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Central Coast

September 2013

Family
Happy Grandparents Day! SEP 8
Inside
Nature
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Library Voice Money

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Fun & Games Education

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Local History Education Calendar

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Family Events

Local Resources Elder Care Basics

Peace Education / Attention / Sweet Shop History / Elder Care / Coastal Cleanup!

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Cover Photo:
Central Coast Family
Phone: (805) 528-0440
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Coastal Cleanup Crew 2012
ECOSLO www.ecoslo.org/coastal-cleanup

PO Box 6424, Los Osos, CA 93412
Fax: (805) 439-0798 PUBLISHER David Vogel ccfamilypb@gmail.com ADVERTISING ACCTS Lou Favre ccfamilyad@gmail.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Eric Woodards

Our goal is to connect Central Coast families with the resources they need to thrive!

EDITOR Patrice Vogel ccfamilyed@gmail.com Associate EDITOR Claire Vogel ccfamilyae@gmail.com GRAPHIC DESIGN Out of the Blue

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kristen Barnhart, Jennifer Best, Guy Crabb, Stephanie Foster, Karyn Lutes, CS Perryess, Walter Reil, Steven Smith, David Vogel
Central Coast Family is published monthly with a readership over 40,000. Find FREE copies throughout San Luis Obispo County and North Santa Barbara County.

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Visit our website: www.centralcoastfamily.com Submission deadline: 15th of each month prior to publication
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September 2013

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Nature

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at your favorite of 28 local beaches, visit www.ecoslo. org/coastal-cleanup or contact Program Coordinator Michael Heater at (805) 544-1777 or programs@ecoslo.org .

“MAKE TRASH EXTINCT”
ON CALIFORNIA COASTAL CLEANUP DAY
The California Coastal Commission plans the 29th annual California Coastal Cleanup Day (CCD), the state’s largest volunteer event. This family event will take place at over 800 locations around the state on Saturday, September 21st, from 9:00 am to Noon. The Cleanup is California’s largest single effort to remove debris that has accumulated on beaches and inland shorelines over the past year, bringing tens of thousands of volunteers out annually to protect marine wildlife and habitat that can be damaged by marine debris. The Environmental Center of San Luis Obispo (ECOSLO) has been organizing CCD since 2005. Last year, over 1,000 volunteers removed nearly 2,800 pounds of marine debris from 28 beaches throughout San Luis Obispo County. Statewide in 2012, over 65,500 volunteers participated and picked-up nearly 770,000 pounds of debris.

ECOSLO is still accepting and even fatal to wildlife, which financial support from the in turn can damage our state’s To sign up for the San Luis community, so donations are economy, and can even become Obispo County Coastal Cleanup also appreciated. a human health hazard. Organizers are also urging all participants to take part in the BYO (Bring Your Own) campaign designed to encourage volunteers to help decrease the ecological footprint of the Cleanup. Volunteers are encouraged to bring their own bucket or reusable bag, gloves, and reusable water bottle, so that they won’t need to use disposable items that the Commission supplies. “Coastal Cleanup Day has been incredibly successful at removing trash from our beaches and waterways, but in order to achieve this success, the Coastal Commission has had to provide hundreds of thousands of single-use, disposable items for volunteers to use,” said Eben Schwartz, Statewide Director of Coastal Cleanup Day. “It’s time for the Cleanup to make every effort to become a zero-waste event.”

service groups, and neighbors to join together, take care of our fragile marine environment, show community support for our shared natural resources, learn about the impacts of marine debris and how we can prevent them, and to have fun!

ECOSLO believes that we must do everything we can to help preserve our local beaches. Coastal Cleanup Day is a great Marine debris can be harmful way for families, students,

Central Coast Family

September 2013

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Library Voice

Younging
by Kristen Barnhart

Turning 60 this year has been one great “aha!” after another. I started with a promise to myself to get out of my “cave” and say YES to as many opportunities and adventures as I possibly could. As an introvert, I do need lots of alone time to charge my battery, but it had gotten ridiculous. My empty nest was becoming underwhelming in its appeal. So I began to surprise my friends with more “Why yes, I’d love to!” and less “Too tired… maybe next time.” when they invited me out and about. It was time to be seen and to see things differently. The next step was to literally reopen my eyes, which had gotten so droopy that my lashes were weighed down and covered by my lids. This turned my already small eyes into mere slits. As my peripheral vision had

narrowed what I could see around me as I drove, so had my inner vision for where I was going on my life journey. My “windows of the soul” were letting less light in and revealing less to those around me. A month before my birthday, I went under the knife and got those heavy lids lightened, freeing me to read longer and see while smiling! Having accessible lids and lashes delighted my ever-fashionable daughter. She took me to Sephora for a minimakeover, bought me makeup for my birthday, and prepared me for my gathering the next day. And what a day it was! My birthday Croning Ceremony Circle was an honor filled with love, tears, and lots of laughter. The amazing Central Coast end-of-February weather was at its blessed best as women from

the last 34 years of my life gathered in my friend’s Templeton backyard park to celebrate the next chapter of my life. I was “rebirthed” through a tunnel of singing women and then basked in the love as I received my wise woman name: Ceridwen. Looking around this circle of chosen sisters, I filled in the missing faces and, as we called them in, I felt the caress of their memories too. Three turns of sharing around the circle: where we met; a lesson learned/ funny story; and hopes, dreams, and wishes for me. It was a dream come true, especially having my daughter there to join with women who had blessed her in my womb and now witnessed my next coming of age, ==adding her wisdom to the mix. The “aha” from that day came from my daughter: “Mommy, my hope and dream and wish for you is that you are happy, strong, and healthy so that my children will have you until they’re grown.” Not that I may see her someday children grow up, but that they will have me until they’re grown. Wow, no pressure, every teary eye was fixed on me. It was the perfect gift; it held the promise of being necessary for a long, long time and I am up to the challenge. I was already getting back to my happiness attitude of gratitude, so health was next. I had gotten lazy about nutrition; sure I knew it all, but food preparation held zero appeal for me. My good intentions organically rotted in the produce drawers, and Trader Joe’s was my personal cook. I was overweight and undernourished and just wasn’t me. I knew my friend Odette was drinking some green beverage, so I asked her about it. After some back and forth of “I told you about it,” “No, you just said it was green,” we got down to business about anabolic transformation cleanses, and I said “Sign me up.” Now I too had my green shake, and fibers, and vegan protein, and “magic” cherry drink, and the transformation has been real and life changing. I’m feeling great, have energy, am losing weight and (can I get an Amen?!) am sleeping deeply enough to dream again. I no longer watch the clock as I toss and turn; I’m back in Technicolor dreamland, waking up refreshed and ready to go nearly every day. I bought a heavy-duty blender juicer, throw in some veggies, banana,

ginger, and whatever else tickles my fancy, add my superfoods powder, and off I go. Easy peasy and yummy, so I actually stay motivated. When I have meals, they are healthier because I’ve pretty much lost my sweet tooth and cravings for salty snacks. Chips and guacamole, however, will always be my go-to munchie at a party. So when I joined more old friends at Lady Tie Dye’s 25th Annual Woodstock party, I enjoyed them immensely! There were folks I hadn’t seen in decades, and we talked of grown children and grandkids instead of chasing little ones around the yard and through the house. We walked around remembering and breathing together, held one another in long embraces that were repeated through doorways, danced, laughed, cried a little in recognition of shared losses, and felt at home. Coming home to myself has been my “aha” this year. Creating myself in my own image. Making sure that my someday grandchildren (as well as my very real chosen ones) will have the real Me until they are grown. 60? It’s just another name for a new chapter, or maybe even a whole new book!
Kristen Barnhart has been telling stories, recommending books, and stamping little hands for over 34 years throughout SLO County. She is currently a Youth Services Librarian at the San Luis Obispo Library. Kristen can be reached at (805) 781-5775 or kbarnhart@slolibrary.org.

