORE CURRICULUM/115 Core Curriculum All undergraduates at The University of Texas at El Paso are required to complete a 42-semester credit hour core curriculum before receiving a baccalaureate degree. The minimum number is also the maximum number of hours that can be applied toward the core requirement. Mathematics (three hours) The objective of the mathematics component is to develop a quantitatively literate college graduate. CORE BLOCKS AND COURSES The core curriculum consists of nine components. ENGL 1311 Expository English Composition [ENGL1301] and ENGL 1313 Writing About Literature or * c. For degree plans that terminate with a postbaccalaureate degree. Each block has a required minimum number of semester credit hours. Every college graduate should be able to apply basic mathematical tools in the solution of real-world problems. For students whose secondary education was not in English: ESOL 1311 Expository English Composition for Speakers of ESL [ENGL 1306] and ESOL 1312 Research and Critical Writing for Speakers of ESL [ENGL 1307] B. Speech (three hours): * COMM 1301 Public Speaking [SPCH 1315] or COMM 1302 Business and Professional Communication [SPCH 1321] _______ 1 COMM/ENGL 1611 can be used to satisfy both the ENGL 1311 and COMM 1301 requirements. undergraduates are required to complete the core curriculum before enrolling in graduate-level courses. Select one course from the following (Only three hours apply toward the required 42): MATH 1319 Math in the Modern World [MATH 1333] or MATH 1320 Mathematics for the Social Sciences I [MATH 1324] or UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . English Composition (six hours): 1. ENGL/COMM 1611 Written and Oral Communication and ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing [ENGL 1302] 2. The core curriculum requirement does not preclude the counting of core courses toward other degree requirements. Communication (nine hours) The objective of the communication component is to enable the student to communicate effectively in clear and correct prose or orally in a style appropriate to the subject.

2 TCCN MATH 1314 will also satisfy this requirement. 1 2 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .CORE CURRICULUM/116 MATH 1508 Precalculus [MATH 2412 ] STAT 1380 Basics of Descriptive and Inferential Statistics _______ 1 A higher-level course in the calculus sequence can be substituted.

GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences [GEOL 1301] and GEOL 1312 Principles of Earth Sciences [GEOL 1302] or b. Natural Sciences (six hours. a minimum of two semesters of lecture and one semester of laboratory) The objective of the study of the natural sciences is to enable the student to understand.): 1. BIOL 1305 General Biology [BIOL 1306] and BIOL 1107 Topics in Study of life I [BIOL 1106] and (1) BIOL 1306 Organismal Biology [BIOL 1307] and BIOL 1108 Organismal Biology Laboratory [BIOL 1107] or (2) BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy and Physiology I [BIOL 2301] and BIOL 2111 Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I [BIOL 2101] or (3) BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy and Physiology II [BIOL 2302] and BIOL 2113 Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab II [BIOL 2102] 3. GEOG 1306 Physical Geography [GEOG 1301] and GEOG 1106 Laboratory for Geography 1306 5. a. GEOL 1313 Introduction to Physical Geology [GEOL 1303] and GEOL 1103 Laboratory for GEOL 1313 [GEOL 1103] or d. GEOL 1312 Principles of Earth Sciences [GEOL 1302] and GEOG 1306 Physical Geography [GEOG 1301] and GEOG 1106 Laboratory for Geography 1306 or UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . construct. a. and evaluate relationships in the natural sciences. GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences [GEOL 1301] (nonmajor-track) or e. ASTR 1107 Astronomy Laboratory I [PHYS 1111] or b. a. BIOL 1303 Introductory Biology [BIOL 1308] and BIOL 1304 Human Biology and (1) BIOL 1103 Introductory Biology Laboratory [BIOL 1108] or (2) BIOL 1104 Human Biology Laboratory (nonmajor-track) or b. CHEM 1305 General Chemistry [CHEM 1311] and CHEM 1105 Laboratory for CHEM 1305 [CHEM 1111] and CHEM 1306 General Chemistry [CHEM 1312] and CHEM 1106 Laboratory for CHEM 1306 [CHEM 1112] 4. and to enable the student to understand the bases for building and testing theories. ESCI 1301 Introduction to Environmental Science [ENVR 1301] and ESCI 1101 Environmental Science Laboratory [ENVR 1101] and a. CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry [CHEM 1406] and CHEM 1408 Introductory Chemistry [CHEM 1408] (nonmajor-track) or b. The courses listed are for nonmajors. BIOL 1306 Organismal Biology [BIOL 1307] and BIOL 1108Organismal Biology Laboratory [BIOL 1107] or b. Select one sequence from the following (Only six hours apply toward the required 42. ASTR 1108 Astronomy Laboratory II [PHYS 1112] 2.CORE CURRICULUM/117 III. BIOL 1303 Introductory Biology [BIOL 1308] and BIOL 1103 Introductory Biology Laboratory [BIOL 1108] (nonmajor-track) or c. GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences [GEOL 1301] and GEOG 1306 Physical Geography [GEOG 1301] and GEOG 1106 Laboratory for Geography 1306 or c. ASTR 1307 Elementary Astronomy of the Solar System [PHYS 1311] and ASTR 1308 Elementary Astronomy of Stars and Galaxies [PHYS 1312] and a. the major courses in the discipline can be substituted for the non-major sequence.

students engage in critical analysis and develop an appreciation of the humanities as fundamental to the health and survival of any society. HIST 2302 World History Since 1500 [HIST 2322] 8. ARTS 3320 Whole Arts 5. ideas. students will form aesthetic judgments and develop an appreciation of the arts as fundamental to the health and survival of any society. Select one course from the following: 1. ARTH 1305 History of World Art I [ARTS 1303] 3. ART 1300 Art Appreciation [ARTS 1301] 2. PHIL 2306 Ethics: Philosophical Perspective on Human Conduct and Values [PHIL 2306] Visual and Performing Arts (three hours) The objective of the visual and performing arts component is to expand students' knowledge and appreciation of the human imagination as expressed through works of visual art. Humanities (three hours) The objective of the humanities component is to expand students' knowledge of the human condition and human cultures. especially in relation to behaviors. GEOL 1313 Introduction to Physical Geology [GEOL 1303] and GEOL 1103 Laboratory for GEOL 1313 [GEOL 1103] and GEOG 1306 Physical Geography [GEOG 1301] and GEOG 1106 Laboratory for Geography 1306 or e. ENGL 2318 Introduction to American Poetry [TCCN applied for] 6. ENGL 2313 Introduction to American Fiction [ENGL 2342] 4. Select one of the following: 1. a. music. ENGL 2311 English Literature [ENGL 2322] 2. dance. MUSL 1327 Jazz to Rock [MUSI 1310] 9. PHYS 1403 General Physics I [PHYS 1401] and PHYS 1404 General Physics II [PHYS 1402] or b. ENGL 2314 Introduction to American Drama [ENGL 2343] 5.CORE CURRICULUM/118 d. HIST 2301 World History to 1500 [HIST 2321] 7. and values expressed in works of human imagination and thought. theatre and film. THEA 1313 Introduction to Theatre [DRAM 1310] 10. Through study in these disciplines. Through study in disciplines such as literature and philosophy. PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy [PHIL 1301] 9. GEOL 1313 Introduction to Physical Geology [GEOL 1303] and GEOL 1103 Laboratory for GEOL 1313 [GEOL 1101] and GEOL 1314 Introduction to Historical Geology [GEOL 1304} and GEOL 1104 Laboratory for GEOL 1314 {GEOL 1104} 6. MUSL 1324 Music in Western Societies [MUSI 1306] 8. MUSL 1321 Introduction to Music History 7. DANC 1304 Dance Appreciation [DANC 2303] 6. FILM 1390 Introduction to the Art of the Motion Picture [DRAM 2366] V. ARTH 1306 History of World Art II [ARTS 1304] 4. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . PHYS 2420 Introductory Mechanics [PHYS 2425] and PHYS 2421 Fields and Waves [PHYS 2426] IV. ENGL 2312 English Literature [ENGL 2323] 3.

rights. events. describe. and their ability to critically evaluate and analyze historical evidence.CORE CURRICULUM/119 VI. focusing on the growth of political institutions. and knowledge acquisition. shall receive credit in UTEP's core curriculum for each of the blocks successfully (C or better) completed in the core curriculum of the sending institution.S.S. UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry [EDUC 1300] or UNIV 2350 Interdisciplinary Technology and Society [TCCN applied for]. and responsibilities. PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology [PSYC 2301] 8. SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology [SOCI 1301] IX. ECON 1301 Basic Issues in Economics [ECON 1301] or ECON 2303 Principles of Economics [ECON 2301] or ECON 2304 Principles of Economics [ECON 2302] 4. their comprehension of the past and current role of the U. CE 2326 Economics for Engineers and Scientists 5. If a UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . but who have completed blocks within the core. history courses (three hours must be Texas history) include: 1. and to enhance their understanding of federalism. Such knowledge will better equip students to understand themselves and the roles they play in addressing the issues facing humanity. communications. ANTH 1301 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology [ANTH 2301] 2. POLS 2311 American Government and Politics [GOVT 2306] VIII. Institutionally Designated Option (three hours) The objective of the institutionally designated option component is to develop the critical thinking skills and academic tools required to be an effective learner. institutions. HIST 1302 History of the U..S. Social and Behavioral Sciences (three hours) The objective of the social and behavioral science component is to increase students' knowledge of how social and behavioral scientists discover.S.S. U. and individual civil liberties. Since 1865 [HIST 1302] VII. HIST 1301 History of the U. 1. POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics [GOVT 2305] and 2. GEOG 1310 Cultural Geography [GEOG 1302] 6. in the world. ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology [ANTH 2351] 3. groups. and ideas. TRANSFER STUDENTS Students who transfer without completing the core curriculum at another Texas institution of higher education. states rights. This also applies to courses transferred from another institution. C RULE All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.S. and Texas political systems. United States History (six hours) The objectives of the history component are to expand students‖ knowledge of the origin and history of the U. and explain the behaviors and interactions among individuals. to 1865 [HIST 1301] and 2. LING/ANTH/ENGL 2320 Introduction to Linguistics [TCCN applied for] 7. and on the constitutions of Texas and the United States. Special emphasis is placed on the use of technology in problem solving. Select one course from the following: 1. Political Science (six hours) The objectives of the political science component are to expand students‖ knowledge of the origin and evolution of the U.

that core shall be substituted for The University of Texas at El Paso's core curriculum. However. Such a transfer student shall receive credit for each block within the core curriculum and shall not be required to take additional courses to satisfy UTEP‖s core curriculum.CORE CURRICULUM/120 student has successfully (C or better) completed the 42-hour core at another Texas institution of higher education. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . courses listed in UTEP‖s core curriculum can be required as a prerequisite to a course or as a degree requirement for the major.

................................ Entering Student Program .......... Academic Advising Center ............................................Office for Undergraduate Studies What’s Inside Undergraduate Studies ............................................................................................................................................. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ....... Center for Civic Engagement ........................................................................... Medical Professions Institute . University Studies Courses ............................................ Developmental Math Program ................................... Developmental English Program................................................................................................................................................. Study Abroad ........................................

Lachica. This advising model helps students take into account transitions. Ekal.edu/advising DIRECTOR: Pat Caro ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: Cynthia Holguin TSI/START MANGER: Jennifer Dunlop PRE-HEALTH PROFESSIONAL COORDINATOR: A. and new responsibilities as they make both short. Grijalva. Phone: (915) 747-5290 Fax: (915) 747-5297 advise1@utep. new roles. abilities. Sifuentes The Academic Advising Center (AAC) helps students develop class schedules and degree plans related to career and life goals that reflect their interests. We also see students on either a walk-in or appointment basis. Jimenez. Research Associate The mission of the Office for Undergraduate Studies is to provide integrated. Advisors look forward to helping all students get connected on campus! The AAC provides academic advising to the following populations: General Studies (undecided majors) students Texas Success Initiative (TSI) students START (provisionally admitted) students Programa Interamericano Estudiantil (PIE) students Pre-nursing students UT Austin Coordinated Admission Program (UTCAP) students Junior Scholars Summer Guest students Transfer students UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Center for Civic Engagement. Grubbs.6:00 p. Associate Provost Thenral Mangadu. Advisors will also assist students via email at advise1@utep. Pihlaja. Medical Professions Institute. Pena. Puente PROGRAM ADVISORS: Aguirre.m. scholarship and artistic production. Study Abroad Program and University Honors Program. Duarte. Kaay Miller PROGRAM ADVISOR/LECTUERS: Arrieta..utep. Ph. Developmental English.. public service and administration.m.edu. and some Saturdays. Entering Student Program. These programs/departments guide students to make informed choices pertaining to opportunities and resources available on UTEP campus to augment student success thereby facilitating UTEP’s goals in relation to learning and teaching.. Advisors are available Monday-Friday from 8:00 a. high-quality academic programs that foster and support student success for our students prior to entering UTEP through the entirety of their undergraduate education in order to encourage and enrich students ’ academic experiences and achievements.THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/120 The Office for Undergraduate Studies 218 Academic Services Building (915) 747 6500 Fax: (915) 747 5412 Donna E. The Office for Undergraduate Studies (OUS) houses eight UTEP programs and departments: Academic Advising.and long-term curricular and co-curricular decisions. See website for Saturday availability. and values. Palacios. Developmental Math. Academic Advising Center Academic Advising Center Bldg. Betancourt. Terrazas.D. research.edu www.

he or she will be advised by the Academic Advising Center into an appropriate developmental course(s) according to UTEP’s Developmental Education Accountability Plan. * SAT and ACT scores are valid for five (5) years from the date of testing. and PSYC 1301. public technical institutes. Students who took the eleventh grade exit-level Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) with a minimum scale score of 2200 on the math section and/or a minimum scale score of 2200 on the English Language Arts section with a writing subsection of a 3*. or released from active duty as members of the armed forces. TAAS and TAKS tests are valid for three (3) years from the date of testing. Texas National Guard. Students who are not seeking a degree or a certificate. and reading-intensive course. Students who have not successfully completed the TSI requirement will be advised every semester at the Academic Advising Center. 1990. The following TSI exemptions are provided by the state: Students with an ACT composite score of 23 with a minimum of 19 on the English and/or mathematics sections*. or reserve forces for at least three years before enrolling. Education majors must take and pass all sections of THEA. Students enrolled in certificate programs of one year or less at public junior colleges. Students on active duty as members of the armed forces. or when they have received a C or better in a college-level writing. Entering Students must take the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) or an approved alternative test prior to enrolling in college-level courses at a Texas public college or university. If a student does not pass one or more sections of the test.0 GPA. POLS 2310 and 2311. with a Texas Learning Index (TLI) of 86 on the math test and 89 on the reading test*. and reading-intensive courses. or public state colleges. or Computer-Administered THEA. Students who score 1770 on the TAAS test. writing. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/121 German Abitur Program students College of Liberal Arts: Selected lower-division Liberal Arts majors are assisted in course selection based on degree requirements College of Education: Students with fewer than 45 hours who are interested in teaching in the elementary and middle school grades are assisted in course selection. Students who score 1070 on the SAT with a minimum of 500 on the English and/or math sections*. Students will complete the TSI when they have passed the reading. writing. and math sections of THEA or ACCUPLACER. math. They can also take the THEA. the Quick THEA. To satisfy TSI requirements students can take the ACCUPLACER. or reserve forces after August 1. or Quick THEA (not ACCUPLACER). Students who transfer to UTEP from a private or accredited out-of-state institution of higher education and who have satisfactorily completed a minimum of 12 college level hours with a grade of C or better and have an overall 2. for acceptance into the teacher certification program. Students honorably discharged. SOCI 1301. which also serves as a placement test for math and English courses. Students who have an associate’s or bachelor’s degrees. the Texas National Guard. Texas Success Initiative (TSI) The Texas Success Initiative (TSI) is designed to ensure that students entering a Texas public college or university are prepared for college-level math. Reading-intensive courses include HIST 1301 and 1302. retired.

utep. Developmental English Program Education 205 915. refer to the Student Assessment and Testing section of this catalog. It has also partnered with over 100 university professors from various disciplines in all colleges to reach over 125. Shaffer. Health. or call (915) 747-5290.utep. 0310. Since 1998. The Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) 101 Benedict Hall Phone: (915)747 – 7969 Fax: (915)747-8917 www. and Citizenship literacy. and college preparedness for youth. In practice.edu DIRECTOR: Azuri Ruiz SERVICE LEARNING COORDINATOR: Jennifer Rodriguez The mission of the Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) at the University of Texas at El Paso is to engage faculty and students in the community through community-based teaching and learning in order to enhance student learning.edu/cce cce@utep.THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/122 UTEP students with disabilities should inquire about special testing accommodations.000 community members and children. The CCE can be contacted to help facilitate community collaborations. and actively improve the El Paso-Cd.000 UTEP students with over 100 partner agencies and schools.000 hours of purposeful service to the community. promote civic engagement. The program consists of ENGL 0111. Williamson The Developmental English Program prepares students for college-level work in reading and writing.edu\developmentalenglish DIRECTOR: Cheryl Baker Heller COORDINATOR: Andrea Berta LECTURERS: Peschka. In its eleven years of operation. and public agencies to address community problems while identifying learning opportunities for UTEP students. the CCE has been home to numerous students who have been the heart and engine of its operations while successfully engaging over 12. nonprofit organizations. the CCE has served as a link that fosters collaboration and partnerships between the university and public schools. visit the Academic Advising Center. and 0311. or for civic engagement training and education. Storey-Gore.5693 Fax: (915) 747-5655 developmentalenglish@utep. ultimately accruing over 300. the CCE also manages service-learning programs with various focus areas like domestic violence prevention. For information concerning TSI testing.edu academics. Juarez Region. For further information about the Texas Success Initiative.747. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . adult English. develop academic and service related curriculum and projects.

Moschopoulos. Beard. Credit hours received for MATH 0120 may not be used to satisfy any institutional degree requirements. Prerequisite: Placement by examination. 0310 0311 Developmental Math Program Education 205 Phone: 915-747-5693 Fax: 915-747-5655 developmentalmath@utep. Math 0120. Schoessler. Introductory Algebra (3-0) The course begins with a review of signed numbers. Mathematics (MATH) 0120 Lab for Math 1320 (0-2) A lab to support learning of the mathematical concepts. David Harvey. The Developmental Math Department offers three courses. This course is designed to prepare students for college-level writing. Prerequisite: ACCUPLACER College Level Math score of 35-50. and interventions based on the belief that every student should have the opportunity to pursue their educational goals. Concurrent enrollment in MATH 1320 is required. Blanchett. Math 0311. Editing skills (punctuation.THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/123 English (ENGL) 0111 Expository Composition Workshop (1-0) An intensive composition workshop focusing on issues relating to the writing process. and editing/proofreading.edu\developmentalmath DIRECTOR: Denise Lujan COORDINATORS: Bill Dodge. emphasis on adapting the writer's ideas and purpose to an audience. inferential. and evaluative comprehension. rational numbers. Prerequisite: Placement by examination. technology. Dan McGlasson FACULTY: Abdelfattah. and exponents. spelling. drafting. but may not be used to satisfy any institutional degree requirements. revision. Viramontes The Developmental Math Department is dedicated to preparing and supporting underprepared students for academic success in college level math through the use of creative course design. and operations with polynomials. and (2) the connected nature of reading and writing. Prerequisite: Placement by examination or transfer credit from EPCC for MATH 0301. Corequisite: ENGL 1311. This course is designed as an introduction to MATH 0311. Reading and Communication Skills (3-0) Instruction in the reading process with emphasis on (1) the development of literal. word problems. Prerequisite: Placement by examination.utep.edu academics. linear equations and inequalities. Major topics include variables. 0310 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Basic English Composition (3-0) Introduction to the writing process: prewriting. grammar/usage) are presented within the context of the students' own writing. analytical. Corequisite: MATH 0120. problem solving and mathematical writing skills encountered in MATH 1320. Credit hours received for MATH 0310 may count toward removal of provisional status. and Math 0310.

and geometry. and it administers learning communities for both general and special populations. The seminar increases students‖ knowledge of the role of technology in the academic community. complex numbers. Ontiveros. critical thinking. Specific topics vary with instructor. Kilpatrick. Entering students must take either University 1301 or University 2350 to satisfy Block IX of the Core Curriculum. Marinovic. Strategies for effective uses of electronic technology in support of research are emphasized. Lee. graphing lines. cultural. The course is designed as an introduction to MATH 1508 or 1320. University Courses (UNIV) 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry This course engages entering students in critical inquiry concerning one or more related academic topics. Interdisciplinary Technology and Society Students in this course are introduced to approaches to technology assessment and will examine social. and arrive at possible solutions for a broad range of topics related to technology and society. University 2350: Interdisciplinary Technology and Society is designed to engage students in a critical examination of technology and its effects. students gain credit toward graduation. Jimenez. 2350 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Joanne Kropp PEER LEADER COORDINATOR: Shawna Clemente LECTURERS: Hibbert. and environmental consequences of technology.747. The course descriptions identify the innovative nature of the two courses. Sterling. Enrollment in University 1301 is restricted to students with fewer than thirty (30) hours of earned credit the semester in which they are taking the course.7618 Fax: 915. Students conduct library and electronic research to support one or more academic projects. and communication are integrated in an active learning environment. radical expressions. Major topics include rational expressions and equations. discuss. analyze. University 1301: Seminar in Critical Inquiry is a discipline-based. Entering Student Program (ESP)/University Studies 344 Undergraduate Learning Center Phone: 915. rational exponents.747. The course includes problem solving in small groups assigned to research. Information acquisition. Puente. Rivera-Rios. Pena. University Courses University 1301 and University 2350 are courses taught by faculty and staff from various departments across campus. By successfully completing either of these courses. Tejeda The Entering Student Program is designed to assist students in their transition to the university and to help increase their opportunities for academic success. Montelongo. quadratic equations.6496 DIRECTOR: Dorothy Ward ASSISTANT DIRECTORS: Ann Gabbert. Wilson-James PROGRAM ADVISOR/LECTURERS: Arrieta. Pihlaja. Specific topics vary with instructor. The Entering Student Program offers two courses—UNIV 1301 and UNIV 2350—that make up Block IX of the UTEP Core Curriculum. Betancourt. theme-driven course designed to engage students in the University community. Duarte.THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/124 0311 Intermediate Algebra (3-0) The course begins with a review of polynomials. Prerequisite: ENGL 1312 or ENGL 1313 or ESOL 1312.

Study Abroad 218 Academic Services Building Phone: (915) 747-6273 Fax: (915) 747-5012 studyabroad@utep. Lower Level West Phone: (915) 747-6260 FAX: (915) 747-6412 mpi@utep. Affiliated Programs Students are able to participate in study abroad programs that are offered by third – party providers. work closely with faculty.edu Coordinator: Niamh Minion The Study Abroad program enables students to gain global experience through several types of international study including Faculty Led. MCAT preparation. Medical Professions Institute (MPI) 001 Classroom Building. and physician assistant. podiatry. Through a unique continuum of programming. and connect ideas across courses. Programs vary in length and cost depending on the type and location. and lifelong community relationship. supports. Faculty Led Programs Faculty or Departments may offer courses which are taught abroad as part of the UTEP curriculum.edu/mpi DIRECTOR: Mary Wells The Medical Professions Institute (MPI) is the resource center for UTEP students interested in the medical professions of: physician. Exchange and Affiliated Programs. osteopathy. early acceptance programs. Exchange Programs UTEP has agreements with a number of universities throughout the world which allow students to attend a foreign university while paying UTEP tuition. dentistry. Sharing courses in this way increases students' opportunities to make friends. and facilitates the development of UTEP students into highly competitive candidates for post-graduate training in these professions.THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/125 Entering Student Program Learning Communities The Entering Student Program also coordinates learning communities for entering students. This can be a very affordable option for many students. a "community" of students might be enrolled together in an English and a history class. Descriptions of each type of program are listed below. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .utep. or more courses together. service. three. including sections of University 1301. leadership. Students who take these courses are assessed normal tuition and fees and are charged additional fees to cover program costs. Students enrolled in learning communities attend two.edu www. for example. and workshops. The institute utilizes an array of collaborations with other entities both on and off campus emphasizing academic preparation. form study groups. UTEP students have access to professional growth opportunities from their first semester to graduation. The MPI instructs. optometry. veterinary medicine. professional student organizations. The Class Schedule contains a list of learning communities offered each semester. Learning communities connect students through linked courses. internships. Students are required to pay the program fees to the providers.

Applications are accepted throughout the academic year. Students cannot register into Honors courses on Goldmine. Upon verification of good academic status. Detailed guidelines and Honors Contract documents are available at the Honors House.edu www.utep. If the contract work is completed and evaluated as Honors quality by the instructor and a final grade of ―A‖ or ―B‖ is earned for the course. Honors Transfer Credit UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . To enroll in Honors courses. Information about other national scholarships is available in the Study Abroad Department. Ramirez The University Honors Program encourages eligible students who are committed to academic excellence. Honors Admission students are required to complete a minimum of 6 hours of Honors course work during the fall semester of their freshmen year to be considered active program members. The Study Abroad Department also coordinates the acceptance and immigration process for all incoming exchange students who want to study at UTEP. Current students with a minimum 3. students who want to be engaged on campus and in the community. Enrollment in Honors courses is generally limited to 20 students. students must be registered by office staff at the Honors House. Honors Contracts Honors Program members enrolled in a non-honors section of a course can arrange to earn Honors credit under the close supervision of the instructor. Students who transfer to UTEP and who were Honors Program/College members in good standing at their previous institution are eligible to apply. Honors credit for the class will be awarded and the Honors (H) designation will appear on the student ’s transcript.3 cumulative GPA to remain active program members. Honors Courses Honors sections offer students a richer. University Honors Program Honors House Phone: (915) 747-5858 Fax: (915) 747-5841 honors@utep. more intense and challenging academic experience. there is no application deadline. and students who will make optimum use of UTEP resources to participate in the program.3 cumulative GPA are eligible to apply to the program. Freshmen who meet the minimum SAT (1030) or ACT (22) exam score or have graduated top ten percent in their high school class are admitted to UTEP as Honors Admission students. as well as closer.THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/126 Financial Assistance Students who are eligible for loans and grants through Financial Aid may use these to cover the costs of studying abroad.edu/honors COORDINATOR: Theresa S. more personalized contact with faculty and fellow students. University Honors Program participants must complete a minimum of one Honors course per year and maintain a 3. students will be accepted into the University Honors Program. Students from universities with which UTEP has established agreements are eligible to study here for up to one year. UTEP also has a special study abroad scholarship available for students who qualify.

the University Honors Certificate or the Honors Senior Thesis. Current enrollment in grades 9 – 12 2. University Honors Degree: Students interested in pursuing a more comprehensive Honors education can elect to obtain an Honors Degree designation on their transcript and diploma by completing 30 or more hours of Honors course work. Candidates must have a minimum 3. Requirements for the Junior Scholars Program are: 1. During the first semester (HON 4395).THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/127 If an Honors course is completed elsewhere. textbooks. a copy of the prospectus prepared by the student describing the proposed thesis should be submitted to the University Program office. For information on tuition UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and transfers as the equivalent of a course offered at UTEP. Minimum SAT score (M&V) of 1030 or ACT Composite score of 22 3. the Honors course will be counted toward hours needed to earn University Honors Program Recognition. Completion of university required placement examinations Junior Scholars Program participants are required to cover the cost of UTEP tuition. A bound or disc copy of the student ’s project must also be submitted to the Honors House upon completion of HON 4396. Honors Senior Thesis: Students can conduct research under the direction of a faculty member in their major department and report their findings in thesis form. Honors Recognition The University Honors Program offers three options for recognition upon graduation: the University Honors Degree. then the course must be evaluated on an individual basis by the University Honors Program. and 3 hours can be by approved independent study course work.3 cumulative GPA upon graduation to receive Honors Certificate recognition. Candidates for the Honors Degree must graduate with a minimum 3.3 cumulative GPA to receive the Honors Degree recognition. A minimum of 6 hours must be upper-division. course materials and registration fees. A minimum of 15 hours of Honors credit at UTEP is required for University Honors Program Recognition to be awarded upon graduation. University Honors Certificate: Students who complete 18 – 29 hours of Honors courses can earn the University Honors Certificate notation on their transcript and diploma. Junior Scholars do not qualify for financial aid. Hours earned in this way will count as university credit and some courses may also be approved to apply toward high school graduation requirements. at an institution accredited by the Association for Colleges and Schools. The Honors Senior Thesis designation is not included on the student ’s diploma. Honors Regalia University Honors Degree – Gold stole University Honors Certificate – Lilac cord University Honors Senior Thesis – Dark green cord Junior Scholars Program The Junior Scholars Program is a cooperative effort between The University of Texas at El Paso and El Paso area public and private schools that allows qualified students to enroll in regular university courses at the UTEP campus while attending high school. If Honors course work completed elsewhere is transferred to UTEP as TR (transfer elective). Six hours must be upper-division Honors credit or satisfactory completion of a two semester Honors Senior Thesis project (HON 4395 & HON 4396).

please see the Academic Regulations section of this catalog. group management.THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/128 and registration fees. students should contact the UTEP Student Business Services office (915) 7475116. which is a unique semester-long experience that prepares students for leadership and employment opportunities in a variety of on-campus positions. Training topics include communication skills. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . time management. The University Honors Program coordinates the Student Leadership Institute. Students who complete Student Leadership Institute training are given first priority in the application and selection process for UNIV 1301/2350 peer leader positions. leadership theory. For information regarding institutional academic honors. and UTEP history. Student Leadership Institute UTEP provides abundant opportunities for students to develop leadership skills.

...... Johnson... the University.................... The College is committed to providing the widest possible access to quality higher education to allow our students to become competitive on local. Steve A..... Dean Dr.....5241 915... and for responsible stewardship of our cultural............. for life-long learning............... and international environments... Room 101 915... the goal of the College is to provide: Broad-based programs that give students the background necessary for entry into and advancement in professional and managerial positions..... UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ...... southern New Mexico and northern Mexico......... Intellectual contributions that extend the boundaries of knowledge.....edu College of Business Administration The College of Business Administration at The University of Texas at El Paso shares with the University its fundamental mission to provide the highest quality education to the residents of El Paso....................... and academia. and enhance the transfer of knowledge to students.... and environmental resources.. 140 Information and Decision Sciences.. 136 Economics and Finance ....... 150 Dr......... and faculty and in the enhancement of the personal and professional lives of community residents......................... regional. alumni................ Service that contributes to the personal and professional betterment of our students. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Business Administration Building..THE OFFICE FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES/116 College of Business Administration Accounting . west Texas............. national....... community.. improve application of existing knowledge to regional........ Our quality is reflected in the success of our students........747......... Patricia Eason. Robert Nachtmann...... for career success. and international levels.... The border location of the University and the expertise developed by the faculty provide an environment that affords opportunities for students to become knowledgeable in cross-border commerce as well as international business...... economic............ Associate Dean for Faculty Development Dr.. Therefore..... alumni........5147 (fax) coba@utep...... 145 Marketing and Management ............ national..................... commensurate with Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International standards for business education..........747........

an Investment Center. The CALC. The College of Business Administration supports academic and professional programs designed to promote and advance regional economic development and transfer proven business principles and practices to entrepreneurial ventures. printers. as well as that of their students. quote board and multiple market-data feeds. accounting. At the heart of all these programs is a distinguished faculty committed to teaching. is supported by the superb facilities of the College of Business Administration. The Investment Center. the Master of Business Administration (MBA). marketing. audiovisual. economics. Their work. are also available to students in the College of Liberal Arts. The Center is designed for hands-on investment capability through specially designed classes and seminar activities. research. and a Computer Application Learning Center (CALC) laboratory. a Bachelor of Arts in Economics is offered through the College of Liberal Arts. the Master of Accountancy (MAcc). has 17 meeting rooms and two large conference rooms and is equipped with a number of computers. provides a modern facility to acquaint students with best practices in the securities industry. which began operations in spring 2005. management. and community service. located on the first floor of the College. and other technical equipment such as video cameras and projection equipment for student use. The College includes the Texas Gas Service Student Center (TGSSC). In addition. which opened in fall 2004. The new Investment Center is located across the foyer from the TGSSC and boasts open viewing for its market ticker. Business minors. includes three microcomputer laboratories and a fully equipped computer classroom. and the BBA in Accounting are all accredited by the AACSB International. The TCSSC.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/131 The undergraduate program leads to the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and multimedia-based learning. Information on graduate programs can be obtained from the Graduate Catalog. and computer information systems. The BBA. located on the third floor of the College. provides facilities and equipment designed to enhance student learning. This modern facility serves as the focal point for computer. This wireless facility. including general business.

5. An overall GPA of 2. Students entering the College of Business Administration will be designated as Pre-Business majors until they have completed the requirements for admission to a major option program offered by the College. Follow University academic regulations as stated elsewhere in this catalog. A freshman-level course can be repeated once and the latter grade substituted for a previous grade in the student's grade point average (GPA) calculation. Grades and attempted hours for other repeated courses will be used in computing the GPA. QMB 2301. Only those transfer credits with a grade of C or better will be accepted for credit toward the BBA degree. Policies Concerning Admission to and Completion of BBA Degree Programs 1. Information and Decision Sciences. Courses taken at four-year accredited institutions and designated as lower-division courses can be accepted as upper-division credits if the course is taught at the upper-division level at UTEP and has received additional validation from the Office of the Dean. Earn a 2. MATH 1320 and MATH 2301. Courses taken at two-year institutions or as a requirement for a two-year degree are accepted by the College of Business Administration as transfer credits for lower-division courses only. In order to declare a Pre-Business major. Admission to a major option program is limited to those students who meet the following requirements: a. 2. ECON 2303 and ECON 2304. Finance with concentrations available in General Finance and Commercial Banking. Enrollment in the upper-division level courses offered by the College of Business Administration is restricted to students who have been admitted to one of the BBA major option programs. 6. ENGL 1311. Transfer credit for courses from institutions outside the United States will be evaluated independently. Transfer credit for upperdivision business administration courses is restricted to AACSB-accredited curricula. and Marketing and Management. Economics and Finance. Upon admission. 3. the student must file a degree plan in the Office of the Dean. Upper-division business courses taken by a Pre-Business major without written permission of the undergraduate advisor will be counted as business electives only. with departments of Accounting. 7. The applicability of transfer credits to the degree plan is determined by the Office of the Dean. Completion of the Non-Business Foundation Requirements and the Business Foundation Requirements as described in the Undergraduate Course of Study for the Bachelor of Business Administration. Upon completion of requirements in item 2. and Operations and Supply Chain Management. the major code will be changed from Pre-Business to the major option code for the program. 1312 and ENGL 3355. Completion of the following courses (or their equivalent) with a minimum grade of C: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302. and other approved upper-level business courses will be designated to complete the degree requirements. To complete the degree. General Business with concentrations in International Business and Secondary Education.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/132 Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) The College of Business Administration. c.0 or greater in all hours attempted. Economics. Concurrent enrollment in lower-division courses in item 2-a and upper-division business courses is allowed only once upon written permission of the Office of the Dean.0 GPA in all courses attempted within the College of Business Administration. the student will be admitted to one of the major option programs offered by the College of Business Administration. offers a BBA degree with the following majors: Accounting. b. 4. a student must comply with the following: Complete the required course of study as outlined below. Marketing. Computer Information Systems. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Management with concentrations available in General Management and Human Resource Management.

Students are responsible for setting an appointment to clear for graduation during announced times. 12.0 or better GPA average in ACCT 3321 and accounting courses listed in the Accounting Option Requirement. Non-Business Foundation Requirements 48 semester hours Business Foundation Requirements 15 semester hours Business Core Requirements 33 semester hours Major Requirements 24 semester hours Total 120 semester hours Non-Business Foundation Requirements (48 semester hours) All of these courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. Note: Accounting majors must also earn a 2. may be taken only during the semester or summer term in which the degree is to be conferred. 6 . Strategic Management.MATH 1320 and 2301 6 . Six of the last 30 hours needed to complete the BBA degree can be taken at another university. 3 . Non-BBA students wishing to take upper-division business courses must be advised in the College of Business Administration. Undergraduate Course of Study The course of study for the Bachelor of Business Administration degree includes four sets of academic requirements. 13.Humanities See University Core Curriculum/Humanities menu for approved courses. Students can pursue more than one major option by completing all requirements. Approval of the undergraduate advisor is required for enrollment in this course. 11. however. 6 . for all major options selected. Students working toward the BBA degree cannot enroll on a pass/fail basis in any course taught in the College of Business Administration. 14. the student must receive written approval from the Office of the Dean before enrolling at the other institution. 3 3 PSYC 1301 or SOCI 1301 UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Students must complete 50 percent or more of their College of Business Administration credit hours at UTEP. including Major Option Requirements.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/133 8. A graduating senior must file an application for the degree with the Office of the Dean before the semester of graduation.0 cumulative GPA and must have completed the stated prerequisites for the course. 10. Room 102. 1210.ENGL 1311* and 1312 (or ESOL 1311. and 1312) 3 . Students wishing to take upper-division courses must have junior standing (60 credit hours) and a 2. lab required See University Core Curriculum/Natural Science menu for approved courses. 9.Natural Sciences.POLS 2310 and 2311 6 . MGMT 4300.COMM 1301* or 1302 6 .Visual and Performing Arts See University Core Curriculum/Visual and Performing Arts menu for approved courses.ENGL 3355 3 .HIST 1301 and 1302 3 .

BLAW 4391. Economics. Business Foundation Requirements (15 semester hours) All of these courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.SCM 3321 3 . and 4304 Elective from ACCT 4301. CIS 4365. 4365. or OSCM 3335 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .ECON 3310 3 .BLAW 3301 3 .ACCT 2301 and 2302 6 . and Finance options require ACCT 3321.FIN 3310 3 . 6 .ACCT 3314 or 3321 (Accounting.BUSN 3304 3 . Business Core Requirements (33 semester hours) 3 .MGMT 3303 3 . CIS 3350.CIS 3345 3 . Students should make Core Curriculum course choices carefully based on these requirements in order to complete their degrees with the minimum number of courses. 4321.QMB 3301 3 . 4305. and 4370 Electives from CIS 3385. CIS 4330. or CIS 4370. 4325. BLAW 4325. Computer Information Systems 15 9 CIS 3301.QMB 2301 The UTEP Core Curriculum is included in the Non-Business Foundation requirements.ECON 2303 and 2304 3 . 4328 or 4399 Elective from ACCT 43XX. 3327. Marketing and Management options require ACCT 3314)* 3 . 3320. 4330. 4320. 4399. 3350. 4305. MGMT 3311. FIN 4318.MGMT 4300 (Taken during final semester) * ACCT 3314 cannot be counted by accounting majors toward fulfillment of any part of the accounting option degree requirements. 3323.MKT 3300 3 . 3322. 3355.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/134 * English 1611 can be counted for ENGL 1311 and COMM 1301. Major Requirements (24 semester hours) Accounting 18 3 3 ACCT 3319.

4312. 4318.FIN 4315.Electives from upper-division FIN electives Financial Analyst Concentration 12 . and 4318 9 . 4316.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/135 Economics 6 12 6 ECON 3302 and ECON 3303 Electives from upper-division ECON courses Upper-division electives Finance General Finance Concentration 6 . 4325 12 .Electives from FIN electives UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .FIN 4311.Electives from upper-division FIN electives Commercial Banking Concentration 9 .Electives from FIN electives 9 .FIN 3315 and FIN 4310 9 .Electives from FIN electives 6 .

4370. ECON 4325. FIN 4324.MGMT 3307 18 .Upper-division non-business electives Management General Management Concentration 12 . 3 .Electives from upper-division MGMT courses 3 .Upper-division non-business elective 6 .Upper-division business electives Human Resource Management Concentration 3 . MGMT 4340.MGMT 3304. MGMT 4339.Elective from upper-division MGMT courses 3 .Electives* from MGMT 3315. 4310.Upper-division business electives (no more than 6 hours in any one functional area) 6 . 4301.Sophomore language (e.MGMT 4395 Secondary Education Concentration 3315 3* * RED 3342 EDPC 3300 SCED 3311.MKT 3302.MGMT 3311 9 . General Business Concentration 18 . 3315.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/136 General Business International Business Concentration 6 . and 4691 Upper-division business electives Students in this option are required to check with the College of Education about entry into the Teacher Education Program.Upper-division business elective Hospitality/Tourism Concentration Students must maintain a 2.Electives from ACCT 4325.g. SPAN 2301 and 2302 or SPAN 2303 and 2304) 12 . ECON 4368. ECON 3367. MGMT 4338.Upper-division non-business elective 3 . or MKT 4325 3 . The inclusion of TED 2101 requires an adjustment of concentration requirements to 25 semester hours. CIS 4326. 4315. and 4325 3 .Upper-division business elective * Some HRM electives might not be offered every semester Marketing 12 . or MKT 4320 3 . and 4337 6 . and 4395 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 4304.5 GPA in all hospitality/tourism courses. 3317. 3311. MGMT 4325. 4325. Students in this option must select an English literature course as the humanities choice in the non-business foundation. BLAW 4325. ECON 3366.. FIN 4325.Upper-division non-business elective 3 .From ACCT 4320.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/137 6 3 3 - Electives from upper-division MKT courses Upper-division non-business elective Upper-division business elective UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

or STAT 2380 (fulfills Mathematics/Statistics requirement). FIN 3310. 3337. MGMT 3303. 3323. MGMT 4325. MGMT 3303. Students electing this minor must complete ECON 2304 (fulfills the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum) and Math 1320 (fulfills the Mathematical Sciences requirement of the Core Curriculum) or a high level Mathematics course. ACCT 2301. FIN 3310. 3327. 4315. ACCT 3309 or 2301. or STAT 2380 (fulfills Mathematics/Statistics requirement).ACCT 2301 and 2302. and 12 hours from BLAW 3301. MKT 3300.ECON 2303 and 2304. 4305. MATH 2301. CIS 2320. Students electing this minor field must complete ECON 2304 and MATH 1320. MGMT 3311. and six hours of FIN 4300-level courses. Major in Economics in Liberal Arts Students can obtain a BA degree with a major in Economics from the College of Liberal Arts. and nine hours from ECON 3300 or 4300 level courses. MGMT 3320.CIS 2320 and 15 hours from BLAW 3301. ECON 3302 or 3303. Students electing this minor field must complete ECON 2304 (fulfills Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement) and MATH 1320.ACCT 2301. and nine hours from ACCT 3321.CIS 2320.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/138 Operations and Supply Chain Management 12 9 3 OSCM 3333. Economics. General Business Minor . 3322. Management Minor . Finance Minor . or 4328. 3315. 2301. or STAT 2380 (fulfills Mathematics/Statistics requirement). or STAT 2380 (fulfills Mathematics/Statistics requirement). and ECON 3320 or CIS 3345. and SCM 3321. Accounting Minor . Students electing this minor field must complete ECON 2304 (fulfills Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement) and MATH 1320. Students electing this minor field must complete MATH 1320. 3325. Accounting. 4301. Students pursuing the BA in Economics cannot minor in Business. MATH 2301. and 4375 Electives from upper-division OSCM Courses Upper-division business elective Minors in Business and Economics Students who are not majoring in Business can obtain minors in Business and Economics in four areas: General Business. Students should check with their major advisors for further details. Students should refer to the Department of Economics for details. and Management. Economics Minor . Accounting 260 Business Administration UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . MATH 2301.

ACCT 2301 and ACCT 3309.ACCOUNTING/137 915. or MATH1410. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and MATH 1409. S. Stevens The Department of Accounting at the University of Texas at El Paso shares with the University its fundamental mission to provide the highest quality education to citizens of El Paso and the West Texas region. Zimmermann ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Walter G. T. Mann PROFESSORS: Salter. Glandon. ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Braun. Huerta.. 2302 Principles of Accounting II (3-0) ( ACCT 2302) A continuation of Principles of Accounting I and study of cost accounting and managerial uses of accounting information. Cannot be counted toward the BBA and the combined BBA/MAcc degree requirements. MATH 1508. or MATH 1320 each with a grade of C or better. Accounting (ACCT) 2301 Principles of Accounting I (3-0) ( ACCT 2301) A study of financial accounting concepts and procedures from the initial recording of an economic transaction to the preparation of financial statements for an entity. or MATH 1320 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: MATH 1409. Techniques and Concepts (3-0) A nontechnical approach to accounting with an emphasis on the use and interpretation of financial statements. or MATH 1508. or ACCT 2302 and ACCT 3309 cannot both be counted toward any degree requirement. Survey of Accounting Principles. and governmental or other not-for-profit organizations. The BBA-Accounting concentration and the Master of Accountancy degrees are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International). Austin. as well as the educational background necessary for entry into a graduate program. Eason. Glandon. MATH 1410. Management Accounting (3-0) A study of product costing systems.Putnam ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Howell. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302 with a grade of C or better. Mayne LECTURERS: Otero. 3309 3314 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Accounting (ACCT) courses and Business Law (BLAW) courses are included under the Accounting section. ACCT 3314 and ACCT 3323 cannot both be counted toward any degree requirements. Jr.edu INTERIM CHAIRPERSON: Raymond Zimmermann PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Gary J.. The BBA-Accounting concentration does not provide the total number of hours of coursework necessary to academically qualify a candidate for the Uniform CPA Examination in the State of Texas.5192 cobacct@utep.747. The Bachelor of Business Administration-Accounting (BBA-Accounting) is designed as an indepth study of the basic topics of accounting and intends to provide students the knowledge and skills necessary for entry into accounting positions in public. planning and control systems. private. and the use of accounting data in management decision making. Cannot be counted toward BBA in Accounting degree requirements.

Accounting Systems (3-0) Analysis of fundamental accounting systems.Individuals (3-0) A comprehensive explanation of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations pertaining to individuals and the preparation of individual tax returns. Prerequisites: Senior standing. and preparation of financial reports. or department approval. Prerequisites: ACCT 2302 with a grade of C or better and demonstrated proficiency in spreadsheet and database software applications. and determination of standard costs. An in-depth examination of elements of financial statements. Intermediate Accounting I (3-0) A study of financial accounting principles. variance analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 3321 with a grade of C or better. relationship of system and organization objectives. the AICPA‖s Code of Professional Conduct. concepts. Course grade is not included in the calculation of the upper-division accounting GPA. and ethical conditions required by the Securities Exchange Commission. completion of a minimum of nine (9) hours of accounting. The course can be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Federal Income Tax . electronic spreadsheets. Prerequisites: ACCT 2302 with a grade of C or better and demonstrated proficiency in spreadsheet and database software applications. Prerequisite: ACCT 3321.ACCOUNTING/138 3319 Software Applications for Accounting (3-0) Application of financial and managerial accounting concepts to current accounting information system software. Prerequisite: ACCT 3321 with a grade of C or better. Emphasis on internal control and accounting transaction cycles. Prerequisites: ACCT 2302 with a grade of C or better and demonstrated proficiency in spreadsheet and database software applications. overhead allocation issues. and plans. a College of Business GPA of 2. Application of the managerial accounting framework to service organizations. and cost-volume-profit analysis for management decision making. Preparation of financial reports in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. and database management systems. Prerequisites: ACCT 2302 with a grade of C or better and demonstrated proficiency in spreadsheet and database software applications. An in-depth study of financial accounting concepts. This course is not available to non-accounting majors.5 or better. Emphasis is placed on the theories of ethics and their applications. budgetary controls. and department approval. Current Concepts in Accounting (3-0) Topics to be announced. Cost Accounting (3-0) A study of theory and procedures of product costing in job order and process cost systems. the Texas State Board of Accountancy‖s rules of ethics. Intermediate Accounting II (3-0) A continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. 3320 3321 3322 3323 3327 3329 4399 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and objectives. elements of financial statements. Ethics in Accounting (3-0) A study of ethics in the accounting profession. procedures. policies. Course is restricted to accounting majors. implications of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

Federal Income Tax . federal taxation of international-related transactions. and department approval. universities. business combinations. Independent Study in Accounting (0-0-3) Prerequisites: ACCT 3322 and department approval. consolidated financial statements. a minimum upper-division Accounting GPA of 3. audit procedures. gift and estate taxes.0.0. ACCT 2302 and ACCT 3314 each with a grade of C or better. Auditing Principles and Procedures (3-0) A study of the professional auditor's opinion-formulation process. and the institutions and environments that affect them. Internship (0-0-3) A practicum in accounting under the supervision of accounting practitioners. and others. Prerequisite: ACCT 3327. The internship must be completed prior to the last full semester of Accounting coursework. Prerequisite: ACCT 3322. Prerequisite: ACCT 3314 with a grade of B or better. accounting for foreign operations. including state and local governments. The course grade counts towards the Business GPA. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301. leasepurchase decisions. and federal income taxation of fiduciaries. budgeting. Not-for-Profit Accounting (3-0) An examination of the accounting and reporting procedures of governmental and other not-forprofit organizations. 4304 4305 4320 4325 International Accounting (3-0) A study of comparative international accounting systems.Partnerships and Corporations (3-0) A study of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations pertaining to partnerships and corporations. which must include ACCT 3321. but not the Accounting GPA. cost analysis. Prerequisites: ACCT 3320 and ACCT 3322. a minimum upper-division Business GPA of 3. and performance incentive systems. and other engagements requiring re ports by CPA‖s. Accounting for Hospitality/Tourism (3-0) Accounts and internal control systems in the international hospitality/tourism industry are examined. This course can count as a Business elective or a free elective but not as an Accounting elective in the Accounting degree. 4328 4396 4398 . Prerequisite: ACCT 3322. or ACCT 3321 with a grade of C or better. and problems of multi-national enterprises.ACCOUNTING/139 4301 Advanced Accounting I (3-0) A study of special problems of partnership accounting. hospitals. Prerequisites: Completion of six (6) hours of upper-division Business courses and six (6) hours of upper-division Accounting courses. professional standards and ethics. including preparation of related tax returns. and other timely topics as appropriate. accounting practices. Topics include acquisition of long-term assets.

and corporations. patent. International Business Law (3-0) Legal environments in which international business operates. Holcomb. Xie LECTURERS: Gamez. 4325 4391 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Prerequisites: BLAW 3301 or instructor approval and department approval. Wei. Varela PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Dilmus D. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .ACCOUNTING/140 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Sprinkle. 3320. including security regulations. trademarks. Hammett.747. Schauer. Prerequisite: BLAW 3301 or BLAW 5306. James ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Elliott. and copyright aspects of international business transactions. Students majoring in Economics and minoring in Business cannot take free electives in the College of Business Administration. Devos. partnerships. MATH 2301. Smith ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Robert D. legal structure and powers of overseas business organizations. and a statistics course offered by either the College of Business Administration or the Department of Mathematical Sciences. transfer of capital and technology regulations. Business Law (BLAW) 3301 Legal Environment of Business (3-0) A study of the legal and ethical environment of business to provide a legal foundation for careers in business or government. and twelve (12) additional hours of economics. impact of antitrust and taxation laws on international business transactions. 3303.edu CHAIRPERSON: Timothy P.5245 econfin@utep. Business Law (3-0) A study of the Uniform Commercial Code and the study of legal principles of agency. litigation and arbitration of international disputes. 2304. Economics and Finance 236 Business Administration 915. Tollen ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Ashby. BLAW 3301 or BLAW 5306. but not both. can be counted toward degrees awarded in the College of Business Administration. Roth PROFESSORS: Fullerton. 3302. Voy Economics Bachelor of Arts (BA) Degree Specific requirements for the economics major are ECON 2303. Johnson. Roth. General Prerequisite: A 2.0 cumulative GPA and junior standing for all 3300 or 4300-level courses.

emphasis is placed on the classification and analysis of conventional spending sectors and their effect on income and employment. MATH 1409. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3-0) A study of national income accounting and theory.ECONOMICS AND FINANCE/141 Economics (ECON) 1301 Basic Issues in Economics (3-0) ( ECON 1301) The course is designed to expose non-business majors to a broad range of economic issues and policies. MATH 1409. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and (1) MATH 1320. or MATH 1508 with a grade of C or better. or MATH 1508. Prerequisite: MATH 1320. a critical survey of policy applications that affect the level of income and employment. The course emphasizes current trends in economic thought and selected topics of current interest. 2303 2304 3302 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisite: MATH 1320. each with a grade of C or better. primary attention is given to aggregate problems and issues considered of particular importance to the United States. Cannot be taken for credit toward any degree plan in the College of Business Administration. (2) MATH 1409. Principles of Economics (3-0) ( ECON 2301) A survey of the basic principles of economics designed to give a broad understanding of the economy. (3) MATH 1410. prices. and production. Principles of Economics (3-0) ( ECON 2302) A survey of basic principles of economics designed to provide an analytical understanding of markets. or (4) MATH 1508.

