You are on page 1of 45

Handbook 2012-13

Welcome from the Vice Chancellor


The University of Warwick has a strong commitment to the development of excellence whether in relation to student achievement, research, learning and teaching or leadership, administration and management. As part of this commitment, we recognise the importance of enhancing the range of professional development opportunities available for our academic staff whether probationers or more experienced colleagues. Warwicks academic development programme for lecturers the Postgraduate Certificate in Academic and Professional Practice (PCAPP) - actively demonstrates the value the University places on flexible and (so far as possible) individualised approaches to staff development and career enhancement by emphasising three key areas of academic practice: Teaching and learning related skills Research related skills Academic management and leadership skills.

The Learning and Development Centre (LDC) team is keen to encourage you and other participants to contribute to the evaluation and further development of the professional development the University provides to academic staff (of which PCAPP is a part) and I would urge you to take the opportunity to be involved. I very much hope you will enjoy and benefit from your participation in the programme over the next few years: I look forward to congratulating you on your successful completion.

Professor Nigel Thrift Vice-Chancellor

Contents
Contents................................................................................................ 5

The programme.......................................................................................... 8 What is PCAPP?........................................................................................... 8 The Programme Aims.................................................................................. 9 Learning Outcomes..................................................................................... 9 Whats involved?....................................................................................... 10

Course components..................................................................................................10 Ten Workshops........................................................................................................10 Five Teaching observations ....................................................................................10 Professional Group meetings: .................................................................................10 Two pieces of assessed written academic work .....................................................11 Immediate essentials for undertaking the programme.............................................13 Timescales...............................................................................................................14
Enrolment................................................................................................. 15

Student Email address.............................................................................................15 Student Card............................................................................................................15


Support for Participants............................................................................ 16 The LDC Team........................................................................................... 16 Support from your Departmental Mentor..................................................16 Support for teaching and learning at Warwick and beyond......................18

Participant Progress reports.....................................................................................16

Programme Liaison Group ........................................................................19


Course Components ............................................................................................................ 21

Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning.......................................................18 The Higher Education Academy (HEA).................................................................18

The Workshops......................................................................................... 22 Workshops substitutions (for C workshops)..............................................23 Teaching Observations............................................................................. 24

Departmental Mentor observations ........................................................................24 Reciprocal Peer Observations..................................................................................24 Learning & Development Adviser Observation......................................................24
Professional Group Meetings.....................................................................26 Teaching Baseline and Reflection.............................................................26 Assessed written academic work..............................................................27 Pedagogic Review (usually undertaken in Year 1)....................................27

The Negotiated Project (usually undertaken in Year 2).............................29

Route 1 assignment brief ........................................................................................27 Route 2 assignment brief .................................................................................................................................28 Route 3 assignment brief Presentation at Teaching and Learning Showcases .................................................................................................................................28 Project Proposal Approval.......................................................................................29 Negotiated Project examples of areas that could be explored.................................29 A Research Review.................................................................................................30
Assessment and submission of your work................................................31 Submission deadlines for portfolio evidence.............................................31 How to submit your work..........................................................................32

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

Assessment criteria................................................................................... 34
Recommended Reading and Resources..................................................37 Appendix 1: Mentoring..........................................................................43

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

Programme Overview

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

The programme What is PCAPP?


The Postgraduate Certificate in Academic and Professional Practice (PCAPP): Is a part-time, practice-based Masters level programme (60CATS) for staff with teaching and learning responsibilities at Warwick o o o o Focuses on supporting your professional development in: Teaching and learning Research Academic leadership and management

Is designed to enable you to plan a route of study through the programme in accordance with your disciplinary interests and professional development needs Allows you to utilise some of your research-related activity as part of your programme Helps to fulfil the Universitys national obligations to meet higher education teaching standards in accordance with the UK Professional Standards Framework for Teaching and Supporting Learning in Higher Education Encourages a collaborative approach to the delivery of professional development for academic staff by engaging the expertise of individuals from across, and beyond the University

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

The Programme Aims


1. To be directly relevant to a participants work situation. 2. To provide opportunities for participants to investigate means of becoming more effective practitioners, evaluate their own practice, develop their skills in professional reflection,, to consider aspects of practice theory, and to develop their own intellectual and professional strengths. 3. To encourage participants to take responsibility for their own learning and to develop a critical stance towards their own programmes of study. 4. To support the development of the Universitys research, teaching and learning culture, benefiting both participants and the wider University. 5. To enable participants further to develop their ability to share ideas with others and communicate ideas and information effectively and fluently. 6. To be appropriate for both full-time and part-time staff, whether potential entrants to the profession, inductees or experienced members of staff. 7. To enable participants to gain academic credit for any appropriate skills, knowledge and understanding gained prior to joining the programme and for skills, knowledge and understanding developed through participation. 8. To be available, where feasible, in modes of study that encourage the widest participation.

Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course, participants should be able to: 1. Practice effectively within their own professional context 2. Describe, analyse and justify their own academic practice 3. Take responsibility for their own professional learning 4. Identify, reflect on and evaluate significant features in their own academic, professional and educational development 5. Employ a problem-solving approach in their academic and professional activity 6. Display the ability to reach well-reasoned conclusions in the context of up-to-date research and developments in specific fields of study 7. Display flexibility of approach through being able to address a range of concepts, methodologies and higher order skills 8. Discuss educational issues, both orally and in writing, with clarity and confidence 9. Demonstrate both collaborative and individual work-based skills 10. Demonstrate an informed awareness of national, institutional and other contexts that affect their practice.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

Whats involved?
The PCAPP programme has been structured to enable you to identify your own route through the course activities and to focus assessed work around your professional disciplinary interests and departmental responsibilities. Assessment is via a portfolio which comprises evidence of your professional development over the course of the programme (usually 2 years) through undertaking and completing the course components.

Course components Ten Workshops


Typically three hours each to include: Three A List core workshops (undertaken by all participants) One research based workshop Any six of the B and C List free choice workshops NOTE: you can substitute up to three free choice workshops with alternative internal or external events/activities, such as workshops, seminars, conference presentations, URSS or masters level supervision reflection and training events offered by HEA Subject Centres which are clearly relevant to your academic practice and responsibilities. D Practically based half workshops (up to 4)

Attendance and participation in workshops allows you to easily build evidence for your portfolio through completion of a Workshop Log and a review proforma for each event attended. The workshop programme is available at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develo pment/pcapp/participants/workshops
Five Teaching observations
One observation of your teaching by a member of the LDC Team Two observations of your teaching by your Departmental Mentor One observation of your teaching by a fellow PCAPP course member from a different department One observation of your fellow PCAPP course members teaching

Each observation involves a pre and post observation briefing/discussion with the observer to establish key areas to address. This allows you to get valuable feedback on your teaching practice and get a range of different perspectives. By completing the five observation forms you will have provided evidence of your developing teaching skills for your portfolio.