Libraries will get you through times with no money, better than money will get you through times with no Libraries!”
• Page 4

Central Coast Family

September 2013

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Central Coast Family • September 2013 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 5

Money
Invest in Every Season of Life
consider consulting a qualified with diligence and discipline, you can discover the paths to take as estate-planning attorney. you move through the seasons of You’ll need to make the your life. appropriate financial and investment decisions at many Molly Peoples is a financial advisor at Edward in San Luis Obispo. She can be reached different times over the years. Jones at (805) 784-9013. © 2013 Edward Jones. All This may sound daunting, but rights reserved. Member SIPC.

by Molly Peoples

Fall is almost officially here — and if you’re like most people, you’re probably wondering how summer went by so fast. Those trips to the lake or the beach are fading in memory now, giving way to helping kids with homework, raking leaves and the other rites of autumn. And just as your dayto-day tasks change with the seasons, so, too, will your money management and investment activities at different phases of your life.

a tax-advantaged college savings vehicle, such as a 529 plan. Also, it’s important to have enough life insurance to protect your young family.

Phase three: Ramping up for retirement — When you reach the mid-to-later stages of your working life, you may find you have more financial resources available, as your earnings may have increased significantly, your children have grown and your mortgage may even be paid off. Here’s how these scenarios might If you are not already doing so, “max out,” if possible, on your look: 401(k) and IRA. And if you still Phase one: Planning for the have money available to invest, possibilities — When you are you may want to look for other young and you’re starting out in tax-advantaged retirement the working world, your most vehicles. immediate financial concerns may be to pay off student loans and Phase four: Reaping the rewards then, possibly, save for a down — Now it’s time to enjoy the payment on a house. To address results of your lifetime of hard both these goals, you’ll need to work and your many years of budget carefully. And yet, even saving and investing. You may at this stage of your life, you have to tap into your retirement should start thinking about saving accounts, so you’ll need to choose for retirement — because time is a sustainable annual withdrawal your biggest ally. Consequently, rate. The amount you withdraw if you work for an employer who each year from your IRA and offers a retirement plan, such as 401(k) depends on a variety of a 401(k), contribute what you can factors: how much you’ve saved, afford. At the very least, put in the lifestyle you’ve chosen, your enough to earn your company’s estimated longevity, how much matching contribution, if one is you have available from other offered. You may also want to sources, and so on. open an Individual Retirement Phase five: Examining your estate Account (IRA). plans — During your retirement Phase two: Gearing up for other goals — As you move through life, and possibly begin a family, you’ll likely develop other financial goals, such as helping your children pay for college. You may want to consider investing in years, if not sooner, you’ll want to review your estate plans so that you can leave the legacy you desire. If you have a need to create or update your legal documents, such as a living trust and durable power of attorney, you should

Programs Countywide
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September 2013

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Fun & Games
Help Scarecrow find the Crows

Jack’s Jokes
What do you call a fly when it retires? What do you call a baby whale? What’s black and white and eats like a horse? A flew! A little squirt! A zebra!

Grandparents Day Word Search

Hink Pinks (2 rhyming 1 syllable words matching a silly definition):
1. autumn fight 2. good cut 3. tree chapel 4. postman route ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________
1. fall brawl 2. nice slice 3. birch church 4. mail trail

Central Coast Family

September 2013

S U D O K U

Sudoku begins with some of the grid cells filled with numbers. The object is to fill the other empty cells with numbers between 1 and 9 (1 number only in each cell). A number should appear only once in each row, column, and region.

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Central Coast Family

September 2013

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Education
A Week of Peace
by Mary Tesoro

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.
~ Mahatma Gandhi

Peace represents a sweeter music, a cosmic melody that is far superior to the discords of war. Somehow, we must transform the dynamics of the world power struggle from the negative nuclear arms race, which no one can win, to a positive contest to harness humanity’s creative genius for the purpose of making peace and prosperity a reality for all the nations of the ~ Martin Luther King, Jr. world. It hardly seems possible that fighters in hundreds of warzones across our planet would lay down arms on the same day. Yet, that is exactly what will happen on Saturday, September 21, 2013. There will be a 24-hour Global Ceasefire, during which millions of civilian children and adults caught in zones of war and conflict will be able to receive food, water, supplies, and medical attention. September 21 is the International Day of Peace, which began with a 1981 United Nations resolution. In recent years, observance of the Sept. 21 Global Ceasefire has expanded to include all sectors of society. Millions of people in all parts of the world engage in practical acts of peace on this shared date. From small private gatherings to public events with hundreds of thousands of people, humans gather to commemorate

and strengthen the ideals of peace within and among all nations and peoples. What good does this do? These global collaborations of individuals, organizations, coalitions and campaigns energize the values, spirit, and actions that move us toward a culture of peace and a more sustainable world – for the good of all. According to Martin Luther King Jr., “We must concentrate not merely on the negative expulsion of war but on the positive affirmation of peace.” He was referring to what is now called Peacebuilding. Peacemaking and peacekeeping focus on resolving existing conflicts or preventing re-occurrences. But new conflicts always arise. Put simply by Albert Einstein, “Peace cannot be kept by force. It can only be achieved by understanding.” The focus of Peacebuilding is on creating and strengthening understanding and tolerance. Peacebuilding activities—ranging from random acts of kindness to global collaborations— contribute to building a culture of understanding, tolerance, and cooperation between individuals, communities, societies, and nations.

(Safe-SLO Nonprofit). Aikido of San Luis Obispo has been a part of our local community for 25 years, offering alternatives to violence for children, adults, families, and agencies. Aikido of San Luis Obispo is a member of Aiki Extensions, an international nonprofit organization that promotes the use of “harmony in action” principles throughout the world. Along with Aikido schools worldwide, Aikido of San Luis Obispo will offer a number of One local nonprofit organization free peace-focused classes to the that participates in the global public during International Aiki celebration of peace each year Peace Week September 15-21. is Aikido of San Luis Obispo Aikido is a philosophy of peace practiced through the body. The revolutionary aspect of Aikido as a martial art is that it changes the focus of training from combat to reconciliation. The physical techniques of Aikido are useful for non-aggressive self-defense. The principles of Aikido are useful for conflict resolution, community relations, education, psychotherapy, trauma recovery, and international peacemaking.