Topics covered include urban growth patterns. Urban Economics (3-0) Investigation of economic forces in metropolitan areas. and policy implications of aspects of particular equilibrium and general equilibrium theory. export patterns. and approaches to economics. demand. emphasizing effects of governmental regulation on manufacturing and service industries. Industrial Organization and Government Policy (3-0) A study of the impact of government policy on the economy. Special emphasis is placed on monetary policy as it affects the level of economic activity. forecasting. and other segments of the economy. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and ECON 2304. voting behavior. Prerequisite: ECON 2303. regional economic integration. factors influencing regional growth.ECONOMICS AND FINANCE/142 3303 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3-0) A study of cost. Prerequisite: ECON 2304. market structure. Description of economic regions and analysis of interaction among economic regions. Topics include demand and supply analysis. Managerial Economics (3-0) The course covers microeconomic concepts relevant to managerial decision-making. Prerequisites: ECON 2304 Money and Banking (3-0) A description of the history and present characteristics of the money and banking structure of the United States. are used for an understanding of the economic tools and their potential use for solving real-world problems. Regional Economics (3-0) Location theory. The emphasis is institutional rather than analytical. and price theory. a critical survey of various concepts of the scope. and techniques of analysis. local public finance. Topics studied by political scientists such as the constitutional process. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and ECON 2304. Economics of Latin America (3-0) Considers economic theory and current problems of monetary and fiscal policy. and industrialization. logrolling. methods. special-interest groups. assumptions. risk analysis and regulatory theory. and location theory. consumer demand theory. including simulation. 3310 3320 3325 3334 3335 3351 3366 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . production and cost analysis. land reform. government bureaucracy and regulation. metropolitan economic performance. real estate markets. Public Choice (3-0) The economic study of collective decision making through political representation and government. public utilities. Applications. the concepts. Prerequisite: ECON 2304. and votingmaximizing behavior of political candidates are analyzed using the tools of an economist.

Economics of Labor (3-0) A study of the basic principles. sales. inflation and the development of innovative techniques. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and ECON 2304. barriers to trade. International Economics (3-0) Principal theories of international trade: foreign exchange markets. Prerequisite: ECON 2304. and characteristics of labor markets. investment criteria. and federal government. different types of economic models. international economic institutions. Consideration is given to patterns and problems of human and material resource utilization. Introduction to Econometrics (3-0) An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the basic concepts employed in model building. Economy of Mexico (3-0) A survey of the growth and change of the Mexican economy. Mathematical Economics (3-0) Basic concepts and operations of mathematical logic and their application to economic analysis. and the role of government in labor problems. state. principles of taxation. Finance (FIN) 2350 Managing Entrepreneurial Finance (3-0) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Emphasis is placed on the application of analytical concepts to the problems of economic development. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and ECON 2304. property. and the use of such models for public and business policy. collective bargaining.ECONOMICS AND FINANCE/143 3367 Economic Development (3-0) A course concerned with problems of economic growth in the less-developed countries. History of Economic Thought (3-0) A study of the development of principal economic doctrines and schools of economic thought. 3372 3373 3380 4325 4330 4340 4368 4398 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. income. historical background. and the economics of regional trade integration. capital formation. Public Sector Economics (3-0) Financial administration by agencies of local. Independent Study in Economics (0-0-3) Prerequisite: Department approval. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and ECON 2304. wage structures. problems and techniques of quantifying models. Emphasis is placed on the description and analysis of recent and current economic policy. international capital flows. analysis of government expenditures and the public credit. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and ECON 2304. and inheritance taxes. theories of wages. Prerequisites: ECON 2303 and ECON 2304.

valuation. and sale of small business firms. and management will be combined to provide the student with the essentials for obtaining and managing the finances of a small business. case studies. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and MATH 1320 or MATH 1409 or MATH 1410 or MATH 1508. and working capital management. economics. capital structure. 3310 Business Finance (3-0) An introduction to the concepts of finance as applied in a business environment. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . presentations by regional practitioners. operation. capital budgeting. and classroom discussion. Completion of this course will prepare future entrepreneurs with the skills required to successfully manage the financial challenges of a small company. This is a core course in the Entrepreneurship Certification Program. finance. The principles of accounting. expansion. The teaching approach combines lectures.ECONOMICS AND FINANCE/144 This course develops basic financial management concepts and applies them to the start-up. time value of money. Topics typically covered include financial environment. each with a grade of C or better.

Managerial Finance (3-0) The development and utilization of financial plans. and the public. Real Estate Finance and Investment (3-0) This course is a survey of real estate investment. employee benefits. design. forms of insurance. financial feasibility. and practices in business enterprises. Commercial Bank Management (3-0) The theory and practice of bank asset and liability management in the context of a liquidityprofitability conflict. Analysis of Derivatives (3-0) 3317 3321 3325 3350 4310 4311 4312 4315 4316 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Personal Financial Planning (3-0) A study of modern financial management from the personal point of view. safety. Current Issues in Banking (3-0) An analysis of current problems in commercial banking from the points of view of the banks. Topics also include site selection. Prerequisites: ECON 3320 and FIN 3310. and management in the real estate development process. Emphasis is given to determinants of growth. and personal investment decision-making. policies. and functional and financial operations of insurers. Prerequisite: FIN 3310. property and liability insurance. life and health insurance. Particular emphasis is given to illustrative problems and cases. Money and Capital Markets (3-0) Analysis of the instruments and institutions of the money and capital markets and emphasis on the roles of these markets in the economy. legal principles. and income and to problems involved in achieving objectives. international diversification. Prerequisite: FIN 3315 or departmental approval. market analysis. consumer credit. Budgeting. social insurance. and other portfolio selection models. finance. appraisal and valuation.ECONOMICS AND FINANCE/145 3315 Investments (3-0) Introduction to the analysis of investment media means of purchasing and selling securities. their regulators. such as safety-first. Prerequisite: FIN 3310. It also utilizes single and multi-index models to calculate the correlation structure of security returns and to simplify the portfolio selection process. Portfolio Analysis (3-0) This course is based on modern portfolio-analysis techniques. Prerequisite: ECON 3320. The course utilizes the computer to demonstrate and explore the various implications of portfolio analysis. and market analysis. and estate planning are among the topics discussed. Prerequisite: FIN 4311 or department approval. introductory and advanced topics in risk management. It further examines models of equilibrium in capital markets. Students become familiar with the basic concepts of risk and insurance. uses of savings. It utilizes mean-variance analysis to delineate efficient portfolios and presents techniques for calculating efficient frontiers. Principles of Insurance (3-0) This course is designed to introduce students to the principles of risk management and insurance.

Internship in Finance (0-0-3) Exposure to the application of financial management and/or investment topics in a business environment. Finance for Hospitality/Tourism (3-0) Financial management and revenue maximization in the international hospitality/tourism industry are covered. exchange rates determination: foreign exchange exposures (risks) for the multinational firm and techniques to hedge such exposures: international bond. as are the international business activities of countries (the balance of payments). budget preparation and application of Cost-Volume-Profit and Yield Management models. investors. Topics include interpretation and analysis of financial statements. Topics include the institutional nature of options and features markets. Prerequisite: ECON 3320 or FIN 3310. Information and Decision Sciences 205 Business Administration 915. foreign exchange markets. investment. department approval. and policies of central banks. Prerequisite: ECON 3320. and accounting exposures and methods to mitigate these with foreign currency options. three additional hours of Finance. economic functions. transaction. futures. and swaps are examined. equity. Emphasis is given to concurrent problems of monetary policy and control. and currency markets: trade documentation: and international capital budgeting. forecasting. hedging. and features contracts. 4324 4325 4328 4396 4398 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses.747. 4318 Financial Statement Analysis (3-0) An inquiry into the techniques of analysis of financial statements as an aid to extraction and evaluation of information for interpretation and decision-making by lenders. interest rates. Prerequisite: FIN 3315 or departmental approval. Prerequisite: FIN 3310. Topics include the history of international finance. and others. Independent Study in Finance (0-0-3) Prerequisite: Department approval. operating techniques.0 cumulative GPA.5496 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisite: FIN 3310 with a grade of C or better. stock index. Economic. and speculative strategies in them. Central Banking (3-0) A study of the history. and a 3.ECONOMICS AND FINANCE/146 This course examines the organizational structure and institutional features in the trading of derivatives. and the analysis of commodity. interest rate. International Finance (3-0) This course examines the financial operations of the firm from an international point of view. the valuation of options on stocks. forwards. Prerequisites: FIN 3310. and foreign exchange features prices.

implementation and documentation of business problems. Ruiz-Torres ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Mukhopadhyay LECTURERS: Ghosh. 3301 Introduction to Business Applications Programming (3-0) This course introduces the student to programming in the most widely used computer language: COBOL. Emphasis is on good programming practice. and pointers are examined. The course is designed to provide the students an advanced set of skills on the software and in decision making through the efficient management of information and problem solving.edu CHAIRPERSON: Leo A. and VBA in solving a variety of business problems. Physical data structures such as linked lists. George PROFESSORS: Mahmood. Coverage of the tools. and 4GL. VBA is covered in a way of automating and improving the functionality within the Microsoft Office suite. Hall. and strategic issues. global. structured program design development. Udo ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Bagchi. Management Information Systems (3-0) This course integrates both computer concepts and information systems concepts. Internet browsers. is also introduced. Access. following top-down. and procedures used to conduct an analysis of the business system including prototyping. The course provides the fundamentals of management of information systems including organizational. modular. The personal computer operating system and applications such as spreadsheet. This course emphasizes the design phase of systems analysis projects. Business Data Structures and Business Programming (3-0) Logical programming concepts such as data types. Gemoets PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Edward Y. 3325 Advanced Microcomputer Business Applications (3-0) The advanced use of popular application software including Excel. Prerequisite: CIS 2320 with a grade of C or better. Tahiliani Computer Information Systems (CIS) 2320 Introduction to Computers and Computer Application Software (3-0) ( BCIS 1305) This literacy course introduces the student to the essentials of computer hardware and software. The student learns data sharing between applications. A term project involves development of application in the student‖s area of interest that links the power of database. arrays.INFORMATION AND DECISION SCIENCES/146 cobids@utep. and ACCT 3320. Kirs. stacks. CASE. queues. Gemoets. and trees are 3345 3350 3355 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisite: Department placement exam. spreadsheet and other such packages. functions. Prerequisites: (1) CIS 3301 or CIS 2335 or (2) CIS 3345. loops. techniques. testing. Web design. Business System Analysis and Design (3-0) A study of the systems analyst in a business environment. Kesh. using COBOL as the implementation programming language. database. and provides a strong managerial emphasis focusing on the impact of technologies in different environments. Emphasis is placed on spreadsheet and database to solve typical business problems. and e-mail are discussed.

development. Prerequisite: CIS 3345 with a grade of C or better. Topics include data management. Students analyze the needs of an organization and design an information system for that organization.INFORMATION AND DECISION SCIENCES/147 investigated. shells. indexed. and implementation using relational DBMS 3385 4305 4320 4326 4330 4365 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and relative file processing systems. Students are provided handson training in database design. inheritance. files. event-driven environments. and management of expert systems and decision-support systems for business organizations. function. logical design. Hospitality Technology and Applications (3-0) Systems and technology to manage information in the hospitality/tourism industry are examined. Object-Oriented Programming Environment (3-0) Object-oriented concepts are used to solve real-world business problems. and use of the Internet as a marketing and management tool. Advanced Business Systems Development (3-0) The application of concepts acquired in systems analysis and design. expert systems. Database Management (3-0) The course introduces students to issues related to database and database management systems (DBMS). analysis. the impact of information systems on hospitality organizations. Coverage includes dealing with problems of installation and security. and ACCT 3320. including analysis of sequential. implementation. 3380 Programming with Visual Basic (3-0) This introductory course in the Visual Basic programming language and environment provides an understanding of fundamental programming concepts required to develop end-user business applications in object-oriented. strings. Prerequisite: CIS 3335. Prerequisite: CIS 3301 or CIS 2335. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for auditing and control of that system. Strong emphasis is placed on hands-on structured programming. Tools such as languages. Also included is a Web-based approach to an interactive update assignment. and hardware for utilizing artificial intelligence in designing expert systems and decision support systems are covered. table processing and utilities. implementation. and decision-support systems concepts and technologies applied to cover development. Advanced Business Application Programming (3-0) All advanced features of COBOL programming language are examined. Students gain technical backgrounds in planning. Integration and interaction of Visual Basic with other application tools are explored. Expert Systems and Decision Support Systems (3-0) A study of artificial intelligence. Also covered are sort and merge techniques. Management of files on secondary storage devices is studied. Emphasis is placed on writing modular programs introducing Object-Oriented COBOL and focusing on the use of object-oriented design strategies in a COBOL environment. Concepts such as pointers. and structures are briefly reviewed. and operator overloading. and virtual functions. Prerequisite: CIS 3350. physical design. Prerequisites: (1) CIS 3301 or CIS 2335. Prerequisite: CIS 3301or CIS 2335. and maintenance of a database. The course focuses on the concept of classes. or (2) CIS 3345. implementation. Prerequisite: CIS 3355. Data structures are discussed.

Prerequisites: (1) CIS 3355 or (2) CIS 3345. Emphasis is placed on the problems and issues of managing in a database environment. and ACCT 3320. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . CIS 3355 can be taken concurrently with CIS 4365.INFORMATION AND DECISION SCIENCES/148 software.

Current Topics in Computer Information Systems (3-0) The topics to be announced. Students gain hands-on experience in designing ecommerce Web sites using appropriated software. Introduction to Information Systems Security Theory and Practice (3-0) Information systems must be protected from hackers and crackers trying to break into the systems and immobilize e-businesses and other sites using. aspects of information systems security such as access control. link control. ecommerce software. The course introduces students to the theory and practice of security. and implement network security tools in hands-on lab exercises. Prerequisite: CIS 3355. error detection and correction methods. cryptography. or department approval. hacks and attacks. Upon completion. and use of the Internet in business. among others. integrity. and privacy of our data and communication resources. transmissions links.INFORMATION AND DECISION SCIENCES/149 . Prerequisite: Department approval. Operations and Supply Chain Management (OSCM) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The student must have the topic approved by the department chair and have a schedule to report progress with the instructor before work commences. worms and viruses. The course covers. Prerequisite: CIS 3301or CIS 2335. and infrastructure. solutions and legal issues. for example. 4375 4385 4396 4398 4399 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. protocols. Restricted to CIS majors. denial of service attacks. Web-based tools for e-commerce. Internship in Computer Information Systems (0-0-3) To be arranged with the prior approval of the instructor and the department chairperson. network management and security. The project can be independent library research or a work-related task. both internal and external computer and network threats motivate the need for implementing cost effective security apparatuses to protect our information and information systems assets. Electronic business transactions and other forms of online communications necessitated the need for security. Independent Study in Computer Information Systems (0-0-3) The student studies a topic as a semester-long project. the student will have a better understanding of computer and network security issues. Increasingly. This course can be repeated for credit as topics are changed. 4370 Business Data Communications (3-0) An introduction to network components. Students explore key security threats. networks and distributed systems security. network typologies. systems and program intrusion detection. and internal secure applications. Introduction to Electronic Commerce (3-0) The course combines Electronic Commerce (e-commerce) business and technical state-of-the art topics and introduce students to these issues to facilitate their participation and involvement in the e-commerce area. Prerequisite: CIS 4365 with a grade of C or better. virtual private networks. electronic commerce. local area networks.

and project management information systems. The course includes logistics topics such as inventory. human. facility location. global. CPM. and job design in an organization. MRP. OSCM 3322 may be taken concurrently with POM 3336. activities. Production Planning and Control (3-0) Material planning and control systems utilizing material requirements planning (MRP) techniques. and work measurement techniques are developed to provide the basis for analyses of processes. methods improvement procedures. productivity improvement. maintenance. Production planning. Service Operations Management (3-0) Methods of process analysis in service organizations. This includes just-in-time (JIT) systems. Case studies and group projects/presentations are used for instructional purposes. and accounting functions are described. The focus and emphasis of the course is on physical. aggregate planning. and project management. warehousing. traffic and 3322 3331 3333 3335 3336 3337 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . precedence diagramming. Organizational and conceptual issues such as project team development and management structure are addressed. layouts. informational. Prerequisites: OSCM 3321 and QMB 3301. Inventory Management (3-0) A study of the concepts. Advanced Production/Operations Management (3-0) Discusses the design and implementation of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT). product and process design. Prerequisite: OSCM 3321. and procedures involved in managing inventories of raw materials. Logistics Management (3-0) Analysis of logistics concepts. and scheduling provide the basis for linking strategic plans to the production plan. and organizational system components. Prerequisites: OSCM 3321 and QMB 3301. facility location and layout. finance. master production scheduling. cellular and Flexible Manufacturing Systems (FMS). PERT. work-in-process. implement. and the design of work systems are presented as well. Other topics discussed include: quality control. Project Management (3-0) Various aspects of project management from conception and planning to project control and termination are discussed. Implications for inventory management of material requirements planning and just-in-time systems are also discussed. principles.INFORMATION AND DECISION SCIENCES/150 3321 Production/Operations Management (3-0) Production management and its relationship to marketing. and control the private and public physical distribution of goods and services. inventory planning and control. and decisions necessary to plan. budgeting. problems. Some emphasis is placed on the formulation and application of models for the analysis and replenishment of inventories. Prerequisite: OSCM 3322. capacity requirements planning and shop floor control techniques are examined from both conceptual and practical standpoints. Forecasting demand. Topics include: project scheduling. It also explores the key role that manufacturing plays in product development efforts and cross-functional teams. Other topics such as manufacturing strategy. and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). finished goods. and supplies. Prerequisite: QMB 2301 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: OSCM 3321.

packaging. order processing. The course seeks to provide an understanding of the importance of individual components (suppliers. Transportation and Warehousing Systems (3-0) Role of transportation systems in economic activity. Prerequisite: OSCM 3321. with analysis of customer service. forecasting. Prerequisites: OSCM 3321 and an advanced elective course in OSCM.INFORMATION AND DECISION SCIENCES/151 transportation. 3390 4315 4371 4375 4398 Quantitative Methods in Business (QMB) 2301 Fundamentals of Business Statistics (3-0) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Administration of warehouse and terminal functions in logistics systems. global sourcing. services. buyer-supplier relationships. Purchasing and Supply Management (3-0) The course addresses the strategic and operational role of the purchasing and the supply function in the organization and between organizations. A practical experience in a service operations/manufacturing enterprise is emphasized. goods. quality. Statistical computer software is used. statistical tolerances. Prerequisites: OSCM 3321. 3339 Quality Planning and Control (3-0) A study of the most effective methods for improving product and process quality in manufacturing and service operations. Prerequisite: OSCM 3321. loss functions. Prerequisites: OSCM 3321 and department approval. and experimental design. quality auditing. negotiation. emphasis on modes of transportation analysis and planning. investment. and the management of transportation systems in supply chains. The focus includes developing and implementing a procurement strategy. Operational Models for Supply Chain Management (3-0) An examination of some of the major operational concepts and issues relating to the flow of materials. and customers) in the operation of the supply chain. Japanese QC tools. It will emphasize inventory-service level tradeoffs. The course covers statistical control charts. and global logistics. materials handling. QMB 3301 and CIS 3345. Internship in Production/Operations Management (0-0-3) A practical and on-site experience is an essential aspect of the learning process for POM students. Prerequisites: OSCM 3321 with a grade of “C” or better. Prerequisite: OSCM 3321. risk pooling. supplier selection and development. and quantity. The student is required to write a paper in a relevant topic agreed upon with the supervising faculty. and other operational concerns. and cost/price considerations for the purchase of goods and services. contract management. Independent Study in Production/Operations Management (0-0-3) The student studies a topic as a semester-long project. and operation activities. manufacturers. and information through a company‖s supply chain -the network of organizations that supply and transform materials and distribute final products to customers. design. distributors. process capability. customer service. Some of the more recent approaches designed for the effective and efficient operation of the supply chain will be discussed.

747. O‖Connor. Hoy. integer. hypothesis testing. LECTURER: Grambling Business (BUSN) 3304 Global Business Environment (3-0) An examination of the issues confronting business enterprises in the global economy. Management (MGMT) 3303 Introduction to Management and Organizational Behavior (3-0) An introduction to the management functions of planning. Prerequisite: MGMT 3303. and transportation linear programming. Posthuma ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Garcia. the influence of social. Mendoza. Included are descriptive statistics. Michie ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Hadjimarcou. and goal programming. network analysis. and economic systems. Emphasis is given to organizational behavior concepts. probability distributions. and quality management perspectives. and controlling.edu CHAIRPERSON: John Hadjimarcou PROFESSOR EMERITA: Lola B. Advanced Organizational Development (3-0) The concepts. sampling theory. Prerequisite: MATH 1320 or MATH 1409 or MATH 1410 or MATH 1508. and regression and correlation analysis. Entrepreneurship (3-0) 3304 3306 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Khorram.INFORMATION AND DECISION SCIENCES/152 Introduction to statistical techniques as applied to business data. underlying assumptions. 3301 Quantitative Methods in Business (3-0) Introduction to quantitative methods applied to business decision making. O‖Donnell. Foster. international business. A major effort is devoted to computerized solution techniques to provide managerial information. Marketing and Management 230 Business Administration 915. Ibarreche. and the impact of environmental and technological issues in the perspective of a global business environment. and MKT 3300. Prerequisite: COMM 1301 or COMM 1302. These methods include linear. and intervention techniques that are common in the practice of organizational development and change are presented. Dawkins PROFESSORS: Brouthers. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses.5185 mandm@utep. leading. ethical issues. values. measures of central tendency and variation. organizing. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 or SOCI 1301. each with a grade of C or better. Topics include understanding cultural and ethical issues. political. A major effort is devoted to computerized solution techniques to provide managerial information. Marsh. Prerequisite: QMB 2301.

and tourism industry. 3307 Introduction to Hospitality/Tourism (3-0) Examination of critical areas of interest in the hotel. staffing.MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/151 This course is designed to provide an understanding of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial process. restaurant. Prerequisites: MGMT 3303 and FIN 3310. Emphasis is also placed on understanding the legal ramifications of human resource management decisions. 3311 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Students are presented with current management. Prerequisite: MGMT 3303. and organizational trends and issues within the global economy. Emphasis is on new venture planning and establishment of new firms as opposed to dealing with problems of an established business. and compensation. performance appraisal. Emphasis is on such topics as strategic human-resource planning. The distinctive focus is enterprise creation. Prerequisite: MGMT 3303 with a grade of C or better. industry. Introduction to Human Resource Management (3-0) This course emphasizes how to effectively utilize and manage human resources in a rapidly changing environment.

employment of aliens. FIN 3310.0 or better GPA in all hours attempted ACCT 3321 and accounting courses listed in the Accounting Option Requirement. and appraisal activities. Employment Law and Dispute Resolution (3-0) Consideration of the full impact of federal and state employment and labor laws on employeremployee relations. Particular emphasis is placed on the discovery and evaluation of the franchiser and the feasibility of entrepreneurs converting an existing business into a franchise chain or creating and selling new business concepts. training and development methods. and management of small business. operation. overall GPA of 2. Prerequisite: MGMT 3311. POM 3321 or OSCM 3321. selection. production management. Investigates marketing production and administrative functions to develop over-all managerial awareness and analytical skills in small-business problem solving. organizing. Human Resource Training and Development (3-0) The course is an intensive study of the procedures utilized by organizations to facilitate the learning process to assure that these efforts result in the achievement of organizational goals and objectives. lawful terminations. International Management (3-0) 3320 4300 4304 4306 4310 4315 4325 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisite: MGMT 3311 or MGMT 3315. evaluation.MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/152 3315 Employee and Labor Relations (3-0) Study of labor law. Prerequisites: MGMT 3303 and FIN 3310. worker's compensation. Experiential exercises are utilized to facilitate the application of theory to organizational practices. Provides practical experience working with small business and entrepreneurial opportunities in the community. union structure.preparation for and handling of negotiations. MKT 3300. job safety and health regulations. MGMT 3303. MGMT 3303.. Prerequisite: MGMT 3311 or MGMT 3315. and collective bargaining processes. Prerequisite: MGMT 3311 or MGMT 3315. trends in the labor movement. and managing in a non-union environment.and for Accounting majors. Prerequisites: Graduating Seniors only. decertification. arbitration. Emphasis is given to such topics as learning theory. Human Resource Staffing and Planning (3-0) A study of the staffing process in organizations. business law. Primary emphasis is on job analysis and the use of human resource information systems in the planning. and ACCT 2301. and substance abuse in the work place. finance. human resources. Small Business Management (3-0) Focuses on the analysis. Franchising (3-0) This course investigates the advantages and potential risks that must be considered before making an investment in a franchise business. business GPA of 2. and marketing to solve management problems. grievance and discipline handling in both union and non-union organizations. Recognition and management of problem situations are covered. a 2.0 or better.0 or better. recruitment. Prerequisites: ENGL 3355. Strategic Management (3-0) Integration of accounting. and administration. minimum wage and overtime. Specific subject matter includes job discrimination.

It is a cross-cultural approach to the study of management using the United States as a point of reference. Prerequisite: MGMT 3303. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/153 A study of the differences in managerial processes in organizations having international operations with an emphasis on traditional managerial activities.

Legal aspects of pay administration such as wage-and-hour laws and ERISA are covered. Human Resources for Hospitality/Tourism (3-0) Planning for the management of human resources in the hospitality/tourism industry. Topics studied include functions. Marketing (MKT) 3300 Principles of Marketing (3-0) A description and analysis of the ways in which goods move to points of consumption. information systems. Recruitment. or financial systems within one hospitality/tourism organization. Independent Study in Management (0-0-3) Individualized instruction in a particular issue in management. Prerequisites: MGMT 3303 and MGMT 3307 each with a grade of C or better. The nature and scope of the study is arranged with a faculty member. restaurant. Internship in Hospitality/Tourism (0-0-3) Corporate internship that rotates through various hotel. Current Topics in Management (3-0) Topics to be announced. Internship in Management (0-0-3) A course designed to give a business major practical work experience. merit pay. Prerequisites: MGMT 3303 and department approval. Consumer Behavior (3-0) 3302 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and department approval. Hospitality/Tourism Law (3-0) Domestic and international legal aspects of the innkeeper/restaurant/ entertainment-guest relationship and property law with particular emphasis on personal and property liability. three hours of MGMT courses beyond 3303. Prerequisites: MGMT 3303. 4338 4339 4395 4396 4398 4399 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Prerequisite: MGMT 3307 with a grade of C or better. and government regulation. and evaluation of employees. and government regulations are examined. selection. Prerequisite: Department approval.MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/154 4337 Compensation and Employee Benefits (3-0) This course examines the goals of the organization in the employment of human resources and its use of reward systems in the motivation of goal-oriented behavior. Prerequisites: MGMT 3311 or MGMT 3315 and department approval. This course can be repeated for credit as topics are changed. Topics included are job evaluation systems. the marketing environment. job analyses and descriptions. labormanagement relations in the hospitality/tourism industry. institutions. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and junior standing. markets. Seminars and reports required. labor-related visas. or tourism organization departments or focuses on specific areas such as human resources. Prerequisites: MGMT 3303 and department approval. and employee benefits.

appraisal. the function and duties of the sales representative. Prerequisite: MKT 3300. and presentation of research findings. Electronic Marketing (3-0) This course examines Web-based communication. Principles of Retailing (3-0) Analysis of retail-store management including personnel requirements and career opportunities with emphasis on modern methods in buying. and Internet-based promotional communications. interpretation. and marketing planning are covered. and the task of sales management in staffing. Prerequisite: MKT 3300. receiving. and brokerage. The course focuses on developing marketing strategies that target Hispanic consumers and other significant culture-based consumer groups. sales promotion. marketplace and the corresponding market segmentation opportunities. analysis. and evaluation of advertising and sales promotion activities to stimulate customer demand. direct selling through electronic commerce. training. Real Estate Principles (3-0) A survey course. investment. International Marketing (3-0) Emphasis is placed upon the marketing function from the viewpoint of the marketing manager who must recognize differences in market arrangement and in legal. Prerequisite: MKT 3300 or graduate standing.S. competitive analysis and demand analysis. 3320 Advertising and Sales Promotion (3-0) The planning. Hospitality/Tourism Marketing (3-0) Application of marketing fundamentals to the hospitality/tourism industry.MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/155 This course emphasizes the psychological and sociological aspects of both industrial and consumer-buyer behavior. and QMB 2301 or (2) graduate standing. cultural. Emphasis on collection of information from internal and external sources. execution. pricing. Prerequisite: MKT 3300 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisites: (1) MKT 3302. Marketing Research (3-0) Scientific methods of analysis and statistical techniques are employed in solving marketing problems. and motivating the sales force. Prerequisites: MKT 3300 and MKT 3302. Multi-Cultural Marketing (3-0) Emphasis is placed upon the consumer diversity evidenced in the U. Selling and Sales Management (3-0) Presents the techniques of effective personal selling. Prerequisite: MKT 3300 or graduate standing. Market segmentation and target marketing. Topics range from basic motivation and learning theory to group dynamics with applications to the formulation of marketing strategy. designed to introduce the basic concepts of real estate law. relationship marketing. Emphasis is on the identification of hospitality/tourism opportunities and the development of effective marketing plans. Prerequisite: MKT 3300 or graduate standing. and economic 4301 4304 4305 4307 4308 4310 4320 4325 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . merchandise and financial control. finance. Prerequisite: MKT 3300. and customer relations. positioning.

interrelationships with other functions. 4340 Special Events Marketing Management (3-0) Design and implementation of marketing management strategies and tactics for sports and entertainment events. Prerequisite: (1) MKT 3300 or (2) graduate standing. sales. promotion. and financial aspects of international marketing.MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/156 factors in different countries. Areas covered include planning and organizing for international operations. and promotion. Topics include human resource planning. legal issues. budgeting and financial administration. customer service. pricing. ticket and concession operations. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . demand analysis and capacity utilization. Prerequisite: MKT 3300 and MGMT 3307 each with a grade of C or better. facility. channels. merchandise marketing. product strategy.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and sales forecasting. other relevant coursework. A distinctive approach to services marketing strategy development and execution is examined. The nature and scope of the study is arranged with a faculty person. marketing information. Prerequisites: MKT 3302 and department approval. To be taken during the senior year with permission of the internship advisor and the department chairperson. This course can be repeated for credit as topics are changed. Prerequisites: MKT 3302. Independent Study in Marketing (0-0-3) Individualized instruction in a particular issue in marketing. Prerequisites: MKT 4301 and FIN 3310. other relevant coursework. Emphasis is placed upon the characteristic features of industrial and institutional demands that set the environment within which the industrial marketer must cope. Prerequisite: MKT 3300 or graduate standing. and department approval. Prerequisites: (1) MKT 3302. and department approval. Current Topics in Marketing (3-0) Topics to be announced. 4395 4396 4398 4399 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Prerequisite: (1) MKT 3300 or (2) graduate standing.MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/157 4390 Business to Business Marketing (3-0) Focuses on marketing products and services to organizations producing consumer or industrial goods and services. Marketing Internship (0-0-3) Designed to provide practical work experience in marketing. 4391 Services Marketing (3-0) This course integrates concepts from other marketing areas to adapt them to services marketing. The focus is on the unique properties of services. Strategic Marketing Management (3-0) An integrating course in marketing systematically oriented with emphasis on the marketing mix. and special attention to market analysis.

..edu/coeadvising College of Education The mission of the College of Education at UTEP is to prepare effective teachers. Judith Munter. Math Education. the College offers programs aimed at providing qualified students an opportunity to attain the knowledge.. and various teaching specialties.... the faculty members of the College engage in research and scholarly activities... counselors.. Room 414 915...utep. Associate Dean Dr...... the College offers graduate-level courses leading to advanced Texas licensure in administration..MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT/158 College of Education Educational Leadership and Foundations 172 Educational Psychology and Special Services ....edu/edpsychology Education Leadership: http://academics.. To support this mission.. Learning... Science Education.edu/education Teacher Education Graduate: http://academics........utep.. and Special Education.... provide educational services to local schools and community. Maria Luisa Gonzalez.... Educational Administration... the College offers master's degrees in the areas of Reading Education.....) in Teaching.747.5755 education@utep...... and skills needed to enter the teaching profession and to receive an initial Texas teaching certificate. Dean Dr.. Bilingual Education.........747. Students who wish to specialize in other subject areas can consult with COE Graduate Faculty for approval..... supervision..... and Culture is UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ..edu Web sites: College of Education: http://academics.....e... At the graduate level.. values...utep.edu/edleadership ARC Center: http://academics... Associate Dean Education Building.... 175 Dr..... Educational Technology...... diagnosticians.utep.. Community Counseling.....D..... Josefina Tinajero. and school administrators to successfully address the needs of schools and other youth serving agencies... Instructional Specialist (i. In addition to these graduate degree programs...5572 915.......... and strive to demonstrate by example the quality of teaching expected of our graduates. At the undergraduate level. Educational Diagnostics. and Reading Education). counseling... especially those in multicultural communities.edu/teachered Education-Psychology Graduate: http://academics.. A Doctorate of Philosophy (Ph.utep.. School Counseling. Early Childhood Education.. 172 Teacher Education .......

Middle Grades. and All-Levels Special Education The College offers a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) degree for students who wish to become certified teachers in Elementary Grades. These students must also have a copy of their degree plan and a certification plan filed in the College of Education Advising. this office provides information about undergraduate degrees. Secondary. and Career (ARC) Center. Program and faculty offices are located on the first through eighth floors. Middle Grades and All-Levels Special Education. and All-Levels Education. Reading Education. Recruitment. and Physical Education complete a Bachelor of Arts. Middle.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/157 offered in the Department of Teacher Education. certification. and transfer work. Undergraduate Degrees and Teaching Licenses Elementary Grades. Students working on the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree must have their degree plan filed in the College of Education. Recruitment and Career (ARC) Center. and can request degree and certification course substitutions through these individuals. Professional certification programs in the College of Education are offered in Early Childhood Education. Secondary Education and All-Levels Education Students interested in becoming secondary teachers of All-Levels Art. Staffed with faculty advisors and other professionals. In this course. Health Sciences and Liberal Arts and Science. a Bachelor of Science. a Bachelor of Music. Programs of-study information appears in the appropriate section of this catalog under the Colleges of Business Administration.) The College maintains close ties with practicing professional teachers through field-based teacher preparation programs. Students planning to become certified in Texas as secondary or all-levels teachers must have their degree plan and a copy of their current certification plan filed under the college in which they are pursuing their major. Students wishing to explore teaching as a career option enroll in education sections of UNIV 1301. The COE Advising. They are advised by the faculty of the college of their major and request course substitutions through the office of their college dean. The College administrative offices are located on the fourth floor of the Education Building. Music. Information on the secondary and all-levels teaching minors is available in the COE Advising. students should refer to the University's Graduate Catalog. (For information about graduate programs in Education. The educator preparation programs are approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) and by the Texas State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC). and Career (ARC) Center is located in Room 412 of the Education Building. These students are advised by College of Education faculty and professional staff. or a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Sports Studies with a minor in secondary or alllevels teaching. a Bachelor of Business Administration. Special Education. Substitutions pertinent to the secondary or all-levels teaching certificate minor are under the purview of the Dean of Education. Counseling. and Educational Administration. Recruitment. Educational Diagnostics. and students have an opportunity to discuss career issues with education faculty and public-school practitioners. information concerning the teaching profession is presented. Bilingual Education. Educationfocused learning communities are available for pre-education students with 0-45 credit hours of academic work. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Candidates who successfully complete a certification program are recommended to receive teacher certification in the state of Texas. Education 412. depending on their specialization area.

For more information contact the CATE Program at 915.747. 2. To be admitted to the program.us). state and local school reform efforts focused on academic achievement fast growing occupations now requiring post-high school technical preparation. Submitted required scores on all portions of the THEA. 3. Unlike Alternative Certification.7639.state. and fulfill any other established requirements. This is a non-degree plan administered by the COE Advising. There are also supplementary certificates offered in Bilingual Education and English as a Second Language (ESOL). Career and Technology Education (CTE) The Career and Technology Teacher Certification Program (CATE) provides qualified applicants the knowledge and skills to become a certified Texas teacher in one of the following areas: Business Education. CATE is a vital component of secondary education in the United States with virtually every high school student taking at least one or more courses in a career and technical training pathway. Transfer students cannot be advised in the College of Education until a written evaluation of previous academic work has been prepared by the Admissions Office. The program requires fieldwork in partner schools. teachers with expired out-of-state teaching certificates must either contact the state in which UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Recruitment. Health Science Technology Education. and Career (ARC) Center in cooperation with the academic department in which the candidate's teaching specialty resides.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/158 Transfer Students Seeking Degrees in Education Undergraduate transfer students seeking a bachelor's degree in Interdisciplinary Studies must submit an application for admission and original copies of their transcripts to the Admissions Office.50 GPA. Teachers who are already certified can add any level of certification or field of specialization available to early childhood.B. secondary. secondary. and Trades and Industrial Education. middle grades. Fields. middle. located in the Academic Services Building. Information is available on the SBEC website (http://www.sbec. With national. Career Investigation. The state provides certified teachers an opportunity to add new certification levels and specialization fields by challenging the TExES tests in those areas (H. Education 412. this program does not provide concurrent employment in a public school. and Supplemental Texas-certified teachers who wish to add another level of certification and/or a new field of specialization or endorsement must submit a copy of their state certificate(s) and have a new plan prepared at the COE Advising. candidates must complete the course of studies and field-based program component specified in the certification plan. and all-levels UTEP students. or alllevels teachers. candidates must have: 1. Out-of-State Teachers Teachers with valid out-of-state teaching credentials who are seeking a Texas certificate must contact the Texas State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) directly in order to have their credentials evaluated. career and technology programs are seeking qualified individuals to lead our students from training programs into high-demand careers. In order to finish the program and to be recommended for certification. A bachelor's degree with a 2. 2185). To update their certificate. Submitted an application for admission to post-baccalaureate coursework at the Graduate School. Recruitment and Career (ARC) Center. Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification The College of Education offers a teacher certification program for candidates who have already completed a bachelor's degree and wish to become early childhood. Marketing Education. Additional Certification Levels.tx. pass the appropriate state certification tests (TExES).

To be admitted to teacher education. 230 in math and 230 in reading. http://www. Recruitment.state. or alllevels teachers in Texas should have an unofficial degree and certification plan prepared as soon as possible. After completing 45 hours. In addition. Meet with advisor and apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program. The degree plan will become official once the student has fulfilled all the requirements for admission to teacher education.50 or better. 6. Until admitted to teacher education. Working with the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Pre-education students begin the advising process during the New Student Orientation (NSO) session the summer proceeding the first semester of freshmen classes.us/SBECOnline/. Education 412. According to University policy. Texas public school districts require applicants for student-teaching or field experiences to undergo a criminal history background check prior to placement in the school district. Students can obtain additional information from SBEC. located in the Education Building. 5. Before an individual can be certified. 2. Admission to teacher education is required to participate in the field-based teacher preparation program.tx. Advising continues for preeducation students (individuals who have 0-45 hours of course credits) at the UTEP Academic Advising Office. a copy of the degree plan must be filed in the ARC Center. School districts can deny placement of students with a criminal background. 3. Admission to Teacher Education Undergraduate students who wish to become elementary grades. Provide an unofficial degree and/or certification plan filed in the ARC Center. located on Hawthorne Street. contact the Student Assessment and Testing Office in the Academic Advising Building. secondary.sbec. middle grades. students must fulfill the following criteria: 1. students must remain in good standing to progress toward the completion of a degree program (See the appropriate catalog section under Academic Standards). the agency conducts statewide criminal history background checks on all applicants for educator certification. Provide required passing scores on the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) examination: 220 in writing. If a school district denies a placement or other field experiences for this reason. Once the student has completed 45 hours. Note: To receive initial Texas teacher certification. 4. students must be free of felony convictions. The Texas State Board for Educator Certification (SBEC) regulates the certification of educators to teach Texas public-school children. Room412. Complete ENGL 1311 and 1312 and COMM 1301 with a grade of C or better in each course. or follow the procedure established for candidates who have a bachelor's degree and desire an initial Texas certification. Complete 60 semester hours of college work with a cumulative GPA of 2. students indicating an intention to become teachers will be classified as pre-education students. To register for the test. Complete STAT 1380 or MATH 2303 or a higher-level math course with a grade of "C" or better. the student is advised at the COE Advising. and Career (ARC) Center. students can be barred from enrolling in professional education courses if their suitability for the teaching profession is found to be unacceptable. Field-Based Teacher Preparation Requirements Teacher preparation students are expected to spend a significant amount of time in specially selected schools (partner schools and professional development schools) while they complete their professional development courses. Students pursuing educator preparation should be aware that some criminal histories can lead to the denial of certification as a teacher. SBEC must conduct a criminal history background check to ensure an applicant‖s suitability to interact with children.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/159 they were certified before contacting SBEC. the UTEP College of Education can attempt to assist the student in obtaining UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

Many of these education courses are taught on site in elementary or middle grades professional development schools. interns spend at least three full days per week throughout the semester student teaching in professional development schools or partner schools and one day per week taking education courses that require classroom practice. and Special Education Field-Based Programs The elementary grades.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/160 a placement in an alternate district. the major concepts and skills required in the fieldbased program are introduced and interns become familiar with the pupils. Middle Grades. however. the College of Science. the teams of teachers. Description of the Elementary Grades. This course should precede the internship semester. During Internship II. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. interns also take education courses that require practice in school classrooms. They normally begin the internship on the first day of teacher in-service or soon afterward and attend for 15 weeks. Middle Grades. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . by teaching some of the methods courses in their respective disciplines. middle grades and special education field-based programs consist of two semesters in which students take site-based University courses in partner or professional development schools and complete Internship I and Internship II. Students should be aware. Internship I takes place in the fall or spring semesters. SCED 3311 . The secondary and all-levels programs have one internship semester that is offered in the fall or spring semester. Many of these education courses are taught on site in elementary or middle-grades professional development schools. Interns are usually assigned to their student teaching classrooms one week prior to the start of UTEP classes. Middle Grades. and the community of the partner schools to which they are assigned. and the College of Health Sciences participate actively with Education faculty in the preparation of secondary and all-levels teachers. and experiences of earlier semesters in developing an effective teaching style. Interns assist teachers mainly through small-group work and begin to experience whole-class instruction. Description of the Secondary and All-Levels Field-Based Program The goal of the secondary and all-levels teacher preparation program is to assist preservice teachers in acquiring the essential competencies required to assume the role of practitioners. Elementary Grades. that if they are unable to obtain a placement they will not meet UTEP‖s requirements for a teaching degree or teacher certification. Faculty from the College of Liberal Arts. and Special Education Internship I. Proficiency in all program competencies is assessed during this time. Education students are grouped in cohorts of approximately 35 interns and assigned to elementary or middle-grades professional development schools or partner schools where they spend three half-days per week engaged in student teaching. The semester has an emphasis on role induction. The emphasis on role induction continues during Internship II while interns work with pupils and educators. Elementary Grades. Internship II takes place in the fall or spring semesters. and Special Education Internship II.Curriculum Planning in the Secondary School is taught on site at various professional development school campuses and requires intensive field experiences that help secondary and all-levels students apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice in schools. In this semester. values. During Internship I. Interns are usually assigned to their practice teaching classrooms one week prior to UTEP classes starting. normally on or soon after the first day of teacher in-service and attend three full days per week for 15 weeks. A description of the two semesters follows.

secondary and all-levels interns assist classroom teachers at a partner school with small-group work and begin to experience whole class instruction.Elementary Education: Bilingual Education Generalist (Head Start) There are six specializations within the Middle Grades Education (4-8) program: #4 . The secondary and all-levels internship takes place in the fall or spring semesters.Middle Grades Education: Mathematics UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Interns practice teaching at schools four and a half (4 ½) days a week throughout the 15-week semester and spend the remaining half-day of the week taking an education course that requires classroom practice.5 GPA or better in the teaching field specialization. There are three specializations within the Early Childhood Grades Education (EC-6) program: #1 . and All-Levels Special Education EC-12.0.Elementary Education: Bilingual Education Generalist #3 . Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) The BIS degree requires that all students complete: I) A General Education Core. ELEMENTARY GRADES (EC-6). and attend all day. individuals must be free of felony convictions. and III) a Professional Education Studies component. Middles Grades. Note: To receive initial Texas teacher certification.Middle Grades Education: Generalist #5 . AND ALL-LEVELS GENERIC SPECIAL EDUCATION (EC-12) PROGRAMS Students who wish to become Early Childhood. Application for Graduation and Certification Students must apply for graduation during the first month of the semester in which they intend to complete all degree requirements. or All-Levels Generic Special Education teachers and receive an initial Texas teacher certification complete the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) offered in the College of Education. A graduation fee is required. In order to be recommended for degree and/or certification. including the appropriate TExES tests.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/161 In the internship semester. Middle Grades Education (4-8).Middle Grades Education: English Language Arts-Reading and Social Studies #7 . Proficiency in all program competencies is assessed.Middle Grades Education: Mathematics and Science #8 . A fee is required for the Texas certificate. normally on or soon after the first day of teacher in-service. a student must: Complete the courses listed in the degree and certification plan with an overall GPA of at least 2. Students apply for certification once they complete all the requirements. Have a 2.Elementary Education: Generalist #2 . Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. MIDDLE GRADES (4-8). II) an Interdisciplinary Major. values. Students who are seeking certification must register for and pass the appropriate state certification examinations (TExES). and experiences of earlier semesters in developing an effective teaching style. Interns are usually assigned to their practice teaching classrooms one week before UTEP classes start. Students enrolled in the BIS will choose from three certification levels: Elementary Education (EC-6). Have a 2.Middle Grades Education: English Language Arts-Reading #9 .Middle Grades Education: Bilingual Education Generalist #6 .75 GPA or better in professional education courses.

SOCI 1301. 3 hours from HIST 2301. BED 4344. POLS 2311. ENGL/ESOL 1312. BED 4393. COMM 1301. Room 412 in the College of Education Building. ANTH 1302 or CHIC 3301 or CHIC 3311 or CHIC 3339. and PSCY 1301. The required General Education Core for each of the programs is also included. #1 . ECON 1301. and PSCY 1301. MATH 3305. HSCI 4201. STAT 1380. POLS 2311. ENGL 2311. BED 4311. 3 hours from HIST 2301. TED 3330 #2 – ELEMENTARY BILINGUAL EDUCATION GENERALIST (EC-6) I. the Middle Grades programs. SPAN 3312 III. GEOL 1313 and GEOL 1103. Professional Education Studies: BED 3345. GEOG 1310. PSCI 2303. PSCI 3304. Professional Education Studies: BED 4343 or LING 3308. and Career (ARC) Center. ELED 2330. HIST 1302. HSCI 4201. PHIL 1301. PHIL 1301. POLS 2310. 915. ELED 4353 or ELED 4359. Interdisciplinary Major: MATH 2303. Recruitment. KIN 4201. ELED 2330. HIST 1301. ARTS 3320. GEOG 1310. POLS 2310. and PSCY 1301. ECON 1301. ENGL 2314. Interdisciplinary Major: MATH 2303. ARTS 3320. HIST 2302. ELED 4309. SOCI 1301. ELED 4394. ELED 4353. ENGL 2312. General Education Core: ENGL/ESOL 1311. STAT 1380. HSCI 2303.Elementary Education Generalist (EC-6) I. General Education Core: ENGL/ESOL 1311. BED 4393. BIOL 1303 and BIOL 1103 II. ENGL 2313. 3 hours from ANTH 1301. UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350 II. HIST 1302. HIST 1301. BED 4394. ENGL 2311. HSCI 2303. EDPC 2300. HIST 1301. RED 3335 or BED 3345. ELED 4359. ANTH 2320. BED 4343 or LING 3308. KIN 4201 III. CHIC 3339. HSCI 2303. ENGL 2313. COMM 1301. COMM 1301. ENGL/ESOL 1312. ANTH 1302 or CHIC 3301 or CHIC 3311 or CHIC 3339. For more information please consult the College of Education Advising. ENGL 2313. and the Special Education program. HIST 2302.747. EDPC 2300. ENGL 2314. BED 4340. RED 4341. PHIL 2306. ELED 2330. PSCI 3304.All-Levels Generic Special Education The following section briefly describes the course requirements for the Early Childhood programs. MATH 3305 or MATH 3308. SOCI 1301. PHIL 2306. ENGL 4345. General Education Core: ENGL/ESOL 1311. HIST 2302.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/162 There is one All-Levels (EC-12) Generic Special Education specialization: #10 . Professional Education Studies: BED 3345. BED 4340. PSCI 2303. SPED 3310. BED 4340. RED 4341. RED 4341. ANTH 1302. GEOL 1313 and GEOL 1103. HIST 1302. PHIL 1301. and ENGL 2318. BED 4310. SPED 3310 #3 Elementary Bilingual Education Generalist (EC-6 Head Start) I. MATH 3309. ANTH 2320. BED 4343 or LING 3308. ARTS 3320L UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350. BED 4309. UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350. ENGL 2312. MATH 3309. PSCI 2303.5571. ELED 4310. and ENGL 2318. ENGL 2312. ELED 4353 or ELED 4359. BED 4311. SPED 3310 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . BED 4310. KIN 4201. MATH 3309. EDT 3371. HSCI 4201. ENGL/ESOL 1312. SPAN 3312 III. ANTH 2320. 3 hours from ANTH 1301. ELED 4393. ECON 1301. ENGL 3305 or ENGL 4354. Interdisciplinary Major: MATH 2303. ENGL 2311. POLS 2311. PSCI 3304. BIOL 1303 and BIOL 1103. EDPC 2300. BED 4394. GEOL 1313 and GEOL 1103. ENGL 3305 or ENGL 4354. 3 hours from ANTH 1301. GEOG 1310. STAT 1380. PHIL 2306. POLS 2310. and ENGL 2318. MATH 3305 or MATH 3308. ELED 4311. 3 hours from HIST 2301. BED 4309. BED 4344. ENGL 2314. ENGL 3305. BIOL 1303 and BIOL 1103 II.