Professional Group meetings:


Attend two within the first 12 months of beginning the programme. They provide opportunities for interdisciplinary networking and peer support around the teaching and learning issues you face. After the first meeting, participants undertake a personal Teaching Baseline Exercise in which they take stock of their skills and experience, consider development goals and how these might be achieved over the course of the programme and beyond. At the second meeting, participants will review their progress to date and provide reflection on this. At the end of the programme participants with then reflect on this and their progress over the two years. The baseline and reflection evidences your professional development planning for your portfolio. Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

10

Two pieces of assessed written academic work


focussed around your disciplinary interests and departmental responsibilities: A Pedagogic Review: (4500-5000 words) enables you to focus on an aspect of teaching and learning of relevance or interest to your practice. It is designed to enable you to evidence the ability to reflect on, describe, analyse and underpin your own academic practice. A Negotiated Project: (4500-5000 words) is designed to allow you to exploit areas of interest to you in your current or planned work based activities. It will demonstrate your problem solving approaches to your academic and professional development. To enable you to tailor the project accordingly, there are several suggested approaches, however it is important to discuss and agree the project with a member of the LDC team prior to commencing work on it. Your portfolio is submitted at the end of your period of study in accordance with the relevant submission dates; however, it is important that you consider how best to undertake and complete the various components throughout your period of study in order to successfully complete the programme in a timely fashion. Details of requirements, advice and guidance for undertaking each component are provided in the Course Components: Further Details section of this handbook.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

11

Information about submission dates and how to submit your work can be found in the Assessment and Submission of your Work section of this handbook.

PCAPP components
Typically undertaken over a 2 year period Workshops (Equivalent of 10) Teaching Observations (5) Professional Group meetings (2) and complete personal Teaching Baseline (500 - 1000 words) Pedagogical review (4500-5000 word academic assignment) Negotiated project (4500-5000 word academic assignment)

Assessment is via a portfolio which comprises the written assignments and evidence of completing the other course components through the completion of the proformas associated with each. Find out more about each component in the Course Components: Further Details section of this handbook.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

12

How long will it take?


Participants are typically expected to undertake and complete all course components in no more than two years from the point of registration There is also a one year fast track option; however, this requires your Head of Departments approval due to the increased workload implications both for you and for your Department Occasionally, participants require a further 6 months to complete. This requires formal written support of your Head of Department (HoD). Further extensions are only available under exceptional circumstances.

Full details are available at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develo pment/pcapp/participants/extensions
Immediate essentials for undertaking the programme
To successfully undertake the programme you need the following essentials: 1. To complete the online enrolment at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develo pment/pcapp/participants/enrolment

2. A Departmental Mentor (your mentor cannot be currently registered on PCAPP) 3. To identify a PCAPP peer from another department to undertake reciprocal peer observations. 4. Sufficient teaching hours to successfully undertake the programme. Typically a minimum average of 30 hours per academic year. 5. Dedicated time to undertake and complete the programme. If completing PCAPP is a condition of your probation, you will usually have a reduced departmental workload. If you have any questions or issues concerning these essentials, (e.g. insufficient hours, atypical teaching pattern) you can contact us for advice at:

pcapp@warwick.ac.uk or telephone the Course secretary in the first


instance: Jenny MacDonald extension 74012

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

13

Timescales
We suggest adopting the following pattern of activity to manage the spread of work across the two years.

Year 1
Attend the PCAPP Welcome and find out about the essentials Consult the online workshop programme and book your workshops. We suggest undertaking the three core mandatory workshops plus one or two others. Attend Professional Group meetings as required and complete the personal Action Plan after the first meeting Undertake two or three observations and submit copies of your completed observation forms to the Course Secretary (place the originals in your portfolio) Complete Workshop Log and Workshop Review Sheets for the PCAPP workshops attended Complete and submit the Pedagogic Review (by the end of year 1)

Year 2
Attend remaining PCAPP workshops (total of 10 over 2 years) Undertake remaining observations and submit copies of your completed observation forms to the Course Secretary (place the originals in your portfolio) Complete and submit the Negotiated Project (by the end of year 2). Most participants submit this with their portfolio. You can submit it in advance if you prefer. Submit your portfolio containing: o o o o o Workshop log and review sheets Completed Teaching Observation reports (total 5) Teaching Baseline and reflection Pedagogic Review Negotiated Project

There are three opportunities per year to submit the two pieces of assessed written academic work (and ultimately your portfolio) for marking. These are typically the first day of each academic term. Dates available at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

participants/

deadlines

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

14

Enrolment
As a participant on the PCAPP programme you are required by the University to enrol as a student. For the time that you are on the programme you will therefore have a dual status: staff and student. At the start of the course you will be given a student number and asked to complete the online enrolment. Then at the start of each subsequent academic year the Academic Office will contact you to ask you to re-enrol. You will need to be fully enrolled for each year in order for your certificate to be issued at the end of the course. The procedure for enrolment and re-enrolment can be found on the website at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develo pment/pcapp/participants/enrolment
Any questions, please contact the Enrolment Team on PCAPP@warwick.ac.uk who will be happy to help.

Student Email address


Part of the enrolment process involves you creating a student IT account. In order to avoid people emailing your student email instead of the staff one, you are advised to set up a redirect from the student account to the staff one. For details of how to do this see:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develo pment/pcapp/participants/enrolment/ forwarding_email.doc


Student Card
As a student of the University you are entitled to a student University card. You may wish to take advantage of the benefits/discounts that go with having a student card. After completing enrolment you can apply online for a card at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/ourservices/enrolment/welcome/ enrolment/unicard

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

15

Support for Participants The LDC Team


The PCAPP programme is one of several professional development activities delivered through the Learning and Development Centre. The LDC team members supporting PCAPP have a range of experience and expertise in the Higher Education sector both in the UK and overseas. We organise and facilitate PCAPP workshops, Professional Groups, and other course activities and provide programme support for participants (see below). Find out who we are at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/staff
We also draw on the expertise of colleagues across the University and beyond to contribute to the workshop programme.

Programme support from the LDC Team


Support and Advice on any aspect of your study is available from the LDC team throughout your registration period via our centralised support system which provides you with access to the collective expertise and experience of the LDC team.