The free classes at Aikido of San Luis Obispo will include a variety of options for youth, adults, and seniors. Some classes will be active, teaching Aikido’s physical techniques. Others will teach Aiki principles of reconciliation, compassion, and nonviolence in non-strenuous ways. In addition, Shelley Massa Gooch will join the Aikido teachers to donate a class of Yoga as a peace practice. To learn more about Aikido or the free Peace Week classes at Aikido of San Luis Obispo, call 544-8866 or visit www.aikidoslo.com. Foster peace in your own life and then apply the Art to all that you encounter.
~ Morihei Ueshiba (Founder of Aikido)

Mary Tesoro (4th degree black belt) has practiced Aikido since 1982. She is co-founder and head instructor of Aikido of San Luis Obispo, a position for which she has volunteered since 1987. Mary is a national self defense trainer, a co-founder of Model Mugging of San Luis Obispo, and author of Options for Avoiding Assault: A Guide to Assertiveness, Boundaries, and De-Escalation.

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September 2013

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Page 10

Academic Associates
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Your child can become an EXCELLENT reader!
With Academic Associates, your child will learn all the skills of reading: 1. Decoding (reading) the word 2. Understanding what is read 3. Evaluating what is read 4. Retaining and applying relevant information 5. Reading with fluency While your student fully develops the skill of decoding using the rules of phonics, he or she will concurrently learn simple, effective techniques for increasing comprehension, fluency, and overall reading proficiency.

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Instruction is provided in a one-on-one, secure, positive environment designed to increase confidence and self-esteem. We start with the basic foundation of reading and build from there. On average, students who complete our entire program gain from 2 to 5 years in reading ability. Central Coast Family • September 2013 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 11

Local History Sweets of the Past
by Guy Crabb

San Luis Obispo: 100 Years Books
Collect all three great books about the history of SLO town. Buy your memory of downtown as it continues to change in the coming months and years. Capture a moment in history!

When my wife and I walk around downtown San Luis Obispo, we have a wonderful ritual. Many times as we walk up Higuera Street, we end up strolling through Court Street and stepping into Powell’s Sweet Shop. I always have a smile on my face when I walk in, and an even bigger smile when I walk out. My wife and I both grab a plastic bag and search for our favorites from the bins of delicious candy. I normally get about a quarter of a pound. Really, honestly, I get a little over a quarter pound, but that’s all. The next big decision we face is whether to open up our candy bags as soon as we depart the store, or when we walk around the corner onto Monterey Street. When you walk out of a candy store with a full bag, it makes you feel like you are a kid again. I am now in the process of writing a new and improved Higuera Street book, because I sold out of all copies of the first book. As I have discovered more information about businesses in downtown SLO, I have also found that our downtown area had many businesses of a particular kind at certain time periods in the past. For instance, at the turn of the century, we had a lot of cigar stores in town. In 1914, we had at least ten cigar and tobacco stores on Higuera, Monterey, and Chorro.

Probably the most famous was the shop owned by Geo. Kluver, who rolled some of the finest cigars in town. His cigar store was in the heart of downtown, where Novo’s is located today. In 1930, there were once again ten cigar stores downtown. We even had a United Cigar Store at 885 Monterey Street, in the St. James Hotel, approximately where Beverly’s is located today.

Enjoy Your Memories!
Get an autographed copy at www.slo100years.com, Boo Boo Records, the History Center, and Antiques on Monterey
Also available at Barnes & Noble, Crushed Grape, Apple Farm, and Volumes of Pleasure
GUY CRABB PUBLISHING

Moondoggies was when it was next to the “old” Muzio’s Market. Austin Candy must have been a fantastic store, judging by the number of years they were at this We have also had a ton of bars in location. But, from what I have town over the years, but believe read, the candy store eventually me, that subject can be an entire went bankrupt and closed. article in itself. The businesses I want to tell you about are the The story of Austin’s then takes candy stores, sometimes called an interesting twist. A young man confectioneries. I know we don’t named Richard Chong worked at use the word confectionery very Austin’s candy store in high school often nowadays, so I found a good to make a few bucks a week definition of the word. It means for spending money. Richard “a confectioner’s (or sweet) was drafted, and after coming shop.” Confectionary means “a back from the war, he decided dish or delicacy made with sweet to open his own candy store. ingredients.” I could think of a lot Chong’s Home Made Candies of things that could fit into that opened in 1950, according to definition such as hot chocolate, the plaque on the outside of handmade candy, etc. the small red brick building at Let me tell you of a few of the more historic popular candy or confectionery stores in town. From the 1920s into the 1950s, there was the very popular Austin Candy. This place of wonder and want was located at 868 Monterey Street, which is where the “old” 798 Palm Street. The history of this building is interesting, because Richard’s brother Addison Chong built the brick building in 1925 and started Chong’s Chinese Restaurant. They lived in the home next door to the restaurant. The restaurant stayed in business until the late 1940s or maybe even 1950. This is when Richard began the longest running candy store in San Luis Obispo history. The sign on top of the building read Chong’s Home Made Candies. From what I have heard and read, the early years of the candy store were incredible with Richard creating all of the candies by hand every day. Richard knew he was in a great location with Mission school just down the block. His store was busy many days with the afterschool crowds. It is said that

Richard was a very memorable person with a high-pitched voice and short and slender build. I have also read accounts that he loved to talk to customers at times, but sometimes he enjoyed reading books more than making a candy sale. Richard was very patient with kids most of the time and even performed a little magic. He was a very interesting person and he made some of the best candy in town until his death in 1978. Today we have lots of great places to buy confectionary. Besides Powell’s, there is a very cool place up on Monterey Street called MaMa Ganache Artisan Chocolates where they have some excellent candy. Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory is on the ground floor of the Warden Jr. Building, and they not only have great candy, but they also have ice cream, candy apples, cookies, and more. I really love their chocolate dipped marshmallows. Then of course, there is the best old standby, See’s Candy on Madonna Road. Polar Bear Paws are one of my favorites at See’s. …These are all hints for my next year’s students, because my wife already knows my favorites at each of the candy stores in town. As we say goodbye to summer, we all need to start bulking up on some good candy for the winter. Mmm, history and candy are one of my favorite combinations.
Guy Crabb teaches at Charles E. Teach Elementary School in San Luis Obispo. He graduated from Cal Poly SLO and has been teaching for 28 years. Guy was a Teacher of the Year in 2006 and currently teaches at a National Blue Ribbon School. Reach him at crabbx5@charter.net.

Richard Chong at his homemade candy store in 1974.