2311. 4310. PSCI 2303. RED 4341. #7 . 3 hours from ANTH 1301. ENGL 2311. MATH 2304. BED 4340. 1302. 2314. POLS 2310. 4394. 1324. 1327. SOCI 1301. MSED 4309. COMM 1301. 3317.MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION (4-8): ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTS-READING AND SOCIAL STUDIES COMPOSITE I. RED 3340. FILM 1390. MATH 1411. and 4394. FILM 1390. 3351. RED 3340. ART 1300. SOCI 1301. 1327. FILM 1390. ART 1300. 4343 or LING 3308. 2311. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 3 hours from: HIST 2301 or 2302. 3309. 3304. 2313. HIST 3317. #6 . 3 hours HIST upper division (3000-4000). HIST 1301. SOCI 1301. 4311. Science: BIOL 1303. PSYC 1301. 4354. HIST 2301. HIST 3317. GEOL 1313/1103. 2304. POLS 2310. HIST 2301. Professional Education Studies: SPED 3310. GEOG 1310. FILM 1390. Social Studies: ANTH 1302 or CHIC 3301/3311/3339. SPAN/LING 3312. 3304. Mathematics: MATH 2303. 1312. GEOL 1311. 2311. MATH 2304. MSED 4309. COMM 1301. 1324. BED 4341. UNIV 1301 or 2350. RED 3342. ART 1300. Professional Education Studies: SPED 3310. Science: ESCI 1301 or ASTR 1307. UNIV 1301 or 2350. STAT 1380. GEOG 1310. 3304 plus EDPC 2300. HIST 2301. Professional Education Studies: SPED 3310. PHIL 1301 or 2306. 3339. 1312. BED 4343 or LING 3308. POLS 4313. HIST 1301. General Education Core: ENGL 1311.MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION GENERALIST (4-8) I. ANTH/LING/ENGL 2320. BED 4343 or LING 3308. UNIV 1301 or 2350. MATH 3308. HIST 2302. TED 3330. 4393. COMM 1301. 1312. POLS 4313. PSCI 2303. 3352. 2312. II. 3 hours from MUSL 1321. 3 hours from ANTH 1301. POLS 2310.Middle Grades Education (4-8): Mathematics and Science I. 3 hours from: MUSL 1321. GEOL 1311. BIOL 1303. ANTH/ENGL/LING 2320. PSYC 1301. POLS 2310. 4393. 1302. COMM 1301. 3 hours from: ANTH 1301. STAT 1380. Interdisciplinary Major: Language Arts/Reading: ENGL 3306. II. General Education Core: ENGL 1311. 2318. 1312. 3311. BED 4340. 1312/1313. 4311. 3353. 3308. 3 hours from: MUSL 1321. 4354. 1302. 3 hours from MUSL 1321. 4393. GEOL 1314/1104. SOCI 1301. ART 1300. 3309. PSYC 1301. ANTH/LING/ENGL 2320. PSYC 1301. UNIV 1301 or 2350. 1312. Social Studies: ANTH 1302 or CHIC 3301. 2311. PSCI 2303. Interdisciplinary Major: Language Arts/Reading: ENGL 3306. Mathematics: MATH 2303. 1327. General Education Core: ENGL 1311. 1324. 4310. STAT 1380. III. 1327. ANTH/LING/ENGL 2320. RED 3340. II. plus EDPC 2300 and BED 4340. plus EDPC 2300. MSED 4309. 1314. 3311.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/163 #4 . 3 hours from ANTH 1301. 4341. GEOL 1313. HIST 1301. General Education Core: ENGL 1311. POLS 4313. 1324. 4394. 4354. TED 3330. III. Interdisciplinary Major: Language Arts/Reading: ENGL 3306. 3339. 4341: Social Studies: ANTH 1302 or CHIC 3301. 1302. III. #5 -Middle Grades Bilingual Education Generalist (4-8) I. HIST 1301. BED 4344. MATH 2303.

3300. and SPED 3310. 3303. 3 hours from: ANTH 1301. and MATH 3305 or 3308. ART 1300. 2306. 1302. 2304. 1103. III. ENGL 3303. 4330. PSYC 1301. 2314. 3345. 3 hours from: MUSL 1321. ECON 1301. MATH 2303 AND 2304. PSCI 2303. 2318. Professional Education Studies: SPED 3310. MATH 2303. BED 4343 or LING 3308. 3303. 2314. 2300. Science: PSCI 2303. 2320. 2318. BED 4343 or LING 3308. #10 .Middle Grades Education (4-8): Mathematics I. RED 3340. RED 4346. Professional Education Studies: SPED 3310. 2313. 3 hours from: MUSL 1321. 4311. 3327. ART 1300. 1327. HIST 1301. HIST 1301. 3304. Interdisciplinary Major: Mathematics: STAT 1380. General Education Core: ENGL 1311. FILM 1390. 4394. ANTH 1302. MATH 2303. 3339. GEOG 1310. 4394. PSYC 1301. POLS 2310. 3353. 3342. 3308. PSCI 2303. MSED 4309. 1105. 4394. 3339. 2325. ARTS 3320. 4340. BED 4340. TED 3330. Professional Education Studies: SPED 4365. 2312. GEOL 1311. These students major in the subject area they desire to teach and complete a minor in Secondary Education. 1302. 1324. TED 3330. POLS 2310. 4302. COMM 1301. PHIL 1301. III. TED 3330. 1327. 2311. 4341. 4354. 1104.Middle Grades Education (4-8): English-Language Arts-Reading I. 3308. #8 . FILM 1390. ENGL 2311. MSED 4310. 1312. 3 hours from: HIST 2301 or 2302. 3304. 3305. 4343 or LING 3308. 3306. ANTH/LING/ENGL 2320. Secondary School Teacher Preparation Programs Students who intend to become secondary school teachers and receive an initial Texas teacher certificate will complete a bachelor's degree outside the College of Education.All Levels Generic Special Education (EC-12) I. II. 2302. 3304. 3351. 1312. 3 hours from: HIST 2301. a UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . SOCI 1301. BED 3345 or RED 3335. 3 hours from: ANTH 1301. 3304. 4341. 1312. GEOL 1311/1312. plus ESCI 1301 or ASTR 1307. 2303. 1324. Science: BIOL 1303. 3340. RED 4341 or 3342. 1312. Interdisciplinary Major: Mathematics: STAT 1380. 3352. 2318. Professional Education Studies: SPED 3310.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/164 II. 3 hours from MATH 3300. 4393. 2313. General Education Core: ENGL 1311. SOCI 1301. MTED 3330. ELED 4311 or MSED 4311. ANTH/LING/ENGL 2320. BED 4343 or LING 3308. 4343 plus EDPC 2300. 3 hours from: ENGL 2311. STAT 1380. UNIV 1301 or 2350. 2311. TED 3330. HIST 1301. SPED 4393. 2311. MTED 3330. PSCI 2303. PSYC 1301. SIED 3330. UNIV 1301 or 2350. ENGL 2311. 1302. STAT 1380. #9 . 4393. 3 hours from: ANTH 1301. GEOL 1311. For example. PHIL1303 or 2306. ANTH 1302 or CHIC 3301. ELED 4310 or MSED 4310. II. ENGL 3305 or 3306. 4341. 4394. 2314. COMM 1301. EDPC 2300. EDPC 2300. and ENGL 4354. Interdisciplinary Major: Language Arts-Reading: ENGL 3300 or 3365. 4393. MSED 4310. COMM 1301. POLS 2310. 3311. General Education Core: ENGL 1311. 3311. CHEM 1305. BED 4340. 1312. 2313. 2312. RED 3340. BED 4340. 3304. SOCI 1301. 2312. MATH 1411. UNIV 1301 or 2350. II. III. Plus EDPC 2300. Interdisciplinary Major: ANTH 1302 or CHIC 3301. RED 3340. 1304. ELED 4309 or MSED 4309. 3304. MATH 1508. 2304.

.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/165 student who intends to teach high school Spanish would seek a Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Liberal Arts with a major in Spanish and a minor in Secondary Education.. 3 GEOL 1313/1103. Students who wish to become all-levels Physical Education or Health Sciences teachers complete a bachelor's degree in the College of Health Sciences and minor in Education..... Health Promotion and Kinesiology. Theatre Arts............. 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) ....... (Students should consult an advisor in their area of specialty for the selection of fields and scheduling of courses): Basic Business English--Language Arts French History Journalism Life Science Mathematics Physical Science Science Social Studies Composite Spanish Speech All-Levels Teacher Preparation Programs Students who wish to be certified in Texas to teach all-levels (grades EC-12) Art..... 3 STAT 1380.. Enrollment in EDPC 3300 requires admission to Teacher Education........ since 1865 ..... 3 HIST 1301 History of the U... Recruitment......... 4 16 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester Hours 2nd Semester Hours UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ........... Samples of Possible EC-6. 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences ..S.. 3 16 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing....... to 1865 ................ For more detailed information.. Music..................... Candidates for all-levels teacher certification must have a degree plan and copy of their certification plan filed in the Advising....................... and EC-12 Program Schedules #1 – Elementary Education Generalist (EC-6) FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ...... located in the Education Building Room 412. (Students should refer to the Admission to Teacher Education section above.. Music or Theatre Arts complete a bachelor's degree in the College of Liberal Arts and a minor in Education........) Students who wish to enroll in the fall internship semester must apply in February of the prior semester in the ARC Center.......................S..... The application process for admission to Teacher Education can be initiated as soon as the student completes 60 hours and a copy of the student's degree and certification plan is submitted to the ARC Center............. and Career (ARC) Center located in Education 412... Physical Geology & Lab .. Recruitment........................ and Career (ARC) Center in the College of Education.... Students who wish to enroll in the spring internship semester must apply in September of the prior semester... 4 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry .... 4-8.................................... students should see the advisors designated to prepare all-levels degree plans in the departments of Art.... The ARC Center verifies that students have fulfilled the required scores in the statemandated test of basic skills (THEA) and have completed all the requirements to be admitted to teacher education. 3 BIOL 1303/1103 Introduction to Biology & Lab ............... 3 HIST 1302 History of the U. List of Approved Secondary Specialization Fields The University is approved by the Texas State Board for Educator Certification to offer the following fields for secondary certification............. Students desiring to become secondary school teachers must have a degree plan and copy of their certificate plan filed in the College of Education Advising.....................

........................................... 3 ELED 4393 Internship I in EC-4 Grades ................................. 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children ....... 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education ..................................................... 3 Core: 3 hours from Humanities .... 3 ECED 2330 Introduction to Early Childhood Education .............COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/166 POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics........ 3 HSCI 4201 Health Education for Elementary Schools ............................................................ 2 MATH 3305 Conceptual Mathematics ................. 3 BIOL 1303/1103 Introduction to Biology & Lab .....................S.. 3 KIN 4201 Physical Education for Elementary Schools .......... in General & Special Ed Settings ........................... 3 BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308................ 3 19 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours 1st Semester UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ................................................ 3 ECED 4353 Play Development in Early Childhood .. 3 POLS 2311 American Government & Politics ......................................................... 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers........ 3 Core: 3 hours from Humanities ... 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children ................. 3 GEOL 1313................................................................... 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) ........................... 3 HIST 1302 History of the U.......................................... 3 ARTS 3320 Whole Arts ......................... 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers...................................................... 3 19 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours ENGL 4354 Writing Processes of Children ....... 3 SPED 3310 Special Ed.... 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry .... 3 15 12 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours MATH 3309 Geometry and Measurement ........ 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading ......................................... 3 HSCI 4201 Health Education for Elementary Schools ....... 3 18 EDT 3371 Educational Technology ................................................. 3 18 EDT 3371 Educational Technology ........ 4 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive Statistics ..... 3 ENGL 3305 Children‖s Literature .............. 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ........ 3 ELED 4310 Teaching Mathematics in EC-4 .................... 3 ENGL 3305 Children‖s Literature . 3 ELED 4309 Social Studies Education EC-4............... Geology & Lab .......... 3 SPAN/LING 3312 ......................................... in General & Special Ed................................................................................... Settings.......... 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences ................... 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education ............................................ 3 12 12 #2 ...............................................................Early Childhood Education Bilingual Generalist (EC-6) FRESHMAN YEAR 2nd Semester Hours Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ................ 3 ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing..............S............... 3 ECED 4353/4359 Children‖s Thinking in Early Years ............................................... 3 SPED 3310 Spec Ed.................. to 1865 ........... 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II ................................... 3 KIN 4201 Physical Education for Elementary Schools .. 3 POLS 2311 American Government & Politics ................ 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I................. 3 HIST 1301 History of the U.. 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II ............. 3 ECED 4359 Early Child Thinking ............... 3 ECED 2330 Introduction to Early Childhood Education ... 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I............................................ 4 16 16 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics............................... 3 ARTS 3320 Whole Arts ................ 2 ECED 3335 Language/Literacy in Early Years ................................... 2 MATH 3305 Conceptual Mathematics I .............. 2 BED 3345 Biliteracy Development ................................. 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ................. 3 TED 3330 Education and Communities ... 1103............................................... since 1865 ....................... 3 ELED 4394 Internship II in EC-4 Grades . 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading .............................................. 3 ELED 4311 Teaching Science in EC-4 ... 3 15 12 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours MATH 3309 Geometry and Measurement ............

..............................................................Early Childhood Education Bilingual Generalist (EC-6) Head Start FRESHMAN YEAR 2nd Semester Hours Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ..... 3 HSCI 2303 Wellness Dynamics .........S......................................................................................... 3 15 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading ..................................... 3 BED 4311 Teaching Science in EC-4 ....... 3 GEOL 1313............ Settings 3 SPAN/LING 3309 Structure of SPAN for Language Prof .................. 2 MATH 3305 Conceptual Mathematics ............................................................ 3 HIST 1302 History of the U.......... 3 BED 4394 Internship II in EC-4 Grades ...................................... 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL1611) ................................................................. 4 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive Statistics ............................... 3 BED 4393 Internship I in EC-4 Grades ........... 3 BED 4309 Social Studies Education EC-4.... 3 POLS 2311 American Government & Politics .................................................................. 3 15 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing................................. 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ............................. 3 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive & Inferential Statistics ......... 3 15 15 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours MATH 3309 Geometry and Measurement .... 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I... 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II ......... 3 12 #3 .................. 3 ARTS 3320 Whole Arts ............. 3 ENGL 3305 Children‖s Literature ............................ 3 BED 4344 Parent & Community Advocacy .......................................................... 3 CHIC 3339 Cultural Diversity & Youth .............. in General & Special Ed....................................Middle Grades Education Generalist (4-8) FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition .......................S................................................................ 3 UNIV 1301/2350 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ................S.. 3 BED 4344 Parent & Community Advocacy ..................... 3 GEOG 1310 Cultural Geography .......................... to 1865 .......COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/167 ENGL 4354 Writing Processes of Children ................ Physical Geology & Lab ............................................ 3 18 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ................................... 3 12 BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308........ 3 BIOL 1303/1103 Introduction Biology & Lab .................................. 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences ..... 3 BED 4311 Teaching Science in EC-4 ..... 3 BED 4393 Internship I in EC-4 Grades .......... 3 BED 4309 Social Studies Education EC-4..... since 1865 .............. 3 15 12 1st Semester #4 .......... since 1865 ......... .................. 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education ........................................................ 3 GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences ............................ 1103.................... 3 BED 4394 Internship II in EC-4 Grades .......................... 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children .................... 3 HIST 1302 History of the U...... 3 BED 4310 Teaching Math in a Dual Lang Classroom .......... 3 HIST 1301 History of the U............................ 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers.......... 3 GEOL 1312 Principles of Earth Sciences ....... 3 19 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours ECED 4353/4359 Early Childhood Playing/ Thinking........ 3 KIN 4201 Physical Education for Elementary Schools ........ 3 SPED 3310 Special Ed................... 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) ......... 3 Core: 3 hours from Humanities ... 2 BED 3345 Biliteracy Development . 3 ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing....................... 3 BED 4310 Teaching Math in a Dual Language Classroom.................... 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences .................. 4 16 16 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics. 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .. to 1865 ................... 3 BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308..S...... 3 ECED 2330 Introduction to Early Childhood Education .. 3 HSCI 4201 Health Education for Elementary Schools ... 3 HIST 1301 History of the U...

....................... 3 BIOL 1303 Introductory Biology ........................COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/168 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics.................................................... 3 2nd Semester Hours PSCI 3304 Physical Science II .................................................... 3 GEOL 1313 Physical Geology ............. 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ............................................... 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II ........................... 3 15 2nd Semester Hours POLS 2311 American Government & Politics ............................................................... 3 MSED 4309 Social Studies Education in Grades 4-8 ............... 3 ESCI 1301/ASTR 1307 Environmental Science ........................ 3 MSED 4311 Teaching Science in Grades 4-8 ......S............. 3 POLS 4313 Southwestern Border Politics ............................................... 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading ............ 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .............................................................................................. 3 15 2nd Semester Hours POLS 2311 American Government & Politics ................... 3 RED 3340 Developmental Reading ................. 3 MSED 4393 Internship I in Grades 4-8 .................... 3 MATH 1319 Mathematics in the Modern World ............ 3 TED 3330 Education and Communities ......... 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children ............................. 3 Core: 3 hours from Visual & Performing Arts .......................... 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers.. 3 POLS 4313 Southwestern Border Politics ......... 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) .............................................................................. 3 MSED 4310 Teaching Mathematics in 4-8 ..... 3 ENGL 3306 Young Adult Literature ............... 3 Core: 3 hours from Visual & Performing Arts ...................... 3 9 MSED 4394 Internship II in Grades 4-8 ............. 3 BIOL 1303 Introductory Biology ........ 3 MATH 3308 Conceptual Algebra .. 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children ................... 3 MATH 3308 Conceptual Algebra .. 3 15 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours SPAN/LING 3312......... 3 15 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing.................. 3 GEOL 1314 History Geology ...... 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading ........... 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ........................................................... Settings.............. 3 15 18 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours ENGL 4354 Writing Processes of Children ............................................................................................................................ 3 HIST 1302 History of the U.......... 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I ............................................ 3 15 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics........................................................ 3 15 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours ENGL 3306 Young Adult Literature ........................S.................................................... 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education .... 3 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive & Inferential Statistics......................... 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences ............................................................................................. 3 UNIV 1301/2350 Seminar in Critical Inquiry .................... 3 MATH 2304 Geometry and Measurements ....... 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers......... 3 BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308.......... 3 HIST 3317 History of Texas Since 1821 ......... 3 SPED 3310 Special Education in General & Special Ed... 3 RED 3340 Developmental Reading ....................................... 3 GEOL 1313 Physical Geology ....... 3 HIST 3317 History of Texas Since 1821 .......... ........ 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I............................ 3 BED 4341 Parent & Community Advocacy ......... 3 Core: HIST 2301 World History to 1500 .................. 3 12 #5 – Middle Grades Education Bilingual Generalist (4-8) FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ........................ 3 MATH 3309 Conceptual Mathematics ............... Since 1865.......................... 3 HIST 1301 History of the U.................. to 1865 ............................................................. 3 Core: HIST 2301 World History to 1500 .....................................................

.. 3 HIST 2302 World History Since 1500 ... 3 MSED 4310 Teaching Mathematics in Grades 4-8.......COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/169 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education ...... 3 MSED 4311 Teaching Science in Grades 4-8 ......................................Reading-Social Studies (4-8) FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ......... 3 18 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 4354 Writing Processes of Children . 3 GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences I ......... 3 Core: 3 hours from Visual & Performing Arts ... 3 HIST 1302 History of the U....... 3 TED 3330 Education and Communities .......... 3 MSED 4309 Social Studies Education in Grades 4-8 ....................................S...................... 3 12 2nd Semester Hours BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308....... 3 BED 4344 Parent & Community Advocacy ............ 3 POLS 4313 Southwestern Border Politics ........ 3 ENGL 3351 The Dynamics of Language ............................................................. 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading . 3 MSED 4393 Internship I in Grades 4-8 ........... 3 18 SPED 3310 Special Ed...... 3 15 2nd Semester Hours POLS 2311 American Government & Politics ........................ 3 SPED 3310 Special Ed...................... Settings ................................................ since 1865 .. 3 MSED 4394 Internship II in Grades 4-8 .................................................... 3 Core: HIST 2301 World History to 1500 ...... 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I ........................ 3 ENGL 3353 Workplace Writing................................... 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) .............. in General & Special Ed................ 3 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive & Inferential Statistics................................................. 3 HIST 1301 History of the U............... 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II...................... 3 RED 3340 Developmental Reading .. 3 9 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ...................................... 3 GEOL 1312 Principles of Earth Sciences II ................. 3 MSED 4309 Social Studies Education in Grades 4-8 .........................S.............................................. 3 9 2nd Semester Hours BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308......................... 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education ............................................... 3 MSED 4394 Internship II in Grades 4-8 ........................................... 3 RED 3342 Reading/Study in Content Areas .... 3 21 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 4354 Writing Processes of Children ....... to 1865 ........................... Settings ........................................ 3 HIST 3317 History of Texas Since 1821 .............. ........................... 3 15 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 3306 Young Adult Literature.......... 3 12 #6 – Middle Grades Education English-Language Arts... in General & Special Ed............. 3 15 15 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 1312/1313 Research and Critical Writing ................................................................... 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real numbers ............................................................................................ 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences ...... 3 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics... 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ...................... 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children ......... 3 GEOG 1310 Cultural Geography ... 3 MSED 4393 Internship I in Grades 4-8 .......... 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology .... 3 HIST: 3 hours from 3300 or 4300-level courses . 3 18 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 3352 Reading & Writing Nonfiction ...........

........ 3 15 2nd Semester Hours POLS 2311 American Government & Politics .........................................S.......................................... 4 GEOL 1314/1104 Historical Geology.................................................. 3 BIOL 1303/1103 Introduction to Biology & Lab ..S.... 3 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive & Inferential Statistics........ 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences .. 3 Core: 3 hours from Humanities ................................................................................... 3 HIST 1302 History of the U.....COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/170 #7 – Middle Grades Education (4-8): Mathematics and Science FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition .. 4 Core: 3 hours from Visual & Performing Arts ........ Since 1865...... 3 16 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ...... 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1600) .................................................. 3 HIST 1301 History of the U................................ 3 CHEM 1305/1105 General Chemistry & Lab.......................... 4 17 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics............................................... 3 ESCI 1301/ASTR 1307 Intro to Environmental Science.......... 3 MATH 1411 Calculus I ........... 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ......... 4 20 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 1312/1313 Research and Critical Writing ................................................ 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I..................... to 1865 .............. 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers........ 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children ... 4 GEOL 1313/1103 Physical Geology &Lab .........................

................................. 3 HIST 1302 History of the U.................... 3 MATH 3309 Conceptual Mathematics ......... 3 BIOL 1304/1104 Human Biology & Lab ....................................... 3 15 2nd Semester Hours MATH 3309 Conceptual Mathematics II . 3 MSED 4311 Teaching Science in Grades 4-8 . Settings ......................... 4 16 2nd Semester Hours MATH: one from 3300............. 3 UNIV 1301/2350 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ............. 5 GEOL 1312 Principles of Earth Sciences II ........................................................... 3 15 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours MATH 2300 Discrete Math............................. 3 MSED 4393 Internship I in Grades 4-8 .......... 3 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive & Inferential Statistics..................... 3 Core: 3 hours Visual & Performing Arts ................... 3 12 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .................... 3 12 #8 – Middle Grades Education (4-8): Math FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ........ 3 RED 3340 Developmental Reading ......... 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading .......... 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education ........... 4 16 2nd Semester Hours POLS 2311 American Government & Politics . 3 MSED 4394 Internship II in Grades 4-8 ......................................................... 3 MATH 1508 Precalculus............ 3 SPED 3310 Special Ed..................S......................................COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/171 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours MATH 3308 Conceptual Algebra ................. 3 MSED 4310 Teaching Mathematics in Grades 4-8................. in General & Special Ed.... 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) ........................... 3 TED 3330 Education and Communities .......................................................... 3 9 2nd Semester Hours BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308........3 18 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours MSED 4310 Teaching Mathematics .............................. 3 15 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 1312/1313 Research and Critical Writing .... 3 HIST 1301 History of the U.. 3 MATH 4370 Introduction to Research Math .......S................. 3 BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308.............. of Basic Math ......... 3 SIED 3330 Integration of Basic Scientific Principles ........................................................................ 3 15 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours MTED 3330 Integration & Alternative Rep......................... 3303.................................................... 3 MATH 3300 History of Math .... 3 MATH 3303 Properties of Real Numbers II ... 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I...... 3 SPED 3310 Special Ed in General & Special Ed...................... 3 GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences I .................... 3 MSED 4394 Internship II in Grades 4-8 ........ Since 1865....... 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences .. 3 Core: 3 hours from Humanities ............. 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II . 3304 ......... 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children ............................... to 1865 ............... 3 MATH: one from 3300..................................... 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ............................................................................... 3304 .. 3 MATH 4370 (Substitute Math 2325) .... 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading……………..................................... 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II ................................................................... 3 17 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics... 3303...... Settings 3 RED 3340 Developmental Reading ....…....................................................... 3 MATH 1411 Calculus I ................................... 3 MTED 3330 Integration & Alternative Rep of Basic Math ............................ 3 12 2nd Semester Hours TED 3330 Education & Community ............................................................. 3 MATH 3304 Fundamentals of Geometry ....................... 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers............................... 3 MSED 4393 Internship I in Grades 4-8 ................ 3 MATH 3308 Conceptual Algebra ...........................................................................

.......................................................... 3 MATH 1319 Mathematics in the Modern World ... 3 ENGL 3300 Lit Stud................ Settings ............. 3 Core: 3 hours Visual & Performing Arts ......................... 3 TED 3330 Education & Community ..........COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/172 #9– Middle Grades Education (4-8): English-Language Arts-Reading FRESHMAN YEAR 2nd Semester Hours Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ......................................... 3 GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences .. 3 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children .......................................................................…................................................... & Rhet...... 3 HIST 1302 History of the U...... 3 ENGL 3305 Children‖s Literature ............................ 3 SPED 3310 Special Ed in General & Special Ed................ 3 15 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics................ Since 1865........ 3 Core: 3 hours from Humanities .................................................................. 3 ENGL 3306 Young Adult Literature ......... Since 1865................. Comp........................................................................... 3 Core: 3 hours Visual & Performing Arts ............................................ 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) .......... 3 ENGL 3351 The Dynamics of Language ................. 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II .... 3 ENGL 1312/1313 Research and Critical Writing . FRESHMAN YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311 Expository Composition ...................…......................... 3 9 1st Semester #10 – All Levels Generic Special Education (EC-12) Note: Schedule requires the student to select ENGL 3306...................... 4311...................….. 3 MSED 4393 Internship I in Grades 4-8 ...... 3 POLS 2311 American Government & Politics ...................... 3 RED 4346 Literary Practice I . 3 RED 4343 Teaching Critical Writing ............................ to 1865 .............. 3 21 21 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 3353 Reading and Responding to Literature...... 3 15 15 JUNIOR YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading........................................ 3 MATH 1319 Mathematics in the Modern World .................................. MATH 3308............................S....... 3 RED 3340 Developmental Reading ...... 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .... 3 MSED 4394 Internship II in Grades 4-8….. 4310......................... 3 UNIV 1301/2350 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ... ............ 3 GEOL 1312 Principles of Earth Sciences II . 3 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive & Inferential Statistics................................ 3 2nd Semester Hours POLS 2311 American Government & Politics . 3 HIST 1301 History of the U.......S............... 3 ENGL 3352 Reading & Writing Nonfiction .................. 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences ....... 3 Core: 3 hours from Humanities ...... 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I... 3 GEOL 1312 Principles of Earth Sciences II ..... 3 BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction or LING 3308................... 3 HIST 1302 History of the U....... 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ............. 3 RED 3342 Reading Content Areas ........... 3 Core: 3 hours from Social/Behavioral Sciences ................. 3 ENGL 4354 Writing Processes of Children ........ 3 MATH 2303 Properties of the Real Numbers.S.............................S........................... 3 MATH 2303 Properties of Real Numbers ........................ 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking (or ENGL 1611) ................................ 3 GEOL 1311 Principles of Earth Sciences I ...... 3 ENGL 3303 Grammar and Writing ................ 3 STAT 1380 Basic Descriptive & Inferential Statistics........................................ 3 UNIV 1301/2350 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ..................... 3 ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology ..................................................................................... 3 PSCI 2303 Physical Science I........ 3 15 2nd Semester Hours ENGL 1312/1313 Research and Critical Writing .............. 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education ............................... 3 HIST 1301 History of the U..... 3 9 2nd Semester Hours MSED 4309 Teaching Social Studies ................ OR ENGL 3365 Adv................ to 1865 ......................... 3 15 15 SOPHOMORE YEAR 1st Semester 2nd Semester Hours Hours POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics..........................….. RED 3342 and MSED 4309..........

.COLLEGE OF EDUCATION/173 EDPC 2300 Development in Young Children 3 15 JUNIOR YEAR 12 1st Semester Hours ENGL 3305 Children‖s Literature ......... 3 12 Educational Leadership and Foundations 501 Education Building 915. Schulte VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Cortez Students should consult the Graduate Catalog for information on degrees and programs in Educational Leadership and Foundations....... 3 SPED 4365 Organization and Management in SPED.......................... 3 PSCI 3304 Physical Science II............ Rincones ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Mendez................. 3 RED 4341 Assessment in Teaching Reading ................................ Johnson ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Dickson..... Field experience required............ 3 SPED 3340 Students With Severe Disabilities ....... Ingalls. Johnston ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brooks.................. 3 ECED/MSED 4310 Teaching Mathematics ..... John B. Settings 3 21 2nd Semester Hours SPED 3345 Language and Reading for Special Learner . Combs............... Pacheco......... 3 SPED 4330 Diagnosis and Placement .edu INTERIM CHAIR: Judy Reinhartz ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Argus-Calvo.............. Trussell Educational Psychology and Counseling (EDPC) 2300 Development in Young Children and Youth (3-1) This course covers typical development (cognitive-language........ Cortez-Gonzalez.............................5221 edpsych@utep.......... 3 ECED/MSED 4309 Social Studies Education .................................... 3 TED 3330 Education and Communities . Educational Psychology and Special Services 701 Education Building 915.utep...... 3 ECED/RED 3335 Language and Literacy in Early Years... 3 BED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education .. 3 ECED/MSED 4311 Teaching Science . 3 12 2nd Semester Hours BED 4343 Sheltered ESL Instruction ........5300 http://academics...... UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ....................... Peper PROFESSORS: Daresh... 3 SPED 4393 Internship I ..........747. Navarro. Hammond............747...... 3 SPED 3310 Special Ed...... 3 MATH 3305 Conceptual Mathematics ........................... 3 21 SENIOR YEAR 1st Semester Hours ENGL 4354 Writing Processes of Children ................................ ........... Heger............................................................ 3 SPED 4394 Internship II ...................................................... 3 SPED 3327 Teaching Students With Mild Disabilities. physical-motor....... in General & Special Ed....edu/edleadership PROFESSORS EMERITI: Herbert K................. Sorenson... 3 SPED 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education........... 3 ARTS 3320 Whole Arts . and socialpersonality) from birth through adulthood..........

including both formal and informal techniques. placement. and interventions for this population. assessment. characteristics. Field Experience required. Survey of various exceptionalities and laws pertaining to the disabled. Transitional Education for Learners With Special Needs (3-0) This course focuses on terms and concepts of transition educational programs for individuals with disabilities. Includes definitions. Diagnosis and Placement (3-0) Referral. Special Education (SPED) 3310 Special Education Services for Students in General and Special Education Settings (3-0) This course covers the definitions and characteristics of the various exceptionalities as well as the accommodations made for students within the general education setting. domestic/self- 3327 3340 3345 4330 4340 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and socialpersonality) from birth through young adulthood as well as variations of typical development and accommodations made within the education system to include federal. Includes various models of integration. and educational implications for students with severe or profound disabilities. Students with Severe and Profound Disabilities (3-0) Focuses on characteristics. Developmental Variations and Learning Differences (3-2) Survey of human growth and development of adolescents and young adults as well as variations of typical development and accommodations made within the education system. physical-motor. curriculum. Specific field experience is required. and the exploration of factors that influence the performance of these students in various settings. local. Prerequisites: SPED 3310 and admission to Teacher Education. Language and Reading for Special Learners (3-0) Designed to provide special education teachers with an understanding of concepts and procedures for encouraging language development. instruction. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Prerequisites: SPED 3310 and admission to Teacher Education. and inclusion within the least restrictive environment are emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. history. transition. and for teaching reading and other major content areas to students with disabilities. and community-based instruction. Emphasizes training for inclusion in communities including vocational. and schoolbased decisions in instruction. and implications for the use of this assessment information. and law. curriculum. and program processes for persons with exceptionalities. Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities (3-0) This course focuses on the cognitive and social-emotional characteristics common to students with learning and behavior difficulties. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL SERVICES/173 3300 Developmental Variations (3-0-2) This course covers typical development (cognitive-language. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. state. 3346 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Specific field experience is required. Federal mandates regarding services.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL SERVICES/174 care. 4350 Workshop in Special Education (3-0) Area of study will be designated. Special admission requirements for student teaching. Internship in Special Education I (3-0-30) As part of the internship. Prerequisites: Department approval and admission to Teacher Education. the assistive technology available for individuals with special needs. middle school (4-8) or high school program for students with disabilities and are scheduled all morning or all afternoon throughout the semester. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Interns divide their time between fieldwork and university classes. and admission to Teacher Education and department approval. and admission to Teacher Education. students enroll in Internship I of the field-based program. values. Prerequisite: Department approval. Prerequisites: SPED 3310. Senior standing suggested. Can be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisites: All other professional studies courses. Prerequisites: SPED 3310 and admission to Teacher Education. Student Teaching in Special Education/Elementary (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks all-day student teaching in special education and elementary classroom plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. Assistive Technology for Special Populations (3-0) This course focuses on the legal requirements for assistive technology. Prerequisites: SPED 4393 with a grade of C or better. interns are enrolled in university classes that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. They are assigned to either an elementary (EC-4). and leisure/recreational skills. RED 3340. Organization and Management in Special Education (3-0) Includes general principles in the organization of all types and levels of special education and inclusive classrooms as well as theories regarding the behavioral and social needs of students in those classrooms. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. This internship will be with a different age group and type of disability from the first internship. and admission to Teacher Education. Specific field experience is required. department approval. Interns are scheduled all day throughout the semester. 4365 4370 4393 4394 4691 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. In addition to classroom teaching duties. and the classroom use of this technology. Internship in Special Education II (3-0-30) Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and participate as members of the instructional team. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. and experiences of earlier semesters in developing an effective professional style.

Rincones ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Espinoza. Schulte VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Cortez Students should consult the Graduate Catalog for information on degrees and programs in Educational Leadership and Foundations. Trussell Educational Psychology and Counseling (EDPC) 2300 Development in Young Children and Youth (3-1) This course covers typical development (cognitive-language. Johnston ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brooks. Peper PROFESSORS: Daresh.747. and socialpersonality) from birth through adulthood. John B. Johnson ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Dickson. physical-motor.Educational Leadership and Foundations 501 Education Building 915. Navarro. Ingalls. physical-motor. Cortez-Gonzalez.utep.edu/edleadership PROFESSORS EMERITI: Herbert K. and socialpersonality) from birth through young adulthood as well as variations of typical development and 3300 . Hammond. Schulte VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Cortez LECTURER: Cortez Students should consult the Graduate Catalog for information on degrees and programs in Educational Leadership and Foundations.utep. Mendez.5300 http://academics. Navarro.edu INTERIM CHAIR: Judy Reinhartz ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Argus-Calvo. Combs. Educational Psychology and Special Services 701 Education Building 915.5300 http://academics.747. Johnston ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Brooks. Heger. Pacheco. John B. Peper PROFESSORS: Daresh. Sorenson. Pacheco. Field experience required. Developmental Variations (3-0-2) This course covers typical development (cognitive-language. Educational Leadership and Foundations 501 Education Building 915.5221 edpsych@utep. Sorenson. Rincones ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Mendez.747. Heger.edu/edleadership PROFESSORS EMERITI: Herbert K.

and implications for the use of this assessment information. Specific field experience is required. and the exploration of factors that influence the performance of these students in various settings.EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL SERVICES/173 accommodations made within the education system to include federal. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. curriculum. and for teaching reading and other major content areas to students with disabilities. Language and Reading for Special Learners (3-0) Designed to provide special education teachers with an understanding of concepts and procedures for encouraging language development. and program processes for persons with exceptionalities. local. Includes various models of integration. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Specific field experience is required. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. history. and leisure/recreational skills. and community-based instruction. placement. Transitional Education for Learners With Special Needs (3-0) This course focuses on terms and concepts of transition educational programs for individuals with disabilities. Includes definitions. Prerequisites: SPED 3310 and admission to Teacher Education. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Emphasizes training for inclusion in communities including vocational. and law. Special Education (SPED) 3310 Special Education Services for Students in General and Special Education Settings (3-0) This course covers the definitions and characteristics of the various exceptionalities as well as the accommodations made for students within the general education setting. Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities (3-0) This course focuses on the cognitive and social-emotional characteristics common to students with learning and behavior difficulties. curriculum. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. 3327 3340 3345 4330 4340 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . transition. Students with Severe and Profound Disabilities (3-0) Focuses on characteristics. and interventions for this population. Diagnosis and Placement (3-0) Referral. including both formal and informal techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. characteristics. Federal mandates regarding services. and schoolbased decisions in instruction. Survey of various exceptionalities and laws pertaining to the disabled. Prerequisites: SPED 3310 and admission to Teacher Education. Prerequisites: SPED 3310 and admission to Teacher Education. state. Field Experience required. domestic/selfcare. and educational implications for students with severe or profound disabilities. 3346 Developmental Variations and Learning Differences (3-2) Survey of human growth and development of adolescents and young adults as well as variations of typical development and accommodations made within the education system. instruction. assessment. and inclusion within the least restrictive environment are emphasized.

department approval. Prerequisites: Department approval and admission to Teacher Education. Prerequisites: SPED 3310. Special admission requirements for student teaching. Assistive Technology for Special Populations (3-0) This course focuses on the legal requirements for assistive technology. the assistive technology available for individuals with special needs. Organization and Management in Special Education (3-0) Includes general principles in the organization of all types and levels of special education and inclusive classrooms as well as theories regarding the behavioral and social needs of students in those classrooms.edu INTERIM CHAIR: Don Combs UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . RED 3340. and the classroom use of this technology. Interns are scheduled all day throughout the semester. Specific field experience is required. Interns divide their time between fieldwork and university classes. They are assigned to either an elementary (EC-4). middle school (4-8) or high school program for students with disabilities and are scheduled all morning or all afternoon throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Department approval. 4365 4370 4393 4394 4691 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Prerequisites: All other professional studies courses. Educational Psychology and Special Services 701 Education Building (915) 747-5221 edpsych@utep. This internship will be with a different age group and type of disability from the first internship. Student Teaching in Special Education/Elementary (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks all-day student teaching in special education and elementary classroom plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. and admission to Teacher Education and department approval. values. Internship in Special Education II (3-0-30) Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and participate as members of the instructional team. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. and admission to Teacher Education. Internship in Special Education I (3-0-30) As part of the internship.EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL SERVICES/174 4350 Workshop in Special Education (3-0) Area of study will be designated. and admission to Teacher Education. and experiences of earlier semesters in developing an effective professional style. students enroll in Internship I of the field-based program. interns are enrolled in university classes that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. Can be repeated for credit when topic varies. Senior standing suggested. Prerequisites: SPED 4393 with a grade of C or better. In addition to classroom teaching duties.

Special Education (SPED) 3310 Special Education Services for Students in General and Special Education Settings (3-0) This course covers the definitions and characteristics of the various exceptionalities as well as the accommodations made for students within the general education setting.171/EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL SERVICES ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Argus-Calvo. Trussell Educational Psychology and Counseling (EDPC) 2300 Development in Young Children and Youth (3-1) This course covers typical development (cognitive-language. physical-motor. Johnson ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Guo. transition. and educational implications for students with severe or profound disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 3300 3346 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. characteristics. Developmental Variations (3-0-2) This course covers typical development (cognitive-language. and socialpersonality) from birth through young adulthood as well as variations of typical development and accommodations made within the education system to include federal. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Survey of various exceptionalities and laws pertaining to the disabled. Developmental Variations and Learning Differences (3-2) Survey of human growth and development of adolescents and young adults as well as variations of typical development and accommodations made within the education system. Haley. local. and socialpersonality) from birth through adulthood. Cortez-Gonzalez. curriculum. and law. and interventions for this population. history. Includes various models of integration. Hammond. instruction. curriculum. and 3327 3340 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . physical-motor. Teaching Students With Mild Disabilities (3-0) This course focuses on the cognitive and social-emotional characteristics common to students with learning and behavior difficulties. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. state. Federal mandates regarding services. Field experience required. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Ingalls. Includes definitions. and the exploration of factors that influence the performance of these students in various settings. Combs. and inclusion within the least restrictive environment are emphasized. Students with Severe and Profound Disabilities (3-0) Focuses on characteristics. Field Experience required. and school-based decisions in instruction.

assessment. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. They are assigned to either an elementary (EC-4). Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. and leisure/recreational skills.172/EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL SERVICES community-based instruction. and the classroom use of this technology. the assistive technology available for individuals with special needs. 3345 Language and Reading for Special Learners (3-0) Designed to provide special education teachers with an understanding of concepts and procedures for encouraging language development. Organization and Management in Special Education (3-0) Includes general principles in the organization of all types and levels of special education and inclusive classrooms as well as theories regarding the behavioral and social needs of students in those classrooms. Workshop in Special Education (3-0) Area of study will be designated. Transitional Education for Learners With Special Needs (3-0) This course focuses on terms and concepts of transition educational programs for individuals with disabilities. Interns divide their time between fieldwork and university classes. Diagnosis and Placement (3-0) Referral. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Senior standing suggested. Internship in Special Education II (3-0-30) 4330 4340 4350 4365 4370 4393 4394 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . domestic/self-care. and for teaching reading and other major content areas to students with disabilities. Assistive Technology for Special Populations (3-0) The course focuses on the legal requirements for assistive technology. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Specific field experience is required. Specific field experience is required. including both formal and informal techniques. students enroll in Internship I of the field-based program. and program processes for persons with exceptionalities. Internship in Special Education I (3-0-30) As part of the internship. placement. Prerequisites: Department approval and admission to Teacher Education. Specific field experience is required. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Prerequisite: Department approval. and implications for the use of this assessment information. Can be repeated for credit when topic varies. Emphasizes training for inclusion in communities including vocational. middle school (4-8) or high school program for students with disabilities and are scheduled all morning or all afternoon throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Special admission requirements for student teaching. Prerequisites: SPED 4393 with a grade of C or better. This internship will be with a different age group and type of disability from the first internship.173/EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL SERVICES Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and participate as members of the instructional team. Interns are scheduled all day throughout the semester. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. and admission to Teacher Education and department approval. values. interns are enrolled in university classes that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. and experiences of earlier semesters in developing an effective professional style. and admission to Teacher Education. 4691 Student Teaching in Special Education/Elementary (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks all-day student teaching in special education and elementary classroom plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. In addition to classroom teaching duties. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . RED 3340. Prerequisites: All other professional studies courses.

Teaching and Empowering English Language Learners in Secondary Schools (3-0. data analysis and probability. Izquierdo. Teaching Science in Dual Language Classrooms (3-3) Methods and materials for teaching science in elementary schools. Giza. Godina. James Milson ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS EMERITI: Mary Louise Zanders Aho. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Joe Lars Klingstedt. patterns and basic algebra. application of learning theories. Olivarez. Jones. Peregrino. Armendariz. Taught in Spanish. Seda. Cashman. Huerta-Macias. Luykx. Norma G. Villa Bilingual Education (BED) 3345 Biliteracy Development (3-1) Develops an understanding of first and second language acquisition. Hampton. Ullman. De La Piedra. Wagler LECTURERS: Aguilar. Emphasis on dual language learners. Kosheleva.utep. Bilingual-Social Studies Education in Primary Grades (3-3) Approaches to teaching social studies in elementary schools to culturally and linguistically diverse populations. Soto Mas ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Araujo. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Hernandez. and conventions. Cashman. Carrejo. its stages. Becker.5426 http://academics. Noba. Integrates this knowledge base and applications in the interrelated components of reading and writing across all developmental stages. Teaching Math in Dual Language Classrooms (3-3) Methods for teaching mathematics in elementary dual language classrooms.Mein. Emphasis on individual differences. inquiry-based and standards-based teaching and learning. Munter. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Includes computer applications and field experiences.747. Awalt. Valdez. the equity principle (mathematics for all) and development of conceptual understanding on topics such as number sense. geometry and measurement. Longoria. Includes setting goals for instruction and content. teaching techniques and methods of evaluation. Emphasis on dual language. Giza. Tchoshanov. Dworin. John Paul Scarborough PROFESSORS: Ainsa. Bixler-Márquez. Delgado-Gaitan. Kephart. González.edu/teachered CHAIR: Elaine Hampton PROFESSORS EMERITI: Lou Ella Burmeister. Tinajero ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Casas. develops a knowledge base of the principles. Theory and practice are integrated through field-based experiences in local schools. Reyes. Noboa. Hurley. Gonzalez. Rossatto. curriculum development and understanding of state and national standards for social studies. Descamps. Robertson. In addition.5) 4309 4310 4311 4317 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Integrates strategies to build on the linguistic knowledge that children bring in their first language in order to teach them a concept not yet developed. Esquinca. components and stages of reading development for children who develop literacy in two languages.TEACHER EDUCATION/175 Teacher Education 601 Education Building 915.

An additional focus is on the implementation of bilingual instruction with U. including their historical. Focus is twofold: (1) English as a Second Language development and methodology. values. The fieldwork consists of assisting in student-centered classroom instruction. Particular emphasis is placed on various theoretical and pedagogical approaches to effectively teach content and academic language. interns are enrolled in university classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. Internship in Dual Language Education I (3-0-10) As part of the internship. students enroll in Internship I of the field-based program. legislative.S. Sheltered ESL Instruction (2-1) Explores English language development and academic language socialization with ESL/Bilingual students through the teaching of subject matter via a second language. and philosophical foundations. Parent and Community Advocacy in Bilingual Education (3-0) The development of advocacy within families and community as a means of participation in the educational process of their children with particular emphasis on parents of children in Bilingual/ESL education programs. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. 4340 Principles of Bilingual/ESL Education (3-0) Emphasis is on the theory and practice of Bilingual Education and English as a Second Language. academic. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. interns are enrolled in University classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. assigned to dual language programs and scheduled all morning or all afternoon throughout the semester. and personal contexts of secondary schooling. and experiences of earlier 4341 4343 4344 4393 4394 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and participate in student-centered classroom instruction as members of the instructional team. Internship in Dual Language Education II (3-0-20) A continuation of BED 4393. Field experience working with English language learners is required. Critical Perspectives in Spanish/English Literacy in Bilingual Education (3-0) Critical perspectives on the development of Spanish/English literacy as relevant to bilingual education. admission to Teacher Education. They are grouped in cohorts.Mexico border populations. Emphasizes the theoretical and practical conceptualization of both composition and reading theory. Focus on identification of program models in Bilingual/ESL education.TEACHER EDUCATION/176 Identification of principles. cultural. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. and issues facing English language learners in the social. Emphasis on appreciation of cultural diversity and alternative ways of knowing among family and community. In addition to classroom teaching duties. Prerequisites: BED 4340 with a grade of B or better. Restricted to undergraduate juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: BED 4340 with a grade of B or better. Includes a history of Spanish reading/writing methodology and the integration of bilingual multicultural literature. Prerequisites: BED 4340 with a grade of B or better. In addition to classroom teaching duties. challenges. as well as instructional frameworks for various programs. and (2) academic and cognitive development through sheltered instruction in content areas.

See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. social. (Can be taken as RED 3335) Play Development in Early Childhood (3-0) Explores how play interacts with emotional and intellectual development of the young child. Includes presentation of theories and research on play and their implementation in early childhood settings. assigned to early or primary grades (EC-4) and scheduled all morning or all afternoon throughout the semester. and appropriate and inappropriate objectives for children at particular stages of development in early childhood. Internship in Early and Primary Grades II (3-0-20) A continuation of ECED 4393. Developmentally appropriate practices are integrated throughout the course. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Early Childhood Education (ECED) 2330 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3-1) Introduction to the field of Early Childhood Education focusing on historical perspectives. Approaches to literacy development. Internship in Early and Primary Grades I (3-0-10) As part of the internship. and emotional development of children during the period of early childhood. They are grouped in cohorts. Theories of language development and research on the acquisition of communication skills. developmental reading. Interns are scheduled three (3) times a week throughout the semester. the relationship of each of these types of developments to school settings. students enroll in Internship I of the field-based program. and department approval. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. The fieldwork consists of assisting in student-centered classroom instruction mostly through tutorial duties and small group work. Language and Literacy in the Early Years (3-1) Integration of literacy and language in early childhood education with emphasis in developmental reading and literacy for second language learners. and developmental practices. Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and participate in student-centered classroom instruction as members of the instructional team. Children's Thinking in the Early Years (3-0) The cognitive. and literacy acquisition for second language learners are addressed. In addition to classroom teaching duties. Language Development for Young Children (3-0) Oral and non-verbal communication. Prerequisites: BED 4393 with a grade of C or better. interns are enrolled in University classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. types of curricula.TEACHER EDUCATION/177 semesters in developing an effective professional style. with particular attention to children in the Southwest. In 3335 4353 4356 4359 4393 4394 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . A working knowledge of the transitional approach in literacy development from the child‖s first language to English is provided. current issues.

safety. Instructional Management. proficiency in the application of technology tools. Delivery. and experiences of earlier semesters in developing an effective professional style. and integration of technology in school curricula. and generative learning environment. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge.TEACHER EDUCATION/178 addition to classroom teaching duties. professional responsibilities and professional development for the career and technical educator. relationships. values. Educational Technology for Career and Technology Education Teachers (3-2) Basic principles for creating a constructive. historical development. instruction. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and department approval. active. Observation by the university instructor of the candidate‖s classroom teaching and seminars designed to relate the classroom instructional situation to corresponding educational theory. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and department approval. 4301 4302 4303 4304 Educational Technology (EDT) 3371 Educational Technology I (3-0) Basic principles of educational technology for prospective teachers including terminology. Educational and Career Technology (EDCT) 4300 Instructional Design. and Assessment (3-2) Basic principles of curriculum planning. Internship I in Career and Technology (3-0-30) First of two semesters of teaching in the classroom. Prerequisites: All other professional studies courses. and assessment in career and technical education settings. Internship II in Career and Technology (3-0-30) Second semester of teaching in the classroom. and admission to Teacher Education. interns are enrolled in University classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Prerequisites: ECED 4393 and department approval. 4691 Student Teaching in the Early Grades (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks of all-day student teaching in an early childhood classroom plus fifteen (15) hours of seminars. Observation by the University instructor of the candidate‖s classroom teaching and seminars designed to relate the classroom instructional situation to corresponding educational theory. Special admission requirements for student teaching. Technology integration and evaluation in the school classroom required. RED 3340. social and ethical implications. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Safety and Relationships (3-2) Management. Interns are scheduled three (3) times a week throughout the semester. including methods of instruction for English language learners.

Emphasis on individual differences. 4310 4311 Teaching Science in Elementary Schools (3-2) Methods and materials for teaching science in elementary schools. algebra and functions. application of learning theories. Emphasis on the equity principle (mathematics for all) and development of conceptual understanding on topics such as number sense. assigned to intermediate or middle grades (4-8) and scheduled all morning or all afternoon throughout the semester. Teaching Math in Intermediate and Middle Grades (3-3) Methods of teaching mathematics in intermediate and middle grades. Emphasis on inquiry and standards-based teaching and learning. teaching techniques and methods of evaluation. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and departmental approval. Includes setting goals for instruction and content. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Teaching Science in Intermediate and Middle Grades (3-3) Methods and materials for teaching science in fourth through eighth grade. Middle School Education (MSED) 4309 Social Studies Education in Intermediate/Middle Grades (3-3) Approaches to teaching social studies in intermediate and middle grades. Emphasis on the equity principle (mathematics for all) and development of conceptual understanding on topics such as real numbers and operation. Emphasis on individual differences. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. patterns and basic algebra. Includes setting goals for instruction and content. Teaching Mathematics in Elementary Schools (3-2) Methods for teaching mathematics in elementary schools.TEACHER EDUCATION/179 Elementary Education (ELED) 4309 Social Science Education in Elementary Schools (3-2) Approaches to teaching social studies in elementary schools. Includes computer applications and field experiences. Theory and practice are integrated through field-based experiences in local schools. Internship in Intermediate and Middle Grades I (3-10) As part of the internship. curriculum development. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and departmental approval. Includes computer applications and field experiences. In addition to classroom teaching duties. application of learning theories. They are grouped in cohorts. and understanding of state and national standards for social studies. data analysis and probability. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and departmental approval. students enroll in Internship I of the field-based program. teaching techniques and methods of evaluation. Theory and practice are integrated through field-based experiences in local schools. statistics and probability. interns are 4310 4311 4393 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . geometry. geometry and measurement. Emphasis on inquiry and standards-based teaching and learning. curriculum development and understanding of state and national standards for social studies.