Requesting support
When you have questions, need advice, or wish to make a request for a teaching observation or a consultation about the assessed written coursework components, send your request to:

pcapp@warwick.ac.uk
Participant Progress reports
To help you monitor your progress throughout your registration, you will be sent a personalised Progress Report twice each academic year (after each exam board) which details which components of the course you have completed and which are outstanding. A copy of the report is also sent to your Head of Department.

Support from your Departmental Mentor


Departmental Mentors provide discipline-specific support, advice and expertise to probationers/participants, (especially with regard to teaching skills) and advise on departmental policies and procedures, e.g. marking and moderation policies; policies to deal with plagiarism, etc. They will also undertake two observations of your teaching. Although Departments may make slightly different mentoring arrangements, in general Departmental Mentors are expected to: Have recent and/or relevant experience of teaching which is compatible with the participants work so that they have an appreciation of the issues faced Provide support, advice and encouragement with regard to participants skills, selfawareness and capacity to undertake a process of self-critique/review of their professional development Maintain confidentiality and trust in supporting the professional development of colleagues Be regarded as an appropriate Mentor by participants: it is crucial that the Mentor/Mentee relationship is based on mutual respect

Your Head of Department is responsible for ensuring you are provided with a Departmental Mentor, who is able to support your completion of PCAPP. Please note that your mentor must not be currently registered on PCAPP. Please inform the PCAPP Course Secretary of your mentors name within one month of joining the programme by emailing ensure your student record is accurate.

pcapp@warwick.ac.uk

to

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

16

A list of useful journals, databases, websites and recommended readings to support your PCAPP activities (and wider professional development) are provided in the Recommended Reading and Resources section of this handbook.
For further advice about mentoring see Appendix 1

Other support
Support from the Library
Staff Development Collection
A dedicated collection of books to support participants on the PCAPP course is held in the Teaching Grid. Items within this collection can be borrowed for standard loan periods by all PCAPP participants. Further material about learning, teaching and higher education can be found within the general education collection on Floor 4; with books about educational psychology and cognition being found on Floor 2.

Further help
Chris Bradford is the Education Librarian with responsibility for providing library resources for the Institute of Education, the Centre for Lifelong Learning and LDC. She is happy to assist with any aspect of library provision and can provide guidance on locating material about teaching methods and learning styles within higher education. If you need any assistance then do book an appointment with her.

c.bradford@warwick.ac.uk or Tel. 024765 24476


Contact:

The Teaching Grid


The Teaching Grid is a dedicated space on Floor 2 of the Library that aims to support the development of innovative teaching at the University of Warwick. It is targeted at any member of staff who is interested in developing their teaching practice - from those who want to discuss or experiment with new ideas before applying them in the classroom to those who are just unsure of the options available. To find out more visit:

www.warwick.ac.uk/go/teachinggrid

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

17

Support for teaching and learning at Warwick and beyond


Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning
The Warwick Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning (IATL) is a designated space for colleagues to develop their teaching practice. The Institute provides academic leadership for teaching and learning innovation and encourages and supports staff to explore and apply innovative teaching practices and methodologies. More information can be found at http://go.warwick.ac.uk/iatl

The Higher Education Academy (HEA)


The HEA champions excellent learning and teaching in higher education. They are a national and independent organisation, funded by the four UK HE funding bodies and by subscriptions and grants. For many individuals working in higher education, it is the subject level where most networking and exchange takes place. The HEA continue to develop and deliver the subjectspecific services that are most valued by the sector, including: workshops and seminars, teaching development grants, journals, support and guidance for staff new to teaching, resources and networking opportunities. http://www.heacademy.ac.uk

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

18

We welcome your feedback and suggestions at any time. Email us at: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk

Tell us what you think: Giving feedback Programme Liaison Group


The Programme Liaison Group (PLG) is a forum which has been set up to consider the development and enhancement of the PCAPP programme; its function is similar to an SSLC. This participative forum brings together members of the LDC team and representatives from Departmental Mentors and each participant cohort. It also includes representatives from the other accredited programmes delivered through the LDC. We need representatives for each cohort. If you are interested in being a PCAPP representative please contact the Course Secretary (email to:

pcapp@warwick.ac.uk) in the first instance.

The PLG meets on a regular basis, normally once a term. Terms of Reference for the PLG can be found with the current years meeting dates and minutes from previous meetings at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develo pment/pcapp/participants/plg

A list of current reps is available from the website. If you have any items that you wish to raise at one of the PLG meetings, please contact your nominated rep at least 2 weeks before the scheduled PLG meeting, so that the item(s) can be added to the agenda. Feedback about PCAPP workshops Participants are invited to complete feedback forms at the conclusion of each PCAPP workshop. This is used to inform and shape future events.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

19

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

20

Course Components

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

21

The Workshops
Selecting your workshops
Participants need to undertake 10 PCAPP eligible workshops to complete this course component
There are three types of PCAPP workshops. Those delivered through the LDC are 3 hours in duration. Workshops must be selected according to the following configuration: A list core workshops Attend all three Compulsory for all participants These focus on the core knowledge and skills associated with academic and professional practice and are compulsory for all. B/C list restricted choice workshops Attend up to seven at least one must be research based NOTE: You can substitute three C list workshops with relevant alternative internal or external events. Effective Large Group Teaching and Lecturing Enhancing Learning Using Small Group Teaching Techniques Assessment Practice and Strategies

These cover a broad range of areas so that participants can make selections according to their professional development needs and interests.

D practical half workshops (Maximum of 4)

These are practical 1-1.5 hour workshops aimed at providing a more practical hands on approach to elements of teaching and learning

The Workshop Programme is available on the PCAPP website . Dates are advertised as soon as arrangements have been confirmed, typically 1 term in advance. However, for operational reasons, this is not always possible. All bookings must be made through the online booking system. We recommend you book early as places fill up quickly and are allocated on a first come, first served basis. We also operate a waiting list system so we can gauge demand and provide additional workshops where possible. The workshop programme is available at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/participants/workshops

We recommend you:
Undertake at least five in your first year of the programme to include the three core mandatory workshops where feasible and one other Book your place early, especially for the core A list workshops as places fill up quickly Visit the website regularly, as new workshops are often added throughout the academic year

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

22

Workshops substitutions (for C workshops)


Participants can apply to substitute up to three C List free choice workshops with alternative internal or external events/activities, such as workshops, seminars, conference presentations which are clearly relevant to their academic practice and responsibilities. These can include: Departmental seminars or other professional development activities Presenting a paper at a conference or similar event

Professional development events provided by an HEA Subject Centre See: www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/networks/subjectcentres Workshops from the Universitys wider professional development provision managed through the LDC see:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/dev elopment
Any other event which you can demonstrate has relevance to the development of your academic practice and responsibilities URSS or Masters level supervision