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September 2013

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Page 12

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Central Coast Family • September 2013 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 13

Education
Attention & Organization
by Karyn Lutes, MA, CCC-SLP “The Speech And Learning Coach”

Returning to school can bring an assortment of feelings for parents– ranging from excitement to trepidation–depending on how the last school year ended. You can help your child to be successful by creating a supportive structure to help him get organized. Requisite skills, known as “executive functions,” can impact attention, independent learning, and making good decisions throughout life. How Do Executive Functions Help? Executive function skills are responsible for the organization of simple and complex tasks. They are necessary so that your child can effectively manage himself and his time, his physical space, and his materials. These skills are often thought of as the “CEO” or “conductor” of your brain, since they organize the mental control of: attention, setting goals, having mental flexibility, and combining new and old information. Attention is the ability to choose and control what you will pay attention to. Setting goals requires the ability to prioritize, organize, and successfully predict outcomes and consequences. Mental flexibility includes having self-control, and it requires the ability to change and adapt to sensory input and new situations. Information processing is the ability to efficiently comprehend, remember, and use information to support attention, learning, and communication. If your child struggles with executive functions, you have two basic options. The first is to assume the role as the “CEO” of your child’s brain (by supporting him with compensatory strategies) in order to accomplish important tasks. The second option is to remediate weaknesses that caused the executive function problem (including attention, language, and learning challenges) with specialized brain training intervention. Strategies for Homework and Organization 1. Organize a reference binder with your children’s class information. Write down teacher and classmate contact information and make a copy of the syllabus containing assignments, tests, and project due dates. 2. Get a student planner for each child. Spend 10 minutes with your

child at the beginning of the week charting events and looking at due-dates and activities for the week ahead. For children in third grade through college, it is best to see both a week at a glance as well as a month at a glance. The week at a glance calendar can help with planning checklists and details for the current week. The month at a glance creates a complete view of deadlines that will lead up to completing a whole project by a specific date. Colorcoding classes and activities add easy visual organization. 3. Set up a designated block of time for daily homework. If your child doesn’t have homework, or finishes early, then she can read, write a letter to a relative, write in a journal, or create flash cards for vocabulary or math facts. You are less likely to hear, “But I don’t have any homework!” in hopes of being freed up to watch television, play video games, chat online, or run outside to catch up with friends. 4. Set up a designated area for each child for homework. Be sure that all necessary supplies are at hand to avoid becoming side tracked looking for items. If more than one child is doing homework at the table, consider reducing distractions by creating a “homework cubicle” made out of tri-fold poster board (available from an office supply store). You can get creative by hot-gluing a lightweight cookie sheet to one side and adding magnets that can hold artwork, photos, math facts, and commonly misspelled words. Allow your child to decorate other sections with drawings and stickers. When not in use it can be collapsed and easily stored. 5. Be sure to review your child’s work nightly. Even if your child is completely independent with homework, your diligence will set an example that it is important. When you review his work, be sure to reward his effort and provide a model for corrections and completeness. This is a great time for your child to give you any completed work, letters from teachers, and forms that need to be filled out. Finally, help him to organize his academic materials and backpack, and to put his backpack by the exit door. 6. Buy your child a watch that she can read to increase awareness

and management of time. 7. If you are tired of reminding your child to get ready in the morning… Write down the list of tasks to get ready. If your child is younger, take a picture of her completing each step (e.g., getting dressed, putting on shoes, eating, brushing hair and teeth, and putting lunch in her backpack). Slip the list or pictures in a plastic page so she can use a dry-erase pen to mark when she has completed each task. Be sure to provide support as needed until she is independent with the routine. Instead of reminding her to brush her hair numerous times, you can say, “Go check your list!” Building Organization and Independence In order for your child to be independent with organization and schoolwork, he must have good executive function skills. He needs these skills to effectively manage his attention, set priorities and goals, adapt easily, have self-control, and process a variety of information quickly and correctly. If he cannot keep up, then it creates stress and anxiety when he is overloaded with information that he cannot process, and this eventually erodes selfconfidence. For parents, it can feel frustrating and

overwhelming because you have to work so hard to support his efforts in order to help him hold it all together before he completely shuts down. At some point, your child will need to be able to do it on his own, unless you plan on functioning as his brain’s CEO for the rest of his life. Since having a weakness in executive function is a symptom of another cognitive problem or disability, it takes an evaluation to pinpoint the problem – and specialized intervention to fix the problem permanently. Your child must learn to create order out of disorder to effectively manage himself in school and throughout life.
Cooper-Kahn Ph.D., Joyce, & Dietzel Ph.D., Laurie, Late, Lost, and Unprepared, Woodbine House, Bethesda, MD, 2008. Dawson, Ed.D., Peg, & Guare, Ph.D., Richard, Smart But Scattered, Guilford Press, NY, NY, 2009 Stowell, Jill, At Wit’s End, Green Dot Press, Lexington, KY, 2010.
Karyn
 Lutes,
 MA,
 CCC‐SLP,
 is
 a
 Licensed
 Speech
 and
 Language
 Pathologist,
 CA
 Credentialed
 Teacher,
 and
 Executive
 Director
 of
 The
 Speech
 And
 Learning
 Coach
 in
 Arroyo
 Grande.
 
 She is an author, speaker, wife, and mother of three. Contact her
at
(805)
474‐1144
or
 Info@TheSpeechAndLearningCoach.com. © 2013
 The
 Speech
 And
 Learning
 Coach. com.
 Reproduction
 allowed
 if
 origination
 is
 included.
 Must
be
used
in
its
entirety.

Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 14

Get ready for Back to School!
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1480 Santa Ysabel Ave, Los Osos, CA 93402 (805) 528-0391

Sermon Series: Sept 8 – Oct 27 “Building a Disciple” (Peter)
September 8th “Introduced to God” September 15th “Jesus to His Family” September 22nd “Creativity in Serving Jesus” September 29th “Vision for Future Ministry” October 6th “Qualified for Raising Future Leadership” October 13th “Mid-Life Transition” October 20th “Kingdom Leader” October 27th “Your Story”

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Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 15

Gymnastics

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Tumble & Trampoline

Music Together

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8 months to 15 months
2013

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2 year-olds

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3 year-olds 4 year-olds

Super Bears

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CCG Block Party & Showcase
September 21

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• Page 16

Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

O

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Recreational & Competitive Programs
Girls and Boys ages 5 and up

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CCG Acro Team

September 2013 Free Ongoing Events
SUNDAY
FARMERS MARKET: 11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club 3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park

MONDAY 2 FARMERS MARKET:
2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

TUESDAY
3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

1

3 FARMERS MARKET:

Baby Safety Month Better Breakfast Month Library Card Sign-Up Month National Honey Month National School Success Month Women of Achievement Month National Courtesy Month Classical Music Month

September is:

labor day

Birthstone: Sapphire

8:30-11am AG Smart & Final lot 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 4 5 FARMERS MARKETS: FARMERS MARKETS:

FRIDAY
FARMERS MARKETS:
9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall 4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

SATURDAY
8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

6 7 BINGO VETS HALL MB - 1st FRI 5:00pm FARMERS MARKETS:

national cheese pizza day

SLO CO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 1st SAT 12:30am IOOF Hall SLO

read a book day

Flower: Aster

NEW MOON

8 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club 3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park

9 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

national grandparents day

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

10 FARMERS MARKET:

8:30-11am AG Smart & Final lot 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