Course will emphasize interrelationships among those principles and alternate conceptual representations of them. Prerequisites: ECED 3335. Interns are scheduled all day throughout the semester. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. The representations will be analyzed to determine the mathematical skills and conceptual levels necessary to understand them. Prerequisites: MSED 4393 with a grade of C or better and department approval. Literacy in Technical Content Area (3-2) Methods and material for developing maturity in the language arts especially in technical content areas from grade eight through 12. In addition to classroom teaching duties. including methods of instruction for English language learners. including methods of instruction for second language students. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Reading Education (RED) 3340 Developmental Reading in the Elementary and Middle Grades (3-0-2) Developmental reading. and methods of individualizing instruction and grouping. and instructional techniques for integrating the teaching of skills with the teaching of content. Identification and teaching strategies for dealing with dyslexia and other reading disorders. especially in the content areas from K-12.TEACHER EDUCATION/180 enrolled in University classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. emphasizing curriculum and materials for teaching reading in the elementary and middle grades. Special emphasis is given to the development of interest. Special emphasis is given to the development of interest. the matching of students to proper materials. RED 3342 3343 4341 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . BED 3345. Field experience required. Assessment in the Teaching of Reading (3-0-2) Standardized and informal materials and techniques for diagnosing strengths and weaknesses of individuals and groups. and instructional techniques for integrating the teaching of literacy skills with content. values. techniques and materials for building specific reading abilities. the matching of students to proper materials. Mathematics Education (MTED) 3330 Integration and Alternative Representation of Basic Mathematical Principles (3-0) A course which integrates basic principles from various mathematical domains. 4394 Internship in Intermediate and Middle Grades II (3-20) Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and participate in student-centered classroom instruction as members of the instructional team. and experience of earlier semesters in developing an effective professional style. The fieldwork consists of assisting in student-centered classroom instruction mostly through tutorial duties and small group work. interns are enrolled in University classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. Reading and Study in the Content Areas (3-0-2) Methods and materials for developing maturity in reading and study skills.

The fieldwork consists of assisting in student-centered UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and deductive teaching are emphasized. For secondary and all-levels students. special emphasis on developing integrated reading-writing programs to meet the needs of diverse learners. 4343 Teaching Critical Reading (3-0) Methods and materials for developing higher level cognitive and affective reading behaviors among students from K-12. Multicultural Education in the Secondary School (3-0-2) A survey of cultural education models. each with a grade of C or better. instructional methods. Interns are grouped in cohorts. students enroll in Internship I in the field-based program. Skills in analysis and discovery. Prerequisites: RED 3340 and admission to Teacher Education. assigned to secondary (9-12) schools and scheduled three (3) half-days of internship per week throughout the semester.TEACHER EDUCATION/181 3335. cultural. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in the use of inquiry. 3312 3317 4367 4368 4393 Internship in Secondary Education I (3-0-20) As part of the internship. process approach. Field experience required. Prerequisites: RED 3340 and RED 4341 each with a grade of C or better and admission to Teacher Education. 4346 Literacy Practicum I (2-1) Linguistic. and psychological foundations of the literacy processes. interns are enrolled in University classes and internship seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Field experience required. Field experience required. Secondary Education (SCED) 3311 Curriculum Planning in the Secondary School (3-0-2) Basic principles of curriculum planning in the secondary school. sociological. Field experience required Teaching Math in Secondary School (3-0-2) Materials and methods used in teaching mathematics in the secondary school. and classroom interaction processes in secondary schools that reflect the cultural composition of the United States. General Methods in the Secondary School (3-0-2) Selection and usage of instructional methods in the secondary school. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Teaching Science in Secondary School (3-0-2) Materials and methods used in teaching natural and physical science in the secondary school. In addition to classroom teaching duties. Teaching strategies which provide for the development of criticalcreative readers in both reading and content area subjects. and discovery in teaching science. or RED 3340. Field experience required. inquiry. Field experience required.

In addition to classroom teaching duties. Topics are selected from the various sciences. Can be repeated for credit when topic varies. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge. Interns are scheduled all day throughout the semester. Special admission requirements for student teaching. 4691 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks of all-day of student teaching in the secondary school plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. Teacher Education (TED) 3330 Education and Communities: Applied Critical Pedagogy (3-3) st An examination of applied critical pedagogy and the multiple roles of teachers in the 21 century. The fieldwork consists of assisting in student-centered classroom instruction mostly through tutorial duties and small group work. Course emphasizes interrelationships among the various sciences and alternate conceptual representations of identified basic science principles. Emphasizes the cultural. Prerequisites: SCED 4393 with a grade of C or better and department approval. Prerequisites: EDPC 3300 with a grade of “C” or better. Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and participate in student-centered classroom instruction as members of the instructional team. Internship I-All Levels Art. students enroll in Internship I in the field-based program. Science Education (SIED) 3330 Integration and Alternative Representations of Basic Science Principles (3-0) A cross-disciplinary course which integrates basic science principles. admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Music. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. 4350 4390 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 4394 Internship in Secondary Education II (3-0-20) Continuation of SCED 4393. Physical Education (3-0) As part of the internship. In addition to classroom teaching duties. structural and institutional dynamics of schooling in multicultural and multilingual communities. interns are enrolled in University classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. values. Educational Workshop (3-0) Studies in designated area. and experiences of earlier semester in developing an effective professional style.TEACHER EDUCATION/182 classroom instruction mostly through tutorial duties and small group work. Includes a field-based application of the socio-cultural foundations of education within the context of local schools and communities. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education and department approval. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. interns are enrolled in university classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. Interns are assigned to elementary and/or secondary classrooms for three half days of internship per week throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Department approval.

Students enroll in Internship II of the field-based program and are assigned to elementary and/or secondary classrooms for three (3) half-days of internship per week throughout the semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. and experiences of the earlier semester in developing an effective professional style. seven weeks in a secondary school). interns are enrolled in University classes and Internship Seminars that help them apply their theoretical understandings to actual practice. seven weeks in a secondary school). Special admission requirements for student teaching. Special admission requirements for student teaching. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. values. plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. Internship--All-Levels Health Promotion (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks of all-day student teaching in elementary and secondary school settings. plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. Special admission requirements for student teaching. Special admission requirements for student teaching. Student Teaching in All-Levels Physical Education (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks of all-day student teaching (eight weeks in an elementary school. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. Interns participate in student-centered classroom instruction as members of the instructional team. Student Teaching in All-Levels Art (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks of all-day student teaching (eight weeks in an elementary school. Physical Education (3-0) Continuation of TED 4390. In addition to classroom teaching duties. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Special admission requirements for student teaching. Prerequisites: TED 4390 with a “grade of S (Satisfactory) and department approval. Music. 4695 4696 4697 4698 4699 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Interns demonstrate that they can synthesize the knowledge.TEACHER EDUCATION/183 4394 Internship II—All-Levels Art. Internship-All Levels Inclusive (0-0-37) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks of all-day student teaching in elementary and secondary school settings plus fifteen (15) hours of seminar. seven weeks in a secondary school). Student Teaching in All-Levels Music (1-0-30) Minimum of fifteen (15) weeks of all-day student teaching (eight weeks in an elementary school. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education.

.. The complexities of today's economy and environment are such that all resources must be used in an optimal manner................. Dean Dr....... aid in medical science's fight against disease............... and expand humans‖ computational and design skills beyond imagination........ In addition..... conserve resources and minimize environmental impact..... 205 Computer Science ...... Associate Dean Dr........... A noted researcher once summarized the engineer's career satisfaction by pointing out that while scientists "explore what is.. 226 Dr.. engineers must recognize that solutions to long-standing societal problems are found only by thorough planning and study............. strives to educate and train engineers who have the desire to learn and the breadth of vision to formulate and solve the problems of UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ...... Manufacturing....747... power-generating plant.............. Carlos Ferregut........ Room E230 915........................ or new automobile design is a lasting testimonial to the engineers responsible for it." The future for engineering graduates remains very bright........................... develop more contamination-free power plants...... the increasing demand for goods and services has imposed new challenges to present and future engineers. Peter Golding......... Thus.. 212 Industrial............................. Associate Dean Engineering/Science Complex Engineering Building............. Schoephoerster...... the College of Engineering... jet aircraft...........747.................... Thus....... To provide these things and..................." engineers "create what never has been...... The rapid pace of technological and industrial developments has established an ever-increasing need for highly talented and qualified professional engineers... computer...... and Systems Engineering ................ to a great extent...................... They can point to tangible evidence of their efforts................... Future accomplishments could help increase energy and food supplies. 218 Mechanical Engineering ...... at the same time...... current standards of living and high levels of technology are results of the diligent and innovative efforts of engineers........ engineers might be the best-qualified persons to address society's problems......... With a capacity for problem solving.5460 (ph) 915...... 222 Metallurgical and Materials Engineering.TEACHER EDUCATION/184 College of Engineering Civil Engineering ..5616 (fax) engineer@utep....edu College of Engineering Engineers enjoy one satisfaction that not everyone can claim................. Richard T....... through its curricula......... 208 Electrical and Computer Engineering . Every modern structure..

347. Maryland 21202-4012. The student cancan choose the traditional bachelor‖s degree and also consider advanced research-oriented graduate programs leading to the master‖s and Ph. interests. The breadth of modern computer technology is covered by BS and MS degrees in Computer Science and a computer engineering concentration in Electrical and Computer Engineering.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/185 today and tomorrow. and thus ready to make significant contributions. telephone: 410. The College offers many programs of study that should be selected on the basis of personal ambitions. It is expected that a student who applies himself or herself and successfully completes one of the engineering or computer science programs will be both technically prepared and broadly educated. electrical. Baltimore. and metallurgical and materials engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Maryland 21202-4012. College Mission Statement The Mission of the College of Engineering at the University of Texas at El Paso is access to excellence.D. Suite 1050.347. College Vision Statement The Vision of the College of Engineering at the University of Texas at El Paso is to change the face of engineering. To recognize outstanding achievement and to encourage professional activities. degrees. Additionally. 111 Market Place. industrial. The program leading to the BS in Computer Science is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Baltimore. 111 Market Place. telephone: 410. mechanical. the undergraduate programs in civil.7700. there are campus chapters of professional societies that cover all fields of engineering. each program has one or more active student sections of the appropriate professional and honor societies.7700. and abilities. Participation in these groups provides a valuable educational and professional experience and students are encouraged to participate to the extent of their eligibility. Suite 1050. Within the College. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

and one semester of Trigonometry or PreCalculus in preparation for their freshman year. Substitutions of lower-division course requirements require the permission of the student's program head. 3. Science. All students entering the College of Engineering must follow the catalog that is in effect at the time of their transfer. Enrollment in upper-division courses prior to completion of the lower-division requires permission of the student's program head. 4.0 in the semester previous to applying for the change of major. Any student enrolled in an engineering program at the University can change his or her major to another program in the College of Engineering if he or she has a minimum overall GPA of 2. 4. and Mathematics courses listed in the freshman and sophomore years. All transfer credit that is to be applied toward undergraduate engineering degree requirements must be approved by the Dean of Engineering. from twoyear junior or community colleges. limited to lower-division courses.0 in mathematics.0 GPA for the lower-division courses designated by the program and a C or better in certain specified courses. Engineering. Transfer Course Work A student can transfer a maximum of 66 semester hours. one year of Geometry. Any student who does not satisfy the C minimum rule in the appropriately designated courses must repeat those courses. Credit for upper-division engineering courses will be given only on the basis of departmental recommendation. All petitions for change of major to or within the College of Engineering are subject to the approval of the head of the program gaining the student. chemistry. Any student enrolled in a non-engineering program at the University can change his or her major to a program in the College of Engineering if he or she has demonstrated an aptitude for the engineering or computer science profession and is qualified to enroll for MATH 1411 in his or her first semester of engineering or computer science. Any student who has not met the requirements for satisfactory completion of the lower-division block as stated above or who fails to make satisfactory progress toward a degree will be denied subsequent enrollment in the College of Engineering. and engineering for all institutions attended. Completion of the lower-division block also requires a minimum 2. physics. 2. 3. The lower-division course block is comprised of English. b. International students must meet the additional requirement of an overall minimum GPA of 3. 2. Lower-Division Program 1. A maximum of 100 semester hours of courses is transferable from accredited U. a. or a subsequent catalog. colleges and universities.S. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Transfer credit evaluation should be completed when the student transfers to the College or before completion of the lower-division requirements. Transfer students might be required to take competency exams and/or take specified courses that the department feels they must have to establish the quality of their degree. The academic records of all transfer students are reviewed by the College of Engineering to determine eligibility for admission into an engineering program. A student entering the College of Engineering must complete the designated lower-division course block prior to enrolling in the upper-division engineering or computer science sequence or any junior/senior classes.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/186 Mathematics Preparation In addition to the usual preparatory work.0 and has earned a minimum GPA of 2. Transfer credit for engineering courses is restricted to ABETaccredited curricula or is awarded on the basis of departmental recommendation. Change of Major 1. applicants to the College of Engineering are expected to have at least two years of Algebra.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/187 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

MATH 0310.0 in all designated courses. F. 1300. There are four major foci within the CircLES Program. he or she will not be allowed to enroll in the course a fourth time. Students wishing to major in engineering or computer science will be classified as pre-engineering students for not less than one semester after admission to the University. students will petition for a change of major into a selected engineering program. 6. Complete the specified orientation program. D. Complete certain specified courses with a C or better. all coordinated by the Director of the Entering Student Program: (1) a mandatory college-specific orientation program in the summer prior to matriculation. and their peers. engineering and mathematics (SEM). 1411. Students must fulfill all preengineering requirements and must: 1. 0311. 1401.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/188 Pre-Engineering Program The Entering Students Program for Engineering and Science Circles of Learning for Entering Students (CircLES) Program Description Circles of Learning for Entering Students (CircLES) is a comprehensive retention program targeting first-time freshman and first-time transfer students in the sciences. ENGL 0310. A learning environment is emphasized in the first year so that entering students can be successful and begin to develop lifelong learning habits. Meet with a pre-engineering advisor each semester. Maintain a minimum overall GPA of 2. B. and to add value to a student‖s education through the creation of an environment in which students make connections with the university. some of these courses do not meet departmental degree requirements. (3) strong developmental advising and early intervention and (4) leadership development. 5.(2) mandatory placement in learning communities (clusters) in the first year. 1311. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . ENGR 1100. the CircLES program has become recognized as a model on campus and elsewhere for creating a strong foundation for entering students to springboard them toward a successful college and (eventually) professional career. the colleges. Once a student has obtained a C or better in an Engineering or Computer Science course. 2. or W will be counted. 1508. Make satisfactory progress toward completion of the pre-engineering program. that course cannot be repeated for credit. Upon completion of the pre-engineering program requirements. faculty. 0311. The goals of CircLES are to increase retention to improve academic performance. Students from outside the engineering college wishing to take engineering/computer science courses should request permission from the head of the program offering the course. upper-division students. Complete an approved program of study that can include one or more of the following courses: UNIV 1301. Since its inception. 1312. If the course is required in the student's degree plan. C. 3. Enrollment in Engineering/Computer Science Courses by Non-Majors Enrollment in nearly all Engineering and Computer Science courses is restricted to students with the appropriate majors. Limit on Engineering Course Enrollments The maximum number of times an Engineering or Computer Science course can be taken is three (3). the student will not be able to complete the requirements for that degree. Check with your CircLES advisor. 1400. Once a student has reached the maximum of three enrollments. 4. All enrollments in a course that result in a grade of A. Although required for the pre-engineering program.

Mechanical Engineering. Students who rank high in their undergraduate class should give serious consideration to developing their full intellectual potential in engineering by continuing with advanced studies at the graduate level. or be considered for employment as a teaching or research assistant at the appropriate salary. These work experiences are an integral part of the student's education. work actively on a research project for nine months. computer science. Possible areas of specialization include business management. Computer Science. During this fourth year. Manufacturing Engineering. operations research. The program is structured to allow qualified engineering students to enter a graduate research or design program during the senior year of the bachelor's degree. government. Industrial Engineering. Vision The Department of Civil Engineering strives to graduate highly qualified engineers. Ph. Computer Engineering. Five-Year Bachelor/Master of Science Program The College of Engineering provides an opportunity for qualified students to participate in a five-year bachelor/master of science degree program. industry. or professional or service organizations. Materials Science and Engineering. all requirements for each degree must be completed before the degree can be awarded. However. Electrical Engineering. and Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering The Department of Civil Engineering at the undergraduate level is broadly based and provides courses in the major divisions of Civil Engineering. normally requiring a thesis and up to 27 hours of graduate course work. The program involves 33 hours of coursework without a thesis. the student can reserve certain courses for graduate credit. The academic value of work completed under the cooperative education program is recognized by allowing credit to be earned for completion of three work periods and submission of required reports. maintain UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Computer Engineering. Contact the Dean of Engineering for information on the availability of co-op work assignments. degrees are offered in Civil Engineering. and others. supplementing academic knowledge and promoting and encouraging personal development and professional preparation. For those students interested in the practice of professional engineering. Computer Science. Graduate Study The traditional Master of Science (MS) degree is available in Civil Engineering. Graduate programs are discussed fully in the Graduate Catalog. the Master of Science in Engineering (MSE) degree should be given serious consideration. and Environmental Science and Engineering.D. This degree is research-oriented. Cooperative Education Cooperative education is a program which integrates a student's formal academic study with special periods of practical work experience in business.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/189 Double Majors Students in the College of Engineering can pursue more than one undergraduate degree. The Master of Science in Environmental Engineering (MSEnE) and the Master of Engineering in Environmental Engineering (MEEnE) are also offered. Both the bachelor's and master's degrees can be completed in five academic years.

............... 6........................... 2..................... 3 17 Sophomore Year 1st Semester UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ........................ The department contributes to the quality of these programs by generating research opportunities that create synergy among faculty................................ Graduates will serve as productive members of society and the profession by recognizing the social........................... We contribute to the quality of life of society through innovation in the generation.......COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/190 nationally recognized research and provide quality professional and community service to the region and the world.................... and use of knowledge............................................................. 3 Introduction to Politics ....... and use knowledge in the different fields of Civil Engineering to make the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez region and the world a better place to live....................................................... 1 Expository English Composition...... Faculty work together within the department and with other departments in the University to provide multidisciplinary opportunities for both students and faculty..................................... 4..... ethical...................................... We will continue to be leaders in procuring external funding for research and teaching............................. Educational Objectives: 1............ share.......... retains and graduates individuals with high professional and ethical standards to work in government and private organizations......... Graduates will be able to communicate effectively to technical and non-technical audiences.................. The faculty is committed to increasing and improving the quality of our graduates.. Graduates will be educated in the fundamental concepts of engineering and science to create intellectual curiosity in order to provide for a successful career and life-long learning....... and constituents works to acquire.................................................................... The department accomplishes its mission through both undergraduate and graduate programs........................... environmental and political implications of engineering decisions............ The Civil Engineering Department recruits. 3 Calculus I . 3 Laboratory for General Chemistry I ....... and practicing professionals.. 3.................................. students.... The result of our work is reflected in the continuing improvement of the quality of life in El Paso and the surrounding regions through the impact that our graduates have on these communities... 4 University Elective3 ......................... students.............................................................. S... to 1865 ............ 5............................ Mission The Department of Civil Engineering of The University of Texas at El Paso through its faculty................................. 3 Calculus II .................................................................... 2 Statics ................... 4 Introductory Mechanics .................................. Freshman Year 1st Semester CHEM 1305+ CHEM 1105+ ENGL 13111+ MATH 1411+ PHYS 2420 Hours General Chemistry ...................................................................... staff.......................... Graduates will be able to design effective civil engineering systems.... 3 18 2nd Semester CE 1205+ CE 2315+ HIST 1301+ ENGL 13124+ MATH 1312+ POLS 2310+ Graphic Fundamentals in Engineering Design......................... generate..... sharing................... 3 Research and Critical Writing.......................... 3 History of U.................... Graduates will have exposure to real-life problems including hands-on experience...................... Graduates will have the ability to function on multidisciplinary teams........

3 Structural Design II................ 3 Water and Waste Laboratory ...... 3 Communications Elective+ .................................................................................................. 3 Hydraulic Engineering .................................... 3 16 2nd Semester CE CE CE CE*5 33353 3336 3345 3373+ Geological Engineering ................... 3 Engineering Analysis I...........................................................................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/191 CE CE*1 MATH CHEM POLS 2334+ 2377+ 2313+ 1306 2311+ Mechanics of Materials ................. 3 15 Senior Year 1st Semester CE CE CE CE CE 4340 4348 4361 4188 4375 Transportation Engineering ......... 3 18 2nd Semester CE*2 2388+ 3 CE* 2375+ CE*4 2341+ CE** 2326+ MATH 2326+ HIST 1302+ Mechanics II (Dynamics) ..................................................... 3 American Government and Politics ............. 3 Structural Design I............................................................................................ 3 Senior Design I........................ 1 Senior Design II............ 2 Senior Professional Orientation ..........................................................................................................................................................................................S.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Humanities Elective4+ ................................. 3 Economics for Engineers ................. 3 Geotechnical Engineering .......................................... 3 18 Junior Year 1st Semester CE CE CE CE 3313 3456 3343 3325 Engineering Measurements ..................... 1 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering II .......................................................................................................................................... Since 1865 .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 4 Structural Analysis I .................... 3 Introduction to Thermal-Fluid Science ............................................... 3 Electro Mechanical Systems ......................................................................................................................................... 3 Civil Engineering Materials.............................. 3 Visual and Performing Arts Elective6+ ...................................................... 3 Engineering Probability and Statistical Models .................................................................................................. 1 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering ......................................................................................................................... 3 General Chemistry II ................................................................................................................................. 3 Differential Equations ......... 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3 13 2nd Semester CE CE CE CE CE 4342 4153 4288 4195 4376 Water and Waste Water Engineering... 3 Environmental Engineering Fundamentals .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3 History of the U.................................................................. 3 Calculus III ........................................

. 2+ 3+ 4+ UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350 Cross-listed with GEOL 3321 Humanities Menu 5+ 6+ COMM 1301 or COMM 1302 Visual and Performing Arts Menu *1Cross-listed with ME 2342 *3 Cross-listed with ME 2311 *2 Cross-listed with ME 2341 *4 Cross-listed with ME 2351 5 6 * Cross-listed with IE 3373 + Cross-listed with CE 5334 ** Meets 3 credit hours of Social and Behavioral Science + Bachelor of Science in Computer Science The Department of Computer Science at the undergraduate level is designed to provide a strong base in programming and problem-solving skills... and practical experience in applying the computer to the solution of problems...... national............. work in teams.... and implement and verify a solution for computing systems of different levels of complexity. convey technical information in both oral and written formats.S........ 128 A grade of C or better is required in these courses... Educational Objectives The overarching educational objective of the B........ The department will advance the field of computer science by supporting its faculty and students with a culture that encourages exemplary. in Computer Science program at UTEP is to produce graduates who will be in a profession or in a graduate program that utilizes their technical expertise.............. develop a design..... and attracts external funding.... Vision The Vision of the Department of Computer Science is to provide computer science programs of the highest quality through a participatory approach to education..... Specifically.. applying.................... methodologies and tools.... involves graduate and undergraduate students.... and a culture that actively involves them inside and outside the classroom and that will enable them to succeed and thrive as computer scientists and in society....... The department will serve as a leading model of education in this process. research.. Mission The department will provide its students: a strong foundation for study and practice. use the theoretical and technical computer science knowledge to specify requirements. fosters internal and external collaboration... advanced knowledge of techniques. The department will serve the local........ refining.. 3 13 Total Semester Credit Hours...COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/192 CE 4334 Construction Management+6 .... the foundation of which they obtained at UTEP..... and transferring approaches to education that encourage students to pursue their education to their full potential. 2. a theoretical understanding of computer science.. Specialization is provided through numerous upper-division electives.... and service to the community.... UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ... and international communities by developing.......... 3.... personal skills and professional attitudes.... graduates of UTEP‖s undergraduate program in Computer Science will be able to: 1............ internationally recognized research............

......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 History of U.......................................................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/193 4............................................................................................. 4 Research and Critical Writing.......................................................... 3 Quantitative Science Sequence I+.. stay current in their profession........ 3 Quantitative Science Sequence II+........................................... 3 History of U... S.......................................S.... apply a professional code of ethics in the daily practice of their profession................................................ Since 1865 ............................................................................................................................. 3 16 2nd Semester CS 3331+ POLS 2310+ Junior Year 1st Semester CS CS MATH POLS 3432+ 3350 3323+ 2311+ Computer Architecture I: Basic Computer Organization and Design ................................................................................................................................ 4 Ethics ........ 3 Core Curriculum Requirement+ ............................................................................................................................... 3 16 Sophomore Year 1st Semester CS 2402+ PHIL 2306+ EE EE 2369 2169 Data Structures ..... 3 Introduction to Politics ............................................... 1 Core Curriculum Requirement+ .... 3 Digital Systems Design Laboratory .............................. 4 Core Curriculum Requirement+ .............................. 3 17 Advanced Object Oriented Programming ............. 3 Calculus II ................................................................................................................................... Computability............................................................................................................. 3 Calculus I .................................................................................... to 1865 .............................................................................................................. 3 16 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ................... and Formal Languages .... 4 Automata................................................................................................................................. 3 American Government and Politics ............................................................................... 4 14 Elementary Data Structures and Algorithms ........................................................................................................................................... 3 Discrete Mathematics........... 3 Core Curriculum Requirement+ ............................................................................. 4 Digital Systems Design I .......... 4 Expository English Composition.............. Sample Degree Program Freshman Year 1st Semester CS 1401+ ENGL 1311+ HIST 1301+ MATH 1411+ 2nd Semester CS 2401+ ENGL 1312+ HIST 1302+ MATH 1312+ MATH 2300+ Hours Introduction to Computer Science ............................................................................................. and 5....................... 3 Matrix Algebra ......

................. Credit for a course may not be applied to both the Quantitative Science Sequence and the Lab Science Elective requirements...................... Technical Electives must be approved by the Computer Science program....... upper division courses outside the department............................................... from the following menus: Visual and Performing Arts menu 3 semester hours Social and Behavioral Sciences menu 3 semester hours Communications Submenu B (Speech) 3 semester hours Institutionally Designated Option 3 semester hours All University Core Curriculum Requirements must be completed with a grade of “C” or better...... chemistry.............................................. or geology....................... 3 Laboratory Science Elective.....................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/194 2nd Semester CS CS 3195 3320+ Junior Professional Orientation .. in some cases.............. biology.................... CHEM 1305 and 1105............................... 3 12 Total semester credit hours .... Laboratory Science Electives: Students must complete a three-credit-hour lecture and one-credit-hour lab in physics.. CS 4371. 120 + A grade of C or better is required in these courses........... 3 Design and Implementation of Programming Languages ............ however.................... 3 Technical Elective ............................. and 1108............... 3 14 Senior Year 1st Semester CS CS MATH CS 4310+ 3360 4329 4375 Software Engineering: Requirements Engineering ..... 1314. 3 Technical Elective . Quantitative Science Sequence: Students must complete a two-semester sequence in physics....................................................................................................................................... Acceptable courses are: PHYS 2420.................. biology..................................... ASTR 1307 & 1107................................ 1306.... 3 Technical Elective .......... 3 Numerical Analysis............ no more than a total of six (6) hours of CS 4390................... 1 Topic: Probability and Statistics ..... Acceptable sequences are: BIOL 1305.................................. 3 Laboratory Science Elective Lab............................................................. 3 Free Elective ..................................... CHEM 1305........ CS 4181.. CS 4371....................................... and CS 4181– can be repeated for credit................ 3 Free Elective ....... 3 15 MATH 4370 2nd Semester CS Software Engineering: Design and Implementation ............................................................................. and 1106... or GEOL 1313............................. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ..... 1107.............................. 1103............... 3 Theory of Operating Systems ................................. The special topics classes–CS 4390................................................ 1306.................. and 1104...................................... BIOL 1305 and 1107......................................... chemistry...................................................................... 1105...... or geology. GEOL 1301 and 1101...... PHYS 2420 and 2421......... This list includes junior-and seniorlevel computer science classes and.......... 1 Computer Architecture II: Advanced Computer Design .. 4311 Students must complete twelve (12) semester hours of University Core Curriculum Requirements......... and technical electives outside of the department in any combination can be counted toward the degree.......... PHYS 2401.....................................................

analyze. We aspire to be a new model for engineering education that is committed to the ideals of excellence and access. CS 3335. and an upper division providing more-specialized courses. Vision We. commit ourselves to providing quality baccalaureate. Statistics Requirement: Students must complete a calculus-based Probability and Statistics course. our graduates will be able to: Demonstrate the ability to formulate. and solve electrical and computer engineering problems. Options for this include MATH 4370: Special Topics. Students should check with their major advisor for further details. or CS 4390. apply and disseminate knowledge. knowledge. Mission The Electrical Engineering Program will: Dedicate itself to providing its students with the skills. CS 4342. CS 2401. institutions and industrial partners in the U. Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering The BS Degree in Electrical Engineering consists of 128 semester credit hours divided into a lower division. STAT 3330 or equivalent. and doctoral programs to a diverse student population. and Latin America. CS 2302 and 9 additional semester hours from CS 3331. Minors for Computer Science Majors Students majoring in Computer Science may also obtain minors from the following approved disciplines in other colleges: Biology. Prepare its graduates for life-long learning to meet intellectual. state-of-the art research enterprise that provides its students and faculty with opportunities to create. EE 3384. CS 3350.. Environmental Science. and Mathematics. We envision capitalizing on the bi-national location of our Institution and the collective strengths of our students and staff to create and maintain educational and research collaborations of the highest quality with faculty. Finance. interpret. ethical. providing diverse courses over a broad base of technical subjects. Recognize and act upon the special mandate to make high-quality engineering education available to the residents of El Paso and the surrounding binational metroplex.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/195 Physics Requirement: Students must complete either PHYS 2420 or PHYS 2401. masters. Maintain a vital. These are: CS 1401. the Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering.S. Educational Objectives As individuals and as members of teams. No course taken on a Pass/Fail basis may be counted for the minor. CS 4320. and attitudes that will allow its graduates to succeed as engineers and leaders. Students should refer to the individual departmental listings in this catalog for specific minor requirements. The Computer Science minor requires 20 credit hours of Computer Science courses. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Minors in Computer Science Students who are not majoring in Computer Science may obtain a minor in Computer Science. CS 3360 (requires CS 3331). CS 3370 (requires Math 3323). CS 4351 (requires CS 3331). Geology. CS 4317. and career challenges. Demonstrate the ability to apply the design process to engineering problems. Probability and Statistics. Mexico.

................................. 3 General Chemistry .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Electric Circuits I ........................................................................................ 3 Research and Critical Writing.................................................... 3 Laboratory for EE 3438 ................................................................................................................................................................................... Sample Degree Program Freshman Year 1st Semester EE 1305+ EE 1105+ MATH 1411+ ENGL 1311+ CHEM 1305 UNIV 1301+ or UNIV 2350+ Hours Introduction to Electrical Engineering................................................................................. 3 Fields and Waves....................................................... 1 Calculus I ....... 3 17 2nd Semester EE 2369+ EE 2169+ MATH 1312+ ENGL 1312+ PHYS 2420+ HIST 1301 Digital Systems Design I .....................................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/196 Communicate effectively with those inside and outside of electrical and computer engineering...................................................... 1 Electromagnetic Field Theory ..... 3 Laboratory for EE 2369 ..................................................................................... 3 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Differential Equations ............................................................................................................................. 4 Business and Professional Communications .................. 3 Arts Core Curriculum Requirement*+ ............................................................................. 3 Interdisciplinary Technology and Society ..................................................................................................... 3 Laboratory for EE 1305 ......................................................................................... 4 History of U....................................... 3 History of U.................. Since 1865 .................... to 1865 ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Calculus III .................. 3 Survey of Modern Physics .. 3 Introductory Mechanics ...........................................................S.................................................................................................................................................................... 3 16 Junior Year 1st Semester EE 3338+ EE 3138+ EE 3321+ EE 3353+ PHYS 3325+ Electronics I........................... 1 Calculus II ............. 3 17 Sophomore Year 1st Semester EE 2372+ EE 2350+ MATH 2326+ PHYS 2421+ COMM 1302+ 2nd Semester EE 2351+ EE 2151+ EE 2353+ HIST 1302+ MATH 2313+ Software Design I .............................................S............................................................................ 3 Signals and Systems........................ 3 19 Electric Circuits .............................................................. 3 Laboratory for EE 2351 .................................................................................................. 4 Expository English Composition....................................................................................................................................... 1 Continuous Time Signals and Systems .................................................. Exhibit social and professional responsibility in a global context..................................................................... 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .......................

.............................................................................................................................................................. 2 American Government and Politics .................. *** At least 1 hour of laboratory associated with a concentration course must be selected....................................................................................................................................................... **At least 12 hours must be selected from the three lists of concentration courses as described below................................................................................. as approved by the student’s advisor............................................ 3 Laboratory for concentration courses*** ............................................ 3 Laboratory for Microprocessor Systems I ................... 6 14 2nd Semester EE 4230 POLS 2311+ Total Semester Credit Hours .... 1 Probabilistic Methods ................. Concentrations Each list of courses permits the student to develop a concentration or pursue a particular career objective.............................. as provided by the advisor....................................................................................... EE 4371 Engineering Problems EE 4395 Special Topics UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ................................. Examples are EE 41412........... 2 Economy for Engineers and Scientists ....................... Most concentration courses are offered only once each academic year................................................. The technical elective must be selected from a list of approved courses.... 3 Microprocessor Systems I .................................................................... The selected course should be outside of the student’s area of concentration.... 1 Humanities Core Curriculum Requirement*+ ............ 1 Specialization Courses** ........................................ 3 Junior Professional Orientation ............................................................. The following courses may be applied toward any concentration requirement with prior approval from the curriculum committees and the student‖s advisor.................................................................................................................... * Six (6) hours of electives must be selected from University Core Curriculum courses................................................................................................ 3 Approved Technical Elective** ....... 3 Introduction to Politics ................ In following a particular list............................ EE 4171 or EE 4178................ 3 16 2nd Semester EE EE EE EE EE EE 3340+ 3376+ 3176+ 3384 3329+ 3195+ Linear Integrated Circuits ............................................................... EE 4153......... and plan their acourse of study in order to satisfy any prerequisites for courses within their chose concentration...................... 3 17 Senior Year 1st Semester EE CE POLS 4220+ 2326+ 2310+ Senior Project Laboratory .................. and three (3) hours must be in humanities.......... 3 Specialization Courses** ...................................................................................... Interested students should select a concentration prior to completion of the junior year.. students will complete an in depth program of current interest to Electrical Engineering............ Students who choose not to have a concentration must take at least three hours from each list............... 3 Electronic Devices..... 6 15 Senior Project Lab II............... 128 + A grade of C or better is required in these courses.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/197 MATH 3323+ Matrix Algebra .......... Three (3) of these hours must be in visual and performing arts............................................

.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/198 Computer Engineering The computer engineering concentration is concerned with the organization..... and (b) the analysis.. 3 CHEM 1305+ and CHEM 1105+ ......... relevant engineering education available to all residents of the El Paso bi-national region.......... and use of digital hardware. 3 MATH 1411+ Calculus I . To fulfill the requirements of this concentration..................................... control....... design....... For this concentration students must complete four courses..... Vision The Industrial Engineering Program strives to graduate industrial engineers of the highest quality and to conduct state-of-the-art research.............................. Prepare all students for jobs in the competitive global marketplace and potential success in leadership positions. and reception of signals in the electromagnetic spectrum.. 4 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ...... production and inventory control and quality control................. design. available from the advisor Fields and Devices Engineering This concentration prepares the student in: (a) the generation.... Educational Objectives 1....... Systems and Communications Engineering The Systems and Control concentration stresses analytical design of systems for information transmission...................... operations research... For this concentration........ available from the advisor.................. Students who satisfy the requirements of this concentration have the opportunity to be prepared to work in both the design and the application of modern computing systems...... as described in the Systems and Control Concentration Course List.. The curriculum provides a broad range of courses in the areas of human interface design and management......... and signal processing.... a student must take four courses..... and testing of modern electronic circuits..................... students must complete four courses........ 2......... Prepare and motivate students to be successful in graduate studies................ as described in the Computer Engineering Concentration Course List..... knowledge and attitudes that will permit its graduates to succeed and thrive as engineers and leaders...................... as described in the Fields and Devices Concentration Course List. 4 UNIV 1301+or 2350+ ............... Sample Degree Program Freshman Year 1st Semester Hours ENGL 1311+ Expository English Composition....... available from the advisor..... Mission The Industrial Engineering Program makes available a high quality... plant design....................... Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering The Industrial Engineering Curriculum is designed for students who desire to enter industry or pursue advanced studies........ The department dedicates itself to providing students with a set of skills... transmission......................................................................................

............................................................................................................................... 3 Calculus III ..... 3 Social Science Core+ .......................................... 3 Production and Inventory Control ............. 3 16 Senior Year 1st Semester IE IE IE POLS 4353 4391 4384 2311 Industrial System Simulation .. to 1865 .................................... 3 13 2nd Semester IE 2126 HIST 1302 IE 2377 MATH 2326+ Junior Year 1st Semester MATH IE IE IE COMM 3323+ 3373+ 3331 3389 1302+ Matrix Algebra ................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Visual and Performing Arts Elective+ ....... 3 14 Sophomore Year 1st Semester IE 2303 MATH 2313+ IE 2326+ PHYS 2421+ Materials and Manufacturing Processes .. 3 Electro Mechanical Systems .... 3 Calculus II .............................................. 3 American Government and Politics ................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/199 14 2nd Semester IE 1205+ IE 2315 HIST 1301+ ENGL 1312+ MATH 1312+ Graphics Fundamentals in Engineering Design .............................................. 3 15 2nd Semester IE IE POLS IE PHIL 3477 3352 2310 3332 2306 Methods and Industrial Ergonomics ......................... 3 Differential Equations ............................... 4 Design of Experiments ... 3 Safety Engineering ............. 4 16 Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory .................................................................................... 2 Statics for IE Majors .......................................... 3 History of U............................................. 3 Research and Critical Writing....................................................................................................... 3 15 2nd Semester UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ......... 3 Introduction to Politics ................................................ 3 Engineering Economy for IE Majors........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Since 1865 ..................................................................................S........................................... 3 Systems Engineering ...................................................................................... 3 Engineering Probability and Statistical Models ...................................................... 3 Ethics ................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Operations Research I .............................................................................................................. S..................................... 3 Business and Professional Communication ............... 3 Fields and Waves ................................................................................................................... 3 Technical Elective1 ........................................................................................................ 3 Industrial Layout ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1 History of the U...

..... 3... To prepare all students for jobs in the marketplace and success in the binational setting..... The Program strives to: prepare its graduates to pursue lifelong learning...... 3 17 Total Semester Credit Hours .... 4 Technical Elective1 .... ethical and career challenges. safety and ergonomics......... any upper course from the College of Engineering and any upper division course from the College of Science............. The curriculum provides a broad range of courses in the areas of thermal sciences........... 3 Senior Design. Sample Degree Plan Freshman Year UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ............................ The mid-term and final examinations will consist of a written report and presentation to the faculty mentor and to the industrial partner based on the research/design/analysis performed in the industrial department in which the student worked...................... accounting........ purchasing............... quality.......... OSCM 3331................. To prepare and motivate students to engage in graduate-level studies....................... maintenance.. The department dedicates itself to providing students a set of skills...COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/200 MATH IE IE IE Numerical Analysis.. OSCM 4375.. Educational Objectives: 1...... Vision The Mechanical Engineering Program strives to graduate mechanical engineers of the highest quality and to conduct state-of-the-art research....... interpret........................ ENGL 3359. serve the profession and meet intellectual....... IE 4371............. relevant engineering education available to all residents of the El Paso binational region. Students will have an industry mentor...... production and inventory control. OSCM 3337......... Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering The Mechanical Engineering curriculum is designed for students who desire to enter industry or pursue advanced studies....................... Mission The Mechanical Engineering Program makes a high-quality............... IE 4333..................... apply........... state-of-the-art research enterprise to provide its students and faculty opportunities to create... To prepare all students to pass the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination... planning and scheduling............. knowledge and attitudes that will permit its graduates to succeed and thrive as engineers and leaders........ and maintain a vital...................... 3 Operations Research II .... tooling........ 4 Statistical Quality Control and Reliability............... 120 + A grade of “C” or better is required.... 2............................. etc...... fluid mechanics. IE 4312.................. The student will intern in a manufacturing facility and work on problems ranging from testing and inspection............... a faculty mentor.............. IE 4397. 1 Select from the following list....................... IE 4396........ and disseminate knowledge.......... and a field engineer helping with problems.. design.. IE 4395................................................... mechanical design and manufacturing.......... 4329 4490 4385 4466 International Manufacturing Certificate This program is an applied internship in a local manufacturing plant where the student applies the international manufacturing management and engineering fundamentals from IE 4360 and 4361...... OSCM 3333...........

.. 3 1301+ or 2350+ ......... S............................................................................................................. 3 Engineering Analysis II............................................................................................................................................................... to 1865 ....................................... 3 Engineering Analysis I............................................ 3 Solid Mechanics Lab ........ 3 Materials and Manufacturing Processes ............................................... 3 Electro Mechanical Systems .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Science/Math Elective+ ........................................................................... 3 Calculus I ................................... 4 16 Sophomore Year 1st Semester MATH 2313+ MECH 2322+ MECH 2331+ MECH 2131+ POLS 2310+ Calculus III ......................................................... 3 Manufacturing Engineering Lab ................................................................................................................................................................................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/201 1st Semester CHEM 1305 CHEM 1105 ENGL 1311+ MATH 1411+ MECH 1305+ UNIV Hours Chemistry I ......................................................................... 3 Thermo Fluid Lab ..................................................................................................................... 3 MECH 1321+ Mechanics I ............................. 3 + MATH 1312 Calculus II ................... 4 Graphic and Design Fundamentals............................................................................................................................................................................ 3 2nd Semester COMM MECH MECH 1302+ 3313+ 3334+ UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ............................ 3 Business and Professional Communication ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 17 2nd Semester HIST 1301+ History of U...................................................... since 1865.........................S............................................................................................... 3 Introduction to Thermo-Fluid Science .................................................................................... 3 15 Junior Year 1st Semester HIST 1302+ MECH MECH MECH MECH 3312 3314 3323 3352 History of U................................................................................... 4 17 2nd Semester MATH MECH MECH MECH MECH 2326 2311+ 2341+ 2342+ 2351+ + Social Science Core+ ............................................................................. 1 Expository English Composition....................................................................... 3 Differential Equations ...................................................................................... 3 PHYS 2420 Introductory Mechanics .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Fluid Dynamics..................................... 3 Mechanical Design .................................................................................................. 3 15 Humanities Elective+ ............................ 3 Thermodynamics................... 3 Science Course+ ................................................................................. 3 Mechanics II – Dynamics ................................ 1 Introduction to Politics .......................................................................................................... 3 Mechanics of Materials .......................... 3 Laboratory for CHEM 1301 .................. 3 ENGL 1312+ Research and Critical Writing...........

.............. 3 Technical Elective++ ......................................... ABETaccredited programs nationally....) 1............................. 3 15 Technical Elective II++................................. and will strive to provide pre-professional employment (either research experiences or internships)................................. while maintaining a high level of excellence in all graduates.....COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/202 MECH 3345+ System Dynamics ........ e............................ MECH 4371............ Vision Our vision is to provide a modern Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program of the highest quality................................................................................ MECH 4368............ Courses related to advanced materials topics are also available.... in industry or other employment.. 128 + A grade of C or better is required... spanning all major classes of materials.......... 3 Mechatronics ............................................................................ 1 being the most important......... The student can specialize in one or more areas in the junior and senior year by taking appropriate elective courses...... both oral and written............................................................ 3 Thermal System Design ....................... UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ................................... Educational Objectives (The following objectives are ranked in order of decreasing importance................ 3 Finite Element Analysis .............................................. MECH 4356.................. 3 Senior Design... 3 2nd Semester POLS MECH MECH 2311+ 4316+ 4366+ 15 Total Semester Credit Hours . IE 4392............................................................................. Mission We will emphasize learning and applying metallurgical and materials engineering fundamentals..................... It will also provide basic engineering skills for problem-solving and lifelong learning........... and (2) to provide opportunity for all types of students............................... Students completing the BS program will be competitive with graduates of similar............... The program is well suited for a career in industry or as a basis for graduate study.................. We will offer students opportunities to explore the whole gamut of applications.............. from advanced microelectronic technology to the basic infrastructure on which we all depend................................... We will maintain a balance between the applied and theoretical aspects.................................................................................... and MECH 3363 4391.................... over time.... Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering The Metallurgical and Materials Engineering curriculum is a broad-based program designed to provide a basic education in metallurgical and materials engineering.. 1++ Approved technical electives are MECH 4355........................................................g............................... 3 18 Senior Year 1st Semester MECH MECH MECH MECH 4315+ 4326+ 4336+ 4346+ Heat Transfer ............. 3 American Government and Politics ........ It will sharpen communication skills............................... MECH 4395...... 3 Principles of Engineering .............. 3 Visual and Performing Arts Elective+ .............. The BS degree program in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering will serve two broad purposes: (1) to provide sufficient grounding for a graduate to perform effectively..................................................

.................... with emphasis on engineering design issues............................................................ 3 Calculus III ................................................................................................................................................................ The department will take a pro-active stance in helping its students............................................................. 3 Calculus II ...................................................................................... to 1865 ................................................................................................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/203 2.... 3 Research and Critical Writing........................................................................... 3 18 Sophomore Year 1st Semester MME 2434+ CE 2326+ MATH 2313+ POLS 2310+ Mechanics of Materials ..... 4 Science Elective1+ .. 3 Material and Energy Balance .................................................................... 3 Visual and Performing Arts Elective+ ......................................... 4............S.................................................. 4 17 Intro to Materials Science and Engineering .............................................. 3 15 2nd Semester MME 2303+ MME 2305+ MECH 2377+ MATH 2326+ Junior Year 1st Semester Social and Behavioral Science Elective3+ ......................................... Sample Degree Plan Freshman Year 1st Semester MME 1301+ MME 1101+ ENGL 1311+ MATH 1411+ Hours Intro to Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Design ................... 4 15 2nd Semester CE HIST ENGL MATH 1205 1301+ 1312+ 1312+ Graphic Fundamentals Engr Design ... 3 Electromechanical Systems ................................................ 3 Calculus I ................. 2 History of U............... 3 Introduction to Politics ....................... A significant proportion of our graduates will secure admission to a graduate program.............................................................. The program will continue to make significant contributions to the minority BS degree pool in metallurgical and materials engineering or related fields....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ...................................................... 3............... 3 Science Elective1+ .......................... 4 Economics for Engineers and Scientists ...... student team development....... The department will take the lead in the development and innovations of CircLES........................... 3 Communication Elective4+ ................................................................................. 3 Intro MME Design Lab . and engineering multidisciplinarity.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 University Elective 2+ ..................................................................................................................... 1 Expository English Composition...................................................................... Our department will provide materials and process fundamentals for other engineering disciplines to show the value-added multidisciplinary efforts..... 3 Science Elective1+ .................................................. 3 Differential Equations .............................................................. 5.......................

.............................................. 3 Calculus I .................................... Humanities Menu...... 3 MME Elective7............................................................. General Manufacturing Option Freshman Year 1st Semester MME 1301+ MME 1101+ ENGL 1311+ MATH 1411+ Hours Intro to Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Design ....... 3 Senior Professional Orientation ................. 3 Introduction to Electronic Materials .. and Polymer Engineering (4310)....... 3 Mechanical Behavior of Materials .......................................................... 3 Physical Metallurgy ....................................................... A C or better is required in MME courses through the junior level...................................................................................... 4 Applied Chemical Thermodynamics............................... Since 1865 .......... 4 Corrosion..........................................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/204 HIST MME MME 1302+ 3306+ 3406+ History of U................................... 3 16 Humanities Elective6+ ..........................................S............................................................................................................................................................................ 3 MME MME MME 4303 4413 4316 Metals Processing ............ 128 + 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A grade of C or better is required...................................................................... 4 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ................................................... 3 Intro MME Design Lab ........................................................ 9 ........................................................................ University Elective: UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350.................... 3 Structural Characterization................................. 3 Nanomaterials & Nanostructures ................................................................................................. Social and Behavioral Science Menu............................................................................. 3 Biomaterials .......... 4 Failure Analysis ............................................................. CHEM 1306 and 1106..... Science Elective: CHEM 1305 and 1105.......................... Communication Elective: COMM 1301 or COMM 1302.. 4 Science Elective1+ ............................................... Engineering Alloys (3321)................. 4 Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Design ..................................... 3 Rate Processes in Materials Systems.................................................................................................................................................... 1 15 Total Semester Credit Hours ................................................... 4 16 2nd Semester POLS 2311+ MME 3407+ MME 3308+ MME 3309+ MME 3310+ Senior Year 1st Semester American Government and Politics ................ 3 16 2nd Semester MME MME MME MME MME 4404 4419 4309 4320 4195 Materials Processing and Fabrication ....................................................................................................... 8................................................. 1 Expository English Composition..................... and PHYS 2421............................................................................................................................................................. Electives offered are Composite Materials (3314)..................................... Visual and Performing Arts Menu................................................................................

............................................... 3 Material and Energy Balance .................................. 3 16 Senior Year 1st Semester Humanities Elective6+ ....... Since 1865 .............S......................................................... 3 Structural Characterization......................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Economics for Engineers and Scientists ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 American Government and Politics ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Systems Engineering ................................................................................ 3 Physical Metallurgy ........................... 4 17 Intro to Materials Science and Engineering .................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Research and Critical Writing........................................................................................................ 3 15 2nd Semester MME 2303+ MECH 2377+ MATH 2326+ POLS 2311+ Junior Year 1st Semester HIST IE IE MME 1302+ 3331 3373 3406+ Social and Behavioral Science Elective3+ ........... 3 Differential Equations ................... 3 Mechanical Behavior of Materials ................. 4 Composite Materials ..............................COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/201 15 2nd Semester CE HIST ENGL MATH 1205 1301+ 1312+ 1312+ Graphic Fundamentals Engr Design ................ 3 Production and Inventory Control... 4 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ....................................... 3 Introduction to Politics ........................... 4 University Elective 2+ ........................................................................ 3 18 Sophomore Year 1st Semester MME 2434+ CE 2326+ MATH 2313+ POLS 2310+ Mechanics of Materials .... 3 Calculus III ........ 3 Calculus II ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Engineering Alloys ...... 3 Science Elective1+ ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Visual and Performing Arts Elective+ ................................. 3 History of U.......................................................................... to 1865 ......................... 2 History of U..................................................S......................................................................................................................................................... 3 Engineering Probability and Statistics .................................. 3 Electromechanical Systems ............................................ 3 IE IE MME 4385 4391 4413 Statistical Quality Control and Reliability................................................................................................................................... 4 16 2nd Semester MME MME MME MME 2305 3407+ 3314+ 3321+ Communication Elective4+ .......................... 3 Science Elective1+ ....................................................................................