Applying for a workshop substitution


1. Complete the application form at least two weeks before the event in question using the Workshop Substitution Form available at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/participants/formsanddocs
2. Submit your application to We will respond to your application as soon as possible. 3. In addition to completing the standard Workshop Review Sheet and Workshop log entry for your portfolio, you should also include evidence of attending the event (e.g. a booking confirmation letter, an event programme, etc.) 4. In the case of the URSS or Masters supervision, you will be required to submit a reflection on your practice Please note that we will not normally accept retrospective applications for a substitution.

pcapp@warwick.ac.uk

Consult the HEA Subject Centre website for your discipline to see the range of activities available to support teaching and learning in your field. Visit: www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/networks/subjectcentres

Completing the Workshop Log and Workshop Review Sheet


Attendance and participation in workshops is evidenced in your portfolio through completion of a Workshop Review Sheet for each event attended and a Workshop Log which lists all workshops attended. These are designed to evidence attendance, and review of your own learning (e.g. outlining any issues raised which may be pertinent to your academic practice and development). The proformas are available at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develo pment/pcapp/participants/formsanddocs

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

23

Teaching Observations
Observer Perspectives
There are five teaching observations which incorporate three different Teaching Observation perspectives: Learning & Development Adviser Departmental Mentor A PCAPP Peer (a fellow course member from a different department) To gain maximum benefit from the observation process, it is recommended where possible that you spread your Teaching Observations over your study period (typically 2 years)

An example of how you might manage your observations over the course of your study is presented below. If you are unable to follow this schedule (eg. due to an atypical teaching pattern) please contact us to discuss alternatives. Obs. 1 Observer Learning & Development Adviser Timeframe Year 1 (autumn or spring term) Year 1 (spring or summer term) Year 1 (spring or summer term) Year 2 (autumn or spring term) Year 2 (spring or summer term)

Departmental Mentor

Peer observer (you observe your peer or vice versa)

Peer observer (your peer observes you or vice versa)

Departmental Mentor

Observer roles
Departmental Mentor observations
Departmental Mentors undertake two observations and are expected to provide guidance and advice as appropriate throughout the course and as part of normal departmental support structures. NOTE: An existing PCAPP course member cannot be a Departmental Mentor.

Reciprocal Peer Observations


The experience of peer observation is likely to be most valuable to you if your Peer Observer is able to take a genuinely objective stance. For this reason, each participant observes and is observed by a fellow participant from a different department. If desired the peer can come from a related discipline. If you are unable to secure an appropriate Peer, please contact the Course Secretary so we can assist you.

Learning & Development Adviser Observation


Your Learning & Development Adviser observation is undertaken first to provide formative advice and feedback at the earlier stages of your teaching practice to inform your development.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

24

When requesting a teaching observation by an adviser, please give as much notice as possible of the date and time you would like the teaching observation to take place. A minimum of two weeks notice is recommended, although this still may not guarantee that an observer is available at the time requested.

Pre and Post observation


Before the observation, it is important to discuss the session to be observed with your observer. The pre-observation meeting should be used to highlight your specific learning outcomes for the session and to identify any specific areas you wish the observer to focus on during the observation e.g. How you handle student questions, how successfully you interact with students during group work etc. Part 1 of the proforma should be completed and sent to the observer at least 5 days before the session. After the observation, it is important that the debrief meeting takes place at the earliest opportunity in order to maintain the momentum of the process and to ensure the observation is completed, with any actions agreed and signed off in a timely fashion. It is therefore recommended that Observer and Observee meet immediately after the session wherever possible. In the event this is not possible, the Observer should try to provide the Observee with some brief, supportive but accurate feedback at the end of the observed session. It is also essential that the Observer provides the Observee with constructive feedback on the session using Part 2 of the PCAPP Teaching Observation Proforma (as noted below). Guidelines for pre and post-observation arrangements are available in Appendix 2.

Observation records and portfolio evidence


To facilitate a consistent approach to the observation process, a two-part Teaching Observation Proforma (TOP) is used for each observation: TOP Part 1: provides pre-observation information and must be given to the observer before the observation TOP Part 2: includes observation comments and any suggested actions based on discussion between observer and observee. This form must be signed off by both observer and observee before returning to LDC. It is essential that a copy of the completed TOP parts 1 and 2 is forwarded to the Course Secretary as soon as each observation is completed and signed off Participants should then place the originals of each form in their Portfolios www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/participants/formsanddocs

The proforma is available at:

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

25

Professional Group Meetings


Professional Group meetings are usually attended twice within the first 12 months of undertaking the programme. These are: Cross institutional to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration and support A forum for exploring the issues and challenges associated with teaching and learning at Warwick (and beyond) Facilitated by a member of the LDC Team

Details of the Professional Group meetings for your cohort will be available on the website:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/developm ent/pcapp/participants/advice/profgroups
Teaching Baseline and Reflection
After the first meeting, participants undertake a personal Teaching Baseline Exercise in which they take stock of their skills and experience, consider development goals and how these might be achieved over the course of the programme and beyond. Participants are encouraged to select a method of creating and capturing their current teaching Baseline and reflection in a way that is meaningful to them, their discipline and their practice. Approaches might include; An action plan Mind Map To do List Audio/video diary/reflection This will provide participants with a starting point for their teaching development whilst on the course and beyond. Participants will be asked to reflect on this in their Professional Groups and at the end of the course as means of calibrating their development. This evidences your professional development planning for your portfolio. The baseline can also be presented using the proforma or as written text (500-1000 words). More information will be given at the first Professional Group Meeting The proforma for the Baseline Exercise will be available from the website prior to your first meeting at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/develop ment/pcapp/participants/formsanddocs

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

26

Assessed written academic work


The two items of written coursework are pieces of academic writing and appropriate reference to relevant academic and/or educational literature (generic, subject specific etc.) is therefore expected. The PCAPP programme operates in accordance with the University of Warwicks Faculty of Social Studies Postgraduate Marking Criteria (see tables below) The table below provides guidance on what constitutes an excellent answer Comprehension
Use of wide range of relevant sources, well understood and fully appreciated.

Information about submission dates and how to submit your work can be found in the Assessment and Submission of Your Work section of this handbook.

Analysis
Excellent answer to question. Locates suitable concepts and makes comprehensive assessment of issues involved. Understands the relevant theories and applies them to answering the question.

Critique
Original perspective on the problems in the question. Ability to set sources and view-points in context and evaluate contributions. Methodological awareness and theoretical appreciation.