11 FARMERS MARKETS:

12 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

13 FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall 4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

14 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

positive thinking day
clayton moore’s birthday

patriot day
international literacy day

teddy bear day

make your bed day

(Born in 1914)

15 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club 3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park

16 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

national working parents day stepfamily day Mayflower Day

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

17 FARMERS MARKET:

8:30-11am AG Smart & Final lot 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

18 FARMERS MARKETS:

19 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

20 FARMERS MARKETS:

LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall 4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade

21 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

national Play-doh day

talk like a pirate day international day of peace world gratitude day

make a hat day national hispanic heritage month (through October 15)
FULL MOON

citizenship day

22 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club 3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park

23 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

24 FARMERS MARKET:

first day of autumn
ice cream cone invented (in 1903)

8:30-11am AG Smart & Final lot 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

25 FARMERS MARKETS:

26 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

27 FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall 4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

28 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

national punctuation day

johnny appleseed’s birthday (Born in 1774)

checkers day

Crush a can day

native american day good neighbor day

29 FARMERS MARKET:

11:30-2:30pm Nipomo: Monarch Club 3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park

30 FARMERS MARKET:

2-4:30pm Los Osos: 2nd & Santa Maria

3:00-6:00 pm in Paso Robles City Park LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB 3:30-4:15pm AG

1 FARMERS MARKET:

Safety Pin invented

8:30-11am AG Smart & Final lot 12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr 3:00-6:00pm AT Sunken Gardens 5:00-8:00pm Pismo, Main St & Dolliver LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT, 10:30 AG, 11:00 NI

2 FARMERS MARKETS:

3 FARMERS MARKETS:

3:00-6:00pm Old Porte Fisheries AG 2:30-5:00pm Spencers Morro Bay 6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB, 10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30 AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG

4 FARMERS MARKETS:

9:00am-12:30pm Paso Robles Wal Mart 2:30-5:30pm Cambria Main St Vets Hall 4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO

5 FARMERS MARKETS:

8:00-10:30am SLO Promenade 9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park 9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves 9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park 12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo 2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG

Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 17

Family Events
THU JUN 20-SAT SEP 21 (times vary): HOW THE WEST WAS REALLY WON at The Great American Melodrama, 1863 Front St, Oceano. There are many stories of how the West was won with legendary characters, brave battles and forgotten heroes. See how the West might have... uh, could have... well, maybe even should have been won... but probably wasn’t. Guns will be blazin’ and laughs will be snortin’ as you hear our tales... maybe slightly tall tales... Cost: $18-22. Contact: americanmelodrama. com or 489-2499. 2nd St, Solvang. PCPA’s Cyrano de Bergerac, starring Derrick Lee Wheedon in the title role. Cost: $20.50-29. Contact: pcpa.org or 922-8313. SAT AUG 24-SAT OCT 19 11:00 am: FELINE NETWORK ADOPT A PET EVENT at PETCO, 271 Madonna Rd, SLO. Feline Network of the Central Coast holds an adoption event every Saturday. Cost: free. Contact: felinenetwork.org or 549-9228.

FRI AUG 30 6:00-9:00 pm: PARENT’S NIGHT OUT at Bethel Lutheran Church, 624 E Camino THU JUL 18-SUN SEP 22 (times Colegio, Santa Maria. Features Cost: free. vary): DEATH AT DEVIL’S CAVE at games for kids. The Great American Melodrama, Contact: BethelSantaMaria.org or 1863 Front St, Oceano. Con man 922-6601. John Livingstone is rotten to the core! Having led poor Bess FRI AUG 30-SAT AUG 31 (times Sinclair into a false marriage, he vary): PASO ROBLES CLASSIC then deserts her. Now he turns CAR SHOW at Downtown Paso his sights on the beautiful Rose Robles, 11th St and Spring St. Day. Will he and Old Tagger ruin The weekend will include 2 days another young girl’s life? Find packed with car show excitement out in this action-packed western including a Friday Cruise in the melodrama full of gunfights, historic downtown, a Saturday heroes, villains, lovers, liars and Car Show in the City Park, and laughter. Cost: $18-22. Contact: more. The Cruise and Car Show is americanmelodrama.com or 489- free to attend for spectators and enthusiasts. Cost: free. Contact: 2499. pasorobleschamber.com or 227FRI JUL 19-SUN SEP 1 (times 2871. vary): THE ODD COUPLE (A FEMALE VERSION) at Pewter SUN SEP 1-SUN SEP 29 3:00-6:00 Plough Playhouse, 824 Main pm: GROVER BEACH SIZZLIN’ St, Cambria. Neil Simon’s most SUMMER CONCERTS at Ramona famous comedy, this time with Garden Park, 993 Ramona Ave, a hilarious twist from a different Grover Beach. Showcasing a perspective, as messy Olive different band along with a and neat-freak Florence are farmers market every Sunday. the mismatched roommates Bring a beach chair or a blanket. who, against all odds, try to live Lineup is: Unfinished Business, together! Cost: $15-25. Contact: Monty Mills and The Lucky pewterploughplayhouse.org or Horsehoe Band, Cinders Blues Band, Mighty Croon Dogs, Burning 927-3877. James and the Funky Flames. FRI AUG 9-SAT AUG 31 (times Cost: free. Contact: grover.org or vary): ALWAYS... PATSY CLINE at 473-4580. Severson Theatre, 1100 S. Bradley Rd, Santa Maria. Kitty Belay SUN SEP 1 4:00 pm: POPS BY THE stars as Patsy Cline, alongside SEA: 30TH BIRTHDAY BASH at Suzy Newman as her devoted Avila Beach Golf Resort, 6464 Ana fan (and friend) Louise, in this Bay Dr. San Luis Obispo Symphony PCPA production. Cost: $18-29.50. presents “Pops By The Sea: 30th Birthday Bash” featuring Cafe Contact: pcpa.org or 922-8313. Musique, The Cuesta Chamber SAT AUG 17-SUN SEP 1 8:00 Singers, and San Luis Obispo pm: CYRANO DE BERGERAC at Symphony. Cost: $15-100. Contact: Solvang Festival Theater, 420 slosymphony.com or 543-3533.

FRI SEP 6 12:30-2:00 pm: 7th Annual DOG SPLASH DAYS Little and Senior Dog Swim at Templeton Community Pool, 420 Crocker St, Templeton. Dogs are admitted on the hour for a 45-minute swim session. Cost: $15/dog before SEP 4, $20/dog after. Walk in registration limited. Contact: 239-4437.

SAT SEP 7 5:00 pm: CASA RENDEZVOUS at SLO Country Club, 255 Country Club Dr. This fundraiser for CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) will feature a wine and dine menu. Cost: $100. Contact: slocasa.org or 541-6542. SUN SEP 8 4:30-6:30pm: GRANDPARENTS’ DAY SOCK HOP at Paso Robles Children’s Museum, 623 13th St. The event will include a dance, refreshments, photos and a grandparent-grandchild look-alike contest. Cost: $5. Contact: 238-7432.