. In addition to the requirements shown in the degree plan. production failures and materials degradation...... In following a particular list............ 3 Senior Professional Orientation .... CHEM 1306 and 1106... and PHYS 2421......................... This concentration prepares a student for advanced study in manufacturing engineering.... and problem solving using Excel.......... written and oral communication skills....... and Polymer Engineering (4310)................................................. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .............................. the student must work on a manufacturing-related project during Senior Design (MME 4419).......COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/202 MME 4316+ Failure Analysis ..................... environmental concerns................. Humanities Menu... Visual and Performing Arts Menu............................ Electives offered are Composite Materials (3314)............................... Engineering Alloys (3321)............. Students work in teams on several hands-on projects that each culminate in a written report and oral presentation.......... 1 14 Total Semester Credit Hours ........... data-analysis techniques........... or other related engineering areas... A C or better is required in MME courses through the junior level................... engineering math applications............ Science Elective: CHEM 1305 and 1105........................................... 3 Nanomaterials and Nanostructures.... 127 + 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A grade of C or better is required................................... The student must complete all the requirements for either Concentration 1 or Concentration 2................. Social and Behavioral Science Menu...... Concentration 2: Manufacturing This concentration utilizes electives in the traditional metallurgical and materials engineering program along with other appropriate program modifications to allow a graduate to perform a variety of professional duties in manufacturing arenas especially involved with materials selection and design.................. 3 Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Design ............. Concentrations Each list of courses permits the student to develop a focus or pursue a particular career objective......... students complete an in-depth program of current interest in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering............ University Elective: UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350............................................ materials science and engineering. Basic Engineering (BE) 1101 Introduction to Engineering Lab (0-3) Students learn and practice team skills... Most concentration courses are offered only once each academic year....................... 3 16 2nd Semester MME MME MME MME MME 4330 4419 4309 4320 4195 Solidification Processes ...... and a range of materials and processes quality control................... Communication Elective: COMM 1301 or COMM 1302............... Concentration 1: General Metallurgical and Materials Engineering This concentration provides students a program of study that emphasizes the major areas of metallurgical and materials engineering..... Students choosing this concentration follow the curriculum outlined above...... materials processing............................. This concentration is intended for students with a broad interest in metallurgical and materials engineering......... 4 Corrosion.......

moments of inertia. auxiliaries. Prerequisite: PHYS 2421 with a grade of C or better. MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311 can be taken concurrently with BE 1301. and geographical information systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 1305 with a grade of C or better. properties. property relationships. study of stress and strain. study of combined stresses. work and energy. first and second laws of thermodynamics and momentum. sections. processing. Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. and processing. Electrical Circuits and Motors (2-3) 1301 2303 2326 2338 2375 2377 Principles of electrical circuits. data-analysis techniques. and performance. centroids. Introduction to Thermal-Fluid Science (2-3) An introduction to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics to include properties. decision process.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/203 Prerequisites: MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311 each with a grade of C or better and department approval. each with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: BE 2338. use of stress-load equations to determine the state of stress in specific structural elements. MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311 can be taken concurrently with BE 1101. 2434 Mechanics I (3-3) A first course in Newtonian mechanics using vectors. materials testing and measurement of properties. Prerequisites: MATH 1312 and BE 2434. pictorial drawings. Prerequisite: MATH 1411 with a grade of C or better. and computational tools. and engineering ethics. Introduction to electronics and introduction to microprocessors for data acquisition. Presentation of the basic equations of thermal-fluid science. impulse and momentum. BE 2338 can be taken concurrently with BE 2375. generator. fundamental engineering concepts. The course will also introduce the student to the engineering profession. behavior. Indicates Texas Common Course Number UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisite: MATH 1411 with a grade of C or better. and motors. Engineering Economy (3-0) Application of economics to engineering and industrial problems which require a knowledge of engineering for their solution. dimensioning. Selection of materials for engineering applications considering interrelationships among structure. Introduction to Engineering (3-0) This course introduces the student to effective methods for solving engineering problems using mathematics. introduction to CAD. 1205 Graphic Fundamentals in Engineering Design (1-3) ( ENGR 1204) Fundamentals of multiview projections. forces in space. Prerequisites: MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311 each with a grade of C or better and department approval. states and fields. including the roles and responsibilities of the engineer in today‖s society. Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering (3-0) Introduction to properties of engineering materials and relationships to their structure. Mechanics II (2-3) ( ENGR 2302) A second course in Newtonian mechanics. continuity. dynamics (kinematics and kinetics) of particles and rigid bodies.

Prerequisites: MATH 2313 and MATH 2326. statistical dependence. Tarquin. Tandon .5464 civilengineering@utep. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 with a grade of C or better. Cheu. graphical and numerical methods. stochastic modeling and random events. distribution functions. basic measuring systems and devices. Osegueda. 3373 Engineering Probability and Statistical Models (2-3) Fundamental concepts of discrete and continuous random variables.747. Turner. Bartell. Prerequisites: MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311. 1401 2303 Civil Engineering 201B Engineering Science Complex 915. and processing. Li. Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering (3-0) Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering (3-0) Introduction to properties of engineering materials and relationships to their structure. Oey. study. David Rozendal PROFESSORS: Ferregut. Walton ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Carrasco. Basic concepts in engineering and science are introduced. computational tools. each with a grade of C or better. The course also introduces the student to the engineering profession. and develop critical thinking basic computer skills and problem-solving skills. properties. behavior. closed-form solutions. formulation analysis and design of physical problems. Prerequisite: CHEM 1305 with a grade of C or better. and department approval. point and interval estimation. each with a grade of C or better. Herbert H. Nazarian. Hernandez.edu PROGRAM CHAIRPERSON: César Carrasco PROFESSORS EMERITI: Howard G. Selection of materials for engineering applications considering interrelationships between structure. Introduction to Engineering and Design (3-3) This course introduces the student to effective procedures for solving engineering and design problems using mathematics. and performance. computer solutions by programming in a higher language and by using mathematical computer packages. and group skills. Engineering (ENGR) 1300 Introduction to Science and Engineering (3-0) This course helps the student develop learning. processing. The creation and proper utilization of statistical decision models for engineering analysis and design are stressed. MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311 can be taken concurrently with ENGR 1401. hypothesis testing and regression analysis. and statistical concepts. improve math application skills. materials testing and measurement of properties. computers. including the roles and responsibilities of the engineer in today‖s society. Emphasis is on measurement. moments. descriptive and inferential statistics.COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING/204 3341 Engineering Analysis (3-0) Applications of mathematical principles to the analysis of engineering problems: derivation and solution of mathematical models of physical systems. moment-generating functions. Applegate.

axial loading. Electro Mechanical Systems (3-0) Circuit equations and network theorems. Introduction to digital logic circuits. Shokouhi CLINICAL PROFESSOR: Marshall Civil Engineering (CE) 2315 Statics (3-0) Newtonian mechanics of force systems. Introduction to Thermal-Fluid Science (3-0) An introduction to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics to include properties. Prerequisite: CE 2315 with a grade of “C” or better. Principles of sensing. water pollution. continuity. Prerequisites: CE 2315 and MATH 1312. study of combined stresses. centroids and friction. 3313 Engineering Measurements (2-3) Theory and practice of surveying measurements with emphasis on precision. sustainable systems. and control. property relationships. each with a grade of “C” or better. and engineer's tape. 2334 2338 2341 2375 2377 General Prerequisite: Junior standing in Civil Engineering or written permission of the instructor for all 3000 and 4000-level courses. Presentation of the basic equations of thermal-fluid science. distributed forces. Prerequisite: MATH 1411 with a grade of "C" or better. equilibrium of particles and rigid body. Motors and generators. Environmental Engineering Fundamentals (3-0) Introduction to the engineering aspects of environmental systems to include such topics as mass and energy balances. actuation. forces in space. Prerequisites: CE 2315 and MATH 2313. transit. work and energy. solid and 3325 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . CE 2338 may be taken conc urrently with CE 2375. air pollution and control. Prerequisite: CE 2338 with a grade of “C” or better. states. and fields. and basic structural analysis. Prerequisites: BE 1205 with a grade of C or better and junior standing in Civil Engineering or department approval. Use of mathematical software and programming languages for modeling and solving engineering problems. and significant figures and the use of the level. errors. Engineering Analysis I (3-0) Applications of mathematical principles and computational techniques to analyze and solve engineering problems. 2326 Economics for Engineers and Scientists (3-0) Application of economics to engineering and industrial problems which require knowledge of engineering for their solution. Mechanics of Materials (3-0) Stress and strain theories. each with a grade of “C” or better.CIVIL ENGINEERING/206 ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Chang. beam and column design. impulse and momentum. first and second laws of thermodynamics and momentum. Mechanics II (Dynamics) (3-0) Dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Prerequisite: MATH 1312 with a grade of “C” or better. torsion.

Prerequisite: MATH 2313 with a grade of “C” or better. hypothesis testing and regression analysis. 3345 3373 3456 4153 4171 4271 4371 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisites: CE 4342 and junior standing in Civil Engineering or department approval. Prerequisites: BE 2434 with a grade of C or better and junior standing in Civil Engineering or department approval. the problem to be selected by the student with the approval of the head of the department. and behavior. 3335 Geological Engineering (2-3) This course introduces students to the principles of physical geology and their applications in the civil-engineering profession. stochastic modeling and random events. relationship between structure. students will have a foundation in geology enabling them to communicate with geologists and geophysicists or to read geological reports that are pertinent to engineering projects. trusses. Prerequisite: BE 2434 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisites: BE 1205 and BE 2303 each with a grade of C or better and department approval. CE 4342 can be taken concurrently with CE 4153. slabs. point and interval estimation. columns. girders. and retaining walls using current design specifications. and beams including applications of static and moving loads on bridges. Emphasis in laboratories will be placed on practical engineering problems that require the use of geology and geophysics. Prerequisites: Senior standing and department approval. Emphasis is on measurement. footings. descriptive and inferential statistics. Can be repeated for credit. The creation and proper utilization of statistical decision models for engineering analysis and design are stressed.CIVIL ENGINEERING/207 hazardous waste management. moment. and governmental regulation. Engineering Problems (0-0-1) Engineering Problems (0-0-2) Engineering Problems (0-0-3) Original investigation of special problems in the student's field. Prerequisite: CE 3343 with a grade of “C” or better. Structural Design I (3-0) Reinforced concrete theory. Hydraulic Engineering (3-3) Essential principles of hydraulics and hydrology demonstrated in the laboratory and applied to the design of hydraulic structures. design of beams. Engineering Probability and Statistical Model (3-0) Fundamental concepts of discrete and continuous random variables. statistical dependence. graphical and numerical methods. distribution functions. 3343 Structural Analysis (2-3) A study of framed structures. Prerequisite: CE 2375 with a grade of “C” or better. formulation analysis and design of physical problems. Water and Waste Laboratory (0-3) Laboratory analysis of water and wastes. moment generating functions. At the end of the course. Civil Engineering Materials (2-3) 3336 Properties of civil engineering materials: measurements and test methods: relationship of properties to performance and their structure and behavior. Prerequisite: Junior standing in engineering or science.

Prerequisite: CE 2326 with a grade of “C” or better. Geotechnical Engineering (2-3) Physical and mechanical properties of soils. and junior standing in Civil Engineering.CIVIL ENGINEERING/208 4181 4182 4183 Co-op Work Experiences (0-0-1) Co-op Work Experiences (0-0-1) Co-op Work Experiences (0-0-1) Work experience in business. permeability. Required of all students prior to graduation. Prerequisites: Selection by the co-op coordinator. Senior Design II (1-3) Final design project. Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering (3-0) 4188 4195 4288 4334 4340 4342 4348 4361 4375 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . each with a grade of C or better. shear strength. and employer. Water and Wastewater Engineering (3-0) Study of basic processes involved in conventional water and wastewater treatment plants. governmental. consolidation. Rankine and Coulomb earth pressure. Transportation Engineering (3-0) Study of planning. Construction Management I (3-0) An understanding of construction management issues such as: procurement of work. location. Prerequisites: CE 3343 and department approval. Senior Professional Orientation (1-0) Introduction to the engineering profession with emphasis on job placement. Coverage includes theory and preliminary design considerations. professional. finance. industrial. seepage. Senior Design I (0-3) Conceptual and preliminary design projects. service. Structural Design II (3-0) Design of steel structures including the application of plastic design methods using current design specifications. design. and administration of transportation systems. Prerequisites: BE 2375 and junior standing in Civil Engineering or department approval. Prerequisites: BE 2434 and BE 2375. program head. a student can use three (3) hours of Co-op Work Experience in his or her degree plan in lieu of a technical elective or an elective in the major. and braced cuts. and an engineering field examination. how the design professionals and the construction professions interact to construct a project. plasticity. professional ethics. or other organizations to provide on-the-job training and professional preparation in the student's area of interest. bidding versus quality-based selection processes. Prerequisite: CE 3313. Prerequisites: Department approval and minimum of 100 hours of Civil Engineering curriculum completed. Upon completion of his or her third work period and submission of a report summarizing the total work experience. A report covering the work experience must be submitted by the student to the departmental co-op coordinator at the end of each work period. shrinkage. and GEOL 3321. CE 3313 may be taken concurrently with CE 4340. economics.

control structures.5030 http://www. 4388 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Visualization methods will also be used to provide an experimental approach to problem solving. and final design projects. Computer Science 234 Computer Science Building 915. Freudenthal. programming environments. including representation. Gates PROFESSORS: Gates. Senior Design (1-6) Conceptual.utep. Skills learned are applicable towards a wide range of applications and career tracks. Teller ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Fuentes. Kreinovich.5480 Fax: 915.cs. Pinheiro da Silva LECTURERS: Romero.747. A procedural programming language will be utilized to solve scientific and engineering-oriented problems. Introduction to problem solving with computers. students learn the basics of programming in high-level languages (such as Python). 4376 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering II (3-0) Presentation of contemporary issues and advanced topics in all areas of civil engineering. Roach. The course does not assume that the student is engaged in mathematically oriented studies. Introduction to Computer Science (3-3) ( COSC 1430) First course for students majoring in Computer Science. Prerequisite: Department approval.edu PROGRAM CHAIRPERSON: Ann Q. and software development methods. Computer Programming for Scientists and Engineers (3-3) Introduction to computers and problem solving with digital computers. Ward ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Ceberio.747. Prerequisites: Department approval and minimum of 115 hours of Civil Engineering Curriculum completed. Longpré. Roy. Prerequisite: MATH 1508 or MATH 1411 each with a grade of C or better. Sassenfeld Computer Science (CS) 1310 Introduction to Computer Programming (3-0) ( COSC 1301) Through the direct manipulation of multimedia such as sounds and images. preliminary. social and ethical aspects of computing.CIVIL ENGINEERING/209 Presentation of contemporary issues and advanced topics in all areas of Civil Engineering. closed laboratory and programming assignments in a high-level language. Modave. 1401 1420 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Cheon. Novick. Prerequisite: MATH 1508 or MATH 1411 each with a grade of C or better.

Fundamental computing algorithms. code reading. Advanced Object-Oriented Programming (3-0) An in-depth exposure to the object-oriented programming paradigm. and Formal Languages (3-0) Theoretical computing models and the formal languages they characterize: finite state machines.. loaders and linkers. and applications including lexical analysis and parsing. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better.g. The language/OS will vary.COMPUTER SCIENCE/209 2401 Elementary Data Structures and Algorithms (3-3) ( COSC 1418) Second course for students majoring in Computer Science.g. including searching and sorting. and introduction to algorithm analysis. Computability. pushdown automata. Capabilities and limitations of each model. compilers. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. trees. C.g. Emphasis on programming in an object-oriented language and on requirements. and the space and time analysis of algorithms. Motif). Haskell. Turing machines and computability. an operating system (e. Systems Programming (3-0) The design and implementation of the programming environment including editors. debuggers and operating systems. search. 2302 3190 3195 3320 3331 3335 3350 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . or advanced topics within a particular language or OS (e. and comprehension. PROLOG. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better. May not be counted toward the major in Computer Science. Prerequisite: CS 3360 with a grade of “C” or better. Prerequisites: CS 2401 and MATH 2300 each with a grade of C or better. and sort algorithms. queues and trees. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better. representation of data using sets. testing.. the mechanics of information transfer and control within digital computer systems. Unix). Intended to alow advanced students to acquire working proficiency quickly. Windows GUI programming. Data Structures (3-3) ( COSC 2418) The definition and implementation of abstract data types. Automata. Special Topics in Programming (1-0) Essential constructs and usage of either a programming language (e. the design and implementation of traversal. elementary abstract data types including linked lists. C++. CGI programming. Java GUI programming. context-free grammars. lists. Required of all students prior to graduation. Junior Professional Orientation (1-0) Introduction to the Computer Science profession with a special emphasis on professional ethics. Prerequisite: CS 3432 and EE 2369 each with a grade of C or better. Perl). and graphs. Computer Architecture II: Advanced Computer Design and Implementation (3-0) The organization and structure and the major hardware components of computers. Prerequisite: CS 1401 with a grade of C or better. stacks. which builds upon programming experience gained in lower-level computer science classes.. regular expressions. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better.

teamwork skills. Computer Graphics (3-0) An introduction to representation and display of graphical information including line. including memory-mapped I/O and interrupt and exception handling. Emphasis on two-dimensional techniques. fetch/decode/execute process. modeling. symbolic coding of instructions and data. Software Engineering: Requirements Engineering (3-0) Methodologies. Participation requires departmental approval and permission of the faculty member(s) supervising the student‖s research. speakers from other institutions and from industry. Other topics include cooperative teamwork. Covered topics include data transmission. including instruction types. requirements elicitation. character. Prerequisite: CS 4310 with a grade of C or better. and curve generation. machine organization. subroutines. and input/output handling at the assembly level. Prerequisites: CS 2302 and MATH 3323 each with a grade of C or better. and documentation. process for defining requirements of a system including feasibility study.COMPUTER SCIENCE/210 3360 Design and Implementation of Programming Languages (3-0) Design features of modern programming languages including flow control mechanism and data structures. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better. verification. and testing of a software system. Prerequisites: CS 2302 and EE 2369 each with a grade of C or better. link control. address resolution. validation. Computer Networks (3-0) Introduction to data communications. multiplexing. project management. Computer Architecture I: Basic Computer Organization and Design (3-3) Compile and assembly processes. These skills are taught in a group environment as part of a research project. second semester of a two-semester capstone project in which students design and implement a real-world application specified in CS 4310. protocol layering. techniques for implementation of these features. comprehension. and addressing modes. Undergraduate Seminar (1-0) Advanced topics in computer science. network topologies. and documentation. Other topics include cooperative teamwork and project management. approaches. and research skills such as formulating a problem. critiquing and feedback skills. 3370 3432 4181 4191 4310 4311 4316 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . encoding. Prerequisite: Department approval. students. including oral presentation skills. formats. and techniques associated with software requirements analysis and definition. first semester of a two-semester capstone project in which students work with a customer to capture and specify requirements for a real-world application. and managing time. Software Engineering: Design and Implementation (3-0) Methodologies. approaches. Prerequisite: CS 3331 with a grade of C or better and departmental approval. and linkage. and techniques associated with software design. Introduction to Computer Science Research (0-0-1) Introduction to the basic skills needed for research. Presentation and discussions of various topics in computer science by faculty. formal specification. implementation. planning research efforts. implementation of data and control structures. report writing skills. switching.

Prerequisite: CS 3320 with a grade of C or better. Compilers and Interpreters (3-0) The structure of compilers and interpreters: lexical syntax and semantic analysis. and distributed systems. cognitive walkthroughs. interface development methods. memory management. and file management. user interface programming. processor scheduling. Theory of Operating Systems (3-0) Process and thread management. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Senior standing in Computer Science and department approval. network and relational data models. Prerequisites: CS 2302 and EE 3384. Topics include system security analysis. including neural. Prerequisites: MATH 4329. file and index organization. 4320 4342 4351 4352 4365 4371 4375 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . usability testing. each with a grade of C or better. optimization and code generation. integrity. Computer Science Problems (0-0-3) Original investigation of special problems selected by the student in consultation with the instructor and with the permission of the Chairperson of the Computer Science Department. and their applications. evaluation techniques such as heuristic evaluation. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better. especially as they relate to confidentiality. design for the desktop. search strategies. I/O management and disk scheduling. 4317 Human-Computer Interaction (3-0) Models and methods of human-computer interaction. Computer Security (3-0) General concepts and applied methods of computer security. symbolic logic. and mobile devices. formal description of programming languages. Human perception and cognition. expert systems. including task analysis. and file security and integrity. communication protocols. properties of input and output devices. and Internet security. concurrency. Artificial Intelligence (3-0) Introduction to basic concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence including knowledge representation. Prerequisite: CS 3350 with a grade of C or better. data security. Prerequisite: CS 3331 with a grade of C or better. identification and authentication. parsing techniques. fuzzy. and interval computations. and applications. and availability of information assets. data description and query languages. protection against external and internal threats. This course can be repeated for credit when topic varies.COMPUTER SCIENCE/211 routing methods. access control and security models. Topics in Soft Computing (3-0) Introduction to basic concepts and techniques of soft computing. prototyping. usercentered design. intermediate languages. Prerequisite: CS 2302 with a grade of C or better. hierarchical. evolutionary. Database Management (3-0) Introduction to database concepts. the Web.

COMPUTER SCIENCE/212

4390

Special Topics in Computer Science (3-0) Selected topics of current interest in Computer Science. Can be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisites: Senior standing in Computer Science and department approval. Research Methods in Computer Science (3-0) An advanced course in the skills needed for research in Computer Science, including a survey of the various research paradigms and experimental protocols used across the field. Within a particular research area of the student‖s choice, the student will learn to judge whether a question is a research question; design an appropriate experiment to answer a research question; interpret the results of an experiment, including selection and application of appropriate statistical tests; and present and defend research orally and in writing. Senior Project (0-0-3) Research and analysis leading to a new publishable theoretical result or a new useful sophisticated piece of software. Includes formal project proposal, generation of a welldocumented report, and a presentation of the results to faculty and students. Intended to allow advanced undergraduate students to actively and productively participate in research. A research topic must be selected by the student in consultation with the instructor and with the permission of the Head of Computer Science. Prerequisite: Department approval.

4392

4393

See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses.

Electrical and Computer Engineering
325 Engineering Annex 915.747.5470 ece@ece.utep.edu CHAIR: Patricia Nava PROFESSORS EMERITI: Austin, Gibson, Schroder, Smith, Williams ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Samir Manoli PROFESSORS: Flores, Liu, Nava, Pierluissi, Riter, Qian, Starks ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Cabrera, Lush, MacDonald, Moya, Nazeran, Sarkodie-Gyan, Usevitch, Zubia ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Gonzalez, Quinones, Rosiles, von Borries LECTURERS: Granda, Pallares, Rubio, Sassenfeld, Woo ADJUNCT PROFESSORS: Abedin, Brower, Goldman, Ramirez-Angulo ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Mireles, Moussavi Electrical and Computer Engineering (EE) General Prerequisite: Junior standing for all 3000 or 4000-level courses. 1105 Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 1305 (0-3) Introduction to Electrical Engineering laboratory procedures, causes, and correction of errors in measurements; theory of operation and usage of basic Electrical Engineering test instruments and report writing. Corequisite: EE 1305. Introduction to Electrical Engineering (3-0)

1305

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/213

An introduction to mathematical and systems concepts that form the basis for electrical engineering. Includes an introduction to circuit components, voltage and current concepts. Also included are sinusoidal signal characteristics, basic filter responses and bandwidth concepts. Corequisite: EE 1105. Prerequisite: MATH 1508 with a grade of C or better. 2151 Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 2351 (0-3) Use of oscilloscopes, function generators, and power supplies to test and study electrical networks and their behavior. Technical writing and computer-aided design. Corequisite: EE 2351. Prerequisite: EE 1105 with a grade of C or better. Laboratory for EE 2369 (0-3) Implementation and testing of basic combinational and sequential digital systems. Corequisite: EE 2369. Prerequisite: EE 1305 or CS 1401 with a grade of C or better. Electric Circuits I (2-1) Theory of electric circuits including Kirchhoff‖s laws, resistive circuits, techniques of circuit analysis, operation amplifier, and transient analysis of RC, RL, and RLC circuits. (1-cr) Lab or recitation emphasizes problem solving, basic instrument procedures and safety (TCCN 2305). Prerequisite: EE1305, MATH 1411, and MATH 1312 with a grade of “C” or higher. Electric Circuits II (3-0)

2169

2350

2351

Continuation of Electric Curcuits I to include sinusoidal steady-state analysis, three-phase systems, Laplace transform in circuits, frequency-selective circuits, Bode diagrams and two-port circuits. Corequisite: EE 2151 and EE 2353. Prerequisites: EE 2350, MATH 1312, and PHYS 2421, each with a grade of “C” or better. PHYS 2421 may be taken concurrently with EE 2351. 2353 Cont. Time Signals and Systems (3-0) Representation and analysis of continuous time signals; time and frequency analysis of linear time – invariant systems; convolution, differential equations. Laplace transform. Fourier series and transform filters. Corequisite: EE 2351. Prerequisite: EE1351, MATH 1312, and MATH 2326 with a grade of “C” or better. 2369 Digital Systems Design I (3-0) Design and synthesis of digital systems using both combinational and sequential circuits. Includes laboratory projects implemented with standard ICs. Corequisite: EE 2169. Prerequisite: EE 1305 or CS 1401 with a grade of C or better. Software Design I (3-0) An introduction to software design with a structured computer language that focuses on the construction of programs consisting of multiple functions residing in multiple files. Covers program creation and top-down-design, basic elements and operations, modular program construction, and the use of programming tools such as make files. Introduces object-oriented programming techniques. Prerequisite: EE 1305 or CS 1401 with a grade of C or better. Computer-aided Digital Design (1-2) Design of digital circuits using CAD tools. Includes schematic capture, simulation, and hardware description language. Prerequisites: EE 2351 and EE 2369, each with a grade of C or better. Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 3338 (0-3)

2372

3109

3138

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/214

Introduction to experimental analysis of junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and junction field effect transistors. Frequency response measurements of operational amplifier circuits. Fourier analysis. PSPICE simulations. Corequisite: EE 3338. Prerequisite: EE 2351 with a grade of C or better. 3176 Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 3376 (0-3) Assembly language programming of microcomputer systems. Corequisite: EE 3376. Junior Professional Orientation (1-0) Professional Orientation for Junior Electrical Engineering Students. Introduction to the engineering profession with emphasis on systems engineering, job placement, and professional and ethical conduct in the engineering workplace. Required of all students prior to graduation. Electromagnetic Field Theory (3-0) Fundamental laws and concepts of static and time-varying electromagnetics, wave propagation in free space and lossy media, wave reflections, transmission lines, basic radiation sources and arrays. Prerequisite: EE 2351, EE 2353, MATH 2313, MATH 2326 and PHYS 2421 with a grade of “C” or better. Electronic Devices (3-0) Energy band models, electron and whole concentrations and transport, p-n junction, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect devices. Prerequisites: PHYS 3325 and EE 3321, each with a grade of C or better. Electronics I (3-0) Electronics I is an introduction to electronic devices and circuits: Amplifier concepts, diodes, field effect transistor amplifiers, bipolar junction transistor amplifiers. Corequisite: EE 3138. Prerequisite: EE 2351 with a grade of “C” or better. Electronics II (3-0) Analysis and design of linear integrated circuits stressing impedance levels, gains, and frequency responses. Complex plane concepts. Active filter and oscillator design. Pulse response and stability analysis. Prerequisites: EE 3338 with a grade of C or better. Discrete Time Signals and Systems (3-0) Representation and analysis of discrete time signals and systems. Z-transform, DT Fourier transform, DFT, FFT, and difference equations. Emphasizes applications to communications, control and signal processing. Prerequisite: EE 2353 and MATH 2326 with a grade of “C” or better. Intro to Communication Networks (3-0)

3195

3321

3329

3338

3340

3353

3354

Familiarization with communication networks through simulation experiments done with computer software. Topics include Protocol Layers, Link Analysis, Circuit & Packet switches, LANs and Internet Protocols. Prerequisites: EE 2351, and EE 2372, each with a grade of C or better. 3372 Software Design II (3-0)

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/215

An introduction to object-oriented software design. Covers basic language elements, operations, and design concepts; emphasizes program design and construction using extensible, reusable modules. Prerequisites: EE 2372, EE 3176, and EE 3376, each with a grade of C or better. 3376 Microprocessor Systems I (3-0) Study of microprocessor programming models, assembly language, macro assemblers, and an introduction to system integration and interfacing. Corequisite: EE 3176. Prerequisites: EE 2372, EE 2369, and EE 2351, each with a grade of C or better. EE 3176 must be taken concurrently with EE 3376. Probabilistic Methods in Engineering and Science (3-0) Problems involving discrete and continuous random variables, distribution functions, moments, statistical dependence, and an introduction to statistical methods. Emphasis on formulation of physical problems. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 and MATH 3323, each with a grade of C or better. Energy Conversion (3-0) Theory and performance characteristics of electro-mechanical energy conversion equipment to include transformers and both d-c and a-c generators and motors and the control devices employed therewith. Prerequisite: EE 3353 with a grade of C or better. Electronic Circuits (4-0) Continuation of networks and introduction to electronic devices: Power computations in sinusoidal steady state. Filters, resonance, transfer functions, and two-port concepts. Diodes, bipolar junction and field effect transistor amplifiers. Corequisite: EE 3138. Prerequisite: EE 2351 and EE 2151, each with a grade of C or better. Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 4342 (0-3) Design and verification of digital systems using simulation. Laboratory implementation using standard, integrated circuits and programmable logic devices. Corequisite: EE 4342. Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 4353 (0-3) Simulation, fabrication and testing of MOS technology. Includes silicon oxidation, lithography, etching, thin film deposition and diffusion. Corequisite: EE 4353. Prerequisite: EE 3329 with a grade of C or better. Engineering Problems (0-0-1) Engineering Problems (0-0-3) Original investigation of special problems in the student's field, the problem to be selected by the student with the approval of the head of the department. A maximum of three (3) credit hours of engineering problems can be applied toward the BS degree. Prerequisites: Senior standing and department approval. Laboratory for Electrical Engineering 4378 (0-3) Use of development tools in the design and implementation of microprocessor-based systems. Corequisite: EE 4378. Co-op Work Experiences (0-0-1) Co-op Work Experiences (0-0-1) Co-op Work Experiences (0-0-1)

3384

3385

3438

4142

4153

4171 4371

4178

4181 4182 4183

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/216

Work experience in business, industrial, governmental, professional, service, or other organizations to provide on-the-job training and professional preparation in the student's area of interest. A report covering the work experience must be submitted by the student to the departmental co-op coordinator at the end of each work period. Upon completion of his or her third work period and submission of a report summarizing the total work experience, a student can use three (3) hours of Co-op Work Experience in his or her degree plan in lieu of a technical elective or an elective in the major. Prerequisite: Selection by the co-op coordinator, department chairperson, and employer.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/217

4195

Senior Professional Orientation (1-0) Introduction to the engineering profession with emphasis on job placement and ethical conduct in the engineering workplace. Required of all students prior to graduation. Electrical Engineering Laboratory II (1-4) Experimental introduction to modulation, communication and IF transformers, transmission lines, wave guides, and antenna measurements. Emphasis on laboratory investigation using specialized instrumentation. Prerequisites: EE 3138, EE 3321 and EE 3340, each with a grade of C or better. EE 3138 and EE 3340 can be taken concurrently with EE 4210. Senior Project Laboratory I (2-4) Research and analysis leading to a preliminary design for an approved engineering project. Includes formal project proposal and work plan; specification of functional, performance and cost goals; generation of computer-aided design documents and simulation or modeling results. Design process is concluded in EE 4230 through prototyping, testing, and revisions. Prerequisites: EE 3195, EE 3176, EE3321, EE3329, EE3340, EE3353, and EE 3376, each with a grade of “c” or better. EE 3329 may be taken concurrently with EE 4220. Laboratory fee required. Senior Project Laboratory II (1-4) Laboratory development of special projects concerned with various electrical systems. Small group or individual semester projects are emphasized. Prerequisite: EE 4220 and EE 3329, each with a grade of “C” or better. Communication Systems (3-0) Spectral density and correlation; sampling theory; linear, angle, and pulse modulation; random signals and noise; effects of noise in modulation systems. Prerequisites: EE 3353 and EE 3384, each with a grade of C or better. Digital Systems Design II (3-0) Design techniques for complex digital systems, with emphasis on computer hardware design and computer-aided techniques, including hardware description languages and hardware simulation packages. Algorithmic State Machine design is emphasized for small systems. Emphasis on problem definition, design, and verification. Corequisite: EE 4142. Prerequisite: EE 3376 with grade of C or better.

4210

4220

4230

4341

4342

4347 Applie d Electro magnet ics (30) The study of static and time-varying electromagnetic principles and laws in their application to modern technology and natural phenomena, as well as to scientific and industrial devices and systems from dc to microwave frequencies. Prerequisite: EE 3321 with a grade of C or better. 4350 Integrated Circuits and Semiconductor Devices (3-0)

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/218

Bipolar and MOS integrated circuits, microelectronic processing technology, microwave devices, photonic devices, and power semiconductor devices. Prerequisite: EE 3329 with a grade of C or better. 4353 VLSI Nanotechnology (3-0) Introduction to the science and technology of integrated device/circuit fabrication. Includes silicon oxidation, lithography, etching, thin film deposition, diffusion and ion implantation. Corequisite: EE 4153. Prerequisite: EE 3329 with a grade of C or better. Real Time Signal Processing and Communications (3-0) A project based course where filtering, spectral analysis, and modulation algorithms are implemented on modern signal processing circuits. This class is programming intensive, emphasizing the practical aspects of design over theory. Prerequisites: EE 3353 and EE 3376, each with a grade of C or better. Fiber Optic Communications (3-0) Light propagation, using ray and electromagnetic mode theories, dielectric slab waveguides, optical fibers, attenuation and dispersion in optical fibers, optical fiber transmitters and receivers, electro-optical devices, and optical fiber measurement techniques. Prerequisites: EE 3438 and EE 3321, each with a grade of C or better. Systems and Controls (3-0) Analysis and design of discrete and continuous time-linear systems. Relationships between frequency and time-domain design. Analysis of system stability and performance using root locus, lead-lag compensation, and other techniques. Applications to electromechanical systems. Prerequisite: EE 3353 with a grade of C or better. Topics in Soft Computing (3-0) Basic concepts and techniques of soft computing, including neural, fuzzy evolutionary, and interval computations, and their applications. Prerequisites: EE 3353 and EE 3384, each with a grade of C or better. Fuzzy Logic and Engineering (3-0) Underlying philosophy of the theory of fuzzy sets and its applications in engineering. Fuzzy logic, fuzzy reasoning and rules, and fuzzy systems. Decision-making in the realm of vague, qualitative and imprecise data. Current models, simulation tools, hardware implementations and their applications will also be covered. Prerequisites: EE 3353 and EE 3384, each with a grade of C or better. Microcontroller Applications (2-3) Use and application of single chip microcontrollers in the design of instrumentation and control systems. Prerequisites: EE 3376 and EE 3340, each with a grade of C or better. Operating Systems Design (3-0) Design and implementation of single and multiuser operating systems. Topics include OS structure, process management, interprocess communication within and between CPUs, memory management, file systems, and I/O. Contemporary operating systems provide design examples. Prerequisite: EE 3372 with a grade of C or better.

4356

4361

4364

4365

4366

4372

4374

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/219

4375

VLSI Design I (3-0) Introduction to CMOS VLSI design and computer-aided VLSI design tools. A term project is required that involves high-level design approaches, layout editing, simulation, logic verification, timing analysis, and testing. Prerequisite: EE 3329 and EE 3109, each with a grade of C or better. CMOS Digital Circuit Design (3-0) Analysis and design of digital integrated circuits in CMOS technology. Discussion of different models for MOS transistors and how to use them to analyze circuit performance. Analysis of logic families and styles including complementary static logic, dynamic, and pass-transistor. Topics include sizing for minimum delay, noise and noise margin, power dissipation and cost. A significant circuit design is assigned as a final project such as an SRAM memory or Content Addressable Memory. Prerequisite: EE3329. EE 3329 can be taken concurrently with EE 4376. Microprocessor Systems II (3-0) A study of a 16/32-bit microprocessor family and companion devices, and various design aspects of microprocessor systems. Corequisite: EE 4178. Prerequisite: EE 3376 with a grade of C or better. Computer Architecture (3-0) Organization of CPUs; memory hierarchies, including cache and virtual memories; parallel processing, including pipelining and multiprocessing. Prerequisite: EE 3376 with a grade of C or better. Microwave Engineering (3-0) Primarily a senior level undergraduate course concerning distributed-elements analysis and design of electric circuits at microwave frequencies. Topics include transmission lines, waveguides, two-port microwave circuits, matching, tuning, resonators, dividers, and directional couplers. Prerequisite: EE 3321 with a grade of C or better. Antenna Engineering (3-0) Introductory antenna theory and design. Fundamentals and definitions, simple radiating systems, arrays, line sources, wire antennas, broadband antennas, and antenna measurements. Prerequisite: EE 3321 with a grade of C or better. Digital Signal Processing (3-0) An introduction to basic one-dimensional processing methods including: sampling and quantization; discrete-time Fourier and z-domain LTI systems analysis, theory of operation and computational aspects of FIR and IIR digital filters; principles of filter design; and the discrete Fourier transform and its application to spectral analysis. Prerequisite: EE 3353 with a grade of C or better. Biomedical Instrumentation (3-0) An introduction to basic concepts in biomedical instrumentation, blood-flow measurements, biopotential amplifiers, and electrodes as well as electrical safety of medical equipment. Prerequisite: EE 3340 with a grade of C or better. Computational Methods in Electrical Engineering (3-0)

4376

4378

4379

4380

4382

4383

4385

4386

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING/220

A presentation of the fundamental numerical techniques used in engineering, including solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations, interpolation and curve-fitting, and solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Prerequisites: EE 3321 with a grade of C or better and familiarity with MATLAB. 4388 Digital Communications (3-0) Techniques of sampling; digital baseband transmission; digital modulation schemes; introduction to coding and fundamental limits on system performance. Prerequisites: EE 3353 and EE 3384, each with a grade of C or better. High Resolution Radar (3-0) Basic theory for design and analysis of radar systems that perform target and surface imaging. Concepts and definitions; the radar range equation; modern radar design; wideband waveforms; and signal processing, synthetic high resolution radar, and synthetic aperture concepts. Prerequisites: EE 3321 and EE 3353, each with a grade of C or better. Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (3-0) Selected topics of current interest in Electrical Engineering. Can be repeated once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisites: Senior standing in engineering and department approval.

4389

4395

See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses.

Industrial, Manufacturing, and Systems Engineering
101 Engineering Science Complex 915.747.5450 meandie@utep.edu PROGRAM CHAIRPERSON: Rafael S. Gutierrez PROFESSORS EMERITI: Thomas M. McLean ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Contreras, Gutierrez, Pennathur ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Pan, Tseng, Zhang Industrial Engineering (IE) 1205 Graphic Fundamentals in Engineering Design for IE Majors (1-3) Fundamentals of multi-view projections, auxiliaries, sections, pictorial drawings, dimensioning; introduction to CAD, decision process, and geographical information systems. Restricted to undergraduate Industrial Engineering majors. Industrial Engineering Laboratory (0-3) Introduction to basic machining and automated manufacturing concepts such as CNC and robotics. Courses include shop demonstrations and visits to area factories. Materials and Manufacturing Processes (3-0) Introduction to properties of engineering materials and relationships to their structure, behavior, and processing; materials testing and measurement of properties. Selection of materials for engineering applications considering interrelationships among structure, properties, processing, and performance. Prerequisite: CHEM 1305 with a grade of C or better. Restricted to sophomore-, junior-, and senior-level Industrial Engineering majors.

2126

2303

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

INDUSTRIAL, MANUFACTURING AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING/219

2315

Statics for IE Majors (2-3) A first course in Newtonian mechanics using vectors. Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, forces in space, centroids, moments of inertia, study of stress and strain; use of stress-load equations to determine the state of stress in specific structural element; study of combined stresses. Prerequisite: MATH 1411 with a grade of C or better. Restricted to sophomore-, junior, and senior-level Industrial Engineering majors. Engineering Economy for IE Majors (3-0) Application of economics to engineering and industrial problems which require knowledge of engineering for their solution. Prerequisite: MATH 1411 with a grade of C or better. Restricted to sophomore-, junior-, and senior-level Industrial Engineering majors. Electro-Mechanical Systems (2-3) Principles of electrical circuits, generators, and motors. Introduction to electronics and introduction to microprocessors for data acquisition. Prerequisite: PHYS 2421 with a grade of C or better. Restricted to undergraduate Industrial Engineering majors. Systems Engineering (3-0) Basics of operations research models, including linear programming models, simplex method, sensitivity analysis, transportation models, assignment models, network flow models, and decision analysis and games. Statistical inferential techniques in IE applications including ANOVA, randomized block designs, factorial designs, linear regression, and response surface methods for process optimization are also included. Prerequisite: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better.

2326

2377

3331

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

INDUSTRIAL, MANUFACTURING AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING/220

3332

Safety Engineering (3-0) A study of man-machine environment and the accident cause-effect relationship. Provides an analytic structure through which safety decision-making can be performed in light of changes in the legal, management, and technical aspects of industrial safety. Prerequisite: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better. Design of Experiments (3-0) Review of the statistical approach to experimental designs. Analysis of variance is introduced as the appropriate method of statistical analysis. Design of experiments is presented with a single factor, with randomized blocks, and with Latin squares. Introduction to factorial designs. Prerequisite: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better. Restricted to junior- and senior-level Industrial Engineering majors. Engineering Probability (2-3) Fundamental concepts of discrete and continuous random variables, distribution functions, moments, moment-generating functions, statistical dependence, stochastic modeling and random events, graphical and numerical methods, descriptive and inferential statistics, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing and regression analysis. The creation and proper utilization of statistical decision models for engineering analysis and design are emphasized. Focus is on measurement, formulation analysis and design of physical problems. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 with a grade of C or better. Restricted to junior- and senior-level Industrial Engineering majors. Operations Research I (3-0) An introduction to deterministic optimization models. These include the concepts of operations research modeling, classical optimization, linear and dynamic programming, and network analysis. Current topics in deterministic modeling are included. Prerequisite: MATH 3323. Restricted to junior- and senior-level Industrial Engineering majors. Methods and Industrial Ergonomics (3-3) Introduction to the design and analysis of human-machine systems and interfaces. Application of biomechanics, anthropometry, and work physiology to the design of work. Study of operations and process analysis, methods analysis, and work design techniques used in manufacturing and service industries. Macro and micro motion analyses, work measurement, and the relation to line balancing, machine loading, scheduling and sequencing, and management control. Prerequisites: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better. Supply Chain Management I: System Modeling (SCM I) (3-0) This course seeks to provide an understanding of the importance of individual components (supplier, manufacturers, distributors and customers) in the operation of the supply chain. Some of the most recent approaches in design for effective and efficient supply chain will be discussed. Students will also be introduced to two application software packages used for supply chain management, SimFlex and SAP/R3. IE 4492 can be taken concurrently with IE 4333. Prerequisites: IE 4492 with a grade of C or better and department approval. Industrial Systems Simulation (2-3) Introduction to systems simulation with special emphasis on: logic and methodologies of discrete event simulation, generation of random numbers and random deviates, and survey of simulation languages. At the end of the course the student should be able to develop simulation models of

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4333

4353

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

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industrial systems and to understand the issues involved in simulation studies. Prerequisite: BE 3373 with a grade of C or better. 4360 International Manufacturing Management (2-3) A comprehensive study of border manufacturing business issues. Includes analyses of the impact of culture on employee recruitment and selection, motivation, attitudes, training, and general labor relations and laws. Technology transfer, international accounting systems, the economics of foreign exchange, international capital budgeting, and the legal environments affecting offshore/border manufacturing are examined. Managerial control functions, materials management/logistics, location analysis, and information flow between manufacturing problems and group projects/presentations are utilized. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. International Manufacturing Engineering (2-3) Practical issues of design, analysis, and integration of international manufacturing engineering components are covered. Emphasis is placed on dynamics of material flow, international planning hierarchies, fundamentals of enterprise resource planning, and the effects of automation on scheduling strategies and materials flow in a labor-intensive environment. Concurrent engineering, function deployment, group technology, process planning, and assembly line design focused on border operations are empasized. A focus on discrete production, with control systems such as MRP, Kanban, JIT, OPT, and synchronous manufacturing are covered. A team project and presentation are required. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Engineering Problems (0-0-3) Original investigation of special problems in the student's field; the problem to be selected by the student with approval of the head of the department. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing and department approval. Industrial Layout (3-0) The design, selection, and layout of buildings and equipment for proper utilization in manufacturing. Prerequisites: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better. Statistical Quality Control and Reliability (3-0) The statistical design of systems for prescribed quality levels and prevention of defects. Prerequisite: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better. Production and Inventory Control (3-0) A study of the principles and theory used in the design and maintenance of production operations and inventory systems. These include forecasting techniques, inventory models, production control models, and assembly-line balancing. Prerequisites: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better. Special Topics in Industrial Engineering (3-0) Selected topics of current interest in Industrial Engineering. Can be repeated once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering. International Manufacturing Internship I (0-0-3) An applied internship in a local manufacturing plan where the student applies the international manufacturing management and engineering fundamentals from IE 4360 and IE 4361. The student intern will rotate between two departments in a U.S. offshore manufacturing facility,

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UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

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working in such areas as testing and inspection, design, quality, production and inventory control, maintenance, purchasing, planning and scheduling, safety and ergonomics tooling, accounting, etc. The mid-term and final examinations will consist of a written report and presentation to the faculty mentor and industrial partner based on the research/design/analysis performed in a department to the faculty mentor and industrial partner. Must be admitted to the International Manufacturing Certificate Internship Program. Prerequisites: IE 4360 and IE 4361, both with a grade of C or better and departmental approval. 4397 International Manufacturing Internship II (0-0-3) An applied internship in a local manufacturing plan where the student applies the international manufacturing management and engineering fundamentals from IE 4360 and IE 4361. The student intern will rotate between two departments in a U.S. offshore manufacturing facility, working in such areas as testing and inspection, design, quality, production and inventory control, maintenance, purchasing, planning and scheduling, safety and ergonomics tooling, accounting, etc. The mid-term and final examinations will consist of a written report and presentation to the faculty mentor and industrial partner based on the research/design/analysis performed in a department. Must be admitted to the International Manufacturing Certificate Internship Program. Prerequisites: IE 4360 and IE 4361, both with a grade of C or better and departmental approval. Senior Design (2-6) Conceptual, preliminary, and final design solutions to engineering problems by students in teams. Prerequisites: Students must be in their last full semester (semester of graduation) and must have a 2.0 GPA or better overall and in their majors. Operations Research II (4-0) An introduction to probabilistic optimization including queuing theory, Monte Carlo techniques of simulation, project scheduling and basic Markov processes. Current topics in probabilistic modeling are included. A project is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: IE 3373 with a grade of C or better. Restricted to senior-level Industrial Engineering majors.

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See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses.

Mechanical Engineering
101 Engineering Science Complex 915.747.5450 meandie@utep.edu PROGRAM CHAIRPERSON: Jack Dowdy PROFESSORS EMERITI: John M. Levosky, John A. Whitacre, Jr. PROFESSORS: Bronson, Craver, Dowdy, Everett, Wicker ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Choudhuri, Chessa, Cooke, Hawkins, Kim, Vargas-Hernandez LECTURER: Lu Mechanical Engineering (MECH)

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

property relationships. deflections. torsion. Introduction to manufacturing processes. continuity. vectors. each with a grade of C or better. Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I (2-3) 1321 2131 2311 2322 2331 2340 2342 2351 3305 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisite: MATH 1312 with a grade of C or better. and control. Materials and Manufacturing Processes (3-0) Properties of engineering materials and failure theories. and friction. Prerequisite: MECH 1321 with a grade of C or better. Mechanics of Materials (3-0) Determination of stresses. Introduction to Thermal-Fluid Science (2-3) An introduction to the basic concepts of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics to include properties. force analysis of truss structures. impulse and momentum.MECHANICAL ENGINEERING/223 General Prerequisite: Junior standing for all 3000 or 4000-level courses. distributed forces. and principal and compound stresses and matrix structural analysis. Mechanics I-Statics (3-0) Principles of mechanics. uses of mathematical software and programming languages for modeling and solving engineering problems. and advanced manufacturing concepts. Introduction to digital logic circuits. automated. Motors and generators. and momentum. actuation. Prerequisite: MECH 1305 with a grade of C or better. Principles of sensing. work and energy. Prerequisite: Math 1411 with a grade of C or better. Electro Mechanical Systems (2-3) Circuit equations and network theorems. Presentation of the basic equations of thermal-fluid science. Prerequisites: MECH 1305 and MECH 1321. and stability of deformable bodies. Manufacturing Engineering Lab (0-3) Basic. states. Prerequisites: MECH 2331 and MECH 1305 (can be taken concurrently) with a grade of C or better. basics of differential equations. 1305 Graphic and Design Fundamentals (2-3) An introduction to solid modeling concepts and software. Shop demonstration and practices. centroids. and fluids. equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. column buckling. including axial loading. first and second laws of thermodynamics. manufacturing equipment and quality assurance. beam bending. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: Math 1312 with a grade of C or better. Mechanics II – Dynamics An introduction to dynamics (kinematics and kinetics) of particles and rigid bodies. dimensioning and basic computer-aided engineering. Engineering Analysis I (3-0) Introduction to basic applications of mathematical principles and computational techniques to analyze and solve engineering problems. force systems.

Fluid Mechanics (3-0) 3313 3314 3315 3323 3334 3345 3352 3354 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and joints. steady periodic states. Prerequisite: MECH 2351 with a grade of C or better. and flow-through pipes. Prerequisite: MECH 2322 with a grade of C or better. fluid statics. force. fluid-flow concepts and basic equations. The applications of these measurement techniques are practiced through various laboratory problems. Fluid Mechanics (3-0) Fluid properties. each with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: MECH 2311 with a grade of C or better. kinematic simulation software. Prerequisites: MATH 2326 or MATH 3326. vibrations. Heat Transfer (3-0) Introduction to heat transfer by conduction. BE 2377. each with grades of C or better. 3312 Thermodynamics (3-0) Continuation of MECH 2311. and BE 3373. Mechanical Design (3-0) Stress analysis. finite volume. and an introduction to control systems. and stress measurements. Prerequisite: MECH 2311 with a grade of C or better. Statistical analysis of experimental data. strain. brakes. Solid Mechanics Lab (2-3) Displacement. and strength of mechanical elements. and radiation. torque. Prerequisite: MECH 2340 with a grade of C or better. both with grades of C or better. fluid resistance. data analysis. and finite element techniques. Engineering Analysis II (3-0) Concepts and modeling of ordinary and partial differential equations for a variety of engineering phenomena using finite difference. acceleration. laminar and turbulent boundary layers. heat transfer in engineering apparatuses Prerequisites: MECH 3312 and 3314. Application of principles of cycles and reactive systems. System Dynamics (3-0) Kinematics of single and multiple degrees of freedom systems. dimensional analysis and dynamic similitude. convection. design of screws. processing and analysis. Prerequisite: MECH 2311 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisites: MECH 2331 and MECH 2322. energy relationships and equilibrium requirements. fasteners. Thermo-fluids Lab (2-3) A continuation of the Mechanical Engineering Lab series with practical measurement problems in the thermo-fluid area. steady and transient states. clutches. deflection analysis. Data acquisition.MECHANICAL ENGINEERING/224 Theory and fundamentals of the measurement of mechanical and thermal properties and the application of these measurements to processes. couplings. viscous effects. This includes the study of various types of measurement devices from traditional gages to modern computer-based data acquisition systems. Introduction to statistics. and probability theories. and shafting. velocity.