Presentation
Well structured and planned. Clear, articulate style (with good spelling, grammar and syntax). Proper referencing and bibliography. Confident presentation and appropriate length.

The table below provides guidance on what would be classed as a referral

Comprehension
Few relevant sources used. Poor understanding.

Analysis

Critique

Presentation

Lack of analytical Irrelevant comments. Lack Unstructured presentation, approach. Purely of any critical or lack of coherence, page descriptive account. Often appreciative framework.. referencing etc. the question has been ignored or badly misunderstood.

Pedagogic Review (usually undertaken in Year 1)


The review enables you to focus on an aspect of teaching and learning of relevance or interest to your practice. It is designed to enable you to evidence the ability to reflect on, describe, analyse and underpin your own academic practice. Participants choose from one of three routes when undertaking their Pedagogic Review: If you wish to consult with a member of the LDC Team to discuss which route to take please email:

pcapp@warwick.ac.uk with your request.


Route 1 assignment brief
This route comprises two parts: A and B (total 4500-5000 words) Part A (40%) Undertake a brief critical review of a book or no more than two articles which have had a significant impact on your academic/professional practice and indicate how this is of relevance to your current teaching role and disciplinary focus (1500-2000 words) Part B (60%) Undertake a brief critical review of a recent personal experience of teaching a module/part module. Whilst (given the word count limitation), you may wish to focus on one specific aspect

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

27

of your teaching, your review should be supported by reference to academic and educational development literature and, where appropriate, you should make recommendations in relation to, for example, the modules future development, its curriculum, assessment, evaluation and/or delivery strategies. (2500-3000 words).

Route 2 assignment brief


Undertake an in-depth critical review of your own recent pedagogic practice. Ideally, your review should focus on one or more aspects of your teaching, which would benefit from further development and/or improvement. (You may also wish to discuss your review with your Departmental Mentor and/or other departmental colleagues before undertaking this task). Your review should be supported by reference to academic and educational development literature (whether subject and/or generic) and, where appropriate, should also make recommendations in relation to, for example, the future development of e.g. a module/course and any relevant curriculum, assessment, evaluation and/or delivery strategies. In completing this review (total 4500-5000 words), you should specifically: Critique your own academic/professional skills as demonstrated in specific teaching situations Outline any specific needs and ways of meeting them, which you (and possibly others, e.g. your Departmental Mentor) may have identified in your teaching and upon which you wish to focus on in future.

Route 3 assignment brief Presentation at Teaching and Learning Showcases


Undertake an in-depth critical review of your own recent pedagogic practice to present for 20 minutes at either the faculty or institutional teaching and learning showcases. Ideally, your review should focus on one or more aspects of your teaching, which you would like to explore with colleagues. (You may also wish to discuss your review with your Departmental Mentor and/or other departmental colleagues before undertaking this task). Your review should be supported by reference to academic and educational development literature (subject and/or generic) and, where appropriate, should also make recommendations in relation to, for example, the future development of e.g. a module/course and any relevant curriculum, assessment, evaluation and/or delivery strategies. In completing the review you will be required to present at a teaching and learning showcase. The presentation should last 20 minutes followed by an opportunity for questions from colleagues. You will be required to provide an abstract of your presentation 1 month before the showcase so that it can be included in the programme for the event. As part of the assessment your presentation will be videoed for the External Examiner. You will also be required to write a reflection on your learning (1500-2000 words). The reflection should include a consideration of how the academic and educational development literature has influenced your analysis and should give an indication of future development of your teaching practice.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

28

The Negotiated Project (usually undertaken in Year 2)


The Negotiated Project: (4500-5000 words) is designed to allow you to exploit areas of interest to you in your current or planned work based activities. It will demonstrate your problem solving approaches to your academic and professional development. The topic for your project will be determined by you in consultation with a Learning and Development Adviser to enable you to tailor the project accordingly. We would advise you to speak with a member of the team once you are ready to consider what the nature of the project might be.

Project Proposal Approval


When you have decided on the area of your academic practice you would like to concentrate on:

Complete the Negotiated Project Proposal form; you may wish to discuss your plans with a member of the LDC team prior to this. Proformas are available at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/participants/formsanddocs Submit it for approval via pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Once you have received approval, you can begin your project. You should keep a copy of your approved proposal to submit with your project

Negotiated Project examples of areas that could be explored


Please note that the options below are indicative, and not prescriptive

A Departmental Project (4500-5000 words)


A project of your choice focused on an aspect of your academic practice which you wish to explore, have been asked to work on, or might enhance or support your teaching or research or department responsibilities. The project should, ideally, be of benefit to both you and your department. There is considerable scope for choice and possible projects could include e.g. specific development work which you wish to, or have been asked to undertake within your department, or discipline area. Examples might include: A project of particular personal, professional interest arising out of an aspect of your own teaching, research or academic management/administration responsibilities e.g. the organisation of assessment, student admissions, supervision, personal tutoring etc within your department developing a new curriculum area or adopting an innovative teaching methodology the organisation/management of e.g. a suite of modules, a course, or research training skills for undergraduates or postgraduates Student diversity Postgraduate student support and training Plagiarism

Identifying possible strategies for addressing specific issues within your department/faculty e.g.:

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

29

An Evaluation of Academic Practice and Principles


(4500-5000 words) This option enables you to undertake an in-depth, critical evaluation of the principles and practices relating to an academic issue which interests you and is likely to have arisen out of, for example, your Teaching Observations, your participation in PCAPP-related Workshops, or your Professional Group meetings. Potential topics might include: Learning from student performance The impact on teaching of a culturally diverse student body The characteristics of high quality lecturing Research-led teaching: the implications for undergraduates Barriers and obstacles to effective postgraduate learning. An analysis of student drop-out rates in your department

A Research Review
(4500-5000 words) This may include: A critique of the concept of research-led teaching and the way in which you interpret it within your own disciplinary context, A review of your professional development whilst undertaking research plus an evaluation of the way in which you envisage your future research activity/priorities developing.

Whilst the nature of research skills and their enhancement varies across disciplines (as well as in accordance with prior experience), evidence of professional development might include: Skills development/ acquiring specific new research skills (e.g. IT based, communication, collaboration, organisational skills) Developing collaborative research either within or beyond Warwick and how this has influenced your development as an academic practitioner Preparation of funding applications Reviewing research papers Organising research symposia Undertaking research supervisions; research project co-ordination etc.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

30

Assessment and submission of your work


PCAPP assessment is via a portfolio which comprises evidence of completing the course components, including the two pieces of assessed written coursework. Your portfolio provides a comprehensive record of your participation in the programme. Specific credit values are not allocated to individual elements within the PCAPP Portfolio. In order to obtain a pass, participants are required to meet the programmes aims and learning outcomes as specified in first section of this handbook, and complete all the specified components to an appropriate standard and level of detail, supported by evidence as appropriate. This includes achieving a pass grade for the Pedagogic Review and Negotiated Project.