FRI SEP 6 2:00-5:00 pm, SAT SEP 7 & SUN SEP 8 9:30 am-3:00 pm: 7th Annual DOG SPLASH DAYS at Templeton Community Pool, 420 Crocker St, Templeton. Owners can bring their dogs for a swim to celebrate the end of summer. Cost: $15/dog before SEP 4, $20/ SUN SEP 8 7:00 pm: PAJAMA dog after. Walk in registration MOVIE NIGHT OCEAN’S ELEVEN limited. Contact: 239-4437. 1960 CLASSIC at Park Cinemas, 1100 Pine St, Paso Robles. A gang SAT SEP 7-SUN SEP 8 10:00 am- of World War II 82nd Airborne 5:00 pm: NORTH COUNTY HOME, veterans is recruited by Danny GARDEN, AND GOURMET EXPO Ocean (Sinatra) and Jimmy at Paso Robles Event Center, 1203 Foster (Lawford) to rob five Las Main St, Morro Bay. Contact: 772- Vegas casinos on a single night. 4600. Wear your pj’s and enjoy a great movie night. Cost: $10. Contact: SAT SEP 7 11:00 am-2:00 pm: pasoroblesdowntown.org or 238PURISMA PEOPLE’S DAY at 4103. La Purisma Mission, Lompoc. Featuring volunteer reenactors. MON SEP 9 5:30-8:00 pm: EDIBLE Cost: free. Contact: 773-3713. WEEDS AND URBAN FORAGING

Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 18

Family Events
com or 544-8866. SAT SEP 21-SAT SEP 28 7:30 am: WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S at Laguna Lake, SLO and Waller Park, Santa Maria. This is the nation’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer care, support and research. Enjoy family friendly activities and ask onsite professionals about encouraging developments in the care and treatment of dementia. After the Walk/Run, participants are treated to a fun post-race party and meal. Cost: free, but donations are welcome. Contact: alz.org/cacentral or 547-3830. SAT SEP 21 11:00 am-2:00 pm: INTERNATIONAL RED PANDA DAY at Charles Paddock Zoo, 9100 Morro Rd, Atascadero. There will be fun games and activities for children and adults alike to learn about red pandas and how we can help to conserve the species and their natural habitats. Cost: $5-7. Contact: charlespaddockzoo.org or 461-5080. Winery and Vineyards, 7350 Linne Rd, Paso Robles. New World Baroque Orchestra and Cass Winery and Vineyards present the Young Artists Concert. Cost: $20. Contact: casswines.com or 7121646. THU SEP 26-SUN NOV 17 (times vary): DRAC IN THE SADDLE AGAIN at The Great American Melodrama, 1863 Front St, Oceano. This show will spoof all of your favorite Western films. Cost: $18-22. Contact: americanmelodrama.com or 4892499. FRI SEP 27-SUN OCT 20 8:00 pm: COMPLETE HISTORY OF AMERICA at The Spot, 116 W Branch St, Arroyo Grande. Don’t miss this rollercoaster ride through the glorious quagmire that is American history. Cost: $15-20. Contact: thespotag.com or 4745711.

at SLO Botanical Garden, 3450 Dairy Creek Rd. Join Seattle-based ethnobotanist and author Melany Vorass Herrera for a special evening presentation on how to identify and gather some of the most common edible weeds. She will also cover ethics, local rules and regulations, safety, and general information about how to cook with weeds. Attendees receive a handy take-home brochure with field identification information and cooking tips. Cost: $5-10. Contact: slobg.org/ edible-weeds.

SAT SEP 14-SUN SEP 15 (times vary): CENTRAL COAST WOODCARVERS SHOW at Cayucos Vet’s Hall, 10 Cayucos Dr. Bring the whole family to this 36th annual show when local and statewide carvers will display and sell their art. Demos, competitions, a raffle for carvings; tools and carvings will be available. On the beach at the foot of the pier. Cost: $2. Contact: 927-3951.

SAT SEP 28 1:00-3:00pm: KIDS’ COAST WEEK EVENTS DAY at SLO Botanical Garden, 3450 Dairy SAT SEP 21-SUN SEP 22 10:00 am- Creek Rd. Learn how to protect 5:00 pm: SLO HOME SHOW at and enjoy the creek. Cost: $5. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 1203 Contact: 541-1400. Main St, Morro Bay. Over 100 home and garden professionals, MON SEP 30-MON OCT 7 (times exihibits, demos and vendors vary): ALL OUT ADVENTURE of home products and services. FESTIVAL at SLO Op Climbing, Cost: free. Contact: 772-4600. 289 Prado Rd. There will be films, talks, and a climbing competition. SUN SEP 22 4:00 pm: YOUNG Cost: varies. Contact: sloARTISTS IN CONCERT at Cass opclimbing.org or 748-1478.

SAT SEP 14-SUN SEP 15 (times vary): THE SPOTTED WHALE CONSIGNMENT SALE at The Spotted Whale, 669 Higuera St, SAT SEP 14 10:00 am-2:00 pm: SLO. The sale will include brand TOMATO EXTRAVAGANZA & name clothing, toys, and gear. PLANT SALE at Garden of the Cost: free entry. Contact: 242-2213. Seven Sisters, 2156 Sierra Way, SLO. Join SLO Master Gardeners MON SEP 16-SAT SEP 21 (times Special Classes for for an annual celebration of one vary): of America’s favorite fruits. Cost: INTERNATIONAL AIKI PEACE free. Contact: ucanr.org/sites/ WEEK at Aikido of SLO, 209 Bonetti, SLO. Enjoy free classes mgslo or 781-5939. for all ages on safety techniques, SAT SEP 14-SUN SEP 15 10:30 am- peace education, fun games, and cooperative 4:00 pm: MORRO BAY AVOCADO tumbling, & MARGARITA FESTIVAL at the interaction skills. Children learn Morro Bay Waterfront. This family how to be safe without hurting friendly event will include live others. The learning environment music and food. Cost: $2. Contact: is fun and skilled teachers are friendly. Contact: http://aikidoslo. AvoMargFest.com or 225-1635.