Application of principles of cycles and reactive systems. stability and time response. steppter motor control and control simulator. Prerequisite: MECH 3305. the analog computer as a simulation tool particularly as pertains to non-linear control systems. with practical measurement problems in mechanical engineering. internal structural damping. Single and multiple degrees of freedom. energy relationships and equilibrium requirements. Also. flowthrough pipes. fluid-flow concepts and basic equations. forced vibrations. viscous effects. Mechanical Engineering Lab II (0-3) A continuation of the Mechanical Engineering Lab series. fluid statics. Mechanical Engineering Lab III (0-3) A continuation of the Mechanical Engineering Lab series. and a class project requiring students to design a mechanical component and create the necessary code for input to a numerically controlled machine tool used in its manufacture. each with a grade of C or better. Prerequisites: BE 2338 and IE 3126. and an engineering field examination. open and closed loop pneumatic systems. Thermodynamics II (3-0) Continuation of BE 2375. Senior Professional Orientation (1-0) Introduction to the Engineering profession with emphasis on job placement.MECHANICAL ENGINEERING/225 Fluid properties. and Bode Plots. fluid resistance. Prerequisites: BE 2338 and MATH 2326 or MATH 3326. Nyquist diagrams. practice using commercial computer aided modeling software. MECH 4311 can be taken concurrently with MECH 4111. Prerequisite: MECH 4311. each with a grade of C or better. damping. Thermal System Design (3-0) 3365 3376 4106 4107 4111 4195 4311 4316 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . laminar and turbulent boundary layers. and isolation. Prerequisites: BE 2375 and MATH 2326 or MATH 3326. root locus. Automatic Controls (3-0) A study of classical control theory including transfer functions. Dynamic Response (3-0) Fundamentals of vibration theory and system response. servomotor control. dimensional analysis and dynamics similitude. parametric representation of analytical and synthetic curves and surfaces. each with a grade of C or better. 3363 Introduction to Computer Aided Manufacturing (2-3) Geometric modeling theory for computer aided drafting and manufacturing. error analysis and sensitivity functions. fundamentals of modeling solids. Prerequisites: Junior standing and BE 2375 with a grade of C or better. cutting-tool fundamentals. an introduction to modern control theory is presented. with practical measurement problems in mechanical engineering. professional ethics. Prerequisite: MECH 4106. Prerequisite: MECH 3365. Controls Laboratory (0-3) Experiments including spring-mass-damped systems.

microprocessor control. steady periodic states. analysis. concept evaluation. human element in design. Analysis of solid mechanics and structural problems using existing FEA computer programs. Mechanical Design I (2-3) Stress analysis. and couplings. and optimization of fluid flow. heat transfer. actuators. measurement of fluid properties. and energy processes of ducts and piping. product generation. Heat Transfer (3-0) Introduction to heat transfer by conduction. normal and oblique shock. design of screws. and joints. Use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tolls to synthesize thermo-fluid system designs. One-dimensional steady flow. design for assembly. computer aid in design. control theory. each with a grade of C or better. documentation. Types of design problems. Prerequisite: Student must be in the last full semester and have a 2. Prerequisites: MECH 3354. brakes. and economics. and sensors. deflection analysis. sustainability. fluid machinery. Gas Dynamics (3-0) A study of the flow of compressible fluids. concept generation. supersonic flow. steady and transient states. heat transfer in engineering apparatus. design for life-cycle. Principles of Engineering Design (3-0) Design process and methodology from concept through analysis.MECHANICAL ENGINEERING/226 Design. Prerequisites: BE 2375 and MECH 3354. specification development. Prerequisite: CE 2334 or BE 2434 with a grade of C or better. convection. fasteners. and report. Senior Design Project (3-0) Conceptual preliminary and final design solutions to engineering problems by students in teams. ethics. final product. flow with heating and cooling. safety. shafting. strength of mechanical elements. Prerequisite: MECH 3334 with a grade of C or better. function and performance evaluation. clutches. design for manufacturing. Mechatronics (3-0) The integration of electronics and the use of digital controls and microcontroller technology with mechanical systems. heat exchangers. power generation and environmental control systems. Prerequisites: MECH 2351 and MECH 3334 each with a grade of C or better.0 GPA in the major. and radiation. Environmental Control Engineering (3-0) A study of theory and practice leading to the design of heating and air-conditioning systems to control building environments for human comfort. Prerequisite: MECH 3345 with a grade of C or better. discretization of governing equations and solution algorithms. Engineering Problems (0-0-3) 4336 4346 4351 4355 4364 4366 4368 4371 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . layout. and flow parameters. 4326 Finite Element Analysis (3-0) Introduction to finite element methods. Prerequisite: MECH 4315 with a grade of C or better.

Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering. Can be repeated once for credit when topic varies. 4395 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering (3-0) Selected topics of current interest in Mechanical Engineering. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisite: Senior standing and department approval. the problems to be selected by the student with approval of the department chairperson. Prerequisites: Students must be in their last full semester (semester of graduation) and must have a 2.MECHANICAL ENGINEERING/227 Original investigation of special problems in the student's field. 4466 Senior Design (2-6) Conceptual.0 GPA or better overall and in their majors. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. preliminary and final design solutions to engineering problems by students in teams.

Prerequisite: CHEM 1305 with a grade of C or better. using vectors. basic measuring systems and devices. Introduction to Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Design (3-0) This course will introduce the student to effective procedures for solving simple metallurgical and materials engineering and design problems using mathematics. Prerequisites: CHEM 1305 or 1306. study of stress and strain. computers. Selection of materials for engineering applicants. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently with MME 1101. Equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Juan M. Murr PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Lonnie L. processing. including the role and responsibilities of the engineer in today‖s society. first law of thermodynamics. basic measuring systems and devices.747. practice-oriented experiences. and seniors. Stafford. Prerequisites: MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311. and statistical concepts. Murr. considering interrelationships between structure. juniors. use of stress-load 1301 2303 2305 2434 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The course will also introduce the student to the metallurgical and materials engineering profession. forces in space. moments of inertia. and statistical concepts. Prerequisites may be taken concurrently with MME 1301. Varma ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Arrowood. Material and Energy Balance Introduction to process variables.5468 metal@utep. computational tools. Abernethy. each with a grade of C or better. and MATH 2313. and performance. computers. Golding ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Trueba LECTURER: Swanson RESEARCH ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Ramana Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MME) 1101 Intro MME Design Lab (0-3) The course combination of MME 1301/1101 will introduce the student to effective procedures for solving simple metallurgical and materials engineering and design problems. computational tools. centroids. and energy balance applied to materials systems. Materials testing and measurement of properties. practice-oriented experiences. using mathematics. The laboratory portion (MME 1101) will provide some hands-on. Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering (3-0) Introduction to the properties of engineering materials and relationships to their structure. Prerequisites: MATH 1411 and ENGL 1311. Herrera PROFESSORS: Fisher.edu PROGRAM CHAIRPERSON: Lawrence E. The course will also introduce the student to the metallurgical and materials engineering profession. properties. and processing. stoichiometry. materials balance. The laboratory portion (MME 1101) will provide some hands-on. Restricted to sophomores. Mechanics of Materials (3-3) A first course in Newtonian mechanics. behavior. including the role and responsibilities of the engineer in today‖s society.METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING/226 Metallurgical and Materials Engineering M201 Engineering Science Complex 915. McClure. each with a grade of C or better. with grades of C or better.

Nanobiomaterials phenomena. powder. General Prerequisite: Junior standing for all 3000 or 4000-level courses. Anisotropic plane-stress elasticity. Composite Materials (3-0) Introduction to fiber-reinforced materials. Prerequisite: MME 2303 with a grade of C or better. Biomaterials (3-0) Selection and use of materials (especially polymers. and superconductor properties of materials. optical. and critical fiber length. ceramics. Application and fabrication of selected materials. design. fundamental issues relating to biological materials and biomimetics applied to materials development and applications. and composites) in biological systems. Nanofunctional Physical Metallurgy (4-0) The underlying principles of physical metallurgy dealing with the structure-property relationships are covered. Delamination and other performance problems. and phase equilibriums including nanophases. solidification. Engineering Alloys (3-0) The study of the selection and specification of engineering alloys for the use in industrial applications. second. stud of combined stresses. 3308 3309 3312 3314 3321 3406 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and junior standing. Prerequisites: BE 2375 with a grade of C or better and junior standing. chemical equilibria. Prerequisite: MATH 1411 with a grade of C or better. and junior standing. function. Introduction to Electronic Materials Science (3-0) Basic theory of the electrical. selection. semiconductor. and macro defects. interfacial shear. and manufacturing of composite products. and third law of thermodynamics applied to materials systems. metals. activity. fluid flow. 3306 Rate Processes in Materials Systems (3-0) Introduction to reaction kinetics. and Junior standing. each with a grade of C or better. diffusion. Prerequisite: MME 3407 with a grade of C or better or department approval. magnetic. Topics include thermochemistry. and electrochemical potential. Prerequisite: PHYS 2421 with a grade of C or better. micro. each with a grade of C or better. phase equilibria. Classical theory of laminates.METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING/227 equations to determine the state of stress in specific structural elements. Topics will include crystal structures. nano. and heat transfer applied to materials systems. Mechanical performance. Prerequisites: BE 2434 and BE 2303. solutions. and nanophases affecting properties. Manufacturing technology for strong fibers and whiskers. deformation and annealing. wrought. Biomaterials and medical devices including implants and implant degradation and failure. and MATH 2326 or MATH 3326. CHEM 1306. precipitation hardening. Prerequisites: BE 2303 with a grade of C or better and junior standing. testing and characterization of biomedical materials. Applied Chemical Thermodynamics (3-0) First. and particle state are covered. Adhesion. Topics related to ferrous and non-ferrous metals in the cast. multiaxial strength of anisotropic materials. solid solutions. Prerequisites: ENGR 1401. nucleation and growth.

and MME 3308.METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING/228 3407 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (3-3) The microstructure-property relationships are emphasized in this course. Prerequisites: BE 2375. service. and uranium.0 grade point average. aluminum. fracture. Can be repeated for credit as topic varies. Corrosion (3-0) Application of electrochemistry and engineering principles to the corrosion. 4171 4271 4175 4181 4182 4183 4195 4275 4303 4309 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . titanium. internships. MME 3306. Prerequisite: Selection by the coordinator. polymers. A report covering the practice-oriented experience must be submitted by the student to the departmental coordinator or the chair at the end of each internship‖s practice period. and thermodynamics. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a 3. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Senior standing. martensite. Can be substituted for only metallurgy electives or technical electives. creep. professional ethics. Undergraduate Research in Metallurgy (0-0-2) Supervised individual research. passivity. or other sectors to provide on-the-job training. Metals Processing (3-0) Analysis of the unit operations involved in metal and mineral production using the principles of material and energy balance. strengthening mechanisms. and composite materials are analyzed in terms of current theories and models. heat transfer. Survey of processing operations for specific metals such as copper. and protection of metals and alloys. A student may use three (3) hours in his or her degree plan in place of a technical elective or as a free elective or additional credit in the degree program. Prerequisite: BE 2303 and MME 3406 each with a grade of C or better. The topics include twinning. industrial.0 grade point average. reaction kinetics. and an engineering field examination. each with grade of C or better. magnesium. The deformation processes for metals. Can only be substituted for metallurgy electives or technical electives. Required of all students prior to graduation. practice-oriented experiences. fluid flow. governmental. Senior Professional Orientation (1-0) Introduction to the engineering profession with emphasis on job placement. department chairperson. dislocation theory. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a 3. professional. Engineering Problems (0-0-1) Engineering Problems (0-0-2) Undergraduate Research in Metallurgy (0-0-1) Supervised individual research. and mechanical testing. fatigue. and professional preparation in the student‖s area of interest. Practice-Oriented Experiences (0-0-1) Practice-Oriented Experiences (0-0-1) Practice-Oriented Experiences (0-0-1) Work experience in business. and employer. Prerequisite: BE 2303 with a grade of C or better or department approval. plastic deformation. ceramics. iron.

Can be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Senior standing. varistors. Nanomaterials and Nanostructures (3-0) Topics will include zero-dimensional nanostructures (including nanoparticles). the problem to be selected by the student with the approval of the head of the department. heat transfer. failure analysis techniques. nanomaterials fabrication and applications. Topics include material and process selection. Design project teams make written and oral 4322 4330 4371 4375 4404 4413 4419 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and sensors. Materials Processing (3-3) Materials and processes in soldering. Weekly discussions explore issues of professionalism including engineering ethics. and junior standing. kinetics. Structural Characterization (3-3) The application of modern instrumentation and techniques to structural characterization problems. Can only be substituted only for metallurgy electives or technical electives. quality control. powder metallurgy. Prerequisite: MME 2303 with a grade of C or better. etc. Prerequisite: BE 2303 with a grade of C or better. materials selection and evaluation. electron microscopy (TEM-SEM). Can be repeated for credit. nanotubes (especially carbon nanotubes). The course covers the principles involved in metal casting. project planning and resource management.METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING/229 4316 Failure Analysis (3-0) The mechanisms of materials failure. glass and ceramic production. soldering and plastic injection molding. Analysis using material and energy balance. etc. and optimization methods. and electron probe analysis are included. vapor deposition. CMOS transistors and ICs advanced metal casting. ceramic/metal joining. Prerequisites: BE 2303 and BE 2434. Both theory and operation are emphasized. brazing. welding. Applications: crystal growth. coatings. ferrites. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a 3. codes. brazing. and non-destructive testing methods are discussed with emphasis on analysis and interpretation of case studies. each with a grade of C or better.0 grade point average. printed wiring boards. and thermodynamics. surface modification. glass/metal seals. and junior standing. nanorods. and standards. Prerequisite: MME 4303 with a grade of C or better. X-Ray analysis. Undergraduate Research in Metallurgy (0-0-3) Supervised individual research. Metallurgical and Materials Design and Practice (3-3) Introduction to creative industrial problem-solving and the design process in materials engineering. public safety and environmental concerns in design. Engineering Problems (0-0-3) Original investigation of special problems in the student's field. fluid flow. Student design teams define and investigate problems in metallurgical processing. economic decision making in terms of cost evaluation and profitability. solidification. nano-thin films). etc. ceramic capacitors. and nanostructure characterization. one and twodimensional nanostructures (nanowires. Prerequisite: MME 3407 with a grade of C or better or department approval. fabrication of patterned multi-layers. Solidification Processes (3-0) Fundamentals of solidification in processes commonly found in manufacturing.

Prerequisites: MME 3407. MME 4303. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. with a grade of C or better. and BE 2326. as well as a final written report and presentation.METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING/230 progress reports. Laboratory time is devoted to design projects.

........ The master‖s degree in Speech Language Pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech................... 261 Occupational Therapy .... the Master of Science in Kinesiology............. The College is located approximately one mile from the main UTEP campus...... Also offered are health-profession programs are offered that lead to the Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science (Medical Technology)........... the Master of Public Health.... faculty offices............. and Hearing Association and is required for a graduate to qualify for national certification by the American Speech... Assistant Dean Ms.D...........747................) in Interdisciplinary Health Sciences designed to respond to the growing national shortage of doctorally-trained professionals in health-related fields and to address significant health research needs related to communities in the Unites StatesMexico border region......................................................................................................... Kathleen A.......... the Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology.......................................7207 chs@utep............ 265 Social Work ........ 263 Speech-Language Pathology ................................ 261 Physical Therapy ............ Curtis........ the Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology.........................................METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING/231 College of Health Sciences Clinical Laboratory Science ..... Language.......... The Physical Therapy Program is accredited by the Commission of Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education........................................... the Bachelor of Social Work............... Jeri Sias...... and is housed in a large.............................................................. the Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion............ Mark Lusk...................................... Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 1101 North Campbell Street 915.............. The Bachelor of Social Work Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education............. and the Master‖s in Physical Therapy.. and Hearing Association and for Texas licensure to practice as a speech-language pathologist....................................... at 1101 North Campbell Street... The Occupational Therapy Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education... The Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences........ Associate Dean Dr.......... 233 Public Health Sciences .......... 270 Dr............747.... the Masters in Occupational Therapy.............. 260 Rehabilitation Sciences .................... Language..... modern building which includes classrooms...7280 915............ Connie Gamboa.. 249 Pharmacy .edu College of Health Sciences The College of Health Sciences offers a doctoral degree (Ph. laboratories............... UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 ..... 241 Kinesiology ....... Dean Dr............

The Speech. Hearing. Anatomy laboratory space is shared with the Physical Therapy Program. The El Paso-Las Cruces-Ciudad Juárez international border community. hematology/immunohematology. the OT Program has an ADL lab where students are able to practice adapting to cooking and activity of daily living activities such as cooking techniques for persons with a variety of disabilities. The Simulation Laboratory provides an opportunity for students to practice skills before making direct contact with patients or clients in clinical settings. and treatment procedures. Hospitals and other health-care agencies throughout the area are utilized for student and faculty clinical practice. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2009-2010 . and customs and consular offices on both sides of the border provide the student unique learning experiences in the control and prevention of disease. and research. The Physical Therapy labs provide students opportunities to develop skills in the evaluation of patient problems and the application of treatment modalities. and Language Clinic provides a community service as well as the first clinical practicum experience for Speech-Language Pathology students. the El Paso City-County Health Department and a number of voluntary agencies provide patient-care opportunities for learning. The Clinical Laboratory Science program has four new laboratories: microbiology. Agencies such as the Pan American Health Organization.5 million. The Occupational Therapy labs provide students the opportunity to develop skills in therapeutic media. with a population of more than 2. evaluations. programmed units. In addition. Training and support on instructional software development are available to all interested students and faculty. The program has a separate lab for analyzing a person‖s gait.COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES/233 and lounges for both students and faculty. the U. and laboratory computers. Equipment reservation and checkout are also available to students and faculty from the College of Health Sciences.S. chemistry. The Independent Learning Center provides audio-visual programs. Immigration and Naturalization Service. In addition. provides a wide variety of clinical experiences for both students and faculty of the College.

Restricted to undergraduate juniors and seniors. May be repeated for credit with the approval of the department and instructor as the topic varies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. 3180 3280 3380 Special Topics in Health Sciences (1-0) Special Topics in Health Sciences (2-0) Special Topics in Health Sciences (3-0) Special topics of current interest. Course will vary with the faculty directing the independent study. Restricted to undergraduate juniors and seniors. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2009-2010 .COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES/234 College of Health Sciences (CHSC) Courses 3115 3215 3315 3415 3515 3615 Independent Study (0-0-1) Independent Study (0-0-2) Independent Study (0-0-3) Independent Study (0-0-4) Independent Study (0-0-5) Independent Study (0-0-6) Conduct intensive study on a health science topic with faculty supervision.

Students graduating from The University of Texas at El Paso are eligible for two national certification examinations: Students passing the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (Chicago. A grade of C or higher must be earned in each CLS class. and microbiological procedures that aid in the diagnosis. including hepatitis vaccinations.747. Students completing core and pre-professional courses must apply for the professional phase of the program in the spring semester. DNA. and sophisticated laboratory techniques such as flow cytometry. electronic charting. a student might be required to attend clinical preceptorships outside the El Paso area at the student‖s expense.0 and a 2. treatment. Room 717 915. Torres Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science The Clinical Laboratory Science Program (CLS). IL) exam can use the initials MT after their name. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Before enrolling in the clinical practicum.8214 clsc@utep. clinics. As a professional. students are selected to enter the professional phase once a year in the fall semester. a recent physical examination. PCR. and current immunizations. and two-dimensional electrophoresis help ensure the accuracy and precision of their work. All students must perform within limits of safe practice. A limited number of clinical sites are available. Applicants must have a minimum CGPA of 2. fingerprinting. Chicago. All work performed by students during the clinical practicum is under the direct supervision of clinical faculty and countersigned by them. which are crucial to the curriculum. Ackall ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Dominguez CLINICAL ASISISTANT PROFESSOR: Saleh INSTRUCTORS: Lewis. Depending on the number of clinical affiliates available in any one year. the student must withdraw from the program and reapply the following year. If a student earns less than a C. University and clinical faculty interview all applicants. Suite 670. Their services are utilized in hospitals. health insurance. DC) exam can use CLS (Clinical Laboratory Scientist) after their names. as well as in business and industry. and private laboratories. Computerized databases. The faculty in the program reserves the right to refuse the opportunity of a student to perform tests or procedures on patients if the student gives evidence of unsafe and/or ineffective laboratory techniques. and prevention of disease. molecular. current CPR certification. therefore. To engage in clinical practicums. formerly Medical Technology. biochemical. 60631). The Safe Practice and Procedure Policy for students is posted on the Official Bulletin Board in the College and in the Clinical Laboratory Science Program Office.5 GPA in math and sciences and must pass a background check.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/233 Clinical Laboratory Science Program 1101 North Campbell Street.edu PROGRAM COORDINATOR: Lorraine Torres PROFESSOR EMERITA: Gail W. Clinical Laboratory Scientists perform a variety of immunological. all students must show evidence of professional liability insurance. students passing the National Certification Agency (Washington. Illinois. is designed to prepare graduates to function as professional members of the health care team. The University of Texas at El Paso's Clinical Laboratory Science Program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (8410 West Bryn Mawr. the student must exhibit a commitment to the welfare of patients. Students who are deemed unsafe by faculty will be dropped and will receive an F in the clinical course. Students must complete all lower-division course work prior to enrolling in the professional Clinical Laboratory Science courses. CLS students must undergo and pass a background check.

Hours. THEA 1313 Introduction to Theatre g. ARTH 1305 Art History of the Western World I c. MUSL 1324 Music Appreciation f. Course Number. ART 1300 Art Appreciation b. and Title 3 ENGL 1311 Expository English Composition or ESOL 1311 Expository English Composition for Speakers of ESL or ENGL/COMM 1611 Written and Oral Communication 3 ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing or ENGL 1313 Writing and Literature or ESOL 1312 Research and Critical Writing for Speakers of ESL 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking or COMM 1302 Business and Professional Communication Note: COMM/ENGL 1611 can be used to satisfy both the ENGL 1311 and COMM 1301 requirements. MUSL 1321 Introduction to Music History e. THEA 1390 Introduction to the Art of the Motion Picture 3 HIST 1301 History of U. to 1865 3 HIST 1302 History of U.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/234 Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science University Core Requirements 45 semester credit hours Pre-Professional Courses 27 semester credit hours CLSC Professional Program 61 semester credit hours Total 137 semester credit hours University Core Requirements (45 semester credit hours). All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a ―C‖ or better.S. 4 MATH 1411 Calculus 4 CHEM 1305 General Chemistry I with CHEM 1105 Lab 4 CHEM 1306 General Chemistry II with CHEM 1106 Lab 3 Humanities PHIL 2306 Ethics (required course) 3 Visual and Performing Arts Menu (Select one 3-hour course) a.S. Since 1865 3 POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics 3 POLS 2311 American Government and Politics 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology (required) 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry or UNIV 2350 Interdisciplinary Technology and Society 45 hours Pre-Professional Courses (27 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 3 BIOL 3320 Genetics 4 CHEM 3324 Organic Chemistry I with CHEM 3124 Lab 2 CLSC 2210 Introduction to the Clinical Laboratory 4 MICR 2440 General Microbiology UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . ARTH 1306 Art History of the Western World II d.

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/235 3 CLSC 1 CLSC 2 CLSC 27 hours 2310 2111 2212 Medical Diagnostic Applications Medical Diagnostic Applications Lab Clinical Laboratory Computations UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

2) Summer 1 2 CLSC 3252 Body Fluids 1 CLSC 3153 Body Fluids Lab 3 hours Summer 2 3 CLSC 3 hours nd 3351 Concepts in Immunodiagnostics 2 Semester (Fall) 3 CLSC 3354 1 CLSC 3155 3 CLSC 3356 2 CLSC 3257 2 CLSC 3258 1 CLSC 3159 2 CLSC 3260 1 CLSC 3161 15 hours 3 Semester (Spring) 2 CLSC 3262 1 CLSC 3164 2 CLSC 3264 3 CLSC 3366 2 CLSC 3268 3 CLSC 3368 2 CLSC 3269 1 CLSC 3165 16 hours 4 Semester (Fall) 4 CLSC 4471 4 CLSC 4472 2 CLSC 4273 2 CLSC 4274 12 hours 5 Semester (Spring) 2 CLSC 4275 4 CLSC 4476 4 CLSC 4478 1 CLSC 4100 1 CLSC 4180 12 hours th th rd Clinical Chemistry I Clinical Chemistry I Lab Hematology I Hematology I Lab Opportunistic and Parasitic Infections Opportunistic and Parasitic Infections Lab Serology Serology Lab Clinical Chemistry II Clinical Chemistry II Lab Hematology II Infectious Diseases Infectious Diseases Lab Immunohematology Immunohematology Lab Hematology II Lab Preceptorship I Preceptorship II Clinical Education Clinical Investigation Clinical Management and Supervision Preceptorship III Preceptroship IV Ethics Seminar UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/236 CLSC Professional Program – Upper-Division Courses (61 semester credit hours) st 1 Semester (Summer 1.

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/237 Total semester credit hours = 133 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .

and molecular techniques. Clinical Chemistry I Lab (0-2) This laboratory provides the basic skills necessary for performing clinical chemistry-laboratory analyses. hematology. each with a grade of C or higher. quality control. instrument and method assessment/verification. Tours of hospital. The course also includes fundamental concepts and techniques which underlie applications to the various clinical laboratory disciplines. hemostasis. molecular techniques. immunohematology. These laboratory assays provide the basis for most body-fluids analyses which will be demonstrated in the clinical hospital laboratory rotations. and post-analytical components of urine and body-fluid analysis. Restricted to Clinical Laboratory Science majors. each with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite: CLSC 3252. analytical and post-analytical components of microscopy and urinalysis and the application of safety to laboratory practice. BIOL 3320. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. Introduction to the Clinical Laboratory (2-0) Information on the careers available in the clinical laboratory as well as an overview of each department in clinical pathology are presented. These laboratory assays provide the basis for most clinical chemistry analyses which will be demonstrated in the clinical hospital laboratory rotations. each with a grade of C or higher. immunology. including pre. Several fundamental laboratory methods are performed by the students using common clinical chemistry principles. BIOL 1305. urinalysis. Prerequisites: BIOL 1305. microbiology. Corequisite: 2210 2212 2310 3153 3155 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . reference labs. molecular pathology. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. and CHEM 1106. and MATH 1411. and CHEM 1306. and specialized clinical laboratories are arranged. Restricted to Clinical Laboratory Science majors. Several fundamental laboratory methods are performed by the students using common body-fluids principles. hematology. BIOL 1107.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/238 Clinical Laboratory Science (CLSC) 2111 Medical Diagnostic Applications Lab (0-2) This laboratory provides basic skills necessary for performing and applying molecular techniques used in molecular pathology as described in CLSC 2211. BIOL 3320. CHEM 1306. principles and practices of quality control and quality assurance. and laboratory emphasis on sampling and applications to include pre-analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Medical Diagnostics Applications (2-2) This course encompasses diagnostic applications in the clinical laboratory.and post-analytical assurance and the application of safety to the laboratory practice. Clinical Laboratory Compositions (2-0) This course encompasses clinical diagnostic computations required in the clinical laboratory setting including clinical chemistry. Prerequisites: MATH 1411. analytical. Corequisite: CLSC 2111. Areas covered include genetics. calculations. Prerequisites: CHEM 1306. The course will focus on the specific applications of molecular techniques within a variety of disciplines such as infectious diseases. and transplantation. forensic science. Restricted to Clinical Laboratory Science majors . Body Fluids Lab (0-2) This laboratory provides the basic laboratory skills necessary for performing urine and body-fluids analyses. including statistical concepts.

and methods. streptococcal infections and others. Prerequisites: CHEM 1305. and microscopic identification of white blood cell disorders including. hemoglobin electrophoresis. CHEM 1106. acute and chronic leukemias. and CHEM 3324 each with a grade of C or better and department approval. but not limited to. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. Prerequisite: Department approval. Serological testing and interpretation for disease such as syphilis. analytical and post-analytical components of hematology and the application of safety to laboratory practice. Emphasis is placed on both manual and automated laboratory procedures. leukemias. Corequisite: CLSC 3258. pharmacokinetics. and hematological procedures performed on body fluids. This course involves the study of maturation. concentration. the 3161 3164 3165 3252 3257 3258 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisites: CLSC 3155 and CLSC 3354 each with a grade of C or better and department approval. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control. CHEM 1105.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/239 CLSC 3354. 3159 Opportunistic and Parasitic Infections Lab (0-2) This laboratory is designed to introduce the fundamental concepts and vocabulary of diagnostic mycology/parasitology. toxicology. and molecular diagnostics. Prerequisite: CLSC 3351 with a grade of C or better. and reactive processes. hormones. and post-analytical components of urine and body fluid analysis. and identification of mycological and parasitological specimens is reviewed and discussed. Corequisite: CLSC 3262. Corequisite: CLSC 3153. Serology Lab ((0-2) Serological techniques commonly used in the clinical laboratory are encompassed with emphasis on direct application to the clinical laboratory. cell identification. Hematology I Lab (0-4 This course is designed to develop the skills and techniques necessary to recognize and identify normal and abnormal components of the hematopoietic system. and the relationship of cells with specific diseases such as anemias. analytical. It includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. Opportunistic and Parasitic Infection (2-0) This course covers the pathogenesis and the epidemiology of opportunistic microorganisms. Prerequisites: CLSC 3356 and CLSC 3257. each with a grade of C or higher. The isolation. Laboratory exercises are performed to learn basic methodology in the isolation and identification of fungi and most common parasites found in clinical specimens. Clinical Chemistry Lab II (0-2) A continuation of CLSC 3155 with an emphasis in therapeutic and abused-drug monitoring. Corequisite: CLSC 3260. Hematology II Laboratory (0-2) This course is a continuation of CLSC 3257 (Hematology I Lab) with emphasis on peripheral blood and bone marrow differentiation. serological. mononucleosis. Corequisite: CLSC 3264 Body Fluids (2-0) This course covers the chemical. Special hematology procedures will be discussed including stains. lymphomas. Prerequisite: MICR 2440 with a grade of C or better. morphology and function of blood cells and their role in disease processes. CHEM 1306. Corequisite: CLSC 3356.

It also encompasses hemostasis and laboratory determination of hemostatic disorders. Prerequisites: CLSC 3356 and CLSC 3257. Prerequisite: CLSC 3351 with a grade of C or better. Prerequisites: MICR 2440 with a grade of C or better and department approval. quality control. and blood component preparation. transplantation and rejection. Immunohematology Lab (0-2) This laboratory course is designed to develop and refine skills in performing antigen and antibody identification techniques. Interactions among immune cells and their secretions are examined. identification of blood-group antigens and antibodies. Corequisite: CLSC 3466. and component therapy. It includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. transfusion practices and related complications. analytical and post-analytical components of immunohematology and the application of safety to laboratory practice. analytical and post analytical components of clinical microbiology and the application of safety to laboratory practice. and anti-microbial susceptibility for a variety of pathogens causing diseases. and the application of safety to laboratory practice. The role of the immune system in tumor growth. Corequisite: CLSC 3159. Various methods utilized in the clinical laboratory are demonstrated and discussed. Prerequisites: CLSC 3354 and CLSC 3155. Clinical Chemistry II (2-0) A continuation of CLSC 3354 with an emphasis on therapeutic drugs of abuse. Corequisite: CLSC 3164. Corequisite: CLSC 3366. and autoimmune diseases is covered. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. pharmacokinetics. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. and post- 3262 3264 3267 3268 3269 3351 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisites: MICR 2440 with a grade of C or better and department approval. The etiology and treatment of white blood cell disorders are discussed. 3260 Serology (2-0) This course emphasizes the detection of disease by the use of serological techniques. toxicology. and methods. Clinical Microbiology II Lab (0-2) This laboratory course develops the basic skills and techniques necessary in the identification of a variety of human pathogens found in the clinical laboratory. Corequisite: CLSC 3368. Concepts in Immunodiagnostics (3-0) This course covers basic clinical immunology and applications in laboratory medicine. including the study of the interaction of blood vessels and platelets with both the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. It includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. Infectious Diseases Lab (0-4) This laboratory course develops the basic skills and techniques necessary for the isolation. Laboratory procedures for processing and selecting blood products. Prerequisite: Admission to the upper-division. blood storage procedures. compatibility testing. analytical. Hematology II (2-0) This course emphasizes white-cell formation and function.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/240 pre-analytical and post-analytical components of clinical microbiology. hormones. identification.

Ethics (1-0) A study of legal and ethical principles in health care and laboratory medicine. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. and post analytical components of hematology. HLA testing and component therapy are explored. Prerequisites: CHEM 1305. Principles and application of professionalism are addressed. parasites. the student is given the opportunity to develop a broader understanding of the clinical laboratory scientist‖s role as a health professional. Clinical Microbiology II (4-0) This course covers the pathogenesis and epidemiology of pathogenic organisms found in the hospital laboratory: bacteria. It includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. and admission to the upper-division. Prerequisites: CLSC 3358 with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: CLSC 3269. Seminar (1-0) Through a variety of learning experiences. Chemical laboratory fundamentals and procedures are presented and related to normal and abnormal human physiology and biochemistry. Infectious Diseases (3-0) This course covers the pathogenesis and the epidemiology of pathogenic microorganisms. and post-analytical components of clinical chemistry. Included in this course are review and practice examinations. analytical. Corequisite: CLSC 3267. Prerequisite: Department approval. The diagnosis of infectious diseases by various cultivation. The diagnosis of infectious diseases by various cultivation isolation and identification techniques are discussed. and panel discussions. 3354 Clinical Chemistry I (3-0) This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. including seminars. analytical. electrophoreses and chromatography is discussed. and hemolytic disease of the newborn are presented. fungi. Corequisite: CLSC 3257. CHEM 1306 CHEM 1106 and CHEM 3324. fluorometry. Prerequisites: CLSC 3351 and CLSC 3260. Hematology I (3-0) This course is a comprehensive study of the process of blood formation. compatibility testing. CHEM 1105. analytical. and viruses. as well as ongoing professional career development. blood grouping. and identification techniques is discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 2313 with a grade of C or better. and post-analytical components of clinical microbiology and the application of safety to laboratory practice. department approval. lectures. spectrophotometry. Prerequisite: MICR 2440 with a grade of C or better. isolation.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/241 analytical components of clinical immunology. Basic concepts of laboratory mathematics. Immunohematology (3-0) The immuno-chemical reactivity of blood antigens and antibodies. Corequisite: CLSC 3155. 3356 3366 3368 3466 4100 4180 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Prerequisites: MICR 2440 with a grade of C or better and department approval. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. It includes morphological and biochemical relationships of red blood cell formation in healthy vis-a-vis diseased states. colorimetry. as well as the performance and application of current methods in hematologic analysis and technology.

Financial management is covered including profit and loss. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. body-fluid analysis. body-fluid analysis. design. program and student assessments. Preceptorship III (0-0-4) 4476 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . clinical microbiology. 4274 4275 4471 4472 Preceptorship II (0-0-4) Instruction and practice of techniques and their applications in the clinical laboratory setting (practicum) in hematology. Corequisite: CLSC 4471. and serology. accreditation agencies. Limit six (6) credits. data collection and dissemination. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and pre-analytical. including the development of continuing education programs. immunohematology. coagulation. and post-analytical components of laboratory science and the application of safety to laboratory practice. Prerequisite: Department approval. clinical chemistry. Clinical Investigation (2-0) This course covers research in medical and clinical settings with foci on research planning. clinical chemistry. performance appraisals. Students design and perform research to include proposal writing. clinical microbiology. Prerequisite: CLSC 3368 with a grade of C or better.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/242 4190 Special Problems (0-0-1) 4290 Special Problems (0-0-2) 4390 Special Problems (0-0-3) Independent study in clinical laboratory research. Correlation of disease states and changes in laboratory values are also included in case studies. evaluation instruments. analytical. analytical. Clinical Laboratory Management and Supervision (3-0) Introductory course in the principles and techniques used in the supervision and management of the clinical laboratory in the health professions. Prerequisite: Department approval. and serology. The course includes human-resource management. and materials/inventory management. cost/benefit. 4273 Clinical Education (2-0) This course covers basic education techniques and terminology to train and educate users and providers of laboratory services. Prerequisite: Department approval. interviewing. communication skills. budget and strategic planning. immunohematology. and test development. Prerequisites: CLSC 3368 with a grade of C or better and department approval. curriculum design. federal and state regulations. coagulation. Prerequisite: Department approval. management and motivational theories. reimbursement requirements. and the implementation of a laboratory quality improvement program. and evaluation of published studies. Corequisite: CLSC 4372. and post-analytical components of laboratory science and the application of safety to laboratory practice. Preceptorship I (0-0-4) Instruction and practice of techniques and their applications in the clinical laboratory setting (practicum) in hematology.

(3) an attitude of cooperation and concern in interpersonal relationships and interdisciplinary communication and team building with patients and healthcare workers. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and preanalytical. (2) the ability to integrate previous knowledge and skills with more sophisticated instrumentation and advanced methodology. Public Health Sciences 1101 North Campbell Street. and skills to the clinical laboratory practices and procedures. evaluating. implementing. Room 717 915. each with a grade of C or higher. Graduates of this 120-semester hour program function in planning. Rosenthal LECTURERS: Ibarra-Mejia. experiences. Education. and professional competencies specific to the practice of health promotion/education. Duarte-Gardea. and post-analytical components of laboratory science and the application of safety to laboratory practice. Thompson.CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE/243 A continuation of CLSC 4471 and 4472.edu CHAIR: Maria Duarte-Gardea PROFESSOR EMERITUS: John Conway PROFESSORS: Weigel ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Armijos. The program is nationally accredited by the Society for Public Health UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . analytical. (3) an attitude of cooperation and concern in interpersonal relationships and interdisciplinary communication and team building with patients and healthcare workers. The curriculum prepares graduates to successfully complete the National Examination for the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) credential. Prerequisites: CLSC 4471 and CLSC 4472. Loza. The curriculum is designed to provide a broad general-educational foundation as well as the basic skills. The student will also be given the opportunity to demonstrate: (1) the ability to apply knowledge. and skills to the clinical laboratory practices and procedures. Tomaka ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Ford. and (4) an appreciation of the ethical foundations of clinical laboratory sciences. and schools. and (4) an appreciation of the ethical foundations of clinical laboratory sciences. and coordinating health promotion and healtheducation programs and activities in a variety of public and private settings. each with a grade of C or higher. Corequisite: CLSC 4478. Students complete a common core of courses in Health Promotion and then select a minor in Community Health.8214 hsci@utep. private business. The student will also be given the opportunity to demonstrate: (1) the ability to apply knowledge. or another approved area. attitudes.747. attitudes. Prerequisites: CLSC 4471 and CLSC 4472. Rascon-Lopez Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion The Health Promotion Degree prepares graduates to function as successful professionals in health education and health-promotion settings such as community and public health agencies. and post-analytical components of laboratory science and the application of safety to laboratory practice. analytical. (2) the ability to integrate previous knowledge and skills with more sophisticated instrumentation and advanced methodology. 4478 Preceptorship IV (0-0-4) A continuation of CLSC 4471 and 4472. This course includes the principles and practices of quality control and preanalytical. Corequisite: CLSC 4478.

Hours Course Number and Title 3 ENGL 1311 Expository English Composition or ESOL 1311 Expository English Composition for Speakers of ESL or ENGL/COMM 1611 Written and Oral Communication 3 ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing or ENGL 1313 Writing and Literature or ESOL 1312 Research and Critical Writing for Speakers of ESL 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking or COMM 1302 Business and Professional Communication Note: COMM/ENGL 1611 can be used to satisfy both the ENGL 1311 and COMM 1301 requirements. Students can receive transfer credit for up to 62 semester hours earned in the student‖s associate degree pr ogram. The Bachelor of Health Promotion program includes a practicum component. Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion with a minor in Community Health or an approved minor University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Pre-requisites 14 semester credit hours Health Promotion Core 36 semester credit hours Minor 18 semester credit hours Electives 8 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion with a minor in Education University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Pre-requisites 14 semester credit hours Health Promotion Core 35 semester credit hours Minor 18 semester credit hours Electives 9 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Bachelor of Science in Health Promotion Degree Plan (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours) All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better. Students who participate in internships with agencies or school districts requiring background checks must successfully pass background checks in order to complete program requirements. 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Professional foundation courses can account for up to 24 semester hours of this total transfer.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/242 Education/American Association of Health Education Baccalaureate Program Approval Committee (SABPAC). All undergraduate students majoring in Health promotion must obtain a minimum grade of C in all HSCI courses in order to graduate. Students who do not meet this requirement must requirement must retake the courses and achieve a minimum grade of “C.” Transfer Students Certified Allied Health professionals should see the Department Chair for a degree plan.

ART 1300 Art Appreciation b.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/243 4 4 3 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2111 Lab Humanities Menu (Select one 3-hour course) a. LING/ANTH/ENGL 2320 Introduction to Linguistics f. HIST 2301 World History to 1500 g. ARTH 1305 Art History of the Western World I c. ANTH 1301 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archeology b. ENGL 2312 English Literature c. ANTH 1302 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology c. ENGL 2318 Introduction to American Poetry f. ECON 1301 Basic Issues in Economics d. Since 1865 3 POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics 3 POLS 2311 American Government and Politics 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences (Select 3 hours) a. DANC 1304 Dance Appreciation e. PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy i. ARTH 1306 Art History of the Western World II d. HIST 2302 World History Since 1500 h. MUSL 1324 Music Appreciation g. PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology g.S. SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry ___ or UNIV 2350 Interdisciplinary Technology and Society 44 hours Program Pre-requisites (14 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 4 CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry 3 ENGL 3359 Technical Writing 3 PSYC 1303 Statistical Methods 14 hours Health Promotion Core* (36 semester credit hours) for Community Health Minor or Approved Minor 3 HSCI 1301 Foundations in Health Science and Health Promotion 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 HSCI 3301 Community Health Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . THEA 1313 Introduction to Theatre h.S. to 1865 3 HIST 1302 History of U. ENGL 2311 English Literature b. MUSL 1321 Introduction to Music History f. FILM 1390 Introduction to the Art of the Motion Picture 3 HIST 1301 History of U. PHIL 2306 Ethics 3 Visual and Performing Arts Menu (Select 3 hours) a. GEOG 1310 Cultural Geography e. ENGL 2314 Introduction to American Drama e. ENGL 2313 Introduction to American Fiction d.

HSCI 3309 Health Psychophysiology i. HSCI 3303 Current Health Issues and Problems e. HSCI 4308 Independent Study in Health q. HSCI 4301 Teaching Health in Secondary School m. HSCI 2309 First Aid and Safety Practices c. HSIC 3304 Health Perspectives in Aging f. HSCI 4303 Family Life and Human Sexuality n. HSCI 3320 Selected Topics in Health Science l. HSCI 3307 Death Dying and Bereavement h. Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . HSCI 3316 Community Nutrition k. Students who do not meet this requirement must requirement must retake the courses and achieve a minimum grade of “C. Prevention. and Control HSCI 3311 Introduction to Epidemiology HSCI 3312 Theories and Methods of Health Behavior Change HSCI 3315 Research for the Health Professional HSCI 4307 Health Promotion Planning and Implementation Select 9 hours from the following HSCI menu: a.” Minor Field (18 or 21 semester credit hours) Select one minor from the following: Community Health Minor* HSCI 4304 Public Health Administration HSCI 4309 Program Evaluation in Health Science HSCI 4311 Community Health Education HSCI 4312 Grant Writing in the Health Professions HSCI 4600 Practicum in Community Health or Approved Minor (18 semester credit hours) Students can select any university minor field. HSCI 4304 Public Health Administration o. HSCI 4311 Community Health Education __ s. HSCI 3310 Media Development for Health Professions j.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/244 3 3 3 3 3 3 9 HSCI 3306 Environmental Health HSCI 3308 Disease Characteristics. Electives (8 semester credit hours) Select upper-division courses in Health Promotion. HSCI 4312 Grant Writing in Health Professions 36 hours All undergraduate students majoring in Health promotion must obtain a minimum grade of C in all HSCI courses in order to graduate. HSCI 4306 Health Concerns of Pre-adolescents and Adolescents p. HSCI 3302 Computerized Systems for Health Professionals d. HSCI 4309 Program Evaluation in Health Science r. HSCI 2303 Wellness Dynamics b. HSCI 3305 Substance Abuse g.

HSCI 3315 Research for the Health Profession k.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/245 All undergraduate students majoring in Health promotion must obtain a minimum grade of C in all HSCI courses in order to graduate. HSCI 3310 Media Development for Health Professions j.” Education Minor (18 semester credit hours) Students selecting all-levels Health Education minor must confirm general education and professional education requirements with the Coordinator of the Health Promotion Department and with the Certification Office in the College of Education. EDPC 3300 Developmental Variations RED 3342 Reading and Study in the Content Areas SCED 3311 Curriculum Planning in the Secondary School Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . HSCI 3309 Health Psychophysiology i. HSCI 4307 Health Promotion Planning and Implementation p. HSCI 4309 Program Evaluation in Health Science r. HSCI 3307 Death Dying and Bereavement h. and Control 3 HSCI 3311 Introduction to Epidemiology 3 HSCI 3312 Theories and Methods of Health Behavior Change 3 HSCI 4303 Family Life and Human Sexuality 3 HSCI 4201 Health Education for Elementary Schools 3 HSCI 4301 Teaching Health in Secondary Schools 9 Select one course from the following HSCI menu: a. HSCI 4308 Independent Study in Health q. HSCI 4304 Public Health Administration n. Students who do not meet this requirement must requirement must retake the courses and achieve a minimum grade of “C. HSCI 3303 Current Health Issues and Problems e. HSCI 3320 Selected Topics in Health Science m. HSCI 2303 Wellness Dynamics b. Students who do not meet this requirement must requirement must retake the courses and achieve a minimum grade of “C. HSCI 3302 Computerized Systems for Health Professionals d. HSCI 4311 Community Health Education __ s. HSCI 4312 Grant Writing in Health Professions 35 hours All undergraduate students majoring in Health promotion must obtain a minimum grade of C in all HSCI courses in order to graduate. HSCI 3316 Community Nutrition l.” Health Promotion Core* (35 semester credit hours) for an All-Levels Education Minor 3 HSCI 1301 Foundations in Health Science and Health Promotion 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 HSCI 3301 Community Health 3 HSCI 3305 Substance Abuse 3 HSCI 3306 Environmental Health 3 HSCI 3308 Disease Characteristics. HSCI 2309 First Aid and Safety Practices c. Prevention. HSCI 3304 Health Perspectives in Aging g. HSCI 4306 Health Concerns of Pre-adolescents and Adolescents o.

PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/246 SCED TED 3317 4698 Multicultural Education in the Secondary School Internship: All-levels Health Education Electives (9 semester credit hours) Select upper-division courses in Health Promotion (junior or senior-level courses). 1318 Wellness of the Young Child (3-0) ( TECA 1304) A study of the factors that impact the well-being of young children including healthy behavior. HSCI 3305 Substance Abuse d. HSCI 4306 Health Concerns of Pre-adolescents and Adolescents 18 hours Health Sciences (HSCI) 1301 Foundations of Health Science and Health Promotion (3-0) ( PHED 1304) Provides information essential to understanding factors that affect human health: health determinants. Visits to community-health work sites might be required. Dying. fitness. HSCI 3303 Current Health Issues and Problems b. Local and national standards and legal implications of relevant policies are included. Fundamentals of Nutrition (3-0) ( BIOL 1322) Includes a study of the nutrients and their sources. ethical issues and societal trends. HSCI 4303 Family Life and Human Sexuality ___ e. health indices. also the components of adequate diets and local. national. health professions. their metabolic functions and their effects on well-being and health problems. Wellness Dynamics (3-0) ( PHED 1305) Study of the concept of wellness and its components. and world nutritional problems. food. Students who are not majoring in Health Promotion can obtain a minor in Health Promotion. Course includes 15 hours of field experience. nutrition. roles and functions of health professionals and professional health organizations. HSCI 3304 Health Perspectives in Aging or HSCI 3307 Death. and Bereavement c. health behavior change theories. Minor in Health Promotion (18 semester credit hours) Required Courses: 3 HSCI 1301 Foundation of Health Science and Health Promotion 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 HSCI 3301 Community Health 9 Select 9 hours from the following menu: a. and safety practices. self-assessment of current health status and application of scientific health and fitness principles for the improvement and maintenance of 2302 2303 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Investigates professional practice settings. Prerequisite: BIOL 1305 with a grade of C or better.

and sociological effects of drug abuse on the individual and society. Equipment maintenance fee required. and communication. chemical. health. Environmental Health (3-0) Examination of the environment and its relationships to disease causation. Death. Discussions on the physical. Substance Abuse (3-0) Pharmacological. Community Health (3-0) Study of international. Prerequisite: HSCI 1301. stress management. and reporting in the health sciences. 2309 First Aid and Safety Practices (3-0) ( PHED 1306) Current practices in first aid. reaction to life-threatening situations. safety practices. Emphasizes the principles and concepts of environmental health and environmental health hazards. and risk management to reduce accidents. biological. psychological. and distribute health resources. decisionmaking. organize. Course content includes theories of aging. computer-assisted communication techniques and computer applications in data collection. and alternatives to institutionalization. Health Perspectives in Aging (3-0) Examination of the lifelong aging process (physical and emotional) and health factors affecting the elderly. Emphasizes individuals' responsibility regarding peer pressure. Dying. and behavioral-sociological factors of the human environment. consumer health and health services. Prerequisite: Department approval. self-esteem. Computerized Systems for Health Professionals (2-2) Focuses on skills and knowledge required of a professional in health sciences. Field trips can be required. and local health problems and the governmental and voluntary health agencies which deal with them. solutions suggested through coordinated efforts of school. Application of computers to gather.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/247 health throughout the life span. state. Selected Topics in Health Science (3-0) Topics not included in or going beyond the regular offerings. Field trips can be required. Course fee required. national. Includes exposure to a variety of lifetime physical activities. Prerequisite: HSCI 1301. and welfare organizations. Can include the study of factors related to mental-emotional health. development of self-esteem. suicide. treatment of typical minor injuries in recreational activities. stress. and international health and border health concerns. and Bereavement (3-0) 3320 3301 3302 3303 3304 3305 3306 3307 Indicates Texas Common Course Number (TCCN) . analysis. Current Health Issues and Problems (3-0) Current scientific findings regarding contemporary health problems and current trends associated with the promotion of health. Incidence and prevalence of specific community health problems and diseases. health maintenance.

social. and bereavement. The course provides in-depth knowledge of the medical. death. examination of cultural. and social implications of death and dying as related to health promotion and wellness. legal. 3308 Disease Characteristics. biological. grief. ethics and lifestyle management related to dying. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/248 Concepts. and environmental factors involved in promoting health and preventing disease. and HSCI 3301. Prevention. financial. behavioral. physical. and control of common communicable and noncommunicable human diseases. attitudes. and Control (3-0) Study of the nature. MATH 1320. treatment. Prerequisite: BIOL 2313. prevention. CHEM 1407.