Submission deadlines for portfolio evidence


Although the portfolio is submitted at the end of your period of study, it is recommended that participants manage their course activities and compile their portfolio over the course of their registration period appropriately to meet the submission deadlines in a timely way. Course components, associated portfolio evidence and submission deadlines are detailed below with suggested timeframes for managing you study. Component Ten Workshops Suggested timeframe Undertake at least 5 in Year 1, the remainder in Year 2 Over the two years as outlined in the Teaching Observations section Portfolio Evidence Workshop Log Workshop Review Sheets Five completed Teaching Observation Reports Submission deadline At the end of your period of study (usually 2 years) in your portfolio A copy of each report should be sent to the course secretary when completed Five originals to be submitted in your portfolio At the end of your period of study (usually 2 years) in your portfolio

Five Teaching observations

Professional Groups & Teaching Baseline Exercise

Attend two meetings in the first 12 months

Teaching Baseline Exercise (500-1000 words)

Assessed written academic coursework Pedagogic Review Negotiated Project Undertake in Year 1 Completed Pedagogic Review Completed Negotiated Project Prior to beginning Year 2. Also to be submitted in your portfolio Submit with your portfolio at the end of your period of study (or before if you prefer)

Begin early in Year 2 and complete by the end of your period of study. NOTE: Approval of your proposal is required prior to beginning the work

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

31

How to submit your work


Participants are responsible for checking the PCAPP submission dates (three per academic year) on the website at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/p capp/participants/deadlines/
1. All work must be submitted in hardcopy to the Course Secretary by 17.00 hr on or before the relevant deadline submission date. 2. Use the relevant cover sheets and checklist provided at:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pc app/participants/formsanddocs/
3. You are also advised to retain a full copy of all the work you have submitted. A confirmation receipt will be sent by email for all work you submit. 4. Two hard copies of each piece of assessed academic writing, (Pedagogic Review and Negotiated Project) must be submitted. This to enable simultaneous distribution to markers and the external examiner when necessary. 5. Work which is submitted after the deadline date will be held over until the next submission deadline and will, therefore, not be marked until the next marking round.

Retention and return of assessed work


1. Please note that one copy of your portfolio may be retained indefinitely by LDC, predominantly for the purposes of assessment moderation and for the monitoring of course development/impact. The other copy will be returned to you as soon as possible after the relevant examination board and at a point when it is clear that it will no longer be required for assessment purposes. 2. Confidentiality is strictly maintained and normally no access to copies of assessed work is permitted to any persons other than those directly involved in assessment procedures and those undertaking course review under quality assurance arrangements recognised by the University. 3. In certain instances, where your Portfolio (or an element within it) demonstrates what is agreed to be good or best practice, you may be asked to confirm that you have no objection to it being shown to others (suitably anonymised where necessary). 4. If you do not wish any copies of your work to be retained beyond the minimum period required by University procedures, please inform the Course Leader in writing within your first three months of registering on the programme. Arrangements will then be made for them to be destroyed or, if feasible, returned to you at the end of the programme. 5. Participants may be required to meet with the External Examiner at an appropriate point in the year.

Collaborating with others


1. Should you wish to undertake any piece of assessed work (e.g. Negotiated Project) in
collaboration with another participant, you must first complete and submit your proposal to: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk A member of the LDC team will then contact you to discuss your request. 2. In cases where a collaborative project is accepted, it is extremely important that those producing it make it very clear what the specific contribution of each individual has been.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

32

Using material more than once


1. Whilst it is possible that similar material may be relevant for more than one aspect of your work, you should be aware that submitting substantially the same material for more than one Portfolio element could be construed as taking unfair advantage. Thus, given the wide range of topics and approaches available to participants in both the end of year two Negotiated Project and the end of year one Pedagogic Review, it is essential that the duplication of material is avoided. 2. If you are at all concerned about this issue, it is essential that you consult with the Course Leader at an early stage and well before the final submission of your Portfolio.

Plagiarism
Plagiarism is covered by Regulation 11, Regulations Governing the Procedure to be Adopted in the Event of Suspected Cheating in a University Test. For further information see:

www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/secti on2/regulations/cheating/
Referencing in assessments
Scholarly referencing is a necessary element within only two particular assessment elements in your Portfolio: The Pedagogic Review The Negotiated Project In-text citation referencing (eg the APA system) is commonly used in the social sciences and is therefore the approach you are most likely to encounter in books and periodicals relating to most aspects of academic practice and professional development in higher education. We appreciate that participants who are not accustomed to working in the social sciences may prefer to use a referencing system from their own discipline. If you wish to do this, please ensure that a consistent referencing style is followed and a full list of bibliographical references is given at the end of each piece of work.

External Examination
1. The PCAPP programme is subject to the normal arrangements and procedures for external examination of postgraduate awards in the Faculty of Social Studies. 2. Please note that candidates for the PCAPP award can be required to meet with the External Examiner prior to the relevant Examination Board. You will be notified in advance that you may be needed but it will not be possible until nearer to the specific date to confirm that your presence is required.

Appeal
1. In the event that a course member should disagree with an assessment decision, the following procedure will be adopted: a. The participant will be required to submit a written statement of the grounds for complaint to the PCAPP Course Leader at the Learning and Development Centre. b. The statement, the submitted work, the assessors decision and comments, assessment guidelines and any other relevant information will be considered by the Course Leader in consultation with the two internal markers. c. In exceptional cases, where the matter cannot be resolved internally, the assignment and supporting material outlined in b. will be sent to the External Examiner, who will adjudicate.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

33

2. Complaints concerning the quality of teaching, or of pastoral care on the course are a different category of grievance, and should be brought to the attention of the Course Leader.