Including Many FREE Family Events!
www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 19

Central Coast Family

September 2013

Local Resources
Every 4th FRI at 6:00 pm: Family Fun Night at Unity Church, 1165 Stubblefield St, Orcutt. Contact: 9373025. Every WED 5:45-7:00 pm: Play at the Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades. For ages 7-15. Cost: free. Contact: 5281862. Every THU-FRI 12:00-5:00 pm & SAT 11:00 am-5:00 pm: Exploration Station’s Interactive Science Center welcomes families at 867 Ramona Ave, Grover Beach. Cost: $2 kids, $3 adults. Contact: 473-1421 or http:// explorationstation.org. 2nd THU of every month 6:00-7:00 pm: Grief Support Group at Central Coast Hospice, 253 Granada Dr, Ste D, San Luis Obispo. This free group is for anyone suffering from the loss of a loved one who is in need of support. Contact: 540-6020. 2nd SAT of every month FEB-NOV at 9:00 am: The City Of Santa Maria Recreation and Parks Department offers free docent-led nature walks in Los Flores Ranch, 6271 Dominion Rd, Santa Maria. Contact: 925-0951 x 263. Volunteer as a Good Neighbor! Make a difference in the life of an older or disabled adult. Once Every TUE 3:00-6:00 pm & FRI 3:00-5:30 pm: Teen Wellness Program at Arroyo Grande EOC Health Services Clinic, 1152 E Grand Ave. Health services, including reproductive health, in a safe environment with staff trained Volunteer at San Luis Obispo Museum to screen, assess, and to provide of Art! Stop by at 1010 Broad St intervention. Appointments are (Mission Plaza) or email volunteer@ preferred. Contact: 489-4026. sloma.org. 1st WED every month at 9:00 am: 2nd MON every month 6:30-8:00 Community Action Partnership pm: Caregiver Support Group Senior Health Screening at First at Cayucos Community Church, United Methodist Church, 275 N. Ocean Ave & S 3rd St. Free support Halcyon Rd, Arroyo Grande. Free group for caregivers and family and low-cost services are offered members dealing with long-term for people 50 and older including illness, memory loss, dementia, and blood pressure, pulse, weight, total cholesterol, screening for anemia, Alzheimer’s. Contact: 458-7484. diabetes and fecal blood, nutritional Every MON 10:00 am-2:00 pm: counseling, and medical referrals. Remain Independent Despite Contact: 481-2692 or 788-0827. Vision Loss at Santa Maria Terrace, 1405 E. Main St. New ways of 1st WED every month at 12:00 doing daily tasks are taught by pm: Disabled American Veterans the Braille Institute, such as managing luncheon at Veterans Memorial the home, traveling, and the use of Bldg, 313 W. Tunnell St, Santa Maria. talking library books. Contact: 462- Contact: 345-0402. 1225. Every WED 5:30-7:00 pm: Widowed 2nd & 4th MON every month at 6:30 Support Group at New Life Church, pm: MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) 990 James Way, Rm 14, Pismo meet at Pacific Christian Church, Beach. Arrive 10 min early for 1st 3435 Santa Maria Way, Santa Maria. meeting. Offered by Hospice of Childcare is provided. Contact: 934- SLO Co. Contact: 544-2266 or www. hospiceslo.org. 3491 or www.pacificchristian.net. trained, volunteers choose services to contribute and schedule hours at their convenience. Training is scheduled monthly at Wilshire Community Services, 285 South St, Ste J, SLO. Contact: 547-7025 x 17.

Counseling Services
Janel A. Chavez, LCSW Individual & Family Therapy
License # 27129

• Marriage, Premarital, Relationships • Adoption & Foster Care • Family Issues • Children & Teens • Divorce, Grief & Loss • School Issues • Depression & Anxiety

• Everyday Life Challenges

Grover Beach 805.540.1902
1st THU every month at 6:15 pm: Commission on the Status of Women meets at Coast National Bank, 500 Marsh St, San Luis Obispo. The Commission is an official advisory group to the SLO County Board of Supervisors to identify issues of concern to women that are not the focus of other advocacy or advisory organizations. Contact: 788-3406. Every TUE at 7:00 pm: Al-Anon Family Support Group at Luis OASIS Senior Center, 420 Soares Ave, Orcutt. Contact: 937-9750. 3rd WED every month at 7:00 pm: How to Survive Divorce seminar at the San Luis Obispo Women’s Community Center, 1124 Nipomo St, #D in SLO. Practical tips, pointers, and suggestions for handling family law issues. $10.00 donation requested for handout materials and book. Contact: 544-9313 to register. 4th TUE every month at 5:30 pm: Legal Clinic for Self-Represented Litigants at the San Luis Obispo County Courthouse Law Library, 1050 Monterey St in SLO, #125. SLO County Bar Assn Family Law Section & Women’s Community Center provide one-on-one legal advice for persons filing divorces w/o an attorney, and a document preparer to assist in completing court-required forms. Min. $40.00 donation. Limit: 12 participants. Contact: 544-9313. RISE (formerly Sexual Assault Recovery and Prevention Center of San Luis Obispo County) offers: Weekly Drop-In Support Group for Sexual Assault Survivors; 24 Hour Crisis Line; Advocacy and Accompaniment; Peer Counseling; Individual Clinical Counseling; Prevention and Education Programs; and Women’s Empowerment and Self Defense Workshops. Contact: 545-8888 or www.sarpcenter.org.

Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 20

SLO and SB counties, and much more. Contact: 925-9554 or www. centralcoastseniors.org.

www.SLOdiaper.com
(805) 242-0431
The best choice for cloth diapers in San Luis Obispo County

San Luis Obispo Senior Center offers health screening, legal services, meals, exercise, bridge, bingo, and more at 1445 Santa Rosa St. Contact: 781-7306.

M W

Dr. Marc Irving Weber
Music Lessons for All Ages
Piano, Guitar, Voice, Winds, Brass, Percussion Composition & Music Theory
Composer and performer with many years of teaching experience

San Luis Obispo ALPHA (Alpha Pregnancy Counseling & Support) provides free pregnancy support, newborn assistance & education Home Delivery Service in SLO, Arroyo Grande, and Atascadero. Pregnancy Testing; Options Counseling; Follow-Up Every SAT 11:00 am-3:00 pm: ADOPT Counseling; Support & Referrals re: A PET at Petco, 2051 Theater Dr, in Post-Partum Depression; Medical Paso Robles. Cats are available for Care & Insurance; Agency Referrals; adoption through NCHS. Dogs are Rental Deposit Assistance; Maternity available through Short n’ Sweet & Baby Clothes; Infant Supplies & Equipment; Workshops; Support Dog Rescue. Contact: 466-5403. Groups; and Speaker’s Bureau. Find the Adventures With Nature & Contact: 541.3367 or www.sloalpha. Mind Walk schedule from Morro Bay org. Museum of Natural History at: www. The Central Coast Astronomical ccnha.org/naturewalks.html. Society plans a Dark Sky Star Party Every FRI at 7:00 pm: Senior Ballroom every month at Santa Margarita Lake Dancing at Madonna Inn. If you are KOA Campground at sunset. CCAS also a senior (single or attached) and like sponsors special guest speakers and ballroom dancing, this is the place! programs periodically. Event details Look left of the bandstand for a table and schedules, weather updates, and sign “Senior Dancers.” Dance, chat local resources can all be found at: and listen to good music. No fees; no www.centralcoastastronomy.org. dues; just fun! Contact: 489-5481 or Contact: Aurora Lipper at aurora@ centralcoastastronomy.org. dg17@juno.com. Every WED 11:00 am-12:00 pm: Growing With Baby, an infant feeding office for breastfeeding mothers and their babies (0-10 mos), offers a free class on feeding, crying, and sleep at 1230 Marsh St, San Luis 1st THU every month at 6:15 pm: Obispo. Pediatric nurse practioner Commission on the Status of Women and lactation consultant Andrea meets at Coast National Bank, 500 Herron will answer questions. Dads Marsh St, San Luis Obispo. The are always welcome! Call to reserve a Commission is an official advisory spot. Contact: 543-6988. group to the SLO County Board of Supervisors to identify issues San Luis Coastal Adult School’s Participation Program of concern to women that are not Parent currently the focus of other advocacy is a family-focused, integratedCore or advisory organizations. Contact: approach to learning. Parenting and Enrichment classes 788-3406. are held in San Luis Obispo, Morro Central Coast Commission for Senior Bay, and Los Osos. Come with Citizens offers many free services: your baby, toddler or preschooler Senior Connection - connecting to an adult and child activity callers with local resources; HICAP class, or find support in a class (Health Insurance Counseling and for parents only. All adults in a Advocacy Program) one on one parenting or caregiving role are assistance for Medicare beneficiaries, welcome. Cost: $74 per 10 week advise and referrals for long term trimester, with a 10% discount for Contact: care options, and help with billing two or more classes. or http://parent / appeals; Vial of Life magnetized 549-1222 containers with medical information; participation.org. a Senior Resource Directory for Literacy Council for San Luis Obispo County has an ongoing and urgent need for volunteer tutors and offers free training in SLO. Contact: 5414219 or www.sloliteracy.org.