Includes discussion of the major behavioral theories. materials. MATH 1320 and PSYC 1303. Health Education for Elementary School Teachers (1-2) This course focuses on the identification and study of current health concerns. Prerequisites: Junior status. hydration importance. and practices in the community with emphasis on underserved populations. Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle (3-0) Provides a comprehensive look at the nutritional needs and changes of people in the various stages of life. ethical. adolescent health problems and their relationship to instruction. and nutritional advice for special populations. principles and practice of teaching health. Examines various approaches of motivating and maintaining positive behavior change. Includes associated legal. adulthood and aging with emphasis on factors influencing normal growth and development. Sports Nutrition Focuses on the role of nutrition in physical performance of competitive and recreational sports participants. Basic concepts of the science of epidemiology are presented with emphasis on preventive health behavior. Prerequisite: HSCI 2302 with a grade of C or better. Development of nutrition policy and legislation and ethical and legal issues in nutrition practice. athlete meal plan analysis. such as adolescents and vegetarians. Teaching Health in Secondary School (3-0) Overview of both traditional and innovative teaching methods. Analysis of nutrition problems. Prerequisite: HSCI 2302 with a grade of C or better. and resources in middle and secondary schools. including pregnancy and lactation. Prerequisites: HSCI 3308. Prerequisites: HSCI 3301 and PSYC 1303. adolescence. and improving health in the community. selection and implementation of effective instructional strategies. Emphasis is on athlete nutritional needs during training and before/during/after competition. Responsibilities of schools for curriculum development and instruction. Theories and Methods of Health Behavior Change (3-0) An introduction to the issues and techniques of health behavior change. maximizing athletic performance based on fuel sources. analysis of ergogenic aids. maintaining. investigation of the coordinated school-health program. curriculum development. Practice of effective teaching 3312 3315 3316 3322 3323 4201 4301 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . athlete eating disorders.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/249 3311 Introduction to Epidemiology (3-0) Provides the health care professional an understanding of the disease process from an epidemiologic and community-health point of view. childhood. Community Nutrition (3-0) Introduction to the role of nutrition in promoting. and evaluation of instruction and the school health program. and moral issues. Prerequisite: HSCI 2302 with a grade of C or better. infancy. Includes nutritional studies of groups and community resources and programs providing nutritional services. Prerequisites: HSCI 1301 and HSCI 3301. Research for the Health Professional (3-0) Introduction to basic research concepts and processes which enable health professionals to use and participate in health-science research.

Supervised by university faculty and personnel from the health agency. and the responsibility for sexual behavior as it relates to family values. and health education programs in the community. Health Promotion Planning and Implementation (3-0) Explores major components of health-promotion program planning and implementation.7 or better. and department approval. each with grades of C or better. plus 12 hours from the Health Science core. problems. Prerequisites: Nine (9) hours from the Health Science core and junior status. Prerequisite: Junior-level status. and practices of administering health programs in voluntary and governmental agencies.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/250 techniques. Can include field trips. Prerequisites: Twelve (12) semester hours from Health Science core. Emphasizes the utilization of various planning models and intervention strategies necessary to plan and implement health education and health-promotion programs. Field experience required. transitions. health promotion. written consent of Health Science Program Coordinator. theories. Health Concerns of Pre-adolescents and Adolescents (3-0) Addresses major health problems. methods. including locating funding sources. materials used in wellness intervention. Grant Writing in the Health Professions (3-0) The course addresses all aspects of grant-proposal preparation and submission. Independent Study in Health (0-0-3) Independent study of a designated health problem or health education issue or trend. motivation. examination of society's beliefs and attitudes. small-group process. Prerequisite: HSCI 4307 and HSCI 4309. Course fee required. 4303 Family Life and Human Sexuality (3-0) The study of sexuality as an aspect of health. Leadership. and techniques involved in evaluation of health promotion and health-education programs. Public Health Administration (3-0) Study of organizational skills and basic principles. Prerequisites: HSCI 1301 and HSCI 3301. Practicum in Community Health (1-0-20) Individually arranged practicum with a community health agency providing a minimum of 320 hours of experience and 15 hours of seminar. and organizational change. problem solving. and developing and writing the proposal. formulating a budget. Students typically take the course in the last semester before 4304 4306 4307 4308 4309 4311 4312 4600 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and lifestyle choices of preadolescents and adolescents. Program Evaluation in Health Science (3-0) An introduction to the issues. interorganizational relationship. Prerequisites: HSCI 3301 and HSCI 3315 each with a grade of C or better. conflict resolution. Community Health Education (3-0) Emphasizes contemporary theories. Prerequisites: HSCI 3315 and HSCI 4307 each with a grade of C or better. HSCI 3301. Prerequisites: Health Science GPA of 2. health risks. Field experience required.

HSCI 4309. (2) program prerequisites.edu CHAIR: Darla Smith PROFESSOR: Meeuwsen ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Garland O‖Quinn ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: King. Physical Therapy. Students interested in a career in the fitness industry or in graduate study in Exercise Science.747. See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Students wishing to obtain a teaching certificate must select the Physical Education Concentration and the Education Minor. (4) program concentration. Gamboa. and HSCI 4311. Students who participate in internships with agencies or school districts requiring background checks must successfully pass the background check in order to complete the practicum requirement.7 or better. (3) Kinesiology core.7245 rmdiaz@utep. Smith ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Dorgo. Kinesiology 1101 North Campbell Street. and departmental approval. Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Physical Education and a Minor in All-levels Physical Education University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 7 semester credit hours Kinesiology Core 24 semester credit hours Physical Education Concentration 23 semester credit hours Education Minor 18 semester credit hours Electives 4 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Exercise Science and an Approved Minor University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 15 semester credit hours Kinesiology Core 24 semester credit hours UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCES/251 graduation. HSCI GPA of 2. 12 additional hours of Health Sciences courses. (5) minor field of study. Riskowski. Vella CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Pederson LECTURERS: Baquera-Shaw. Room 502 915. Students who already have a bachelor's degree in some other field and who wish to pursue a teaching certificate to teach physical education should refer to the College of Education section of this catalog. Prerequisites: HSCI 4307. Torres Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology The Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology requires (1) a general University core. Students desiring to pursue a Master of Science in Kinesiology should consult the Graduate Catalog. or similar fields should select the Exercise Science Concentration. and (6) possibly electives.

Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Exercise Science (Pre-Occupational Therapy) and a Minor in Psychology University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 21 semester credit hours Kinesiology Core 21 semester credit hours Exercise Science Concentration 15 semester credit hours Psychology Minor 18 semester credit hours Elective-Upper Division 1 semester credit hour Total 120 semester credit hours Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology Degree Plan-with Physical Education Concentration (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours) See University Core Curriculum section of this catalog. see the UTEP Graduate Catalog. To complete this degree plan in the most efficient manner. Prerequisites for programs at other universities might differ.KINESIOLOGY/250 Exercise Science Concentration 15 semester credit hours Minor 18 semester credit hours Electives.Upper Division 4 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Exercise Science (Pre-Physical Therapy) University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 20 semester credit hours Kinesiology Core 21 semester credit hours Exercise Science Concentration 15 semester credit hours Biology Minor 20 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Students who are interested in pursuing a Master‖s Degree in Occupational Therapy are required to complete the following degree plan which is designed to fulfill the prerequisites for admission to the graduate program in Occupational Therapy at UTEP. For specific prerequisites to admission into the Occupational Therapy program at UTEP. All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better. Kinesiology Core (24 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . students should use the following specific options for the University core: 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences or MATH 1508 Precalculus 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 4 BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2111 Lab Program Prerequisites (7 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 7 hours Note: All Kinesiology courses used to satisfy degree requirements must be completed with a C or better.

in Kinesiology Degree Plan-Exercise Science Concentration (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours).in Physical Education (23 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 2315 Introduction to Athletic Training or HSCI 2309 First Aid and Safety 2 KIN 3217 Fundamental Movement Skills 2 KIN 3219 Individual Games and Sports 2 KIN 3221 Team Games and Sports 2 KIN 3223 Lifetime Physical Activities 3 KIN 3315 Principles of Teaching Physical Education 3 KIN 4319 Teaching Elementary Physical Education 3 KIN 4320 Adventure Curricula in Physical Education 3 KIN 4321 Teaching Secondary Physical Education 23 hours Education Minor (18 semester credit hours) Students selecting All-Levels Physical Education Certification must confirm general education and professional education requirements with the KIN Advisor and the Certification Office in the College of Education. Program Prerequisites (15 semester credit hours) 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 4 CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry or 4 PHYS 1403 General Physics I Kinesiology Core (24 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3313 Statistics and Measurement in Kinesiology UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The core requirements for this concentration are the same as for the Physical Education concentration.KINESIOLOGY/251 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3313 Statistics and Measurement in Kinesiology 3 KIN 3331 Anatomical Kinesiology 3 KIN 4312 Exercise Physiology 3 KIN 4313 Biomechanics 3 KIN 4314 Special Populations 3 KIN 4330 Fitness Programs and Appraisal 24 hours Concentration. EDPC 3300 Developmental Variations SCED 3311 Curriculum Planning in the Secondary School RED 3342 Reading and Study in the Content Areas SCED 3317 Multicultural Education in the Secondary School TED 4698 Internship II in All-Levels Physical Education Electives (4 semester credit hours) B. All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better.S.

KIN 4301 Personal Training b.S in Kinesiology Degree Plan for students who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in Physical Therapy (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours).KINESIOLOGY/252 3 KIN 3 KIN 3 KIN 3 KIN 3 KIN 24 hours 3331 4312 4313 4314 4330 Anatomical Kinesiology Exercise Physiology Biomechanics Special Populations Fitness Programs and Appraisal Exercise Science Concentration (15 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 4323 Current Issues in Exercise Science 3 KIN 4334 Coronary Intervention Programs 3 KIN 4340 Scientific Principles of Strength Training and Conditioning 6 Select 6 hours from the following menu or any approved upper division Kinesiology elective (Note: Students interested in NSCA Personal Trainer should select KIN 4301 and students interested in Strength and Conditioning Specialist Certification should select KIN 4351 ) a. 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences or MATH 1508 Precalculus 4 CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry 4 CHEM 1408 Introductory Chemistry 3 PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology Program Prerequisites (20 semester credit hours) 4 PHYS 1403 General Physics I 4 PHYS 1404 General Physics II 3 PSYC 1303 Statistical Methods 3 PSYC 2310 Life Cycle Development 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 ENGL 3359 Technical Writing 20 hours UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . To complete this degree plan in the most efficient manner. See University Core Curriculum section of this catalog. KIN 4350 Internship d. students should use the following specific options for the university core. Electives (4 semester credit hours) B. KIN 2315 Introduction to Athletic Training or HSCI 2309 First Aid and Safety c. KIN 4351 Internship in Strength Training and Conditioning ___ 15 hours Approved Minor Students can select an approved minor in another field with consultation from a Kinesiology faculty advisor. Note: The Business Minor is recommended for students interested in employment in the private fitness and exercise industry. All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better.

S. 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences I or MATH 1508 Precalculus 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 4 BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2111 Lab 3 SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology Program Prerequisites (21 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2113 Lab 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 PSYC 2310 Life Cycle Development 3 PSYC 2312 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology 3 ENGL 3359 Technical Writing 1 CLSC 3150 Medical Terminology 4 CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry or PHYS 1403 General Physics I 21 hours Elective (1 semester credit hour) Note: All Kinesiology courses used to satisfy degree requirements must be completed with a C or better. See University Core Curriculum section of this catalog. Kinesiology Core (21 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3331 Anatomical Kinesiology 3 KIN 4312 Exercise Physiology UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .KINESIOLOGY/253 Note: All Kinesiology courses used to satisfy degree requirements must be completed with a C or better. Kinesiology Core (21 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3331 Anatomical Kinesiology 3 KIN 4312 Exercise Physiology 3 KIN 4313 Biomechanics 3 KIN 4314 Special Populations 3 KIN 4330 Fitness Programs and Appraisal 21 hours Exercise Science Concentration (15 semester credit hours) is the same for all Exercise Science degree plans. students should use the following specific options for the university core. in Kinesiology Degree Plan for students who are interested in pursuing a Masters in Occupational Therapy (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours). All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better. B. To complete this degree plan in the most efficient manner. Biology* (20 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 4 BIOL 1306 Organismal Biology with BIOL 1108 Lab 4 BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2113 Lab 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 3 BIOL 4388 Mammalian Physiology 1 ZOOL 4181 Vertebrate Physiology Methods 20 hours * An optional 3-hour upper-division biology elective required to obtain an official Biology minor.

or 4324. Psychology Minor (18 semester credit hours) 3 PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology 3 PSYC 1303 Statistical Methods 2 PSYC 3201 General Experimental Psychology 1 PSYC 3101 Lab for General Experimental Psychology 9 Upper-division psychology.KINESIOLOGY/254 3 KIN 4313 Biomechanics 3 KIN 4314 Special Populations 3 KIN 4330 Fitness Programs and Appraisal 21 hours Exercise Science Concentration (15 semester credit hours) is the same for all Exercise Science degree plans. 18 hours Indicates Texas Common Course Number UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 3330. 3348. Must choose at least one from 3320.

and emergency care for common injuries among athletes and the physically active. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better and department approval. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. and risk management. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Includes taping and bracing experience.KINESIOLOGY/255 Kinesiology (KIN) 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology (3-0) ( PHED 1301) Historical and philosophical aspects of kinesiology and sports. augmented feedback. Fee required. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. and development of skills in theory and practice. Motor Learning and Control (3-0) A study of principles that govern the control and the learning of movements. stages of learning. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3202. Track and Field . and individual differences. Racquet Sports . Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Topics include equipment. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. KIN 1303 can be taken concurrently with KIN 2332. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3203. practice conditions. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. music. Orientation to programs in public and private settings. Course fee required. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Introduction to Athletic Training (3-0) Introduction to the field of athletic training with emphasis on injury prevention. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. review. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. review. Fee required. Developmental Gymnastics . facilities. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. KIN 1303 can be taken concurrently with KIN 2315.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. drills.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Dance . Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better and department approval. PSYC 2310 recommended. 2315 2332 2342 3201 3202 3203 3204 3205 Indicates Texas Common Course Number UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Minimum grade of C is required to pass.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. basic evaluation. rules. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3205. Fee required. and development of skills in theory and practice.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis and evaluation of stroke techniques and strategies. and development of skills in theory and practice. and choreographic styles relating to the dances of Spain and Spanish America. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisite: Department approval. review. review. Topics include control of coordinated movement.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Fee required. and development of skills in theory and practice. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3204. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Basketball . traditions. Fee required. Spanish Dance (2-2) Provides information on the origins.

Aquatics . review. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3207. development gymnastics. Twenty (20) hours of field experience and observation required. Course fee required. Course fee required. Teacher candidates will prepare. review. Soccer . implement. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. review. review. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3209. and dance. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Baseball and Softball . Team Games and Sports (1-2) This course provides teacher candidates exposure to and preparation in teaching multiple team games and sports. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. nonlocomotor. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3210. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. Course fee required. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3206.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. and development of skills in theory and practice. Fundamental Movement Skills (1-2) This course provides teacher candidates the opportunity to develop knowledge of and competency in fundamental movement skills. Competency in teaching skills and tasks and individual games and sports will be assessed.KINESIOLOGY/256 3206 3207 Football . and development of skills in theory and practice. Twenty (20) hours 3209 3210 3211 3217 3219 3221 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. and development of skills in theory and practice. Minimum grade of C is required to pass.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. implement.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Competency in teaching skills and tasks and individual games and sports will be assessed. implement. and analyze learning experiences in a variety of traditional and modern team games and sport activities. Twenty (20) hours of field experience and observation required. Teacher candidates prepare. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Teacher candidates will prepare. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. Course fee required. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. and manipulative skills as well as gymnastics and dance. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315. and analyze learning experiences in a variety of traditional and modern individual activities. Course fee required. review. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3211. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Course fee required. Competency in teaching skills and tasks and individual games and sports will be assessed. and development of skills in theory and practice. and development of skills in theory and practice. Individual Games and Sports (1-2) This course provides teacher candidates exposure to and preparation for teaching multiple individual games and sports. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Volleyball . and analyze learning experiences based on TEKS designed to develop competency in locomotor. Course fee required.

health needs of young children. BIOL 2311. Growth. Teacher candidates will develop. Course fee required.KINESIOLOGY/257 of field experience and observation required. Health. principles of and activities for motor skill development. and department approval. Maturation. Teacher candidates will understand the knowledge. components of health-related fitness for life. managing. Course fee required. practice teacher tasks involved in the planning and implementation of learning experiences. learning and teaching styles. Course fee required. Anatomical Kinesiology (3-0) A study of the science of human movement with special consideration given to anatomical and neuromuscular contributions. Motor Behavior. with emphasis on 3313 3315 3318 3331 4201 4222 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Practical lab experiences included. skills and attitudes for K-12 Physical Education presented in Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Principles of Teaching Physical Education (2-1) This course is designed to introduce teacher candidates to pedagogical skills identified in the Texas Examination of Educator Standards (TExES) necessary for directing the teaching/learning process. managing the classroom. MATH 1320 or MATH 1508. and experience the process of physical education curriculum development. Course fee required. Twenty (20) hours of field experience and observation required. implement and analyze learning experiences focused on the development of healthrelated physical fitness and active lifestyles. and department approval. 3223 Lifetime Physical Activities (1-2) This course prepares teacher candidates to integrate lifetime physical activities into physical education curriculum to develop physically active lifestyles in students. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. and legal issues. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 with a grade of C or better and department approval. Physical Education for Elementary Schools (2-2) Principles and practice of teaching physical education in elementary school: Personal skill development. Statistics and Measurement in Kinesiology (3-0) Measurement and evaluation of physical attributes and performance. Course fee required. and motor development occurring in early childhood. Outdoor Education and Survival Skills (2-0) Development of proficiency in basic outdoor education and survival skills. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better. performance assessment. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisite: Junior status. Competency in teaching skills and tasks (TExES) and lifetime physical activities as presented in TEKS will be assessed. and monitoring the learning environment. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315. This course is not available for Kinesiology majors. maturation. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better. learn strategies for organizing. and Movement Experiences in Early Childhood (3-0) Physical growth. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315. Prerequisite: Department approval. motivating diverse student populations. promoting a physically active lifestyle. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. Thirty (30) hours of field experience and observation required.

and evaluation. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. 4313 4314 4315 4319 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Athletic training fee required. and teaching-learning process for elementary physical education teachers. The nature of physical. and department approval. and BIOL 2113. materials selection. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Minimum grade of C is required to pass. class management. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better and department approval. BIOL 2111. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 2332. 4312 Exercise Physiology (2-2) Study of the physiological adaptations the body makes to exercise stress. Field experience required. Advanced Athletic Training (3-0) Provides opportunities for the development of competence in the uses of common techniques for both the prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Teaching Elementary School Physical Education (3-0) Curriculum planning. and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 1303. Students are provided opportunities to demonstrate an understanding of bone and soft-tissue injury management and of the implications of gender differences for conditioning and injury management. and muscular and cardiorespiratory endurance development. BIOL 2111. Biomechanics (2-2) The study of biomechanics of human movement with concepts for coaching. emotional. Prerequisites: BIOL 2311. Prerequisites: KIN 2315. Course fee required. and social disabilities is discussed with application of corrective. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. BIOL 2313. and department approval. Fee required. Practical laboratory experiences are provided.KINESIOLOGY/258 safety and appreciation of the natural environment. KIN 3331. senior standing. CC4310 Selected Topics in Kinesiology (0-0-3) Study of selected topics not included in the regular curricular offerings in kinesiology. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 2332. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. injury prevention. developmental. Prerequisites: KIN 1303. Course fee required. BIOL 2313. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. Course fees required. rehabilitation. and remedial physical activities in various social settings. 4301 Personal Training (2-2) Experience in the application of exercise technique and prescription in the development of fitness and strength-training programs for a variety of populations. BIOL 2113. KIN 3331 each with a grade of C or better. the principles of strength development. and the enhancement of human performance. Arranged field trips are required. BIOL 2311. Special Populations: Characteristics and Motor Behavior (3-0) Development of an understanding of persons with disabilities and programs of sports and physical activity adapted to their needs. and MATH 1320 or MATH 1508 (or equivalent). each with a grade of C or better. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. mental. Minimum grade of C is required to pass.

Prerequisite: KIN 4312 with a grade of C or better or instructor approval. each with a grade of C or better. and department approval. class management. Internship in Strength Training and Conditioning (0-0-15) Supervised. Includes analysis and application of contemporary periodization concepts. prevention programs. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. 4321 4323 Current Issues in Exercise Science (3-0) Analysis of current issues related to the exercise science. Corequisite: KIN 4320. Field experience required. Minimum of 15 hours per week with a National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Strength and 4330 4334 4340 4350 4351 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 2332 each with a grade of C or better. KIN 4312. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Teaching Secondary School Physical Education (3-0) Curriculum planning. Corequisite: KIN 4321. and evaluation.KINESIOLOGY/259 4320 Adventure Curricula in Physical Education (2-2) Enhances understanding of the principles of experiential education through hands-on experiences with challenge-course and adventure activities. and department approval. theoretical. and cardiac rehabilitation programs are discussed. Course fee required. Prerequisites: KIN 1303. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Credit: Three (3) hours. each with a grade of C or better. and department approval. and implementing strength training and conditioning programs. participatory experience in a commercial sport or exercise-related setting. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 4312. Coronary Intervention Programs (2-3) The anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system. participatory experience in strength training and conditioning. electrophysiology. Additional training is required for low-challenge courses facilitator certification. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Course fee required. materials selection. designing. and KIN 4313. senior standing. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 4312. focus on integrating these activities in secondary school curricula. cardiovascular disease. Course fee required. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Course is designed to help beginning teachers implement individual leadership and teamwork challenges for their students. Scientific Principles of Strength Training and Conditioning (3-0) Analysis of the conceptual. Fitness Programs and Appraisal (2-3) Programs to enhance physical fitness. each with a grade of C or better. and individualized exercise prescription methods are covered. Minimum of 15 hours per week for a total of 225 hours. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better. Course fee required. exercise tolerance testing. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. and teaching-learning process for secondary physical education teachers. methods of fitness assessment. Internship (0-0-15) Supervised. risk factor analysis. and department approval. ECG interpretation. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. and technical considerations of assessing.

Beginning Karate (0-3) Open to all students. Open to all students. Prerequisites: Senior standing and department approval. Basketball (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Physical Education course fee required. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 4340. each with a grade of C or better. senior standing. 4390 Independent Study (0-0-3) Individual directed study in an area of special interest. Conditioning (0-3) ( DANC 1115) Open to all students. These courses can be repeated for credit and are open to all students. Cheerleading (0-3) Open to all students. Intermediate Karate (0-3) Open to all students. Kick Boxing (0-3) 1104 1105 1116 1122 1125 1128 1151 1152 1154 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Various topics TBA. Water Aerobics (0-3) Open to all students. 1101 Activity Course (0-3) . Physical Education Activity Courses (PE) Students should note that Physical Education activity courses often involve strenuous physical activity and/or participation in activities with inherent risk of personal injury. if appropriate before enrolling in these courses. Physical Education course fee required. www. Physical Education course fee required.edu. Equipment and lockers are provided. The following activity courses. Beginning Fencing (0-3) Open to all students. are offered by the Professional and Continuing Education (PACE) department located in Miner‖s Hall. Physical Education course fee required. The University is not responsible for illness or injury resulting from participation in these courses.KINESIOLOGY/260 Conditioning Specialist for a total of 225 hours. and department approval. Physical Education course fee required. Students are advised to review their physical condition and consult with a physician. Beginning Karate strongly recommended prior to enrollment in this course. The fee charged for participation in these courses is used for the provision and maintenance of equipment.utep. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Aerobic Dance (0-3) Open to all students. all of which are co-educational. Physical Education course fee required. Suite 108. Physical Education course fee required. Physical Education course fee required.pace.

Kinesiology 1101 North Campbell Street.KINESIOLOGY/261 Open to all students. Riskowski. Beginning Swimming (0-3) 1164 1166 1173 1178 Open to all students.747. Beginning Weight Training (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Physical Education course fee required. 1182 1188 1194 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Physical Education course fee required. Smith ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Dorgo. Physical Education course fee required. 1157 Military Conditioning (0-3) Open to all students.edu CHAIR: Darla Smith PROFESSOR: Meeuwsen ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITUS: Garland O‖Quinn ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: King. Vella CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Pederson LECTURERS: Baquera-Shaw. Gamboa.7245 rmdiaz@utep. Torres Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Beginning Racquetball (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Room 502 915. Advanced Racquetball (0-3) Open to all students. Soccer (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. 1180 Advanced Swimming (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Volleyball (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Physical Education course fee required. Beginning Tennis (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required.

Students desiring to pursue a Master of Science in Kinesiology should consult the Graduate Catalog. For specific prerequisites to admission into the Occupational Therapy program at UTEP. Prerequisites for programs at other universities might differ. Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Exercise Science (Pre-Occupational Therapy) and a Minor in Psychology University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 21 semester credit hours UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . (5) minor field of study. Physical Therapy.Upper Division 4 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Exercise Science (Pre-Physical Therapy) University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 20 semester credit hours Kinesiology Core 21 semester credit hours Exercise Science Concentration 15 semester credit hours Biology Minor 20 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Students who are interested in pursuing a Master‖s Degree in Occupational Therapy are required to complete the following degree plan which is designed to fulfill the prerequisites for admission to the graduate program in Occupational Therapy at UTEP. Students who already have a bachelor's degree in some other field and who wish to pursue a teaching certificate to teach physical education should refer to the College of Education section of this catalog. and (6) possibly electives. Students who participate in internships with agencies or school districts requiring background checks must successfully pass the background check in order to complete the practicum requirement. Students wishing to obtain a teaching certificate must select the Physical Education Concentration and the Education Minor. (3) Kinesiology core. Students interested in a career in the fitness industry or in graduate study in Exercise Science. Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Physical Education and a Minor in All-levels Physical Education University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 7 semester credit hours Kinesiology Core 24 semester credit hours Physical Education Concentration 23 semester credit hours Education Minor 18 semester credit hours Electives 4 semester credit hours Total 120 semester credit hours Degree Requirements for a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology with a Concentration in Exercise Science and an Approved Minor University Core Requirements 44 semester credit hours Program Prerequisites 15 semester credit hours Kinesiology Core 24 semester credit hours Exercise Science Concentration 15 semester credit hours Minor 18 semester credit hours Electives. (4) program concentration. or similar fields should select the Exercise Science Concentration. (2) program prerequisites. see the UTEP Graduate Catalog.KINESIOLOGY/250 The Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology requires (1) a general University core.

To complete this degree plan in the most efficient manner. Kinesiology Core (24 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3313 Statistics and Measurement in Kinesiology 3 KIN 3331 Anatomical Kinesiology 3 KIN 4312 Exercise Physiology 3 KIN 4313 Biomechanics 3 KIN 4314 Special Populations 3 KIN 4330 Fitness Programs and Appraisal 24 hours Concentration.KINESIOLOGY/251 Kinesiology Core Exercise Science Concentration Psychology Minor Elective-Upper Division Total 21 semester credit hours 15 semester credit hours 18 semester credit hours 1 semester credit hour 120 semester credit hours Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology Degree Plan-with Physical Education Concentration (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours) See University Core Curriculum section of this catalog.in Physical Education (23 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 2315 Introduction to Athletic Training or HSCI 2309 First Aid and Safety 2 KIN 3217 Fundamental Movement Skills 2 KIN 3219 Individual Games and Sports 2 KIN 3221 Team Games and Sports 2 KIN 3223 Lifetime Physical Activities 3 KIN 3315 Principles of Teaching Physical Education 3 KIN 4319 Teaching Elementary Physical Education 3 KIN 4320 Adventure Curricula in Physical Education 3 KIN 4321 Teaching Secondary Physical Education 23 hours UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better. students should use the following specific options for the University core: 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences or MATH 1508 Precalculus 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 4 BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2111 Lab Program Prerequisites (7 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 7 hours Note: All Kinesiology courses used to satisfy degree requirements must be completed with a C or better.

S. EDPC 3300 Developmental Variations SCED 3311 Curriculum Planning in the Secondary School RED 3342 Reading and Study in the Content Areas SCED 3317 Multicultural Education in the Secondary School TED 4698 Internship II in All-Levels Physical Education Electives (4 semester credit hours) B. KIN 4350 Internship d. KIN 2315 Introduction to Athletic Training or HSCI 2309 First Aid and Safety c. All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better. Program Prerequisites (15 semester credit hours) 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 4 CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry or 4 PHYS 1403 General Physics I Kinesiology Core (24 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3313 Statistics and Measurement in Kinesiology 3 KIN 3331 Anatomical Kinesiology 3 KIN 4312 Exercise Physiology 3 KIN 4313 Biomechanics 3 KIN 4314 Special Populations 3 KIN 4330 Fitness Programs and Appraisal 24 hours Exercise Science Concentration (15 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 4323 Current Issues in Exercise Science 3 KIN 4334 Coronary Intervention Programs 3 KIN 4340 Scientific Principles of Strength Training and Conditioning 6 Select 6 hours from the following menu or any approved upper division Kinesiology elective (Note: Students interested in NSCA Personal Trainer should select KIN 4301 and students interested in Strength and Conditioning Specialist Certification should select KIN 4351 ) a. in Kinesiology Degree Plan-Exercise Science Concentration (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours). KIN 4301 Personal Training b.KINESIOLOGY/252 Education Minor (18 semester credit hours) Students selecting All-Levels Physical Education Certification must confirm general education and professional education requirements with the KIN Advisor and the Certification Office in the College of Education. KIN 4351 Internship in Strength Training and Conditioning ___ 15 hours UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The core requirements for this concentration are the same as for the Physical Education concentration.

Electives (4 semester credit hours) B. students should use the following specific options for the university core. Note: The Business Minor is recommended for students interested in employment in the private fitness and exercise industry. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Biology* (20 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 5 BIOL 1306 Organismal Biology with BIOL 1108 Lab 4 BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2113 Lab 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology II with BIOL 2113 Lab 3 BIOL 4388 Mammalian Physiology 1 ZOOL 4181 Vertebrate Physiology Methods 20 hours * An optional 3-hour upper-division biology elective required to obtain an official Biology minor. Kinesiology Core (21 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3331 Anatomical Kinesiology 3 KIN 4312 Exercise Physiology 3 KIN 4313 Biomechanics 3 KIN 4314 Special Populations 3 KIN 4330 Fitness Programs and Appraisal 21 hours Exercise Science Concentration (15 semester credit hours) is the same for all Exercise Science degree plans.KINESIOLOGY/253 Approved Minor Students can select an approved minor in another field with consultation from a Kinesiology faculty advisor. 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences or MATH 1508 Precalculus 4 CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry 4 CHEM 1408 Introductory Chemistry 3 PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology Program Prerequisites (20 semester credit hours) 4 PHYS 1403 General Physics I 4 PHYS 1404 General Physics II 3 PSYC 1303 Statistical Methods 3 PSYC 2310 Life Cycle Development 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 ENGL 3359 Technical Writing 20 hours Note: All Kinesiology courses used to satisfy degree requirements must be completed with a C or better. All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better. See University Core Curriculum section of this catalog. To complete this degree plan in the most efficient manner.S in Kinesiology Degree Plan for students who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in Physical Therapy (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours).

Psychology Minor (18 semester credit hours) 3 PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology 3 PSYC 1303 Statistical Methods 2 PSYC 3201 General Experimental Psychology 1 PSYC 3101 Lab for General Experimental Psychology 9 Upper-division psychology.S. See University Core Curriculum section of this catalog. Kinesiology Core (21 semester credit hours) 3 KIN 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KIN 2332 Motor Learning and Control 3 KIN 3331 Anatomical Kinesiology 3 KIN 4312 Exercise Physiology 3 KIN 4313 Biomechanics 3 KIN 4314 Special Populations 3 KIN 4330 Fitness Programs and Appraisal 21 hours Exercise Science Concentration (15 semester credit hours) is the same for all Exercise Science degree plans. To complete this degree plan in the most efficient manner. All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better.KINESIOLOGY/254 B. 3348. 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences I or MATH 1508 Precalculus 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 4 BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2111 Lab 3 SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology Program Prerequisites (21 semester credit hours) 4 BIOL 2313 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2113 Lab 3 HSCI 2302 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 PSYC 2310 Life Cycle Development 3 PSYC 2312 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology 3 ENGL 3359 Technical Writing 1 CLSC 3150 Medical Terminology 4 CHEM 1407 Introductory Chemistry or PHYS 1403 General Physics I 21 hours Elective (1 semester credit hour) Note: All Kinesiology courses used to satisfy degree requirements must be completed with a C or better. or 4324. 18 hours Indicates Texas Common Course Number UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . in Kinesiology Degree Plan for students who are interested in pursuing a Masters in Occupational Therapy (120 semester credit hours) University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours). Must choose at least one from 3320. students should use the following specific options for the university core. 3330.

stages of learning. Developmental Gymnastics . Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. KIN 1303 can be taken concurrently with KIN 2315. Fee required. and development of skills in theory and practice. Racquet Sports . Basketball . and development of skills in theory and practice. Introduction to Athletic Training (3-0) Introduction to the field of athletic training with emphasis on injury prevention. 2315 2332 2342 3201 3202 3203 3204 3205 Indicates Texas Common Course Number UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 .KINESIOLOGY/255 Kinesiology (KIN) 1303 Foundations of Kinesiology (3-0) ( PHED 1301) Historical and philosophical aspects of kinesiology and sports. review. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Dance . Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. augmented feedback.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Fee required. KIN 1303 can be taken concurrently with KIN 2332. Spanish Dance (2-2) Provides information on the origins.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. rules. and development of skills in theory and practice.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. review. traditions. basic evaluation. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3203. Topics include equipment. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3204. and risk management. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better and department approval. practice conditions. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. and development of skills in theory and practice. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Topics include control of coordinated movement. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Includes taping and bracing experience. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3202. review. and emergency care for common injuries among athletes and the physically active. Minimum grade of C is required to pass.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis and evaluation of stroke techniques and strategies. Track and Field . Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Course fee required. Fee required. Motor Learning and Control (3-0) A study of principles that govern the control and the learning of movements. Orientation to programs in public and private settings. PSYC 2310 recommended. and individual differences. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Fee required. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Fee required. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. drills. music. and choreographic styles relating to the dances of Spain and Spanish America. facilities. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better and department approval. Prerequisite: Department approval. review. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3205. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN.

KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3207. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. Competency in teaching skills and tasks and individual games and sports will be assessed. and development of skills in theory and practice. Competency in teaching skills and tasks and individual games and sports will be assessed. Aquatics . Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. and development of skills in theory and practice. and analyze learning experiences in a variety of traditional and modern individual activities. Baseball and Softball . KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3210.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315. Teacher candidates will prepare. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3209.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. development gymnastics. Course fee required. implement. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315. implement. Twenty (20) hours of field experience and observation required. Team Games and Sports (1-2) This course provides teacher candidates exposure to and preparation in teaching multiple team games and sports. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. review. review. Course fee required. and development of skills in theory and practice. Twenty (20) hours 3209 3210 3211 3217 3219 3221 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Individual Games and Sports (1-2) This course provides teacher candidates exposure to and preparation for teaching multiple individual games and sports. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Soccer . Minimum grade of C is required to pass. and analyze learning experiences in a variety of traditional and modern team games and sport activities. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. Teacher candidates prepare. Fundamental Movement Skills (1-2) This course provides teacher candidates the opportunity to develop knowledge of and competency in fundamental movement skills. Course fee required. Course fee required.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. and analyze learning experiences based on TEKS designed to develop competency in locomotor. Volleyball . and development of skills in theory and practice. and dance. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Competency in teaching skills and tasks and individual games and sports will be assessed. review. Course fee required. nonlocomotor. Teacher candidates will prepare.Analysis and Development (1-2) Analysis. Course fee required. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Course fee required. review. implement. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN.KINESIOLOGY/256 3206 3207 Football . and development of skills in theory and practice. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. and manipulative skills as well as gymnastics and dance. review. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3211. Restricted to majors: IDST and KIN. Twenty (20) hours of field experience and observation required. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. KIN 2332 can be taken concurrently with KIN 3206.

and monitoring the learning environment. This course is not available for Kinesiology majors. and motor development occurring in early childhood. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315. Motor Behavior. Course fee required. 3223 Lifetime Physical Activities (1-2) This course prepares teacher candidates to integrate lifetime physical activities into physical education curriculum to develop physically active lifestyles in students. and legal issues. Teacher candidates will understand the knowledge. Teacher candidates will develop. with emphasis on 3313 3315 3319 3331 4201 4222 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and experience the process of physical education curriculum development. maturation. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. learning and teaching styles. components of health-related fitness for life. health needs of young children. and Movement Experiences in Early Childhood (3-0) Physical growth. principles of and activities for motor skill development. Prerequisite: Junior status. implement and analyze learning experiences focused on the development of healthrelated physical fitness and active lifestyles. Growth. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. managing. promoting a physically active lifestyle. Health. Practical lab experiences included. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. motivating diverse student populations. and department approval. skills and attitudes for K-12 Physical Education presented in Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). managing the classroom. Principles of Teaching Physical Education (2-1) This course is designed to introduce teacher candidates to pedagogical skills identified in the Texas Examination of Educator Standards (TExES) necessary for directing the teaching/learning process. Course fee required. and department approval. Outdoor Education and Survival Skills (2-0) Development of proficiency in basic outdoor education and survival skills. Course fee required. Maturation. Statistics and Measurement in Kinesiology (3-0) Measurement and evaluation of physical attributes and performance. learn strategies for organizing. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 with a grade of C or better and department approval.KINESIOLOGY/257 of field experience and observation required. Anatomical Kinesiology (3-0) A study of the science of human movement with special consideration given to anatomical and neuromuscular contributions. performance assessment. Twenty (20) hours of field experience and observation required. Thirty (30) hours of field experience and observation required. BIOL 2311. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better. Course fee required. Competency in teaching skills and tasks (TExES) and lifetime physical activities as presented in TEKS will be assessed. practice teacher tasks involved in the planning and implementation of learning experiences. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and KIN 3315. MATH 1320 or MATH 1508. Prerequisite: Department approval. Physical Education for Elementary Schools (2-2) Principles and practice of teaching physical education in elementary school: Personal skill development. Course fee required. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 2313. developmental.KINESIOLOGY/258 safety and appreciation of the natural environment. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 2332. Special Populations: Characteristics and Motor Behavior (3-0) Development of an understanding of persons with disabilities and programs of sports and physical activity adapted to their needs. BIOL 2311. and BIOL 2113. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. 4312 Exercise Physiology (2-2) Study of the physiological adaptations the body makes to exercise stress. and muscular and cardiorespiratory endurance development. Biomechanics (2-2) The study of biomechanics of human movement with concepts for coaching. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. BIOL 2313. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 2332. KIN 3331. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. rehabilitation. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Prerequisites: BIOL 2311. BIOL 2113. Practical laboratory experiences are provided. Course fee required. KIN 3331 each with a grade of C or better. and department approval. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Prerequisites: KIN 1303. class management. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. senior standing. injury prevention. CC4310 Selected Topics in Kinesiology (0-0-3) Study of selected topics not included in the regular curricular offerings in kinesiology. Field experience required. 4313 4314 4315 4319 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . and evaluation. Athletic training fee required. and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 1303. Course fees required. each with a grade of C or better and department approval. and social disabilities is discussed with application of corrective. materials selection. and MATH 1320 or MATH 1508 (or equivalent). BIOL 2111. Teaching Elementary School Physical Education (3-0) Curriculum planning. each with a grade of C or better. Fee required. emotional. mental. Prerequisites: KIN 2315. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better and department approval. BIOL 2111. and department approval. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Advanced Athletic Training (3-0) Provides opportunities for the development of competence in the uses of common techniques for both the prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Students are provided opportunities to demonstrate an understanding of bone and soft-tissue injury management and of the implications of gender differences for conditioning and injury management. Arranged field trips are required. and remedial physical activities in various social settings. Course fee required. The nature of physical. and the enhancement of human performance. and teaching-learning process for elementary physical education teachers. the principles of strength development. 4302 Personal Training (2-2) Experience in the application of exercise technique and prescription in the development of fitness and strength-training programs for a variety of populations.

Corequisite: KIN 4321. Internship in Strength Training and Conditioning (0-0-15) Supervised. Course is designed to help beginning teachers implement individual leadership and teamwork challenges for their students. Minimum of 15 hours per week for a total of 225 hours. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 4312. 4321 4323 Current Issues in Exercise Science (3-0) Analysis of current issues related to the exercise science. Internship (0-0-15) Supervised. and individualized exercise prescription methods are covered. materials selection. participatory experience in a commercial sport or exercise-related setting. electrophysiology. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 4312. each with a grade of C or better. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. risk factor analysis. focus on integrating these activities in secondary school curricula. theoretical. methods of fitness assessment. prevention programs. ECG interpretation. Course fee required. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. KIN 4312. and department approval. Course fee required. and department approval. and department approval. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). exercise tolerance testing. class management. Course fee required. designing. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Coronary Intervention Programs (2-3) The anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system. each with a grade of C or better. and department approval. Course fee required. cardiovascular disease. Additional training is required for low-challenge courses facilitator certification. Prerequisites: KIN 1303. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 2332 each with a grade of C or better. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. and evaluation. Corequisite: KIN 4320. and KIN 4313. Includes analysis and application of contemporary periodization concepts. Credit: Three (3) hours.KINESIOLOGY/259 4320 Adventure Curricula in Physical Education (2-2) Enhances understanding of the principles of experiential education through hands-on experiences with challenge-course and adventure activities. and teaching-learning process for secondary physical education teachers. Scientific Principles of Strength Training and Conditioning (3-0) Analysis of the conceptual. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. Fitness Programs and Appraisal (2-3) Programs to enhance physical fitness. Prerequisite: KIN 4312 with a grade of C or better or instructor approval. each with a grade of C or better. and cardiac rehabilitation programs are discussed. participatory experience in strength training and conditioning. Minimum of 15 hours per week with a National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Strength and 4330 4334 4341 4351 4351 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Teaching Secondary School Physical Education (3-0) Curriculum planning. Field experience required. senior standing. and technical considerations of assessing. Prerequisites: KIN 2332 and department approval. and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 with a grade of C or better. Minimum grade of C is required to pass. and implementing strength training and conditioning programs.

Physical Education course fee required. Water Aerobics (0-3) Open to all students.KINESIOLOGY/260 Conditioning Specialist for a total of 225 hours. Physical Education Activity Courses (PE) Students should note that Physical Education activity courses often involve strenuous physical activity and/or participation in activities with inherent risk of personal injury. senior standing. Physical Education course fee required. each with a grade of C or better. 1101 Activity Course (0-3) .edu. The University is not responsible for illness or injury resulting from participation in these courses. all of which are co-educational. Conditioning (0-3) ( DANC 1115) Open to all students. Students are advised to review their physical condition and consult with a physician. These courses can be repeated for credit and are open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Kick Boxing (0-3) 1104 1105 1116 1122 1125 1128 1151 1152 1155 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Physical Education course fee required. Cheerleading (0-3) Open to all students. 4390 Independent Study (0-0-3) Individual directed study in an area of special interest. Prerequisites: Senior standing and department approval. Prerequisites: KIN 1303 and KIN 4340. Various topics TBA. Beginning Fencing (0-3) Open to all students. Intermediate Karate (0-3) Open to all students.pace. The fee charged for participation in these courses is used for the provision and maintenance of equipment. Suite 108. Physical Education course fee required. The following activity courses. Physical Education course fee required. and department approval. Equipment and lockers are provided. Open to all students. Basketball (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. if appropriate before enrolling in these courses.utep. are offered by the Professional and Continuing Education (PACE) department located in Miner‖s Hall. Aerobic Dance (0-3) Open to all students. Beginning Karate strongly recommended prior to enrollment in this course. Beginning Karate (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. www. Physical Education course fee required. Minimum grade of C is required to pass.

cognitive impairment. 1180 Advanced Swimming (0-3) Open to all students. and which develop. Room 500 915. Physical Education course fee required. Beginning Weight Training (0-3) Open to all students. improve. Advanced Racquetball (0-3) Open to all students. Soccer (0-3) Open to all students.747. Volleyball (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. prevent injury or disability. Rehabilitation Sciences Occupational Therapy 1101 North Campbell Street. 1157 Military Conditioning (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required.7270 ot@utep. It is the use of purposeful activity or interventions designed to achieve functional outcomes which promote health. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . illness. Physical Education course fee required. Physical Education course fee required. Beginning Tennis (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Beginning Racquetball (0-3) Open to all students. Physical Education course fee required. Beginning Swimming (0-3) 1164 1166 1173 1178 Open to all students. 1182 1188 1194 See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses. Physical Education course fee required. Physical Education course fee required. Leech CLINICAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Funk CLINICAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Capshaw Occupational Therapy is a dynamic profession and an integral part of modern comprehensive health care.edu DIRECTOR: Karen Funk PROFESSOR EMERITA: Gretchen Schmalz ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Haltiwanger. Physical Education course fee required.KINESIOLOGY/261 Open to all students. sustain or restore the highest possible level of independence of any individual who has an injury.

When planning a course of study that can lead to consideration for the Occupational Therapy Program. meet requirements for a regular academic major. Hours Course Number and Title 3 3 3 ENGL 1311 Expository English Composition or ESOL 1311 Expository English Composition Speakers of ESL ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing or ENGL 1313 Writing and Literature or ESOL 1312 Research and Critical Writing for Speakers of ESL COMM 1301 Public Speaking or COMM 1302 Business and Professional Communication Note: ENGL/COMM 1611 (Written and Oral Communication can be used to fulfill the requirement for both ENGL 1311 and COMM 1301 or 1302. ENGL 2313 Introduction to American Fiction d. ranging from medical facilities to community health agencies. ENGL 2318 Introduction to American Poetry f. In addition. Biology. Anthropology. etc. Occupational Therapy students must pass a background check. applicants accepted to the Occupational Therapy Masters Degree program will be required to undergo and pass a background check prior to matriculation. Anthropology.g. or other disorder or condition. Psychology. Kinesiology. University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours). developmental or learning disability. HIST 2301 World History to 1500 g. schools. and private practice. Although acceptance into the Masters Degree Program does not require prior completion of an undergraduate degree. which are a crucial element in the curriculum.g. Health Promotion. All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a CC or better. Degree Requirements The Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy is no longer offered in the United States. NOTE: In order to engage in clinical rotations. ENGL 2311 English Literature b. PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy i. etc. Social Work.. Occupational Therapy services are provided in a variety of settings. the competitive nature of the admissions process makes it imperative that interested undergraduates follow a traditional undergraduate major (e. It includes assessment by means of skilled observation or evaluation through the administration and interpretation of standardized or nonstandardized tests and measurements. undergraduates should be aware of the University Core Curriculum and its requirements as they plan a course of study that can lead to consideration for admission to the Masters Degree in Occupational Therapy. students must take courses that apply to the University Core Curriculum.. physical disability. mental illness. ENGL 2314 Introduction to American Drama e.OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY/262 psychosocial dysfunction. MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab BIOL 1306 Organismal Biology with BIOL 1108 Lab Humanities Menu (Select one 3-hour course) a. Psychology.) as they complete the program prerequisites and electives.). Kinesiology. Therefore. Biology. PHIL 2306 Ethics Visual and Performing Arts Menu (Select 3 hours) 3 4 4 3 3 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Health Promotion. Students interested in pursuing a Masters in Occupational Therapy will be designated as PreOccupational Therapy (P-OT). and satisfy specific program prerequisites. HIST 2302 World History SSince 1500 h. ENGL 2312 English Literature c. Candidates with a bachelor’s degree will be given preference. Social Work. The Occupational Therapy Program offers a Masters Degree in Occupational Therapy. Students are encouraged to select a program and complete the degree requirements for a major which is closely aligned to the Occupational Therapy Program (e.

11. to 1865 3 HIST 1302 History of U. 27 hours program prerequisites. Graduate application processing fee ($15 US for permanent residents. minimum of 19 hours of upper-division courses in undergraduate program major) After completing 90 semester credit hours. 9.0 (on a four-point scale). Since 1865 3 POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics 3 POLS 2311 American Government and Politics 3 SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry or UNIV 2350 Interdisciplinary Technology and Society 44 hours Program Prerequisites (27 semester credit hours) 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 BIOL 2311 Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2111 Lab BIOL Elective (Recommend are Human Anatomy/Physiology II. Completion of the University Core Curriculum prior to beginning the Masters Degree Program in Occupational Therapy unless the applicant already holds a baccalaureate degree. $65 for international applicants). PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1303 Statistical Methods PSYC 2310 Life Cycle Development PSYC 2312 Abnormal Psychology (or equivalent) Select upper-division courses from PSYC. 8. etc. MUSL 1321 Introduction to Music History e. A minimum GPA of 3. 7. 27 hours Total semester credit hours for Pre-Occupational Therapy = 90 (Includes 44 hours University Core Curriculum. 4. 3.OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY/263 a. universities or community colleges attended. 6. THEA 1313 Introduction to Theatre g. A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 (on a four-point scale) on the Occupational Therapy prerequisites. Graduate record Examination (GRE) scores. Three letters of recommendation (preference for occupational therapists or instructors). MUSL 1324 Music Appreciation f. ART 1300 Art Appreciation b. and Academic Advisors. ARTH 1306 History of the World Art II d.S. students can apply for acceptance into the Graduate School-Master‖s in Occupational Therapy Program. Completed application for the Graduate School.S. Medical Terminology course-grade or test score must be provided (can be an online non-degree course). Additional Requirements for Admission 1. Chemistry. 5. 10. SOWK. International students (when English is not the official or first language) must have a minimum score of 213/550 on TOEFL. Students who are not competitive will be directed to other majors/options by the CHS. the Student Support Center. Official transcripts of all colleges. Although not required. Zoology. or ANTH ENGL 3359 Technical Writing (A writing sample can suffice for this elective in some cases). ARTH 1305 History of the World Art I c. 2. it is recommended that students volunteer in an Occupational Therapy setting to gain knowledge and core values of the profession. FILM 1390 Introduction to the Art of the Motion Picture 3 HIST 1301 History of U. Students with a background in medical terminology can request a waiver for this course. Selection Criteria UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Completion of an official interview of all eligible candidates. SOCI.

Ryberg ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Ko.OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY/263 Completion of the above requirements makes a student eligible for selection but does NOT guarantee admission to the Occupational Therapy Program. 8. See the Graduate Catalog for more detailed information about the Occupational Therapy Program. 6. El Paso. The final selection is competitive and based on academic course work and the other requirements. Physical therapy encompasses areas of specialization and includes the development of new approaches to more effectively meet existing and emerging health care needs.8207. supporting documentation.0 in the Occupational Therapy prerequisite courses work. Arrange to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and have the official scores sent to the UTEP Graduate School. 4. Physical therapists apply scientific principles to prevent and treat acute and chronic movement disorders. 3. Letters of admission will be sent from the UTEP Graduate School as students are selected and until the class is filled. Campbell. El Paso. subsequent transcripts must be submitted as soon as they are available.747. Interviews for qualified applicants will occur on the UTEP campus when applications are complete. gradschool@utep. Room 500 (915) 747-8207 pt@utep. and administration. Texas 79902-0581 915.edu Inquiries can be made to: Occupational Therapy Program. All applications. Sipla LECTURERS: Fisher.edu Physical Therapy 1101 N. Walker Physical Therapy is a health profession whose primary purpose is the promotion of optimal physical function.5491. 5. Texas 79968 915. International applicants must arrange for the TOEFL score to be sent to the Graduate School. Submit an Application for Graduate Admission with the required fee and a written plan for prerequisite course completion. 7. The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Degree provides a professional entry education at the doctoral level. Admissions Process 1. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . UTEP College of Health Sciences 1101 North Campbell Street.edu DIRECTOR: Mary Carlson ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Carlson CLINICAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: Dillon.747. and test scores should be sent to: Graduate School. Obtain an Application for Graduate Admission from the UTEP Graduate School.0 and a minimum of 3. education. The University of Texas at El Paso 223 Academic Services Building. Submit official transcripts of all course work and three confidential letters of reference. Complete at least 90 hours of prerequisite work as an undergraduate student with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3. 2. Other professional activities that physical therapists participate in include research. ot@utep. transcripts. If prerequisites are not completed when application is submitted.