Assessment criteria
1. Assessment within the PCAPP programme operates in accordance with the University of Warwicks Faculty of Social Studies Postgraduate Marking Criteria. 2. Participants are required, within their final Portfolio, to demonstrate that they have addressed the learning outcomes for the programme (presented in the Programme Overview section of this handbook). It is not necessary to address all the learning outcomes within each of the elements in the Portfolio. 3. The following guidance is offered to participants in relation to the marking of work:

Pass
Work meriting a pass will normally demonstrate many of the following: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. Clear evidence that appropriate and identified learning outcomes have been met Clear evidence of relevance to the candidate's own academic practice and development The competent and scholarly organisation of material A logical conclusion set within an appropriate context for the task Clear evidence of background reading The use (e.g. critique) of relevant underpinning theory The coherent and logical progression of ideas An awareness of broader departmental, disciplinary, institutional, national and international contexts where appropriate i. Competence in handling primary sources where used j. Well reasoned conclusions which are indicative of a recognition that there are likely to be inherent tensions both in relation to practice/practical situations and within the supporting literature. k. Effective referencing of sources and authorities l. In the case of the Portfolio, demonstrate that all the specified components have been satisfactorily completed m. A high standard of English grammar and punctuation n. An appropriate bibliography. o. A short abstract. NB. A 'pass' with minor corrections expected may be awarded in certain occasional instances.

Refer
Where a submission is referred, there is likely to be evidence of a number but not necessarily the majority of the following elements: a. b. c. d. e. f. Limited evidence of ability to demonstrate relevance of appropriate learning outcome(s) Limited or even poor organisation of material Limited relevance to candidate's academic work Restricted understanding of the subject of the submission; Little or no evidence of secondary reading Limited awareness of broader departmental, disciplinary, institutional, national and international contexts when clearly relevant g. Little or no evidence of critique and comment h. Limited coherence and limited evidence of logical argument i. Failure to recognise sufficiently the inherent tensions in both practice and literature j. In the case of the Portfolio, evidence that some specified components are incomplete k. Insufficiently high standard of English grammar and punctuation NB. A referral indicates that the candidate should, in the view of markers, be able to achieve a pass with some re-working of the material.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

34

Fail
A submission which fails is likely to display many of the following: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. l. Failure to demonstrate achievement of appropriate learning outcome(s) Very poor or incompetent organisation of the material No obvious relevance to candidate's academic work Little or no evidence that the candidate understands the subject of the submission Very poor or non-existent evidence of use of a range of secondary reading Substantial errors of fact No clear evidence of ability to review, critique or comment on relevant literature No evidence of awareness or relevance of broader departmental, disciplinary, institutional, national and international contexts m. Poor overall coherence and limited logical argument h. Lack of any reference to or acknowledgement of any tensions inherent in the material. i. In the case of the Portfolio, evidence that certain specified components are unsatisfactorily completed and/or are missing j. Poor standard of English grammar/punctuation which makes the text difficult to fully comprehend. k. Lack of Bibliography or overt evidence of reading l. Lack of relevant supporting documentation when required.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

35

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

36

Recommended Reading and Resources

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

37

Recommended reading and resources

Staff Development Collection


A dedicated collection of books to support participants on the PCAPP course is held in the Teaching Grid. Items within this collection can be borrowed for standard loan periods by all PCAPP participants. Further material about learning, teaching and higher education can be found within the general education collection on Floor 4; with books about educational psychology and cognition being found on Floor 2. Dont forget about the further support available Chris Bradford is the Education Librarian with responsibility for providing library resources for the Institute of Education, the Centre for Lifelong Learning and LDC. She is happy to assist with any aspect of library provision and can provide guidance on locating material about teaching methods and learning styles within higher education. If you need any assistance then do book an appointment with her. Contact: c.bradford@warwick.ac.uk or Tel 024765 24476

Indicative reading
The following list offers only a sample of the growing body of literature available electronically, or in the University of Warwick Library, focused around academic and professional practice in education generally, and in higher education in particular. Further specific readings and references will be supplied at the various PCAPP workshops and participants are also recommended to use the internet for support, e.g. by referring to their relevant disciplinary/subject support network. For further information on the HEA Subject Centres see their website www.heacademy.ac.uk. (In due course, further information about links to potentially useful websites will also be made available on the PCAPP website). Angelo, T.A. and Cross, K.P. (1993) Classroom Assessment Techniques. San Francisco: Barnett, R., (1992) Improving Higher Education. Buckingham: SRHE/OUP. Barnett, R., (1999) Realizing the University in an Age of Supercomplexity. Buckingham: SRHE/OUP. Biggs (2003) Teaching for quality learning at university: what the student does. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Biggs, J. and Tang, C. (2007). Teaching for quality learning at university: what the student does. Maidenhead: Open University Press. Boud, D. and Falchikov, N. (eds) (2007) Rethinking Assessment in Higher Education. London: Routledge. Boud, D.J. et al. (1993) Using Experience for Learning. Milton Keynes, OUP. Brockbank, A. and McGill, I. (1998) Facilitating Reflective Learning in Higher Education. Brookfield, S. (2nd ed. 2005). Discussion as a way of teaching: tools and techniques for university teachers. Buckingham: Open University Press. Brown, A. and Glasner, S. (eds) (1999) Assessment matters in Higher Education: choosing and using diverse approaches. Buckingham, SRHE and OUP Buckingham, SRHE and Open University Press. Butcher, C., Davies, C. and Highton, M. (2006). Designing learning: from module outline to effective teaching. New York, NY: Routledge. Cousin, G. (2009) Researching Learning in Higher Education, London: Routledge. Cowan, J. (1998) On Becoming an Innovative University Teacher. Buckingham, SRHE and Open University Press.

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

38

Exley, K. & Dennick, R. (2004) Small Group Teaching: Tutorials, seminars and beyond. London: Routledge Farmer Exley, K. (2004). Giving a Lecture: from presenting to teaching. London: Routledge Farmer Falchikov, N. (2004) Improving Assessment through Student Involvement. London: Routledge Farmer Fry, H., Kettridge, S., Marshall, S. (2003). A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: Enhancing Academic Practice. (2nd edition) London: Routledge Farmer Gibbs, G. (1988). Learning by Doing: a guide to teaching and learning methods Haines, C. (2004) Assessing Students Written Work: marking essays and reports. London: Routledge Jackson, N. and Lund, H.S. (2000) Benchmarking for Higher Education Buckingham: SRHE and OUP Knight, P. (2002) Being a Teacher in Higher Education. Buckingham: SRHE/OUP. Knight, P. and Yorke, M. (2003) Learning, Curriculum and Employability in Higher Education. London: Routledge Falmer. Knowles, M. S. (1984) Andragogy in action San Francisco: Jossey Bass Kolb, D.A. (1984) Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Laurillard, D. (2006) E-Learning in Higher Education. In Changing Higher Education, Edited by Paul Ashwin London: RoutledgeFalmer McGill, I and Brockbank, A. (2003) The Action Learning Handbook London: Routledge Falmer McGill, I. and Beaty, L. (2002) Action Learning (2nd edition) London: Routledge Moon, J. (1999) Learning Journals London: Kogan Page Moon, J. (2004) A Handbook of Reflective and Experiential Learning: theory and practice. London: Routledge Farmer Prosser, M. and Trigwell, K. (1999) Understanding Learning and Teaching. Buckingham: SRHE/OUP Race, P. (1999) 500 Computing Tips for Teachers and Lecturers. London: Kogan Page Ramsden, P. (2003) Learning to Teach in Higher Education. (2nd edition) London: Routledge Falmer. Rowland, S. (2000) The Enquiring University Teacher. Buckingham: SHRE /OUP. Rust, C. and Gibbs, G. (1997) Improving Student Learning Through Course Design Oxford: OCSD Salmon, G. (2004) E-Moderating: The Key to Online Teaching and Learning. London: Taylor & Francis Salmon, G. (2005) E-tivites: The Key to Online Learning. London: Taylor & Francis Savin-Baden, M. (2003) Facilitating Problem Based Learning. Buckingham: SRHE and OUP. Schon, D.A. (1983) The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action New York: Basic Books Tight, M. (2004) The Routledge Falmer Reader in Higher Education. London: Routledge Falmer