B.M. from the Cleveland Institute of Music M.M. from Yale School of Music Ph.D. from the University of Iowa School of Music
Each student is unique and requires a flexible approach I teach the student, not the instrument My goal is to provide students with a solid musical foundation that will transcend all genres

Lessons in Your Home
$25/half hour $50/hour
Credit Cards Accepted

drmarcweber@yahoo.com
http://iowacreativemusic.com

661 993-2540

Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 21

ELDER CARE: The Basics
by David S. Vogel

It is estimated that over 34 million Americans serve as unpaid caregivers for other adults, usually elderly relatives, and that they spend an average 21 hours a week helping out, according to a study released by AARP. Millions more grown children are calling regularly, flying into town every few weeks or months or just stopping by to take Mom or Dad to the doctor. Among boomers who are helping their parents, 89% say the responsibility is only a “minor sacrifice” or “no sacrifice at all,” according to the USA TODAY poll. But as their elderly parents get older, some boomers are beginning to worry that they won’t be able to care for them in the future. Caring for an aging parent, spouse, domestic partner or close friend presents tough challenges, especially when a crisis hits and responsibility descends upon you suddenly. This article will walk you through the first steps -- whether you are dealing with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, recovery from a broken hip, or trying to figure out Medicare benefits. Each caregiving situation is unique, of course. Your loved one’s medical history, financial resources, personality, relationships with potential caregivers, proximity to services and other factors all determine the best approach to take. Some seniors may have prepared in advance for declining health and have the necessary documents and services in place; others may have delayed taking action because they always believed they had more time. Whatever the circumstances, the following is some basic advice for caregivers: Keep the senior’s date of birth and Social Security number handy. You will need this information to access many services. Collect information about medical providers. If you haven’t done so already, gather details about your loved one’s physicians and health insurance. Here is some of the information you will need: names, phone numbers and addresses of the senior’s doctors, dentist, and pharmacy (be sure to include complete details about any arrangements

the senior has made for discount prescriptions). Keep copies of health insurance policies and the front and back of all insurance cards. If your loved one is 65 or older, you will need a copy of his or her Medicare card. Medicare has prepared a helpful online booklet, Medicare & You 2013. Download it at www.medicare.gov/ Publications/Pubs/pdf/10050.pdf . It includes a summary of benefits; rights and protections; answers to frequently asked questions, and information about Medicare’s prescription drug coverage. Make a list of all the medications (including prescription drugs, over-the-counter drugs such as aspirin, antacids, herbal remedies, nutritional supplements -- even daily vitamins), dosage amounts, and instructions for taking them (time of day, with food or between meals, etc.). Take this list with you to ALL of your loved one’s medical appointments to help avoid dangerous drug interactions. Keep records of the date and results of recent medical tests, including exams, x-rays, CT scans and MRIs. Maintain a complete health history (also take this with you to all of your loved one’s medical appointments). If possible, include major illness and medical conditions for your loved one’s parents and siblings. Learn as much as possible about the medical condition afflicting the senior. Talk to his or her doctors. Conduct research on the Internet, and /or find reference books in the library. Contact related organizations and associations for information about the disorder. Study the symptoms and progression of the disease, so you can anticipate what might come next. Find out about available treatments, experimental research and clinical trials. Call a family meeting. Try to get as many people as possible involved from the beginning. Early input from them will facilitate communication and decision-making down the line. Allow all family members a chance to express themselves and their feelings about what should be done.

If possible, designate a person to be responsible for each task. Find out if the senior has the proper legal tools and documents in place. Has someone been appointed to take care of business and make health care decisions in case of temporary or permanent disability? Has the senior made clear their wishes for end-of-life care? If necessary, consult an attorney specializing in elder law. These are some of the documents you should help the senior prepare if they have not already done so: Will; Durable Power of Attorney for Finances; Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care, and a Living will. Investigate your loved one’s health insurance. What kind of coverage do they have? Are they eligible for Medicare benefits or Medicaid? If so, are they enrolled properly? Do they have a long-term care insurance policy? If so, what exactly does it cover? Do they have any coverage through a private pension plan or retirement package? Explore other available financial resources. What assets does he

or she have? Do they own real estate? How much is their home worth? How much is in savings accounts, IRAs, stocks and bonds and other investments? What is his or her monthly income from Social Security, other government programs, private pension plans, CDs, other bank accounts, annuities and investments? Take a crash course in community resources. Find out about senior centers and adult day services in the senior’s area. What are the best home health agencies around? What meal delivery and transportation support options are available? Assess the senior’s skills and determine the resources you need. The Central Coast Commission for Senior Citizens website (http:// centralcoastseniors.org) offers a variety of checklists and links to Internet-based resources to help you investigate these matters.
David Vogel is an attorney with over 30 years of experience and offices in San Luis Obispo and Seattle. His practice areas include Personal Injury, Elder Abuse, Nursing Home Neglect, and Medical Malpractice throughout California and Washington. You can reach David at (805) 5407100 or learn more at http://davidvogel.com.

Central Coast Family

September 2013

www.centralcoastfamily.com

Page 22

The Village Salon
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Check out our Rooster for the AG Art Program Painted by Lee Ann Simmons

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115 East Branch Street in Arroyo Grande

of San Luis Obispo County crisis line: 781-6400 business phone: 781-6401 email: info@wspslo.com www. womensshelterslo.org

Women’s Shelter

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mail@lovorganicfarm.com

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David S. Vogel
Serious Injury
Car, Truck & Motorcycle Accidents Wrongful Death, Head Injury, Burns Medical Malpractice, Nursing Home Neglect No Recovery . No Fee
Former Prosecutor with 30 years of Experience Honored with the highest rating (AV Preeminent) in the Peer-Reviewed National Law Directory Martindale-Hubbell

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