The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is also required. Each qualified applicant is scheduled for an interview with the Admissions Committee. and while there is no minimum score required. Preferably a Psychology or Education-Based 6 9 3 3 ENGL 1311 & ENGL 1312 & ENGL 3359 COMM 1301 or COMM 1302 PSYC 1303 ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 No equivalent SPCH 1315 or SPCH 1321 PSYC 2317 ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 No equivalent SPCH 1315 or SPCH 1321 PSYC 2317 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . 50 clock hours of volunteer or paid experience in a physical therapy setting is required.Should include ANOVA.PHYSICAL THERAPY/264 Admission requirements include an earned bachelor‖s degree including 49 semester hours of prerequisites. Prerequisite Courses Forty-nine (49) semester hours are required prerequisite courses. These courses must meet specified 1 conditions and include: Semester Hours 8 Subject Majors' Biology with Lab UTEP Course Number BIOL 1305/ 1107 & either BIOL 1306/ 1108 or BIOL 3414 or ZOOL 2406 BIOL 4388/ ZOOL 4181 or ZOOL 4380/4181 CHEM 1407 & CHEM 1408 or CHEM 1305/1105 & CHEM 1306/1106 PHYS 1403 & PHYS 1404 PSYC 1301 & PSYC 2310 Texas Common Course Number BIOL 1306/1106 & BIOL 1307/1107 No equivalent BIOL 2428 No equivalent No equivalent CHEM 1406 No equivalent CHEM 1311/1111 & CHEM 1312/1112 PHYS 1401 & PHYS 1402 PSYC 2301 & PSYC 2314 EPCC Course Number BIOL 1406 & BIOL 1407 No equivalent BIOL 2428 No equivalent No equivalent CHEM 1407 & CHEM 1408 CHEM 1411 & CHEM 1412 PHYS 1401 & PHYS 1402 PSYC 2301 & PSYC 2314 4 Upper-Level Physiology Course with Lab Chemistry 8 8 Precalculus-Level Physics with Lab Psychology: General & Development to include Entire Life Span English (Must Include Composition) Speech Statistics .0 in prerequisite courses are required. The Required Course List is attached.0 on four point scale. Physical Therapy prerequisites must also be completed. and a minimum GPA of 3. the score will be considered in the competitive admissions process. and must be supervised by a licensed physical therapist. Note that a minimum overall GPA of 3. Students must complete an undergraduate degree prior to beginning this program. In addition.

Completed applications will be reviewed semiannually in February and November. Other qualified applicants will be placed in a “pool”. transcripts. To be considered for Fall interviews. The final selection is competitive and is based on academic course work and the other requirements. All applications.747. To be considered for Spring interviews. will remain in competition for class slots.8207 pt@utep. Applications remain viable for one year (i. TX 79902-0581 915. all materials must received by February 1.PHYSICAL THERAPY/265 Course Selection Criteria Completion of the above requirements makes a student eligible for selection but does NOT guarantee admission to the Physical Therapy Program. one must reapply. supporting documentation.edu Inquires can be made to: Physical Therapy Program UTEP College of Health Sciences 1101 North Campbell Street El Paso. Texas 79968 915. Our objective is to fill the class with students who complete all course requirements by the end of the Spring Semester of the year for entrance into our program. Admissions Process: There are two deadlines for submission of admission packets each year. Interviews for qualified applicants will be scheduled in November and February/March for qualified applicants. The University of Texas at El Paso 223 Academic Services Building 500 West University Ave. and test scores should be sent to: Graduate School (Physical Therapy). and will be compared to subsequent applicants in March. exceptionally well-qualified students will be immediately accepted to the program. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . The application process will close February 1 for all admissions. To continue to be considered after one year. El Paso..edu See the Graduate Catalog for more detailed information about the Physical Therapy Program.e. all materials must be received by November 1.747. Following the November interviews.5491 gradschool@utep. from date application fee is received by Graduate School). Students should apply when they are within 1 semester of completion of course requirements for admission.

applicants accepted to the Master of Science in Speech Language Pathology program will be required to undergo and pass a background check prior to matriculation. 2. as well as the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology. Undergraduate students selecting this program will be designated as pre-Speech-Language Pathology majors. Nelson LECTURER: Navedo CLINIC COORDINATOR: Valles Speech-Language Pathology Program The Program in Speech-Language Pathology offers an innovative five-year plan that culminates with the Master of Science Degree. all of which can be completed in five years.0 can offset low GRE scores. Hours Course Number and Title 3 ENGL 1311 Expository English Composition or ESOL 1311 Expository English Composition for Speakers of ESL 3 ENGL 1312 Research and Critical Writing or ENGL 1313 Writing and Literature or ESOL 1312 Research and Critical Writing for Speakers of ESL 3 COMM 1301 Public Speaking or COMM 1302 Business and Professional Communication UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Students interested in pursuing a Master of Science in Speech Language Pathology will be designated as Pre-Speech Language Pathology (PSHL). Mueller. in addition to registering for five semesters of clinical practicum (15 semester hours). Speech Language Pathology students must pass a background check. Admission is competitive. Students with a BS or BA in Speech-Language Pathology from another university are encouraged to apply for admission to the Graduate program. Degree Requirements The Bachelor of Science in Speech-Language Pathology is not offered. Students who complete the plan fulfill academic course work and clinical practicum requirements for the Texas license. which are a crucial element in the curriculum. 4.747.edu DIRECTOR: Anthony P. Therefore. A description of the Master of Science program is in the Graduate Catalog.0 in upper-division preparatory SPLP undergraduate courses and acceptable GRE scores on the Verbal. University Core Requirements (44 semester credit hours). All courses used to satisfy the core curriculum must be completed with a C or better.SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY/265 Speech-Language Pathology 1101 North Campbell Street. Salvatore PROFESSORS EMERITI: Grace Middleton. Students with a BS or BA in Speech-Language Pathology from another university are encouraged to apply for admission to the graduate program. 3. Students whose grades in SPLP courses do not appear to demonstrate the potential for success in Graduate School should discuss with their advisor the advisability of continuing in the SpeechLanguage Pathology Program prior to beginning the third year. In order to engage in clinical rotations. high GRE scores can enhance consideration. Undergraduate students must take the GRE and apply to the Graduate School prior to the completion of the prescribed 97 undergraduate hours. Joseph A. Since the plan of study culminates with the Master of Science Degree. The number of students admitted each year is depends on available program resources. undergraduates should be aware of the following: 1. Quantitative and Written section are required for acceptance into the Graduate School. Fjordbak. Room 107 915. Perozzi PROFESSOR: Salvatore ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Biswas. A GPA minimum of 3. The plan includes 97 semester credit hours of undergraduate course work and 33 required semester hours.7250 scphlang@utep. A GPA higher than 3.

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Note: ENGL/COMM 1611 (Written and Oral Communication can be used to fulfill the requirement for both ENGL 1311 and COMM 1301 or 1302. 3 MATH 1320 Mathematics for Social Sciences 4 BIOL 1305 General Biology with BIOL 1107 Lab 4 BIOL 1306 Organismal Biology with BIOL 1108 Lab 3 Humanities Menu (Select one 3-hour course) a. ENGL 2311 English Literature b. ENGL 2312 English Literature c. ENGL 2313 Introduction to American Fiction d. ENGL 2314 Introduction to American Drama e. ENGL 2318 Introduction to American Poetry f. HIST 2301 World History to 1500 g. HIST 2302 World History Since 1500 h. PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy i. PHIL 2306 Ethics 3 Visual and Performing Arts Menu (Select 3 hours) a. ART 1300 Art Appreciation b. ARTH 1305 History of World Art I c. ARTH 1306 History of World Art II d. MUSL 1321 Introduction to Music History e. MUSL 1324 Music Appreciation f. THEA 1313 Introduction to Theatre g. FILM 1390 Introduction to the Art of the Motion Picture 3 HIST 1301 History of U.S. to 1865 3 HIST 1302 History of U.S. Since 1865 3 POLS 2310 Introduction to Politics 3 POLS 2311 American Government and Politics 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences a. PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology 3 UNIV 1301 Seminar in Critical Inquiry or UNIV 2350 Interdisciplinary Technology and Society 3 Physical Sciences 47 hours

Program Prerequisites (16 semester credit hours)
3 3 3 3 4 PSYC PSYC LING LING BIOL 1303 2310 2320 3357 2311 Statistical Methods Life Cycle Development An Introduction to Linguistics Sociolinguistics Human Anatomy/Physiology I with BIOL 2113 Lab

16 hours Pre-Professional Core Courses (37 34 semester credit hours)
3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP SPLP 1312 2111 2313 2320 3310 3312 3313 3314 3318 4309 4310 Survey of Speech, Hearing and Language Disorders General Phonetics Laboratory General Phonetics Hearing Science Language Development Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism Disorders of Articulation and Phonology Language Disorders in Pre-School Children Principles of Clinical Management Audiology Aural Rehabilitation

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3 SPLP 4312 Neural Bases of Speech and Language Additional courses offered as electives: a. SPLP 1300 Introduction to Sign Language b. SPLP 4320 Independent Study in SPLP and Audiology c. SPLP 4340 Clinical Practicum in Audiology

34 hours Total semester credit hours for Pre-Speech Language Pathology = 97 After completing the required 97 semester credit hours, students must apply for acceptance into the Graduate School-Master of Science in Speech Language Pathology Program. Students who are not competitive will be directed to other majors/options by the CHS Student Support Center, Academic Advisors. Recommended Sequence of Courses Select one degree plan option from the following: a) Two-Year Undergraduate Option 1st Year-Fall Semester SPLP 2313 General Phonetics SPLP 2111 General Phonetics Laboratory SPLP 1312 Survey of Speech, Hearing and Language Disorders SPLP 3310 Language Development SPLP 3312 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism 1st Year-Spring Semester SPLP 3313 Disorders of Articulation and Phonology SPLP 3314 Language Disorders in Pre-School Children 2nd Year-Fall Semester SPLP 2320 Hearing Science 2nd Year-Spring Semester SPLP 3318 Principles of Clinical Management SPLP 4312 Neural Bases of Speech and Language SPLP 4309 Audiology 2nd Year-Summer Semester SPLP 4310 Aural Rehabilitation b) Three-Year Undergraduate Option 1st Year-Fall Semester SPLP 2313 General Phonetics SPLP 2111 General Phonetics Laboratory SPLP 1312 Survey of Speech, Hearing and Language Disorders 1st Year Spring Semester SPLP 3313 Disorders of Articulation and Phonology nd 2 Year-Fall Semester SPLP 3310 Language Development SPLP 3312 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism 2nd Year-Spring Semester SPLP 3314 Language Disorders in Pre-School Children 3rd Year-Fall Semester SPLP 2320 Hearing Science 3rd Year-Spring Semester SPLP 3318 Principles of Clinical Management SPLP 4312 Neural Bases of Speech and Language SPLP 4309 Audiology SPLP

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3rd Year-Summer Semester SPLP 4310 Aural Rehabilitation

c) Post-Baccalaureate Option Fall Semester SPLP 2313 General Phonetics SPLP 2111 General Phonetics Laboratory SPLP 2320 Hearing Science SPLP 3310 Language Development SPLP 3312 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism Spring Semester SPLP 3313 Disorders of Articulation and Phonology SPLP 3314 Language Disorders in Pre-School Children SPLP 3318 Principles of Clinical Management SPLP 4312 Neural Bases of Speech and Language Summer Semester SPLP 4310 Aural Rehabilitation Speech-Language Pathology Minor for Bachelor of Arts (Liberal Arts) Students: Required courses are SPLP 1312, SPLP 4309 (6 hours), and 12-13 hours selected from SPLP 2111, SPLP 2313, SPLP 2320, SPLP 3310, SPLP 3312, and SPLP 4312. For students pursuing admission to the MS in Speech Language Pathology, the SPLP course(s) not selected as a part of the minor (totaling 3-4 hours) can be used as elective credit in the Linguistics major. These students will be advised jointly by Linguistics and Speech-Language Pathology programs. Speech-Language Pathology (SPLP) 1300 Introduction to Sign Language (3-0) A beginning course in sign language, including finger spelling and the system of signed English. 1312 Survey of Speech, Hearing and Language Disorders (3-0) A survey of disorders associated with the five parameters of communication: audition, articulation, voice, fluency, and language. Course includes discussion of the professional aspects of speech-language pathology and audiology. General Phonetics Laboratory (0-2) Experience using the International Phonetic Alphabet for transcription of standard and nonstandard speakers. Corequisite: SPLP 2313. SPLP 2313 must be taken concurrently with SPLP 2111. General Phonetics (3-0) Principles of speech sound production, their acoustic correlates, and their perception. Instruction in the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet is included with application to communication disorders. Corequisite: SPLP 2111. SPLP 2313 must be taken concurrently with SPLP 2111. Hearing Science (3-0) Anatomy and physiology of the auditory mechanism and the nature, measurement, and psychoacoustics of sound. Language Development (3-0)

2111

2313

2320

3310

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Theory and chronology of speech and language acquisition with emphasis on the cognitive and physiological correlates of language as related to communication disorders. Cultural impacts on language development and usage are discussed. 3312 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism (3-0) The anatomical and physiological bases of speech. Emphasis is placed on respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, and deglutition. Disorders of Articulation and Phonology (3-0) A study of disorders of articulation and phonology in children and adults including characteristics, causes, and procedures for diagnosis and treatment. Prerequisites: SPLP 2111 or SPLP 1110, and SPLP 1312 or SPLP 3210, and SPLP 2313 or SPLP 3110, and SPLP 3312, each with a grade of C or better. Language Disorders in Pre-School Children (3-0) Theoretical foundations, diagnosis, and intervention for language impairments in pre-school populations. Multicultural issues related to language disorders in this population are discussed. Prerequisites: SPLP 3310 or SPLP 3315, and SPLP 2111 or SPLP 1110, and SPLP 2313 or SPLP 3110, and SPLP 1312 or SPLP 3210, and SPLP 3312, each with a grade of C or better. Principles of Clinical Management (3-0) Preparation of diagnostic reports, treatment plans, and other written documentation of client performance and progress. The treatment sequence, ethical decision-making, universal precautions for infection prevention, and the team approach to treatment are also discussed. Completion of 25 clock hours of supervised clinical observation. Prerequisites: SPLP 3310, SPLP 3312, SPLP 3313, SPLP 3314, SPLP 2111 or SPLP 1110, SPLP 2313 or SPLP 3110, and SPLP 1312 or SPLP 3210, each with a grade of C or better. Audiology (3-0) The study of hearing and hearing disorders with an emphasis on the basic audiological test battery. Prerequisite: SPLP 2320 with a grade of C or better. Aural Rehabilitation (3-0) This course is an introduction to aural rehabilitation of adults and children. Included is information regarding the identification, assessment and remediation of hearing loss. Prerequisites: SPLP 4309 with a grade of C or better and department approval. Neural Bases of Speech and Language (3-0) Study of neuroanatomical and neurophysiological mechanisms related to speech and language. Prerequisites: BIOL 2311, BIOL 2111, and SPLP 3312, each with a grade of C or better. Independent Study in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (0-0-3) Individual directed study. Can be repeated when topic varies. Prerequisites: Completion of 12 semester hours of SPLP course work with a GPA of 3.0 and instructor approval. Clinical Practicum in Audiology (0-0-3) Supervised practicum in audiology. Prerequisites: SPLP 2320 and SPLP 4309, each with a grade of C or better. Liability insurance required. Course fee required.

3313

3314

3318

4309

4310

4312

4320

4340

See the Graduate Catalog for graduate programs and courses.

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Social Work
College of Health Sciences 915.747.5095 socialwork@utep.edu DIRECTOR: Mark Lusk PROFESSOR: Lusk ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Berger ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: Childers, Lucas, Villalobos FIELD COORDINATOR: Rodriguez-Le Sage LECTURER: Moya, Gallinar Social Work is a challenging and rewarding profession which has the primary goal of helping individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities develop knowledge, values, and skills to help themselves to attain a better quality of life. The purpose of professional social work education is to enable students to integrate the knowledge, values, and skills of the social work profession into competent practice. Fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, the Department of Social Work baccalaureate program prepares students for generalist social work practice. Social Work Department Mission The mission of the Department of Social Work is to educate culturally competent social work practitioners to provide services and promote social and economic justice in partnership with the unique multicultural, international population of the Paso Del Norte region and beyond. The Department of Social Work is dedicated to student success.

Bachelor of Social Work Degree The BSW degree plan is designated to assure coverage of Council of Social Work Educationmandated curriculum content. The degree plan is based on a building-block analogy of Social Work education. The freshman and sophomore years are considered the liberal arts foundation. The junior year is the foundation professional year. The senior year is the concluding professional year. Social Work classes are offered sequentially and include content on values, ethics, diversity, social and economic justice, populations at risk, human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy and services, social work practice, research, and field practicum. The Department of Social Work places a strong value on community involvement, and students begin early in their course of study to gain practical experience through volunteer hours in approved agencies. In the foundation professional (junior) year, a pre-internship experience of 60 hours is incorporated into the course SOWK 3355 Introduction to Generalist Practice I. Professional social work advising allows for early and periodic evaluation of each student’s performance and guides students in selecting courses required to fulfill degree-plan requirements. Advising during the freshman and sophomore years can be provided by the Student Support Center at the College of Health Sciences, with Social Work majors also attending Social Work Orientation and receiving advising as needed from Social Work faculty members. When Social Work majors are nearing completion of university core and pre-professional course requirements as described on the Social Work Degree Plan, advising will be provided by UTEP Social Work faculty members.

BSW Course Requirements and Admissions Policy All students who wish to graduate with the BSW Degree Program at UTEP must apply for a separate admission into the Program. Admission is granted by the social work faculty. Only students who have

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been admitted into the BSW Degree Program and have completed all degree-plan requirements in both the liberal arts core and the Social Work major will be recommended for graduation with a BSW degree. Criteria for admission to the program are outlined below.

University and Pre-Professional Course Requirements and Course Transfer Information 1. UTEP Students a. The following is the list of transferred or UTEP courses from which the 64 hours of University Core Curriculum and additional required College of Health Sciences pre-professional courses will be counted University Core Curriculum is indicated with a +. These courses are required for graduation from the Social Work Program. + + + (1) English Composition (6 hours): ENGL 1311 and ENGL 1312 or ENGL 1313 *ENGL 1611 or COMM 1611 can be used to meet this requirement, or ESOL 1311 and ESOL 1312 in place of ENGL 1312 and 1313 (placement exam). + + (2) History (6 hours): HIST 1301 and HIST 1302 + + (3) Political Science (6 hours): POLS 2310 and POLS 2311 must include Texas Government (4) Language (6 hours): Spanish recommended (2300 and above; placement exam) Health Professional Spanish course recommended + (5) Humanities from menu (3 hours): PHIL 1301 recommended. + (6) MATH 1320 (placement exam) (7) Statistics (3 hours): one course from PSYC 1303, SOCI 2312, STAT 1380, or STAT 2380 (PSYC 1303 recommended.) + (8) Science (7 hours): University Core Natural Science Sequence BIOL 1305, 1107 and 2311 required. + (9) PSYC 1301 + (10) SOCI 1301 + (11) Visual/Performing Arts (3 hours): University Core Visual/Performing Arts from menu + + (12) Communications (3 hours): COMM 1301 or 1302 ; ENGL/COMM 1611 can be used to meet this requirement. + + (13) Institutionally Designated Option UNIV 1301 or UNIV 2350 (14) ECON 1301 or 2303 (15) ENGL 3359 or 3355 (16) SOWK 2310

2. Transfer Students A maximum of 66 semester hours is transferable to a UTEP degree program from a two-year institution. (1) A student can transfer up to 30 semester hours from a CSWE-accredited BSW degree program: (a) An introduction to social work course (three hours); (b) Up to six (6) hours of social policy; (c) Up to six (6) hours of HBSE; (d) Up to nine (9) hours of practice; and (e) Up to three (3) hours of research courses. (2) Students must complete at least 25% of the semester credit hours needed for graduation (a minimum of 32 hours) in residence.

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(3) Students must complete 24 of the last 30 semester credit hours needed for graduation hours in residence. (4) Students must complete 12 advanced hours in their major in residence within three (3) years of graduation. BSW Admissions Application Process 1. Admissions application: All students who wish to apply for the BSW Degree Program must complete an admissions application available from the Department of Social Work. A completed application includes: a. Completed application form b. Copy of official transcripts c. Writing sample as specified on the application for admission d. Two letters of professional reference e. Signed statement of understanding and adherence to NASW Code of Ethics f. Completed Transfer Credit Evaluation form, if applicable. 2. Applications Reviews: Applications can be submitted at any time. Admissions applications are reviewed individually by the BSW Admissions Committee. Students are notified of faculty decisions by mail. 3. Admissions Criteria: Students‖ eligibility for admission will be based on the following criteria: a) A completed application form. b) Discussion of formal admission to the department with a UTEP Social Work faculty member or attendance of orientation to the profession and the program presented by the UTEP Social Work Program. c) Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better 4. Admissions Decisions: The following decisions are made on admissions application folders by the Admissions Committee: a. Clear Admission: Application is accepted with no problems. b. Conditional Admission: Application is accepted with a GPA or other condition. To remain in the BSW degree program following conditional admission, students are required to post a 2.0 GPA in coursework. Students who post less than a 2.0 GPA in the succeeding semester following conditional admission will not be allowed to enroll in social work practice courses. c. Denied Admission: Application is not accepted. Students who are denied admission should see their advisor and can reapply during the subsequent admissions cycle. A designation other than clear admission requires a meeting of the student with the faculty advisor. The purpose of the meeting is to design a plan to address any outstanding concerns in the file.

Progression Through Professional/Advanced Professional Courses Although students can identify themselves as Social Work majors at any time and apply for formal admission to the program as described above, students should begin taking the professional course sequence in the fall semester. To complete the requirements for the BSW degree, the student takes the following courses (For admission to and additional requirements for the Field Work sequence, see below.) Professional/Advanced Professional Courses (a total of 56 hours) Social Work Core (36 hours) SOWK 2331, 2320, 3341, 3355, 3320, 3330, 3358, 4282, 4480, 4281, 4370,and 4490. Social Work Electives (11 hours)

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Select 11 hours from SOWK 3326, 3336, 3345, 3346, 3350, 3365, and 3370. Social Work Support Courses (9 hours, approved by advisor) Subject to approval by the Advisor, courses can be chosen from Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Political Science, Chicano Studies, African American Studies, Asian and African Studies, Women‖s Studies, Health Sciences and other fields. Total hours required for BSW degree: 120

Field Instruction During their professional (senior) year, students complete their field practicum, working 16 hours per week in an approved social service or health care agency under the supervision of a degreed social worker. Students are required to make formal application for the field practicum by contacting the Coordinator of Field Practicum in the academic semester preceding their placement.

Admission to Field Instruction All BSW students must complete a supervised field instruction sequence. To be considered eligible for field instruction, students must meet the following criteria: 1. Have a 2.0 or better cumulative GPA on a 4.0 scale in University Core pre-professional courses. 2. Have a 2.5 or better cumulative GPA for all courses completed in Social Work by the end of the second semester of the foundation professional year of study. 3. Completed SOWK 2310, SOWK 2331, SOWK 2320, SOWK 3320, SOWK 3330, SOWK 3341, and SOWK 3355 with a grade of C or better in each of these courses Social Work (SOWK) 2310 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare (3-0) ( SOCW 2361) Introduction to the human-service delivery system in the United States, with an emphasis on the social work profession: its mission, philosophy, ethics, values, diverse fields, and ethnocultural perspectives. Observations of social-service agencies and guest speakers provide a career orientation to the social work profession. Social Welfare Policy and Services I (3-0) Examination of the historical evolution of social welfare and the social work profession, with focus on the social policies which comprise the foundation of the welfare state in the United States. Present patterns of social welfare services are also be examined. Emphasis is on the historical evolution of contemporary social problems in the borderlands region. Oppression, discrimination, justice/immigration issues and policies, and their impact on diverse populations at risk will be explored. Required for pre-social work majors. Prerequisites: SOWK 2310 with a grade of C or better. Human Behavior and Social Environment I (3-0) Designed to introduce beginning social work students to some mainstream theoretical explanations by which to view individuals, groups, and families. Students will be given an opportunity to compare traditional mainstream models with newer alternative paradigms that focus on human growth and development from a strengths perspective. Special emphasis is

2320

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placed on issues of cultural, racial, ethnic diversity, racism, sexism, ageism, and disabling mental or physical conditions. Prerequisites: SOWK 2310 with a grade of C or better. 3170 3270 3370 Special Issues in Social Work (1-0) Special Issues in Social Work (2-0) Special Issues in Social Work (3-0) Professional concerns and issues of social work will be selected by the instructor dependent on student needs. Students can repeat this course if the focus of the course differs. Social Welfare Policy and Services II (3-0) An analysis of current major issues and problems in the formulation of social welfare policies on the local, state, and federal levels in the U.S. Social Security, health, education, public welfare and income maintenance, immigration, and international agreements are highlighted. The impact of various policies upon Hispanics and other at-risk populations in the borderlands region. Application of strategies of change are emphasized. Prerequisites: SOWK 2320, POLS 2310 and POLS 2311 each with a grade of C or better. Research Methods in Social Work (3-0) An understanding and appreciation of a scientific, analytic approach to building knowledge for practice and for evaluating service delivery in all areas of intervention including the student's own practice. Ethical standards, critical thinking, and writing skills are emphasized. Various methods for analyzing, evaluating, and utilizing research findings are presented. Theoretical constructs for conducting culturally sensitive, quantitative/qualitative research in borderlands region are examined. Students are strongly advised to complete a statistics course (required for graduation) listed under “University and pre-professional course requirements and course transfer information” prior to taking this course. Prerequisites: SOWK 2310, with a grade of C or better. Child Welfare Practice and Services (3-0) Overview of practice and policy issues, problems, and opportunities in the provision of child welfare services in the borderlands region. Emphasis is given to collaborative international efforts, culturally sensitive intervention approaches, case management, family preservation, and other intervention strategies. Human Behavior and Social Environment II (3-0) Designed to introduce beginning social-work students to various theoretical models by which to view how groups, communities, and organizations interface and interact with the social environment. Students also examine various theoretical models of poverty, particularly as these influence social welfare policies and/or affect the delivery of social services to impoverished populations. Restricted to Social Work majors only. Prerequisites: SOWK 2331 with a grade of C or better. The Process of Addiction: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (3-0) An examination of the cross-cultural implications of the process of addiction in borderlands region. Focus is on the comparative patterns of addictions by gender, age, family, and ethnocultural factors. Culturally competent intervention modalities are explored. Diagnostic Systems for Social Workers (3-0)

3320

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3336

3341

3346

3350

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Survey of selected diagnostic classification systems, including the DSM-IV, curanderismo/folkhealing practices, and alternative schema based on themes of conflict. Assessment and diagnosis of client and community situations, including cultural understandings of mental and emotional disorders. 3355 Generalist Social Work Practice I (3-0) This is the first of three generalist practice courses designed to provide entry-evel theory, knowledge, research, values, and skills for social work practice with individuals. Self-awareness, problem solving, interviewing, professional relationships, intervention planning and skills, and ethics are included. An ethnocultural perspective with particular focus on the borderlands region is emphasized. Restricted to Social Work majors only. Sixty (60) hours of volunteer service are required. Prerequisite: SOWK 2331 with a grade of C or better. Generalist Social Work Practice II (3-0) This is the second of three generalist practice courses designed to provide entry-level theory, knowledge, research, values, and skills for social work practice with groups and families. This course continues to build on the problem-solving model, intervention methods, and planning introduced in SOWK 3355. An ethnocultural perspective with particular focus on the borderlands region is emphasized. Restricted to Social Work majors only. Prerequisite: SOWK 3355 with a grade of C or better. Social Work With Special Populations (3-0) Emphasis is placed on theories, concepts, and techniques of social group work in a wide range of social-work settings. This course also covers content on the importance of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status, women, sexual orientation, and disabilities in group processes. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Students can repeat this course if the focus of the course differs. Independent Study (0-0-3) Supervised individual reading and research leading to development of a major paper or report. Prerequisites: Nine (9) hours of advanced course work in Social Work and department approval. Generalist Field Seminar I (2-0) A capstone seminar that enables students to integrate the theory, knowledge, values, skills, ethics, and ethnocultural competence of generalist social work practice. Corequisite: SOWK 4480. Prerequisites: SOWK 3320, SOWK 3341, and SOWK 3355 each with a grade of C or better. Generalist Field Seminar II (2-0) A capstone seminar that enables students to integrate the theory, knowledge, values, skills, ethics, and ethnocultural competence of generalist social work practice. Emphasis includes an evaluation of one's own practice. Restricted to Social Work majors only. Corequisite: SOWK 4490. Prerequisites: SOWK 4281, and SOWK 4480 each with a grade of C or better. Generalist Social Work Practice III (3-0) This is the third of three generalist practice courses designed to provide entry-level theory, knowledge, research, values, and skills for social work practice with organizations and communities. This course continues to build on the problem-solving model, intervention methods, and planning introduced in SOWK 3355 and SOWK 3358 with an emphasis on community

3358

3365

3375

4281

4282

4370

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development skills and strategies of change. An ethnocultural perspective with particular focus on the borderlands region is emphasized. Restricted to Social Work majors only. Prerequisites: SOWK 3320 and SOWK 3341 each with a grade of C or better 4480 Field Instruction I (0-0-4) First of two field courses in a supervised, laboratory-learning experience in a selected social welfare agency consisting of 240 hours. A weekly seminar (SOWK 4281) accompanies this course which enables the student to integrate and apply classroom learning (theory and practice) in a field setting. An ethnocultural practice perspective is emphasized. Restricted to Social Work majors only. Corequisite: SOWK 4281. Prerequisites: Formal admission to field placement. Field Instruction II (0-0-4) The second course of the field learning experience in a selected social welfare agency requires a minimum of 240 hours. It is accompanied by a seminar (SOWK 4282) to optimally integrate and apply generalist social-work practice. An ethnocultural practice perspective is emphasized. Restricted to Social Work majors only. Corequisite: SOWK 4282. Prerequisites: SOWK 4281 and SOWK 4480 each with a grade of C or better.

4490

College of Liberal Arts
Aerospace Studies ................... 289 African American Studies ........... 292 Art .............................................. 296 Chicano Studies ....................... 312 Communication ........................ 317 Creative Writing ........................ 328 Criminal Justice ........................ 332 English ...................................... 337 History ....................................... 347 Humanities ................................ 354 Languages and Linguistics ..... 356 Latin American Studies ........... 369 Military Science ........................ 372 Music ......................................... 376 Philosophy ................................ 395 Political Science ....................... 399 Psychology ................................. 407 Religious Studies ..................... 412 Sociology and ........................... 413 Anthropology Theatre and Dance ................... 423 Women’s Studies ..................... 440

Dr. Howard C. Daudistel, Dean Vincent Burke, Associate Dean Dr. Harmon M. Hosch, Associate Dean Dr. Michael M. Topp, Associate Dean Liberal Arts Building, Room 343 915.747.5666 915.747.5905

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

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libarts@utep.edu

College of Liberal Arts
The College of Liberal Arts, UTEP‖s largest college, consists of more than 20 undergraduate degree departments and programs in the three broad areas of the humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and fine and performing arts. The College has been built on a long tradition of excellence. Many College of Liberal Arts faculty are internationally recognized scholars and leaders in their academic disciplines; they draw on their research findings, scholarship, and creative activities to enhance the quality of students‖ classroom experiences. Noted for its innovative educational programming that engages students in a variety of creative, scholarly, and service activities, the College of Liberal Arts is dedicated to preparing students for a variety of careers and professions in a rapidly changing global environment. In addition to its many outstanding degree programs, the College offers students many opportunities to enhance their classroom experiences with special activities that promote learning and achievement outside the classroom. All UTEP students can access a variety of instructional services delivered by faculty, staff, and students in the new UTEP Writing Center managed by the Department of English. Students in the performing arts, for example, regularly perform in concert, recitals, and a variety of theatre productions. The world-class UTEP Dinner Theatre gives musical theatre students the opportunity to gain live performance experience with our long-established and well-respected production company. College of Liberal Arts students learn from first-rate scholars and teachers, and are able to participate in faculty-directed research projects or join research teams of faculty and other students who are studying important contemporary issues. Among many other research opportunities, Psychology students can participate in studies focused on legal decision-making, the accuracy of eyewitness identification, and the effectiveness of various smoking-cessation techniques. Anthropology students are able to participate in important archeological research excavations. Others work with faculty studying life in border communities, or engage in research intended to find better ways to address a variety of social and community problems. Communication students are afforded the opportunity to produce and develop radio and television programs, to produce documentary films, or to design advertising campaigns. Many History students have worked on public history projects for their communities, while Foreign Language and English students can be found working in schools as specialized instructors and tutors. Additionally, many Liberal Arts students serve the community by volunteering their services to nonprofit organizations. Hundreds of Criminal Justice students have served as interns in state and federal law-enforcement agencies. The College of Liberal Arts also supports programs that enhance the quality of life for all people living in the El Paso region. The Department of Music, for example, presents more than 80 musical performances and recitals on campus each year. Every year, more than 28,000 patrons enjoy UTEP Dinner Theatre productions. The Art Department operates the Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for Contemporary Art which is one of our nation‖s finest contemporary art galleries. The Department of History hosts an Annual History Day for area high school and middle school students. The English Department manages the West Texas Writing Project, which serves as a national model of university and public school collaboration to help teachers become better writing instructors.

Degrees and Majors
Bachelor of Arts

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/279

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree is offered in the following major fields: Anthropology, Art, Biology, Chemistry, Chicano Studies, Communication, Creative Writing, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, French, Geological Sciences, History, Latin American and Border Studies, Linguistics, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Spanish, and Theatre Arts. Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree are designed to provide an essential unity in the programs of all Liberal Arts students and, at the same time, to offer each student substantial latitude in course selection. The degree consists of a minimum of 120 semester hours, including at least 45 at the advanced (3000-4000) level. Twenty-four (24) of the last 30 hours must be taken in residence. With exceptions noted in departmental program descriptions, a course taken to satisfy one degree area requirement (University Core Curriculum, major, or minor) cannot be used to satisfy any other degree area requirement. No course used for Liberal Arts General Education Requirements can be doublecounted toward any other requirement. University Core Curriculum (42 hours) Students should refer to the University Core Curriculum section of this Catalog for a complete description. Liberal Arts General Education Requirements (24-27 hours) 0-3 Communication Skills: ESOL 2303 (for those whose post-primary education has been in a language other than English). 6 One Modern or Classical Language: Complete 2301 and 2302 in French, German, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish (prerequisites: completion of 1401 and 1402 in the language, or placement by examination); or SPAN 2301 and 2302 (non-native) or SPAN 2303 and 2304 (native) prerequisite: placement by examination); or LING 2403 and 2404. 18 Blocks: A total of 18 upper-division hours distributed among three blocks. At least three (3) hours must be taken in each block. No more than nine (9) of the 18 required hours can be taken in any one block. No course to meet this requirement can be taken in the student‖s major or minor. The Blocks are: Visual and Performing Arts (courses with prefixes in Art, Dance, Music, and Theatre Arts and Film) Humanities (courses with prefixes in Creative Writing, English, History, Languages and Linguistics, and Philosophy) Social and Behavioral Sciences (Courses with prefixes in Anthropology, Communication, Criminal Justice, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology) Courses in African-American Studies, Chicano Studies, Latin American and Border Studies, Religious Studies, Western Cultural Heritage (Humanities), and Women‖s Studies that are also cross-listed will be counted in the block to which the course is cross-listed. If a course is not cross-listed, each studies program will determine into which block its courses fit. Major Field (27-36 hours) Students complete a major prescribed by an academic department in the College of Liberal Arts (or Science or Business Administration [for the Economics major]) of at least 27 hours, 18 or more of which must be advanced (3000-or 4000-level). Students should refer to the individual departmental listings in this catalog for specific major field requirements. Nine (9) of the advanced hours in the major must be completed in residence within three years of the date of graduation. No course taken on a Pass/Fail basis can be counted for the major, even if the student changes majors after having taken the course. A completed degree plan must include a minimum grade point average (GPA) of C (2.0) in the major. Credit for courses taken to fulfill the major field requirements cannot also be counted to satisfy minor or College General Education field requirements.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011

0) in both majors. Elective credit cannot also be used in meeting any other degree requirement. The second major fulfills the requirement for a minor field.COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/280 A student who fulfills requirements for two majors prescribed by academic departments in the College of Liberal Arts (or Science or Business Administration [for the Economics major]) can earn a degree with a double major. The student must earn a minimum GPA of C (2. provided that the two majors are from different fields. Electives of advanced (3000-4000) level can. Credit for courses taken to fulfill the major field requirements in one major cannot also be counted to satisfy requirements in the other major field. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . however. Electives Students complete electives as needed to bring the total semester hours of credit to at least 120. be applied toward satisfaction of the requirement of 45 advanced hours.

choral and instrumental (All-Levels Teaching Program). and Music Theatre. and Film. Printmaking. Dance. Drawing. The BFA in Dance is a Ballet Performance major offered by the Department of Music. The BS in Psychology is subject to the BS degree plan listed in the College of Science section and the BS degree plan listed in the Psychology Department section. students should refer to the Liberal Arts Interdisciplinary section of this catalog. Theory and Composition. Printmaking. Performance. For specific requirements. All of these degree plans are structured to include University Core requirements. The BFA in Music Theatre is a multi-disciplinary degree offered by the Department of Music and the Department of Theatre. Minors:. and Sculpture. College of Liberal Arts General Education requirements. Bachelor of Music Students can pursue this professional Music degree in one of three areas: 1. students should refer to the Art Department section of this catalog. Metals. keyboard instruments. Drawing. and major and minor requirements. Bachelor of Science in Psychology The Psychology Department and all departments in the College of Science offer the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree. Graphic Design. For specific requirements. Credit UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Art History. For specific requirements. The Art degree is offered with the following areas of specialization: Majors: Ceramics. Painting. and Sculpture. students should refer to the Music Department section of this catalog. 2. For specific requirements. The minor field must be selected from a discipline different from that of the major field. Graphic Design. Metals. or voice. students should refer to the Music Department section of this catalog. 3. Specific degree plans containing requirements are available in the Office of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. Painting.COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/281 Bachelor of Arts Degrees in Science and Math The College of Liberal Arts offers BA degrees with majors in science and mathematics including: Bachelor of Arts in Biology with concentrations in Ecology and Biomedical Science Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry with General and Premedical concentrations Bachelor of Arts in Geology Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics Bachelor of Arts in Physics It is strongly recommended that students considering these degree plans seek and receive informed advising in both the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Science to ensure that these degree plans are the best choices to prepare students for their future goals. General Music. Ceramics. Dance. Bachelor of Fine Arts The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) is a professional degree offered in three fields: Art. Minor Field (18 hours) Students will complete a minor of at least 18 or more hours. orchestra and band instruments. nine of which must be advanced (3000-or 4000-level).

no more than six (6) hours from a student's major field can be counted toward such a minor. ACCT 3322. and Women's Studies. FIN 3310. History. Sociology. Philosophy. These students are advised jointly by the Linguistics and Speech-Language Pathology departments. and courses so counting cannot help satisfy the major requirement. Military Science. French. and nine (9) hours from ACCT 3321. Humanities. CIS 2320. SPLP 2320. Chemistry. Professional Writing and Rhetoric. MGMT 3320. MGMT 3303 or MGMT 3304. or CIS 3345 Management Minor: CIS 2320. Latin American Studies. SPLP 3310.0) in the minor. Students should refer to the College of Science departmental listings for details. Urban Studies. Translation (Spanish/English). and 12-13 hours selected from SPLP 2111. SPLP 2313. Interdisciplinary minors are also available. ACCT 3327. Mathematics. or ACCT 4328 Economics Minor: ECON 2303. Creative Writing. Asian Studies. and Theatre Arts. Students should refer to the departmental listings for requirements. A completed degree plan must include a minimum GPA of C (2. No course taken on a Pass/Fail basis can be counted for the minor. Art History. Students should refer to the individual departmental listings in this catalog for specific minor requirements. Students electing an interdisciplinary major cannot elect an interdisciplinary minor. ACCT 4301. Asian Studies UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . However. or MGMT 4325 Speech-Language Pathology Minor for Bachelor of Arts (Liberal Arts) Students : SPLP 1312. ECON 3320.) Minors can also be selected from the following approved disciplines in other colleges: Accounting Minor: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302. German. Communication. The following are approved interdisciplinary minors: African American Studies. Criminal Justice. even though the student changes minors after having taken the course. Film Studies. SPLP 4309 (6 hours). Museum Studies. Liberal Arts minor fields are available in Anthropology. no more than nine (9) hours from any one discipline will be counted as part of such a minor. Psychology. ECON 2304. English and American Literature. (Students should refer to the section on Interdisciplinary Minors for requirements. MGMT 3311. ACCT 3323. Dance. Political Science. plus 9 hours from ECON 3300 or ECON 4300-level courses General Business Minor: CIS 2320 and 15 hours from BLAW 3301. and SPLP 4312. Spanish. and Physics. Chicano Studies. Interdisciplinary Minors The College offers several interdisciplinary programs of study that can be pursued in conjunction with any major (except an interdisciplinary major). and 12 hours from BLAW 3301. Geology. In addition. the SPLO course(s) not selected as part of the minor (totaling 3-4 hours) can be used as elective credit in the Linguistics major. ACCT 4305. Music. Border Studies. MKT 3300. Linguistics. MGMT 3303. Science Minors are available in Biology. ACCT 2301. African American Studies The African American Studies Program offers students an interdisciplinary opportunity to examine the African American experience in detail. Specific requirements are listed under African American Studies. POM 3321. and either ECON 3302 or ECON 3303. Russian and Post-Communist Studies. For students pursuing admission to the Master of Science in Speech Language Pathology. Religious Studies. ACCT 3309 or ACCT 2301.COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/282 for courses taken to fulfill the minor field requirements cannot also be counted to satisfy major field requirements. SPLP 3312. These minors require the completion of a minimum of 18 semester hours. Art.

POLS 4348. As world economies continue to globalize. economics. HIST 3338. PHIL 3340. is an academic exploration of the multi-faceted. with China.6248 tschmid@utep. flexible. HIST 3330. arts. histories. The minor. MGMT 4325. The remaining nine hours can be taken from the core courses not taken to satisfy the core requirement or from the list of optional courses. POLS 4355. philosophy. Room 316 915. POLS 3334. ECON 4325. POLS 4364. HIST 2301. and RS 3310 Asian Studies Optional Courses: ANTH 3306. Humanities. religion. Asian Studies Core Courses: ASIA 3300. and other Asian regions through multidisciplinary approaches. Japan. At least three (3) disciplines must be represented by the core courses. No more than six (6) hours can be taken from a student's major area. The UTEP Asian Studies minor strives to fill this need. Specific requirements are listed under the Western Cultural Heritage section of this catalog. POLS 3332. policies. government service. 3350 Special Topics in Asian Studies To accommodate special-topics offerings from various departments on a proposal-byproposal basis. Inter-American Jewish Studies A broad. Specific requirements can be found under the Chicano Studies section of this catalog. POLS 3339.747. Students must take nine (9) hours of courses from the following list that constitutes the minor‖s core. POLS 3360. or teaching overseas.COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/283 Hudspeth Hall.edu DIRECTOR: Tom Schmid The Asian Studies minor is designed to give students a broad background in the philosophies. ENGL 3331 (when the topic is Asian literature). ASIA 3350. and politics of Asian cultures. interdisciplinary minor designed for undergraduates to gain an understanding of Jewish civilization and its creative and cultural experiences. Examines the interrelationships of history. it becomes increasingly important for the emerging workforce to have some knowledge of the diversity of Asian thought and social practices. Might be team-taught. or Interdisciplinary. Asian Studies (ASIA) 3300 Introduction to Asian Studies An overview of central issues relevant to the study of East Asia. Can be repeated once for credit with the topic varies. Fine Arts. Humanities The minor in Humanities is offered through the Western Cultural Heritage Program. POLS 4314. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Taiwan. Southeast Asia. socio-historical. HIST 3324. 4. ENGL 3317. particularly to serve students who are interested in comparative cultural studies or careers in international business. HIST 2302. and the arts to achieve this goal. and RS 3350 (when the focus is Asia). which is non-theological in orientation.000-year record of Jewish UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . HIST 3390 (when the focus is Asia). Prerequisite: Junior standing. No more than nine (9) hours (total of core and optional) can be taken from any one discipline. HIST 3339. POLS 4365. and other Asian regions playing central roles. Chicano Studies The Chicano Studies minor offers students four options: Social Science.

Under faculty supervision the student is required to complete several short written assignments or one long. This course requires the consent of the course instructor and the program director. This course examines religious. and philosophical approaches to the study of the Jewish tradition. and contemporary Jewish thought. and philosophy this course surveys the works of Jewish scholars and writers from antiquity to the present. Border Studies. The Inter-American Jewish Studies Undergraduate Minor Students must complete 18 hours of advanced-level courses (3300-4300) from the InterAmerican Jewish Studies minor course offerings. In consultation with the director. This course can be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Hasidism. The proposal must be approved by the director and must be on file in the office from which the Inter-American Jewish Studies Minor is administered (Hudspeth Hall Room 214).COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/284 people. This course covers an area in Jewish studies for which no regular course is offered. Philosophy. Jewish philosophy. historical. This course can be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Bible commentary. Courses taught in and cross-listed with the minor highlight the diversity of cultural. sociology. literary. mysticism. Linguistics. It covers major theories of the Jewish experience from the Bible through Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages to modern and contemporary times. and Western Cultural Heritage. History. issues and contexts of Jewish studies. history. Theater. 3310 Latin American and Border Studies UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . This includes courses in Literature. Communication. and a more complex and rich understanding of the world. This course can be repeated for credit when the topic varies. end-term research essay. Readings can include religious texts. Music. Jewish literature. 3300 Special Topics in Jewish Studies (3-0) An interdisciplinary examination of a particular theme or topic in Jewish studies. students should design a proposal for a coherent course of studies. 3301 Theories in Jewish Studies (3-0) Through the interdisciplinary perspectives of literary studies. The minor is structured to provide an in-depth liberal arts education that will constitute a foundation for advanced academic study. Religion. A key component of the minor is an examination of the rich cultural tradition of the Jewish people of Mexico and Latin America. professional careers in a variety of fields. political. It can be repeated for credit when the topic varies. sociological. Jewish Studies (JS) 2300 Introduction to Jewish Studies (3-0) An interdisciplinary overview of the major themes. The specific topic will be listed when the course is offered. Directed Study (0-0-3) A directed program of independent readings and assignments for students who wish to investigate an area of Jewish studies not covered by regular course offerings. and religious experiences of Jewish people in different times and places. social. Art. Humanities.

UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . RUSS 3350. and THEA 3342. and one course chosen from RUSS 3301. or HIST 3374. COMM 3320. SOCI 3381. RUSS 3320. Students are required to complete a core course and to elect fifteen (15) hours from among the optional courses. POLS 3330. COMM 3338. POLS 4341. Russian and Post-Communist Studies The Russian and Post-Communist Studies minor is a broad. HIST 3308. MS 3302. POLS 3335. Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Arts A minor in Museum Studies will prepare students for an entry-level position in a museum. nor can a student elect courses from both Military Science and Aerospace Studies. Religious Studies The Religious Studies minor is designed to provide an interdisciplinary framework within which students can take courses that explore the nature of religion and its impact on human culture. AS 4301. COMM 3323. THEA 2301. BIOL 4326. but particularly as illuminated by the social sciences and humanities. CIS 2335. and ART 3307. past and present. SOCI 3341. CS 1401. CIS 2315. HIST 3305. Not more than twelve (12) hours of the optional courses can be selected from a single department. or naval-science instruction. HIST 3369. MS 3301. interdisciplinary plan designed to help acquaint students from any major with the Post-Soviet and East European world. HIST 3321. not solely as reflected in formal military. air. COMM 2300. ANTH 4365. or ENGL 3382. HIST 3324. POLS 4331. HIST 3374. they provide students in other majors the opportunity to take advantage of the University's rich resources in these areas. POLS 4332 or POLS 4331. Core Courses: HIST 3332 or HIST 3333. Optional Courses: HIST 2302. HIST 3311. CIS 3345. POLS 4330. ENGL 3381. MS 4301. HIST 3369. MGMT 3303. or government agencies dealing with Russia and Post-Communist countries. Other courses may be considered with the approval of the Museum Studies Advisor. AS 4302. education. MS 4302. Students must complete a total of 18 semester credit hours. Military Studies The Military Studies minor is intended for students with an interest in the military as a social institution and in its policies and problems. CS 1420. Courses are academic and non-sectarian in nature. including 9 hours of Core courses and 9 hours of electives. ART 3309. Core courses include: ART 3308. Director. AS 3302. It is especially recommended for students who plan advanced study in Russian and Post-Communist fields at the graduate level or who plan careers in business. SCI 1401. HIST 3307. POLS 3332.COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/285 Minors are available in both Latin American Studies and in Border Studies. and no more than one course from CS 1310. POLS 4356. Specific requirements are listed in the Latin American Studies section. Core Course: HIST 3313 Optional Courses (15 hours): AS 3301. SOCI 3381. Museum Studies ADVISOR: Kate Bonansinga. Elective courses include: ART 3339. Specific course listings and requirements can be found under Religious Studies. and GEOG 1310. ART 4303. HIST 3312. COMM 2352. or HSCI 3302.

A GPA of 2. French. A GPA of 2. In the case of some majors. For further information. In order to meet TEA's certification requirements.5 or higher is required in the minor. 4. The requirement of a course in computing is met by completing EDT 3371 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG 2010-2011 . Interested students are referred to the description of those programs in the catalog section for the Department of Art and the Department of Music. Other certification programs in the sciences are also described in that section. RED 3342 is required for certification. 3. should consult with the Education Advising Office in the College of Education concerning the requirements for certification to teach in the elementary or middle schools. Consultation with the Program Coordinator is necessary for students to be admitted into the program. and Theatre Arts. The minor must be taken in Education. This course does not meet any of the requirements for the BA degree. Twelve (12) semester hours of courses in a supporting field are required. Certification for teaching in secondary schools is available in the following Liberal Arts fields: Communication. students must select courses in accordance with the following restrictions and recommendations: 1. specific courses are required for students seeking secondary certification. History.COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS/286 Translation and Interpretation (Spanish/English) The Translation and Interpretation Program is designed to provide qualified students the opportunity to acquire skills in these fields. 2. English. Students who plan to teach these subjects in the secondary schools will earn the Bachelor of Arts degree in the selected field after meeting all the requirements for that degree as described above and in the catalog section for the department of the major. Specific requirements are listed under the Women's Studies section of this Catalog. All-Levels Certification All-levels programs are available in Art and Music. Translation Certificates in either Spanish or English or both will be awarded to those who pass professional-level competency examinations.5 or higher is required in the major. Spanish. Social Studies. Dance. Secondary Certification Certification program requirements for students seeking a BA in Mathematics are described in the catalog section for the College of Science. interdisciplinary minor in which students can take course work to specialize in issues of gender and/or women. 5. These students are referred to the description of that degree contained in the catalog section for the College of Education. or who plan to earn such a degree. Details of the program are listed in the Languages and Linguistics section of this catalog. students should read the section of the catalog that describes the requirements of the major department. Thirty-six (36) semester hours in the major field are required. Language Arts and Reading. Teacher Certification Primary and Middle Grades Certification Incoming stu