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

39

Useful journals available from the library


About campus [electronic resource]. Active learning in higher education [electronic resource]. ASHE-ERIC higher education report [electronic resource]. Assessment and evaluation in higher education [electronic resource]. Assessment update [electronic resource]. Black issues in higher education [electronic resource]. Chronicle of higher education [electronic resource]. Education research and perspectives. EDUCAUSE review [electronic resource]. European journal of education [electronic resource]. Further & higher education and training statistics in Wales. Higher education [electronic resource]. Higher education in Europe. [electronic resource] Higher education policy [electronic resource]. Higher education quarterly [electronic resource]. Higher education research & development [electronic resource]. "Higher quality (online);""Higher quality : the bulletin of the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education [electronic resource].""" "Inclusion (Coventry, England);""Inclusion : focus on disability and widening participation in higher education [electronic resource].""" Innovative higher education [electronic resource]. International journal for academic development [electronic resource]. International journal of sustainability in higher education [electronic resource]. Internet and higher education [electronic resource]. Journal of access policy and practice Journal of access studies. Journal of blacks in higher education [electronic resource]. Journal of college student development [electronic resource]. Journal of further and higher education [electronic resource]. Journal of higher education [electronic resource]. Learning and individual differences [electronic resource] Learning and motivation [electronic resource] Learning and teaching in higher education [electronic resource]. Mentoring and tutoring [electronic resource] New directions for institutional research [electronic resource]. New directions for student services [electronic resource]. Portal [electronic resource] libraries and the academy. Quality in higher education [electronic resource]. Research in higher education [electronic resource]. Research in post-compulsory education [electronic resource].

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

40

Review of higher education [electronic resource]. Studies in the education of adults [electronic resource] Studies in higher education [electronic resource]. Teaching in higher education [electronic resource]. Tertiary education and management [electronic resource]. Times higher education supplement [electronic resource]. Virtual university journal [electronic resource].

Key databases for education include:


British Education Index, Education Research Complete, Educational; Research Abstracts and ERIC. Useful websites include: British Education Internet Resource Catalogue

http://brs.leeds.ac.uk/~beiwww/beirc.ht m
Provides access to useful internet resources in education Copyright Licensing Agency www.cla.co.uk/ Intute www.intute.ac.uk/ Provides access to good internet resources for Education and research Higher Education Academy

www.heacademy.ac.uk/

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

41

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

42

Appendix 1: Mentoring
Some suggestions for Good Practice
Whilst the approach to Departmental Mentoring is bound to differ between mentors and across departments and disciplines, there are a number of generally accepted good practice points and principles which may be of help to Mentors undertaking the role, particularly for the first time. The following points may also be helpful to Mentees who are new into post and have not had any experience of being 'mentored previously. A Mentors role is potentially very important in achieving a successful probationary outcome for a new and often relatively inexperienced lecturer. Meeting the individual needs of Mentees demands a number of important and potentially sensitive skills from the practical and organisational to the personal and emotional. The following general points are offered as an aide memoire to good practice. They should be considered in the light of the specific mentoring circumstances on the ground.

Meeting personal needs and providing information


Talking informally to Mentees rather than relying solely on more formal Mentee/Mentor meetings Making encouraging comments and emphasising the positive aspects of a Mentees performance and indicating where progress is being made Helping Mentees to maintain a motivated approach, especially when they are experiencing problems Providing and guiding Mentees towards information on the Department, University and, if appropriate, disciplinary area Providing information on useful contacts, networks and resources etc Maintaining the confidentiality of the relationship and developing mutual trust

Practical and organisational needs


Encouraging Mentees to set themselves reasonable deadlines so that they achieve their goals within the appropriate programme timescales: for example, deferring Teaching Observations will not help them to improve their teaching skills or complete the programme. Helping Mentees to identify different approaches when they are experiencing difficulty in resolving a particular issue Encouraging Mentees to address workload issues in a proactive way rather than simply deferring decision-making Providing informal feedback to Mentees helps them to see the positive aspects of feedback (whether overt or implicit) from colleagues, students and yourself Trying to create relaxed and supportive opportunities for development by leaving sufficient time for meetings in appropriate surroundings

Asking questions and listening


Using open questions that create space for exploring issues when meeting with your Mentee. This is more helpful than using closed questions that simply invite yes/no answers and can foreclose discussion Listening carefully to identify problems which Mentees may be trying to resolve. Helping Mentees to identify clearly what they are trying to achieve Using questions which help to clarify issues and encourage your Mentee to articulate the problem or issue for themselves, eg Could you give me an example of. Trying to ensure that the outcome of discussions with Mentees are clearly defined and accepted

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

43

Giving (and receiving) feedback


Being clear and precise Citing/providing evidence to support your views Being honest but tactful so that Mentees morale and motivation is maintained Making suggestions about alternative solutions and identifying achievable problem solving approaches Addressing the most important aspects of issues and the ones that Mentees have control over/the power to change themselves Asking for feedback from you Mentee with regard to how the Mentor/Mentee relationship is working

Reviewing and identifying action points


Helping Mentees to review and reflect on recent and present experiences in order to identify future actions which will help them meet requirements and achieve specific tasks in good time Helping Mentees to identify and explore options/strategies, and set short as well as longer term goals (e.g. research related demands placed upon them) Helping Mentees to identify specific aspects or areas for professional development and consider future plans/needs

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

44

Email us: pcapp@warwick.ac.uk Find out more at: www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/ldc/development/pcapp/

45